Science.gov

Sample records for affects primary production

  1. Factors affecting the estimate of primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, W. M.; Byrne, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    Remote sensing of primary production in the euphotic zone has been based mostly on visible-band and water-leaving radiance measured with the coastal zone color scanner. There are some robust, simple relationships for calculating integral production based on surface measurements, but they also require knowledge for photoadaptive parameters such as maximum photosynthesis which currently cannot be obtained from spave. A 17,000-station data set is used to show that space-based estimates of maximum photosynthesis could improve predictions of psi, the water column light utiliztion index, which is an important term in many primary productivity models. Temperature is also examined as a factor for predicting hydrographic structure and primary production. A simple model is used to relate temperature and maximum photosynthesis; the model incorporates (1) the positive relationship between maximum photosynthesis and temperature and (2) the strongly negative relationship between temperature and nitrate in the ocean (which directly affects maximum growth rates via nitrogen limitation). Since these two factors relate to carbon and nitrogen, 'balanced carbon/nitrogen assimilation' was calculated using the Redfield ratio, It is expected that the relationship between maximum balanced carbon assimilation versus temperature is concave-down, with the peak dependent on nitrate uptake kinetics, temperature-nitrate relationships,a nd the carbon chlorophyll ration. These predictions were compared with the sea truth data. The minimum turnover time for nitrate was also calculated using this approach. Lastly, sea surface temperature gradients were used to predict the slope of isotherms (a proxy for the slope of isopycnals in many waters). Sea truth data show that at size scales of several hundred kilometers, surface temperature gradients can provide information on the slope of isotherms in the top 200 m of the water column. This is directly relevant to the supply of nutrients into the surface

  2. How stratification changes affect primary production in the California Current System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Miller, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Warming of the California Current for the recent several decades was observed and buoyancy frequency increased by the warming, which might alter the upwelling cell and nutrient supply in the California Current System (CCS). Coastal upwelling plays an important role in bringing nutrients into euphotic zone for photosynthesis in the CCS. It is well known that bottom stress plays a significant role for the coastal upwelling. However, Lentz and Chapman (2004) proposed a new theory that nonlinear cross-shelf momentum flux can be more important than the bottom stress so onshore returning flow in the bottom boundary layer is less than interior cross-shelf momentum flux. The importance of interior flow depends on Burger number, which is a function of buoyancy frequency. Thus, we hypothesized that intensified stratification observed in the CCS, consequently increased Burger number can result in stronger interior return flow, which has less nutrient than bottom boundary return flow, and presumably less primary production and zooplankton biomass. To address this hypothesis modeling effort has been conducted using Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with biological tracers.

  3. Time-lagged variation in pond density and primary productivity affects duck nest survival in the Prairie Pothole Region.

    PubMed

    Walker, Johann; Rotella, Jay J; Stephens, Scott E; Lindberg, Mark S; Ringelman, James K; Hunter, Christine; Smith, Aaron J

    2013-07-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) is the primary breeding region for most species of North American dabbling ducks (Anas spp.). Conservation of these species is guided in part by knowledge of relationships between nest survival probability and habitat features. Positive relationships between duck nest survival and amount and configuration of herbaceous perennial vegetation have been observed in previous studies, but these 2- to 4-year studies might not have adequately characterized the temporal effect of wet-dry episodes on nest survival. Over an eight-year period, we studied nest survival of five species of ducks in the PPR relative to spatial and temporal variation in pond density, primary productivity, and hydrologic status of wetlands, soil, and vegetation on 52 study sites selected to span a gradient of spatial variation in proportion of herbaceous perennial vegetation and in number of wetland basins. We observed the fate of 12 754 nests. Consistent with past studies, 90% of nests that failed to hatch were destroyed by predators. Nest survival probability was positively related to current-year pond density and primary productivity, negatively related to pond density and primary productivity during the previous two years, and positively related to the number of wetland basins on the study site. Predicted relationships between nest survival and proportion or configuration of herbaceous perennial vegetation in the surrounding landscape were not supported. For mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), median estimated nest survival probability ranged from 0.02 (SE = 0.01) to 0.22 (SE = 0.02). Estimated nest survival was greatest on sites with numerous wetland basins that had transitioned from dry, unproductive conditions to wet, productive conditions in the previous 1-2 years. Our results were consistent with time-lagged responses of food webs to resource pulses in a broad array of ecosystems. Our study highlighted the importance of wetland basins and wet-dry episodes to duck

  4. Asymmetric warming significantly affects net primary production, but not ecosystem carbon balances of forest and grassland ecosystems in northern China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hongxin; Feng, Jinchao; Axmacher, Jan C.; Sang, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    We combine the process-based ecosystem model (Biome-BGC) with climate change-scenarios based on both RegCM3 model outputs and historic observed trends to quantify differential effects of symmetric and asymmetric warming on ecosystem net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of six ecosystem types representing different climatic zones of northern China. Analysis of covariance shows that NPP is significant greater at most ecosystems under the various environmental change scenarios once temperature asymmetries are taken into consideration. However, these differences do not lead to significant differences in NEP, which indicates that asymmetry in climate change does not result in significant alterations of the overall carbon balance in the dominating forest or grassland ecosystems. Overall, NPP, Rh and NEP are regulated by highly interrelated effects of increases in temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentrations and precipitation changes, while the magnitude of these effects strongly varies across the six sites. Further studies underpinned by suitable experiments are nonetheless required to further improve the performance of ecosystem models and confirm the validity of these model predictions. This is crucial for a sound understanding of the mechanisms controlling the variability in asymmetric warming effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. PMID:25766381

  5. Asymmetric warming significantly affects net primary production, but not ecosystem carbon balances of forest and grassland ecosystems in northern China.

    PubMed

    Su, Hongxin; Feng, Jinchao; Axmacher, Jan C; Sang, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    We combine the process-based ecosystem model (Biome-BGC) with climate change-scenarios based on both RegCM3 model outputs and historic observed trends to quantify differential effects of symmetric and asymmetric warming on ecosystem net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of six ecosystem types representing different climatic zones of northern China. Analysis of covariance shows that NPP is significant greater at most ecosystems under the various environmental change scenarios once temperature asymmetries are taken into consideration. However, these differences do not lead to significant differences in NEP, which indicates that asymmetry in climate change does not result in significant alterations of the overall carbon balance in the dominating forest or grassland ecosystems. Overall, NPP, Rh and NEP are regulated by highly interrelated effects of increases in temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentrations and precipitation changes, while the magnitude of these effects strongly varies across the six sites. Further studies underpinned by suitable experiments are nonetheless required to further improve the performance of ecosystem models and confirm the validity of these model predictions. This is crucial for a sound understanding of the mechanisms controlling the variability in asymmetric warming effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. PMID:25766381

  6. Asymmetric warming significantly affects net primary production, but not ecosystem carbon balances of forest and grassland ecosystems in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hongxin; Feng, Jinchao; Axmacher, Jan C.; Sang, Weiguo

    2015-03-01

    We combine the process-based ecosystem model (Biome-BGC) with climate change-scenarios based on both RegCM3 model outputs and historic observed trends to quantify differential effects of symmetric and asymmetric warming on ecosystem net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of six ecosystem types representing different climatic zones of northern China. Analysis of covariance shows that NPP is significant greater at most ecosystems under the various environmental change scenarios once temperature asymmetries are taken into consideration. However, these differences do not lead to significant differences in NEP, which indicates that asymmetry in climate change does not result in significant alterations of the overall carbon balance in the dominating forest or grassland ecosystems. Overall, NPP, Rh and NEP are regulated by highly interrelated effects of increases in temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentrations and precipitation changes, while the magnitude of these effects strongly varies across the six sites. Further studies underpinned by suitable experiments are nonetheless required to further improve the performance of ecosystem models and confirm the validity of these model predictions. This is crucial for a sound understanding of the mechanisms controlling the variability in asymmetric warming effects on ecosystem structure and functioning.

  7. Factors Affecting the Contribution by Epiphytic Algae to the Primary Productivity of an Oligotrophic Freshwater Lake1

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Richard B.; Boylen, Charles W.

    1975-01-01

    A diatom-dominated population of epiphytic algae was studied in an oligotrophic lake to determine the factors which limit epiphyte growth and to measure their contribution to primary productivity. Algae were collected from plants growing at four sites in Lake George, N.Y., during the spring, summer, and fall of 1974. Samples were taken from 3 m, corresponding to the depth at which macrophytes were most productive. Algae exhibited an optimum temperature for H14CO3- uptake at 30 C, although the summer littoral lake temperature ranged from 18 to 25 C. Light saturation occurred at an intensity of 8,608 lux, approximating the environmental intensity at the depth from which algae were taken. Epiphytes exhibited their maximum photosynthetic capacity of 0.6 mg of carbon fixed/m2 of macrophyte surface area per h in the early afternoon in mid-August. They assimilated approximately 5% as much inorganic carbon as the macrophytes from which they were taken. Epiphyte population densities followed the seasonal growth patterns of the macrophytes, with maximal leaf colonization remaining essentially constant relative to the leaf position on the plant. There was little change in density between sampling sites at any given time. Productivities of epiphytes from bottom leaves were 10-fold greater than those of epiphytes from top leaves. Addition of PO4-3, NO3-, NH3, Si, and SO4-2 had no stimulatory effect on photosynthesis. Addition of HCO3- stimulated photosynthesis greater than 30%, suggesting that carbon may be a limiting nutrient for epiphytic algae in Lake George. PMID:16350036

  8. [Analysis on factors affecting net primary productivity distribution in Changbai Mountain based on process model for landscape scale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Yu, Guirui; Yu, Zhenliang; Zhao, Shidong

    2003-05-01

    Based on the data received from remote sensing images, the spatial distribution of annual net primary productivity (NPP) was simulated by the process model (EPPML), and the relationships between annual NPP and environmental conditions were analyzed. The results showed that NPP in 1995 was 0.680 kg C.m-2.yr.-1, mostly ranging from 0.105 to 1.241 kg C.m-2.yr.-1, accounting for 82.1%. The highest NPP (1.084 kg C.m-2.yr.-1) appears in mixed broad-leaved and Korean pine forest. Environmental conditions decide the main trend of the spatial distribution of annual NPP (Carbon) in Changbai Mountain. Soil water content had a negative correlativity with NPP, and the correlation coefficient (R) was -0.65. Therefore, water was sufficient for the growth of plants in Changbai Mountain. NPP was highly correlated with LAI (R = 0.81). When LAI was greater than 4-5 m2.m-2, NPP became saturated. NPP was also highly correlated with canopy transpiration (R = 0.77). The response of NPP on environmental conditions, LAI and canopy transpiration in Betula ermanii and broad-leaved forests were different from those in other vegetation. PMID:12924113

  9. Gross Primary Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's new Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) allows scientists to gauge our planet's metabolism on an almost daily basis. GPP, gross primary production, is the technical term for plant photosynthesis. This composite image over the continental United States, acquired during the period March 26-April 10, 2000, shows regions where plants were more or less productive-i.e., where they 'inhaled' carbon dioxide and then used the carbon from photosynthesis to build new plant structures. This false-color image provides a map of how much carbon was absorbed out of the atmosphere and fixed within land vegetation. Areas colored blue show where plants used as much as 60 grams of carbon per square meter. Areas colored green and yellow indicate a range of anywhere from 40 to 20 grams of carbon absorbed per square meter. Red pixels show an absorption of less than 10 grams of carbon per square meter and white pixels (often areas covered by snow or masked as urban) show little or no absorption. This is one of a number of new measurements that MODIS provides to help scientists understand how the Earth's landscapes are changing over time. Scientists' goal is use of these GPP measurements to refine computer models to simulate how the land biosphere influences the natural cycles of water, carbon, and energy throughout the Earth system. The GPP will be an integral part of global carbon cycle source and sink analysis, an important aspect of Kyoto Protocol assessments. This image is the first of its kind from the MODIS instrument, which launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra spacecraft. MODIS began acquiring scientific data on February 24, 2000, when it first opened its aperture door. The MODIS instrument and Terra spacecraft are both managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Image courtesy Steven Running, MODIS Land Group Member, University of Montana

  10. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  11. Variability in primary productivity determines metapopulation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Néstor; Román, Jacinto; Delibes, Miguel

    2016-04-13

    Temporal variability in primary productivity can change habitat quality for consumer species by affecting the energy levels available as food resources. However, it remains unclear how habitat-quality fluctuations may determine the dynamics of spatially structured populations, where the effects of habitat size, quality and isolation have been customarily assessed assuming static habitats. We present the first empirical evaluation on the effects of stochastic fluctuations in primary productivity-a major outcome of ecosystem functions-on the metapopulation dynamics of a primary consumer. A unique 13-year dataset from an herbivore rodent was used to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variations in primary productivity determine spatiotemporal habitat occupancy patterns and colonization and extinction processes. Inter-annual variability in productivity and in the growing season phenology significantly influenced habitat colonization patterns and occupancy dynamics. These effects lead to changes in connectivity to other potentially occupied habitat patches, which then feed back into occupancy dynamics. According to the results, the dynamics of primary productivity accounted for more than 50% of the variation in occupancy probability, depending on patch size and landscape configuration. Evidence connecting primary productivity dynamics and spatiotemporal population processes has broad implications for metapopulation persistence in fluctuating and changing environments. PMID:27053739

  12. Variability in primary productivity determines metapopulation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Temporal variability in primary productivity can change habitat quality for consumer species by affecting the energy levels available as food resources. However, it remains unclear how habitat-quality fluctuations may determine the dynamics of spatially structured populations, where the effects of habitat size, quality and isolation have been customarily assessed assuming static habitats. We present the first empirical evaluation on the effects of stochastic fluctuations in primary productivity—a major outcome of ecosystem functions—on the metapopulation dynamics of a primary consumer. A unique 13-year dataset from an herbivore rodent was used to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variations in primary productivity determine spatiotemporal habitat occupancy patterns and colonization and extinction processes. Inter-annual variability in productivity and in the growing season phenology significantly influenced habitat colonization patterns and occupancy dynamics. These effects lead to changes in connectivity to other potentially occupied habitat patches, which then feed back into occupancy dynamics. According to the results, the dynamics of primary productivity accounted for more than 50% of the variation in occupancy probability, depending on patch size and landscape configuration. Evidence connecting primary productivity dynamics and spatiotemporal population processes has broad implications for metapopulation persistence in fluctuating and changing environments. PMID:27053739

  13. Primary productivity in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in primary productivity is discussed in the book based on 27 symposia texts and 19 poster abstracts. Most papers deal with particular cellular processes in pelagic phytoplankton and their relationship to whole plant photosynthesis and growth. In addition, presentations on the productivity of the seaweed, Laminaria, zooxanthellae and whole corals are included. Other articles discuss predictive modeling, new developments in remote sensing, nutrient regeneration within the sea, grazing effects, and carbon cycling. (JMT)

  14. Responses of primary productivity to increased temperature and phytoplankton diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M.; Breithaupt, Petra; Hillebrand, Helmut; Hoppe, Hans-Georg; Jürgens, Klaus; Sommer, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    In order to examine the effects of warming and diversity changes on primary productivity, we conducted a meta-analysis on six independent indoor mesocosm experiments with a natural plankton community from the Baltic Sea. Temperature effects on primary productivity changed with light intensity and zooplankton density and analysed pathways between temperature, diversity and productivity, elucidating direct and indirect effects of warming on primary productivity during the spring phytoplankton bloom. Our findings indicate that warming directly increased carbon specific primary productivity, which was more pronounced under low grazing pressure. On the other hand, primary productivity per unit water volume did not respond to increased temperature, because of a negative temperature effect on phytoplankton biomass. Moreover, primary productivity response to temperature changes depended on light limitation. Using path analysis, we tested whether temperature effects were direct or mediated by warming effects on phytoplankton diversity. Although phytoplankton species richness had a positive impact on both net primary productivity and carbon specific primary productivity - and evenness had a negative effect on net primary productivity - both richness and evenness were not affected by temperature. Thus, we suggest that diversity effects on primary productivity depended mainly on other factors than temperature like grazing, sinking or nutrient limitation, which themselves are temperature dependent.

  15. Global Patterns in Human Consumption of Net Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence William T.

    2004-01-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, flows within food webs and the provision of important primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial ba!mce sheet of net primary production supply and demand for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production "imports" and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  16. Affective Productions of Mathematical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshaw, Margaret; Brown, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In underscoring the affective elements of mathematics experience, we work with contemporary readings of the work of Spinoza on the politics of affect, to understand what is included in the cognitive repertoire of the Subject. We draw on those resources to tell a pedagogical tale about the relation between cognition and affect in settings of…

  17. Primary production in Southern Ocean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Worthen, Denise; Schnell, Anthony; Lizotte, Michael P.

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Ocean forms a link between major ocean basins, is the site of deep and intermediate water ventilation, and is one of the few areas where macronutrients are underutilized by phytoplankton. Paradoxically, prior estimates of annual primary production are insufficient to support the Antarctic food web. Here we present results from a primary production algorithm based upon monthly climatological phytoplankton pigment concentrations from the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS). Phytoplankton production was forced using monthly temperature profiles and a radiative transfer model that computed changes in photosynthetically usable radiation at each CZCS pixel location. Average daily productivity (g C m-2 d-1) and total monthly production (Tg C month-1) were calculated for each of five geographic sectors (defined by longitude) and three ecological provinces (defined by sea ice coverage and bathymetry as the pelagic province, the marginal ice zone, and the shelf). Annual primary production in the Southern Ocean (south of 50°S) was calculated to be 4414 Tg C yr-1, 4-5 times higher than previous estimates made from in situ data. Primary production was greatest in the month of December (816 Tg C month-1) and in the pelagic province (contributing 88.6% of the annual primary production). Because of their small size the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and the shelf contributed only 9.5% and 1.8%, respectively, despite exhibiting higher daily production rates. The Ross Sea was the most productive region, accounting for 28% of annual production. The fourfold increase in the estimate of primary production for the Southern Ocean likely makes the notion of an "Antarctic paradox" (primary production insufficient to support the populations of Southern Ocean grazers, including krill, copepods, microzooplankton, etc.) obsolete.

  18. School Conditions Affecting Implementation of the Primary Program in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooden, Susan H.

    2000-01-01

    A study of two elementary schools identified school conditions affecting implementation of Kentucky state reforms of primary education: innovation advocates, teacher-relevant implementation strategies, and supportive principals. Essential elements were a fit between leadership style and faculty needs and time to develop collaborative working…

  19. Patterns of net primary production across sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net primary production (NPP) is a fundamentally important and commonly measured ecosystem process that provides an integrative estimate of energy capture and flow into systems, and consequently the energy available for use by other trophic levels. A wide range of productivity levels occurs globally ...

  20. Primary Production in Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Worthen, Denise L.; Lizotte, Michael P.; Dixon, Paul; Dieckmann, Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    A numerical model shows that in Antarctic sea ice, increased flooding in regions with thick snow cover enhances primary production in the infiltration (surface) layer. Productivity in the freeboard (sea level) layer is also determined by sea ice porosity, which varies with temperature. Spatial and temporal variation in snow thickness and the proportion of first-year ice thus determine regional differences in sea ice primary production. Model results show that of the 40 tera-grams of carbon produced annually in the Antarctic ice pack, 75 percent was associated with first-year ice and nearly 50 percent was produced in the Weddell Sea.

  1. Forecasting annual aboveground net primary production in the intermountain west

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many land manager’s annual aboveground net primary production, or plant growth, is a key factor affecting business success, profitability and each land manager's ability to successfully meet land management objectives. The strategy often utilized for forecasting plant growth is to assume every y...

  2. RARE CASE OF IDIOPATHIC GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS AFFECTING PRIMARY DENTITION.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sanaa; Ali, Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis (GF) is a rare condition with an estimated incidence of 1750,000 in autosomal dominant cases and is supposedly genetic in origin. Gingival fibromatosis (GF) may occur as an isolated finding (Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis or IGF) or in combination with additional clinical problems that is, giving rise to syndromic forms of the disease. It usually is triggered when permanent dentition starts to erupt and can cover crowns of the teeth. Gingival fibromatosis occasionally manifests at birth or affect primary dentition. This enlargement may cause mal-position and diastema. Surgical excision of excessive fibrous tissue is the only treatment but it recurs. We are presenting here a case of 5 year old patient presenting with severe idiopathic gingival fibromatosis covering crowns of primary teeth and causing functional impairment. PMID:27004356

  3. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTY IN NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net primary production (NPP, e.g., g m-2 yr-1), a key ecosystem attribute, is estimated from a combination of other variables, e.g. standing crop biomass at several points in time, each of which is subject to errors in their measurement. These errors propagate as the variables a...

  4. Primary Productivity in Meduxnekeag River, Maine, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Robert M.; Schalk, Charles W.; Kempf, Joshua P.

    2009-01-01

    During August and September 2005, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, specific conductance, streamflow, and light intensity (LI) were determined continuously at six sites defining five reaches on Meduxnekeag River above and below Houlton, Maine. These data were collected as input for a dual-station whole-stream metabolism model to evaluate primary productivity in the river above and below Houlton. The river receives nutrients and organic matter from tributaries and the Houlton wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Model output estimated gross and net primary productivity for each reach. Gross primary productivity (GPP) varied in each reach but was similar and positive among the reaches. GPP was correlated to LI in the four reaches above the WWTP but not in the reach below. Net primary productivity (NPP) decreased in each successive downstream reach and was negative in the lowest two reaches. NPP was weakly related to LI in the upper two reaches and either not correlated or negatively correlated in the lower three reaches. Relations among GPP, NPP, and LI indicate that the system is heterotrophic in the downstream reaches. The almost linear decrease in NPP (the increase in metabolism and respiration) indicates a cumulative effect of inputs of nutrients and organic matter from tributaries that drain agricultural land, the town of Houlton, and the discharges from the WWTP.

  5. The marketing implications of affective product design.

    PubMed

    Seva, Rosemary R; Duh, Henry Been-Lirn; Helander, Martin G

    2007-11-01

    Emotions are compelling human experiences and product designers can take advantage of this by conceptualizing emotion-engendering products that sell well in the market. This study hypothesized that product attributes influence users' emotions and that the relationship is moderated by the adherence of these product attributes to purchase criteria. It was further hypothesized that the emotional experience of the user influences purchase intention. A laboratory study was conducted to validate the hypotheses using mobile phones as test products. Sixty-two participants were asked to assess eight phones from a display of 10 phones and indicate their emotional experiences after assessment. Results suggest that some product attributes can cause intense emotional experience. The attributes relate to the phone's dimensions and the relationship between these dimensions. The study validated the notion of integrating affect in designing products that convey users' personalities. PMID:17303064

  6. Chemolithotrophic Primary Production in a Subglacial Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Havig, Jeff R.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Shock, Everett L.

    2014-01-01

    Glacial comminution of bedrock generates fresh mineral surfaces capable of sustaining chemotrophic microbial communities under the dark conditions that pervade subglacial habitats. Geochemical and isotopic evidence suggests that pyrite oxidation is a dominant weathering process generating protons that drive mineral dissolution in many subglacial systems. Here, we provide evidence correlating pyrite oxidation with chemosynthetic primary productivity and carbonate dissolution in subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada. Quantification and sequencing of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) transcripts suggest that populations closely affiliated with Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, an iron sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium, are abundant constituents of microbial communities at RG. Microcosm experiments indicate sulfate production during biological assimilation of radiolabeled bicarbonate. Geochemical analyses of subglacial meltwater indicate that increases in sulfate levels are associated with increased calcite and dolomite dissolution. Collectively, these data suggest a role for biological pyrite oxidation in driving primary productivity and mineral dissolution in a subglacial environment and provide the first rate estimate for bicarbonate assimilation in these ecosystems. Evidence for lithotrophic primary production in this contemporary subglacial environment provides a plausible mechanism to explain how subglacial communities could be sustained in near-isolation from the atmosphere during glacial-interglacial cycles. PMID:25085483

  7. Chemolithotrophic primary production in a subglacial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Havig, Jeff R; Skidmore, Mark L; Shock, Everett L

    2014-10-01

    Glacial comminution of bedrock generates fresh mineral surfaces capable of sustaining chemotrophic microbial communities under the dark conditions that pervade subglacial habitats. Geochemical and isotopic evidence suggests that pyrite oxidation is a dominant weathering process generating protons that drive mineral dissolution in many subglacial systems. Here, we provide evidence correlating pyrite oxidation with chemosynthetic primary productivity and carbonate dissolution in subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada. Quantification and sequencing of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) transcripts suggest that populations closely affiliated with Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, an iron sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium, are abundant constituents of microbial communities at RG. Microcosm experiments indicate sulfate production during biological assimilation of radiolabeled bicarbonate. Geochemical analyses of subglacial meltwater indicate that increases in sulfate levels are associated with increased calcite and dolomite dissolution. Collectively, these data suggest a role for biological pyrite oxidation in driving primary productivity and mineral dissolution in a subglacial environment and provide the first rate estimate for bicarbonate assimilation in these ecosystems. Evidence for lithotrophic primary production in this contemporary subglacial environment provides a plausible mechanism to explain how subglacial communities could be sustained in near-isolation from the atmosphere during glacial-interglacial cycles. PMID:25085483

  8. PRIMARY PRODUCTION ESTIMATES IN CHESAPEAKE BAY USING SEAWIFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal and spatial variability in primary production along the main stem of Chesapeake Bay was examined from 1997 through 2000. Primary production estimates were determined from the Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM) (Behrenfeld and Falkowski, 1997) using chloro...

  9. Observations of Ocean Primary Productivity Using MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark R.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Measuring the magnitude and variability of oceanic net primary productivity (NPP) represents a key advancement toward our understanding of the dynamics of marine ecosystems and the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. MODIS observations make two new contributions in addition to continuing the bio-optical time series begun with Orbview-2's SeaWiFS sensor. First, MODIS provides weekly estimates of global ocean net primary productivity on weekly and annual time periods, and annual empirical estimates of carbon export production. Second, MODIS provides additional insight into the spatial and temporal variations in photosynthetic efficiency through the direct measurements of solar-stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The two different weekly productivity indexes (first developed by Behrenfeld & Falkowski and by Yoder, Ryan and Howard) are used to derive daily productivity as a function of chlorophyll biomass, incident daily surface irradiance, temperature, euphotic depth, and mixed layer depth. Comparisons between these two estimates using both SeaWiFS and MODIS data show significant model differences in spatial distribution after allowance for the different integration depths. Both estimates are strongly dependence on the accuracy of the chlorophyll determination. In addition, an empirical approach is taken on annual scales to estimate global NPP and export production. Estimates of solar stimulated fluorescence efficiency from chlorophyll have been shown to be inversely related to photosynthetic efficiency by Abbott and co-workers. MODIS provides the first global estimates of oceanic chlorophyll fluorescence, providing an important proof of concept. MODIS observations are revealing spatial patterns of fluorescence efficiency which show expected variations with phytoplankton photo-physiological parameters as measured during in-situ surveys. This has opened the way for research into utilizing this information to improve our understanding of oceanic NPP

  10. The productivity of primary care research networks.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, F; Wild, A; Harvey, J; Fenton, E

    2000-11-01

    Primary care research networks are being publicly funded in the United Kingdom to promote a culture of research and development in primary care. This paper discusses the organisational form of these networks and how their productivity can be evaluated, drawing on evidence from management science. An evaluation of a research network has to take account of the complexity of the organisation, the influence of its local context, and its stage of development. Output measures, such as number of research papers, and process measures, such as number of research meetings, may contribute to an evaluation. However, as networking relies on the development of informal, trust-based relationships, the quality of interactions within a network is of paramount importance for its success. Networks can audit and reflect on their success in promoting such relationships and a more formal qualitative evaluation by an independent observer can document their success to those responsible for funding. PMID:11141879

  11. Factors affecting nutritional status of Malaysian primary school children.

    PubMed

    Zaini, M Z Anuar; Lim, C T; Low, W Y; Harun, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the nutritional status of a randomly selected cohort of school children and the factors affecting it. This random survey was conducted in the state of Selangor, involving 1,405 primary students (aged 9-10 years from 54 national primary schools). Physical examination was carried out on all the students. Information on the students was also obtained from the parents. Blood samples were taken by using the finger pricking technique. Body mass index (BMI) was used as a measure of physical growth. The students were mainly from urban areas (82.9%). The mean age was 9.71 years and a higher proportion was females (51%). Malays constituted 83.6%, Indians 11.6% and Chinese 4.2% of the study population. The mean weight and height were 32.30 kg and 135.18 cm respectively. The mean BMI was 17.42 kg/m2, with 1.2% of the students underweight, 76.3% normal BMI, 16.3% overweight and 6.3% were obese. Nutritional status was significantly related to blood pressure, history of breast feeding, eating fast food, taking canned/bottled drinks, income and educational level of parents. Significant differences in nutritional status between sexes and locations (rural/urban) were also found. The prevalence of overweight and obese children was of concern. There is thus an urgent need for the School Health Program to periodically monitor the school children's eating habits and physical growth. Appropriate counselling on nutritional intake and physical activities should be given not only to schoolchildren but also to their teachers and parents or caregivers. PMID:16425649

  12. Seasonality of primary and secondary production in an Arctic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M.; Huryn, A.; Deegan, L.

    2011-12-01

    Rivers and streams that freeze solid for 8-9 months each year provide excellent examples of the extreme seasonality of arctic habitats. The communities of organisms inhabiting these rivers must complete growth and development during summer, resulting in a rapid ramp-up and down of production over the short ice-free period. The effects of recent shifts in the timing of the spring thaw and autumn freeze-up on the duration and pattern of the period of active production are poorly understood. We are currently investigating: 1) the response of the biotic community of the Kuparuk River (Arctic Alaska) to shifts in the seasonality of the ice-free period, and 2) the community response to increases in phosphorous (P) supply anticipated as the volume of the permafrost active-layer increases in response to climate warming. Here algal production supports a 2-tier web of consumers. We tracked primary and secondary production from the spring thaw through mid-August in a reference reach and one receiving low-level P fertilization. Gross primary production/community respiration (GPP/R) ratios for both reaches were increasing through mid-July, with higher GPP/R in response to the P addition. Understanding the degree of synchrony between primary and secondary production in this Arctic river system will enhance further understanding of how shifts in seasonality affect trophic dynamics.

  13. MODIS-Derived Terrestrial Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven; Heinsch, Faith Ann; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    Temporal and spatial changes in terrestrial biological productivity have a large impact on humankind because terrestrial ecosystems not only create environments suitable for human habitation, but also provide materials essential for survival, such as food, fiber and fuel. A recent study estimated that consumption of terrestrial net primary production (NPP; a list of all the acronyms is available in the appendix at the end of the chapter) by the human population accounts for about 14-26% of global NPP (Imhoff et al. 2004). Rapid global climate change is induced by increased atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration, especially CO2, which results from human activities such as fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. This directly impacts terrestrial NPP, which continues to change in both space and time (Melillo et al. 1993; Prentice et al. 2001; Nemani et al. 2003), and ultimately impacts the well-being of human society (Milesi et al. 2005). Additionally, substantial evidence show that the oceans and the biosphere, especially terrestrial ecosystems, currently play a major role in reducing the rate of the atmospheric CO2 increase (Prentice et al. 2001; Schimel et al. 2001). NPP is the first step needed to quantify the amount of atmospheric carbon fixed by plants and accumulated as biomass. Continuous and accurate measurements of terrestrial NPP at the global scale are possible using satellite data. Since early 2000, for the first time, the MODIS sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, have operationally provided scientists with near real-time global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and net photosynthesis (PsnNet) data. These data are provided at 1 km spatial resolution and an 8-day interval, and annual NPP covers 109,782,756 km2 of vegetated land. These GPP, PsnNet and NPP products are collectively known as MOD17 and are part of a larger suite of MODIS land products (Justice et al. 2002), one of the core Earth System or Climate Data Records (ESDR or

  14. Mass extinctions: Ecological selectivity and primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Melissa Clark; Thayer, Charles W.

    1991-09-01

    If mass extinctions were caused by reduced primary productivity, then extinctions should be concentrated among animals with starvation-susceptible feeding modes, active lifestyles, and high-energy budgets. The stratigraphic ranges (by stage) of 424 genera of bivalves and 309 genera of articulate brachiopods suggest that there was an unusual reduction of primary productivity at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary extinction. For bivalves at the K/T, there were (1) selective extinction of suspension feeders and other susceptible trophic categories relative to deposit feeders and other resistant categories, and (2) among suspension feed-ers, selective extinction of bivalves with active locomotion. During the Permian-Triassic (P/Tr) extinction and Jurassic background time, extinction rates among suspension feeders were greater for articulate brachiopods than for bivalves. But during the K/T event, extinction rates of articulates and suspension-feeding bivalves equalized, possibly because the low-energy budgets of articulates gave them an advantage when food was scarce.

  15. Affective processing bias in youth with primary bipolar disorder or primary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Karen E; Kim, Kerri L; Cushman, Grace K; Puzia, Megan E; Weissman, Alexandra B; Galvan, Thania; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2015-11-01

    High rates of comorbidity and overlapping diagnostic criteria between pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) contribute to diagnostic and treatment confusion. To advance what is known about both disorders, we compared effect of emotional stimuli on response control in children with primary BD, primary ADHD and typically developing controls (TDC). Participants included 7-17 year olds with either "narrow-phenotype" pediatric BD (n = 25), ADHD (n = 25) or TDC (n = 25). Groups were matched on participant age and FSIQ. The effect of emotional stimuli on response control was assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Affective Go/No-Go task (CANTAB AGN). We found a group by target valence interaction on commission errors [F(2,71) = 5.34, p < 0.01, ƞ p (2) = 0.13] whereby ADHD, but not TDC participants, made more errors on negative than positive words [t(24) = -2.58, p < 0.05, r = 0.47]. In contrast, there was a nonsignificant trend for BD participants to make fewer errors on negative versus positive words compared to ADHD and TDC participants. Between-subjects effects showed that ADHD participants made more errors than TDC, but not BD participants. Our main finding advances what is known about the effect of emotional stimuli on response control in children with ADHD. Our results suggesting a positive affective processing bias in children with ADHD compliment emerging literature show that difficulties with emotional processing and regulation may be core features of ADHD. Further, given the observed pattern of results in children with ADHD compared to BD children, our behavioral results suggest the importance of examining differences in the brain-behavior mechanisms involved in affective processing in children with ADHD compared to BD children. PMID:25724546

  16. Cold stress as it affects animal production.

    PubMed

    Young, B A

    1981-01-01

    Almost two-thirds of all livestock in North America are raised in regions where the mean January temperature is below 0 C. The effects of cold conditions on productivity and efficiency of feed conversion by swine, dairy and beef cattle are reviewed. Swine are rather cold-susceptible and are therefore usually kept in heated housing when raised in colder regions. Lactating or fattening cattle are extremely cold-hardy and rarely experience climatic conditions below their lower critical temperature. Despite the absence of a challenge to homothermy in cattle, there are marked seasonal fluctuations in the cattle's level and efficiency of production which probably arise from hormonal and adaptive changes occurring as a consequence of mild cold stress. Primary among these changes are an increase resting metabolic rate, and hence an increased energy requirement for maintenance, and an increased rate of passage of digesta, which results in reduced digestive efficiency. With cold there is stimulation of appetite, which may partially counteract the reduced level of production but not the reduced efficiency of utilization of dietary energy. PMID:7240034

  17. Biospheric primary production during an ENSO transition.

    PubMed

    Behrenfeld, M J; Randerson, J T; McClain, C R; Feldman, G C; Los, S O; Tucker, C J; Falkowski, P G; Field, C B; Frouin, R; Esaias, W E; Kolber, D D; Pollack, N H

    2001-03-30

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) provides global monthly measurements of both oceanic phytoplankton chlorophyll biomass and light harvesting by land plants. These measurements allowed the comparison of simultaneous ocean and land net primary production (NPP) responses to a major El Niño to La Niña transition. Between September 1997 and August 2000, biospheric NPP varied by 6 petagrams of carbon per year (from 111 to 117 petagrams of carbon per year). Increases in ocean NPP were pronounced in tropical regions where El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) impacts on upwelling and nutrient availability were greatest. Globally, land NPP did not exhibit a clear ENSO response, although regional changes were substantial. PMID:11283369

  18. Potential Marine Organisms Affecting Airborne Primary Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, J. Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The oceans cover 70% of earth with the marine environment contributing ~50% of the global biomass. Particularly during periods of high biological activity associated with phytoplankton blooms, primary emitted aerosol particles dominated by organic compounds in the submicron size range, are ejected from surface waters increasing in concentration exponentially with overlying wind speeds. This is significant for clouds and climate particularly over nutrient rich polar seas, where seawater concentrations of biogenic particles can reach 109 cells per ml during spring phytoplankton blooms, and even 106 cells per ml in winter when empty frustules and fragments of diatoms are resuspensed from shallow shelf sediments by strong winds, and mix with living pico- and nanoplankton in surface sea waters. This organic aerosol fraction can have a significant impact on the ability of ocean derived aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei. It has been shown that small insoluble organic particles are aerosolized from the sea surface microlayer (SML) via bubble bursting. The exact composition and complexity of the SML varies spatially and temporally but includes phytoplankton cells, microorganisms, organic debris, and a complex mixture of proteins, polysaccharides, humic-type material and waxes, microgels and colloidal nanogels, and strong surface active lipids. The specific chemical composition is dependent on the fractionation of organic matter which originates from in-situ production, from underlying water and even from atmospheric deposition. These conditions will most likely determine the nature of the organic and biogenic material. Here we review the types, sizes, and properties of ocean-derived particles and organic material which present potential candidates for airborne biogenic and organic particles.

  19. AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside) increases the production of toxic molecules and affects the profile of cytokines release in LPS-stimulated rat primary microglial cultures.

    PubMed

    Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Liber, Sebastian; Gabryel, Bozena; Okopień, Bogusław

    2010-01-01

    AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside, Acadesine, AICA riboside) is an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The results of recent studies suggest that AICAR, in addition to its application for treating metabolic disorders, may also have therapeutic potential for treating neuroinflammatory diseases where reactive microglia play an etiological role. However, the molecular mechanisms of action by which AICAR exerts its anti-inflammatory effects still remain unclear or controversial. In this paper we attempt to evaluate the effects of AICAR on non-stimulated and LPS-activated rat primary microglial cell cultures. The presented evidence supports the conclusion that AMPK activated by AICAR is involved in regulation of ROS and cytokine production (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha (6h), IL-10 and TGF-beta) as well as arginase I and PGC-1alpha expression. Furthermore, we found that the effects of AICAR on IL-6 and TNF-alpha (12, 24h) release and on the expression of iNOS and NF-kappaB p65 are not AMPK-dependent because the pre-treatment of LPS-activated microglia with compound C (a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK) did not reverse the effect of AICAR. The results of the presented study provide additional data about AMPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms whereby AICAR may modulate inflammatory response of microglia. PMID:19853624

  20. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production. PMID:26098841

  1. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production

    PubMed Central

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production. PMID:26098841

  2. Primary production in the northern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qurban, Mohammed Ali; Balala, Arvin C.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bhavya, P. S.; Wafar, Mohideen

    2014-04-01

    Rates of uptake of carbon and nitrogen (ammonium, nitrate and urea) by phytoplankton, along with concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll a, in the Saudi Arabian waters of the northern Red Sea (23 °N-28 °N) were measured in autumn, 2012. Concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and phosphate within the euphotic zone were in trace amounts while those of silicon were in excess of 0.5 μmol L- 1. Concentrations of chlorophyll (Chl a) were very low within the euphotic zone (0.01-0.6 μg L- 1 at discrete depths and 1.53-21.5 mg m- 2 as column-integrated values). A deep chlorophyll maximum and a nitrite maximum were present between 60 and 80 m at almost all of the stations occupied. Rates of carbon uptake at discrete depths ranged from 0.02 to 3 μg C L- 1 h- 1. Chl-normalized carbon uptake rates related with ambient light in a Michaelis-Menten kinetic pattern. About 80% of the carbon uptake was attributable to the < 20 μm fraction. Ammonium and urea were the nitrogen compounds taken up in preference by phytoplankton and accounted for close to 90% of the total N uptake. Considered together, these results indicate that the waters of the northern Red Sea are oligotrophic and that the primary production is strongly N-controlled. Analyses of the data and interpretation of the results led to the following speculations: (1) the perceived north-south gradient in Chl a (and possibly in primary production) in the Red Sea is maintained by circulation of Chl- and nutrient-rich waters through a series of gyres, (2) there is a greater role for heterotrophy and microbial loop in the trophic dynamics, and (3) in situ nitrification in the euphotic zone is an important source of N for phytoplankton and consequently export of carbon to deep sea could be lesser than that indicated by f-ratios.

  3. Effecting Affect: Developing a Positive Attitude to Primary Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Len; Hurst, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Most adults' attitudes to mathematics come from their experiences of mathematics in school when they were children. Children's mathematical worlds are complex places containing both cognitive and affective elements. One cannot ignore the affective domain if one wishes to understand children's mathematical learning. Teacher education students…

  4. Enhanced Primary Productivity at the Subtropical Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llido, J.; Garcon, V.; Lutjeharms, J.; Sudre, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Subtropical Convergence is one of the major frontal systems in the world ocean. It is not just simply a biogeographical boundary, but forms a unique biological habitat of its own. Ocean colour satellite data indicate that it is a region of enhanced chlorophyll a and thus a potential key region of carbon drawdown from the atmosphere. Ship crossings sometimes show peaks in chlorophyll a at the front, but at other times these peaks are absent. If the normal mode of primary productivity at the front consists of intermittent bloom events, as these observations suggest, organisms endemic to this habitat may have to be adapted to a boom-or-bust situation. We have studied the presence of chlorophyll a using daily SeaWiFS images and showed that bloom events with limited spatial and temporal scales are indeed the norm. A coupled physical-biological model simulates this process with a fair degree of verisimilitude. We use this model to investigate the physico-biogeochemical requirements for bloom events and demonstrate that in most cases the limiting factor is intensity of vertical stratification combined with light availability.

  5. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  6. Affective Education in the Primary Grade Levels: A Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stilwell, William E.; Barclay, James R.

    This report describes a 12-week pilot phase of an affective education program in the Stuttgart School District, Arkansas. Participating in the program were 218 children, grades 2-4, and a team of nineteen teachers who were given 12 weeks of in-service training designed to facilitate their use of the DUSO, Focus on Self-Development Human…

  7. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  8. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. ); Geider, R. . Coll. of Marine Studies)

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  9. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G.; Geider, R.

    1992-07-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  10. Factors affecting patient outcome in primary cutaneous aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, Alexander M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary cutaneous aspergillosis (PCA) is an uncommon infection of the skin. There is a paucity of organized literature regarding this entity in regard to patient characteristics, associated Aspergillus species, and treatment modalities on outcome (disease recurrence, disease dissemination, and mortality). We reviewed all published reports of PCA from 1967 to 2015. Cases were deemed eligible if they included the following: patient baseline characteristics (age, sex, underlying condition), evidence of proven or probable PCA, primary treatment strategy, and outcome. We identified 130 eligible cases reported from 1967 to 2015. The patients were predominantly male (63.8%) with a mean age of 30.4 ± 22.1 years. Rates of PCA recurrence, dissemination, and mortality were 10.8%, 18.5%, and 31.5%, respectively. In half of the cases, there was an association with a foreign body. Seven different Aspergillus species were reported to cause PCA. Systemic antifungal therapy without surgery was the most common form of therapy (60% of cases). Disease dissemination was more common in patients with underlying systemic conditions and occurred on average 41.4 days after PCA diagnosis (range of 3–120 days). In a multivariate linear regression model of mortality including only patients with immunosuppressive conditions, dissemination and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome were statistically significantly associated with increased mortality. Nearly one-third of patients with PCA die with the disease. Dissemination and host status are critical in patient outcome. PMID:27367980

  11. Scoparone affects lipid metabolism in primary hepatocytes using lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Qiu, Shi; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Tianlei; Guan, Yu; Han, Ying; Yan, Guangli; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Lipidomics, which focuses on the global study of molecular lipids in biological systems, could provide valuable insights about disease mechanisms. In this study, we present a nontargeted lipidomics strategy to determine cellular lipid alterations after scoparone exposure in primary hepatocytes. Lipid metabolic profiles were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and a novel imaging TransOmics tool has been developed for the analysis of high-resolution MS data, including the data pretreatment, visualization, automated identification, deconvolution and quantification of lipid species. Chemometric and statistical analyses of the obtained lipid fingerprints revealed the global lipidomic alterations and tested the therapeutic effects of scoparone. Identification of ten proposed lipids contributed to the better understanding of the effects of scoparone on lipid metabolism in hepatocytes. The most striking finding was that scoparone caused comprehensive lipid changes, as represented by significant changes of the identificated lipids. The levels of identified PG(19:1(9Z)/14:0), PE(17:1(9Z)/0:0), PE(19:1(9Z)/0:0) were found to be upregulated in ethanol-induced group, whereas the levels in scoparone group were downregulated. Lipid metabolism in primary hepatocytes was changed significantly by scoparone treatment. We believe that this novel approach could substantially broaden the applications of high mass resolution mass spectrometry for cellular lipidomics. PMID:27306123

  12. Scoparone affects lipid metabolism in primary hepatocytes using lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aihua; Qiu, Shi; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Tianlei; Guan, Yu; Han, Ying; Yan, Guangli; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Lipidomics, which focuses on the global study of molecular lipids in biological systems, could provide valuable insights about disease mechanisms. In this study, we present a nontargeted lipidomics strategy to determine cellular lipid alterations after scoparone exposure in primary hepatocytes. Lipid metabolic profiles were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and a novel imaging TransOmics tool has been developed for the analysis of high-resolution MS data, including the data pretreatment, visualization, automated identification, deconvolution and quantification of lipid species. Chemometric and statistical analyses of the obtained lipid fingerprints revealed the global lipidomic alterations and tested the therapeutic effects of scoparone. Identification of ten proposed lipids contributed to the better understanding of the effects of scoparone on lipid metabolism in hepatocytes. The most striking finding was that scoparone caused comprehensive lipid changes, as represented by significant changes of the identificated lipids. The levels of identified PG(19:1(9Z)/14:0), PE(17:1(9Z)/0:0), PE(19:1(9Z)/0:0) were found to be upregulated in ethanol-induced group, whereas the levels in scoparone group were downregulated. Lipid metabolism in primary hepatocytes was changed significantly by scoparone treatment. We believe that this novel approach could substantially broaden the applications of high mass resolution mass spectrometry for cellular lipidomics. PMID:27306123

  13. Differential effects of nutrient-limited primary production on primary, secondary or tertiary consumers.

    PubMed

    Malzahn, Arne M; Hantzsche, Florian; Schoo, Katherina L; Boersma, Maarten; Aberle, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional imbalances between predator and prey are the rule rather than the exception at the lower end of food webs. We investigated the role of different grazers in the propagation of nutritionally imbalanced primary production by using the same primary producers in a three-trophic-level food chain and a four-trophic-level food chain experimental setup. The three-trophic-level food chain consisted of a classic single-cell primary producer (Rhodomonas salina), a metazoan grazer (the copepod Acartia tonsa) and a top predator (the jellyfish Gonionemus vertens), while we added a protozoan grazer (Oxyrrhis marina) as primary consumer to the food chain to establish the four-trophic-level food chain. This setup allowed us to investigate how nutrient-limitation effects change from one trophic level to another, and to investigate the performance of two components of our experimental food chains in different trophic positions. Stoichiometry and fatty acid profiles of the algae showed significant differences between the nutrient-depleted [no N and no P addition (-P), respectively] and the nutrient-replete (f/2) treatments. The differences in stoichiometry could be traced when O. marina was the first consumer. Copepods feeding on these flagellates were not affected by the nutritional imbalance of their prey in their stoichiometry, their respiration rates nor in their developmental rates. In contrast, when copepods were the primary consumer, those reared on the -P algae showed significantly higher respiration rates along with significantly lower developmental rates. In neither of our two experimental food chains did the signals from the base of the food chains travel up to jelly fish, our top predator. PMID:19784675

  14. Assessing Achievement of Primary Grader Students and Factors Affecting Achievement in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeed, Muhammad; Gondal, Muhammad Bashir; Bushra

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on achievement level of primary grade students in different subjects taught at primary level and the factors affecting the student achievement in this regard. Design/methodology/approach: The study was carried out on a sample of 1,080 students of grade 3 and 5 drawn from randomly selected 36 primary/elementary…

  15. Factors affecting production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Good production rates are needed for cosmic-ray-produced nuclides to interpret their measurements. Rates depend on many factors, especially the pre-atmospheric object's size, the location of the sample in that object (such as near surface or deep inside), and the object's bulk composition. The bulk composition affects rates, especially in objects with very low and very high iron contents. Extraterrestrial materials with high iron contents usually have higher rates for making nuclides made by reactions with energetic particles and lower rates for the capture of thermal neutrons. In small objects and near the surface of objects, the cascade of secondary neutrons is being developed as primary particles are being removed. Deep in large objects, that secondary cascade is fully developed and the fluxes of primary particles are low. Recent work shows that even the shape of an object in space has a small but measureable effect. Work has been done and continues to be done on better understanding those and other factors. More good sets of measurements in meteorites with known exposure geometries in space are needed. With the use of modern Monte Carlo codes for the production and transport of particles, the nature of these effects have been and is being studied. Work needs to be done to improve the results of these calculations, especially the cross sections for making spallogenic nuclides.

  16. A primary screen of the bovine genome for quantitative trait loci affecting carcass and growth traits.

    PubMed

    Stone, R T; Keele, J W; Shackelford, S D; Kappes, S M; Koohmaraie, M

    1999-06-01

    A primary genomic screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting carcass and growth traits was performed by genotyping 238 microsatellite markers on 185 out of 300 total progeny from a Bos indicus x Bos taurus sire mated to Bos taurus cows. The following traits were analyzed for QTL effects: birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WW), yearling weight (YW), hot carcass weight (HCW), dressing percentage (DP), fat thickness (FT), marbling score (MAR), longissimus muscle area (LMA), rib bone (RibB), rib fat (RibF), and rib muscle (RibM), and the predicted whole carcass traits, retail product yield (RPYD), fat trim yield (FATYD), bone yield (BOYD), retail product weight (RPWT), fat weight (FATWT), and bone weight (BOWT). Data were analyzed by generating an F-statistic profile computed at 1-cM intervals for each chromosome by the regression of phenotype on the conditional probability of receiving the Brahman allele from the sire. There was compelling evidence for a QTL allele of Brahman origin affecting an increase in RibB and a decrease in DP on chromosome 5 (BTA5). Putative QTL at or just below the threshold for genome-wide significance were as follows: an increase in RPYD and component traits on BTA2 and BTA13, an increase in LMA on BTA14, and an increase in BWT on BTA1. Results provided represent a portion of our efforts to identify and characterize QTL affecting carcass and growth traits. PMID:10375215

  17. A review of ocean chlorophyll algorithms and primary production models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Zhou, Song; Lv, Nan

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly introduces the five ocean chlorophyll concentration inversion algorithm and 3 main models for computing ocean primary production based on ocean chlorophyll concentration. Through the comparison of five ocean chlorophyll inversion algorithm, sums up the advantages and disadvantages of these algorithm,and briefly analyzes the trend of ocean primary production model.

  18. Parameters Affecting Solvent Production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    PubMed Central

    Dabrock, Birgit; Bahl, Hubert; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100 mol), lactate (32 mol/100 mol), and butanol (36 mol/100 mol) in addition to the usual products, acetate (38 mol/100 mol) and butyrate (17 mol/100 mol). During glycerol fermentation, a completely different product pattern was found. In continuous culture under phosphate limitation, acetate and butyrate were produced only in trace amounts, whereas ethanol (30 mol/100 mol), butanol (18 mol/100 mol), and 1,3-propanediol (18 mol/100 mol) were the major products. Under iron limitation, the ratio of these products could be changed in favor of 1,3-propanediol (34 mol/100 mol). In addition, lactate was produced in significant amounts (25 mol/100 mol). The tolerance of C. pasteurianum to glycerol was remarkably high; growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations up to 17% (wt/vol). Increasing glycerol concentrations favored the production of 1,3-propanediol. PMID:16348691

  19. Physical control of primary production on the Faroe Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Solva; Margretha Larsen, Karin; Hansen, Bogi

    2014-05-01

    The Faroe Islands are surrounded by a shelf with tidally mixed water, partly isolated from the open ocean by a tidal front. The on-shelf areas support a relatively uniform shelf ecosystem, distinct from the off-shelf waters. Earlier studies have shown high inter-annual variability in biological production on-shelf, with high correlation between fluctuations in the various trophic levels. It seems as if phytoplankton production is the prime driver in the ecosystem since grazing pressure by the zooplankton community during the spring bloom is not large enough to postpone and/or suppress the phytoplankton spring bloom. This indicates that physical effects are the dominant control of the primary production on the Faroe Shelf. For a well-mixed shelf water mass, solar radiation is an obvious candidate as a controlling factor, but inter-annual variations in light intensity show no correlation with primary production. Instead, it appears that variations in the horizontal exchange rate on-shelf and between on-shelf and off-shelf waters can explain the main features in both the inter-annual and shorter term variations of the spring bloom on-shelf. Two competing forcing factors seem to control the exchange rate: the homogenizing tidal currents and the air-sea heat exchange, which tends to induce both vertical and horizontal density gradients. In the presentation, a simple model is proposed to explain how the variations in these two factors affect the horizontal exchange rate and through that the spring bloom on the Faroe shelf.

  20. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2013-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of four phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First, we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production ((is)approximately 50%, the equivalent of 20 PgC·y1). Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed approximately 20% ((is) approximately 7 PgC·y1) of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10% ((is) approximately 4 PgC·y1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in the high latitudes ((is) greater than 40 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4% (1-2 PgC·y1). We assessed the effects of climate variability on group-specific primary production using global (i.e., Multivariate El Niño Index, MEI) and "regional" climate indices (e.g., Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p (is) less than 0.05) between the MEI and the group-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatoms/cyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect

  1. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer for making in situ measurements of primary productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kolber, Z.S.; Falkowski, P.G.

    1992-10-01

    Understanding the ocean carbon cycle and predicting how climate-induced changes in ocean circulation will affect ocean productivity requires that (a) primary productivity be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution, and (b) natural variability in primary productivity be parameterized with regardto environmental factors such as nutrient availabuity, irradiance, and temperature. Instrumentation to measure primary productivity from the stimulated in vivo fluoresence of phytoplankton chlorophyll is currendy being developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The instrumentation is based on fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometry, and provides a robust technique for deriving the photosynthetic rates in situ. Moreover, the FRR methodology directly measures several photosynthetic parameters such as effective absorption cross- section, photo-conversion efficiency, and turnover time of photosynthesis, and relate them to primary productivity. Since photosynthetic parameters are affected by environmental factors such as fight and nutrient availability, the relationship between these parameters and primary productivity can be established. By understanding such relationships, prognostic models of primary productivity can be developed and parameterized.

  2. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer for making in situ measurements of primary productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kolber, Z.S.; Falkowski, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the ocean carbon cycle and predicting how climate-induced changes in ocean circulation will affect ocean productivity requires that (a) primary productivity be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution, and (b) natural variability in primary productivity be parameterized with regardto environmental factors such as nutrient availabuity, irradiance, and temperature. Instrumentation to measure primary productivity from the stimulated in vivo fluoresence of phytoplankton chlorophyll is currendy being developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The instrumentation is based on fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometry, and provides a robust technique for deriving the photosynthetic rates in situ. Moreover, the FRR methodology directly measures several photosynthetic parameters such as effective absorption cross- section, photo-conversion efficiency, and turnover time of photosynthesis, and relate them to primary productivity. Since photosynthetic parameters are affected by environmental factors such as fight and nutrient availability, the relationship between these parameters and primary productivity can be established. By understanding such relationships, prognostic models of primary productivity can be developed and parameterized.

  3. Mean Angular Momenta of Primary Photofission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Bezshyyko, O.A.; Kadenko, I.M.; Plujko, V.A.; Yermolenko, R.V.; Mazur, V.M.; Strilchuk, N.V.; Vishnevsky, I.M.; Zheltonozhsky, V.A.

    2005-05-24

    Isomer ratios and mean angular momenta for photofission products of 237Np and 238U are obtained. The technique of gamma-ray spectrometry for isomeric ratio determination was used. Fissionable nuclei were irradiated by bremsstrahlung spectrum of microtron M-30 with electron energy 16 MeV. Calculations of mean angular momenta were performed by modified version of the EMPIRE II code.

  4. Factors Affecting the Motivation of Turkish Primary Students for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavas, Pinar

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Turkish primary students' (sixth to eighth grade) motivation toward science learning was investigated and factors affecting this determined. The sample for the study consisted of 376 students from 5 different primary schools in Izmir. The data were collected through a Students' Motivation toward Science Learning (SMTSL)…

  5. How Glassy States Affect Brown Carbon Production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Li, Y.; Wang, Y.; Bateman, A. P.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Z.; Gilles, M. K.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic material (SOM) can become light-absorbing (i.e. brown carbon) via multiphase reactions with nitrogen-containing species such as ammonia and amines. The physical states of SOM, however, potentially slow the diffusion of reactant molecules in organic matrix under conditions that semisolids or solids prevail, thus inhibiting the browning reaction pathways. In this study, the physical states and the in-particle diffusivity were investigated by measuring the evaporation kinetics of both water and organics from aromatic-derived SOMs using a quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM). The results indicate that the SOMs derived from aromatic precursors toluene and m-xylene became solid (glassy) and the in particle diffusion was significantly impeded for sufficiently low relative humidity ( < 20% RH) at 293 K. Optical properties and the AMS spectra were measured for toluene-derived SOM after ammonia exposure at varied RHs. The results suggest that the production of light-absorbing nitrogen-containing compounds from multiphase reactions with ammonia was kinetically limited in the glassy organic matrix, which otherwise produce brown carbon. The results of this study have significant implications for production and optical properties of brown carbon in urban atmospheres that ultimately influence the climate and tropospheric photochemistry.

  6. Influence of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Primary Productivity in the Semi-Enclosed Bay in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, R.; Nishi, S.; Taniguchi, M.; Tominaga, O.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have shown that submarine groundwater discharge is an alternative nutrient pathway and can drive primary production in coastal seas. However, very little is known about an exact relationship between input of groundwater and response of primary production. To clarify the relationship, we conducted the field survey in the semi-enclosed coastal bay in Japan (Obama Bay). There are abundant amounts of groundwater resources in the basin. Firstly, we conducted 222Rn continuous measurement along the coast in March 2013 to obtain the spatial difference of groundwater impact. As a result, 222Rn activity clearly showed that groundwater discharge concentrates in the western part of the bay head. We thus conducted in-situ measurements of primary productivity using stable 13C tracer method and environmental parameters (ex. 222Rn activity, light intensity, temperature and nutrient concentrations) at 6 stations within the western bay head in July and August 2013. Primary productivity within the western bay head changed from 11.0 to 49.5 μg C L-1 hr-1 in July and from 9.3 to 32.4 μg C L-1 hr-1 in August. Moreover, there was significant relationship between primary productivity and 222Rn concentration in both months. Although light intensity and water temperature were different in each station and month, concentrations of nutrients limited primary productivity. These results showed that nutrient supply from SGD would affect crucial impact on primary productivity in Obama Bay.

  7. Primary and Bacterial Secondary Production in a Southwestern Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Chrzanowski, Thomas H.; Hubbard, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Rates of primary and bacterial secondary production in Lake Arlington, Texas, were determined. The lake is a warm (annual temperature range, 7 to 32°C), shallow, monomictic reservoir with limited macrophyte development in the littoral zone. Samples were collected from six depths within the photic zone from a site located over the deepest portion of the lake. Primary production and bacterial production were calculated from NaH14CO3 and [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation, respectively. Peak instantaneous production ranged between 14.8 and 220.5 μg of C liter−1 h−1. There were two distinct periods of high rates of production. From May through July, production near the metalimnion exceeded 100 μg of C liter−1 h−1. During holomixis, production throughout the water column was in excess of 100 μg of C liter−1 h−1 and above 150 μg of C liter−1 h−1 near the surface. Annual areal primary production was 588 g of C m−2. Bacterial production was markedly seasonal. Growth rates during late fall through spring were typically around 0.002 h−1, and production rates were typically 5 μg of C liter−1 h−1. Growth rates were higher during warmer parts of the year and reached 0.03 h−1 by August. The maximum instantaneous rate of bacterial production was approximately 45 μg of C liter−1 h−1. Annual areal bacterial production was 125 g of C m−2. Temporal and spatial distributions of bacterial numbers and activities coincided with temporal and spatial distributions of primary production. Areal primary and bacterial secondary production were highly correlated (r = 0.77, n = 15, P < 0.002). PMID:16347577

  8. Primary production in the Chukchi Sea with potential effects of freshwater content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, M. S.; Whitledge, T. E.; Stockwell, D.; Son, S. H.; Lee, J. H.; Park, J. W.; Lee, D. B.; Park, J.; Lee, S. H.

    2016-02-01

    The in situ primary production rates and various environmental variables were investigated in the Chukchi Sea during the RUSALCA expedition, which was conducted in 2012, to identify the current status of primary production. A 13C-15N dual-tracer technique was used to measure the daily primary production rates, which ranged from 0.02 to 1.61 g C m-2 d-1 (mean ±SD = 0.42 ± 0.52 g C m-2 d-1). The primary production rates showed large regional differences, with the southern region (0.66 ± 0.62 g C m-2 d-1) producing approximately 5 times as much as the northern region (0.14 ± 0.10 g C m-2 d-1), which was primarily due to the differences in phytoplankton biomasses induced by regional nutrient conditions. The primary production rates in the Chukchi Sea were averaged using data acquired during the three different RUSALCA expeditions (2004, 2009, and 2012) as 0.33 g C m-2 d-1 (SD = 0.40 g C m-2 d-1), which was significantly lower than previously reported rates. In addition to strong seasonal and interannual variations in primary production, recent decreases in the concentrations of major inorganic nutrients and chlorophyll a could be among the reasons for the recent low primary production in the Chukchi Sea because the primary production is mainly affected by nutrient concentration and phytoplankton biomass. The nutrient inventory and primary production appear to be largely influenced by the freshwater content (FWC) variability in the region due to the significant relationships between FWC, nitrate inventory (r = 0.54, p < 0.05), and primary production rates (r = 0.56, p < 0.05). Moreover, we found highly significant relationships between the nutrient inventory and the primary production rates (r = 0.75, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the primary production in the Chukchi Sea is primarily controlled by nutrient availability, which is strongly related to the FWC variability. Our results imply that the predicted increase in freshwater accumulation might cause a

  9. Exploration of Lexical-Semantic Factors Affecting Stress Production in Derived Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarmulowicz, Linda; Taran, Valentina L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether lexical frequency, semantic knowledge, or sentence context affect children's production of primary stress in derived words with stress-changing suffixes (e.g., "-ity"). Method: Thirty children (M[subscript age] = 9;1 [years;months]) produced a limited set of high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) derived…

  10. Remote estimation of crop gross primary production with Landsat data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accurate and synoptic quantification of gross primary productivity (GPP) in crops is essential for studies of carbon budgets at regional and global scales. In this study, we developed a model relating crop GPP to a product of total canopy chlorophyll (Chl) content and potential incident photosynt...

  11. Global climate change and terrestrial net primary production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Mcguire, A. D.; Kicklighter, David W.; Moore, Berrien, III; Vorosmarty, Charles J.; Schloss, Annette L.

    1993-01-01

    A process-based model was used to estimate global patterns of net primary production and soil nitrogen cycling for contemporary climate conditions and current atmospheric CO2 concentration. Over half of the global annual net primary production was estimated to occur in the tropics, with most of the production attributable to tropical evergreen forest. The effects of CO2 doubling and associated climate changes were also explored. The responses in tropical and dry temperate ecosystems were dominated by CO2, but those in northern and moist temperate ecosystems reflected the effects of temperature on nitrogen availability.

  12. Primary production of the cryptoendolithic microbiota from the Antarctic Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Primary production in the Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbiota can be determined from biomass and photosynthetic 14CO2 incorporation measurements. Even though good nanoclimate data are available, it is difficult to determine the amount of time when abiotic conditions permit metabolism. Making appropriate assumptions concerning the metabolism of the cryptoendolithic microbiota during periods of warmth, light and moisture, the primary production of the biota was calculated to be on the order of 0.108 to 4.41 mgC/m2/yr, with a carbon turnover time from 576 to 23,520 years. These production values are the lowest found on planet Earth.

  13. Benthic primary production in the Columbia River Estuary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, C.D.; Amspoker, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The general objective of the research associated with the Benthic Primary Production Work Unit of Columbia River Estuary Development Program was to determine mechanisms that control the production dynamics and species composition of benthic plant assemblages in the Columbia River Estuary. In particular, the work was concerned with effects of selected physical variables on structural and functional attributes of micro- and macro- vegetation, and on the productivity and biomass of benthic autotrophs on the tidal flats of the estuary.

  14. How sequestration cuts affect primary care physicians and graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Bindiya; Coffin, Janis

    2013-01-01

    On April 1, 2013, sequestration cuts went into effect impacting Medicare physician payments, graduate medical education, and many other healthcare agencies. The cuts range from 2% to 5%, affecting various departments and organizations. There is already a shortage of primary care physicians in general, not including rural or underserved areas, with limited grants for advanced training. The sequestration cuts negatively impact the future of many primary care physicians and hinder the care many Americans will receive over time. PMID:24044191

  15. Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production - Can Earth Keep Up?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Earth's vegetation or net primary production required to support human activities is powerful measure of aggregate human impacts on the biosphere. Biophysical models applied to consumption statistics were used to estimate the annual amount of net primary production in the form of elemental carbon required for food, fibre, and fuel-wood by the global population. The calculations were then compared to satellite-based estimates of Earth's average net primary production to produce a geographically explicit balance sheet of net primary production "supply" and "demand". Humans consume 20% of Earth's net primary production (11.5 petagrams carbon) annually and this percentage varies regionally from 6% (South America) to over 70% (Europe and Asia), and locally from near 0% (central Australia) to over 30,000% (New York City, USA). The uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations are vulnerable to climate change and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of NPP demand.

  16. Nuclide production by primary cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in the solar system and in interstellar space were calculated for the primary protons in the galactic and solar cosmic rays. At 1 AU, the long-term average fluxes of solar protons usually produce many more atoms of a cosmogenic nuclide than the primary protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the exceptions being nuclides made only by high-energy reactions (like /sup 10/Be). Because the particle fluxes inside meteorites and other large objects in space include many secondary neutrons, the production rates are much higher and ratios inside large objects are often very different from those by just the primary GCR protons in small objects. The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are calculated to vary by about factors of 2.5 during at typical 11-year solar cycle, in agreement with measurements of short-lived radionuclides in recently fallen meteorites. The production of cosmogenic nuclides by the GCR particles outside the heliosphere is higher than that by the modulated GCR primaries normally in the solar system. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the fluxes of interstellar protons and, therefore, in the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in interstellar space. Production rates and ratios for cosmogenic nuclides would be able to identify particles that were small in space or that were exposed to an unmodulated spectrum of GCR particles. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Extreme events in gross primary production: a characterization across continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zscheischler, J.; Reichstein, M.; Harmeling, S.; Rammig, A.; Tomelleri, E.; Mahecha, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Climate extremes can affect the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, for instance via a reduction of the photosynthetic capacity or alterations of respiratory processes. Yet the dominant regional and seasonal effects of hydrometeorological extremes are still not well documented and in the focus of this paper. Specifically, we quantify and characterize the role of large spatiotemporal extreme events in gross primary production (GPP) as triggers of continental anomalies. We also investigate seasonal dynamics of extreme impacts on continental GPP anomalies. We find that the 50 largest positive extremes (i.e., statistically unusual increases in carbon uptake rates) and negative extremes (i.e., statistically unusual decreases in carbon uptake rates) on each continent can explain most of the continental variation in GPP, which is in line with previous results obtained at the global scale. We show that negative extremes are larger than positive ones and demonstrate that this asymmetry is particularly strong in South America and Europe. Our analysis indicates that the overall impacts and the spatial extents of GPP extremes are power-law distributed with exponents that vary little across continents. Moreover, we show that on all continents and for all data sets the spatial extents play a more important role for the overall impact of GPP extremes compared to the durations or maximal GPP. An analysis of possible causes across continents indicates that most negative extremes in GPP can be attributed clearly to water scarcity, whereas extreme temperatures play a secondary role. However, for Europe, South America and Oceania we also identify fire as an important driver. Our findings are consistent with remote sensing products. An independent validation against a literature survey on specific extreme events supports our results to a large extent.

  18. Extreme events in gross primary production: a characterization across continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zscheischler, J.; Mahecha, M. D.; Harmeling, S.; Rammig, A.; Tomelleri, E.; Reichstein, M.

    2014-01-01

    Climate extremes can affect the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, for instance via a reduction of the photosynthetic capacity or alterations of respiratory processes. Yet the dominant regional and seasonal effects of hydrometeorological extremes are still not well documented. Here we quantify and characterize the role of large spatiotemporal extreme events in gross primary production (GPP) as triggers of continental anomalies. We also investigate seasonal dynamics of extreme impacts on continental GPP anomalies. We find that the 50 largest positive (increase in uptake) and negative extremes (decrease in uptake) on each continent can explain most of the continental variation in GPP, which is in line with previous results obtained at the global scale. We show that negative extremes are larger than positive ones and demonstrate that this asymmetry is particularly strong in South America and Europe. Most extremes in GPP start in early summer. Our analysis indicates that the overall impacts and the spatial extents of GPP extremes are power law distributed with exponents that vary little across continents. Moreover, we show that on all continents and for all data sets the spatial extents play a more important role than durations or maximal GPP anomaly when it comes to the overall impact of GPP extremes. An analysis of possible causes implies that across continents most extremes in GPP can best be explained by water scarcity rather than by extreme temperatures. However, for Europe, South America and Oceania we identify also fire as an important driver. Our findings are consistent with remote sensing products. An independent validation against a literature survey on specific extreme events supports our results to a large extent.

  19. Metabolic differences in temperamental Brahman cattle can affect productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many factors may adversely affect the growth and productivity of livestock. These include stressors associated with management practices, such as weaning, handling relative to transportation, and vaccination, that can modulate growth through the production of stress-related hormones (i.e., cortisol,...

  20. Behavioral factors affecting exposure potential for household cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, D C; Small, M J; Davidson, C I; Fischhoff, B

    1997-01-01

    Behavioral experiments were performed on 342 subjects to determine whether behavior, which could affect the level of personal exposure, is exhibited in response to odors and labels which are commonly used for household chemicals. Potential for exposure was assessed by having subjects perform cleaning tasks presented as a product preference test, and noting the amount of cleaning product used, the time taken to complete the cleaning task, the product preference, and the exhibition of avoidance behavior. Product odor was found to affect product preference in the study with the pleasant odored product being preferred to the neutral and unpleasant products. Product odor was also found to influence the amount of product used; less of the odored products was used compared to the neutral product. The experiment also found that very few of the subjects in the study read the product labels, precluding analysis of the effect of such labels on product use. A postexperiment questionnaire on household cleaning product purchasing and use was administered to participants. The results indicate that significant gender differences exist. Women in the sample reported more frequent purchase and use of cleaning products resulting in an estimated potential exposure 40% greater than for the men in the sample. This finding is somewhat countered by the fact that women more frequently reported exposure avoidance behavior, such as using gloves. Additional significant gender differences were found in the stated importance of product qualities, such as odor and environmental quality. This study suggests the need for further research, in a more realistic use setting, on the impact of public education, labels, and product odor on preference, use, and exposure for different types of consumer products. PMID:9306234

  1. Primary production control of methane emission from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, G. J.; Chanton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands extending from subarctic peatlands to subtropical marshes, a positive correlation between CH4 emission and net ecosystem production is reported. It is suggested that net ecosystem production is a master variable integrating many factors which control CH4 emission in vegetated wetlands. It is found that about 3 percent of the daily net ecosystem production is emitted back to the atmosphere as CH4. With projected stimulation of primary production and soil microbial activity in wetlands associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the potential for increasing CH4 emission from inundated wetlands, further enhancing the greenhouse effect, is examined.

  2. Opinions of Primary School Science and Technology Teachers about Developing Students' Affective Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eristi, Bahadir; Tunca, Nihal

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the primary school secondary level science and technology teachers' opinions about developing students' affective competence. It was designed as a case study with qualitative research method. The participants of the study consisted of 19 science and technology teachers with at least five years of experience,…

  3. An Investigation of Factors Affecting the Use of Educational Technology in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazu, Ibrahim Yasar

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the related factors that affect the usage of educational technology in primary schools. This study depends on literature analysis and the questionnaire to collect data. Specifically, the items employed in this study were derived from the teachers' and school administrators' perceptions of using…

  4. Activation of Inaccurate Prior Knowledge Affects Primary-School Students' Metacognitive Judgments and Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Loon, Mariette H.; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; van Gog, Tamara; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated whether activation of inaccurate prior knowledge before study contributes to primary-school children's commission errors and overconfidence in these errors when learning new concepts. Findings indicate that inaccurate prior knowledge affects children's learning and calibration. The level of children's judgments of learning…

  5. Evaluation of primary production in Lake Erie by multiple proxies.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Carrick, Hunter J; Twiss, Michael R; Piwinski, Leah

    2005-06-01

    Direct measurements of rates of primary production in Lake Erie are few and uncertainties surround rate measurements based on radiocarbon and the light-dark bottle incubation methods. For these reasons, we conducted a series of simultaneous primary productivity measurements in Lake Erie in July and August of 2003, based on incubation with [14C]-NaHCO3, the light-dark bottle method, and incubation with (18)O enriched water. Significant differences in the rates of primary production obtained by incubations with [(18)O]-H2O (0.19-34.60 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1)), [14C]-NaHCO3 (0.03-90.50 mmol-C m(-3) h(-1)), and light-dark bottles (0.06-60.78 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1)) were evident in six out of nine comparisons. Within the epilimnion, [(18)O]-H2O rates of primary production were significantly different from rates based on [14C]-NaHCO3 and light-dark bottles in all four comparisons and lower rates were obtained in three out of four comparisons. Eutrophic conditions in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie were evident from the high primary production rates of 20.50-34.60 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1) ([(18)O]-H2O), 34.39-90.50 mmol-C m(-3) h(-1) ([14C]-NaHCO3), and 46.66-60.78 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1) (light-dark bottle). The photosynthetic quotient (PQ), or ratio of O2 production to CO2 consumption during photosynthesis, averaged 0.64+/-0.33 and 1.93+/-1.93, respectively, based on a comparison of [(18)O]-H2O to [14C]-NaHCO3 rates or light-dark bottle to [14C]-NaHCO3 production rates, respectively, demonstrating that photosynthesis in Lake Erie communities primarily follows expected stochiometric trends. The average of the ratio of production rates based on incubation with [(18)O]-H2O relative to those obtained by the light-dark incubation method was 0.66+/-0.33, indicating a tendency for the [(18)O]-H2O method to provide slightly lower estimates of production in Lake Erie. Lower estimates of primary production based on [(18)O]-H2O incubation relative to the other two approaches is most likely a consequence

  6. Decadal Changes in Global Ocean Annual Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson; Conkright, Margarita E.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Ginoux, Paul; Casey, Nancy W.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) has produced the first multi-year time series of global ocean chlorophyll observations since the demise of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) in 1986. Global observations from 1997-present from SeaWiFS combined with observations from 1979-1986 from the CZCS should in principle provide an opportunity to observe decadal changes in global ocean annual primary production, since chlorophyll is the primary driver for estimates of primary production. However, incompatibilities between algorithms have so far precluded quantitative analysis. We have developed and applied compatible processing methods for the CZCS, using modern advances in atmospheric correction and consistent bio-optical algorithms to advance the CZCS archive to comparable quality with SeaWiFS. We applied blending methodologies, where in situ data observations are incorporated into the CZCS and SeaWiFS data records, to provide improvement of the residuals. These re-analyzed, blended data records provide maximum compatibility and permit, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of the changes in global ocean primary production in the early-to-mid 1980's and the present, using synoptic satellite observations. An intercomparison of the global and regional primary production from these blended satellite observations is important to understand global climate change and the effects on ocean biota. Photosynthesis by chlorophyll-containing phytoplankton is responsible for biotic uptake of carbon in the oceans and potentially ultimately from the atmosphere. Global ocean annual primary decreased from the CZCS record to SeaWiFS, by nearly 6% from the early 1980s to the present. Annual primary production in the high latitudes was responsible for most of the decadal change. Conversely, primary production in the low latitudes generally increased, with the exception of the tropical Pacific. The differences and similarities of the two data records provide evidence

  7. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS OF NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have estimated the potential effects of greenhouse gas-induced climate change on various systems using outputs of general circulation models (GCMs). he purpose of this study was to generate comparable estimates of potential impacts on net primary production using ...

  8. STUDIES OF CIRCULATION AND PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN DEEP INLET ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to investigate various aspects of circulation dynamics and primary production in a deep inlet environment. Throughout the course of the research, special attention has been give...

  9. Quantifying Annual Aboveground Net Primary Production in the Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a larger project, methods were developed to quantify current year growth on grasses, forbs, and shrubs. Annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) data are needed for this project to calibrate results from computer simulation models and remote-sensing data. Measuring annual ANPP of ...

  10. Chapter 12. Net primary production in the shortgrass steppe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net primary production (NPP), the amount of carbon or energy fixed by green plants in excess of their respiratory needs, is the fundamental quantity upon which all heterotrophs and the ecosystem processes they are associated with depend. Understanding NPP is therefore a prerequisite to understanding...

  11. Deep-sea primary production at the Galapagos hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, D.M.; Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1980-03-21

    Dense animal populations surrounding recently discovered hydrothermal vents at the Galapagos Rift sea-floor spreading center, 2550 meters deep, are probably sustained by microbial primary production. Energy in the form of geothermically reduced sulfur compounds emitted from the vents is liberated during oxidation and used for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic matter by chemosynthetic bacteria.

  12. Relations between affective music and speech: evidence from dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoluan; Xu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study compares affective piano performance with speech production from the perspective of dynamics: unlike previous research, this study uses finger force and articulatory effort as indexes reflecting the dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production respectively. Moreover, for the first time physical constraints such as piano fingerings and speech articulatory constraints are included due to their potential contribution to different patterns of dynamics. A piano performance experiment and speech production experiment were conducted in four emotions: anger, fear, happiness and sadness. The results show that in both piano performance and speech production, anger and happiness generally have high dynamics while sadness has the lowest dynamics. Fingerings interact with fear in the piano experiment and articulatory constraints interact with anger in the speech experiment, i.e., large physical constraints produce significantly higher dynamics than small physical constraints in piano performance under the condition of fear and in speech production under the condition of anger. Using production experiments, this study firstly supports previous perception studies on relations between affective music and speech. Moreover, this is the first study to show quantitative evidence for the importance of considering motor aspects such as dynamics in comparing music performance and speech production in which motor mechanisms play a crucial role. PMID:26217252

  13. Relations between affective music and speech: evidence from dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoluan; Xu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study compares affective piano performance with speech production from the perspective of dynamics: unlike previous research, this study uses finger force and articulatory effort as indexes reflecting the dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production respectively. Moreover, for the first time physical constraints such as piano fingerings and speech articulatory constraints are included due to their potential contribution to different patterns of dynamics. A piano performance experiment and speech production experiment were conducted in four emotions: anger, fear, happiness and sadness. The results show that in both piano performance and speech production, anger and happiness generally have high dynamics while sadness has the lowest dynamics. Fingerings interact with fear in the piano experiment and articulatory constraints interact with anger in the speech experiment, i.e., large physical constraints produce significantly higher dynamics than small physical constraints in piano performance under the condition of fear and in speech production under the condition of anger. Using production experiments, this study firstly supports previous perception studies on relations between affective music and speech. Moreover, this is the first study to show quantitative evidence for the importance of considering motor aspects such as dynamics in comparing music performance and speech production in which motor mechanisms play a crucial role. PMID:26217252

  14. Estimation of primary dendrite arm spacings in continuous casting products

    SciTech Connect

    Cicutti, C.; Bilmes, P.; Boeri, R.

    1997-09-01

    The proportion of steels produced by continuous casting has grown drastically during the last two decades, increasing to such an extent that in some countries, several grades of steel are exclusively made by this process. Many investigations recognized the significant influence of the solidification structure on the quality of cast products, and pointed out the importance of the development of appropriate tools to predict the microstructure as a function of thermal and physical parameters. The estimation of secondary dendrite arm spacings in continuously cast steel products has received some attention. However, very little effort has been focused on the prediction of primary dendrite arm spacings, to the best of the authors` knowledge. The main objective of this study is to develop simple expressions to estimate the variation of primary dendrite arm spacings through the section of continuous casting steel products.

  15. Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

    1981-02-01

    At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

  16. Evaluating North American net primary productivity with satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Dye, Dennis G.

    An ecological model is developed to estimate annual net primary productivity in twelve North American biomes. Existing models were combined which together address canopy photosynthesis in response to light, temperature, and moisture availability, and account for respiration. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the NOAA-7 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor provided estimates of canopy-intercepted photosynthetically active radiation for the twelve-month study period. Estimates of NPP generated from the model compare favorably with figures reported in the literature. However the model estimates are, in general, less than reported figures, suggesting the possibility of systematic error in the model. Difficulties confronted in specifying certain model parameters are discussed as possible sources of error. The results of this study suggest the promise of remotely sensed measurements for macroscale evaluation and modeling of primary productivity.

  17. Satellites for the study of ocean primary productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.; Baker, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques for obtaining estimates of global marine primary productivity is examined. It is shown that remote sensing and multiplatform (ship, aircraft, and satellite) sampling strategies can be used to significantly lower the variance in estimates of phytoplankton abundance and of population growth rates from the values obtained using the C-14 method. It is noted that multiplatform sampling strategies are essential to assess the mean and variance of phytoplankton biomass on a regional or on a global basis. The relative errors associated with shipboard and satellite estimates of phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity, as well as the increased statistical accuracy possible from the utilization of contemporaneous data from both sampling platforms, are examined. It is shown to be possible to follow changes in biomass and the distribution patterns of biomass as a function of time with the use of satellite imagery.

  18. The remote sensing of oceanic primary productivity - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    The ocean is a major sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This paper assesses the correctness of the present estimates of the marine primary productivity, obtained by remote sensing techniques, by modeling the physiological mechanisms of carbon assimilation by phytoplankton. The model uses, as the input, measurements of the ocean-surface pigments and data on the incident solar irradiance, and incorporates a description of the photosynthetically available and usable irradiance in the ocean, to describe the light field required for photosynthesis. A comparison of measured and estimated values of the water-column integrated primary marine productivity over large ocean regions yielded favorable results. These estimates do not appear to depend on regional or seasonal factors.

  19. Do non-native plant species affect the shape of productivity-diversity relationships?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, J.M.; Cleland, E.E.; Horner-Devine, M. C.; Fleishman, E.; Bowles, C.; Smith, M.D.; Carney, K.; Emery, S.; Gramling, J.; Vandermast, D.B.; Grace, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between ecosystem processes and species richness is an active area of research and speculation. Both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted in numerous ecosystems. One finding of these studies is that the shape of the relationship between productivity and species richness varies considerably among ecosystems and at different spatial scales, though little is known about the relative importance of physical and biological mechanisms causing this variation. Moreover, despite widespread concern about changes in species' global distributions, it remains unclear if and how such large-scale changes may affect this relationship. We present a new conceptual model of how invasive species might modulate relationships between primary production and species richness. We tested this model using long-term data on relationships between aboveground net primary production and species richness in six North American terrestrial ecosystems. We show that primary production and abundance of non-native species are both significant predictors of species richness, though we fail to detect effects of invasion extent on the shapes of the relationship between species richness and primary production.

  20. Productivity of aquatic primary producers under global climate change.

    PubMed

    Häder, Donat-P; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2014-10-01

    The productivity of aquatic primary producers depends on a number of biotic and abiotic factors, such as pH, CO2 concentration, temperature, nutrient availability, solar UV and PAR irradiances, mixing frequency as well as herbivore pressure and the presence of viruses, among others. The effects of these factors, within a climate change context, may be additive, synergistic or antagonistic. Since some of them, e.g. solar radiation and temperature, vary along a latitudinal gradient, this perspective about the effects of global climate change on primary producers will consider ecosystems individually, separated into polar (Arctic and Antarctic), temperate and tropical waters. As coastal waters are characterized by lower light penetration and higher DOM and nutrient concentrations, they are considered in a separate section. Freshwater systems are also governed by different conditions and therefore also treated in their own section. Overall, we show that although there are general common trends of changes in variables associated with global change (e.g. the impact of UVR on photosynthesis tends to decrease with increasing temperature and nutrient input), the responses of aquatic primary producers have great variability in the different ecosystems across latitudes. This is mainly due to direct or indirect effects associated with physico-chemical changes that occur within water bodies. Therefore we stress the need for regional predictions on the responses of primary producers to climate change as it is not warranted to extrapolate from one system to another. PMID:25191675

  1. A multi-sites analysis on the ozone effects on Gross Primary Production of European forests.

    PubMed

    Proietti, C; Anav, A; De Marco, A; Sicard, P; Vitale, M

    2016-06-15

    Ozone (O3) is both a greenhouse gas and a secondary air pollutant causing adverse impacts on forests ecosystems at different scales, from cellular to ecosystem level. Specifically, the phytotoxic nature of O3 can impair CO2 assimilation that, in turn affects forest productivity. This study aims to evaluate the effects of tropospheric O3 on Gross Primary Production (GPP) at 37 European forest sites during the time period 2000-2010. Due to the lack of carbon assimilation data at O3 monitoring stations (and vice-versa) this study makes a first attempt to combine high resolution MODIS Gross Primary Production (GPP) estimates and O3 measurement data. Partial Correlations, Anomalies Analysis and the Random Forests Analysis (RFA) were used to quantify the effects of tropospheric O3 concentration and its uptake on GPP and to evaluate the most important factors affecting inter-annual GPP changes. Our results showed, along a North-West/South-East European transect, a negative impact of O3 on GPP ranging from 0.4% to 30%, although a key role of meteorological parameters respect to pollutant variables in affecting GPP was found. In particular, meteorological parameters, namely air temperature (T), soil water content (SWC) and relative humidity (RH) are the most important predictors at 81% of test sites. Moreover, it is interesting to highlight a key role of SWC in the Mediterranean areas (Spanish, Italian and French test sites) confirming that, soil moisture and soil water availability affect vegetation growth and photosynthesis especially in arid or semi-arid ecosystems such as the Mediterranean climate regions. Considering the pivotal role of GPP in the global carbon balance and the O3 ability to reduce primary productivity of the forests, this study can help in assessing the O3 impacts on ecosystem services, including wood production and carbon sequestration. PMID:26971205

  2. Global net primary production and heterotrophic respiration for 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.E. Jr.; Piper, S.C.; Nemani, R. |

    1995-06-01

    An ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, was parameterized and used to simulate the actual net primary production and heterotrophic respiration using daily climatic data, land cover type, leaf area index gridded to 1{degree} latitude by 1{degree} longitude grid cells for the year 1987. Global net primary production was 52 Pg C. These estimates were validated directly by two different methods. First, the grid cells were aggregated and used as inputs to a 3D atmospheric transport model, to compare CO{sub 2} station data with predictions. We simulated the intra-annual variation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} well for the northern hemisphere, but not for the southern hemisphere. Second, we calculated the net {sup 13}C uptake of vegetation, which is a function of water use efficiency. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios agreed with measured data, indicating a strong limitation of global primary processes by the hydrologic cycle, especially precipitation. These are different from other global carbon models as we can simulate the year-to-year variation of climate, including El Nino, on the global carbon cycle.

  3. Ocean color observations of phytoplankton distributions and primary productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, W.

    1988-01-01

    The primary goal of this activity is to develop the means to assess the mean and variability of phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity on global scales. There are three major approaches whose goals are to provide global scale observations. These are processing and analysis of the complete CZCS data set in a consistent manner; preparing science mission and project implementation plans for the SeaWiFS sensor to be launched on LANDSAT 6 in 1991; and providing guidance to EOS flight projects for ocean color observations using the MODIS sensor planned for the Polar Platform in the mid 1990's. This processing presents the first consistent view of phytoplankton pigments on global scales, and analysis of this temporally undersampled data set is proving very instructive in specifying mission requirements for SeaWiFS and future algorithm development.

  4. How does burnout affect physician productivity? A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interest in the well-being of physicians has increased because of their contributions to the healthcare system quality. There is growing recognition that physicians are exposed to workplace factors that increase the risk of work stress. Long-term exposure to high work stress can result in burnout. Reports from around the world suggest that about one-third to one-half of physicians experience burnout. Understanding the outcomes associated with burnout is critical to understanding its affects on the healthcare system. Productivity outcomes are among those that could have the most immediate effects on the healthcare system. This systematic literature review is one of the first to explore the evidence for the types of physician productivity outcomes associated with physician burnout. It answers the question, “How does burnout affect physician productivity?” Methods A systematic search was performed of: Medline Current, Medline in process, PsycInfo, Embase and Web of Science. The search period covered 2002 to 2012. The searches identified articles about practicing physicians working in civilian settings. Articles that primarily looked only at residents or medical students were excluded. Productivity was captured by hours worked, patients seen, sick leave, leaving the profession, retirement, workload and presenteeism. Studies also were excluded if: (1) the study sample was not comprised of at least 50% physicians, (2) the study did not examine the relationship between burnout and productivity or (3) a validated measure of burnout was not used. Results The search identified 870 unique citations; 5 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. This review indicates that globally there is recognition of the potential impact of physician burnout on productivity. Productivity was examined using: number of sick leave days, work ability, intent to either continue practicing or change jobs. The majority of the studies indicate there is a negative relationship between

  5. Transpiration affects soil CO2 production in a dry grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, János; Fóti, Szilvia; Pintér, Krisztina; Burri, Susanne; Eugster, Werner; Papp, Marianna; Nagy, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Although soil CO2 efflux can be highly variable on the diel time scale, it is often measured during daytime only. However, to get a full understanding of soil CO2 efflux and its impact on carbon cycle processes, looking at diurnal processes is crucial. Therefore, our aim was to investigate how diel variation in soil CO2 efflux from a dry, sandy grassland in Hungary depends on variations in potential drivers, such as gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). In order to reach this goal, we combined measurements of CO2 and H2O fluxes by eddy covariance, soil chambers and soil CO2 gradient system. Surface CO2 fluxes were partitioned into the three CO2 production components originating from the three soil layers to clarify the timing and the source of the CO2 within the top 50 cm of the soil. CO2 production rates during the growing season were higher during nighttime than during daytime. This diel course was not only driven by soil temperature and soil moisture, but also by ET. This was shown by changes of ET causing a hysteresis loop in the diel response of CO2 production to soil temperature. CO2 production was coupled to soil temperature at night and during midday (12-14 h), when ET remained relatively constant. However, when ET was changing over time, CO2 production was decoupled from soil temperature. In order to disentangle these effects, we carried out time-lag analyses between CO2 production and efflux residuals after having subtracted the main effects of soil temperature and soil water content from measured CO2 fluxes. The results showed a strong negative correlation between ET rates and residuals of soil CO2 production, and a less strong, but still significantly time-lagged positive correlation between GPP and residuals of soil CO2 production. Thus, we could show that there is a rapid negative response of soil CO2 production rates to transpiration (suggesting CO2 transport in the xylem stream) and a delayed positive response to GPP

  6. Global impact of tropical cyclones on primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menkes, Christophe E.; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Lévy, Marina; Ethé, Christian; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier; Vincent, Emmanuel; Vialard, Jérôme; Jullien, Swen

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we explore the global responses of surface temperature, chlorophyll, and primary production to tropical cyclones (TCs). Those ocean responses are first characterized from the statistical analysis of satellite data under ~1000 TCs over the 1998-2007 period. Besides the cold wake, the vast majority of TCs induce a weak chlorophyll response, with only ~10% of induced blooms exceeding 0.1 mg m-3. The largest chlorophyll responses mostly occur within coastal regions, in contrast to the strongest cold wakes that generally occur farther offshore. To understand this decoupling, we analyze a coupled dynamical-biogeochemical oceanic simulation forced by realistic wind vortices applied along observed TC tracks. The simulation displays a realistic spatial structure of TC-induced blooms and its observed decoupling with TC cold wakes. In regions of strong TC energy input, the strongest cold wakes occur in regions of shallow thermocline (<60 m) and the strongest blooms in regions of shallow nitracline and/or subsurface chlorophyll maximum (<60 m). Shallow thermoclines are found over many open ocean regions, while regions of shallow nitracline and/or subsurface chlorophyll maximum are most prominent in near-coastal areas, explaining the spatial decoupling between the cold and bloom wakes. The overall TC contribution to annual primary production is weak and amounts to ~1%, except in a few limited areas (east Eurasian coast, South tropical Indian Ocean, Northern Australian coast, and Eastern Pacific Ocean in the TC-prone region) where it can locally reach up to 20-30%. Nearly 80% of this TC-induced annual primary production is the result of the biogeochemical response to the 30% strongest TCs.

  7. Evaluating North American net primary productivity with satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Dye, Dennis G.

    1987-01-01

    An ecological model is developed to estimate annual net primary productivity (NPP) in 12 North American biomes. The model combines existing models which address canopy photosynthesis in response to light, temperature, and moisture availability, and account for respiration. Climate data, solar radiation data, and spectral vegetation index data are utilized. Estimates of NPP from the model compare well with data in the literature, but a systematic error is suspected. Difficulties encountered in specifying certain model parameters are discussed as possible sources of this error. The results of this study suggest the promise of remotely sensed measurements for macroscale evaluation and modeling of NPP.

  8. Light-enhanced primary marine aerosol production from biologically productive seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. S.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2014-04-01

    Physical and biogeochemical processes in seawater controlling primary marine aerosol (PMA) production and composition are poorly understood and associated with large uncertainties in estimated fluxes into the atmosphere. PMA production was investigated in the biologically productive NE Pacific Ocean and in biologically productive and oligotrophic regions of the NW Atlantic Ocean. Physicochemical properties of model PMA, produced by aeration of fresh seawater under controlled conditions, were quantified. Diel variability in model PMA mass and number fluxes was observed in biologically productive waters, increasing following sunrise and decreasing to predawn levels overnight. Such variability was not seen in oligotrophic waters. During daytime, surfactant scavenging by aeration in the aerosol generator without replenishing the seawater in the reservoir reduced the model PMA production in productive waters to nighttime levels but had no influence on production from oligotrophic waters. Results suggest bubble plume interactions with sunlight-mediated biogenic surfactants in productive seawater significantly enhanced model PMA production.

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei induces IL-23 production in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kulsantiwong, Panthong; Pudla, Matsayapan; Boondit, Jitrada; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Dunachie, Susanna J; Chantratita, Narisara; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a gram-negative intracellular bacterium, is a causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium has been shown to induce the innate immune response, particularly pro-inflammatory cytokine production in several of both mouse and human cell types. In the present study, we investigate host immune response in B. pseudomallei-infected primary human monocytes. We discover that wild-type B. pseudomallei is able to survive and multiply inside the primary human monocytes. In contrast, B. pseudomallei LPS mutant, a less virulent strain, is susceptible to host killing during bacterial infection. Moreover, microarray result showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei but not B. pseudomallei LPS mutant is able to activate gene expression of IL-23 as demonstrated by the up-regulation of p19 and p40 subunit expression. Consistent with gene expression analysis, the secretion of IL-23 analyzed by ELISA also showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei induces a significantly higher level of IL-23 secretion than that of B. pseudomallei LPS mutant. These results implied that IL-23 may be an important cytokine for the innate immune response during B. pseudomallei infection. The regulation of IL-23 production may drive the different host innate immune responses between patients and may relate to the severity of melioidosis. PMID:26563410

  10. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for production of biologics. 113.51 Section 113.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from normal... of Production, each batch of primary cells used to prepare a biological product shall be tested...

  11. Aspergillus oryzae nrtA affects kojic acid production.

    PubMed

    Sano, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed the role of the nitrate transporter-encoding gene (nrtA) of Aspergillus oryzae by gene disruption. Southern hybridization analysis indicated that homologous recombination occurred at the resident nrtA locus. Real-time PCR showed that the nrtA gene was strongly inducible by NaNO3. The nrtA disruptant did not exhibit normal growth when nitrate was available as the sole nitrogen source. These results indicate that NrtA is essential for nitrate uptake in A. oryzae. Kojic acid (KA) production was inhibited by the addition of a small amount of sodium nitrate. The nrtA-disrupted strain was deficient in the uptake of nitrate. As a result, KA production in this strain was not considerably affected by the presence of nitrate. PMID:27108780

  12. How Are Assistant Heads Affecting Primary School Management and How Do Their Opinions, Attitudes and Beliefs Affect Their Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Keith

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of assistant heads onto the landscape of primary school leadership. Through the use of job descriptions, questionnaires, interviews and a case study, the functions that assistant heads are performing in primary schools is examined and their opinions, attitudes and beliefs about their work are considered. The…

  13. Phonological overlap affects lexical selection during sentence production.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, T Florian; Furth, Katrina; Hilliard, Caitlin

    2012-09-01

    Theories of lexical production differ in whether they allow phonological processes to affect lexical selection directly. Whereas some accounts, such as interactive activation accounts, predict (weak) early effects of phonological processes during lexical selection via feedback connections, strictly serial architectures do not make this prediction. We present evidence from lexical selection during unscripted sentence production that lexical selection is affected by the phonological form of recently produced words. In a video description experiment, participants described scenes that were compatible with several near-meaning-equivalent verbs. We found that speakers were less likely than expected by chance to select a verb form that would result in phonological onset overlap with the subject of the sentence. Additional evidence from the distribution of disfluencies immediately preceding the verb argues that this effect is due to early effects on lexical selection, rather than later corrective processes, such as self-monitoring. Taken together, these findings support accounts that allow early feedback from phonological processes to word-level nodes, even during lexical selection. PMID:22468803

  14. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of

  15. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Foster, S.Q.; Kleckner, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land – estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m−2 yr−1, but the range is large: from −105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m−2 yr−1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148

  16. Mechanisms behind primary production distribution during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mézo, Priscilla; Kageyama, Masa; Bopp, Laurent; Beaufort, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructions of past climates are possible through the analysis of organisms contained in marine and terrestrial sediments. Most of the paleorecords depend on biological processes, e.g. production of shells for coccolithophorids in the ocean, and these processes are sensitive to climate fluctuations from seasonal to orbital timescales. Consequently, depending on where and when the organisms that record climate conditions lived in the past, different factors may have influenced their abundance, their functioning, and thus it may bias interpretations of paleodata. In this context, it is necessary to evaluate the response of paleorecorders to climate variability at different timescales. In order to do so, we are using the coupled Earth System Model IPSLCM5A, which has a biogeochemical component PISCES that simulates primary production. We use 9 climate simulations of the IPSL-CM5A model, from -80kyr BP climate conditions to a preindustrial state. Thanks to different forcing conditions of these simulations we are able to disentangle the effects of precession changes from those of obliquity, sea level or gases concentrations. The objectives are to characterize the mechanisms behind the observed changes in primary production between the different time periods. The results of this modeling study will also be compared to reconstructed productions in the Indian, West and East Tropical Pacific Oceans obtained from core sediments with the method described in Beaufort et al. 1997. The early results on seasonal cycles show that, in the Indian Ocean, precession is not the main driver of changes in primary production. Indeed, we observe a grouping between simulations having the same sea level, which suggests that changes in primary production are more sensitive to parameters that define glacial-interglacial conditions such as ice sheets which affect oceanic circulation.

  17. Changes in Net Primary Production over Korea and Climate Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, C.; Hong, J.; Lee, M.; Baek, G.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variabilities of NPP(Net Primary Production) retrieved from two satellite instruments, AVHRR(Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, 1981-2000) and MODIS(MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, 2000-2006), were investigated. The range of mean NPP from AVHRR and MODIS were estimated to be 894-1068 g C/m2/yr and 610-694.90 g C/m2/yr, respectively. The discrepancy of NPP between the two instruments is about 325 g C/m2/yr, and MODIS product is generally closer to the ground measurement than AVHRR despite the limitation in direct comparison such as spatial resolution and vegetation classification. The higher NPP values over South Korea are related to the regions with higher biomass (e.g., mountains) and higher annual temperature. The interannual NPP trends from the two satellite products were computed, and both mean annual trends show continuous NPP increase; 41 g C/m2/yr from AVHRR (1981-2000) and 36 g C/m2/yr from MODIS (2000-2006) over South Korea. Specifically, the higher increasing trends over the Southwestern region are likely due to the increasing productivity of crop fields from sufficient irrigation and fertilizer use. The retrieved NPP shows a closer relationship between monthly temperature and precipitation, which results in maximum correlation during summer monsoons. The difference in the detection wavelength and model schemes during the retrieval can make a significant difference in the satellite products, and a better accuracy in the meterological and land use data and modeling applications will be necessary to improve the satellite-based NPP data.

  18. Efficiency of chlorophyll in gross primary productivity: A proof of concept and application in crops.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Viña, Andrés; Arkebauer, Timothy; Schepers, James S

    2016-08-20

    One of the main factors affecting vegetation productivity is absorbed light, which is largely governed by chlorophyll. In this paper, we introduce the concept of chlorophyll efficiency, representing the amount of gross primary production per unit of canopy chlorophyll content (Chl) and incident PAR. We analyzed chlorophyll efficiency in two contrasting crops (soybean and maize). Given that they have different photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4), leaf structures (dicot vs. monocot) and canopy architectures (a heliotrophic leaf angle distribution vs. a spherical leaf angle distribution), they cover a large spectrum of biophysical conditions. Our results show that chlorophyll efficiency in primary productivity is highly variable and responds to various physiological and phenological conditions, and water availability. Since Chl is accessible through non-destructive, remotely sensed techniques, the use of chlorophyll efficiency for modeling and monitoring plant optimization patterns is practical at different scales (e.g., leaf, canopy) and under widely-varying environmental conditions. Through this analysis, we directly related a functional characteristic, gross primary production with a structural characteristic, canopy chlorophyll content. Understanding the efficiency of the structural characteristic is of great interest as it allows explaining functional components of the plant system. PMID:27374843

  19. Annual primary production: Patterns and mechanisms of change in a nutrient-rich tidal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Cole, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    Although nutrient supply often underlies long-term changes in aquatic primary production, other regulatory processes can be important. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a complex of tidal waterways forming the landward portion of the San Francisco Estuary, has ample nutrient supplies, enabling us to examine alternate regulatory mechanisms over a 21-yr period. Delta-wide primary productivity was reconstructed from historical water quality data for 1975–1995. Annual primary production averaged 70 g C m−2, but it varied by over a factor of five among years. At least four processes contributed to this variability: (1) invasion of the clam Potamocorbula amurensis led to a persistent decrease in phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a) after 1986; (2) a long-term decline in total suspended solids—probably at least partly because of upstream dam construction—increased water transparency and phytoplankton growth rate; (3) river inflow, reflecting climate variability, affected biomass through fluctuations in flushing and growth rates through fluctuations in total suspended solids; and (4) an additional pathway manifesting as a long-term decline in winter phytoplankton biomass has been identified, but its genesis is uncertain. Overall, the Delta lost 43% in annual primary production during the period. Given the evidence for food limitation of primary consumers, these findings provide a partial explanation for widespread Delta species declines over the past few decades. Turbid nutrient-rich systems such as the Delta may be inherently more variable than other tidal systems because certain compensatory processes are absent. Comparisons among systems, however, can be tenuous because conclusions about the magnitude and mechanisms of variability are dependent on length of data record.  

  20. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  1. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  2. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  3. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  4. Interfacing primary heat sources and cycles for thermochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    Advantages cited for hydrogen production from water by coupling thermochemical cycles with primary heat include the possibility of high efficiencies. These can be realized only if the cycle approximates the criteria required to match the characteristics of the heat source. Different types of cycles may be necessary for fission reactors, for fusion reactors or for solar furnaces. Very high temperature processes based on decomposition of gaseous H/sub 2/O or CO/sub 2/ appear impractical even for projected solar technology. Cycles based on CdO decomposition are potentially quite efficient and require isothermal heat at temperatures that may be available from solar furnaces of fusion reactors. Sulfuric acid and solid sulfate cycles are potentially useful at temperatures available from each heat source. Solid sulfate cycles offer advantages for isothermal heat sources. All cycles under development include concentration and drying steps. Novel methods for improving such operations would be beneficial.

  5. Mindfulness Training in Primary Schools Decreases Negative Affect and Increases Meta-Cognition in Children

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Charlotte E.; Dorjee, Dusana

    2016-01-01

    Studies investigating the feasibility and impact of mindfulness programs on emotional well-being when delivered by school teachers in pre-adolescence are scarce. This study reports the findings of a controlled feasibility pilot which assessed acceptability and emotional well-being outcomes of an 8-week mindfulness program (Paws b) for children aged 7–9 years. The program was delivered by school teachers within a regular school curriculum. Emotional well-being was measured using self-report questionnaires at baseline, post-training and 3 months follow-up, and informant reports were collected at baseline and follow-up. Seventy one participants aged 7–9 years were recruited from three primary schools in the UK (training group n = 33; control group n = 38). Acceptability of the program was high with 76% of children in the training group reporting ‘liking’ practicing mindfulness at school, with a strong link to wanting to continue practicing mindfulness at school (p < 0.001). Self-report comparisons revealed that relative to controls, the training group showed significant decreases in negative affect at follow-up, with a large effect size (p = 0.010, d = 0.84). Teacher reports (but not parental ratings) of meta-cognition also showed significant improvements at follow-up with a large effect size (p = 0.002, d = 1.08). Additionally, significant negative correlations were found between changes in mindfulness and emotion regulation scores from baseline to post-training (p = 0.038) and baseline to follow-up (p = 0.033). Findings from this study provide initial evidence that the Paws b program in children aged 7–9 years (a) can be feasibly delivered by primary school teachers as part of the regular curriculum, (b) is acceptable to the majority of children, and (c) may significantly decrease negative affect and improve meta-cognition. PMID:26793145

  6. Aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the primary dentition affected by amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Marquezin, Maria Carolina Salomé; Zancopé, Bruna Raquel; Pacheco, Larissa Ferreira; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Pascon, Fernanda Miori

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case report was to describe the oral rehabilitation of a five-year-old boy patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the primary dentition. AI is a group of hereditary disorders that affects the enamel structure. The patient was brought to the dental clinic complaining of tooth hypersensitivity during meals. The medical history and clinical examination were used to arrive at the diagnosis of AI. The treatment was oral rehabilitation of the primary molars with stainless steel crowns and resin-filled celluloid forms. The main objectives of the selected treatment were to enhance the esthetics, restore masticatory function, and eliminate the teeth sensitivity. The child was monitored in the pediatric dentistry clinic at four-month intervals until the mixed dentition stage. Treatment not only restored function and esthetic, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life. The preventive, psychological, and curative measures of a young child with AI were successful. This result can encourage the clinicians to seek a cost-effective technique such as stainless steel crowns, and resin-filled celluloid forms to reestablish the oral functions and improve the child's psychosocial development. PMID:25705526

  7. Aesthetic and Functional Rehabilitation of the Primary Dentition Affected by Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Marquezin, Maria Carolina Salomé; Zancopé, Bruna Raquel; Pacheco, Larissa Ferreira; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Pascon, Fernanda Miori

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case report was to describe the oral rehabilitation of a five-year-old boy patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the primary dentition. AI is a group of hereditary disorders that affects the enamel structure. The patient was brought to the dental clinic complaining of tooth hypersensitivity during meals. The medical history and clinical examination were used to arrive at the diagnosis of AI. The treatment was oral rehabilitation of the primary molars with stainless steel crowns and resin-filled celluloid forms. The main objectives of the selected treatment were to enhance the esthetics, restore masticatory function, and eliminate the teeth sensitivity. The child was monitored in the pediatric dentistry clinic at four-month intervals until the mixed dentition stage. Treatment not only restored function and esthetic, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life. The preventive, psychological, and curative measures of a young child with AI were successful. This result can encourage the clinicians to seek a cost-effective technique such as stainless steel crowns, and resin-filled celluloid forms to reestablish the oral functions and improve the child's psychosocial development. PMID:25705526

  8. Primary productivity and its correlation with rainfall on Aldabra Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekeine, J.; Turnbull, L. A.; Cherubini, P.; de Jong, R.; Baxter, R.; Hansen, D.; Bunbury, N.; Fleischer-Dogley, F.; Schaepman-Strub, G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldabra Atoll, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1982, hosts the world's largest population of giant tortoises. In view of recent rainfall declines in the East African region, it is important to assess the implications of local rainfall trends on the atoll's ecosystem and evaluate potential threats to the food resources of the giant tortoises. However, building an accurate picture of the effects of climate change requires detailed context-specific case-studies, an approach often hindered by data deficiencies in remote areas. Here, we present and analyse a new historical rainfall record of Aldabra atoll together with two potential measures of primary productivity: (1) tree-ring measurements of the deciduous tree species Ochna ciliata and, (2) satellite-derived NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) data for the period 2001-2012. Rainfall declined by about 6 mm yr-1 in the last four decades, in agreement with general regional declines, and this decline could mostly be attributed to changes in wet-season rainfall. We were unable to cross-date samples of O. ciliata with sufficient precision to deduce long-term patterns of productivity. However, satellite data were used to derive Aldabra's land surface phenology (LSP) for the period 2001-2012 which was then linked to rainfall seasonality. This relationship was strongest in the eastern parts of the atoll (with a time-lag of about six weeks between rainfall changes and LSP responses), an area dominated by deciduous grasses that supports high densities of tortoises. While the seasonality in productivity, as reflected in the satellite record, is correlated with rainfall, we did not find any change in mean rainfall or productivity for the shorter period 2001-2012. The sensitivity of Aldabra's vegetation to rainfall highlights the potential impact of increasing water stress in East Africa on the region's endemic ecosystems.

  9. Cognitive and affective sequelae of primary hyperparathyroidism and early response to parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Benge, Jared F; Perrier, Nancy D; Massman, Paul J; Meyers, Christina A; Kayl, Anne E; Wefel, Jeffrey S

    2009-11-01

    Cognitive and affective complaints are common in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), but few studies have used psychometric testing to document these symptoms and their response to parathyroidectomy. The current study sought to clarify the nature of cognitive and affective impairments in PHPT and changes postparathyroidectomy. One hundred eleven patients with PHPT underwent neuropsychological evaluation prior to parathyroidectomy with 68 returning for an early postsurgical evaluation. Changes in cognition were assessed using practice effect corrected reliable change indices. Biochemical and anesthesia variables were compared between groups who improved and declined. In a subset of patients, assessment revealed a significant pattern of cognitive slowing, reductions in psychomotor speed, memory impairment, and depression prior to parathyroidectomy. Postsurgical evaluations revealed a trend for improvements on timed tests and depression but a decline in memory. Older patients responded less well to surgical intervention, as did patients who experienced more dramatic changes in biochemical status following surgery. Cognitive changes early postparathyroidectomy are characterized by improved information processing speed and decline in verbal memory, with younger patients more likely to recover during this acute phase. The need for longer-term follow-up studies and increasing utilization of neuropsychological assessments in this population are discussed. PMID:19807940

  10. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-05-22

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers. PMID:24695425

  11. Potential role of large oceanic diatoms in new primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Joel C.

    1993-01-01

    Very large phytoplankton species >50 μm in size, particularly diatoms, generally are found in background numbers throughout the euphotic zone of oceanic waters. Yet, when responding to episodic injections of new nutrients across the nutricline at the base of the euphotic zone these phototrophs may make a disproportionately large contribution to new primary production. To test this concept, we isolated a group of large diatoms from the Sargasso Sea and found that the specific growth rate of several of these species in culture was great enough at the ≈2% light level in oligotrophic waters to meet the requirements of several hypothetical scenarios in which annual rates of new production from the sum of one or more episodic blooms were equal to contemporary estimates. Two of the fast-growing species, Stephanopyxis palmeriana (Greville) Grunow and Pseudoguinardia recta von Stosch, formed giant flocculant masses while growing. Such masses could sink rapidly out of the euphotic zone or be a direct food source for invertebrates or fish higher up the food chain. Not only would a short, simple trophic system with low losses result, but the events would virtually be impossible to observe with conventional sampling.

  12. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    2002-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or the annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and respiration (R) per unit ground area. Available field observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), although it is generally recognized that there are considerable difficulties in determining these fluxes, and thus pose challenge in assessing the accuracy. Further uncertainties arise in extrapolating field measurements (which are acquired over a hectare or so area) to regional scale. Here, an approach is presented for determining these fluxes using satellite and ancillary data to be representative of regional scale and allow assessment of interannual variation. A, has been expressed as the product of radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis by an unstressed canopy and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, which is then adjusted for stresses due to soil water shortage and temperature away from optimum. R has been calculated as the sum of growth and maintenance components (respectively, R(sub g) and R(sub m)).The R(sub m) has been determined from nitrogen content of plant tissue per unit ground area, while R(sub g) has been obtained as a fraction of the difference of A(sub g) and R(sub m). Results for five consecutive years (1986-1990) are presented for the Amazon-Tocontins, Mississippi, and Ob River basins.

  13. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers. PMID:24695425

  14. Increased Primary Production from an Exotic Invader Does Not Subsidize Native Rodents.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Jacob E; Allen, Phil S; McMillan, Brock R

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plants have tremendous potential to enrich native food webs by subsidizing net primary productivity. Here, we explored how a potential food subsidy, seeds produced by the aggressive invader cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is utilized by an important guild of native consumers--granivorous small mammals--in the Great Basin Desert, USA. In a series of field experiments we examined 1) how cheatgrass invasion affects the density and biomass of seed rain at the ecosystem-level; 2) how seed resources from cheatgrass numerically affect granivorous small mammals; and 3) how the food preferences of native granivores might mediate the trophic integration of cheatgrass seeds. Relative to native productivity, cheatgrass invasion increased the density and biomass of seed rain by over 2000% (P < 0.01) and 3500% (P < 0.01), respectively. However, granivorous small mammals in native communities showed no positive response in abundance, richness, or diversity to experimental additions of cheatgrass seeds over one year. This lack of response correlated with a distinct preference for seeds from native grasses over seeds from cheatgrass. Our experiments demonstrate that increased primary productivity associated with exotic plant invasions may not necessarily subsidize consumers at higher trophic levels. In this context, cheatgrass invasion could disrupt native food webs by providing less-preferred resources that fail to enrich higher trophic levels. PMID:26244345

  15. Increased Primary Production from an Exotic Invader Does Not Subsidize Native Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Jacob E.; Allen, Phil S.; McMillan, Brock R.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plants have tremendous potential to enrich native food webs by subsidizing net primary productivity. Here, we explored how a potential food subsidy, seeds produced by the aggressive invader cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is utilized by an important guild of native consumers – granivorous small mammals – in the Great Basin Desert, USA. In a series of field experiments we examined 1) how cheatgrass invasion affects the density and biomass of seed rain at the ecosystem-level; 2) how seed resources from cheatgrass numerically affect granivorous small mammals; and 3) how the food preferences of native granivores might mediate the trophic integration of cheatgrass seeds. Relative to native productivity, cheatgrass invasion increased the density and biomass of seed rain by over 2000% (P < 0.01) and 3500% (P < 0.01), respectively. However, granivorous small mammals in native communities showed no positive response in abundance, richness, or diversity to experimental additions of cheatgrass seeds over one year. This lack of response correlated with a distinct preference for seeds from native grasses over seeds from cheatgrass. Our experiments demonstrate that increased primary productivity associated with exotic plant invasions may not necessarily subsidize consumers at higher trophic levels. In this context, cheatgrass invasion could disrupt native food webs by providing less-preferred resources that fail to enrich higher trophic levels. PMID:26244345

  16. Cultivar and Year Rather than Agricultural Practices Affect Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Catherine M. G. C.; Plenet, Daniel; Gautier, Hélène; Touloumet, Line; Girard, Thierry; Simon, Sylvaine

    2015-01-01

    Many biotic and abiotic parameters affect the metabolites involved in the organoleptic and health value of fruits. It is therefore important to understand how the growers' decisions for cultivar and orchard management can affect the fruit composition. Practices, cultivars and/or year all might participate to determine fruit composition. To hierarchize these factors, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids contents, titratable acidity, individual sugars and organics acids, and phenolics were measured in three apple cultivars (‘Ariane’, ‘Melrose’ and ‘Smoothee’) managed under organic, low-input and conventional management. Apples were harvested at commercial maturity in the orchards of the cropping system experiment BioREco at INRA Gotheron (Drôme, 26) over the course of three years (2011, 2012 and 2013). The main factors affecting primary and secondary metabolites, in both apple skin and flesh, were by far the cultivar and the yearly conditions, while the management system had a very limited effect. When considering the three cultivars and the year 2011 to investigate the effect of the management system per se, only few compounds differed significantly between the three systems and in particular the total phenolic content did not differ significantly between systems. Finally, when considering orchards grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions and of the same age, instead of the usual organic vs. conventional comparison, the effect of the management system on the apple fruit quality (Fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, individual sugars, organic acids, and phenolics) was very limited to non-significant. The main factors of variation were the cultivar and the year of cropping rather than the cropping system. More generally, as each management system (e.g. conventional, organic…) encompasses a great variability of practices, this highlights the importance of accurately documenting orchard practices and design beside the

  17. Cultivar and Year Rather than Agricultural Practices Affect Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Le Bourvellec, Carine; Bureau, Sylvie; Renard, Catherine M G C; Plenet, Daniel; Gautier, Hélène; Touloumet, Line; Girard, Thierry; Simon, Sylvaine

    2015-01-01

    Many biotic and abiotic parameters affect the metabolites involved in the organoleptic and health value of fruits. It is therefore important to understand how the growers' decisions for cultivar and orchard management can affect the fruit composition. Practices, cultivars and/or year all might participate to determine fruit composition. To hierarchize these factors, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids contents, titratable acidity, individual sugars and organics acids, and phenolics were measured in three apple cultivars ('Ariane', 'Melrose' and 'Smoothee') managed under organic, low-input and conventional management. Apples were harvested at commercial maturity in the orchards of the cropping system experiment BioREco at INRA Gotheron (Drôme, 26) over the course of three years (2011, 2012 and 2013). The main factors affecting primary and secondary metabolites, in both apple skin and flesh, were by far the cultivar and the yearly conditions, while the management system had a very limited effect. When considering the three cultivars and the year 2011 to investigate the effect of the management system per se, only few compounds differed significantly between the three systems and in particular the total phenolic content did not differ significantly between systems. Finally, when considering orchards grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions and of the same age, instead of the usual organic vs. conventional comparison, the effect of the management system on the apple fruit quality (Fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, individual sugars, organic acids, and phenolics) was very limited to non-significant. The main factors of variation were the cultivar and the year of cropping rather than the cropping system. More generally, as each management system (e.g. conventional, organic…) encompasses a great variability of practices, this highlights the importance of accurately documenting orchard practices and design beside the generic

  18. Initial pH of medium affects organic acids production but do not affect phosphate solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Leandro M.; de Oliveira-Longatti, Silvia M.; Soares, Cláudio R.F.S.; de Lima, José M.; Olivares, Fabio L.; Moreira, Fatima M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The pH of the culture medium directly influences the growth of microorganisms and the chemical processes that they perform. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the initial pH of the culture medium on the production of 11 low-molecular-weight organic acids and on the solubilization of calcium phosphate by bacteria in growth medium (NBRIP). The following strains isolated from cowpea nodules were studied: UFLA03-08 (Rhizobium tropici), UFLA03-09 (Acinetobacter sp.), UFLA03-10 (Paenibacillus kribbensis), UFLA03-106 (Paenibacillus kribbensis) and UFLA03-116 (Paenibacillus sp.). The strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 solubilized Ca3(PO4)2 in liquid medium regardless of the initial pH, although without a significant difference between the treatments. The production of organic acids by these strains was assessed for all of the initial pH values investigated, and differences between the treatments were observed. Strains UFLA03-09 and UFLA03-10 produced the same acids at different initial pH values in the culture medium. There was no correlation between phosphorus solubilized from Ca3(PO4)2 in NBRIP liquid medium and the concentration of total organic acids at the different initial pH values. Therefore, the initial pH of the culture medium influences the production of organic acids by the strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 but it does not affect calcium phosphate solubilization. PMID:26273251

  19. Initial pH of medium affects organic acids production but do not affect phosphate solubilization.

    PubMed

    Marra, Leandro M; de Oliveira-Longatti, Silvia M; Soares, Cláudio R F S; de Lima, José M; Olivares, Fabio L; Moreira, Fatima M S

    2015-06-01

    The pH of the culture medium directly influences the growth of microorganisms and the chemical processes that they perform. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the initial pH of the culture medium on the production of 11 low-molecular-weight organic acids and on the solubilization of calcium phosphate by bacteria in growth medium (NBRIP). The following strains isolated from cowpea nodules were studied: UFLA03-08 (Rhizobium tropici), UFLA03-09 (Acinetobacter sp.), UFLA03-10 (Paenibacillus kribbensis), UFLA03-106 (Paenibacillus kribbensis) and UFLA03-116 (Paenibacillus sp.). The strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 solubilized Ca3(PO4)2 in liquid medium regardless of the initial pH, although without a significant difference between the treatments. The production of organic acids by these strains was assessed for all of the initial pH values investigated, and differences between the treatments were observed. Strains UFLA03-09 and UFLA03-10 produced the same acids at different initial pH values in the culture medium. There was no correlation between phosphorus solubilized from Ca3(PO4)2 in NBRIP liquid medium and the concentration of total organic acids at the different initial pH values. Therefore, the initial pH of the culture medium influences the production of organic acids by the strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 but it does not affect calcium phosphate solubilization. PMID:26273251

  20. Climate change enhances primary production in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Sébastien; Mostajir, Behzad; Bélanger, Simon; Schloss, Irene R; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Demers, Serge; Ferreyra, Gustavo A

    2015-06-01

    Intense regional warming was observed in the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) over the last 50 years. Here, we investigate the impact of climate change on primary production (PP) in this highly productive region. This study is based on temporal data series of ozone thickness (1972-2010), sea ice concentration (1978-2010), sea-surface temperature (1990-2010), incident irradiance (1988-2010) and satellite-derived chlorophyll a concentration (Chl-a, 1997-2010) for the coastal WAP. In addition, we apply a photosynthesis/photoinhibition spectral model to satellite-derived data (1997-2010) to compute PP and examine the separate impacts of environmental forcings. Since 1978, sea ice retreat has been occurring earlier in the season (in March in 1978 and in late October during the 2000s) while the ozone hole is present in early spring (i.e. August to November) since the early 1990s, increasing the intensity of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR, 280-320 nm). The WAP waters have also warmed over 1990-2010. The modelled PP rates are in the lower range of previously reported PP rates in the WAP. The annual open water PP in the study area increased from 1997 to 2010 (from 0.73 to 1.03 Tg C yr(-1) ) concomitantly with the increase in the production season length. The coincidence between the earlier sea ice retreat and the presence of the ozone hole increased the exposure to incoming radiation (UVBR, UVAR and PAR) and, thus, increased photoinhibition during austral spring (September to November) in the study area (from 0.014 to 0.025 Tg C yr(-1) ). This increase in photoinhibition was minor compared to the overall increase in PP, however. Climate change hence had an overall positive impact on PP in the WAP waters. PMID:25626857

  1. Investigating the potential for subsurface primary production fueled by serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazelton, W. J.; Nelson, B. Y.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2011-12-01

    Ultramafic rocks in the Earth's mantle represent a tremendous reservoir of carbon and reducing power. Tectonic uplift of these materials into the crust can result in serpentinization, a highly exothermic geochemical reaction that releases hydrogen gas (H2) and promotes the abiogenic synthesis of organic molecules. The extent and activity of microbial communities in serpentinite-hosted subsurface habitats is almost entirely unknown, but they clearly have great potential to host extensive sunlight-independent primary production fueled by H2 and abiotic carbon compounds. We have been testing this hypothesis at several sites of serpentinization around the globe utilizing a suite of techniques including metagenomics, 16S rRNA pyrotag sequencing, and stable isotope tracing experiments. All four of our study sites, which include deep-sea hydrothermal vents, terrestrial alkaline springs, and continental drill holes, are characteristically low in archaeal and bacterial genetic diversity. In carbonate chimneys of the Lost City hydrothermal field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge), for example, a single archaeal phylotype dominates the biofilm community. Stable isotope tracing experiments indicated that these archaeal biofilms are capable of both production and anaerobic oxidation of methane at 80C and pH 10. Both production and oxidation were stimulated by H2, suggesting a possible syntrophic relationship among cells within the biofilm. Preliminary results from similar stable isotope tracing experiments at terrestrial alkaline seeps at the Tablelands Ophiolite (Newfoundland), Ligurian springs (Italy), and McLaughlin Reserve (California) have indicated the potential for microbial activity fueled by H2 and acetate. Furthermore, recent metagenomic sequencing of fluids from the Tablelands and Ligurian springs have revealed genomic potential for chemolithotrophy powered by iron reduction with H2. In summary, these data support the potential for extensive microbial activity fueled by

  2. Landscape level influence: aquatic primary production in the Colorado River of Glen and Grand canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yard, M. D.; Kennedy, T.; Yackulic, C. B.; Bennett, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Irregular features common to canyon-bound regions intercept solar incidence (photosynthetic photon flux density [PPFD: μmol m-2 s-1]) and can affect ecosystem energetics. The Colorado River in Grand Canyon is topographically complex, typical of most streams and rivers in the arid southwest. Dam-regulated systems like the Colorado River have reduced sediment loads, and consequently increased water transparency relative to unimpounded rivers; however, sediment supply from tributaries and flow regulation that affects erosion and subsequent sediment transport, interact to create spatial and temporal variation in optical conditions in this river network. Solar incidence and suspended sediment loads regulate the amount of underwater light available for aquatic photosynthesis in this regulated river. Since light availability is depth dependent (Beer's law), benthic algae is often exposed to varying levels of desiccation or reduced light conditions due to daily flow regulation, additional factors that further constrain aquatic primary production. Considerable evidence suggests that the Colorado River food web is now energetically dependent on autotrophic production, an unusual condition since large river foodwebs are typically supported by allochthonous carbon synthesized and transported from terrestrial environments. We developed a mechanistic model to account for these regulating factors to predict how primary production might be affected by observed and alternative flow regimes proposed as part of ongoing adaptive management experimentation. Inputs to our model include empirical data (suspended sediment and temperature), and predictive relationships: 1) solar incidence reaching the water surface (topographic complexity), 2) suspended sediment-light extinction relationships (optical properties), 3) unsteady flow routing model (stage-depth relationship), 4) channel morphology (photosynthetic area), and 5) photosynthetic-irradiant response for dominant algae (Cladophora

  3. Occupational exposure to beryllium in primary aluminium production.

    PubMed

    Skaugset, Nils Petter; Ellingsen, Dag G; Dahl, Kari; Martinsen, Ivar; Jordbekken, Lars; Drabløs, Per Arne; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2012-02-01

    Alumina used in the production of primary aluminium contains Be which partly vaporises from the cryolite bath into the workroom atmosphere. Since Be may be toxic at lower exposure levels than previously thought, the personal exposure to Be among workers in 7 Norwegian primary smelters has been assessed. In total, 480 personal Respicon® virtual impactor full shift air samples have been collected during 2 sampling campaigns and analysed for water soluble Be, Al and Na using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. In addition, water soluble F(-) has been measured by ion chromatography. The Be air concentrations in the inhalable, thoracic and respirable aerosol fractions have been calculated. The Be concentrations in the inhalable aerosol fraction vary between the different smelters. The highest GM concentration of Be in the inhalable fraction (122 ng m(-3), n = 30) was measured in the prebake pot room of a smelter using predominantly Jamaican alumina where also the highest individual air concentration of 270 ng m(-3) of Be was identified. The relative distribution of Be in the different aerosol fractions was fairly constant with the mean Be amount for the two sampling campaigns between 44-49% in the thoracic fraction expressed as % of the inhalable amount. Linear regression analysis shows a high correlation between water soluble Be, Al, F and Na describing an average measured chemical bulk composition of the water soluble thoracic fraction as Na(5.7)Al(3.1)F(18). Be is likely to be present as traces in this particulate matter by replacing Al atoms in the condensed fluorides and/or as a major element in a nanoparticle sized fluoride. Thus, the major amount of Be present in the work room atmosphere of Al smelter pot rooms will predominantly be present in combination with substantial amounts of water soluble Al, F and Na. PMID:21993554

  4. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in primary disorders of ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Vojtísková, Alena; Jesina, Pavel; Kalous, Martin; Kaplanová, Vilma; Houstek, Josef; Tesarová, Markéta; Fornůsková, Daniela; Zeman, Jirí; Dubot, Audrey; Godinot, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Studies of fibroblasts with primary defects in mitochondrial ATP synthase (ATPase) due to heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations in the ATP6 gene, affecting protonophoric function or synthesis of subunit a, show that at high mutation loads, mitochondrial membrane potential DeltaPsi(m) at state 4 is normal, but ADP-induced discharge of DeltaPsi(m) is impaired and ATP synthesis at state 3-ADP is decreased. Increased DeltaPsi(m) and low ATP synthesis is also found when the ATPase content is diminished by altered biogenesis of the enzyme complex. Irrespective of the different pathogenic mechanisms, elevated DeltaPsi(m) in primary ATPase disorders could increase mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and decrease energy provision. PMID:20021115

  5. Potato snakin-1 gene silencing affects cell division, primary metabolism, and cell wall composition.

    PubMed

    Nahirñak, Vanesa; Almasia, Natalia Inés; Fernandez, Paula Virginia; Hopp, Horacio Esteban; Estevez, José Manuel; Carrari, Fernando; Vazquez-Rovere, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Snakin-1 (SN1) is an antimicrobial cysteine-rich peptide isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) that was classified as a member of the Snakin/Gibberellic Acid Stimulated in Arabidopsis protein family. In this work, a transgenic approach was used to study the role of SN1 in planta. Even when overexpressing SN1, potato lines did not show remarkable morphological differences from the wild type; SN1 silencing resulted in reduced height, which was accompanied by an overall reduction in leaf size and severe alterations of leaf shape. Analysis of the adaxial epidermis of mature leaves revealed that silenced lines had 70% to 90% increases in mean cell size with respect to wild-type leaves. Consequently, the number of epidermal cells was significantly reduced in these lines. Confocal microscopy analysis after agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that SN1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was localized in plasma membrane, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed that SN1 self-interacted in vivo. We further focused our study on leaf metabolism by applying a combination of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and spectrophotometric techniques. These targeted analyses allowed a detailed examination of the changes occurring in 46 intermediate compounds from primary metabolic pathways and in seven cell wall constituents. We demonstrated that SN1 silencing affects cell division, leaf primary metabolism, and cell wall composition in potato plants, suggesting that SN1 has additional roles in growth and development beyond its previously assigned role in plant defense. PMID:22080603

  6. Palaeoenvironmental Indications of Enhanced Primary Productivity During Pliocene Sapropel Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.; Hopmans, E. C.; Schouten, S.; van Bergen, P. F.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Cores taken during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 160 in the eastern Mediterranean basin revealed periodic, laminated intervals with high organic contents, i.e. sapropels (Emeis et al., 1996). These include Pliocene sediments showing cyclic variations in organic matter deposition strongly correlated to the precession cyclicity of the Earth's orbit (e.g. Rossignol-Strick, 1985; Lourens et al., 1996a). The two main causes for sapropel formation are either climate-related enhanced organic matter productivity and/or increased preservation due to oxygen depletion of the bottom waters (e.g. Calvert et al., 1992; Canfield, 1994). Increased productivity is suggested to be the driving force in generating euxinic conditions leading to sapropel deposition (e.g. Passier et al., 1999). Photic zone euxinia was most probably triggered by large-scale input of nutrients from the Nile and other rivers leading to enhanced primary productivity and consequently high organic matter fluxes. This was based on concentrations of isorenieratene, a biomarker of photic zone euxinia, studied in three lateral time-equivalent Pliocene sapropels (subm. Menzel et al., 2001). Photic zone euxinia was more pronounced at the central and western part of the eastern Mediterranean basin, when compared with the most eastern part, where a deepening of the chemocline resulted from the increased delivery of fresh water. Using additional biomarkers will provide detailed insights in palaeoenvironmental changes that caused high organic matter deposition. The quantitative analysis of compounds specific for phytoplankton classes, e.g. isololiolides and loliolides reflecting Bacillariophyta, C37 - C39 alkenones indicative of Prymnesiophyta etc., will result in reconstruction of compositions of the standing crop and changes thereof at the time of deposition. The quantitative analysis of long-chain n-alkanes, indicating higher land plants, could reveal river input into the basin. Carbon isotope compositions of

  7. Controls on the ratio of mesozooplankton production to primary production in marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Charles; Dunne, John

    2010-01-01

    An ecosystem model was used to (1) determine the extent to which global trends in the ratio of mesozooplankton production to primary production (referred to herein as the " z-ratio") can be explained by nutrient enrichment, temperature, and euphotic zone depth, and (2) quantitatively diagnose the mechanisms driving these trends. Equilibrium model solutions were calibrated to observed and empirically derived patterns in phytoplankton biomass and growth rates, mesozooplankton biomass and growth rates, and the fraction of phytoplankton that are large (>5 μm ESD). This constrained several otherwise highly uncertain model parameters. Most notably, half-saturation constants for zooplankton feeding were constrained by the biomass and growth rates of their prey populations, and low zooplankton basal metabolic rates were required to match observations from oligotrophic ecosystems. Calibrated model solutions had no major biases and produced median z-ratios and ranges consistent with estimates. However, much of the variability around the median values in the calibration dataset (72 points) could not be explained. Model results were then compared with an extended global compilation of z-ratio estimates (>10 000 points). This revealed a modest yet significant ( r=0.40) increasing trend in z-ratios from values ˜0.01-0.04 to ˜0.1-0.2 with increasing primary productivity, with the transition from low to high z-ratios occurring at lower primary productivity in cold-water ecosystems. Two mechanisms, both linked to increasing phytoplankton biomass, were responsible: (1) zooplankton gross growth efficiencies increased as their ingestion rates became much greater than basal metabolic rates and (2) the trophic distance between primary producers and mesozooplankton shortened as primary production shifted toward large phytoplankton. Mechanism (1) was most important during the transition from low to moderate productivity ecosystems and mechanism (2) was responsible for a relatively

  8. Estimation of gross primary production capacity from global satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Thanyapraneedkul, Juthasinee; Furumi, Shinobu; Soyama, Noriko; Daigo, Motomasa

    2012-10-01

    To estimate gross primary production (GPP), the process of photosynthesis was considered as two separate phases: capacity and reduction. The reduction phase is influenced by environmental conditions such as soil moisture and weather conditions such as vapor pressure differences. For a particular leaf, photosynthetic capacity mainly depends on the amount of chlorophyll and the RuBisCO enzyme. The chlorophyll content can be estimated by the color of the leaf, and leaf color can be detected by optical sensors. We used the chlorophyll content of leaves to estimate the level of GPP. A previously developed framework for GPP capacity estimation employs a chlorophyll index. The index is based on the linear relationship between the chlorophyll content of a leaf and the maximum photosynthesis at PAR =2000 (μmolm -2s-1) on a light-response curve under low stress conditions. As a first step, this study examined the global distribution of the index and found that regions with high chlorophyll index values in winter corresponded to tropical rainforest areas. The seasonal changes in the chlorophyll index differed from those shown by the normalized difference vegetation index. Next, the capacity of GPP was estimated from the light-response curve using the index. Most regions exhibited a higher GPP capacity than that estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations, except in areas of tropical rainforest, where the GPP capacity and the MODIS GPP estimates were almost identical.

  9. Natural Organic Matter as Global Antennae for Primary Production

    PubMed Central

    Van Trump, J. Ian; Rivera Vega, Fransheska J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Humic substances (HS) are high-molecular-weight complex refractory organics that are ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic environments. While resistant to microbial degradation, these compounds nevertheless support microbial metabolism via oxidation or reduction of their (hydro)quinone moieties. As such, they are known to be important electron sinks for respiratory and fermentative bacteria and electron sources for denitrifying and perchlorate-reducing bacteria. HS also strongly promote abiotic reduction of Fe(III) when irradiated with light. Here, we show that HS-enhanced Fe(III) photoreduction can also drive chemolithotrophic microbial respiration by producing Fe(II), which functions as a respiratory electron donor. Due to their molecular complexity, HS absorb most of the electromagnetic spectrum and can act as broad-spectrum antennae converting radiant energy into bioavailable chemical energy. The finding that chemolithotrophic organisms can utilize this energy has important implications for terrestrial, and possibly extraterrestrial, microbial processes and offers an alternative mechanism of radiation-driven primary productivity to that of phototrophy. Key Words: Deep subsurface biosphere—Chemolithotrophic microorganisms—Organic matter—Geochemistry—Iron-oxidizing bacteria. Astrobiology 13, 476–482. PMID:23683047

  10. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering enhances terrestrial gross primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Neely, R. R., III

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering could impact the terrestrial carbon cycle by enhancing the carbon sink. With an 8 Tg yr-1 injection of SO2 to balance a Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6.0) scenario, we conducted climate model simulations with the Community Earth System Model, with the Community Atmospheric Model 4 fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (CAM4-chem). During the geoengineering period, as compared to RCP6.0, land-averaged downward visible diffuse radiation increased 3.2 W m-2 (11 %). The enhanced diffuse radiation combined with the cooling increased plant photosynthesis by 2.4 %, which could contribute to an additional 3.8 ± 1.1 Gt C yr-1 global gross primary productivity without nutrient limitation. This increase could potentially increase the land carbon sink. Suppressed plant and soil respiration due to the cooling would reduce natural land carbon emission and therefore further enhance the terrestrial carbon sink during the geoengineering period. This beneficial impact of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering would need to be balanced by a large number of potential risks in any future decisions about implementation of geoengineering.

  11. Natural organic matter as global antennae for primary production.

    PubMed

    Van Trump, J Ian; Rivera Vega, Fransheska J; Coates, John D

    2013-05-01

    Humic substances (HS) are high-molecular-weight complex refractory organics that are ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic environments. While resistant to microbial degradation, these compounds nevertheless support microbial metabolism via oxidation or reduction of their (hydro)quinone moieties. As such, they are known to be important electron sinks for respiratory and fermentative bacteria and electron sources for denitrifying and perchlorate-reducing bacteria. HS also strongly promote abiotic reduction of Fe(III) when irradiated with light. Here, we show that HS-enhanced Fe(III) photoreduction can also drive chemolithotrophic microbial respiration by producing Fe(II), which functions as a respiratory electron donor. Due to their molecular complexity, HS absorb most of the electromagnetic spectrum and can act as broad-spectrum antennae converting radiant energy into bioavailable chemical energy. The finding that chemolithotrophic organisms can utilize this energy has important implications for terrestrial, and possibly extraterrestrial, microbial processes and offers an alternative mechanism of radiation-driven primary productivity to that of phototrophy. PMID:23683047

  12. Gross primary production of global forest ecosystems has been overestimated

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianyong; Yan, Xiaodong; Dong, Wenjie; Chou, Jieming

    2015-01-01

    Coverage rate, a critical variable for gridded forest area, has been neglected by previous studies in estimating the annual gross primary production (GPP) of global forest ecosystems. In this study, we investigated to what extent the coverage rate could impact forest GPP estimates from 1982 to 2011. Here we show that the traditional calculation without considering the coverage rate globally overestimated the forest gross carbon dioxide uptake by approximately 8.7%, with a value of 5.12 ± 0.23 Pg C yr−1, which is equivalent to 48% of the annual emissions from anthropogenic activities in 2012. Actually, the global annual GPP of forest ecosystems is approximately 53.71 ± 4.83 Pg C yr−1 for the past 30 years by taking the coverage rate into account. Accordingly, we argue that forest annual GPP calculated by previous studies has been overestimated due to the exaggerated forest area, and therefore, coverage rate may be a required factor to further quantify the global carbon cycle. PMID:26027557

  13. Herbivore and Fungal Pathogen Exclusion Affects the Seed Production of Four Common Grassland Species

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Timothy L.; Mitchell, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect herbivores and fungal pathogens can independently affect plant fitness, and may have interactive effects. However, few studies have experimentally quantified the joint effects of insects and fungal pathogens on seed production in non-agricultural populations. We examined the factorial effects of insect herbivore exclusion (via insecticide) and fungal pathogen exclusion (via fungicide) on the population-level seed production of four common graminoid species (Andropogon gerardii, Schizachyrium scoparium, Poa pratensis, and Carex siccata) over two growing seasons in Minnesota, USA. We detected no interactive effects of herbivores and pathogens on seed production. However, the seed production of all four species was affected by either insecticide or fungicide in at least one year of the study. Insecticide consistently doubled the seed production of the historically most common species in the North American tallgrass prairie, A. gerardii (big bluestem). This is the first report of insect removal increasing seed production in this species. Insecticide increased A. gerardii number of seeds per seed head in one year, and mass per seed in both years, suggesting that consumption of flowers and seed embryos contributed to the effect on seed production. One of the primary insect species consuming A. gerardii flowers and seed embryos was likely the Cecidomyiid midge, Contarinia wattsi. Effects on all other plant species varied among years. Herbivores and pathogens likely reduce the dispersal and colonization ability of plants when they reduce seed output. Therefore, impacts on seed production of competitive dominant species may help to explain their relatively poor colonization abilities. Reduced seed output by dominant graminoids may thereby promote coexistence with subdominant species through competition-colonization tradeoffs. PMID:20711408

  14. Effect of an acid mine drainage effluent on phytoplankton biomass and primary production at Britannia Beach, Howe Sound, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Levings, C D; Varela, D E; Mehlenbacher, N M; Barry, K L; Piercey, G E; Guo, M; Harrison, P J

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the effect of acid mine drainage (AMD) from an abandoned copper mine at Britannia Beach (Howe Sound, BC, Canada) on primary productivity and chlorophyll a levels in the receiving waters of Howe Sound before, during, and after freshet from the Squamish River. Elevated concentrations of copper (integrated average through the water column >0.050 mgl(-1)) in nearshore waters indicated that under some conditions a small gyre near the mouth of Britannia Creek may have retained the AMD from Britannia Creek and from a 30-m deep water outfall close to shore. Regression and correlation analyses indicated that copper negatively affected primary productivity during April (pre-freshet) and November (post-freshet). Negative effects of copper on primary productivity were not supported statistically for July (freshet), possibly because of additional effects such as turbidity from the Squamish River. Depth-integrated average and surface chlorophyll a were correlated to copper concentrations in April. During this short study we demonstrated that copper concentrations from the AMD discharge can negatively affect both primary productivity and the standing stock of primary producers in Howe Sound. PMID:16038945

  15. Does Cost of Schooling Affect Enrollment by the Poor? Universal Primary Education in Uganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deininger, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Evaluates the impact of Uganda's program of "Universal Primary Education," which, starting from 1997, dispensed with fees for primary enrollment. Finds, for example, that while the program was associated with a dramatic increase in primary school attendance and that inequalities in attendance related to gender, income, and region were…

  16. Comparing the impact of the 2003 and 2010 heatwaves on Net Primary Production in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Ana; Gouveia, Célia M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Running, Steve W.

    2013-04-01

    Climate variability is known to influence primary productivity on land ecosystems (Nemani et al., 2003). In particular, extreme climatic events such as major droughts and heatwaves are known to have severe impact on primary productivity and, therefore, to affect significantly the carbon dioxide uptake by land ecosystems at regional (Ciais et al., 2005) or even global scale (Zhao and Running, 2010). In the last decade, Europe was struck by two outstanding heatwaves, the 2003 event in Western Europe and the recent 2010 episode over Eastern Europe. Both were characterised by record breaking temperatures at the daily, weekly, monthly and seasonal scales, although the amplitude and spatial extent of the 2010 mega-heatwave surpassed the 2003 event (Barriopedro et al., 2011). This work aims to assess the influence of both mega-heatwaves on yearly Net Primary Production (NPP) and seasonal Net Photosynthesis (NP), which corresponds to the difference between Gross Primary Production and maintenance respiration. The work relies on yearly NPP and monthly NP data derived from satellite imagery obtained from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor at 1km spatial resolution. Data were selected for the period between 2000 and 2011 over a region extending from 34.6N to 73.5N and 12.1W to 46.8E, covering Eurasia. In 2010 very low primary production anomalies are observed over a very large area in Eastern Europe, at the monthly, seasonal and yearly scale. In western Russia, yearly NPP anomalies fall below 50% of average. These widespread negative anomalous values of NP fields over the western Russia region match the patterns of very high temperature values combined with below-average precipitation, at the seasonal (summer) scale. Moreover, the impact of the heatwave is not only evident at the regional level but also at the wider continental (European) scale and is significantly more extensive and intense than the corresponding heatwave of 2003 in Western Europe

  17. 40 CFR 63.5984 - What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tire production affected sources? 63.5984 Section 63.5984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5984 What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources? You must meet each emission limit in...

  18. 40 CFR 63.5984 - What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tire production affected sources? 63.5984 Section 63.5984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5984 What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources? You must meet each emission limit in...

  19. 40 CFR 63.5984 - What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tire production affected sources? 63.5984 Section 63.5984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5984 What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources? You must meet each emission limit in...

  20. Attributing Changes in Gross Primary Productivity from 1901 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, C. R.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Michalak, A. M.; Cook, R. B.; El Masri, B.; Hayes, D. J.; Huang, M.; Jacobson, A. R.; Jain, A. K.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Tian, H.; Schaefer, K. M.; Wei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Model-based studies are foundational to perform diagnosis (has there been a change?) and attribution (what caused this change?) in the context of global environmental change. Here we employ a dual method approach using machine learning and simulation differencing across an ensemble of terrestrial biosphere models (TBM) to attribute changes in gross primary productivity (GPP) from 1901 to 2010. The simulations are taken from the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). For each TBM MsTMIP prescribes a semi-factorial set of five runs (globally at 0.5º spatial resolution) where time-varying controls on carbon metabolism are sequentially enabled. MsTMIP has a constrained simulation protocol -driving data, vegetation cover, boundary conditions, and steady-state spin up protocol are all standardized- such that only model structure varies and ensemble spread addresses process uncertainty. Applying this dual method to MsTMIP simulation output we attribute changes in GPP to changes in climate, land cover/land use change, atmospheric CO2, nitrogen deposition, near-surface air temperature, precipitation, and downwelling shortwave radiation as well as climate sigma (irreducible climate noise) and nonlinearity (interactions). Globally, the key factor associated with the Anthropocene, namely the sustained increase in atmospheric CO2, dominates changes in GPP across the full time period. Climate factors are of secondary importance and, along with land cover/land use change, may act to decrease GPP depending on decade and reference period. Despite differences in model structure attribution results across the full ensemble are generally consistent. Spatial morphologies, replicating the same dual approach by grid cell, exhibit high variability but with an atmospheric CO2 fertilization effect dominating the tropical zone. Our results suggest that the modern era of global warming, when viewed through the prism of GPP attribution, reaches back at

  1. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and autotrophic respiration (R) per unit ground area. Although available observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), viz., 0.3 to 0.7, it is generally recognized that much uncertainties exist in this fraction due to difficulties associated with the needed measurements. Additional uncertainties arise when these measurements are extrapolated to regional or global land surface using empirical equations, for example, using regression equations relating C to mean annual precipitation and air temperature. Here, a process-based approach has been taken to calculate A(sub g) and R using satellite and ancillary data. A(sub g) has been expressed as a product of radiation use efficiency, magnitude of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and normalized by stresses due to soil water shortage and air temperature away from the optimum range. A biophysical model has been used to determine the radiation use efficiency from the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf, foliage temperature, and the fraction of diffuse PAR incident on a canopy. All meteorological data (PAR, air temperature, precipitation, etc.) needed for the calculation are derived from satellite observations, while a land use, land cover data (based on satellite and ground measurements) have been used to assess the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf of varied cover type based on field measurements. R has been calculated as the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and live fine roots at a standard temperature of different land cover has been determined from their nitrogen content using field and satellite measurements, while that of living fraction of woody stem (viz., sapwood) from the seasonal maximum leaf area index as

  2. Quantitative grain density autoradiography and the intraspecific distribution of primary productivity in phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.B.; Maguire, B. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Analysis of a method of grain density autoradiography demonstrates that reliable measurements of the primary productivity of individual phytoplankton species can be obtained with this technique. Grain density autoradiography is particularly useful for providing an estimate of the intraspecific distribution of primary productivity. As an example, the productivity distribution of the marine diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus became positively skewed during a period of population decline.

  3. Does enhanced solar UV-B radiation affect marine primary producers in their natural habitats?

    PubMed

    Häder, Donat-P

    2011-01-01

    This article is a highlight of the paper by Li et al. in this issue of Photochemistry and Photobiology as well as a short summary of the research on the effects of solar UV-B radiation on primary production in the oceans. Laboratory experiments under controlled conditions using artificial light sources indicate species-specific damage of many phytoplankton groups. Mesocosm studies in enclosures of limited volume allow analyzing UV effects in multigeneration monitoring of natural assemblages. Field studies to determine the effects of short-wavelength solar radiation require sensitive instrumentation and measurements over extended areas of the open ocean to yield significant results. Results from a cruise described in the paper by Li et al. indicate clear effects of UV-B and UV-A on the photosynthetic carbon fixation of phytoplankton communities with spatial differences between coastal and open-ocean waters. Increasing temperatures and acidification in the ocean due to global climate change may exacerbate the detrimental effects of solar UV-B radiation. PMID:21208211

  4. Emotions, affects and the production of social life.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nick J

    2015-06-01

    While many aspects of social life possess an emotional component, sociology needs to explore explicitly the part emotions play in producing the social world and human history. This paper turns away from individualistic and anthropocentric emphases upon the experience of feelings and emotions, attending instead to an exploration of flows of 'affect' (meaning simply a capacity to affect or be affected) between bodies, things, social institutions and abstractions. It establishes a materialist sociology of affects that acknowledges emotions as a part, but only a part, of a more generalized affective flow that produces bodies and the social world. From this perspective, emotions are not a peculiarly remarkable outcome of the confluence of biology and culture, but part of a continuum of affectivity that links human bodies to their physical and social environment. This enhances sociological understanding of the part emotions play in shaping actions and capacities in many settings of sociological concern. PMID:25788237

  5. Steroid replacement in primary adrenal failure does not appear to affect circulating adipokines.

    PubMed

    Fichna, Marta; Fichna, Piotr; Gryczyńska, Maria; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Żurawek, Magdalena; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Despite continuous efforts for an optimal steroid replacement, recent observations suggest increased cardiometabolic risk and related mortality in primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI). Adipokines are peptides from the adipose tissue, markers of cardiometabolic dysfunction. This study was aimed to evaluate serum levels of adipokines: leptin, adiponectin, and resistin in PAI during conventional steroid substitution. The analysis comprised 63 patients (mean age 42.7 ± 14.1 years) and 63 healthy controls. Serum adipokines, lipid profile, and plasma glucose were assessed in both cohorts. ACTH, serum insulin, HOMA-IR, DHEA-S, cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol were determined in PAI. Body mass composition was analyzed by Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry. Mean BMI in the control group was 24.1 ± 3.9 kg/m(2) and 23.7 ± 3.9 kg/m(2) in the PAI cohort. Serum leptin and adiponectin levels were similar in both groups, whereas resistin appeared significantly lower among affected subjects (p = 0.0002). Its levels were weakly correlated with HOMA-IR (p = 0.048). Leptin was independently correlated with fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, BMI, and body fat (p < 0.001). At the multiple regression analysis only weight (p = 0.017), total and HDL cholesterol (p < 0.001) appeared significant predictors of adiponectin level. No adipokine correlations with serum cortisol or daily hydrocortisone dose were found. Patients receiving DHEA substitution displayed lower leptin and adiponectin levels (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our study did not provide evidence of an adverse adipokine profile in patients with PAI under conventional glucocorticoid replacement. Serum adipokines in treated PAI follow similar correlations to those reported in healthy subjects. Further prospective studies are warranted to verify and explain plausible excess of cardiovascular mortality in PAI. PMID:25129652

  6. Effect of thermal power effluents on the community structure and primary production of phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, N.K.; Ambasht, R.S.; Kumar, R. )

    1993-01-01

    Effluents discharged by the coal-fired thermal power plant at Obra (22[degrees] 52[prime] N lat. and 83[degrees] 5[prime]E long.) reach into the nearby flowing Rihand river and alter the ecological features of the river ecosystem. The temperature and pH of the receiving river water increased while the transparency, dissolved oxygen, chloride, NO[sub 3]-N, and PO[sub 4]-P decreased. In the effluent zone of the river, no phytoplankton existed during a one-year study period (January to December 1987). Chlorophycean members like Spirogyra and Scenedesmus which were present in the unaffected upstream (control site) were replaced by Bacillariophycean members like Pinnularia and Nitzschia with reduced phytoplankton density in the downstream-affected water. At the control site (average of 12 months), Chlorophyta density contributed 335 unit L[sup [minus]1] to the total phytoplankton density (774 unit L[sup [minus]1]) followed by Cyanophyta (260 unit L[sup [minus]1]) and Bacillariophyta (188 unit L[sup [minus]1]). At the affected site maximum of 112, the unit L[sup [minus]1] contribution was by Bacillariophyta followed by 90 unit L[sup [minus]1] of Chlorophyta and 60 unit L[sup [minus]1] of Cyanophyta to the total phytoplankton density (221 unit L[sup [minus]1]). Phytoplankton diversity indices and primary production were reduced in the affected zone. Chloride and PO[sub 4]-P together accounted for 54% (p<0.01) of the variability of the Bacillariophyta density, while no clear influence on Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta density was observed. Total phytoplankton density was changed by 28% (p<0.05) by chloride itself. Gross and net primary productivities were significantly (p<0.01) influenced by alteration of the NO[sub 3]-N concentrations of the water. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. ANALYSIS OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS AT A PRIMARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project investigated the source of priority pollutants, assessment of the wastewater treatment plant, and priority pollutant removal efficiency for a single Soderberg-type primary aluminum plant. Forty-eight hour composite samples were collected from the following streams: (...

  8. Knowledge of Repetitions Range Affects Force Production in Trained Females

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Israel; Aboodarda, Saied J.; Basset, Fabien A.; Behm, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Most studies have examined pacing strategies with cyclical activities (running and cycling). It has been demonstrated that males employ different pacing strategies during repeated maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) dependent upon a known endpoint. Since different fatiguing mechanisms have been identified between the genders, it is not known if females use comparable pacing strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine if informing female subjects regarding the number of MVCs to perform would affect force and electromyography (EMG). Twenty well-trained females completed 3 fatiguing protocols in a randomized order. In the control condition participants were informed they would perform twelve MVCs and then actually completed twelve. In the unknown condition they were not told how many MVCs to perform but were stopped after twelve. In the deception condition they were initially informed to perform 6 MVCs, but after the 6th MVC they were asked to perform a few more MVCs and were stopped after twelve. During the first 6 MVCs, forces in the deception condition were greater compared to the unknown (p = 0.021, ES = 0.65, 5%) and control (p = 0.022, ES = 0.42, 3%) conditions. No differences were found between conditions in the last 6 MVCs. A main effect for repetitions showed force deficits during the first 6 MVCs (p = 0.000, ES = 1.81, 13%) and last 6 MVCs (p = 0.05, ES = 0.34, 3%). No differences were found between conditions in biceps and triceps EMG. However, EMG decreased during the first 6 MVCs for biceps (p = 0.001, ES = 1.0, 14%) and triceps (p = 0.001, ES = 0.76, 14%) across conditions. No differences were found in the last 6 MVCs. The anticipation of performing fewer MVCs led to increased force, whereas no endpoint led to decreased force production. Key points Pacing strategies occur during repeated (fatiguing) MVCs as a function of end point expectations. Females use similar pacing strategies as previously published results with males. Without a known

  9. Leaching and primary biodegradation of sulfonated naphthalenes and their formaldehyde condensates from concrete superplasticizers in groundwater affected by tunnel construction.

    PubMed

    Ruckstuhl, Sabine; Suter, Marc J F; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Giger, Walter

    2002-08-01

    Sulfonated naphthalenes and their formaldehyde condensates (SNFC) are used as concrete superplasticizers fortunnel construction through aquifers.This paperdiscusses their primary biodegradation in groundwater affected by construction activities. The analyses of groundwater samples collected 5 m away from a construction site clearly indicated that components of the applied SNFC product leached into the groundwater. A maximum total concentration of these compounds of 233 microg/L was found, and it was shown that only the monomeric sulfonated naphthalenes andthe condensates uptothetetramerleached in substantial amounts. The decrease in concentration of several monomeric components could not be explained by mere dispersion but rather indicates a biological transformation in the aquifer. This was confirmed at a second field site and by laboratory degradation experiments with piezometer material as inoculum. Lag phases for the individually degradable sulfonated naphthalenes ranged from 0 to 96 d. Naphthalene-1,5-disulfonate and the oligomeric components were neither degraded in the aquifer nor in the laboratory experiments within an observation time of up to 195 d. This clearly indicates their persistence in subsurface waters. PMID:12188355

  10. Fine root production across a primary successional ecosystem chronosequence at Mt. Shasta, California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating changes in belowground biomass and production is essential for understanding fundamental patterns and processes during ecosystem development. We examined patterns of fine root production, aboveground litterfall, and forest floor accumulation during forest primary succession at the Mt. Sha...

  11. Factors affecting motivation and retention of primary health care workers in three disparate regions in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Government of Kenya alike identify a well-performing health workforce as key to attaining better health. Nevertheless, the motivation and retention of health care workers (HCWs) persist as challenges. This study investigated factors influencing motivation and retention of HCWs at primary health care facilities in three different settings in Kenya - the remote area of Turkana, the relatively accessible region of Machakos, and the disadvantaged informal urban settlement of Kibera in Nairobi. Methods A cross-sectional cluster sample design was used to select 59 health facilities that yielded interviews with 404 health care workers, grouped into 10 different types of service providers. Data were collected in November 2011 using structured questionnaires and a Focus Group Discussion guide. Findings were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate methods of the associations and determinants of health worker motivation and retention. Results The levels of education and gender factors were lowest in Turkana with female HCWs representing only 30% of the workers against a national average of 53%. A smaller proportion of HCWs in Turkana feel that they have adequate training for their jobs. Overall, 13% of the HCWs indicated that they had changed their job in the last 12 months and 20% indicated that they could leave their current job within the next two years. In terms of work environment, inadequate access to electricity, equipment, transport, housing, and the physical state of the health facility were cited as most critical, particularly in Turkana. The working environment is rated as better in private facilities. Adequate training, job security, salary, supervisor support, and manageable workload were identified as critical satisfaction factors. Family health care, salary, and terminal benefits were rated as important compensatory factors. Conclusions There are distinct motivational and retention factors that affect

  12. Does Autocthonous Primary Production Influence Oviposition by Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Container Habitats?

    PubMed Central

    LORENZ, AMANDA R.; WALKER, EDWARD D.; KAUFMAN, MICHAEL G.

    2014-01-01

    Aedes (Finlaya) japonicus japonicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae) is recently invasive in North America and has expanded its range rapidly since 1998. Throughout its native and expanded range, Ae. j. japonicus larvae are commonly observed in many types of natural and artificial water-filled containers that vary in organic matter content and exposure to sunlight. Larvae are most often found in containers with decaying leaf material or algae, and we postulated that the added autocthonous primary production from algae could be both an important food source for larvae and an influential oviposition attractant to adult Ae. j. japonicus. We tested this hypothesis by placing plastic containers with varied levels of shading to manipulate algal density in the field, and then monitored oviposition by natural populations of Ae. j. japonicus. Over 99% of larvae hatching from eggs laid on the walls of our containers were Ae. j. japonicus, indicating that this species is a dominant colonizer of artificial containers in the study areas. Although full shading treatments effectively reduced algal biomass (significant reduction in chlorophyll a levels), at only one of three sites did this appear to affect Ae. j. japonicus oviposition. We conclude that algae in larval habitats are not a major factor in oviposition choices of adult Ae. j. japonicus females except when in situ primary production is high enough to substantially alter overall organic matter content cues. PMID:23427654

  13. Leucine metabolism regulates TRI6 expression and affects deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Narayanan, Swara; Walkowiak, Sean; Wang, Li; Joshi, Manisha; Rocheleau, Hélène; Ouellet, Thérèse; Harris, Linda J

    2015-11-01

    TRI6 is a positive regulator of the trichothecene gene cluster and the production of trichothecene mycotoxins [deoxynivalenol (DON)] and acetylated forms such as 15-Acetyl-DON) in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. As a global transcriptional regulator, TRI6 expression is modulated by nitrogen-limiting conditions, sources of nitrogen and carbon, pH and light. However, the mechanism by which these diverse environmental factors affect TRI6 expression remains underexplored. In our effort to understand how nutrients affect TRI6 regulation, comparative digital expression profiling was performed with a wild-type F. graminearum and a Δtri6 mutant strain, grown in nutrient-rich conditions. Analysis showed that TRI6 negatively regulates genes of the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway. Feeding studies with deletion mutants of MCC, encoding methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase, one of the key enzymes of leucine metabolism, showed that addition of leucine specifically down-regulated TRI6 expression and reduced 15-ADON accumulation. Constitutive expression of TRI6 in the Δmcc mutant strain restored 15-ADON production. A combination of cellophane breach assays and pathogenicity experiments on wheat demonstrated that disrupting the leucine metabolic pathway significantly reduced disease. These findings suggest a complex interaction between one of the primary metabolic pathways with a global regulator of mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence in F. graminearum. PMID:26248604

  14. Decreased summer drought affects plant productivity and soil carbon dynamics in Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, M. F.; Alberti, G.; Inglima, I.; Marjanović, H.; Lecain, D.; Zaldei, A.; Peressotti, A.; Miglietta, F.

    2011-06-01

    Precipitation patterns are expected to change in the Mediterranean region within the next decades, with projected decreases in total rainfall and increases in extreme events. We manipulated precipitation patterns in a Mediterranean woodland, dominated by Arbutus unedo L., to study the effects of changing precipitation regimes on above-ground net primary production (ANPP) and soil C dynamics, specifically plant-derived C input to soil and soil respiration (SR). Experimental plots were exposed to either a 20 % reduction of throughfall or to water addition targeted at maintaining soil water content above a minimum of 10 % v/v. Treatments were compared to control plots which received ambient precipitation. The throughfall manipulation experiment started in 2004 and we report data up to the 2009 growing season. Enhanced soil moisture during summer months highly stimulated annual stem primary production, litter fall, SR and net annual plant-derived C input to soil which on average increased by 130 %, 26 %, 50 % and 220 %, respectively, as compared to control. In contrast, the 20 % reduction in throughfall (equivalent to 10 % reduction of precipitation) did not significantly change soil moisture at the site, and therefore did not significantly affect ANPP or SR. We conclude that minor changes (around 10 % reduction) in precipitation amount are not likely to significantly affect ANPP or soil C dynamics in Mediterranean woodland. However, if summer rain increases, C cycling will significantly accelerate but soil C stocks are not likely to be changed in the short-term. More studies involving modelling of long term C dynamics are needed to predict if the estimated increases in soil C input under wet conditions is going to be sustained and if labile C is being substituted to stable C, with a negative effect on long term soil C stocks.

  15. Decreased summer drought affects plant productivity and soil carbon dynamics in a Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, M. F.; Alberti, G.; Inglima, I.; Marjanović, H.; Lecain, D.; Zaldei, A.; Peressotti, A.; Miglietta, F.

    2011-09-01

    Precipitation patterns are expected to change in the Mediterranean region within the next decades, with projected decreases in total rainfall and increases in extreme events. We manipulated precipitation patterns in a Mediterranean woodland, dominated by Arbutus unedo L., to study the effects of changing precipitation regimes on above-ground net primary production (ANPP) and soil C dynamics, specifically plant-derived C input to soil and soil respiration (SR). Experimental plots were exposed to either a 20 % reduction of throughfall or to water addition targeted at maintaining soil water content above a minimum of 10 % v/v. Treatments were compared to control plots which received ambient precipitation. Enhanced soil moisture during summer months highly stimulated annual stem primary production, litter fall, SR and net annual plant-derived C input to soil which on average increased by 130 %, 26 %, 58 % and 220 %, respectively, as compared to the control. In contrast, the 20 % reduction in throughfall (equivalent to 10 % reduction in precipitation) did not significantly change soil moisture at the site, and therefore did not significantly affect ANPP or SR. We conclude that minor changes (around 10 % reduction) in precipitation amount are not likely to significantly affect ANPP or soil C dynamics in Mediterranean woodlands. However, if summer rain increases, C cycling will significantly accelerate but soil C stocks are not likely to be changed in the short-term. More studies involving modelling of long-term C dynamics are needed to predict if the estimated increases in soil C input under wet conditions is going to be sustained and if labile C is being substituted to stable C, with a negative effect on long-term soil C stocks.

  16. How drought severity constrains gross primary production(GPP) and its partitioning among carbon pools in a Quercus ilex coppice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambal, S.; Lempereur, M.; Limousin, J. M.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, J.

    2014-12-01

    The partitioning of photosynthates toward biomass compartments plays a crucial role in the carbon (C) sink function of forests. Few studies have examined how carbon is allocated toward plant compartments in drought-prone forests. We analyzed the fate of gross primary production (GPP) in relation to yearly water deficit in an old evergreen Mediterranean Quercus ilex coppice severely affected by water limitations. Carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured with an eddy covariance flux tower running continuously since 2001. Discrete measurements of litterfall, stem growth and fAPAR allowed us to derive annual productions of leaves, wood, flowers and acorns, and an isometric relationship between stem and belowground biomass has been used to estimate perennial belowground growth. By combining eddy covariance fluxes with annual net primary productions (NPP), we managed to close a C budget and derive values of autotrophic, heterotrophic respirations and carbon-use efficiency (CUE; the ratio between NPP and GPP). Average values of yearly net ecosystem production (NEP), GPP and Reco were 282, 1259 and 977 g C m-2. The corresponding aboveground net primary production (ANPP) components were 142.5, 26.4 and 69.6 g C m-2 for leaves, reproductive effort (flowers and fruits) and stems, respectively. NEP, GPP and Reco were affected by annual water deficit. Partitioning to the different plant compartments was also impacted by drought, with a hierarchy of responses going from the most affected - the stem growth - to the least affected - the leaf production. The average CUE was 0.40, which is well in the range for Mediterranean-type forest ecosystems. CUE tended to decrease less drastically in response to drought than GPP and NPP did, probably due to drought acclimation of autotrophic respiration. Overall, our results provide a baseline for modeling the inter-annual variations of carbon fluxes and allocation in this widespread Mediterranean ecosystem, and

  17. Talon cusp affecting primary dentition in two siblings: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mallineni, S K; Manan, N M; Lee, C K; King, N M

    2013-01-01

    The term talon cusp refers to a rare developmental dental anomaly characterized by a cusp-like structure projecting from the cingulum area or cement-enamel junction. This condition can occur in the maxillary and mandibular arches of the primary and permanent dentitions. The purpose of this paper is to report on the presence of talon cusps in the primary dentition of two southern Chinese siblings. The 4 years and 2 months old girl had a talon cusp on her maxillary right primary central incisor, while her 2 years and 9 months old brother had bilateral talon cusps on the maxillary primary central incisors. The presence of this rare dental anomaly in two siblings has scarcely been reported in the literature and this may provide further evidence of a hereditary etiology. PMID:23529333

  18. Statistical Frequency in Perception Affects Children's Lexical Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richtsmeier, Peter T.; Gerken, LouAnn; Goffman, Lisa; Hogan, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    Children's early word production is influenced by the statistical frequency of speech sounds and combinations. Three experiments asked whether this production effect can be explained by a perceptual learning mechanism that is sensitive to word-token frequency and/or variability. Four-year-olds were exposed to nonwords that were either frequent…

  19. Age of riverine carbon suggests rapid export of terrestrial primary production in tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Erin E.; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Keil, Richard G.; Santos, Guaciara M.; Truxal, Laura T.; Alin, Simone R.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2013-11-01

    balance between the storage of vascular plant carbon in soils, oxidation to carbon dioxide, and export via rivers affects calculations of the strength of terrestrial ecosystems as carbon sinks. The magnitude and timescale of the riverine export pathway are not well constrained. Here we use radiocarbon dating of lignin phenols to show that plant-derived carbon carried by suspended sediment of the Mekong River is very young, having been produced within the last 18 years. Further, this plant-derived carbon remains young during times of the year when bulk carbon varies from modern to over 3000 radiocarbon years old. Our results demonstrate that primary-production derivatives are exported rapidly and suggest that the age of riverine lignin is similar to estimates of the residence time of terrestrial organic carbon in tropical catchments. These results are relevant for modeling predictions of the influence of the terrestrial biosphere on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  20. Short-term to seasonal variability in factors driving primary productivity in a shallow estuary: Implications for modeling production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canion, Andy; MacIntyre, Hugh L.; Phipps, Scott

    2013-10-01

    The inputs of primary productivity models may be highly variable on short timescales (hourly to daily) in turbid estuaries, but modeling of productivity in these environments is often implemented with data collected over longer timescales. Daily, seasonal, and spatial variability in primary productivity model parameters: chlorophyll a concentration (Chla), the downwelling light attenuation coefficient (kd), and photosynthesis-irradiance response parameters (Pmchl, αChl) were characterized in Weeks Bay, a nitrogen-impacted shallow estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Variability in primary productivity model parameters in response to environmental forcing, nutrients, and microalgal taxonomic marker pigments were analysed in monthly and short-term datasets. Microalgal biomass (as Chla) was strongly related to total phosphorus concentration on seasonal scales. Hourly data support wind-driven resuspension as a major source of short-term variability in Chla and light attenuation (kd). The empirical relationship between areal primary productivity and a combined variable of biomass and light attenuation showed that variability in the photosynthesis-irradiance response contributed little to the overall variability in primary productivity, and Chla alone could account for 53-86% of the variability in primary productivity. Efforts to model productivity in similar shallow systems with highly variable microalgal biomass may benefit the most by investing resources in improving spatial and temporal resolution of chlorophyll a measurements before increasing the complexity of models used in productivity modeling.

  1. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Jiménez, E.; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; Salinas, N.; Phillips, O. L.; . Anderson, L. O.; Baker, T. R.; Goncalvez, P. H.; Huamán-Ovalle, J.; Mamani-Solórzano, M.; Meir, P.; Monteagudo, A.; Peñuela, M. C.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Rozas-Dávila, A.; Rudas, A.; Silva Junior, J. A.; Vásquez, R.

    2009-02-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1) How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2) How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (mean±standard error), at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  2. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Jiménez, E.; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; Salinas, N.; Phillips, O. L.; Anderson, L. O.; Alvarez, E.; Baker, T. R.; Goncalvez, P. H.; Huamán-Ovalle, J.; Mamani-Solórzano, M.; Meir, P.; Monteagudo, A.; Patiño, S.; Peñuela, M. C.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Rozas-Dávila, A.; Rudas, A.; Silva, J. A., Jr.; Vásquez, R.

    2009-12-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1) How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2) How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (mean±standard error), at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  3. Produce Surface Characteristics Affect Product Quality and Safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface characteristics of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables vary largely among produce types, maturities and processing procedure. Studies have shown that the surface topography of produce significantly affected adherence, attachment, and biofilm formation of bacteria, as well as their removal a...

  4. Mindfulness, Resilience, and Burnout Subtypes in Primary Care Physicians: The Possible Mediating Role of Positive and Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Marin, Jesús; Tops, Mattie; Manzanera, Rick; Piva Demarzo, Marcelo M.; Álvarez de Mon, Melchor; García-Campayo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Primary care health professionals suffer from high levels of burnout. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the associations of mindfulness and resilience with the features of the burnout types (overload, lack of development, neglect) in primary care physicians, taking into account the potential mediating role of negative and positive affect. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Six hundred and twenty-two Spanish primary care physicians were recruited from an online survey. The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire (BCSQ-12) questionnaires were administered. Polychoric correlation matrices were calculated. The unweighted least squares (ULS) method was used for developing structural equation modeling. Results: Mindfulness and resilience presented moderately high associations (φ = 0.46). Links were found between mindfulness and overload (γ = −0.25); resilience and neglect (γ = −0.44); mindfulness and resilience, and negative affect (γ = −0.30 and γ = −0.35, respectively); resilience and positive affect (γ = 0.70); negative affect and overload (β = 0.36); positive affect and lack of development (β = −0.16). The links between the burnout types reached high and positive values between overload and lack of development (β = 0.64), and lack of development and neglect (β = 0.52). The model was a very good fit to the data (GFI = 0.96; AGFI = 0.96; RMSR = 0.06; NFI = 0.95; RFI = 0.95; PRATIO = 0.96). Conclusions: Interventions addressing both mindfulness and resilience can influence burnout subtypes, but their impact may occur in different ways, potentially mediated by positive and negative affect. Both sorts of trainings could constitute possible tools against burnout; however, while mindfulness seems a suitable intervention for preventing its initial stages, resilience may be more effective for

  5. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to

  6. Causal Predominance of Cognitions in Disturbed Affects among Finnish Primary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Raimo

    1990-01-01

    A putative causal relationship of cognitions to affects in different phases of teachers' stress cycles was studied for 414 elementary school teachers in Finland. Results provide only negligible support for the causal predominance of cognitions in disturbed affects; the opposite seemed to prevail. Implications for teacher satisfaction are…

  7. Some factors affecting tannase production by Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem

    PubMed Central

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; El-Sahn, Malak A.; El-Banna, Amr A.

    2013-01-01

    One variable at a time procedure was used to evaluate the effect of qualitative variables on the production of tannase from Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem. These variables including: fermentation technique, agitation condition, tannins source, adding carbohydrates incorporation with tannic acid, nitrogen source type and divalent cations. Submerged fermentation under intermittent shaking gave the highest total tannase activity. Maximum extracellular tannase activity (305 units/50 mL) was attained in medium containing tannic acid as tannins source and sodium nitrate as nitrogen source at 30 °C for 96 h. All added carbohydrates showed significant adverse effects on the production of tannase. All tested divalent cations significantly decreased tannase production. Moreover, split plot design was carried out to study the effect of fermentation temperature and fermentation time on tannase production. The results indicated maximum tannase production (312.7 units/50 mL) at 35 °C for 96 h. In other words, increasing fermentation temperature from 30 °C to 35 °C resulted in increasing tannase production. PMID:24294255

  8. MODIS Ocean Color, SST and Primary Productivity Products at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziana, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Savtchenko, A.; Serafino, G.; Sharma, A. K.

    2001-12-01

    The Goddard Earth Science (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) plays a major role in enabling basic scientific research and providing access to scientific data for the user community through the ingest, processing, archive and distribution of MODIS data. MODIS is part of the instrument package on the Terra (formally AM-1) satellite that was launched on December 18. 1999. Global scale ocean products are derived from many of the 36 different wavelengths measured by the MODIS/Terra instrument and are archived at a rate of about 230 GB/day. This paper will provide a description of the MODIS Ocean data products and associated geophysical parameters, data access, data availability and tools. The full suite of ocean products is grouped into three categories: ocean color, SST and primary productivity. The amount of MODIS ocean data being archived at the DAAC will increase dramatically in the near future when the data from the MODIS instrument onboard the Aqua (formally PM-1) spacecraft begins transmission. This will result in a significant increase in the volume of ocean data being ingested, archived and distributed at the GES DAAC. The current suite of products will be generated for both Terra and Aqua. In addition, joint Terra/Aqua ocean products will be derived. The challenge, to distribute such large volumes of data to the ocean community, is achieved through a combination of GES DAAC Hierarchical Search and Order Tool known as, WHOM, and EOS Data Gateway (EDG) World Wide Web (WWW) interfaces and an FTP site that contains samples of MODIS data. The MODIS Data Support Team (MDST) continues the tradition of quality support at the GES DAAC for the ocean color data from CZCS and SeaWiFS by providing expert assistance to users in accessing data products, information on visualization tools, documentation for data products and formats (HDF-EOS), information on the scientific content of products and metadata. Visit the MDST website at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/CAMPAIGN_DOCS/MODIS/index.html

  9. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology

    PubMed Central

    Koontz, Melissa; Lundberg, Christopher; Lane, Robert; Day, John; Pezeshki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008–2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m−2·year−1), the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m−2·year−1·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m−2·year−1. The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River. PMID:26861409

  10. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Melissa; Lundberg, Christopher; Lane, Robert; Day, John; Pezeshki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008-2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m(-2)·year(-1)), the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m(-2)·year(-1)·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m(-2)·year(-1). The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River. PMID:26861409

  11. Influence of seasonal primary productivity on δ13C of North Atlantic deep-sea benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corliss, B. H.; Sun, X.; Brown, C. W.; Showers, W. J.

    2006-04-01

    The stable isotopic composition of benthic foraminifera has been widely used to reconstruct deep-ocean circulation, but questions have been raised about the influence of organic carbon flux on the carbon isotopic composition of deep-sea taxa. We show that annual and seasonality of primary productivity in the North Atlantic do not affect δ13C of Planulina wuellerstorfi, but that the intermittency or seasonality of primary production has a significant effect (0.9‰ change over 60° latitude) on δ13C of Epistominella exigua, reflecting the influence of pelagic-benthic coupling and microhabitat preferences on test geochemistry. These results support the use of δ13C of P. wuellerstorfi in paleocirculation studies and suggest that the δ13C of E. exigua can be used to reconstruct seasonality of productivity.

  12. Climatic controls on aboveground net primary production of tropical lowland rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofhansl, F.; Drage, S.; Poelz, E.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.

    2012-12-01

    Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of tropical forests is driven by soil fertility and climate, the latter receiving special attention as recent projections of global circulation models predict Mesoamerican tropics to become drier and warmer. Given the scarcity of manipulative experiments, interannual climate variations caused by El Nino Southern Oscillation have been used to assess the potential responses of tropical ANPP to projected climate change. The focus of this study was (1) to investigate how seasonal and interannual climate variations affect ANPP and the partitioning between litterfall and stem increment on three forest sites differing in soil fertility and disturbance regime in SW Costa Rica, and (2) to identify major drivers of tropical forest ANPP by integrating our results into a dataset provided by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). While forest productivity was reported to decline in areas with high precipitation and temperature, we measured among the highest stem increments and litterfall rates published to date at a site with >6000 mm mean annual precipitation (MAP) and a mean annual temperature (MAT) of 28 °C. Based on the full dataset MAP was inversely correlated with litterfall, while MAT and soil fertility promoted stem increment. Therefore the percentage of litterfall and stem increment to ANPP shifted from 80:20 in low productive tropical forests to 40:60 at forest sites with high biomass production. Our results suggest that there is a shift in the allocation of biomass towards greater nutrient conservation (i.e. production of wood biomass) in more productive tropical forests while litterfall is sustaining nutrient recycling processes in less productive forests and that this relationship is driven by climate. We finally demonstrate that both ANPP components are sensitive to seasonal and interannual climate variation at the three forest sites studied, but that the controls differ for litterfall and stem

  13. Temperature can interact with landscape factors to affect songbird productivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Reidy, Jennifer L; Faaborg, John

    2013-04-01

    Increased temperatures and more extreme weather patterns associated with global climate change can interact with other factors that regulate animal populations, but many climate change studies do not incorporate other threats to wildlife in their analyses. We used 20 years of nest-monitoring data from study sites across a gradient of habitat fragmentation in Missouri, USA, to investigate the relative influence of weather variables (temperature and precipitation) and landscape factors (forest cover and edge density) on the number of young produced per nest attempt (i.e., productivity) for three species of songbirds. We detected a strong forest cover × temperature interaction for the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) on productivity. Greater forest cover resulted in greater productivity because of reduced brood parasitism and increased nest survival, whereas greater temperatures reduced productivity in highly forested landscapes because of increased nest predation but had no effect in less forested landscapes. The Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) exhibited a similar pattern, albeit with a marginal forest cover × temperature interaction. By contrast, productivity of the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) was not influenced by landscape effects or temperature. Our results highlight a potential difficulty of managing wildlife in response to global change such as habitat fragmentation and climate warming, as the habitat associated with the greatest productivity for flycatchers was also that most negatively influenced by high temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on nest predation (and therefore, nest predators) underscores the need to acknowledge the potential complexity of species' responses to climate change by incorporating a more thorough consideration of community ecology in the development of models of climate impacts on wildlife. PMID:23504884

  14. The Impact of Submesoscale Physics on Primary Productivity of Plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-01-01

    Life in the ocean relies on the photosynthetic production of phytoplankton, which is influenced by the availability of light and nutrients that are modulated by a host of physical processes. Submesoscale processes are particularly relevant to phytoplankton productivity because the timescales on which they act are similar to those of phytoplankton growth. Their dynamics are associated with strong vorticity and strain rates that occur on lateral scales of 0.1-10 km. They can support vertical velocities as large as 100 m d-1 and play a crucial role in transporting nutrients into the sunlit ocean for phytoplankton production. In regimes with deep surface mixed layers, submesoscale instabilities can cause stratification within days, thereby increasing light exposure for phytoplankton trapped close to the surface. These instabilities help to create and maintain localized environments that favor the growth of phytoplankton, contribute to productivity, and cause enormous heterogeneity in the abundance of phytoplankton, which has implications for interactions within the ecosystem.

  15. Contrasting impacts of different-sized herbivores on species richness of Mediterranean annual pastures differing in primary productivity.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Marta; Rebollo, Salvador; García-Salgado, Gonzalo

    2013-06-01

    Vertebrate herbivores can be key determinants of grassland plant species richness, although the magnitude of their effects can largely depend on ecosystem and herbivore characteristics. It has been demonstrated that the combined effect of primary productivity and body size is critical when assessing the impact of herbivores on plant richness of perennial-dominated grasslands; however, the interaction of site productivity and herbivore size as determinants of plant richness in annual-dominated pastures remains unknown. We experimentally partitioned primary productivity and herbivore body size (sheep and wild rabbits) to study the effect of herbivores on the plant species richness of a Mediterranean semiarid annual plant community in central Spain over six years. We also analyzed the effect of grazing and productivity on the evenness and species composition of the plant community, and green cover, litter, and plant height. We found that plant richness was higher where the large herbivore was present at high-productivity sites but barely changed at low productivity. The small herbivore did not affect species richness at either productivity site despite its large effects on species composition. We propose that adaptations to resource scarcity and herbivory prevented plant richness changes at low-productivity sites, whereas litter accumulation in the absence of herbivores decreased plant richness at high productivity. Our results are consistent with predictions arising from a long history of grazing and highlight the importance of both large and small herbivores to the maintenance of plant diversity of Mediterranean annual-dominated pastures. PMID:23090759

  16. Primary production export flux in Marguerite Bay (Antarctic Peninsula): Linking upper water-column production to sediment trap flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Keith; Jickells, Timothy D.; Carson, Damien S.; Clarke, Andrew; Meredith, Michael P.; Brandon, Mark A.; Wallace, Margaret I.; Ussher, Simon J.; Hendry, Katharine R.

    2013-05-01

    A study was carried out to assess primary production and associated export flux in the coastal waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula at an oceanographic time-series site. New, i.e., exportable, primary production in the upper water-column was estimated in two ways; by nutrient deficit measurements, and by primary production rate measurements using separate 14C-labelled radioisotope and 15N-labelled stable isotope uptake incubations. The resulting average annual exportable primary production estimates at the time-series site from nutrient deficit and primary production rates were 13 and 16 mol C m-2, respectively. Regenerated primary production was measured using 15N-labelled ammonium and urea uptake, and was low throughout the sampling period. The exportable primary production measurements were compared with sediment trap flux measurements from 2 locations; the time-series site and at a site 40 km away in deeper water. Results showed ˜1% of the upper mixed layer exportable primary production was exported to traps at 200 m depth at the time-series site (total water column depth 520 m). The maximum particle flux rate to sediment traps at the deeper offshore site (total water column depth 820 m) was lower than the flux at the coastal time-series site. Flux of particulate organic carbon was similar throughout the spring-summer high flux period for both sites. Remineralisation of particulate organic matter predominantly occurred in the upper water-column (<200 m depth), with minimal remineralisation below 200 m, at both sites. This highly productive region on the Western Antarctic Peninsula is therefore best characterised as 'high recycling, low export'.

  17. Clinical Inquiry: Does primary nocturnal enuresis affect childrens' self-esteem?

    PubMed

    Phung, Phuc; Kelsberg, Gary; Safranek, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Children with primary nocturnal enuresis often, but not always, score about 10% lower on standardized rating scales for self-esteem, or scores for symptoms similar to low self-esteem (sadness, anxiety, social fears, distress) than children without enuresis. PMID:25973452

  18. Primary particle size distribution of eroded material affected by degree of aggregate slaking and seal development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Primary particle size distribution (PSD) of eroded sediments can be used to estimate potential nutrient losses from soil and pollution hazards to the environment. We studied eroded sediment PSDs from three saturated soils, packed in trays (20 x 40 x 4 cm), that had undergone either minimal aggregate...

  19. Children's Perceptions of Parental Attitude Affecting Breakfast Skipping in Primary Sixth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tereza Sy; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Griffiths, Sian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Breakfast skipping is an international public health concern. This study investigated the prevalence of breakfast skipping among primary sixth-grade students in Hong Kong and the impact of students' perceptions of parental attitudes on breakfast skipping. Methods: A total of 426 students aged 10-14 years in 4 local schools participated…

  20. Student Primary Teachers Improving Their Mathematics Subject Knowledge: Cognition and Affect Intertwined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted with a random sample of 80 student primary teachers drawn from all four years of the Bachelor of Education (BEd) programme at a teacher education institution in Scotland, with a view to determining why there were such differing levels of engagement with an online maths assessment. The assessment was created…

  1. Primary Dysmenorrhea, Educational Performance, and Cognitive and Affective Variables in Adolescent Schoolgirls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, D.; Rees, Valerie

    1982-01-01

    Research among adolescent English schoolgirls indicated that although girls with primary dysmenorrhea appeared to be more neurotic than those who did not experience menstrual distress, there was no apparent difference between the two groups on cognitive and academic performance measures or in school attendance. (Author/MJL)

  2. Cultural practices in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) affect weed seed production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Billions of dollars are lost annually due to weeds or weed control, but weeds persist. Successful weed management systems must reduce weed populations. The objectives of this research were to 1) determine if cotton row spacing has an impact on weed growth and seed production and 2) evaluate the infl...

  3. Does breed of ram affect ewe and lamb productivity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systematic use of breed diversity in terminal crossbreeding systems can improve the efficiency of commercial lamb production. Data from controlled research should be used to select the genetic line or lines of rams to use in terminal crossbreeding systems. Thus, research is underway at the USDA, ARS...

  4. Affected functional networks associated with sentence production in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; van den Hurk, Job; Hofman, Paul Am; Zimmermann, Luc Ji; Uludağ, Kâmil; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-08-01

    Patients with the inherited metabolic disorder classic galactosemia have language production impairments in several planning stages. Here, we assessed potential deviations in recruitment and connectivity across brain areas responsible for language production that may explain these deficits. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study neural activity and connectivity while participants carried out a language production task. This study included 13 adolescent patients and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Participants passively watched or actively described an animated visual scene using two conditions, varying in syntactic complexity (single words versus a sentence). Results showed that patients recruited additional and more extensive brain regions during sentence production. Both groups showed modulations with syntactic complexity in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a region associated with syntactic planning, and in right insula. In addition, patients showed a modulation with syntax in left superior temporal gyrus (STG), whereas the controls did not. Further, patients showed increased activity in right STG and right supplementary motor area (SMA). The functional connectivity data showed similar patterns, with more extensive connectivity with frontal and motor regions, and restricted and weaker connectivity with superior temporal regions. Patients also showed higher baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF) in right IFG and trends towards higher CBF in bilateral STG, SMA and the insula. Taken together, the data demonstrate that language abnormalities in classic galactosemia are associated with specific changes within the language network. These changes point towards impairments related to both syntactic planning and speech motor planning in these patients. PMID:25979518

  5. How Soil Roughness Affects Runoff and Sediment Production?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of soil surface roughness on runoff and sediment production have not been clearly quantified, mostly due to the lack of a logical separation between geometric (i.e., surface microtopography) and process (i.e., runoff generation, soil detachment by raindrop and runoff) scales. In this resea...

  6. Sex of littermate twin affects lifetime ewe productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ewe productivity is synonymous with annual litter-weight weaned (LWW) per ewe exposed to rams for breeding, and LWW is largely a function of number of lambs born (NLB) and weaned (NLW). Selecting for LWW should increase litter size and numbers of ewe-ram co-twins. Thus, we used historical records to...

  7. The effects of urbanization on net primary productivity in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dengsheng; Xu, Xiaofeng; Tian, Hanqin; Moran, Emilio; Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven

    2010-09-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is one of the major ecosystem products on which human societies rely heavily. However, rapid urban sprawl and its associated dense population and economic conditions have generated great pressure on natural resources, food security, and environments. It is valuable to understand how urban expansion and associated demographic and economic conditions affect ecosystem functions. This research conducted a case study in Southeastern China to examine the impacts of urban expansion and demographic and economic conditions on NPP. The data sources used in research include human settlement developed through a combination of MODIS, DMSP-OLS and Landsat ETM+ images, the annual NPP from MODIS, and the population and gross domestic product (GDP) from the 2000 census data. Multiple regression analysis and nonlinear regression analysis were used to examine the relationships of NPP with settlement, population and GDP. This research indicates that settlement, population and GDP have strongly negative correlation with NPP in Southeastern China, but the outcomes were nonlinear when population or GDP reached certain thresholds. PMID:20703877

  8. The Effects of Urbanization on Net Primary Productivity in Southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dengsheng; Xu, Xiaofeng; Tian, Hanqin; Moran, Emilio; Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven

    2010-09-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is one of the major ecosystem products on which human societies rely heavily. However, rapid urban sprawl and its associated dense population and economic conditions have generated great pressure on natural resources, food security, and environments. It is valuable to understand how urban expansion and associated demographic and economic conditions affect ecosystem functions. This research conducted a case study in Southeastern China to examine the impacts of urban expansion and demographic and economic conditions on NPP. The data sources used in research include human settlement developed through a combination of MODIS, DMSP-OLS and Landsat ETM+ images, the annual NPP from MODIS, and the population and gross domestic product (GDP) from the 2000 census data. Multiple regression analysis and nonlinear regression analysis were used to examine the relationships of NPP with settlement, population and GDP. This research indicates that settlement, population and GDP have strongly negative correlation with NPP in Southeastern China, but the outcomes were nonlinear when population or GDP reached certain thresholds.

  9. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-Specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2014-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (50, the equivalent of 20 PgC y-1. Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed to 20 (7 PgC y-1 of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10 (4 PgC y(sub-1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (45) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4 (1-2 PgC y-1. We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nio Index, MEI) and regional climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p 0.05) between the MEI and the class-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatomscyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect on the class-specific primary production in the Southern Ocean. These results provide a modeling and

  10. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP accumulation and dinitrogen fixation - a mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Neulinger, S. C.; Reichel, A. F.; Loginova, A.; Borchard, C.; Schmitz, R. A.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) deoxygenates further and microbially driven nitrogen (N) loss processes are promoted. Consequently, water masses with a low nitrogen to phosphorus (N : P) ratio could reach the euphotic layer, possibly influencing primary production in those waters. Previous mesocosm studies in the oligotrophic Atlantic Ocean identified nitrate availability as a control of primary production, while a possible co-limitation of nitrate and phosphate could not be ruled out. To better understand the impact of changing N : P ratios on primary production and N2 fixation in the ETNA surface ocean, we conducted land-based mesocosm experiments with natural plankton communities and applied a broad range of N : P ratios (2.67-48). Silicic acid was supplied at 15 µmol L-1 in all mesocosms. We monitored nutrient drawdown, biomass accumulation and nitrogen fixation in response to variable nutrient stoichiometry. Our results confirmed nitrate to be the key factor determining primary production. We found that excess phosphate was channeled through particulate organic matter (POP) into the dissolved organic matter (DOP) pool. In mesocosms with low inorganic phosphate availability, DOP was utilized while N2 fixation increased, suggesting a link between those two processes. Interestingly this observation was most pronounced in mesocosms where nitrate was still available, indicating that bioavailable N does not necessarily suppress N2 fixation. We observed a shift from a mixed cyanobacteria-proteobacteria dominated active diazotrophic community towards a diatom-diazotrophic association of the Richelia-Rhizosolenia symbiosis. We hypothesize that a potential change in nutrient stoichiometry in the ETNA might lead to a general shift within

  11. Catastrophic shifts in the aquatic primary production revealed by a small low-flow section of tropical downstream after dredging.

    PubMed

    Marotta, H; Enrich-Prast, A

    2015-11-01

    Dredging is a catastrophic disturbance that directly affects key biological processes in aquatic ecosystems, especially in those small and shallow. In the tropics, metabolic responses could still be enhanced by the high temperatures and solar incidence. Here, we assessed changes in the aquatic primary production along a small section of low-flow tropical downstream (Imboassica Stream, Brazil) after dredging. Our results suggested that these ecosystems may show catastrophic shifts between net heterotrophy and autotrophy in waters based on three short-term stages following the dredging: (I) a strongly heterotrophic net primary production -NPP- coupled to an intense respiration -R- likely supported by high resuspended organic sediments and nutrients from the bottom; (II) a strongly autotrophic NPP coupled to an intense gross primary production -GPP- favored by the high nutrient levels and low solar light attenuation from suspended solids or aquatic macrophytes; and (III) a NPP near to the equilibrium coupled to low GPP and R rates following, respectively, the shading by aquatic macrophytes and high particulate sedimentation. In conclusion, changes in aquatic primary production could be an important threshold for controlling drastic shifts in the organic matter cycling and the subsequent silting up of small tropical streams after dredging events. PMID:26602334

  12. Bacterial Community Affects Toxin Production by Gymnodinium catenatum

    PubMed Central

    Albinsson, Maria E.; Negri, Andrew P.; Blackburn, Susan I.; Bolch, Christopher J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The paralytic shellfish toxin (PST)-producing dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum grows in association with a complex marine bacterial community that is both essential for growth and can alter culture growth dynamics. Using a bacterial community replacement approach, we examined the intracellular PST content, production rate, and profile of G. catenatum cultures grown with bacterial communities of differing complexity and composition. Clonal offspring were established from surface-sterilized resting cysts (produced by sexual crosses of strain GCDE06 and strain GCLV01) and grown with: 1) complex bacterial communities derived from each of the two parent cultures; 2) simplified bacterial communities composed of the G. catenatum-associated bacteria Marinobacter sp. strain DG879 or Alcanivorax sp. strain DG881; 3) a complex bacterial community associated with an untreated, unsterilized sexual cross of the parents. Toxin content (STX-equivalent per cell) of clonal offspring (134–197 fmol STX cell−1) was similar to the parent cultures (169–206 fmol STX cell−1), however cultures grown with single bacterial types contained less toxin (134–146 fmol STX cell−1) than offspring or parent cultures grown with more complex mixed bacterial communities (152–176 fmol STX cell−1). Specific toxin production rate (fmol STX day−1) was strongly correlated with culture growth rate. Net toxin production rate (fmol STX cell−1 day−1) did not differ among treatments, however, mean net toxin production rate of offspring was 8-fold lower than the parent cultures, suggesting that completion of the sexual lifecycle in laboratory cultures leads to reduced toxin production. The PST profiles of offspring cultures were most similar to parent GCDE06 with the exception of cultures grown with Marinobacter sp. DG879 which produced higher proportions of dcGTX2+3 and GC1+2, and lower proportions of C1+2 and C3+4. Our data demonstrate that the bacterial community can alter

  13. The FRIABLE1 Gene Product Affects Cell Adhesion in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Neumetzler, Lutz; Humphrey, Tania; Lumba, Shelley; Snyder, Stephen; Yeats, Trevor H.; Usadel, Björn; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Patel, Jignasha; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Persson, Staffan; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1), was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246). Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22916179

  14. Mercury emission and behavior in primary ferrous metal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Naomichi; Takaoka, Masaki; Doumoto, Shingo; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Morisawa, Shinsuke; Mizuno, Tadao

    2011-07-01

    Ferrous metal production is thought to be a major mercury emission source because it uses large amounts of coal and iron ore, which contain trace amounts of mercury impurities. However, there is limited information about mercury emissions during the production process. In this study, we focused on the coke-oven process, sintering furnace process, and blast furnace process. We measured the mercury concentration in the raw materials, products, and byproducts to estimate the amount of mercury emitted and to investigate the behavior of mercury during the processes. Average mercury concentrations were 30.8 μg kg -1 in 54 samples of iron ore and 59.9 μg kg -1 in 33 samples of coal. The total mercury used for ferrous metal production in Japan was estimated to be 8.45 tons in 2005, with 4.07 tons from iron ore, 3.76 tons from coal, and 0.478 tons from limestone. Emissions from the sintering process accounted for more than 90% of the total emissions, and mercury in the exhaust gas was reduced using an activated coke tower and desulfurization equipment installed downstream of an electrostatic precipitator. When byproduct gas generated from coke-oven and blast furnace processes were included, mercury emissions estimates based on actual measurements were 4.08 tons y -1 (in 2005). Thus, about 50% of the mercury input in ferrous metal production was emitted to the atmosphere. The emission factor was calculated as 0.0488 g Hg ton -1 for crude steel production. The introduction of activated coke tower or desulfurization equipment in sintering furnace facilities would reduce mercury emissions.

  15. Does thalidomide affect IL-2 response and production?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, L P; Schlegel, P G; Baker, J; Chen, Y; Chao, N J

    1995-08-01

    The exact mechanism of immunosuppression by thalidomide is poorly understood. A common denominator in the pathogenesis of graft-vs.-host disease, graft rejection, reactional lepromatous leprosy, and autoimmune disorders modulated by thalidomide is the activation of T lymphocytes culminating in the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2), the expression of high-affinity IL-2 receptors, and the induction of proliferation. We investigated the effect of thalidomide on the production of IL-2 by the human leukemia cell line Jurkat through induction of IL-2 gene enhancer activity and through the presence of IL-2 in supernatants. beta-galactosidase activity, encoded by a reporter lac z construct and controlled by a transcription factor in thalidomide-treated PMA- and ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat cells, was similar (97 +/- 1.33%; p > 0.1) to non-thalidomide-treated controls at all drug concentrations tested. IL-2 enhancer-driven beta-galactose activity of thalidomide-treated and stimulated cells was also similar to that of untreated controls (p > 0.2). The IL-2 production of activated nontransfected Jurkat cells was gauged by using the IL-2-dependent cell line HT-2 as a readout and by ELISA. Jurkat cells were subcloned by limiting dilution. Bulk cultures and three subclones (J.5.2.5., J.5.2.9., and J.5.3.8.) were assayed at 6, 12, and 24 hours after PHA/PMA-induced stimulation. No inhibitory effect on the IL-2 production by thalidomide could be detected at any of the drug concentrations tested (5-30 micrograms/mL), whereas 10 to 100 ng/mL of cyclosporine inhibited the IL-2 production by 95 to 100%. In addition, we observed neither inhibition of IL-2-dependent proliferation of HT-2 nor inhibition of PHA-induced proliferation of peripheral mononuclear cells by thalidomide at all drug concentrations used (5-30 micrograms/mL). These results do not support the possibility of a modulatory effect on the immune response by thalidomide via IL-2 production and IL-2 response. PMID:7635184

  16. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile; Gregg, Watson

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton is responsible for over half of the net primary production on earth. The knowledge on the contribution of various phytoplankton groups to the total primary production is still poorly understood. Data from satellite observations suggest that for upwelling regions, photosynthetic rates by microplankton is higher than that of nanoplankton but that when the spatial extent is considered, the production by nanoplankton is comparable or even larger than microplankton. Here, we used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (approx. 50%) followed by coccolithophores and chlorophytes. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (>45 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nino Index, MEI) and 'regional' climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability. These results provide a modeling and data assimilation perspective to phytoplankton partitioning of primary production and contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of the carbon cycle in the oceans at a global scale.

  17. Zika virus productively infects primary human placenta-specific macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Simoni, Michael K.; Tang, Zhonghua; Uraki, Ryuta; Hwang, Jesse; Householder, Sarah; Wu, Mingjie; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Guller, Seth; Fikrig, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The strong association of Zika virus infection with congenital defects has led to questions of how a flavivirus is capable of crossing the placental barrier to reach the fetal brain. Here, we demonstrate permissive Zika virus infection of primary human placental macrophages, commonly referred to as Hofbauer cells, and placental villous fibroblasts. We also demonstrate Zika virus infection of Hofbauer cells within the context of the tissue ex vivo using term placental villous explants. In addition to amplifying infectious virus within a usually inaccessible area, the putative migratory activities of Hofbauer cells may aid in dissemination of Zika virus to the fetal brain. Understanding the susceptibility of placenta-specific cell types will aid future work around and understanding of Zika virus–associated pregnancy complications. PMID:27595140

  18. Fission Product Migration in Primary System and Containment

    2015-04-01

    Version 00 ART MOD2 aims at a comprehensive analysis for the FP behaviour in primary system and in containment during severe accidents and therefore the code considers the removal of radio-nuclides of up to 60 materials including chemical compounds by natural deposition and by the engineered safety features (ESF) such as spray systems. As for the natural deposition of radio-nuclides, the code can consider the phenomena such as gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, Brownian diffusion, diffusionmore » under laminar or turbulent flows, resuspension, condensation, chemisorption and revaporization. The code also models the aerosol growth by agglomeration of aerosols and condensation/evaporation of volatile material at the aerosol surface. Recently, the models for iodine chemistry in containment sump water was incorporated into ART MOD2 ART MOD2 was modified in January 2015 to correct coding errors and improve the vibration of the calculation result of water (H2O) vapor.« less

  19. Fission Product Migration in Primary System and Containment

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-01

    Version 00 ART MOD2 aims at a comprehensive analysis for the FP behaviour in primary system and in containment during severe accidents and therefore the code considers the removal of radio-nuclides of up to 60 materials including chemical compounds by natural deposition and by the engineered safety features (ESF) such as spray systems. As for the natural deposition of radio-nuclides, the code can consider the phenomena such as gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, Brownian diffusion, diffusion under laminar or turbulent flows, resuspension, condensation, chemisorption and revaporization. The code also models the aerosol growth by agglomeration of aerosols and condensation/evaporation of volatile material at the aerosol surface. Recently, the models for iodine chemistry in containment sump water was incorporated into ART MOD2 ART MOD2 was modified in January 2015 to correct coding errors and improve the vibration of the calculation result of water (H2O) vapor.

  20. Capacity Building for collecting primary data through Crowdsourcing - An Example of Disaster affected Uttarakhand State (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, Y. V. N.; Raju, P. L. N.; Srivastav, S. K.; Kumar, P.; Mitra, D.; Karnatak, H.; Saran, S.; Pandey, K.; Oberai, K.; Shiva Reddy, K.; Gupta, K.; Swamy, M.; Deshmukh, A.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Bothale, V.; Diwakar, P. G.; Ravikumar, M. V.; Leisely, A.; Arulraj, M.; Kumar, S.; Rao, S. S.; Singh Rawat, R.; Pathak, D. M.; Dutt, V.; Negi, D.; Singh, J.; Shukla, K. K.; Tomar, A.; Ahmed, N.; Singh, B.; Singh, A. K.; Shiva Kumar, R.

    2014-11-01

    Uttarakhand State of India suffered a widespread devastation in June 2013 due to floods caused by excessive rain in the upper reaches of the Himalaya, glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) and landslides. Restoration process in this mountainous State calls for scientifically sound planning so that the vulnerabilities and risks to such natural hazards are minimised and developmental processes are sustainable in long run. Towards this, an understanding of the patterns and major controls of damage of the recent disaster is a key requirement which can be achieved only if the primary data on locations and types of damage along with other local site conditions are available. Considering widespread damage, tough nature of terrain and the need for collecting the primary data on damage in shortest possible time, crowdsourcing approach was considered to be the most viable solution. Accordingly, a multiinstitutional initiative called "Map the Neighbourhood in Uttarakhand" (MANU) was conceptualised with the main objective of collecting primary data on damage through participation of local people (mainly students) using state-of-art tools and technologies of data collection and a mechanism to integrate the same with Bhuvan geo-portal (www.bhuvan.nrsc.gov.in) in near real-time. Geospatial analysis of crowd-sourced points with different themes has been carried out subsequently for providing inputs to restoration planning and for future developmental activities. The present paper highlights the capacity building aspect in enabling the data collection process using crowdsourcing technology.

  1. Seed Production Affects Maternal Growth and Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Samuel Elias; Philipp, Matthias Anton; Guthörl, Daniela; Schmid, Bernhard; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-05-01

    Correlative control (influence of one organ over another organ) of seeds over maternal growth is one of the most obvious phenotypic expressions of the trade-off between growth and reproduction. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we characterize the physiological and molecular effects of correlative inhibition by seeds on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescences, i.e. global proliferative arrest (GPA) during which all maternal growth ceases upon the production of a given number of seeds. We observed transcriptional responses to growth- and branching-inhibitory hormones, and low mitotic activity in meristems upon GPA, but found that meristems retain their identity and proliferative potential. In shoot tissues, we detected the induction of stress- and senescence-related gene expression upon fruit production and GPA, and a drop in chlorophyll levels, suggestive of altered source-sink relationships between vegetative shoot and reproductive tissues. Levels of shoot reactive oxygen species, however, strongly decreased upon GPA, a phenomenon that is associated with bud dormancy in some perennials. Indeed, gene expression changes in arrested apical inflorescences after fruit removal resembled changes observed in axillary buds following release from apical dominance. This suggests that GPA represents a form of bud dormancy, and that dominance is gradually transferred from growing inflorescences to maturing seeds, allowing offspring control over maternal resources, simultaneously restricting offspring number. This would provide a mechanistic explanation for the constraint between offspring quality and quantity. PMID:27009281

  2. Factors affecting the bioaccessibility of fluoride from seafood products.

    PubMed

    Rocha, R A; de la Fuente, B; Clemente, M J; Ruiz, A; Vélez, D; Devesa, V

    2013-09-01

    Fluoride is considered important for health because of its beneficial effect on the prevention of dental caries and on bone development in the child population. However, excessive intake has negative effects. The main pathway for exposure is oral, through consumption of drinking water, and some food products. Therefore its bioaccessibility (quantity of the element solubilized during the digestive process) is a parameter to be considered when estimating the risk/benefit associated with this element. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of the digestion phase, gastrointestinal digestion factors (pH, pepsin and bile salt concentrations) and the presence of cations on the bioaccessibility of fluoride from seafood products. The results show that the solubilization of fluoride takes place entirely during the gastric phase. Its bioaccessibility is strongly influenced by conditions that favor the formation of insoluble complexes of fluoride with other elements present in the matrix. The factors that are most influential in reducing its bioaccessibility are the increase in pH in the gastric phase, the presence of cations, especially in the intestinal phase, and a low concentration of bile salts. PMID:23747712

  3. Effects of Stream Fishes on Benthic Primary Productivity: A Mechanistic Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrave, C. W.

    2005-05-01

    I simultaneously tested three alternative hypotheses (the trophic cascade, nutrient enhancement via terrestrial nutrient translocation, and nutrient enhancement via bioturbation) for consumer regulation of primary productivity (PPR) by three widely distributed stream fish species (Orangethroat Darter, Western Mosquitofish, and Bullhead Minnow). I used stream mesocosms fitted with fish and terrestrial input barriers to address relative importance of localized fish predation versus access to terrestrial inputs for fish consumer effects. Orangethroat Darter, a benthic invertivore, increased PPR through an apparent trophic cascade, by localized reduction of benthic grazing invertebrate densities. Western mosquitofish, a surface feeding insectivore, increased PPR by enhancing nutrients through terrestrial nutrient translocation, and had no effect on benthic grazer invertebrate density. Bullhead Minnow, a benthic omnivore that disturbed sediments during foraging, increased PPR through nutrient enhancement via bioturbation, but within specific stream mesocosm areas two which the fish was restricted it also reduced benthic grazing invertebrates. Thus, suggesting this species may have affected PPR through a combination bioturbation and trophic cascade mechanisms. These mechanistic pathways are likely common processes by which fish affect food web structure and ecosystem function in many stream ecosystems.

  4. Small diversity effects on ocean primary production under environmental change in a diversity-resolving ocean ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowe, A. E. F.; Pahlow, M.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Oschlies, A.

    2013-07-01

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic diversity. Diversity, however, can affect functions such as primary production and their sensitivity to environmental changes. Using a global ocean ecosystem model that explicitly resolves phytoplankton diversity within four phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) we investigate the model's ability to capture diversity effects on primary production under environmental change. An idealized scenario with a sudden reduction in vertical mixing causes diversity and primary-production changes that turn out to be largely independent of the number of coexisting phytoplankton types. The model provides a small number of niches with respect to nutrient use in accordance with the PFTs defined in the model, and increasing the number of phytoplankton types increases the resolution within the niches. The variety of traits and trade-offs resolved in the model constrains diversity effects such as niche complementarity, which operate between, but not within PFTs. The number and nature of the niches formulated in the model, for example via trade-offs or different PFTs, thus determines the diversity effects on ecosystem functioning captured in ocean ecosystem models.

  5. Will Global Change Effect Primary Productivity in Coastal Ecosystems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Algae are the base of coastal food webs because they provide the source of organic carbon for the remaining members of the community. Thus, the rate that they produce organic carbon to a large extent controls the productivity of the entire ecosystem. Factors that control algal productivity range from the physical (e.g., temperature, light), chemical (e.g., nutrient levels) to the biological (e.g., grazing). Currently, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide surficial fluxes of ultraviolet radiation are rising. Both of these environmental variables can have a profound effect on algal productivity. Atmospheric carbon dioxide may increase surficial levels of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our laboratory and field studies of algal mats and phytoplankton cultures under ambient and elevated levels of pCO2 show that elevated levels of inorganic carbon can cause an increase in photosynthetic rates. In some cases, this increase will cause an increase in phytoplankton numbers. There may be an increase in the excretion of fixed carbon, which in turn may enhance bacterial productivity. Alternatively, in analogy with studies on the effect of elevated pCO2 on plants, the phytoplankton could change their carbon to nitrogen ratios, which will effect the feeding of the planktonic grazers. The seasonal depletion of stratospheric ozone has resulted in elevated fluxes of UVB radiation superimposed on the normal seasonal variation. Present surface UV fluxes have a significant impact on phytoplankton physiology, including the inhibition of the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis, inhibition of nitrogenase activity, inhibition of heterocyst formation, reduction in motility, increased synthesis of the UV-screening pigment scytonemin, and mutation. After reviewing these issues, recent work in our lab on measuring the effect of UV radiation on phytoplankton in the San Francisco Bay Estuary will be presented.

  6. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Supplement: An evaluation of benthic habitat primary productivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Balcom, B.J.; Foster, M.A.; Fourqurean, J.J.; Heine, J.N.; Leonard, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Literature on current primary productivity was reviewed and evaluated for each of nine benthic communities or habitats, estimates of daily and annual benthic primary productivity were derived within each community, the benthic primary estimates were related to an estimate of areal extent of each community within or adjacent to each OCS planning area. Direct comparisons between habitats was difficult because of the varying measures and methodologies used. Coastal marshes were the most prevalent habitat type evaluated. Mangrove and coral reef habitats were highly productive but occur within few planning areas. Benthic diatoms and blue-green algae are less productive in terms of estimated annual productivity on a per square meter basis; these habitats have the potential to occur across wide areas of the OCS and should not be overlooked.

  7. 40 CFR 63.5984 - What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tire production affected sources? 63.5984 Section 63.5984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5984 What emission limits must I...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5984 - What emission limits must I meet for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tire production affected sources? 63.5984 Section 63.5984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5984 What emission limits must I...

  9. Factors Affecting the Production of Vietnamese Tones: A Study of American Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Hanh thi; Macken, Marlys A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates factors that affect the accuracy of tone production by American students of Vietnamese as a second language (L2). Nine hypotheses are examined, each of which isolates a factor expected to affect production accuracy: (a) task type, (b) the position of a tone in a clause, (c) discourse distance between a model provided by a…

  10. Microscale Topographic Influence on Grassland Primary Productivity on Semiarid Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, Jeffrey Todd

    Understanding the distribution of plant productivity is vital for understanding the spatial variability of ecosystem functions. This study evaluates microtopographic controls (1m-12m) on plant productivity on three rolling hills in Sedgwick Natural Reserve, located in south-central California. Specifically I evaluate the relationship between topographic metrics and plant biomass production through space and time. Biomass was measured using destructive harvests and seasonal Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. Eighty-three 1x0.5m2 quadrats of aboveground plant matter at peak biomass (ANPP) were harvested for the 2012 growing season. For the 2009 growing season, AVIRIS derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was used to estimate biomass at roughly monthly intervals from March to August. I evaluate whether seasonal changes in growing degree days (GDD) was a better predictor of plant phenological events than cumulative days since first soil moisture increase. To characterize topography, I used a 1m resolution digital elevation model derived from terrestrial lidar data to calculate curvature, aspect, and the Compound Topographic Index (CTI) - an index that integrates the flow accumulation area and slope. Using GDD, I found that ecosystem productivity was not temperature limited early in the growing season. Using webcam images I was able to remotely monitor phenological events quantitatively, but was not able to calculate NDVI because I lacked appropriate spectral bands. Plants growing on north facing slopes consistently had higher ANPP than those on south facing slopes, due to lower temperatures, hence greater preservation of soil moisture. No correlation was found between CTI or curvature and ANPP across the 83 sampled points in 2012, potentially because it was a dry year and there was limited water redistribution to lower positions in the landscape. Although a relationship between topography and soil moisture is probably valid

  11. How hollow melanosomes affect iridescent colour production in birds.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Chad M; Bitton, Pierre-Paul; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2013-09-22

    Developmental constraints and trade-offs can limit diversity, but organisms have repeatedly evolved morphological innovations that overcome these limits by expanding the range and functionality of traits. Iridescent colours in birds are commonly produced by melanin-containing organelles (melanosomes) organized into nanostructured arrays within feather barbules. Variation in array type (e.g. multilayers and photonic crystals, PCs) is known to have remarkable effects on plumage colour, but the optical consequences of variation in melanosome shape remain poorly understood. Here, we used a combination of spectrophotometric, experimental and theoretical methods to test how melanosome hollowness--a morphological innovation largely restricted to birds--affects feather colour. Optical analyses of hexagonal close-packed arrays of hollow melanosomes in two species, wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and violet-backed starlings (Cinnyricinclus leucogaster), indicated that they function as two-dimensional PCs. Incorporation of a larger dataset and optical modelling showed that, compared with solid melanosomes, hollow melanosomes allow birds to produce distinct colours with the same energetically favourable, close-packed configurations. These data suggest that a morphological novelty has, at least in part, allowed birds to achieve their vast morphological and colour diversity. PMID:23902909

  12. Evaluation of some physical hazards which may affect health in primary schools

    PubMed Central

    Bakır, Bilal; Babayiğit, Mustafa Alparslan; Tekbaş, Ömer Faruk; Oğur, Recai; Kılıç, Abdullah; Ulus, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study was performed with the objective to determine the levels of some physical hazards in primary schools. Material and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional field survey. In this study which was conducted in 31 primary schools selected by appropriate sampling from the district of Keçiören of the province of Ankara, measurements related with temperature, light, electromagnetic field (EMF) and noise levels were done at hundreds of points. Approval was obtained from Gülhane Military Medical Faculty Ethics Committee (2007/97). Results: Only 47.1% of the classes had a temperature value within the recommended limits (20–21°C). It was found that the illumination levels in 96.8% of the schools were above the standard values. However, the levels of illumination were found to be statistically significantly decreased towards the door and the back line (p<0.05). It was found that electromagnetic field levels were significantly higher in the schools who had a source of electromagnetic field nearby compared to the schools who did not have such a source nearby (p<0.001). It was found that the electromagnetic field levels in computer classes were statistically significantly higher compared to the other classes (p<0.001). Noise levels were found to be statistically significantly higher in classes which had 35 and more students (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was found in schools near intensive vehicle traffic in terms of noise levels (62.8±5.0 (n=72), 62.0±6.4 (n=79), respectively, p>0.05). Conclusions: It was found that primary schools in the region of Keçiören had aspects which had to be improved in terms of building age, building location, brightness, electromagnetic field and noise levels. School health programs directed to improve negative enviromental factors should be developed. PMID:26078666

  13. Energy and materials flows in the production of primary aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.Y.

    1981-10-01

    The primary aluminum industry is one of the top five industrial energy users in the United States consuming about one quad annually. In 1980, for each ton of aluminum produced, an average smelting operation used about 157 million Btu of direct energy and another 70 million Btu were embodied in purchased materials. Producers employing the best practices used approximately 15% less energy per ton, or 132 million Btu of direct energy and 52 million Btu of embodied energy. These energy and materials flows are described in detail, using availability and input/output analyses and industry estimates. Energy consumption could be reduced further by developing (1) economical processes for using domestic nonbauxitic raw materials, a step that also would lessen the industry's present 94% dependence on foreign raw materials; (2) bulk alumina feeding equipment for handling more than one grade of alumina, thereby increasing the flexibility of smelting operations; (3) a reduction cell meter and temperature sensor for automatic control of alumina feeding and cell temperature; (4) a method for quickly and frequently measuring the NaF/AlF/sub 3/ ratio in a reduction cell for tighter control of electrolyte composition; and (5) a method for recovering waste heat.

  14. Interorganizational factors affecting the delivery of primary care to older Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, A D; Zuckerman, H S; Rabiner, D J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss different types and forms of interorganizational linkages involved in the provision of primary care to older Americans, along with their distinguishing characteristics. RESEARCH STRATEGY: To take advantage of these linkage characteristics. The strategy requires a partnership with health services organizations and providers actually involved in the provision of services along with a planned sequence of activities involving hypotheses and methods development, intervention trials, and finally, demonstration and implementation. CONCLUSION: Because older Americans are frequent users of health services, their need for continuity and access provides an opportunity to examine changes to the delivery system and to monitor the system's capability for meeting their healthcare needs. PMID:9618676

  15. Influence of hydroperiod on aquatic primary productivity between short- and long-hydroperiod Florida Everglades marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, J.; Olivas, P. C.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Malone, S. L.; Starr, G.

    2014-12-01

    Everglades National Park (ENP) represents one of the largest wetlands in the United States, where carbon cycling and primary productivity are closely linked to hydroperiod. Only recently has an integrative assessment of the CO2balance been undertaken in ENP. Previous periphyton and marcrophyte clipping experiments suggest that aquatic primary productivity (APP) is generally low in the Everglades freshwater marsh ecosystems. However, few studies have quantified aquatic metabolism in ENP, which may have significant influence on the entire ecosystem carbon dynamics. Eddy covariance towers were installed at a long- and short-hydroperiod marsh (Shark River Slough, SRS and Taylor Slough; TS, respectively) within ENP and have been running since 2008 . Net ecosystem exchange of CO2, H2O, and energy between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured along with meteorological data. To address how interannual and habitat variations in APP influences overall CO2 flux dynamics, we installed a D-Opto dissolved oxygen sensor (Zebra-Tech LTD) at each site in March of 2011, which allowed us to collect percent dissolved oxygen (DO%), dissolved oxygen concentration (DO ppm), and water temperature (oC) data at half hourly intervals from March of 2011 until present. We calculated gross and net aquatic primary productivity (ANPP), and night time aquatic respiration (AR), and compare interannual and inter site variation in APP between SRS and TS from October 2011 through December 2013. Our results reveal that across all three years (2011 - 2013) ANPP and AR were significantly higher at TS. ANPP was 15%, 16%, and 20% higher, and AR was 96%, 55%, and 7% higher at TS than at SRS. These results indicate that APP is contributing to the ecosystem carbon dynamics and differs with hydroperiod. Along with meteorological and data collected at the flux towers, we were also able to relate APP to changes in water level, photosynthetically active radiation and water temperature. This is the first

  16. Effect of cobalt on the primary productivity of Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.M.; Panigrahi, S.; Azeez, P.A.

    1987-10-01

    Cobalt, a micronutrient for biological organisms, is a metal of wide use. Main sources of Co to the environment are combustion of fossil fuels, smelters, cobalt processing facilities, sewage and industrial wastes. Atomic power plants and nuclear weapon detonations form an important source of radioisotopes of this metal to the environment. Cobalt has been included in the 14 toxic trace elements of critical importance from the point of view of environmental pollution and health hazards. Cobalt deficiency leads to diseases like stunted growth. At toxic level, Co inhibits heme biosynthesis and enzyme activities. The present study reports the effect of cobalt on biomass productivity of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

  17. Clinorotation affects morphology and ethylene production in soybean seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Peterson, B. V.; Guikema, J. A.; Brown, C. S.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight influences growth, morphology and metabolism in etiolated germinating soybean. To determine if clinorotation will similarly impact these processes, we conducted ground-based studies in conjunction with two space experiment opportunities. Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) seeds were planted within BRIC (Biological Research In Canister) canisters and grown for seven days at 20 degrees C under clinorotation (1 rpm) conditions or in a stationary upright mode. Gas samples were taken daily and plants were harvested after seven days for measurement of growth and morphology. Compared to the stationary upright controls, plants exposed to clinorotation exhibited increased root length (125% greater) and fresh weight (42% greater), whereas shoot length and fresh weight decreased by 33% and 16% respectively. Plants grown under clinorotation produced twice as much ethylene as the stationary controls. Seedlings treated with triiodo benzoic acid (TIBA), an auxin transport inhibitor, under clinorotation produced 50% less ethylene than the untreated control subjected to the same gravity treatment, whereas a treatment with 2,4-D increased ethylene by five-fold in the clinorotated plants. These data suggest that slow clinorotation influences biomass partitioning and ethylene production in etiolated soybean plants.

  18. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Stream Food Webs Declines with Increasing Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Walters, David M; Raikow, David F; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Mehling, Molly G; Kovach, Amanda; Oris, James T

    2015-07-01

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048-0.71 mg O2 L(-1) d(-1)) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems. PMID:26018982

  19. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in stream food webs declines with increasing primary production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David; D.F. Raikow; C.R. Hammerschmidt; M.G. Mehling; A. Kovach; J.T. Oris

    2015-01-01

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048–0.71 mg O2 L–1 d–1) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems.

  20. Interannual variability of primary production and dissolved organic nitrogen storage in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ya-Wei; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Church, Matthew J.; Karl, David M.; Doney, Scott C.

    2012-09-01

    The upper ocean primary production measurements from the Hawaii Ocean Time series (HOT) at Station ALOHA in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre showed substantial variability over the last two decades. The annual average primary production varied within a limited range over 1991-1998, significantly increased in 1999-2000 and then gradually decreased afterwards. This variability was investigated using a one-dimensional ecosystem model. The long-term HOT observations were used to constrain the model by prescribing physical forcings and lower boundary conditions and optimizing the model parameters against data using data assimilation. The model reproduced the general interannual pattern in the observed primary production, and mesoscale variability in vertical velocity was identified as a major contributing factor to the interannual variability in the simulation. Several strong upwelling events occurred in 1999, which brought up nitrate at rates several times higher than other years and elevated the model primary production. Our model results suggested a hypothesis for the observed interannual variability pattern of primary production at Station ALOHA: Part of the upwelled nitrate input in 1999 was converted to and accumulated as semilabile dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and subsequent recycling of this semilabile DON supported enhanced primary productivity for the next several years as the semilabile DON perturbation was gradually removed via export.

  1. Simulation of the effects of bottom topography on net primary production induced by riverine input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Riverine input often leads to high biological productivity in coastal areas. In coastal areas termed as region of freshwater influence (ROFI), horizontal anticyclonic gyres and vertical circulation form by density differences between buoyant river water and sea water. Previous physical oceanography studies have shown that the horizontal pattern of anticyclonic gyres and the strength of vertical circulation are dependent on the bottom topography of ROFI. However, the dependencies of biogeochemical cycles such as the net primary production (NPP) on the bottom topography have not been verified. In order to clarify how the bottom topography affects the NPP in phytoplankton blooms caused by riverine input through the physical processes in ROFI, we used an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) including a simple ecosystem model and conducted several case studies varying the bottom slope angle in the ideal settings. We estimated NPP categorized into three nutrients supplied from the river, the sea-subsurface layer and via regeneration: RI-NPP, S-NPP and RE-NPP. S-NPP and RE-NPP are larger and smaller with a steeper slope, respectively, while RI-NPP is not affected by the slope angle. As a result, total NPP is weakly dependent on the slope angle, i.e., because S- and RE-NPPs cancel each other out through two physical processes, (1) S-NPP is controlled by the strength of the vertical circulation and (2) RE-NPP is controlled by the shape of the horizontal gyre, which both vary with the bottom slope angle. We also conducted realistic simulations for Ishikari Bay, Japan and confirmed a similar dependency to that in the above ideal settings. That is, the simulation results are consistent with the regime of ideal settings and show that RI- and RE-NPPs are important variables for Ishikari Bay which has a gentle slope.

  2. Effects of oligotrophication on primary production in peri-alpine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, David; Wüest, Alfred; Bossard, Peter

    2013-08-01

    During the second half of the 20th century untreated sewage released from housing and industry into natural waters led to a degradation of many freshwater lakes and reservoirs worldwide. In order to mitigate eutrophication, wastewater treatment plants, including Fe-induced phosphorus precipitation, were implemented throughout the industrialized world, leading to reoligotrophication in many freshwater lakes. To understand and assess the effects of reoligotrophication on primary productivity, we analyzed 28 years of 14C assimilation rates, as well as other biotic and abiotic parameters, such as global radiation, nutrient concentrations and plankton densities in peri-alpine Lake Lucerne, Switzerland. Using a simple productivity-light relationship, we estimated continuous primary production and discussed the relation between productivity and observed limnological parameters. Furthermore, we assessed the uncertainty of our modeling approach based on monthly 14C assimilation measurements using Monte Carlo simulations. Results confirm that monthly sampling of productivity is sufficient for identifying long-term trends in productivity and that conservation management has successfully improved water quality during the past three decades via reducing nutrients and primary production in the lake. However, even though nutrient concentrations have remained constant in recent years, annual primary production varies significantly from year to year. Despite the fact that nutrient concentrations have decreased by more than an order of magnitude, primary production has decreased only slightly. These results suggest that primary production correlates well to nutrients availability but meteorological conditions lead to interannual variability regardless of the trophic status of the lake. Accordingly, in oligotrophic freshwaters meteorological forcing may reduce productivity impacting on the entire food chain of the ecosystem.

  3. Plant community, primary productivity, and environmental conditions following wetland re-establishment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.L.; Fujii, R.

    2010-01-01

    Wetland restoration can mitigate aerobic decomposition of subsided organic soils, as well as re-establish conditions favorable for carbon storage. Rates of carbon storage result from the balance of inputs and losses, both of which are affected by wetland hydrology. We followed the effect of water depth (25 and 55 cm) on the plant community, primary production, and changes in two re-established wetlands in the Sacramento San-Joaquin River Delta, California for 9 years after flooding to determine how relatively small differences in water depth affect carbon storage rates over time. To estimate annual carbon inputs, plant species cover, standing above- and below-ground plant biomass, and annual biomass turnover rates were measured, and allometric biomass models for Schoenoplectus (Scirpus) acutus and Typha spp., the emergent marsh dominants, were developed. As the wetlands developed, environmental factors, including water temperature, depth, and pH were measured. Emergent marsh vegetation colonized the shallow wetland more rapidly than the deeper wetland. This is important to potential carbon storage because emergent marsh vegetation is more productive, and less labile, than submerged and floating vegetation. Primary production of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from 1.3 to 3.2 kg of carbon per square meter annually; and, mid-season standing live biomass represented about half of the annual primary production. Changes in species composition occurred in both submerged and emergent plant communities as the wetlands matured. Water depth, temperature, and pH were lower in areas with emergent marsh vegetation compared to submerged vegetation, all of which, in turn, can affect carbon cycling and storage rates. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  4. [Affection, proximity, frequency and hesitant clinical practice: basis of the "bond" between Down syndrome patients and primary health care?].

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Bruno José Barcellos; Setoue, Cesar Seiji; Melo, Débora Gusmão

    2013-07-01

    The national policy of comprehensive care in clinical genetics propounds that families and individuals with genetic disorders should receive ongoing assistance at primary health care (PHC) level. In this study, the social representation of professionals working in family health care units (FHCU) is investigated based on their "bond" with Down syndrome patients, bearing in mind that this expression currently contains relevant meanings in the clinical practice and service management routine. Sixteen practitioners were interviewed, and the sample was defined by theoretical saturation. The statements given by the participants expressed knowledge based mainly on affective skills, physical proximity and patients' frequency of attendance at the family health care unit (FHCU). Clinical skills of other kinds, especially cognitive skills, do not appear to justify the notion of "bond." The results indicate the need of continuous professional education and definition of guidelines and approaches in care to the most common syndromes in the context of primary health care (PHC). PMID:23827892

  5. Tight coupling of primary production and marine mammal reproduction in the Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, J. Terrill; Rotella, Jay J.; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Garrott, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Polynyas are areas of open water surrounded by sea ice and are important sources of primary production in high-latitude marine ecosystems. The magnitude of annual primary production in polynyas is controlled by the amount of exposure to solar radiation and sensitivity to changes in sea-ice extent. The degree of coupling between primary production and production by upper trophic-level consumers in these environments is not well understood, which prevents reliable predictions about population trajectories for species at higher trophic levels under potential future climate scenarios. In this study, we find a strong, positive relationship between annual primary production in an Antarctic polynya and pup production by ice-dependent Weddell seals. The timing of the relationship suggests reproductive effort increases to take advantage of high primary production occurring in the months after the birth pulse. Though the proximate causal mechanism is unknown, our results indicate tight coupling between organisms at disparate trophic levels on a short timescale, deepen our understanding of marine ecosystem processes, and raise interesting questions about why such coupling exists and what implications it has for understanding high-latitude ecosystems. PMID:25854885

  6. Production of primary mirror segments for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, H. M.; Allen, R. G.; Burge, J. H.; Davis, J. M.; Davison, W. B.; Johns, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kingsley, J. S.; Law, K.; Lutz, R. D.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Su, P.; Tuell, M. T.; West, S. C.; Zhou, P.

    2014-07-01

    Segment production for the Giant Magellan Telescope is well underway, with the off-axis Segment 1 completed, off-axis Segments 2 and 3 already cast, and mold construction in progress for the casting of Segment 4, the center segment. All equipment and techniques required for segment fabrication and testing have been demonstrated in the manufacture of Segment 1. The equipment includes a 28 m test tower that incorporates four independent measurements of the segment's figure and geometry. The interferometric test uses a large asymmetric null corrector with three elements including a 3.75 m spherical mirror and a computer-generated hologram. For independent verification of the large-scale segment shape, we use a scanning pentaprism test that exploits the natural geometry of the telescope to focus collimated light to a point. The Software Configurable Optical Test System, loosely based on the Hartmann test, measures slope errors to submicroradian accuracy at high resolution over the full aperture. An enhanced laser tracker system guides the figuring through grinding and initial polishing. All measurements agree within the expected uncertainties, including three independent measurements of radius of curvature that agree within 0.3 mm. Segment 1 was polished using a 1.2 m stressed lap for smoothing and large-scale figuring, and a set of smaller passive rigid-conformal laps on an orbital polisher for deterministic small-scale figuring. For the remaining segments, the Mirror Lab is building a smaller, orbital stressed lap to combine the smoothing capability with deterministic figuring.

  7. Does Congenital Deafness Affect the Structural and Functional Architecture of Primary Visual Cortex?

    PubMed Central

    Smittenaar, C.R.; MacSweeney, M.; Sereno, M.I.; Schwarzkopf, D.S.

    2016-01-01

    Deafness results in greater reliance on the remaining senses. It is unknown whether the cortical architecture of the intact senses is optimized to compensate for lost input. Here we performed widefield population receptive field (pRF) mapping of primary visual cortex (V1) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in hearing and congenitally deaf participants, all of whom had learnt sign language after the age of 10 years. We found larger pRFs encoding the peripheral visual field of deaf compared to hearing participants. This was likely driven by larger facilitatory center zones of the pRF profile concentrated in the near and far periphery in the deaf group. pRF density was comparable between groups, indicating pRFs overlapped more in the deaf group. This could suggest that a coarse coding strategy underlies enhanced peripheral visual skills in deaf people. Cortical thickness was also decreased in V1 in the deaf group. These findings suggest deafness causes structural and functional plasticity at the earliest stages of visual cortex. PMID:27014392

  8. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  9. Dietary Restriction Affects Neuronal Response Property and GABA Synthesis in the Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfang; Wang, Qian; He, Fenfen; Ding, Yanxia; Sun, Qingyan; Hua, Tianmiao; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent effects of dietary restriction (DR) on cortical inhibition. To clarify this issue, we examined the response properties of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of DR and control groups of cats using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques, and assessed the synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the V1 of cats from both groups using immunohistochemical and Western blot techniques. Our results showed that the response of V1 neurons to visual stimuli was significantly modified by DR, as indicated by an enhanced selectivity for stimulus orientations and motion directions, decreased visually-evoked response, lowered spontaneous activity and increased signal-to-noise ratio in DR cats relative to control cats. Further, it was shown that, accompanied with these changes of neuronal responsiveness, GABA immunoreactivity and the expression of a key GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 in the V1 were significantly increased by DR. These results demonstrate that DR may retard brain aging by increasing the intracortical inhibition effect and improve the function of visual cortical neurons in visual information processing. This DR-induced elevation of cortical inhibition may favor the brain in modulating energy expenditure based on food availability. PMID:26863207

  10. Dietary Restriction Affects Neuronal Response Property and GABA Synthesis in the Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qingyan; Hua, Tianmiao; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent effects of dietary restriction (DR) on cortical inhibition. To clarify this issue, we examined the response properties of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of DR and control groups of cats using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques, and assessed the synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the V1 of cats from both groups using immunohistochemical and Western blot techniques. Our results showed that the response of V1 neurons to visual stimuli was significantly modified by DR, as indicated by an enhanced selectivity for stimulus orientations and motion directions, decreased visually-evoked response, lowered spontaneous activity and increased signal-to-noise ratio in DR cats relative to control cats. Further, it was shown that, accompanied with these changes of neuronal responsiveness, GABA immunoreactivity and the expression of a key GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 in the V1 were significantly increased by DR. These results demonstrate that DR may retard brain aging by increasing the intracortical inhibition effect and improve the function of visual cortical neurons in visual information processing. This DR-induced elevation of cortical inhibition may favor the brain in modulating energy expenditure based on food availability. PMID:26863207

  11. Role of eddy pumping in enhancing primary production in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Kolber, Zbigniew; Ziemann, David; Bienfang, Paul K.

    1991-01-01

    Eddy pumping is considered to explain the disparity between geochemical estimates and biological measurements of exported production. Episodic nutrient injections from the ocean into the photic zone can be generated by eddy pumping, which biological measurements cannot sample accurately. The enhancement of production is studied with respect to a cyclonic eddy in the subtropical Pacific. A pump-and-probe fluorimeter generates continuous vertical profiles of primary productivity from which the contributions of photochemical and nonphotochemical processes to fluorescence are derived. A significant correlation is observed between the fluorescence measurements and radiocarbon measurements. The results indicate that eddy pumping has an important effect on phytoplankton production and that this production is near the maximum relative specific growth rates. Based on the production enhancement observed in this case, eddy pumping increases total primary production by only 20 percent and does not account for all enhancement.

  12. How infectious disease outbreaks affect community-based primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkimainen, R. Liisa; Bondy, Susan J.; Parkovnick, Meredith; Barnsley, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare how the infectious disease outbreaks H1N1 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) affected community-based GPs and FPs. Design A mailed survey sent after the H1N1 outbreak compared with the results of similar survey completed after the SARS outbreak. Setting Greater Toronto area in Ontario. Participants A total of 183 randomly selected GPs and FPs who provided office-based care. Main outcome measures The perceptions of GPs and FPs on how serious infectious disease outbreaks affected their clinical work and personal lives; their preparedness for a serious infectious disease outbreak; and the types of information they want to receive and the sources they wanted to receive information from during a serious infectious disease outbreak. The responses from this survey were compared with the responses of GPs and FPs in the greater Toronto area who completed a similar survey in 2003 after the SARS outbreak. Results After the H1N1 outbreak, GPs and FPs still had substantial concerns about the effects of serious infectious disease outbreaks on the health of their family members. Physicians made changes to various office practices in order to manage and deal with patients with serious infectious diseases. They expressed concerns about the effects of an infectious disease on the provision of health care services. Also, physicians wanted to quickly receive accurate information from the provincial government and their medical associations. Conclusion Serious community-based infectious diseases are a personal concern for GPs and FPs, and have considerable effects on their clinical practice. Further work examining the timely flow of relevant information through different health care sectors and government agencies still needs to be undertaken. PMID:25316747

  13. Dietary energy availability affects primary and metastatic breast cancer and metformin efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Kathryn N.; Vumbaca, Frank; Fox, Melissa M.; Evans, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Dietary energy restriction has been shown to repress both mammary tumorigenesis and aggressive mammary tumor growth in animal studies. Metformin, a caloric restriction mimetic, has a long history of safe use as an insulin sensitizer in diabetics and has been shown to reduce cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality in humans. To determine the potential impact of dietary energy availability and metformin therapy on aggressive breast tumor growth and metastasis, an orthotopic syngeneic model using triple negative 66cl4 tumor cells in Balb/c mice was employed. The effect of dietary restriction, a standard maintenance diet or a diet with high levels of free sugar, were tested for their effects on tumor growth and secondary metastases to the lung. Metformin therapy with the various diets indicated that metformin can be highly effective at suppressing systemic metabolic biomarkers such as IGF-1, insulin and glucose, especially in the high energy diet treated animals. Long-term metformin treatment demonstrated moderate yet significant effects on primary tumor growth, most significantly in conjunction with the high energy diet. When compared to the control diet, the high energy diet promoted tumor growth, expression of the inflammatory adipokines leptin and resistin, induced lung priming by bone marrow-derived myeloid cells and promoted metastatic potential. Metformin had no effect on adipokine expression or the development of lung metastases with the standard or the high energy diet. These data indicate that metformin may have tumor suppressing activity where a metabolic phenotype of high fuel intake, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes exist, but may have little or no effect on events controlling the metastatic niche driven by proinflammatory events. PMID:20204498

  14. ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND SIZE AS DETERMINED REMOTELY FROM AIRCRAFT AND COASTAL OBSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used remotely sensed estimates of chlorophyll a and sea surface temperature, incorporated into the Chesapeake Bay Productivity Model (Harding et al., 2002), to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of phytoplankton net primary production and species size in the Narragans...

  15. Patterns of new versus recycled primary production in the terrestrial biosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability regulate plant productivity throughout the terrestrial biosphere, influencing the patterns and magnitude of net primary production (NPP) by land plants both now and into the future. These nutrients enter ecosystems via geologic and atmospheric pathways, a...

  16. MODIS EVI as a Proxy for Net Primary Production across Precipitation Regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Above ground net primary production (ANPP) is a measure of the rate of photosynthesis in an ecosystem, and is indicative of its biomass productivity. Prior studies have reported a relationship between ANPP and annual precipitation which converged across biomes in dry years. This deserves further s...

  17. A reassessment of primary production and environmental change in the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Zachary W.; van Dijken, Gert L.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2011-08-01

    Regarded as one of the world's most productive marine environments, the Bering Sea is widely thought to be rapidly warming and losing sea ice. Such changes would be expected to have dramatic impacts on primary producers, with cascading effects on upper trophic levels, including this region's vast commercial fisheries resources. Here, we use satellite-derived sea ice concentration, sea surface temperature, and ocean color data as input to a primary productivity algorithm to take stock of environmental change and primary production in the Bering Sea. Results show that, rather than declining, mean annual sea ice extent in the Bering Sea has exhibited no significant change over the satellite sea ice record (1979-2009). Furthermore, significant warming during the satellite sea surface temperature record (1982-2009) is mainly limited to the summer months, when all regions of the Bering Sea warmed. This warming suggests increasing stratification during the phytoplankton growth season. Despite certain hot spots of primary production and a strong pulse in the spring, the rate of annual area-normalized primary production in the Bering Sea (124 g C m-2 yr-1) is below the global mean (140 g C m-2 yr-1). Between 1998 and 2007, basin-wide annual primary production ranged from 233 to 331 Tg C yr-1 under the influence of highly variable sea ice and temperature conditions. By comparing warm, low-ice years (2001-2005) with cold, high-ice years (1998-2000 and 2006-2007), we speculate that Bering Sea primary productivity is likely to rise under conditions of future warming and sea ice loss.

  18. Primary productivity, bacterial productivity and nitrogen uptake in response to iron enrichment during the SEEDS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Isao; Noiri, Yoshifumi; Cochlan, William P.; Suzuki, Koji; Aramaki, Takafumi; Ono, Tsuneo; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2009-12-01

    Primary productivity (PP), bacterial productivity (BP) and the uptake rates of nitrate and ammonium were measured using isotopic methods ( 13C, 3H, 15N) during a mesoscale iron (Fe)-enrichment experiment conducted in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean in 2004 (SEEDS II). PP increased following Fe enrichment, reached maximal rates 12 days after the enrichment, and then declined to the initial level on day 17. During the 23-day observation period, we observed the development and decline of the Fe-induced bloom. The surface mixed layer (SML) integrated PP increased by 3-fold, but was smaller than the 5-fold increase observed in the previous Fe-enrichment experiment conducted at almost the same location and season during 2001 (SEEDS). Nitrate uptake rates were enhanced by Fe enrichment but decreased after day 5, and became lower than ammonium uptake rates after day 17. The total nitrogenous nutrient uptake rate declined after the peak of the bloom, and accumulation of ammonium was obvious in the euphotic layer. Nitrate utilization accounted for all the requirements of N for the massive bloom development during SEEDS, whereas during SEEDS II, nitrate accounted for >90% of total N utilization on day 5, declining to 40% by the end of the observation period. The SML-integrated BP increased after day 2 and peaked twice on days 8 and 21. Ammonium accumulation and the delayed heterotrophic activity suggested active regeneration occurred after the peak of the bloom. The SML-integrated PP between days 0 and 23 was 19.0 g C m -2. The SML-integrated BP during the same period was 2.6 g C m -2, which was 14% of the SML-integrated PP. Carbon budget calculation for the whole experimental period indicated that 33% of the whole (particulate plus dissolved) PP (21.5 g C m -2) was exported below the SML and 18% was transferred to the meso-zooplankton (growth). The bacterial carbon consumption (43% of the whole PP) was supported by DOC or POC release from phytoplankton, zooplankton

  19. E-Cigarette Affects the Metabolome of Primary Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aug, Argo; Altraja, Siiri; Kilk, Kalle; Porosk, Rando; Soomets, Ursel; Altraja, Alan

    2015-01-01

    E-cigarettes are widely believed to be safer than conventional cigarettes and have been even suggested as aids for smoking cessation. However, while reasonable with some regards, this judgment is not yet supported by adequate biomedical research data. Since bronchial epithelial cells are the immediate target of inhaled toxicants, we hypothesized that exposure to e-cigarettes may affect the metabolome of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and that the changes are, at least in part, induced by oxidant-driven mechanisms. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of e-cigarette liquid (ECL) on the metabolome of HBEC and examined the potency of antioxidants to protect the cells. We assessed the changes of the intracellular metabolome upon treatment with ECL in comparison of the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) with mass spectrometry and principal component analysis on air-liquid interface model of normal HBEC. Thereafter, we evaluated the capability of the novel antioxidant tetrapeptide O-methyl-l-tyrosinyl-γ-l-glutamyl-l-cysteinylglycine (UPF1) to attenuate the effect of ECL. ECL caused a significant shift in the metabolome that gradually gained its maximum by the 5th hour and receded by the 7th hour. A second alteration followed at the 13th hour. Treatment with CSC caused a significant initial shift already by the 1st hour. ECL, but not CSC, significantly increased the concentrations of arginine, histidine, and xanthine. ECL, in parallel with CSC, increased the content of adenosine diphosphate and decreased that of three lipid species from the phosphatidylcholine family. UPF1 partially counteracted the ECL-induced deviations, UPF1’s maximum effect occurred at the 5th hour. The data support our hypothesis that ECL profoundly alters the metabolome of HBEC in a manner, which is comparable and partially overlapping with the effect of CSC. Hence, our results do not support the concept of harmlessness of e-cigarettes. PMID:26536230

  20. Hot-spots of primary productivity: An Alternative interpretation to Conventional upwelling models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruth, Paul D.; Ganf, George G.; Ward, Tim M.

    2010-12-01

    The eastern Great Australian Bight (EGAB) forms part of the Southern and Indian Oceans and is an area of high ecological and economic importance. Although it supports a commercial fishery, quantitative estimates of the primary productivity underlying this industry are open to debate. Estimates range from <100 mg C m -2 day -1 to > 500 mg C m -2 day -1. Part of this variation may be due to the unique upwelling circulation of shelf waters in summer/autumn (November-April), which shares some similarities with highly productive eastern boundary current upwelling systems, but differs due to the influence of a northern boundary current, the Flinders current, and a wide continental shelf. This study examines spatial variations in primary productivity in the EGAB during the upwelling seasons of 2005 and 2006. Daily integral productivity calculated using the vertically generalised production model (VGPM) showed a high degree of spatial variation. Productivity was low (<800 mg C m -2 day -1) in offshore central and western regions of the EGAB. High productivities (1600-3900 mg C m -2 day -1) were restricted to hotspots in the east that were influenced by the upwelled water mass. There was a strong correlation between the depth of the euphotic zone and the depth of the mixed layer that suggested that ˜50% of the euphotic zone lay below the mixed layer depth. As a result, high rates of primary productivity did not require upwelled water to reach the surface. A significant proportion of total productivity in the euphotic zone (57% in 2005 and 65% in 2006) occurred in the upwelled water mass below the surface mixed layer. This result has implications for daily integral productivities modelled with the VGPM, which uses surface measures of phytoplankton biomass to calculate productivity. Macro-nutrient concentrations could not be used to explain the difference in the low and high productivities (silica > 1 μmol L -1, nitrate/nitrite > 0.4 μmol L -1, phosphate > 0.1 μmol L -1

  1. Responses of Terrestrial Ecosystems’ Net Primary Productivity to Future Regional Climate Change in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongsheng; Wu, Shaohong; Yin, Yunhe

    2013-01-01

    The impact of regional climate change on net primary productivity (NPP) is an important aspect in the study of ecosystems’ response to global climate change. China’s ecosystems are very sensitive to climate change owing to the influence of the East Asian monsoon. The Lund–Potsdam–Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model for China (LPJ-CN), a global dynamical vegetation model developed for China’s terrestrial ecosystems, was applied in this study to simulate the NPP changes affected by future climate change. As the LPJ-CN model is based on natural vegetation, the simulation in this study did not consider the influence of anthropogenic activities. Results suggest that future climate change would have adverse effects on natural ecosystems, with NPP tending to decrease in eastern China, particularly in the temperate and warm temperate regions. NPP would increase in western China, with a concentration in the Tibetan Plateau and the northwest arid regions. The increasing trend in NPP in western China and the decreasing trend in eastern China would be further enhanced by the warming climate. The spatial distribution of NPP, which declines from the southeast coast to the northwest inland, would have minimal variation under scenarios of climate change. PMID:23593325

  2. Community structure and primary productivity of forested wetlands in western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Community structure and net primary productivity were measured in five forested wetlands in western Kentucky and compared with hydrologic information. A bottomland hardwood forest (H1), cypress-ash swamp (H2), and deep cypress swamp (H3) were located on the floodplain of the Ohio River and were subject to annual spring flooding. The other two sites were adjacent to a smaller, channelized stream that floods frequently, but for short periods. Only a young riparian forest (C3) is directly affected by the stream unless an unusually severe flood exceeds the levee that hydrologically isolates the stagnant cypress swamp (C4). Community structure indices were lowest in the two permanently-flooded cypress swamps. Tree biomass was 9.4 kg/m/sup 2/ at C4 and 10.2 kg/m/sup 2/ at H3. High biomass was found at H1 and H2 (30.3 and 31.2 kg/m/sup 2/) while C3 was intermediate at 18.4 kg/m/sup 2/. Other structural measures, notably stem density and mean height were closely related to biomass estimates. Low leaf to wood biomass ratios were found at H2 and C4 which suggests low nutrient availability. Nutrients are abundant at H2 due to agricultural runoff but physiological stress and aquatic macrophyte competition may limit tree uptake.

  3. Estimating Daytime Ecosystem Respiration to Improve Estimates of Gross Primary Production of a Temperate Forest

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jinwei; Wu, Jiabing; Guan, Dexin; Yao, Fuqi; Yuan, Fenghui; Wang, Anzhi; Jin, Changjie

    2014-01-01

    Leaf respiration is an important component of carbon exchange in terrestrial ecosystems, and estimates of leaf respiration directly affect the accuracy of ecosystem carbon budgets. Leaf respiration is inhibited by light; therefore, gross primary production (GPP) will be overestimated if the reduction in leaf respiration by light is ignored. However, few studies have quantified GPP overestimation with respect to the degree of light inhibition in forest ecosystems. To determine the effect of light inhibition of leaf respiration on GPP estimation, we assessed the variation in leaf respiration of seedlings of the dominant tree species in an old mixed temperate forest with different photosynthetically active radiation levels using the Laisk method. Canopy respiration was estimated by combining the effect of light inhibition on leaf respiration of these species with within-canopy radiation. Leaf respiration decreased exponentially with an increase in light intensity. Canopy respiration and GPP were overestimated by approximately 20.4% and 4.6%, respectively, when leaf respiration reduction in light was ignored compared with the values obtained when light inhibition of leaf respiration was considered. This study indicates that accurate estimates of daytime ecosystem respiration are needed for the accurate evaluation of carbon budgets in temperate forests. In addition, this study provides a valuable approach to accurately estimate GPP by considering leaf respiration reduction in light in other ecosystems. PMID:25419844

  4. Distributions of pigments and primary production in a Gulf Stream meander

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Cullen, J.J.; Phinney, D.A.; Olson, D.B.; Yentsch, C.S.

    1993-08-15

    An investigation was made of physical effects of Gulf Stream meandering on the vertical and horizontal distributions of photosynthetic pigments and primary production. Cruises were conducted in the vicinity of a meander east of 73{degrees}W and north of 37{degrees}N from September 21 to October 5 (leg 1) and October 12-21, 1988 (leg 2), on the R/V Cape Hatteras. Relationships of photosynthesis (normalized to chlorophyll) to irradiance (P-I) did not show large horizontal variation, and water column composite P-I curves from leg 1 and leg 2 were similar. Therefore, a single P-I curve derived from pooled data was used to model distributions of primary production. Distributions of photosynthetic pigments were characterized on the basis of in vivo fluorescence profiles and empirical relationships with extracted pigment concentrations. Subsurface irradiance was described using a spectral irradiance model. Cross sections of the Gulf Stream revealed consistently higher pigment concentrations and primary production on the slope water side. Along-stream variations in pigment distributions and primary production were apparently related to density structure influenced by meander circulation. Such variations were less pronounced during leg 2, which came after a transition from a well-defined meander interacting with a warm-core ring (leg 1) to a more linear stream (leg 2). Higher water-column-integrated primary production during leg 2 was attributed to mixing-induced nutrient injection and redistribution of chlorophyll in the photic zone. 47 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Sanz-Martín, M.; Mesa, E.; Arrieta, J. M.; Chierici, M.; Hendriks, I. E.; García-Corral, L. S.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; Delgado, A.; Reigstad, M.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145-2,099 μatm however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  6. Plant Products Affect Growth and Digestive Efficiency of Cultured Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) Fed Compounded Diets

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Gregory P.; Reigh, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Costs of compounded diets containing fish meal as a primary protein source can be expected to rise as fish meal prices increase in response to static supply and growing demand. Alternatives to fish meal are needed to reduce production costs in many aquaculture enterprises. Some plant proteins are potential replacements for fish meal because of their amino acid composition, lower cost and wide availability. In this study, we measured utilization of soybean meal (SBM) and soy protein concentrate (SPC) by Florida pompano fed compounded diets, to determine the efficacy of these products as fish meal replacements. We also calculated apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) for canola meal (CM), corn gluten meal (CGM), and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), following typical methods for digestibility trials. Juvenile Florida pompano were fed fish-meal-free diets containing graded levels of SBM and SPC, and weight gain was compared to a control diet that contained SBM, SPC, and fish meal. Fish fed diets that contained 25–30 percent SBM in combination with 43–39 percent SPC had weight gain equivalent to fish fed the control diet with fish meal, while weight gain of fish fed other soy combinations was significantly less than that of the control group. Apparent crude protein digestibility of CGM was significantly higher than that of DDGS but not significantly different from CM. Apparent energy digestibility of DDGS was significantly lower than CGM but significantly higher than CM. Findings suggested that composition of the reference diet used in a digestibility trial affects the values of calculated ADCs, in addition to the chemical and physical attributes of the test ingredient. PMID:22536344

  7. System Factors Affect the Recognition and Management of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder by Primary Care Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Lisa S; Eisenman, David P; Green, Bonnie L; Basurto-Dávila, Ricardo; Cassells, Andrea; Tobin, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Background Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common with an estimated prevalence of 8% in the general population and up to 17% in primary care patients. Yet, little is known about what determines primary care clinician’s (PCC) provision of PTSD care. Objective To describe PCC’s reported recognition and management of PTSD and identify how system factors affect the likelihood of performing clinical actions with regard to patients with PTSD or “PTSD treatment proclivity.” Design Linked cross-sectional surveys of medical directors and PCCs. Participants Forty-six medical directors and 154 PCCs in community health centers (CHCs) within a practice-based research network in New York and New Jersey. Measurements Two system factors (degree of integration between primary care and mental health services, and existence of linkages with other community, social, and legal services) as reported by medical directors, and PCC reports of self-confidence, perceived barriers, and PTSD treatment proclivity. Results Surveys from 47 (of 58) medical directors (81% response rate) and 154 PCCs (86% response rate). PCCs from CHCs with better mental health integration reported greater confidence, fewer barriers, and higher PTSD treatment proclivity (all p<.05). PCCs in CHCs with better community linkages reported greater confidence, fewer barriers, higher PTSD treatment proclivity, and lower proclivity to refer patients to mental health specialists or to use a “watch and wait” approach (all p<.05). Conclusion System factors play an important role in PCC PTSD management. Interventions are needed that restructure primary care practices by making mental health services more integrated and community linkages stronger. PMID:19433999

  8. Controls of vegetation structure and net primary production in restored grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    1. Vegetation structure and net primary production (NPP) are fundamental properties of ecosystems. Understanding how restoration practices following disturbance interact with environmental factors to control these properties can provide insight on how ecosystems recover and guide management efforts. 2. We assessed the relative contribution of environmental and restoration factors in controlling vegetation structure, above- and below-ground investment in production across a chronosequence of semiarid Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields recovering from dryland wheat cropping relative to undisturbed grassland. Importantly, we determined the role of plant diversity and how seeding either native or introduced perennial grasses influenced the recovery of vegetation properties. 3. Plant basal cover increased with field age and was highest in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses. In contrast, fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses had tall-growing plants with relatively low basal cover. These vegetation structural characteristics interacted with precipitation, but not soil characteristics, to influence above-ground NPP (ANPP). Fields enrolled in the CRP program for >7 years supported twice as much ANPP as undisturbed shortgrass steppe in the first wet year of the study, but all CRP fields converged on a common low amount of ANPP in the following dry year and invested less than half as much as the shortgrass steppe in below-ground biomass. 4. ANPP in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses for more than 7 years was positively related to species richness, whereas ANPP in CRP fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses were controlled more by dominant species. 5. Synthesis and applications. Seeding with introduced, instead of native, perennial grasses had a strong direct influence on vegetation structure, including species richness, which indirectly affected NPP through time. However, the effects of restoring either native or introduced

  9. Short-term effects of herbicides on primary productivity of periphyton in lotic environments.

    PubMed

    Day, K E

    1993-06-01

    : Freshwater algae are quite sensitive to herbicides that enter running water ecosystems through direct application, aerial drift, and/or watershed run-off. However, due to a lack of suitable methodologies, few studies examine the effects of such contamination on naturally occurring attached algal communities under field conditions (i. e., exposure regimes using pulsed doses or brief episodes of peak concentrations to simulate surface run-off during storm events). This paper describes a method for determining the acute short-term effects of four herbicides (hexazinone, atrazine, tebuthiuron and metolachlor) on the net primary productivity (NPP) of periphytic algae in the field using a portable bankside incubator; NPP was measured by monitoring changes in oxygen production (mg O2 per m(2)) upper surface of rock substrate per h and mg O2 h per mg chlorophyll using the light-dark technique. All herbicides with photosynthetic inhibition as a mode of action significantly reduced NPP. The lowest observed effect concentrations (LOECs) for the herbicides were 43 μg hexazinone l(-1), 109 μg atrazine l(-1) and 137 μg tebuthiuron l(-1). The no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) for these chemicals were <43 μg hexazinone l(-1), 93 μg atrazine l(-1) and 52 μg tebuthiuron l(-1). Metolachlor did not significantly reduce NPP at the concentrations that were tested (range 19.6-274 μg l(-1)). However, community respiration (which included respiration by invertebrates) was significantly reduced at the highest metolachlor concentration (274 μg l(-1)). Community respiration was not significantly affected by any concentration of the other three herbicides used. PMID:24201554

  10. Are preoperative sex-related differences of affective symptoms in primary brain tumor patients associated with postoperative histopathological grading?

    PubMed

    Richter, Andre; Jenewein, J; Krayenbühl, N; Woernle, C; Bellut, D

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to explore the impact of the histopathological tumor type on affective symptoms before surgery among male and female patients with supratentorial primary brain tumors. A total of 44 adult patients were included in the study. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Additionally, clinical interviews, including the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), were conducted. The general function of patients was measured with the Karnofsky Performance Status scale (KPS). All measures were obtained before surgery and therefore before the final histopathological diagnosis. All self-rating questionnaires but not the HDRS, showed significantly higher scores in female patients. The functional status assessed with the KPS was lower in female patients and correlated to the somatic part of the BDI. We further found a tendency for higher HDRS scores in male patients with a WHO grade 4 tumor stage compared to female patients. This finding was supported by positive correlations between HDRS scores and WHO grade in male and negative correlations between HDRS scores and WHO grade in female patients. In conclusion the preoperative evaluation of affective symptoms with self-rating questionnaires in patients with brain tumors may be invalidated by the patient’s functional status. Depression should be explored with clinical interviews in these patients. Sex differences of affective symptoms in this patient group may also be related to the malignancy of the tumor, but further studies are needed to disentangle this relationship. PMID:26468140

  11. Evaluation of bio-optical algorithms to remotely sense marine primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Beatrice; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    1994-01-01

    In situ bio-optical measurements from several oceanographic campaigns were analyzed to derive a direct relationship between water column primary production P (sub t) ocean color as expressed by the ratio of reflectances R (sub 1) at 440 nm and R (sub 3) at 550 nm and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR). The study is restricted to the Morel case I waters for which the following algorithm is proposed: log (P(sub f)) = -4.286 - 1.390 log (R(sub 1)/R(sub3)) + 0.621 log (PAR), with P(sub t) in g C m(exp -2)/d and PAR in J m(exp -2)/d. Using this algorithm the rms accuracy of primary production estimate is 0.17 on a logarithmic scale, i.e., a factor of 1.5. Using spectral reflectance measurements in the entire visible spectral range, the central wavelength, spectral bandwidth, and radiometric noise level requirements are investigated for the channels to be used by an ocean color space mission dedicated to estimating global marine primary production and the associated carbon fluxes. Nearly all the useful information is provided by two channels centered at 440 nm and 550 nm, but the accuracy of primary production estimate appears weakly sensitive to spectral bandwidth, which, consequently, may be enlarged by several tens of nanometers. The sensitivity to radiometric noise, on the contrary, is strong, and a noise equivalent reflectance of 0.005 degraded the accuracy on the primary production estimate by a factor 2 (0.14-0.25 on a logarithmic scale). The results should be applicable to evaluating the primary production of oligotrophic and mesotrophic waters, which constitute most of the open ocean.

  12. Past and future climate patterns affecting temperate, sub-tropical and tropical horticultural crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial horticultural crop production will be impacted by climate change effects on temperature, water availability, solar radiation, air pollution, and carbon dioxide. Horticultural crop value is derived from both the quantity and the quality of the harvested product; both of which are affected ...

  13. Primary productivity and nitrogen assimilation with identifying the contribution of urea in Funka Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Isao; Hisatoku, Takatsugu; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Maita, Yoshiaki

    2015-06-01

    Primary production is supported by utilization of several forms of nitrogen (N), such as nitrate, ammonium, and urea. Nevertheless, only few studies have measured the concentration and uptake of urea despite its importance as a nitrogenous nutrient for phytoplankton. We measured primary productivity monthly at four depths within the euphotic zone using a clean technique and the 13C method by a 24 h in situ mooring incubation over a year in Funka Bay, a subarctic coastal area in Japan, to make better updated estimates (re-evaluation) of annual primary production. Nitrogenous (N) nutrient assimilation rates (nitrate, ammonium and urea) were also measured to elucidate the relative contributions of these nutrients to autotrophic production and to distinguish between new and regenerated production. The estimated annual primary production was 164 g C m-2, which was 40-60% higher than the previously reported values in the bay. Use of a clean technique and more frequent measurement during the spring bloom may have contributed to the higher rates. The production during the spring bloom was 56.5 g C m-2, accounting for 35% of the annual production. The maximum daily productivity occurred in the bloom at 1.4 g C m-2 d-1, which is one of the highest values among the world embayments. The annual primary production in the bay was classified as mesotrophic state based on the classification by Cloern et al. (2014). The assimilation rate of nitrate was maximal at 54 nmol N L-1 h-1 during the bloom. During the post-bloom periods with nitrate depleted conditions, assimilation rates of ammonium and urea increased and accounted for up to 85% of the total N assimilation. The assimilation rate of urea was almost comparable to that of ammonium throughout the year. Taking urea into account, the f-ratio ranged from 0.15 under the nitrate-depleted conditions to 0.8 under the spring bloom conditions. These ratios were overestimated by 50% and 10%, respectively, if urea uptake was eliminated

  14. Primary productivity estimation in Liaodong Bay and Liaohe River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, S.; Ye, S.; Laws, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, primary productivities of phytoplankton in the areas of Liaodong Bay and Liaohe River Delta, China were investigated with chlorophyll contents and components, nutrient dynamics and all related environment parameters in July, 2013. Water samples collected from 14 typical sites were incubated under in situ or simulated in situ conditions by the 14C tracer method. Surface chl-a concentration in the coastal zone of Liaodong Bay ranged from 2.16 to 19.85 mg·m-3, and the corresponding primary productivity of particulate organic carbon (POC) ranged from 26.82 to 204.91 mg·m-3·h-1. Although both our chl-a and primary productivity measurements reveal significant spatial variability across the Liaodong Bay, the release rates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from phytoplankton cells into seawater accounts for 4.94±1.44% of the primary productivity of total organic carbon (TOC). Furthermore, the mean and standard deviation of photosynthetic assimilation numbers were 11.65±2.33 (range = 8.78 to 14.63; n=6) with specific maxima in two sites where transparency was better than others, comparatively. In the Liaohe River Delta, it is observed that chl-a concentration and the primary productivity of POC declined from 11.20 mg·m-3 and 89.03 mg·m-3·h-1 to be 1.54 mg·m-3 and 13.22 mg·m-3·h-1, separately, corresponding to the increasing of salinity from 1.0 to be 6.7 in the area dominated by the salinity gradient. The maxima primary productivity of TOC in the river (99.74 mg·m-3·h-1) was about ten times higher than the minima primary productivity (9.73 mg·m-3·h-1) in the coastal area of Liaodong Bay, probably because of the significant variation of nutrient dynamics, suspended particulate matter and transparency along the river discharge. The percentage of DOC release from phytoplankton cell in the river delta area was approximately 13.71±3.62%, much higher than that in the coastal area of Liaodong Bay. The possible effect of phytoplankton community on the

  15. The effects of temporal variability of mixed layer depth on primary productivity around Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissett, W. Paul; Meyers, Mark B.; Walsh, John J.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations in primary production and surface chlorophyll concentrations, as measured by ship and satellite around Bermuda, were simulated with a numerical model. In the upper 450 m of the water column, population dynamics of a size-fractionated phytoplankton community were forced by daily changes of wind, light, grazing stress, and nutrient availability. The temporal variations of production and chlorophyll were driven by changes in nutrient introduction to the euphotic zone due to both high- and low-frequency changes of the mixed layer depth within 32 deg-34 deg N, 62 deg-64 deg W between 1979 and 1984. Results from the model derived from high-frequency (case 1) changes in the mixed layer depth showed variations in primary production and peak chlorophyll concentrations when compared with results from the model derived from low-frequency (case 2) mixed layer depth changes. Incorporation of size-fractionated plankton state variables in the model led to greater seasonal resolution of measured primary production and vertical chlorophyll profiles. The findings of this study highlight the possible inadequacy of estimating primary production in the sea from data of low-frequency temporal resolution and oversimplified biological simulations.

  16. Impact of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter on UV Inhibition of Primary Productivity in the Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Brown, Christopher W.

    1996-01-01

    A model was developed to assess the impact of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on phytoplankton production within the euphotic zone. The rate of depth-integrated daily gross primary productivity within the euphotic zone was evaluated as a function of date, latitude, CDONI absorption characteristics, chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration, vertical stratification, and phytoplankton sensitivity to UV radiation (UVR). Results demonstrated that primary production was enhanced in the upper 30 m of the water column by the presence of CDOM, where predicted increases in production due to the removal of damaging UVR more than offset its reduction resulting from the absorption of photosynthetically usable radiation. At greater depths, where little UVR remained, primary production was always reduced due to removal by CDOM of photosynthetically usable radiation. When CDOM was distributed homogeneously within the euphotic zone, the integral over z [(GPP)(sub ez)], was reduced under most bio-optical (i.e. solar zenith angle, and CDOM absorption, and ozone concentration) and photophysiological production at depth was greater than the enhancement of production at the surface.

  17. Primary productivity by phytoplankton in the tidal, fresh Potomac River, Maryland, May 1980 to August 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, R.R.; Pollock, S.O.

    1983-01-01

    Primary productivity by phytoplankton was measured on samples collected from the Potomac Tidal River, Maryland. The studies were performed monthly from May 1980 to September 1981. Additional studies were done once a week in August 1980, twice a week from August 4 to 8, 1980 and twice in September 1980. Depth-integrated samples were collected at five stations and incubated in boxes that were exposed to natural sunlight. The boxes were covered with neutral density filters transmitting 100 , 65, 32, 16, and 6 percent surface light. River water was pumped continuously over the samples. The extinction of light in the water column by phytoplankton was measured when samples were collected. Experiments were performed to select a method for routine productivity analysis. No difference was found between productivity: (1) determined in situ and in boxes; (2) measured in 300 ml and (4) calculated from short term (4 hours) and long term (10-24 hours) incubations. There were higher productivity differences in samples that were rotated among different light intensities every 15 minutes (simulating mixing) than those remaining stationary. Respiration was significantly less in samples pumped through a hose from those collected using a depth-integrating sampler. Depth-integrated primary productivity was determined from the productivity data using an equation modified from one reported in the literature. Depth-integrated gross primary productivity was highest in August 1980 and 1981 and lowest in January 1980. (USGS)

  18. Physico-mechanical properties determination using microscale homotopic measurements: application to sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Orestes; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette; Bohaty, Brenda; Katz, J Lawrence

    2009-05-01

    Microscale elastic moduli, composition and density have rarely been determined at the same location for biological materials. In this paper, we have performed homotopic measurements to determine the physico-mechanical properties of a second primary molar specimen exhibiting sound and caries-affected regions. A microscale acoustic impedance map of a section through this sample was acquired using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Scanning electron microscopy was then used to obtain mineral mass fraction of the same section using backscattered images. Careful calibration of each method was performed to reduce system effects and obtain accurate data. Resorption, demineralization and hypermineralization mechanisms were considered in order to derive relationships between measured mineral mass fraction and material mass density. As a result, microscale mass density was determined at the same lateral resolution and location as the SAM data. The mass density and the acoustic impedance were combined to find the microscale elastic modulus and study the relationship between microscale composition and mechanical properties. PMID:19059013

  19. Benthic primary production in an upwelling-influenced coral reef, Colombian Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Hauffe, Torsten; Pizarro, Valeria; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In Tayrona National Natural Park (Colombian Caribbean), abiotic factors such as light intensity, water temperature, and nutrient availability are subjected to high temporal variability due to seasonal coastal upwelling. These factors are the major drivers controlling coral reef primary production as one of the key ecosystem services. This offers the opportunity to assess the effects of abiotic factors on reef productivity. We therefore quantified primary net (Pn) and gross production (Pg) of the dominant local primary producers (scleractinian corals, macroalgae, algal turfs, crustose coralline algae, and microphytobenthos) at a water current/wave-exposed and-sheltered site in an exemplary bay of Tayrona National Natural Park. A series of short-term incubations was conducted to quantify O2 fluxes of the different primary producers during non-upwelling and the upwelling event 2011/2012, and generalized linear models were used to analyze group-specific O2 production, their contribution to benthic O2 fluxes, and total daily benthic O2 production. At the organism level, scleractinian corals showed highest Pn and Pg rates during non-upwelling (16 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1), and corals and algal turfs dominated the primary production during upwelling (12 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1, respectively). At the ecosystem level, corals contributed most to total Pn and Pg during non-upwelling, while during upwelling, corals contributed most to Pn and Pg only at the exposed site and macroalgae at the sheltered site, respectively. Despite the significant spatial and temporal differences in individual productivity of the investigated groups and their different contribution to reef productivity, differences for daily ecosystem productivity were only present for Pg at exposed with higher O2 fluxes during non-upwelling compared to upwelling. Our findings therefore indicate that total benthic primary productivity of local autotrophic reef communities is

  20. Arsenic affects expression and processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of human APP.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Sergio; Bürger, Susanne; Delgado, Juan M; Jiménez-Capdeville, Maria E; Schliebs, Reinhard

    2011-06-01

    Arsenic poisoning due to contaminated water and soil, mining waste, glass manufacture, select agrochemicals, as well as sea food, affects millions of people world wide. Recently, an involvement of arsenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been hypothesized (Gong and O'Bryant, 2010). The present study stresses the hypothesis whether sodium arsenite, and its main metabolite, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), may affect expression and processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using the cholinergic cell line SN56.B5.G4 and primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP, as experimental approaches. Exposure of cholinergic SN56.B5.G4 cells with either sodium arsenite or DMA decreased cell viability in a concentration- and exposure-time dependent manner, and affected the activities of the cholinergic enzymes acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase. Both sodium arsenite and DMA exposure of SN56.B5.G4 cells resulted in enhanced level of APP, and sAPP in the membrane and cytosolic fractions, respectively. To reveal any effect of arsenic on APP processing, the amounts of APP cleavage products, sAPPβ, and β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, released into the culture medium of primary neuronal cells derived from transgenic Tg2576 mice, were assessed by ELISA. Following exposure of neuronal cells by sodium arsenite for 12h, the membrane-bound APP level was enhanced, the amount of sAPPβ released into the culture medium was slightly higher, while the levels of Aβ peptides in the culture medium were considerably lower as compared to that assayed in the absence of any drug. The sodium arsenite-induced reduction of Aβ formation suggests an inhibition of the APP γ-cleavage step by arsenite. In contrast, DMA exposure of neuronal cells considerably increased formation of Aβ and sAPPβ, accompanied by enhanced membrane APP level. The DMA-induced changes in APP processing may be the result of the enhanced APP expression. Alternatively, increased Aβ production

  1. Exogenous N addition enhances the responses of gross primary productivity to individual precipitation events in a temperate grassland.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qun; Hu, Zhong-Min; Li, Sheng-Gong; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Li, Ling-Hao; Liang, Nai-Shen; Bai, Wen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Predicted future shifts in the magnitude and frequency (larger but fewer) of precipitation events and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition may interact to affect grassland productivity, but the effects of N enrichment on the productivity response to individual precipitation events remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the effects of N addition on the response patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP) to individual precipitation events of different sizes (Psize) in a temperate grassland in China. The results showed that N enrichment significantly increased the time-integrated amount of GPP in response to an individual precipitation event (GPPtotal), and the N-induced stimulation of GPP increased with increasing Psize. N enrichment rarely affected the duration of the GPP response, but it significantly stimulated the maximum absolute GPP response. Higher foliar N content might play an important role in the N-induced stimulation of GPP. GPPtotal in both the N-addition and control treatments increased linearly with Psize with similar Psize intercepts (approximately 5 mm, indicating a similar lower Psize threshold to stimulate the GPP response) but had a steeper slope under N addition. Our work indicates that the projected larger precipitation events will stimulate grassland productivity, and this stimulation might be amplified by increasing N deposition. PMID:27264386

  2. Exogenous N addition enhances the responses of gross primary productivity to individual precipitation events in a temperate grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qun; Hu, Zhong-Min; Li, Sheng-Gong; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Li, Ling-Hao; Liang, Nai-Shen; Bai, Wen-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Predicted future shifts in the magnitude and frequency (larger but fewer) of precipitation events and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition may interact to affect grassland productivity, but the effects of N enrichment on the productivity response to individual precipitation events remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the effects of N addition on the response patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP) to individual precipitation events of different sizes (Psize) in a temperate grassland in China. The results showed that N enrichment significantly increased the time-integrated amount of GPP in response to an individual precipitation event (GPPtotal), and the N-induced stimulation of GPP increased with increasing Psize. N enrichment rarely affected the duration of the GPP response, but it significantly stimulated the maximum absolute GPP response. Higher foliar N content might play an important role in the N-induced stimulation of GPP. GPPtotal in both the N-addition and control treatments increased linearly with Psize with similar Psize intercepts (approximately 5 mm, indicating a similar lower Psize threshold to stimulate the GPP response) but had a steeper slope under N addition. Our work indicates that the projected larger precipitation events will stimulate grassland productivity, and this stimulation might be amplified by increasing N deposition.

  3. Exogenous N addition enhances the responses of gross primary productivity to individual precipitation events in a temperate grassland

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qun; Hu, Zhong-min; Li, Sheng-gong; Yu, Gui-rui; Sun, Xiao-min; Li, Ling-hao; Liang, Nai-shen; Bai, Wen-ming

    2016-01-01

    Predicted future shifts in the magnitude and frequency (larger but fewer) of precipitation events and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition may interact to affect grassland productivity, but the effects of N enrichment on the productivity response to individual precipitation events remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the effects of N addition on the response patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP) to individual precipitation events of different sizes (Psize) in a temperate grassland in China. The results showed that N enrichment significantly increased the time-integrated amount of GPP in response to an individual precipitation event (GPPtotal), and the N-induced stimulation of GPP increased with increasing Psize. N enrichment rarely affected the duration of the GPP response, but it significantly stimulated the maximum absolute GPP response. Higher foliar N content might play an important role in the N-induced stimulation of GPP. GPPtotal in both the N-addition and control treatments increased linearly with Psize with similar Psize intercepts (approximately 5 mm, indicating a similar lower Psize threshold to stimulate the GPP response) but had a steeper slope under N addition. Our work indicates that the projected larger precipitation events will stimulate grassland productivity, and this stimulation might be amplified by increasing N deposition. PMID:27264386

  4. Production of arabitol from glycerol: strain screening and study of factors affecting production yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol is a major byproduct from biodiesel production, and developing new uses for glycerol is imperative to overall economics and sustainability of the biodiesel industry. With the aim of producing xylitol and/or arabitol as the value-added products from glycerol, 214 yeast strains, many osmotole...

  5. Bacterial and primary production in the pelagic zone of the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, A. F.; Romanova, N. D.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2010-10-01

    Data on the bacterial and primary production, which were obtained simultaneously for the same water samples, are presented for three regions of the Kara Sea. The samples were collected for the transect westwards of the Yamal Peninsula, along the St. Anna Trough, and the transect in Ob Bay. Direct counts of the DAPI-stained bacterial cells were performed. The bacterial production and grazing rates were determined using a direct method when metabolic inhibitors vancomycin and penicillin were added. The primary production rates were estimated using the 14C method. The average primary production was 112.6, 58.5, and 28.7 mg C m-2 day-1, and the bacterial production was 12.8, 48.9, and 81.6 mg C m-2 day-1 along the Yamal Peninsula, the St. Anna Trough, and Ob Bay, respectively. The average bacterial carbon demand was 34.6, 134.5, and 220.4 mg C m-2 day-1 for these regions, respectively. The data obtained lead us to conclude that the phytoplankton-synthesized organic matter is generally insufficient to satisfy the bacterial carbon demand and may be completely assimilated via the heterotrophic processes in the marine ecosystems. Therefore, the bacterial activity and, consequently, the amount of the synthesized biomass (i.e., the production) both depend directly on the phytoplankton’s condition and activity. We consider these relationships to be characteristics of the Kara Sea’s biota.

  6. Global 4 km resolution monthly gridded Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) data set derived from FLUXNET2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Hargrove, William W.; Collier, Nathan

    2016-08-01

    This data set contain global gridded surfaces of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) at 2 arc minute (approximately 4 km) spatial resolution monthly for the period of 2000-2014 derived from FLUXNET2015 (released July 12, 2016) observations using a representativeness based upscaling approach.

  7. Aboveground net primary production responses to water availability in the Chihuhuan Desert: importance of legacy effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In arid ecosystems, current year precipitation explains a small proportion of annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Precipitation that occurred in previous years may be responsible for the observed difference between actual and expected ANPP, a concept that we called legacy. Thus, previo...

  8. Legacies of precipitation fluctuations on primary production: theory and data synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability of above-ground net primary production (ANPP) of arid to sub-humid ecosystems displays a closer association with precipitation when considered across space (based on multiyear averages for different locations) than through time (based on year-to-year change at single locations). Here, we...

  9. Legacies of precipitation fluctuations on primary production: Theory and data synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of arid to sub-humid ecosystems displays a closer association with precipitation when considered across space, based on multiyear averages for different locations, than through time, based on year to year change at single locations. Here, we p...

  10. Global Net Primary Production Predicted from Vegetation Class, Precipitation, and Temperature.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net Primary Production (NPP), the difference between CO2 fixed by photosynthesis and CO2 lost to autotrophic respiration, is one of the most important components of the carbon cycle. Our goal was to develop a simple regression model to estimate global NPP using climate and land cover data. Approxima...

  11. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  12. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  13. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  14. PHOSPHOROUS AND NITROGEN LIMITATION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN A SIMULATED ESTUARINE GRADIENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transition between phosphorus limitation of primary production in freshwater and nitrogen limitation in seawater was examined along an estuarine gradient simulated in 4 large 13 M3 enclosures connected in a series and containing pelagic and benthic subsystems. ominal saliniti...

  15. Deconstructing Immigrant Girls' Identities through the Production of Visual Narratives in a Catalan Urban Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rifa-Valls, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the research findings of a deconstructive visual ethnography focused on the production of immigrant girls' identities will be analysed. This collaborative research project involved experimentation with a dialogic curriculum aimed at creating diverse identity narratives with immigrant girls at an urban primary school in Barcelona.…

  16. Modeling the Response of Nutrient Concentrations and Primary Productivity in Lake Michigan to Nutrient Loading Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality model, LM3 Eutro, will be used to estimate the response of nutrient concentrations and primary productivity in Lake Michigan to nutrient loading scenarios. This work is part of a larger effort, the Future Midwestern landscapes study, that will estimate the produc...

  17. Variability in light-use efficiency for gross primary productivity on Great Plains grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gross primary productivity (GPP) often is estimated at regional and global scales by multiplying the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by the plant canopy (PARa) by a light-use efficiency (eg) which is modeled as a function of air temperature (Ta) and other environmental c...

  18. The Potential of Carbonyl Sulfide as a Tracer for Gross Primary Productivity at Flux Tower Sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional/continental scale studies of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) seasonal dynamics and leaf level studies of plant OCS uptake have shown a close relationship to CO2 dynamics and uptake, suggesting potential for OCS as a tracer for gross primary productivity (GPP). Canopy CO2 and OCS differen...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with all of the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 61, subpart A. (b) You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, that are specified... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  1. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  2. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply with all of the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 61, subpart A. (b) You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, that are specified... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment...

  3. 24 CFR 3282.362 - Production Inspection Primary Inspection Agencies (IPIAs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production Inspection Primary Inspection Agencies (IPIAs). 3282.362 Section 3282.362 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  4. Variability in light-use efficiency for gross primary productivity on Great Plains grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gross primary productivity (GPP) often is estimated at regional scales by multiplying the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by the plant canopy (PARa) by light-use efficiency (eg; GPP/PARa). Mass flux techniques are being used to calculate eg. Flux-based estimates of eg ...

  5. Productivity, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and light use efficiency in crops: implications for remote sensing of crop primary production.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Suyker, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation productivity metrics such as gross primary production (GPP) at the canopy scale are greatly affected by the efficiency of using absorbed radiation for photosynthesis, or light use efficiency (LUE). Thus, close investigation of the relationships between canopy GPP and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation is the basis for quantification of LUE. We used multiyear observations over irrigated and rainfed contrasting C3 (soybean) and C4 (maize) crops having different physiology, leaf structure, and canopy architecture to establish the relationships between canopy GPP and radiation absorbed by vegetation and quantify LUE. Although multiple LUE definitions are reported in the literature, we used a definition of efficiency of light use by photosynthetically active "green" vegetation (LUE(green)) based on radiation absorbed by "green" photosynthetically active vegetation on a daily basis. We quantified, irreversible slowly changing seasonal (constitutive) and rapidly day-to-day changing (facultative) LUE(green), as well as sensitivity of LUE(green) to the magnitude of incident radiation and drought events. Large (2-3-fold) variation of daily LUE(green) over the course of a growing season that is governed by crop physiological and phenological status was observed. The day-to-day variations of LUE(green) oscillated with magnitude 10-15% around the seasonal LUE(green) trend and appeared to be closely related to day-to-day variations of magnitude and composition of incident radiation. Our results show the high variability of LUE(green) between C3 and C4 crop species (1.43 g C/MJ vs. 2.24 g C/MJ, respectively), as well as within single crop species (i.e., maize or soybean). This implies that assuming LUE(green) as a constant value in GPP models is not warranted for the crops studied, and brings unpredictable uncertainties of remote GPP estimation, which should be accounted for in LUE models. The uncertainty of GPP estimation due to facultative and

  6. 40 CFR 63.5985 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5985 Section 63.5985 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5985 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected...

  7. 40 CFR 63.5986 - What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tire cord production affected sources? 63.5986 Section 63.5986 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5986 What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources? You must meet each emission limit...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5985 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5985 Section 63.5985 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5985 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected...

  9. 40 CFR 63.5987 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources? 63.5987 Section 63.5987 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5987 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources?...

  10. 40 CFR 63.5994 - How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for tire production affected sources? 63.5994 Section 63.5994 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5994 How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire production affected sources? (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 63.5986 - What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tire cord production affected sources? 63.5986 Section 63.5986 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5986 What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources? You must meet each emission limit...

  12. 40 CFR 63.5987 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources? 63.5987 Section 63.5987 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5987 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources?...

  13. 40 CFR 63.5997 - How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for tire cord production affected sources? 63.5997 Section 63.5997 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5997 How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire cord production affected...

  14. 40 CFR 63.5985 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5985 Section 63.5985 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5985 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected sources? You must...

  15. 40 CFR 63.5985 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5985 Section 63.5985 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5985 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected sources? You must...

  16. 40 CFR 63.5985 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5985 Section 63.5985 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5985 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire production affected...

  17. 40 CFR 63.5994 - How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for tire production affected sources? 63.5994 Section 63.5994 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5994 How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire production affected sources? (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 63.5986 - What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tire cord production affected sources? 63.5986 Section 63.5986 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5986 What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources? You must meet each emission limit...

  19. 40 CFR 63.5997 - How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for tire cord production affected sources? 63.5997 Section 63.5997 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5997 How do I conduct tests and procedures for tire cord production affected...

  20. Turbidity, light, temperature, and hydropeaking control primary productivity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O., Jr.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Yard, Michael D.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.; Voichick, Nicholas; Behn, Kathrine E.

    2015-01-01

    Dams and river regulation greatly alter the downstream environment for gross primary production (GPP) because of changes in water clarity, flow, and temperature regimes. We estimated reach-scale GPP in five locations of the regulated Colorado River in Grand Canyon using an open channel model of dissolved oxygen. Benthic GPP dominates in Grand Canyon due to fast transport times and low pelagic algal biomass. In one location, we used a 738 days time series of GPP to identify the relative contribution of different physical controls of GPP. We developed both linear and semimechanistic time series models that account for unmeasured temporal covariance due to factors such as algal biomass dynamics. GPP varied from 0 g O2 m−2 d−1 to 3.0 g O2 m−2 d−1 with a relatively low annual average of 0.8 g O2 m−2d−1. Semimechanistic models fit the data better than linear models and demonstrated that variation in turbidity primarily controlled GPP. Lower solar insolation during winter and from cloud cover lowered GPP much further. Hydropeaking lowered GPP but only during turbid conditions. Using the best model and parameter values, the model accurately predicted seasonal estimates of GPP at 3 of 4 upriver sites and outperformed the linear model at all sites; discrepancies were likely from higher algal biomass at upstream sites. This modeling approach can predict how changes in physical controls will affect relative rates of GPP throughout the 385 km segment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon and can be easily applied to other streams and rivers.

  1. Relationships between net primary productivity and forest stand age in U.S. forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liming; Chen, Jing M.; Pan, Yude; Birdsey, Richard; Kattge, Jens

    2012-09-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is a key flux in the terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance, as it summarizes the autotrophic input into the system. Forest NPP varies predictably with stand age, and quantitative information on the NPP-age relationship for different regions and forest types is therefore fundamentally important for forest carbon cycle modeling. We used four terms to calculate NPP: annual accumulation of live biomass, annual mortality of aboveground and belowground biomass, foliage turnover to soil, and fine root turnover in soil. For U.S. forests the first two terms can be reliably estimated from the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data. Although the last two terms make up more than 50% of total NPP, direct estimates of these fluxes are highly uncertain due to limited availability of empirical relationships between aboveground biomass and foliage or fine root biomass. To resolve this problem, we developed a new approach using maps of leaf area index (LAI) and forest age at 1 km resolution to derive LAI-age relationships for 18 major forest type groups in the USA. These relationships were then used to derive foliage turnover estimates using species-specific trait data for leaf specific area and longevity. These turnover estimates were also used to derive the fine root turnover based on reliable relationships between fine root and foliage turnover. This combination of FIA data, remote sensing, and plant trait information allows for the first empirical and reliable NPP-age relationships for different forest types in the USA. The relationships show a general temporal pattern of rapid increase in NPP in the young ages of forest type groups, peak growth in the middle ages, and slow decline in the mature ages. The predicted patterns are influenced by climate conditions and can be affected by forest management. These relationships were further generalized to three major forest biomes for use by continental-scale carbon cycle models in conjunction with

  2. A comparison of global estimates of marine primary production from ocean color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Mary-Elena; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Schmeltz, Marjorie; Noguchi Aita, Maki; Antoine, David; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Asanuma, Ichio; Aumont, Olivier; Barber, Richard; Behrenfeld, Michael; Bidigare, Robert; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Campbell, Janet; Ciotti, Aurea; Dierssen, Heidi; Dowell, Mark; Dunne, John; Esaias, Wayne; Gentili, Bernard; Gregg, Watson; Groom, Steve; Hoepffner, Nicolas; Ishizaka, Joji; Kameda, Takahiko; Le Quéré, Corinne; Lohrenz, Steven; Marra, John; Mélin, Frédéric; Moore, Keith; Morel, André; Reddy, Tasha E.; Ryan, John; Scardi, Michele; Smyth, Tim; Turpie, Kevin; Tilstone, Gavin; Waters, Kirk; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2006-03-01

    The third primary production algorithm round robin (PPARR3) compares output from 24 models that estimate depth-integrated primary production from satellite measurements of ocean color, as well as seven general circulation models (GCMs) coupled with ecosystem or biogeochemical models. Here we compare the global primary production fields corresponding to eight months of 1998 and 1999 as estimated from common input fields of photosynthetically-available radiation (PAR), sea-surface temperature (SST), mixed-layer depth, and chlorophyll concentration. We also quantify the sensitivity of the ocean-color-based models to perturbations in their input variables. The pair-wise correlation between ocean-color models was used to cluster them into groups or related output, which reflect the regions and environmental conditions under which they respond differently. The groups do not follow model complexity with regards to wavelength or depth dependence, though they are related to the manner in which temperature is used to parameterize photosynthesis. Global average PP varies by a factor of two between models. The models diverged the most for the Southern Ocean, SST under 10C, and chlorophyll concentration exceeding 1 mg Chl m-3. Based on the conditions under which the model results diverge most, we conclude that current ocean-color-based models are challenged by high-nutrient low-chlorophyll conditions, and extreme temperatures or chlorophyll concentrations. The GCM-based models predict comparable primary production to those based on ocean color: they estimate higher values in the Southern Ocean, at low SST, and in the equatorial band, while they estimate lower values in eutrophic regions (probably because the area of high chlorophyll concentrations is smaller in the GCMs). Further progress in primary production modeling requires improved understanding of the effect of temperature on photosynthesis and better parameterization of the maximum photosynthetic rate.

  3. Different contributions of riverine and oceanic nutrient fluxes supporting primary production in Ishikari Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agboola, Julius I.; Kudo, Isao

    2014-10-01

    We computed a ratio of riverine nutrient flux (RNF) to bottom nutrient flux (BNF) to determine the relative importance of oceanic and riverine nutrient fluxes on primary production dynamics in Ishikari Bay, which is composed of oligotrophic subarctic coastal water. Across spring, summer and autumn, the RNF:BNF ratio (R:B ratio) was significantly greater than 1.0, especially in spring and autumn for DIN and Si(OH)4, suggesting that riverine nutrients mostly supported primary production. A strong inverse relationship (r=-0.927) between Chl a and salinity in autumn and a corresponding increase in the apparent utilization of DIN and primary production indicated that the contribution of DIN from the Ishikari River on primary production was maximal in autumn. However the R:B ratio for PO4 was significantly less than 1.0, especially in summer (0.1) and autumn (0.3), suggesting a larger contribution of bottom upwelling nutrient sources. In spring, when the ratio was close to 1 (0.8), PO4 supply from both bottom (upwelling) and surface (river) was equivalent, since PO4 concentration of river end-member was the lowest. Although riverine nutrient fluxes were a major source of DIN and Si(OH)4 nutrient supply in the bay, oceanic nutrient contribution from bottom upwelling and horizontal advection was a major source of PO4. While riverine nutrients significantly fuel primary production, the estuarine circulation process may contribute significantly to compensating for the inadequate supply of riverine PO4 in an oligotrophic system like Ishikari Bay. Also, unlike the usual estuarine system in which nutrient concentration at a deeper layer is high due to the regeneration of nutrients at depth, concentration in Ishikari Bay was very low due to an influence of oligotrophic waters. We conclude that riverine nutrient flux contributes a large portion of the total flux in Ishikari Bay.

  4. Ongoing evaluation of sources and factors affecting emissions from engineered wood products

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.L.; Martin, C.B.; Sheldon, L.S.; Baskir, J.N.; Howard, E.M.

    1998-09-01

    The paper describes an ongoing evaluation of sources and factors affecting emissions from engineered wood products. It summarizes early results from emissions testing of engineered wood products. These tests have shown the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the alcohol, aldehyde/ketone, ester, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon, monoterpene, sesquiterpene, indene, and alkyl ether chemical families from engineered wood samples. This information will be used to target pollution prevention approaches, such as alternate materials and production technologies for raw board and engineered wood products, for reducing VOC emissions.

  5. A global analysis of fine root production as affected by soil nitrogen and phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Z. Y.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    Fine root production is the largest component of belowground production and plays substantial roles in the biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial ecosystems. The increasing availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) due to human activities is expected to increase aboveground net primary production (ANNP), but the response of fine root production to N and P remains unclear. If roots respond to nutrients as ANNP, fine root production is anticipated to increase with increasing soil N and P. Here, by synthesizing data along the nutrient gradient from 410 natural habitats and from 469 N and/or P addition experiments, we showed that fine root production increased in terrestrial ecosystems with an average increase along the natural N gradient of up to 0.5 per cent with increasing soil N. Fine root production also increased with soil P in natural conditions, particularly at P < 300 mg kg−1. With N, P and combined N + P addition, fine root production increased by a global average of 27, 21 and 40 per cent, respectively. However, its responses differed among ecosystems and soil types. The global average increases in fine root production are lower than those of ANNP, indicating that above- and belowground counterparts are coupled, but production allocation shifts more to aboveground with higher soil nutrients. Our results suggest that the increasing fertilizer use and combined N deposition at present and in the future will stimulate fine root production, together with ANPP, probably providing a significant influence on atmospheric CO2 emissions. PMID:22764168

  6. Teleconnections between upwelling along the Pacific coast of Baja California and marine and terrestrial gross primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, J. J.; Vargas, R.; Gaxiola-Castro, G.; Hernandez-Ayon, M.; Lara-Lara, R.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial processes are closely connected to the oceans through teleconnections in the atmosphere. The global terrestrial carbon cycle is known to be affected by a teleconnection to large scale atmospheric events such as El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO; 2 to 7 year cycles), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO; decadal cycles). ENSO and PDO are the predominate atmospheric patterns which impact the Pacific coast of North America. Correlations between ENSO indices and gross primary production have shown that ENSO may partially explain the variability in the global terrestrial carbon cycle. We hypothesize that the remaining variability (for those ecosystems along eastern basin margins) may be explained by the teleconnection between terrestrial primary production and upwelling along continental margins. The study sites were selected along the Baja California peninsula due to the fact that each one is characterized by year round coastal upwelling (though stronger during the boreal spinr/summer months) and their respective terrestrial climate characteristics: 1. Punta Colonet/Sierra San Pedro Martir is located in a mediterranean climate with conifer forest; 2. Punta Abre Ojos (just south of Guerrero Negro) is located in the central desert region; 3. at approximate 29°00' N (west of Bahía de los Angeles) is in the central desert region but is also characterized by fog; and 4. Magdalena Bay is located in a subtropical desert region with sporadic rain events (here the marine portion of the transect will extend out from the mouth of the bay). Using ten years of MODIS Terra and Aqua (terrestrial gross primary production [TGPP]) and SeaWif's (chlorophyll a [chl. a] as a proxy for biomass) data for four transects along the Baja California peninsula (extending from approximately 300 km off the coast to up to 50 km inland depending on the transect) the gross primary production will be analyzed in relation to upwelling (represented by sea

  7. A guided search genetic algorithm using mined rules for optimal affective product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Chris K. Y.; Kwong, C. K.; Chan, Kit Yan; Jiang, H.

    2014-08-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of new product development, especially for consumer products, to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. It can help companies to develop new products that can better satisfy the emotional needs of customers. However, product designers usually encounter difficulties in determining the optimal settings of the design attributes for affective design. In this article, a novel guided search genetic algorithm (GA) approach is proposed to determine the optimal design attribute settings for affective design. The optimization model formulated based on the proposed approach applied constraints and guided search operators, which were formulated based on mined rules, to guide the GA search and to achieve desirable solutions. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the proposed approach and validate its effectiveness. Validation tests were conducted, and the results show that the guided search GA approach outperforms the GA approach without the guided search strategy in terms of GA convergence and computational time. In addition, the guided search optimization model is capable of improving GA to generate good solutions for affective design.

  8. Mapping net primary production and related biophysical variables with remote sensing: Application to the BOREAS region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Prince, Stephen D.; Goward, Samuel N.; Thawley, Michelle M.; Small, Jennifer; Johnston, Andrew

    1999-11-01

    Maps of net and gross primary production, autotrophic respiration, biomass, and other biophysical variables were generated for 106 km2 of boreal forest in central Canada (the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere (BOREAS) region) using a production efficiency model (PEM) driven with remotely sensed observations at 1 km2 spatial resolution. The PEM was based on carbon yields of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation for both gross and net primary production (GPP and NPP), accounting for environmental stress and autotrophic respiration (Ra). Physiological control was modeled using remotely sensed maps of air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, and soil moisture. The accuracy of the inferred variables was generally within 10-30% of point measurements at the surface and independent model results (both at the stand level). Biomass maps were derived from visible reflectance measurements and were also compared to independently derived maps. Area-averaged GPP was 604 g C m-2 yr-1 compared with average canopy respiration of 428 g C m-2 yr-1 and NPP of 235 g C m-2 yr-1. Net annual carbon uptake in net primary production for the region totaled 175 teragrams. Canopy carbon exchange (GPP and Ra) differed widely between land cover types even though the model does not use land cover information. Extensive areas of the least productive cover types (e.g., lowland needleleaf species) accounted for the greatest amount of NPP.

  9. Distribution of plankton lipids and their role in the biological transformation of Antarctic primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzaud, P.; Errhif, A.; Bedo, A.

    1998-11-01

    Production and transfer of lipid through the Antarctic food web is reviewed for the Indian Ocean sector. The slow settling fine particles showed a marked inter-annual variability in biochemical composition with an increase in lipid content as % organic carbon. Comparison of the fatty acid spectra of different size categories of organic particles indicated that fine particles are dominated by saturated, monoenoic and branched acids, while larger material (50-100 μm, 200-500 μm net collected fractions) displayed a signature dominated by polyunsaturated acids. Zooplankton taxa displayed different strategies of lipid accumulation. Lipid content was highest in Thysanoessa macrura females and copepodite stages of Calanus propinquus. Relatively low levels were recorded for juveniles and male stages of euphausiids. Reserve lipids varied with species: C. propinquus showed equal content of triglycerides and wax esters, T. macrura showed a dominance of wax esters and Euphausia superba and Themisto gaudichaudii accumulated only triglycerides. Computed as carbon equivalent and integrated over 200 m, lipids in slow settling particles represented 22.6% of annual primary production. Similar computation with mesozooplankton and E. superba data on biomass and population structure from several summer cruises indicated values of carbon accumulation as lipid reserves and egg production of 4.2 and 0.1% of annual primary production for copepods and 4.4 and 3.8% for E. superba. When all trophic levels are considered, the overall mean exceeded 30% of annual primary production.

  10. Potential consequences of climate change for primary production and fish production in large marine ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Julia L.; Jennings, Simon; Holmes, Robert; Harle, James; Merino, Gorka; Allen, J. Icarus; Holt, Jason; Dulvy, Nicholas K.; Barange, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Existing methods to predict the effects of climate change on the biomass and production of marine communities are predicated on modelling the interactions and dynamics of individual species, a very challenging approach when interactions and distributions are changing and little is known about the ecological mechanisms driving the responses of many species. An informative parallel approach is to develop size-based methods. These capture the properties of food webs that describe energy flux and production at a particular size, independent of species' ecology. We couple a physical–biogeochemical model with a dynamic, size-based food web model to predict the future effects of climate change on fish biomass and production in 11 large regional shelf seas, with and without fishing effects. Changes in potential fish production are shown to most strongly mirror changes in phytoplankton production. We project declines of 30–60% in potential fish production across some important areas of tropical shelf and upwelling seas, most notably in the eastern Indo-Pacific, the northern Humboldt and the North Canary Current. Conversely, in some areas of the high latitude shelf seas, the production of pelagic predators was projected to increase by 28–89%. PMID:23007086

  11. Release of primary microplastics from consumer products to wastewater in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Wezel, Annemarie; Caris, Inez; Kools, Stefan A E

    2016-07-01

    The authors estimate the release of primary microplastics from consumer products-cosmetics and personal care products, cleaning agents, and paint and coatings-via sewage effluent as an expected relevant route to the marine environment. Total estimated concentrations in the 3 scenarios are 0.2 μg/L, 2.7 μg/L, and 66 μg/L in sewage-treatment plant (STP) effluent, respectively. All product categories relevantly contribute. Predicted concentrations are compared with reported actual concentrations in STP effluents. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1627-1631. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627661

  12. Trends in primary production in the California Current detected with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahru, Mati; Kudela, Raphael; Manzano-Sarabia, Marlenne; Mitchell, B. Greg

    2009-02-01

    Several ocean primary production algorithms using satellite data were evaluated on a large archive of net primary production (NPP) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) measurements collected by the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations program in the California Current. The best algorithm matching in situ data was found by empirically adjusting the Behrenfeld-Falkowski Vertically Generalized Production Model. Satellite-derived time series of NPP were calculated for the California Current area. Significant increase in NPP and Chl-a annual peak levels, i.e., the "bloom magnitude," were found along the coasts of the California Current as well as other major eastern boundary currents for the period of modern ocean color data (1997-2007). The reasons for this increase are not clear but are associated with various environmental conditions.

  13. Logopenic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia are differentiated by acoustic measures of speech production.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E; Vogel, Adam P; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r(2) = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  14. Logopenic and Nonfluent Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia Are Differentiated by Acoustic Measures of Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kirrie J.; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E.; Vogel, Adam P.; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r2 = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  15. Investigating the contribution of mussel N regeneration to coastal primary production using stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pather, S.; Altabet, M. A.; Pfister, C. A.; Post, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Determining the sources, pathways and sinks of inorganic nitrogen is integral to our understanding of one of the main determinants of primary productivity in the marine environment. The current view of rocky shore productivity is that it is largely fuelled by ‘new’ inorganic nitrogen brought to surface waters by the physical process of upwelling. However, along the rocky shores of the Washington State outer coast, the high densities of mussels (Mytilus californianus) colonizing these shores produce significant quantities of ‘regenerated’ inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source for primary production. In this study, we seek to determine to what extent regenerated nitrogen is responsible for fueling primary production in these environments. To this end, we employed stable isotope tracers (15NH4 and 15NO3) to track the pathway of inorganic nitrogen in several rocky shore tidepools over the course of half a tidal cycle. Half of all the pools contained mussels in their natural abundance, while half were mussel control pools in which most of the mussels had been physically removed. Discrete water and algal tissue samples were taken at several time points within the study period for mass spectrometric stable isotope analysis. Preliminary results show isotope dilution of tidepool ammonium in pools containing mussels over half a tidal cycle, due to continued ammonium production by mussels. Combined concentration data, regeneration rates as well as removal rates due to autotrophic uptake and/or microbially-mediated ammonium oxidation (nitrification) will be calculated. Isotopic analysis of algal tissue samples and of the other nitrogen pools will shed further light on the contribution of regenerated ammonium to tidepool biogeochemical cycling and ultimately to coastal primary production.

  16. A multi-sensor remote sensing approach for measuring primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, Catherine

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed to develop a multi-sensor remote sensing method for computing marine primary productivity from space, based on the capability to measure the primary ocean variables which regulate photosynthesis. The three variables and the sensors which measure them are: (1) downwelling photosynthetically available irradiance, measured by the VISSR sensor on the GOES satellite, (2) sea-surface temperature from AVHRR on NOAA series satellites, and (3) chlorophyll-like pigment concentration from the Nimbus-7/CZCS sensor. These and other measured variables would be combined within empirical or analytical models to compute primary productivity. With this proposed capability of mapping primary productivity on a regional scale, we could begin realizing a more precise and accurate global assessment of its magnitude and variability. Applications would include supplementation and expansion on the horizontal scale of ship-acquired biological data, which is more accurate and which supplies the vertical components of the field, monitoring oceanic response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, correlation with observed sedimentation patterns and processes, and fisheries management.

  17. The Influence of Sea Ice on Primary Production in the Southern Ocean: A Satellite Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Walker O., Jr.; Comiso, Josefino C.

    2007-01-01

    Sea ice in the Southern Ocean is a major controlling factor on phytoplankton productivity and growth, but the relationship is modified by regional differences in atmospheric and oceanographic conditions. We used the phytoplankton biomass (binned at 7-day intervals), PAR and cloud cover data from SeaWiFS, ice concentrations data from SSM/I and AMSR-E, and sea-surface temperature data from AVHRR, in combination with a vertically integrated model to estimate primary productivity throughout the Southern Ocean (south of 60"s). We also selected six areas within the Southern Ocean and analyzed the variability of the primary productivity and trends through time, as well as the relationship of sea ice to productivity. We found substantial interannual variability in productivity from 1997 - 2005 in all regions of the Southern Ocean, and this variability appeared to be driven in large part by ice dynamics. The most productive regions of Antarctic waters were the continental shelves, which showed the earliest growth, the maximum biomass, and the greatest areal specific productivity. In contrast, no large, sustained blooms occurred in waters of greater depth (> 1,000 m). We suggest that this is due to the slightly greater mixed layer depths found in waters off the continental shelf, and that the interactive effects of iron and irradiance (that is, increased iron requirements in low irradiance environments) result in the limitation of phytoplankton biomass over large regions of the Southern Ocean.

  18. Studies of slow-positron production using low-energy primary electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.

    1999-04-20

    Slow-positron beams produced from negative-work-function solid-state moderators have found numerous applications in condensed matter physics. There are potential advantages in using low-energy primary electron beams for positron production, including reduced radiation damage to single-crystal moderators and reduced activation of nearby components. We present numerical calculations of positron yields and other beam parameters for various target-moderator configurations using the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) [1] and Advanced Photon Source (APS) [2] electron linacs [3] as examples of sources for the primary electron beams. The status of experiments at these facilities is reviewed.

  19. Dynamics of interleukin-21 production during the clinical course of primary and secondary dengue virus infections.

    PubMed

    Vivanco-Cid, H; Maldonado-Rentería, M J; Sánchez-Vargas, L A; Izaguirre-Hernández, I Y; Hernández-Flores, K G; Remes-Ruiz, R

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have revealed the clinical relevance of pro-inflammatory cytokine production during dengue virus (DENV) infections. In this study, we evaluated the production of interleukin-21 (IL-21), a key soluble mediator mainly produced by CD4+ T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-21 production during the clinical course of primary and secondary DENV infections and the potential association of IL-21 serum levels with the disease pathogenesis. Blood samples from DENV-infected patients were collected on different days after the onset of symptoms. Patients were classified according to their phase of disease (acute vs. convalescent phases), the type of infection (primary vs. secondary), and the clinical severity of their disease (dengue fever (DF) vs. dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)). IL-21 levels were measured using a quantitative capture ELISA assay. The levels of IL-21 were significantly elevated in the disease group compared with the control group. IL-21 was detected in primary and secondary DENV infections, with a significantly higher concentration in the convalescent phase of primary infections. IL-21 levels were significantly higher in patients with secondary acute DHF infections when compared with those with secondary acute DF infection. There was a relationship between the elevated serum levels of IL-21 and the production of DENV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies. Taking together, our results show for the first time the involvement of IL-21 during the clinical course of DENV infections. We speculate that IL-21 may play a protective role in the context of the convalescent phase of primary infections and the acute phase of secondary infections. PMID:24858204

  20. Modeling the Impacts of Long-Term Warming Trends on Gross Primary Productivity Across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekonnen, Z. A.; Grant, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    There is evidence of warming over recent decades in most regions of North America (NA) that affects ecosystem productivity and the past decade has been the warmest since instrumental records of global surface temperatures began. In this study, we examined the spatial and temporal variability and trends of warming across NA using climate data from the North America Regional Reanalysis (NARR) from 1979 to 2010 with a 3-hourly time-step and 0.250 x 0.250 spatial resolution as part of the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). A comprehensive mathematical process model, ecosys was used to simulate impacts of this variability in warming on gross primary productivity (GPP). In a test of model results, annual GPP modeled for pixels which corresponded to the locations of 25 eddy covariance towers correlated well (R2=0.76) with annual GPP derived from the flux towers in 2005. At the continental scale long-term (2000 - 2010) annual average modeled GPP for NA correlated well (geographically weighed regression R2 = 0.8) with MODIS GPP, demonstrating close similarities in spatial patterns. Results from the NARR indicated that most areas of NA, particularly high latitude regions, have experienced warming but changes in precipitation vary spatially over the last three decades. GPP modeled in most areas with lower mean annual air temperature (Ta), such as those in boreal climate zones, increased due to early spring and late autumn warming observed in NARR. However modeled GPP declined in most southwestern regions of NA, due to water stress from rising Ta and declining precipitation. Overall, GPP modeled across NA had a positive trend of +0.025 P g C yr-1 with a range of -1.16 to 0.87 P g C yr-1 from the long-term mean. Interannual variability of GPP was the greatest in southwest of US and part of the Great Plains, which could be as a result of frequent El Niño-Southern Oscillation' (ENSO) events that led to major droughts.

  1. Sea spray geoengineering can reduce ocean net primary productivity and carbon uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Keller, David; Korhonen, Hannele; Matthews, Damon

    2016-04-01

    Sea spray geoengineering or marine cloud brightening is one of the proposed methods to deliberately increase planetary albedo and thus counteract climate change. Previous studies have shown that it has potential to significantly alter the global energy balance and reduce impacts on temperature and precipitation. However, its effects on ecosystems have received considerably less attention. Our goal is to assess the effects of sea spray geoengineering on marine biological productivity and global carbon cycle. We use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) to simulate the effects of prescribed aerosol forcing from previous simulations with the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ. In our baseline simulation (GEO), forcing from geoengineering was applied over three persistent stratocumulus regions off the coasts of North America, South America, and South Africa. The global mean forcing was -1 W m‑2. Other forcings and emissions were set according to the RCP4.5 scenario. The control run (CTRL) was identical to GEO except that no geoengineering was present. As a more extreme case, we simulated a scenario where forcing from geoengineering was applied over all ocean area (GEO-ALL) giving a global mean forcing of -4.9 W m‑2. Geoengineering decreased the global total ocean net primary productivity (NPP) during the first decades, but the effect was insignificant by the end of the 21st century. The decrease was caused by decreased temperature of the ocean and climate system in general, not by the decrease in available sunlight as might have been expected. This was demonstrated by two sensitivity simulations where geoengineering was affecting only either temperature or the light available to marine ecosystems. The simulation GEO-ALL behaves in a different way than GEO: ocean NPP was lower than that in CTRL for the first three decades of geoengineering as in GEO, but then NPP increased over the level in CTRL for the remaining of the simulation. In

  2. Purple Nutsedge Tuber Productivity as Affected by Organic Mulches in a Watermelon Production System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research was conducted in Isabela, Puerto Rico, to determine the tuber productivity of the weed purple nutsedge (PN) and the yield of ‘Crimson Sweet' watermelon when grown with or without organic soil bed mulches [hays of millet (Pennisetum glaucum), nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus), sunnhemp (Crotalaria...

  3. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  4. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C

    2015-01-13

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  5. Microbial primary production on an Arctic glacier is insignificant in comparison with allochthonous organic carbon input.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Tranter, Martyn; Benning, Liane G; Rehák, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Cryoconite holes are unique freshwater environments on glacier surfaces, formed when solar-heated dark debris melts down into the ice. Active photoautotrophic microorganisms are abundant within the holes and fix inorganic carbon due to the availability of liquid water and solar radiation. Cryoconite holes are potentially important sources of organic carbon to the glacial ecosystem, but the relative magnitudes of autochthonous microbial primary production and wind-borne allochthonous organic matter brought are unknown. Here, we compare an estimate of annual microbial primary production in 2006 on Werenskioldbreen, a Svalbard glacier, with the organic carbon content of cryoconite debris. There is a great disparity between annual primary production (4.3 mug C g(-1) year(-1)) and the high content of organic carbon within the debris (1.7-4.5%, equivalent to 8500-22 000 mug C g(-1) debris). Long-term accumulation of autochthonous organic matter is considered unlikely due to ablation dynamics and the surface hydrology of the glacier. Rather, it is more likely that the majority of the organic matter on Werenskioldbreen is allochthonous. Hence, although glacier surfaces can be a significant source of organic carbon for glacial environments on Svalbard, they may be reservoirs rather than oases of high productivity. PMID:18430008

  6. Relationships between primary production and irradiance in coral reef algal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Shallow water algal turf communities are the major primary producers on coral reefs. High rates of primary production are maintained despite extremely high light intensities and exposure to ultraviolet wavelengths. The relationships between the light intensity and primary production in these assemblages are typical of algae adapted to a high light environment (low ..cap alpha.. (initial slope), high I/sub k/ (saturating light intensity), and high I/sub c/ (compensation point light intensity)). Seasonal variations in algal standing crop due to herbivory and daylength result in some characteristic photoadaptive changes in ..cap alpha.. I/sub k/, and I/sub c/ and changes in Pnet/sub max/ rates (maximum net photosynthetic rate achieved at light saturation) on both a chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. and an areal basis. Exposure to UV wavelength results in significantly higher respiration rates but no changes in ..cap alpha.., Pnet/sub max/, or I/sub k/, when compared with these parameters for the same algal communities incubated at the same light intensities without UV wavelengths. The apparent lack of photoinhibition in these algae allows calculation of the daily integrated production from the P vs. I parameters. This integrated production is highest in July (3.1 +/- 0.2 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/) and is reduced by 30% from this maximum in December (2.1 +/- 0.1 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/).

  7. Seasonality of oceanic primary production and its interannual variability from 1998 to 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher W.; Schollaert Uz, Stephanie; Corliss, Bruce H.

    2014-08-01

    The seasonality of primary productivity plays an important role in nutrient and carbon cycling. We quantify the seasonality of satellite-derived, oceanic net primary production (NPP) and its interannual variability during the first decade of the SeaWiFS mission (1998 to 2007) using a normalized seasonality index (NSI). The NSI, which is based upon production half-time, t(1/2), generally becomes progressively more episodic with increasing latitude in open ocean waters, spanning from a relatively constant rate of primary productivity throughout the year (mean t(1/2) ~5 months) in subtropical waters to more pulsed events (mean t(1/2) ~3 months) in subpolar waters. This relatively gradual, poleward pattern in NSI differs from recent estimates of phytoplankton bloom duration, another measure of seasonality, at lower latitudes (~40°S-40°N). These differences likely reflect the temporal component of production assessed by each metric, with NSI able to more fully capture the irregular nature of production characteristic of waters in this zonal band. The interannual variability in NSI was generally low, with higher variability observed primarily in frontal and seasonal upwelling zones. The influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation on this variability was clearly evident, particularly in the equatorial Pacific, where primary productivity was anomalously episodic from the date line east to the coast of South America in 1998. Yearly seasonality and the magnitude of annual production were generally positively correlated at mid-latitudes and negatively correlated at tropical latitudes, particularly in a region bordering the Pacific equatorial divergence. This implies that increases of annual production in the former region are attained over the course of a year by shorter duration but higher magnitude NPP events, while in the latter areas it results from an increased frequency or duration of similar magnitude events. Statistically significant trends in the seasonality

  8. Estimating the Capacity of Gross Primary Production from Global Observation Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Soyama, Noriko; Thanyaparaneedkul, Juthasinee; Furumi, Shinobu; Daigo, Motomasa

    2012-07-01

    Estimation of Gross Primary Production with high accuracy is important for understanding the carbon cycle. For estimating gross primary production, photosynthesis process was considers into two parts. One is the capacity and another is the reduction which is influenced by environmental conditions such as weather conditions of vapor pressure difference and soil moisture. The capacity estimation part is reported in this conference. For a leaf, it is well known photosynthesis capacity is mainly depend on amount of chlorophyll and enzyme. Chlorophyll contents reflect the color of a leaf. Since we focus on the chlorophyll contents for estimating the capacity of the gross primary production. It was reported by J. Thanyapraneedkul (2012) that vegetation index of the ratio of green band and near infrared was linear relationship with chlorophyll contents of a leaf, and was a linear relationship with the maximum photosynthesis at light saturation of light response curve with less stress conditions using flux data. The index is suitable for global observing satellite, because the spectral bands are available. Using the index and empirical relationship developed by J. Thanyapraneedkul, the light response curve with less stress can be estimated from the vegetation index. In this study, firstly, the global distribution of the index was studied. The regions of high index value in winter time were correspond to tropical rainforest. Next, the capacity of gross primary production was estimated using the light response curve using the index. The GPP capacity of the almost all regions was higher than MODIS GPP. For the tropical rain forest regions, the GPP capacity value was similar with MODIS GPP product.

  9. Microbial Primary Productivity in Hydrothermal Vent Chimneys at Middle Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olins, H. C.; Rogers, D.; Frank, K. L.; Girguis, P. R.; Vidoudez, C.

    2012-12-01

    Chemosynthetic primary productivity supports hydrothermal vent ecosystems, but the extent of that productivity has not been well measured. To examine the role that environmental temperature plays in controlling carbon fixation rates, and to assess the degree to which microbial community composition, in situ geochemistry, and mineralogy influence carbon fixation, we conducted a series of shipboard incubations across a range of temperatures (4, 25, 50 and 90°C) and at environmentally relevant geochemical conditions using material recovered from three hydrothermal vent chimneys in the Middle Valley hydrothermal vent field (Juan de Fuca Ridge). Net rates of carbon fixation (CFX) were greatest at lower temperatures, and were similar among structures. Rates did not correlate with the mineralogy or the geochemical composition of the high temperature fluids at each chimney. No obvious patterns of association were observed between carbon fixation rates and microbial community composition. Abundance of selected functional genes related to different carbon fixation pathway exhibited striking differences among the three study sites, but did not correlate with rates. Natural carbon isotope ratios implicate the Calvin Benson Bassham Cycle as the dominant mechanism of primary production in these systems, despite the abundance of genes related to other pathways (and presumably some degree of activity). Together these data reveal that primary productivity by endolithic communities does not exhibit much variation among these chimneys, and further reveal that microbial activity cannot easily be related to mineralogical and geochemical assessments that are made at a coarser scale. Indeed, the relationships between carbon fixation rates and community composition/functional gene abundance were also likely obfuscated by differences in scale at which these measurements were made. Regardless, these data reveal the degree to which endolithic, anaerobic carbon fixation contributes to

  10. Metaphor priming in sentence production: concrete pictures affect abstract language production.

    PubMed

    Sato, Manami; Schafer, Amy J; Bergen, Benjamin K

    2015-03-01

    People speak metaphorically about abstract concepts-for instance, a person can be "full of love" or "have a lot of love to give." Over the past decade, research has begun to focus on how metaphors are processed during language comprehension. Much of this work suggests that understanding a metaphorical expression involves activating brain and body systems involved in perception and motor control. However, no research to date has asked whether the same is true while speakers produce language. We address this gap using a sentence production task. Its results demonstrate that visually activating a concrete source domain can trigger the use of metaphorical language drawn from that same concrete domain, even in sentences that are thematically unrelated to the primes, a metaphorical priming effect. This effect suggests that conceptual metaphors play a part in language production. It also shows that activation in the perceptual system that is not part of an intended message can nevertheless influence sentence formulation. PMID:25443987

  11. Factors that Affect Student Motivation in a Dairy Products Elective Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Baraem; Hayes, Kirby

    2005-01-01

    Student motivation is influenced by instructional approach. Motivation is a function of initiating and sustaining goal-directed behavior. The objective of this study was to identify factors (positive and negative) that affect motivation in a junior-level dairy products elective course. Student attitudes were surveyed each year half-way through the…

  12. 75 FR 50033 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States-Measures Affecting the Production and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States-- Measures Affecting the Production and Sale of Clove Cigarettes AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative....

  13. ALOX5 gene variants affect eicosanoid production and response to fish oil supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine whether 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene variants associated with cardiovascular disease affect eicosanoid production by monocytes. The study was a randomized, double-masked, parallel intervention trial with fish oil (5.0 g of fish oil daily, containing 2.0 g ...

  14. Demographic and Academic Factors Affecting Research Productivity at the University of KwaZulu-Natal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, D.; Zewotir, T.; Murray, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research output affects both the strength and funding of universities. Accordingly university academic staff members are under pressure to be active and productive in research. Though all academics have research interest, all are not producing research output which is accredited by the Department of Education (DOE). We analyzed the demographic and…

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission Limits for Tire Cord...: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As stated in § 63.5986, you must comply with the...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... source Emissions must not exceed 280 grams HAP per megagram (0.56 pounds per ton) of fabric processed at... tire cord production affected source Emissions must not exceed 220 grams HAP per megagram (0.43 pounds... Table 16 to this subpart must not exceed 1,000 grams HAP per megagram (2 pounds per ton) of...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... source Emissions must not exceed 280 grams HAP per megagram (0.56 pounds per ton) of fabric processed at... tire cord production affected source Emissions must not exceed 220 grams HAP per megagram (0.43 pounds... Table 16 to this subpart must not exceed 1,000 grams HAP per megagram (2 pounds per ton) of...

  18. Cognitive rehabilitation for early post-surgery inpatients affected by primary brain tumor: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zucchella, Chiara; Capone, Annarita; Codella, Valentina; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Vecchione, Carmine; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pace, Andrea; Pierelli, Francesco; Bartolo, Michelangelo

    2013-08-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most common neurological disorders in neuro-oncological patients and exerts a deep negative impact on quality of life interfering with familiar, social and career-related activities. To test the effectiveness of early cognitive rehabilitation treatment for inpatients affected by primary brain tumors. Out of 109 consecutive patients enrolled in the study, 58 patients were randomly assigned to a rehabilitation group or to a control group. The rehabilitation consisted of 16 one-hour individual sessions of therapist-guided cognitive training, spread over 4 weeks, combining computer exercises and metacognitive training. Patients in the control group received usual care without cognitive training. All patients were evaluated by means of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery at the admission (T0) and after 4 weeks (T1). Patients in the rehabilitation group showed a significant improvement of cognitive functions. In particular, the domains that benefited most from the training were visual attention and verbal memory. The control group exhibited only a slightly, not statistically relevant, enhancement of cognitive performances. Cognitive rehabilitation for neuro-oncological inpatients resulted in a significant enhancement of cognitive performances after the training, also providing a foundation for early administration. Future research should be aimed to clarify the patients' characteristics that predict neuropsychological improvement, to identify the most effective elements in rehabilitative programs and to study the effects of treatment extension to everyday life. PMID:23677749

  19. Primary production and nutrients in a tropical macrotidal estuary, Darwin Harbour, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burford, M. A.; Alongi, D. M.; McKinnon, A. D.; Trott, L. A.

    2008-09-01

    Tropical estuaries are under increasing pressure worldwide from human impacts, but are poorly studied compared with temperate systems. This study examined a tropical macrotidal estuary, Darwin Harbour, in northern Australia, using a combination of direct measurements and literature values to determine the main sources of primary production and the sources of nutrients supporting growth. The main source of primary production was calculated to be the extensive area of fringing mangroves and resulted in a net autotrophic system ( PG: R = 2.1). Much of the carbon in the mangrove forests appears to be retained within the forests or respired, as the water column was also net autotrophic despite the carbon inputs. Phytoplankton were the second largest primary producer on a whole-of-harbour basis, with low biomass constrained by light and nutrient availability. The phytoplankton were likely to be nitrogen (N) limited, based on low N:phosphorus (P) ratios, low dissolved bioavailable N concentrations (ammonium (NH 4+), nitrate (NO 3-), urea), and evidence that phytoplankton growth in bioassays was stimulated by NH 4+ addition. The largest new source of N to the system was from the ocean due to higher N concentrations in the incoming tides than the outgoing tides. Atmospheric inputs via N fixation on the intertidal mudflats and subtidal sediments were substantially lower. The rivers feeding into the harbour and sewage were minor N inputs. Nitrogen demand by primary producers was high relative to available N inputs, suggesting that N recycling within the water column and mangrove forests must be important processes. Darwin Harbour is adjacent to the rapidly growing urban area of Darwin city, but overall there is no evidence of anthropogenic nutrient inputs having substantial effects on primary production in Darwin Harbour.

  20. Oceanic primary production: estimation by remote sensing at local and regional scales.

    PubMed

    Platt, T; Sathyendranath, S

    1988-09-23

    Satellites provide the only avenue by which marine primary production can be studied at ocean-basin scales. With maps of chlorophyll distribution derived from remotely sensed data on ocean color as input, deduction of a suitable algorithm for primary production is a problem in applied plant physiology. An algorithm is proposed that combines a spectral and angular model of submarine light with a model of the spectral response of algal photosynthesis. To apply the algorithm at large horizontal scale, a dynamic biogeography is needed for the physiological rate parameters and the biological structure of the water column. Fieldwork to obtain this type of data should be undertaken so that the use of satellite data in modern biological oceanography may be optimized. PMID:17820892

  1. Remote sensing of biomass and annual net aerial primary productivity of a salt marsh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardisky, M. A.; Klemas, V.; Daiber, F. C.; Roman, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Net aerial primary productivity is the rate of storage of organic matter in above-ground plant issues exceeding the respiratory use by the plants during the period of measurement. It is pointed out that this plant tissue represents the fixed carbon available for transfer to and consumption by the heterotrophic organisms in a salt marsh or the estuary. One method of estimating annual net aerial primary productivity (NAPP) required multiple harvesting of the marsh vegetation. A rapid nondestructive remote sensing technique for estimating biomass and NAPP would, therefore, be a significant asset. The present investigation was designed to employ simple regression models, equating spectral radiance indices with Spartina alterniflora biomass to nondestructively estimate salt marsh biomass. The results of the study showed that the considered approach can be successfully used to estimate salt marsh biomass.

  2. Diffuse Parenchymal Diseases Associated With Aluminum Use and Primary Aluminum Production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum use and primary aluminum production results in the generation of various particles, fumes, gases, and airborne materials with the potential for inducing a wide range of lung pathology. Nevertheless, the presence of diffuse parenchymal or interstitial lung disease related to these processes remains controversial. The relatively uncommon occurrence of interstitial lung diseases in aluminum-exposed workers—despite the extensive industrial use of aluminum—the potential for concurrent exposure to other fibrogenic fibers, and the previous use of inhaled aluminum powder for the prevention of silicosis without apparent adverse respiratory effects are some of the reasons for this continuing controversy. Specific aluminum-induced parenchymal diseases described in the literature, including existing evidence of interstitial lung diseases, associated with primary aluminum production are reviewed. PMID:24806728

  3. Global human appropriation of net primary production doubled in the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Krausmann, Fridolin; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Gingrich, Simone; Haberl, Helmut; Bondeau, Alberte; Gaube, Veronika; Lauk, Christian; Plutzar, Christoph; Searchinger, Timothy D

    2013-06-18

    Global increases in population, consumption, and gross domestic product raise concerns about the sustainability of the current and future use of natural resources. The human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) provides a useful measure of human intervention into the biosphere. The productive capacity of land is appropriated by harvesting or burning biomass and by converting natural ecosystems to managed lands with lower productivity. This work analyzes trends in HANPP from 1910 to 2005 and finds that although human population has grown fourfold and economic output 17-fold, global HANPP has only doubled. Despite this increase in efficiency, HANPP has still risen from 6.9 Gt of carbon per y in 1910 to 14.8 GtC/y in 2005, i.e., from 13% to 25% of the net primary production of potential vegetation. Biomass harvested per capita and year has slightly declined despite growth in consumption because of a decline in reliance on bioenergy and higher conversion efficiencies of primary biomass to products. The rise in efficiency is overwhelmingly due to increased crop yields, albeit frequently associated with substantial ecological costs, such as fossil energy inputs, soil degradation, and biodiversity loss. If humans can maintain the past trend lines in efficiency gains, we estimate that HANPP might only grow to 27-29% by 2050, but providing large amounts of bioenergy could increase global HANPP to 44%. This result calls for caution in refocusing the energy economy on land-based resources and for strategies that foster the continuation of increases in land-use efficiency without excessively increasing ecological costs of intensification. PMID:23733940

  4. Ocean Primary Production Estimates from Terra MODIS and Their Dependency on Satellite Chlorophyll Alpha Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark; Carder, Kendall; Campbell, Janet; Clark, Dennis; Evans, Robert; Brown, Otis; Kearns, Ed; Kilpatrick, Kay; Balch, W.

    2003-01-01

    Simplistic models relating global satellite ocean color, temperature, and light to ocean net primary production (ONPP) are sensitive to the accuracy and limitations of the satellite estimate of chlorophyll and other input fields, as well as the primary productivity model. The standard MODIS ONPP product uses the new semi-analytic chlorophyll algorithm as its input for two ONPP indexes. The three primary MODIS chlorophyll Q estimates from MODIS, as well as the SeaWiFS 4 chlorophyll product, were used to assess global and regional performance in estimating ONPP for the full mission, but concentrating on 2001. The two standard ONPP algorithms were examined with 8-day and 39 kilometer resolution to quantify chlorophyll algorithm dependency of ONPP. Ancillary data (MLD from FNMOC, MODIS SSTD1, and PAR from the GSFC DAO) were identical. The standard MODIS ONPP estimates for annual production in 2001 was 59 and 58 GT C for the two ONPP algorithms. Differences in ONPP using alternate chlorophylls were on the order of 10% for global annual ONPP, but ranged to 100% regionally. On all scales the differences in ONPP were smaller between MODIS and SeaWiFS than between ONPP models, or among chlorophyll algorithms within MODIS. Largest regional ONPP differences were found in the Southern Ocean (SO). In the SO, application of the semi-analytic chlorophyll resulted in not only a magnitude difference in ONPP (2x), but also a temporal shift in the time of maximum production compared to empirical algorithms when summed over standard oceanic areas. The resulting increase in global ONPP (6-7 GT) is supported by better performance of the semi-analytic chlorophyll in the SO and other high chlorophyll regions. The differences are significant in terms of understanding regional differences and dynamics of ocean carbon transformations.

  5. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony size in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Laidre, Kristin L; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Nyeland, Jens; Mosbech, Anders; Boertmann, David

    2008-01-01

    Sea ice loss will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We quantified spring-time trends in sea ice recession around each of 46 thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) colonies in west Greenland across 20° of latitude and investigated the magnitude and timing of the associated spring-time primary production. A geographical information system was used to extract satellite-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979–1987) and the Defence Meteorological Satellite Programs Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI, 1987–2004), and satellite-based observations of chlorophyll a from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS: EOS-Terra satellite) in weekly intervals in circular buffers around each colony site (150 km in radius). Rapid recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom and associated trophic cascade in water gradually exposed to solar radiation. This pattern was largely absent from lower latitudes where little to no sea ice resulted in a temporally variable primary production bloom driven by nutrient cycling and upwelling uncoupled to ice. The relationship between the rate and variability of sea ice recession and colony size of thick-billed murres shows that periodical confinement of the trophic cascade at high latitudes determines the carrying capacity for Arctic seabirds during the breeding period. PMID:18713716

  6. Connectedness of land use, nutrients, primary production, and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Andrews, Caroline S.; Kroger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explored the strength of connectedness among hierarchical system components associated with oxbow lakes in the alluvial valley of the Lower Mississippi River. Specifically, we examined the degree of canonical correlation between land use (agriculture and forests), lake morphometry (depth and size), nutrients (total nitrogen and total phosphorus), primary production (chlorophyll-a), and various fish assemblage descriptors. Watershed (p < 0.01) and riparian (p = 0.02) land use, and lake depth (p = 0.05) but not size (p = 0.28), were associated with nutrient concentrations. In turn, nutrients were associated with primary production (p < 0.01), and primary production was associated with sunfish (Centrarchidae) assemblages (p < 0.01) and fish biodiversity (p = 0.08), but not with those of other taxa and functional guilds. Multiple chemical and biological components of oxbow lake ecosystems are connected to landscape characteristics such as land use and lake depth. Therefore, a top-down hierarchical approach can be useful in developing management and conservation plans for oxbow lakes in a region impacted by widespread landscape changes due to agriculture.

  7. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  8. Seasonal distribution of net primary production by functional groups in Chihuahuan Desert, and the role of seasonal precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In hot deserts, precipitation is the principal driver for net primary production.  This study tested two hypotheses regarding aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and the effects of precipitation on ANPP in the Chihuahuan Desert, with emphasis on differences among seasons and among functional g...

  9. Predicting tree diversity across the United States as a function of modeled gross primary production.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Joanne M; Fan, Weihong; Coops, Nicholas C; Waring, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    At the regional and continental scale, ecologists have theorized that spatial variation in biodiversity can be interpreted as a response to differences in climate. To test this theory we assumed that ecological constraints associated with current climatic conditions (2000-2004) might best be correlated with tree richness if expressed through satellite-derived measures of gross primary production (GPP), rather than the more commonly used, but less consistently derived, net primary production. To evaluate current patterns in tree diversity across the contiguous United States we acquired information on tree composition from the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program that represented more than 17,4000 survey plots. We selected 2693 cells of 1000 km2 within which a sufficient number of plots were available to estimate tree richness per hectare. Our estimates of forest productivity varied from simple vegetation indices indicative of the fraction of light intercepted by canopies at 16-d intervals, a product from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer), to 8- and 10-d GPP products derived with minimal climatic data (MODIS) and SPOT-Vegetation (Systeme Pour l'Observation de la Terre), to 3-PGS (Physiological Principles Predicting Growth with Satellites), which requires both climate and soil data. Across the contiguous United States, modeled predictions of gross productivity accounted for between 51% and 77% of the recorded spatial variation in tree diversity, which ranged from 2 to 67 species per hectare. When the analyses were concentrated within nine broadly defined ecoregions, predictive relations largely disappeared. Only 3-PGS predictions fit a theorized unimodal function by being able to distinguish highly productive forests in the Pacific Northwest that support lower than expected tree diversity. Other models predicted a continuous steep rise in tree diversity with increasing productivity, and did so with generally better or

  10. Plankton distribution and the impact of copepod grazing on primary production in Fram Strait, Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirche, H.-J.; Baumann, M. E. M.; Kattner, G.; Gradinger, R.

    1991-08-01

    Two hydrobiological transects across the East Greenland Shelf and the open waters of Fram Strait in summer were chosen to illustrate the distribution and production of phyto- and zooplankton in relation to water masses and ice cover. The parameters used were temperature and salinity, inorganic nutrients, chlorophyll a, primary production, phytoplankton species composition, abundance of the dominant herbivorous copepods Calanus finmarchicus, C. glacialis, C. hyperboreus, Metridia longa and egg production of C. finmarchicus and C. glacialis. Grazing impact of copepodites and adults of these four species was modelled for each station by using egg production rates as an index of growth. Seasonal development of plankton communities was closely associated with the extent of the ice cover, hydrographic conditions and the water masses typical of the different hydrographic domains. Four regions were identified from their biological activities and physical environment: The Northeast Water polynya on the East Greenland Shelf, with a springbloom of diatoms and active reproduction of herbivorous copepods. The pack ice region, dominated by small flagellates and negligible grazing activities. The marginal ice zone, with high variability and strong gradients of autotroph production related to eddies and ice tongues, an active microbial loop and low egg production. The open water, with high station-to-station variability of most of the parameters, probably related to hydrographic mesoscale activities. Here, Phaeocystis pouchetii was a prominent species in the phytoplankton communities. Its presence may at least partly be responsible for the generally low egg production in the open waters. Grazing impact on primary production was always small, due to low zooplankton biomass in the polynya and due to low ingestion in the remaining regions.

  11. Partial decoupling of primary productivity from upwelling in the California Current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Lionel; Deutsch, Curtis; McWilliams, James C.; Frenzel, Hartmut; Liang, Jun-Hong; Colas, François

    2016-07-01

    Coastal winds and upwelling of deep nutrient-rich water along subtropical eastern boundaries yield some of the ocean's most productive ecosystems. Simple indices of coastal wind strength have been extensively used to estimate the timing and magnitude of biological productivity on seasonal and interannual timescales and underlie the prediction that anthropogenic climate warming will increase the productivity by making coastal winds stronger. The effect of wind patterns on regional net primary productivity is not captured by such indices and is poorly understood. Here we present evidence, using a realistic model of the California Current system and satellite measurements, that the observed slackening of the winds near the coast has little effect on near-shore phytoplankton productivity despite a large reduction in upwelling velocity. On the regional scale the wind drop-off leads to substantially higher production even when the total upwelling rate remains the same. This partial decoupling of productivity from upwelling results from the impact of wind patterns on alongshore currents and the eddies they generate. Our results imply that productivity in eastern boundary upwelling systems will be better predicted from indices of the coastal wind that account for its offshore structure.

  12. Modeling the spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary production in Yangtze River Basin using IBIS model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Z.; Jiang, H.; Liu, J.; Zhu, Q.; Wei, X.; Jiang, Z.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, X.; Han, J.

    2011-01-01

    The climate change has significantly affected the carbon cycling in Yangtze River Basin. To better understand the alternation pattern for the relationship between carbon cycling and climate change, the net primary production (NPP) were simulated in the study area from 1956 to 2006 by using the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS). The results showed that the average annual NPP per square meter was about 0.518 kg C in Yangtze River Basin. The high NPP levels were mainly distributed in the southeast area of Sichuan, and the highest value reached 1.05 kg C/m2. The NPP increased based on the simulated temporal trends. The spatiotemporal variability of the NPP in the vegetation types was obvious, and it was depended on the climate and soil condition. We found the drought climate was one of critical factor that impacts the alterations of the NPP in the area by the simulation. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  13. Response of Soil Properties and Microbial Communities to Agriculture: Implications for Primary Productivity and Soil Health Indicators.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Anderson, Ian C; Singh, Brajesh K

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is placing tremendous pressure on the soil's capacity to maintain its functions leading to large-scale ecosystem degradation and loss of productivity in the long term. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find early indicators of soil health degradation in response to agricultural management. In recent years, major advances in soil meta-genomic and spatial studies on microbial communities and community-level molecular characteristics can now be exploited as 'biomarker' indicators of ecosystem processes for monitoring and managing sustainable soil health under global change. However, a continental scale, cross biome approach assessing soil microbial communities and their functional potential to identify the unifying principles governing the susceptibility of soil biodiversity to land conversion is lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis from a dataset generated from 102 peer-reviewed publications as well as unpublished data to explore how properties directly linked to soil nutritional health (total C and N; C:N ratio), primary productivity (NPP) and microbial diversity and composition (relative abundance of major bacterial phyla determined by next generation sequencing techniques) are affected in response to agricultural management across the main biomes of Earth (arid, continental, temperate and tropical). In our analysis, we found strong statistical trends in the relative abundance of several bacterial phyla in agricultural (e.g., Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi) and natural (Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria) systems across all regions and these trends correlated well with many soil properties. However, main effects of agriculture on soil properties and productivity were biome-dependent. Our meta-analysis provides evidence on the predictable nature of the microbial community responses to vegetation type. This knowledge can be exploited in future for developing a new set of indicators for primary productivity and soil

  14. Response of Soil Properties and Microbial Communities to Agriculture: Implications for Primary Productivity and Soil Health Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Anderson, Ian C.; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is placing tremendous pressure on the soil’s capacity to maintain its functions leading to large-scale ecosystem degradation and loss of productivity in the long term. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find early indicators of soil health degradation in response to agricultural management. In recent years, major advances in soil meta-genomic and spatial studies on microbial communities and community-level molecular characteristics can now be exploited as ‘biomarker’ indicators of ecosystem processes for monitoring and managing sustainable soil health under global change. However, a continental scale, cross biome approach assessing soil microbial communities and their functional potential to identify the unifying principles governing the susceptibility of soil biodiversity to land conversion is lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis from a dataset generated from 102 peer-reviewed publications as well as unpublished data to explore how properties directly linked to soil nutritional health (total C and N; C:N ratio), primary productivity (NPP) and microbial diversity and composition (relative abundance of major bacterial phyla determined by next generation sequencing techniques) are affected in response to agricultural management across the main biomes of Earth (arid, continental, temperate and tropical). In our analysis, we found strong statistical trends in the relative abundance of several bacterial phyla in agricultural (e.g., Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi) and natural (Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria) systems across all regions and these trends correlated well with many soil properties. However, main effects of agriculture on soil properties and productivity were biome-dependent. Our meta-analysis provides evidence on the predictable nature of the microbial community responses to vegetation type. This knowledge can be exploited in future for developing a new set of indicators for primary productivity and

  15. The puzzle of HCN in comets: Is it both a product and a primary species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M.; Bonev, B.; Charnley, S.; Cordiner, M.; DiSanti, M.; Gibb, E.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Paganini, L.; Villanueva, G.

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular-cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: - HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H_2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. If much HCN is sometimes produced in the coma, its adoption as a water proxy could introduce unwanted bias to taxonomies based on composition. - HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing, with NH_3 being the dominant nitrile. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. - The stereoisomer HNC is regarded as a product species, thought to result from coma chemistry involving HCN. But, could another reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? - The production rate for CN greatly exceeds the possible production from HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN radicals in them. - The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets, but in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. Is prompt emission from vibrationally excited HCN responsible? - With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H_2O, CH_3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). We will present the

  16. Phytoplankton taxa in relation to primary production in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Francisco P.; Buck, Kurt R.; Barber, Richard T.

    1990-11-01

    Equatorial regions, especially the equatorial Pacific, are important to the global carbon and nitrogen cycle, yet little is known about the processes regulating phytoplankton dynamics in these areas. Here we report on the abundance of planktonic groups, in the picoplankton to netplankton range, estimated using epifluorescence microscopy, in samples collected in the equatorial Pacific from 110 to 140°W, and discuss their relation to primary production, chlorophyll, chemical and physical properties. Microscopic examination supports previous reports ( CHAVEZ, 1989, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 3, 27-35), based on size separations of biomass and production, that the equatorial Pacific is dominated by small phytoplankton, most of them smaller then 5 μm. The phytoplankton in this region is dominated by relatively few taxa: Synechococcus spp., red fluorescing picoplankton, a small naked dinoflaellate (4 × 7 μm), small prymnesiophytes (on the order of 3-5 μm), and small single-celled pennate diatoms (2 × 15 μm). The spatial variability in phytoplankton biomass, composition and production could be clearly related to distinct physical features of the equatorial circulation, such as equatorial upwelling, Long or Legeckis waves and the Equatorial Front. During November 1988, a period of abnormally cool sea surface temperatures, changes in the abundance of pennate diatoms accounted for the largest proportion of the variability in chlorophyll and primary production even though this group was a relatively minor contributor to the total biomass of the phytoplankton community. Since primary production and particulate organic flux are well correlated in the equatorial Pacific ( BETZERet al., 1984, Deep-Sea Research, 31, 1-11), variations in the abundance of pennate diatoms also must have important consequences to variations in particulate organic flux. Before a predictive model for particulate organic flux in the equatorial Pacific can be established further understanding of

  17. Holocene primary productivity and the atmosphere/ocean linkage in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, J. A.; Finney, B.; Anderson, L.; Barron, J. A.; Hayes, S. M.; Sliwinski, M.; Mix, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work in the temperate fjords of the Gulf of Alaska, located in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean, has demonstrated a positive link between modern atmosphere/ocean dynamics and accumulation of biogenic sediments during the last 100 years, where intensified Aleutian Low atmospheric pressure cell regimes correspond to peaks in export primary productivity (Addison et al., 2013). Here, this work is extended by examining the last 7500 years of biogenic sedimentation from marine sediment core EW0408-33JC (57.16°N, 135.36°W, 144 m water depth), which is constrained by 17 age-control points spaced every ~500 years. We use bromine (Br) intensities measured by core-scanning XRF with a 2-mm sampling resolution as a geochemical proxy for past primary productivity. These Br intensities are calibrated to organic Br concentrations using a combination of quantitative WD-XRF methods and synchrotron-radiation Br speciation studies, with cross-verification provided by low-resolution analyses of other productivity proxies, including biogenic silica (opal), total organic carbon (TOC), and organic matter δ13C ratios. Our findings indicate distinct centennial-to-millennial changes, with positive productivity excursions between 7500-7000, 6500-6000, 5000-3500, 2500-1500, and 1000-500 INTCAL13 yr BP. We compare the timing of these excursions against a compilation of marine and terrestrial paleoclimate records sensitive to forcing by the Aleutian Low to determine if the positive relationship between atmosphere/ocean dynamics and marine primary productivity has remained consistent over the last 7500 years. Other potential forcing mechanisms (e.g., solar insolation, irradiance) are also considered. Reference: Addison, J.A., Finney, B., Jaeger, J., Stoner, J., Norris, R., & Hangsterfer, A., 2013, Integrating satellite observations and modern climate measurements with the recent sedimentary record: an example from Southeast Alaska. JGR-Oceans, v. 118, 18 pgs.

  18. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady state conditions in phosphorus controlled chemostats (N : P = 29, growth rate of μ = 0.2 d-1). 14C incubations were accomplished to determine primary production (PP), comprised by particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C), and the concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO), and of high molecular weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) as major components of ER. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (<0.40 μm, <1000 kDa, <100 kDa and <10 kDa) of DO14C and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady state growth, corresponding to ∼4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size (<10 kDa) fraction of HMW-dCCHO exhibited a similar sugar composition, dominated by high percentages of glucose (74-80 Mol%), the composition of HMW-dCCHO size-classes >10 kDa was significantly different with higher Mol% of arabinose. Mol% of acidic sugars increased and Mol% glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  19. Fission product plateout and liftoff in the MHTGR primary system: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, R.P. )

    1991-04-01

    A review is presented of the technical basis for predicting radioactivity release resulting from depressurization of an MHTGR primary system. Consideration is restricted to so called dry events with no involvement of the steam system. The various types of deposition mechanisms effective for iodine, cesium, strontium, and silver are discussed in terms of their chemical characteristics and the nature of the materials in the primary system. Emphasis is given to iodine behavior, including means for estimating the quantity available for release, the types of plateout locations in the primary system, and the effect of dust on distribution and release. The behavior of fission products cesium, strontium, and silver in such accidents is presented qualitatively. A major part of the review deals with expected dust levels, types, and transport. Available information on the level and nature of dust in the HTGR primary system is reviewed. A summary is presented of dust deposition and liftoff mechanisms. It was concluded that recent approaches to dust liftoff modeling, based on turbulent burst concepts for removal from surfaces, probably offer advantages over the current shear ratio approach. This study concludes that iodine releases from dry depressurization events are likely to be extremely low, on the order of millicuries, due to a predictably low degree of chemical desorption, a low degree of dust liftoff, and a low involvement of iodine with dust. It was also concluded that deposition mechanisms controlling the distribution of fission product material in the primary system, and hence also controlling the degree of liftoff, depend strongly on the chemical nature of the individual elements. Therefore contrary to the current practice, both plateout and liftoff models should reflect those unique chemical and physical properties. 56 refs., 16 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Phonological similarity affects production of gestures, even in the absence of overt speech

    PubMed Central

    Nozari, Nazbanou; Göksun, Tilbe; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Does phonological similarity affect gesture production in the absence of speech?Participants produced gestures from pictures with no words presented or spoken.Same pictures and gestures but different training labels were used.Phonologically similar labels led to more errors in subsequent gestures.Thus, phonological similarity affects gesture production in the absence of speech. Are manual gestures affected by inner speech? This study tested the hypothesis that phonological form influences gesture by investigating whether phonological similarity between words that describe motion gestures creates interference for production of those gestures in the absence of overt speech. Participants learned to respond to a picture of a bottle by gesturing to open the bottle's cap, and to a picture of long hair by gesturing to twirl the hair. In one condition, the gestures were introduced with phonologically-similar labels “twist” and “twirl” (similar condition), while in the other condition, they were introduced with phonologically-dissimilar labels “unscrew” and “twirl” (dissimilar condition). During the actual experiment, labels were not produced and participants only gestured by looking at pictures. In both conditions, participants also gestured to a control pair that was used as a baseline. Participants made significantly more errors on gestures in the similar than dissimilar condition after correction for baseline differences. This finding shows the influence of phonology on gesture production in the absence of overt speech and poses new constraints on the locus of the interaction between language and gesture systems. PMID:26441724

  1. Phonological similarity affects production of gestures, even in the absence of overt speech.

    PubMed

    Nozari, Nazbanou; Göksun, Tilbe; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Does phonological similarity affect gesture production in the absence of speech?Participants produced gestures from pictures with no words presented or spoken.Same pictures and gestures but different training labels were used.Phonologically similar labels led to more errors in subsequent gestures.Thus, phonological similarity affects gesture production in the absence of speech. Are manual gestures affected by inner speech? This study tested the hypothesis that phonological form influences gesture by investigating whether phonological similarity between words that describe motion gestures creates interference for production of those gestures in the absence of overt speech. Participants learned to respond to a picture of a bottle by gesturing to open the bottle's cap, and to a picture of long hair by gesturing to twirl the hair. In one condition, the gestures were introduced with phonologically-similar labels "twist" and "twirl" (similar condition), while in the other condition, they were introduced with phonologically-dissimilar labels "unscrew" and "twirl" (dissimilar condition). During the actual experiment, labels were not produced and participants only gestured by looking at pictures. In both conditions, participants also gestured to a control pair that was used as a baseline. Participants made significantly more errors on gestures in the similar than dissimilar condition after correction for baseline differences. This finding shows the influence of phonology on gesture production in the absence of overt speech and poses new constraints on the locus of the interaction between language and gesture systems. PMID:26441724

  2. Phenotypes and gene expression profiles of Saccharopolyspora erythraea rifampicin-resistant (rif) mutants affected in erythromycin production

    PubMed Central

    Carata, Elisabetta; Peano, Clelia; Tredici, Salvatore M; Ferrari, Francesco; Talà, Adelfia; Corti, Giorgio; Bicciato, Silvio; De Bellis, Gianluca; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Background There is evidence from previous works that bacterial secondary metabolism may be stimulated by genetic manipulation of RNA polymerase (RNAP). In this study we have used rifampicin selection as a strategy to genetically improve the erythromycin producer Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Results Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (rif) mutants were isolated from the parental strain NRRL2338 and two rif mutations mapping within rpoB, S444F and Q426R, were characterized. With respect to the parental strain, S444F mutants exhibited higher respiratory performance and up to four-fold higher final erythromycin yields; in contrast, Q426R mutants were slow-growing, developmental-defective and severely impaired in erythromycin production. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that these rif mutations deeply changed the transcriptional profile of S. erythraea. The expression of genes coding for key enzymes of carbon (and energy) and nitrogen central metabolism was dramatically altered in turn affecting the flux of metabolites through erythromycin feeder pathways. In particular, the valine catabolic pathway that supplies propionyl-CoA for biosynthesis of the erythromycin precursor 6-deoxyerythronolide B was strongly up-regulated in the S444F mutants, while the expression of the biosynthetic gene cluster of erythromycin (ery) was not significantly affected. In contrast, the ery cluster was down-regulated (<2-fold) in the Q426R mutants. These strains also exhibited an impressive stimulation of the nitrogen regulon, which may contribute to lower erythromycin yields as erythromycin production was strongly inhibited by ammonium. Conclusion Rifampicin selection is a simple and reliable tool to investigate novel links between primary and secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation in S. erythraea and to improve erythromycin production. At the same time genome-wide analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays allowed information to be gained about the mechanisms

  3. Modeling ocean primary production: Sensitivity to spectral resolution of attenuation and absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Helen; Merchant, Chris J.

    2008-08-01

    Modeling the vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) through the ocean, and its utilization by phytoplankton, is fundamental to simulating marine primary production. The variation of attenuation and absorption of light with wavelength suggests that photosynthesis should be modeled at high spectral resolution, but this is computationally expensive. To model primary production in global 3d models, a balance between computer time and accuracy is necessary. We investigate the effects of varying the spectral resolution of the underwater light field and the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton ( α∗), on primary production using a 1d coupled ecosystem ocean turbulence model. The model is applied at three sites in the Atlantic Ocean (CIS (∼60°N), PAP (∼50°N) and ESTOC (∼30°N)) to include the effect of different meteorological forcing and parameter sets. We also investigate three different methods for modeling α∗ - as a fixed constant, varying with both wavelength and chlorophyll concentration [Bricaud, A., Morel, A., Babin, M., Allali, K., Claustre, H., 1998. Variations of light absorption by suspended particles with chlorophyll a concentration in oceanic (case 1) waters. Analysis and implications for bio-optical models. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 31033-31044], and using a non-spectral parameterization [Anderson, T.R., 1993. A spectrally averaged model of light penetration and photosynthesis. Limnol. Oceanogr. 38, 1403-1419]. After selecting the appropriate ecosystem parameters for each of the three sites we vary the spectral resolution of light and α∗ from 1 to 61 wavebands and study the results in conjunction with the three different α∗ estimation methods. The results show modeled estimates of ocean primary productivity are highly sensitive to the degree of spectral resolution and α∗. For accurate simulations of primary production and chlorophyll distribution we recommend a spectral resolution of at least six wavebands

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources... Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Emission Point Specific Limitations 3 Table 3...

  5. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources Emission point... Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of...

  6. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Source...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources... Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Source-Wide Emission Limitation 4 Table 4...

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources Emission point... Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of...

  8. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources Emission point Emission point... Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of...

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources Emission point Emission point... Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources... Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Emission Point Specific Limitations 3 Table 3...

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Source...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources... Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Source-Wide Emission Limitation 4 Table 4...

  12. A scorpion venom neurotoxin paralytic to insects that affects sodium current inactivation: Purification, primary structure, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Eitan, M.; Fowler, E.; Herrmann, R.; Duval, A.; Pelhate, M.; Zlotkin, E. )

    1990-06-26

    A new toxin, Lqh alpha IT, which caused a unique mode of paralysis of blowfly larvae, was purified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus, and its structural and pharmacological properties were compared to those of three other groups of neurotoxins found in Buthinae scorpion venoms. Like the excitatory and depressant insect-selective neurotoxins, Lqh alpha IT was highly toxic to insects, but it differed from these toxins in two important characteristics: (a) Lqh alpha IT lacked strict selectivity for insects; it was highly toxic to crustaceans and had a measurable but low toxicity to mice. (b) It did not displace an excitatory insect toxin, 125I-AaIT, from its binding sites in the insect neuronal membrane; this indicates that the binding sites for Lqh alpha IT are different from those shared by the excitatory and depressant toxins. However, in its primary structure and its effect on excitable tissues, Lqh alpha IT strongly resembled the well-characterized alpha scorpion toxins, which affect mammals. The amino acid sequence was identical with alpha toxin sequences in 55%-75% of positions. This degree of similarity is comparable to that seen among the alpha toxins themselves. Voltage- and current-clamp studies showed that Lqh alpha IT caused an extreme prolongation of the action potential in both cockroach giant axon and rat skeletal muscle preparations as a result of the slowing and incomplete inactivation of the sodium currents. These observations indicate that Lqh alpha IT is an alpha toxin which acts on insect sodium channels.

  13. Does Dietary Mitigation of Enteric Methane Production Affect Rumen Function and Animal Productivity in Dairy Cows?

    PubMed Central

    Veneman, Jolien B.; Muetzel, Stefan; Hart, Kenton J.; Faulkner, Catherine L.; Moorby, Jon M.; Perdok, Hink B.; Newbold, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the rumen microbiome and rumen function might be disrupted if methane production in the rumen is decreased. Furthermore concerns have been voiced that geography and management might influence the underlying microbial population and hence the response of the rumen to mitigation strategies. Here we report the effect of the dietary additives: linseed oil and nitrate on methane emissions, rumen fermentation, and the rumen microbiome in two experiments from New Zealand (Dairy 1) and the UK (Dairy 2). Dairy 1 was a randomized block design with 18 multiparous lactating cows. Dairy 2 was a complete replicated 3 x 3 Latin Square using 6 rumen cannulated, lactating dairy cows. Treatments consisted of a control total mixed ration (TMR), supplementation with linseed oil (4% of feed DM) and supplementation with nitrate (2% of feed DM) in both experiments. Methane emissions were measured in open circuit respiration chambers and rumen samples were analyzed for rumen fermentation parameters and microbial population structure using qPCR and next generation sequencing (NGS). Supplementation with nitrate, but not linseed oil, decreased methane yield (g/kg DMI; P<0.02) and increased hydrogen (P<0.03) emissions in both experiments. Furthermore, the effect of nitrate on gaseous emissions was accompanied by an increased rumen acetate to propionate ratio and consistent changes in the rumen microbial populations including a decreased abundance of the main genus Prevotella and a decrease in archaeal mcrA (log10 copies/ g rumen DM content). These results demonstrate that methane emissions can be significantly decreased with nitrate supplementation with only minor, but consistent, effects on the rumen microbial population and its function, with no evidence that the response to dietary additives differed due to geography and different underlying microbial populations. PMID:26509835

  14. Physical-biological oceanographic coupling influencing phytoplankton and primary production in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, X.; Chai, F.; Xue, H.; Cai, Y.; Liu, C.; Shi, J.

    2004-10-01

    Two cruises were carried out in the summer and winter of 1998 to study coupled physical-chemical-biological processes in the South China Sea and their effects on phytoplankton stock and production. The results clearly show that the seasonal distributions of phytoplankton were closely related to the coupled processes driven by the East Asian Monsoon. Summer southwesterly monsoon induced upwelling along the China and Vietnam coasts. Several mesoscale cyclonic cold eddies and anticyclonic warm pools were identified in both seasons. In the summer, the upwelling and cold eddies, both associated with rich nutrients, low dissolved oxygen (DO), high chlorophyll a (Chl a) and primary production (PP), were found in the areas off the coast of central Vietnam, southeast of Hainan Island and north of the Sunda shelf, whereas in the winter they form a cold trough over the deep basin aligning from southwest to northeast. The warm pools with poor nutrients, high DO, low Chl a, and PP were found in the areas southeast of Vietnam, east of Hainan, and west of Luzon during the summer, and a northwestward warm jet from the Sulu Sea with properties similar to the warm pools was encountered during the winter. The phytoplankton stock and primary production were lower in summer due to nutrient depletion near the surface, particularly PO4. This phosphorus depletion resulted in phytoplankton species succession from diatoms to dinoflagellates and cyanophytes. A strong subsurface Chl a maximum, dominated by photosynthetic picoplankton, was found to contribute significantly to phytoplankton stocks and production.

  15. The role of mesoscale eddies for primary production along the ice edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, Annette

    2016-04-01

    The ice-edge is a favorable area for the generation of mesoscale eddies. Because of the high latitudes, these eddies are often order of 10 km, but have been observed up to 50 km. The physical surface manifestation can be remotely observed by SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar), but the corresponding patterns of phytoplankton are hard to observe by ocean color because of the presence of ice and clouds. Because these eddies will transport fresh-water it is likely that they influence the stratification and thus the local blooming conditions. A regional model for the Fram Strait with resolution 3.5 km has been set up as a coupled physical-biogeochemical model, HYCOM-NORWECOM, nested into a 15-km basin-scale model for the North Atlantic and Arctic. The biogeochemical model represents nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton. The 3.5 km resolution model is adequate to resolve the largest eddies in the region, while smaller eddies and submesoscale processes are not resolved. Patches of higher primary production are present close to the ice edge, despite nutrient availability being comparable to adjacent regions. During late summer the biomass and primary production close to the ice edge is dominated by diatoms and closely follows the mesoscale structures. Here we investigate whether theses eddies play a role primarily in redistributing the water with high production and if the eddies themselves contribute to enhancement or reduction in the production.

  16. Influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production of eastern Caribbean surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Ramón; López, José M.; Morell, Julio; Corredor, Jorge E.; Castillo, Carlos E.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production in eastern Caribbean waters was investigated using fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF) and ocean color remote sensing. FRRF-based carbon fixation rates significantly correlated with independent estimates based on the 14C uptake method (r = 0.92, n = 9). Satellite-derived estimates of primary production, using the Carbon Based Productivity Method (CbPM), moderately correlated with in situ FRRF-based measurements. These estimates varied with river plume dilution gradients, with the highest rates associated with waters under river plume influence (CbPM 631 mg C m-2 d-1 and FRRF 570 mg C m-2 d-1). A time series of satellite-derived estimates (2002-2011) revealed seasonal variations associated with river discharge and climate driven fluctuations. Regional integrated productivity of about 2.80 Tg C yr-1 was calculated based on the average spatial coverage of the Orinoco River plume over the last decade.

  17. The Puzzle of HCN in Comets: Is it both a Product and a Primary Species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Paganini, Lucas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: 1. HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. 2. HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. 3. The stereoisomer HNC is now confirmed as a product species. Could reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? 4. The production rate for CN greatly exceeds that of HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN. Several puzzling lines of evidence raise issues about the origin of HCN: a. The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets - in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. b. With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H2O, CH3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). c. The nucleus-centered rotational temperatures measured for H2O and other species (C2H6, CH3OH) usually agree within error, but those for HCN are often slightly smaller. d. In comet ISON, ALMA maps of HCN and the dust continuum show a slight displacement 80 km) in the centroids. We will

  18. Modelling the seasonality of subsurface light and primary production in the Arabian Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal changes in mixed-layer depth and phytoplankton biomass in the Arabian Sea are assessed with climatologies of ship-based hydrographic measurements and ocean-color observations from satellite.  At the close of the intermonsoons in November and especially May, the open Arabian Sea resembles the stereotypic, unperturbed tropical ocean, with a thin oligotrophic mixed layer and a pronounced subsurface chlorophyll maximum.  Both the northeast and southwest monsoons disrupt this typical tropical hydrography through mixed-layer deepening and eutrophication in the central and northern Arabian Sea.  Computations using a spectral model of light penetration suggest that seasonal changes in mixed-layer thickness and phytoplankton concentration result in pronounced fluctuations through the annual cycle in the radiant flux reaching the base of the mixed layer.  At the close of the fall and spring intermonsoons the base of the model euphotic zone is in the thermocline across all of the open Arabian Sea.  The euphotic zone appears to rise into the mixed layer of the northern Arabian Sea during both the winter and summer monsoons.  Strong seasonality in total primary production and its partitioning between the mixed layer and thermocline is predicted byb a photo-synthesis-irradiance model for a site in the western Arabian Sea (14.36° N, 57.38° E).  Modeled mixed-layer primary production depicts an intense peak for the southwest monsoon and a secondary northeast monsoon peak separated by intermonsoon period of low production.  During the fall and spring intermonsoons, in the presence of a subsurface clorophyll maximum, the model estimate of primary production in the thermocline exceeds that in the mixed layer.  Our model calculations suggest that the subsurface clorophyll maximum present in the Arabian Sea during the spring intermonsoon is a precursor of the regional, summer, phytoplankton bloom.

  19. Cadmium-isotopic evidence for increasing primary productivity during the Late Permian anoxic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Horner, Tristan J.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Bingen, Bernard; Rehkämper, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Earth's most extreme extinction event near the end of the Late Permian decimated more than 90% of all extant marine species. Widespread and intensive oceanic anoxia almost certainly contributed to the catastrophe, though the driving mechanisms that sustained such conditions are still debated. Of particular interest is whether water column anoxia was a consequence of a 'stagnant ocean', or if it was controlled by increases in nutrient supply, primary productivity, and subsequent heterotrophic respiration. Testing these competing hypotheses requires deconvolving sedimentary/bottom water redox conditions from changes in surface water productivity in marine sediments. We address this issue by studying marine shales from East Greenland and the mid-Norwegian shelf and combining sedimentary redox proxies with cadmium-isotopic analyses. Sedimentary nitrogen-isotopic data, pyrite framboid analyses, and organic and inorganic shale geochemistry reveal sulfidic conditions with vigorous upwelling, and increasingly anoxic conditions with a strengthening upwelling in the Greenland and Norwegian sections, respectively. Detailed analysis of sedimentary metal budgets illustrates that Cd is primarily associated with organic carbon and records primary geochemical signatures, thus enabling reconstruction of surface water nutrient utilization. Cadmium-isotopic analyses of the authigenic shale fraction released by inverse aqua regia digestion yield an average δ114Cd110 of + 0.15 ± 0.01 ‰ (2 SE, n = 12; rel. NIST SRM 3108), indicative of incomplete surface water nutrient utilization up-section. The constant degree of nutrient utilization combined with strong upwelling requires increasing primary productivity - and not oceanic stagnation - to balance the larger nutrient fluxes to both study sites during the development of the Late Permian water column anoxia. Overall, our data illustrate that if bottom water redox and upwelling can be adequately constrained, Cd-isotopic analyses of

  20. Estimation of primary productivity in Banda Sea using the vertical distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemili, Putri; Putri, Mutiara R.

    2014-03-01

    To estimate Net Primary Productivity (NPP) which more represent nature condition, it is important to know both horizontal and vertical distribution. Carbon-based Productivity Model (CbPM) used to calculate NPP in 15 layers of depth. Gauss equation and Lambert Beer Law used to estimate chlorophyll-a and light intensity in each layer from satellite-derived data, whereas the temperature data obtained from model result of HAMburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM). This model is being applied to verified and describe how the NPP had been distributed in Banda Sea on 2006. Verification results show that CbPM algorithm has clearly give less error in data observation than what Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM) algorithm did, which stand on the error average approximately 33%. The results also show that the vertical distribution of NPP in Banda Sea indicate a seasonal variation.

  1. Scale-up and economic analysis of biodiesel production from municipal primary sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Olkiewicz, Magdalena; Torres, Carmen M; Jiménez, Laureano; Font, Josep; Bengoa, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Municipal wastewater sludge is a promising lipid feedstock for biodiesel production, but the need to eliminate the high water content before lipid extraction is the main limitation for scaling up. This study evaluates the economic feasibility of biodiesel production directly from liquid primary sludge based on experimental data at laboratory scale. Computational tools were used for the modelling of the process scale-up and the different configurations of lipid extraction to optimise this step, as it is the most expensive. The operational variables with a major influence in the cost were the extraction time and the amount of solvent. The optimised extraction process had a break-even price of biodiesel of 1232 $/t, being economically competitive with the current cost of fossil diesel. The proposed biodiesel production process from waste sludge eliminates the expensive step of sludge drying, lowering the biodiesel price. PMID:27131292

  2. Marine foods sourced from farther as their use of global ocean primary production increases

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Reg A.; Nowara, Gabrielle B.; Hartmann, Klaas; Green, Bridget S.; Tracey, Sean R.; Carter, Chris G.

    2015-01-01

    The growing human population must be fed, but historic land-based systems struggle to meet expanding demand. Marine production supports some of the world's poorest people but increasingly provides for the needs of the affluent, either directly by fishing or via fodder-based feeds for marine and terrestrial farming. Here we show the expanding footprint of humans to utilize global ocean productivity to feed themselves. Our results illustrate how incrementally each year, marine foods are sourced farther from where they are consumed and moreover, require an increasing proportion of the ocean's primary productivity that underpins all marine life. Though mariculture supports increased consumption of seafood, it continues to require feeds based on fully exploited wild stocks. Here we examine the ocean's ability to meet our future demands to 2100 and find that even with mariculture supplementing near-static wild catches our growing needs are unlikely to be met without significant changes. PMID:26079714

  3. Factors affecting waterfowl breeding density and productivity estimates in the Northeast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longcore, J.R.; Ringelman, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    During 1977-79, information useful for making breeding pair and brood surveys was obtained while studying black duck (Anas rubripes) habitat selection and productivity in south-central Maine. Surveys should be initiated in relation to sunrise and sunset time. Morning versus evening counts, familiarity with the survey area, wetland dynamics of the study area, wetland surface water area, and allotment of relative survey effort are discussed as they affect the conduct and results of brood surveys.

  4. Assessment, modeling and optimization of parameters affecting the formation of disinfection by-products in water.

    PubMed

    Gougoutsa, Chrysa; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on (a) the development of a screening methodology, in order to determine the main experimental variables affecting chlorinated and brominated disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in water during chlorination experiments and (b) the application of a central composite design (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM) for the mathematical description and optimization of DBP formation. Chlorine dose and total organic carbon (TOC) were proven to be the main factors affecting the formation of total chlorinated DBPs, while chlorine dose and bromide concentration were the main parameters affecting the total brominated THMs. Longer contact time promoted a rise in chlorinated DBPs' concentration even in the presence of a minimal amount of organic matter. A maximum production of chlorinated DBPs was observed under a medium TOC value and it reduced at high TOC concentrations, possibly due to the competitive production of brominated THMs. The highest concentrations of chlorinated THMs were observed at chlorine dose 10 mg L(-1) and TOC 5.5 mg L(-1). The formation of brominated DBPs is possible even with a minimum amount of NaOCl in the presence of high concentration of bromide ions. Brominated DBPs were observed in maximum concentrations using 8 mg L(-1) of chlorine in the presence of 300 μg L(-1) bromides. PMID:27178297

  5. Effect of primary culture medium type for culture of canine fibroblasts on production of cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Jin; Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-09-01

    Fibroblasts are common source of donor cells for SCNT. It is suggested that donor cells' microenvironment, including the primary culture, affects development of reconstructed embryos. To prove this, canine embryos were cloned with fibroblasts that were cultured in two different primary media (RCMEp vs. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium [DMEM]) and in vivo developments were compared with relative amount of stemness, reprogramming, apoptosis gene transcripts, and telomerase activity. Donor cells cultured in RCMEp contained a significantly higher amount of SOX2, NANOG, DPPA2, REXO1, HDAC, DNMT1, MECP2 and telomerase activity than those cultured in DMEM (P < 0.05). In vivo developmental potential of cloned embryos with donor cells cultured in RCMEp had a higher birth rate than that of embryos derived from DMEM (P < 0.05). The culture medium can induce changes in gene expression of donor cells and telomerase activity, and these alterations can also affect in vivo developmental competence of the cloned embryos. PMID:26001598

  6. Socio-Economic Factors Affecting Parents' Involvement in Homework: Practices and Perceptions from Eight Johannesburg Public Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndebele, Misheck

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines socio-economic factors influencing parental involvement in homework at the Foundation Phase in eight Johannesburg public primary schools. The research was conducted among over 600 parents from schools in different geographical and socio-economic areas such as the inner city, suburban and township. Two primary schools were…

  7. Coupling of Sinking Biogenic Particulate Fluxes and Primary Production in the Euphotic Zone of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Herrera, E.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Thunell, R.; Hollander, D.; Astor, Y.; Varela, R.; Soto, I.; Lorenzoni, L.

    2007-12-01

    Only 1% of the organic matter produced in the upper ocean by photosynthesis reaches depths below 1500 m due to dissolution and microbial degradation. Recent work shows that the vertical flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) is strongly correlated with the settling flux of minerals like calcium carbonate, opal and lithogenic material. These act as ballast and also provide physical protection against degradation of POC. Results from the CARIACO (Carbon Retention in a Colored Ocean) time series program support this hypothesis. For over ten years, CARIACO has been studying the connections between primary production (PP) and the biogeochemical features of sinking particles in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, with moored sediment traps that collect settling matter at five depths between 125 and 1300 m on a bi-weekly basis. The geomorphology of the basin restricts deep water ventilation, leading to anoxia below 250 m. Although the Cariaco Basin exhibits strong seasonal production cycles related to wind-driven upwelling, the flux of biogenic matter at all depths below the oxic-anoxic interface is not significantly correlated to primary production. In order to understand the flux of particles in the upper 100 m of the water column, deployments of drifting sediment traps in the Cariaco Basin were carried out from March to July 2007, collecting settling material at 50 and 100 m. The hypothesis is that the flux of sinking material through the euphotic zone may be less affected by decomposition and dissolution than material reaching the deep moored traps. Initial results show significant differences in POC, PON and carbonate flux rates between 50 and 100 m. They also exhibit significant differences in the flux rates of these components between upwelling vs. relaxation periods, suggesting potential connections among seasonal changes in surface chlorophyll a concentrations, plankton community structure, and the vertical export of biogenic materials. We describe results from this

  8. The exchange of water between the Faroe Shelf and the surrounding waters and its effect on the primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Sólvá Karadóttir; Hansen, Bogi; Larsen, Karin Margretha Húsgarð; Hátún, Hjálmar

    2016-01-01

    The interannual variation of the spring bloom and its effect on the marine ecosystem on the Faroe Shelf has been observed for a couple of decades. However, the mechanism controlling the spring bloom has so far not been known and attempts to explain the mechanism have mostly ruled out possibilities. The Faroe Shelf is to a variable degree isolated from the surrounding waters by a tidal front. It has previously been suggested that variations in the density difference across the front and how water masses are transferred across it affect the spring primary production, which is thought to be a driver of the shelf ecosystem. Using air-sea heat flux data and sea temperature observations on the shelf and off the shelf, we estimate the cross-frontal volume exchange in January-April and find that it increases with the tidal current speed and decreases with the cross-frontal temperature difference. Using the observed exchange rates, we show that the phytoplankton growth rate may be reduced by more than 0.05 day- 1 when the exchange is intense and off-shelf production is still low. Based on frontal dynamics theory, we suggest that the cross-frontal exchange rate in the above mentioned period is determined by the rate of vertical turbulent diffusion through the front. A simple theoretical model is found to support this hypothesis qualitatively as well as quantitatively. This supports that variations in horizontal exchange are an important controlling factor of the initial spring bloom and that the horizontal exchange during the winter can be determined by vertical turbulent diffusion. Our results will be relevant for the primary production in other similar systems of small geographical extent and also for other problems involving cross-shelf exchange, such as oil spill dispersal.

  9. Commentary on "Finance, Management, and Costs of Public and Private Schools in Indonesia" and "Do Local Contributions Affect the Efficiency of Public Primary Schools?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Mark C.

    1996-01-01

    Studies on Indonesia and the Philippines in this special issue examine how local financial control affects costs of providing primary schooling. In both countries, schools with greater financial decentralization operated more efficiently. These results have important implications for U.S. schools, where decentralization reforms in Kentucky and…

  10. The Development of an Indicator System for The Affective and Social Schooling Outcomes for Primary and Secondary Students in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phillip J.; Mo Ching Mok, Magdalena; Chan, Lorna K.S.; Yin Lai, Po

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the development of performance indicators for measuring primary and secondary students? affective and social outcomes of schooling. Psychometric properties as well as norms for the selected performance indicators for Hong Kong students were developed. The performance indicator system developed in this study has been subsequently…

  11. Primary productivity and the prospects for biofuels in the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, G. J.; Callaghan, T. V.

    1983-09-01

    Estimates of land use and plant productivity are combined to predict total annual primary production in the UK as 252 million tonnes dry matter (10.5 t ha-1yr-1). Annual above ground production is predicted to be 165 Mt (6.9 t ha-1yr-1). Within these totals, intensive agriculture contributes 60%, productive woodland 8%, natural vegetation 26% and urban vegetation 5%. However, only 25% of total plant production is cropped by man and animals, and most of this is subsequently discarded as wastes and residues. 2112 PJ of organic material is available for fuel without reducing food or fibre production, but since much of this could not be economically collected, 859 PJ is calculated as a more realistic biofuel contribution by the year 2000. After deducting 50% conversion losses, this could save P1 billion (1979 prices) in oil imports. Short rotation energy plantations, forest residues, coppice woodlands, animal and crop wastes, industrial and domestic wastes, catch crops, natural vegetation and urban vegetation all have immediate or short term potential as biofuel sources. Sensitive planning is required to reduce environmental impact, but in some cases more diverse wildlife habitats may be created.

  12. Monitoring Agricultural Production in Primary Export Countries within the framework of the GEOGLAM Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Reshef, I.; Justice, C. O.; Vermote, E.

    2012-12-01

    Up to date, reliable, global, information on crop production prospects is indispensible for informing and regulating grain markets and for instituting effective agricultural policies. The recent price surges in the global grain markets were in large part triggered by extreme weather events in primary grain export countries. These events raise important questions about the accuracy of current production forecasts and their role in market fluctuations, and highlight the deficiencies in the state of global agricultural monitoring. Satellite-based earth observations are increasingly utilized as a tool for monitoring agricultural production as they offer cost-effective, daily, global information on crop growth and extent and their utility for crop production forecasting has long been demonstrated. Within this context, the Group on Earth Observations developed the Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative which was adopted by the G20 as part of the action plan on food price volatility and agriculture. The goal of GEOGLAM is to enhance agricultural production estimates through the use of Earth observations. This talk will explore the potential contribution of EO-based methods for improving the accuracy of early production estimates of main export countries within the framework of GEOGLAM.

  13. Time Series Analysis Of Primary Productivity Along The East Coast Of India Using Oceansat-2 Ocean Colour Monitor (O cm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, E.; Pratap, D.; Nagamani, P. V.; Rao, K. H.; Preethi Latha, T.; Choudhury, S. B.

    2014-11-01

    Primary Productivity is the ultimate source of energy for all organisms in an ecosystem. It is associated with the food production and the global carbon cycle. Sensors on remote platforms (satellites) are capable of estimating the Chlorophyll-a concentration in surface waters by measurement of spectral changes of the upwelling light. From these data, which connected with other remotely sensed data, it is possible to use algorithms to estimate the primary production. In this paper, an initial attempt is made to estimate the Primary Productivity along the east coast of India. Vertically Generalized Productivity Model (VGPM) which is a depth (euphotic depth) integrated model is used for the estimation. The common input variables or geophysical parameters used for the model are chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a), vertically diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd-490), Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR), and Sea Surface Temperature (SST). The chlorophyll-a and Kd-490 parameters were estimated using Oceansat-2 OCM data whereas PAR and SST were taken from MODIS-aqua data. Oceansat-2 Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) data for the year 2013 is used in the analysis to compute the primary productivity using the weekly (8-day) data products of all the parameters as mentioned above. These products were inter compared with the MODIS Weekly (8-day) Primary Productivity products which were estimated at a global scale using the modified Vertically Generalized Productivity Model (VGPM) with which uses the exponential function of Sea surface temperature (SST).

  14. Ozone Effects on Global Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Biogeochemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, B. S.; Kicklighter, D. W.; Melillo, J. M.; Wang, C.; Zhuang, Q.; Prinn, R. G.

    2002-12-01

    The effects of air pollution on vegetation may provide another important control on the carbon cycle that has not yet been widely considered. Prolonged exposure to high levels of ozone, in particular, has been observed to inhibit photosynthesis by direct cellular damage within the leaves and through changes in stomatal conductance. We have incorporated simple empirical equations derived for hardwoods, pines, and crops into the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.3) to explore spatial and temporal variations of ozone effects on net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon sequestration across the globe. Although our results show up to a 2% reduction in annual NPP as a result of historical ozone levels during the late 1980s-early 1990s, regionally this reduction is much larger. The largest decreases (up to 39% in some locations) occur in the eastern U.S., Europe, and China, during months with high ozone levels and substantial production. Carbon sequestration during the early 1990s is reduced by as much as 0.43 PgC/yr, or 15%, with the presence of ozone. Thus the effects of ozone on net primary production and carbon sequestration should be factored into future calculations of the global carbon budget.

  15. Ethanol production from spent sulfite liquor fortified by hydrolysis of pulp mill primary clarifier sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, J.W.; Duff, S.J.B.

    1996-12-31

    Some low-yield sulfite pulping operations ferment spent sulfite liquor (SSL) to remove biochemical oxygen demand associated with dissolved sugars while at the same time generating ethanol as a salable product. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of primary clarifier sludge in a medium of SSL was proposed as a means of reducing the amount of sludge to be disposed of while at the same time increasing ethanol productivity. In this article, the option of fortifying existing SSL fermenting processes with the sugars produced via in situ enzymatic hydrolysis of sulfite primary clarifier sludge (PCS) has been explored. In 100% SSL PCS hydrolysis rates as high as 3.4 g/(L{center_dot}h) were observed at an initial enzyme loading of 10 filter paper units (FPU)/g PCS. To reduce the deleterious effects of glucose inhibition, single-stage SSF was carried out using cellulose enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The production rate of ethanol in SSL was increased by as much as 25% through the SSF process. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Modelled effects of primary and secondary production enhancement by seamounts on local fish stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morato, Telmo; Bulman, Cathy; Pitcher, Tony J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses how large aggregations of fish found on many seamounts are sustained. We used a generic seamount ecosystem model from the Northeast Atlantic to examine the impact of a potential increase of local primary production on higher trophic levels, to quantify the immigration of allochthonous micronekton that would be required to maintain a "typical" seamount community, and to quantify if the necessary immigration ratios could be supported by local oceanographic conditions. Our simulation predictions indicate a lack of autochthonous resources in the system to support large amounts of seamount aggregating fish. In other words, autochthonous seamount production may be responsible for sustaining only a small amount of its total biomass. Additionally, our study supports the idea that enhancement of primary productivity also cannot sustain large aggregations of seamount fish. Our seamount model, which took into account high abundances of fish, marine mammals, seabirds and tuna, required a total immigration of allochthonous micronekton of 95.2 t km -2 yr -1 less than the potential available biomass after considering the immigration of prey based upon average current velocities and prey standing stocks in oceanic waters. Our model predicted that the horizontal flux of prey would be sufficient to sustain the rich communities living on seamounts.

  17. Net primary productivity of forest stands in New Hampshire estimated from Landsat and MODIS satellite data

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Christopher; Gross, Peggy; Genovese, Vanessa; Smith, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Background A simulation model that relies on satellite observations of vegetation cover from the Landsat 7 sensor and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate net primary productivity (NPP) of forest stands at the Bartlett Experiment Forest (BEF) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Results Net primary production (NPP) predicted from the NASA-CASA model using 30-meter resolution Landsat inputs showed variations related to both vegetation cover type and elevational effects on mean air temperatures. Overall, the highest predicted NPP from the NASA-CASA model was for deciduous forest cover at low to mid-elevation locations over the landscape. Comparison of the model-predicted annual NPP to the plot-estimated values showed a significant correlation of R2 = 0.5. Stepwise addition of 30-meter resolution elevation data values explained no more than 20% of the residual variation in measured NPP patterns at BEF. Both the Landsat 7 and the 250-meter resolution MODIS derived mean annual NPP predictions for the BEF plot locations were within ± 2.5% of the mean of plot estimates for annual NPP. Conclusion Although MODIS imagery cannot capture the spatial details of NPP across the network of closely spaced plot locations as well as Landsat, the MODIS satellite data as inputs to the NASA-CASA model does accurately predict the average annual productivity of a site like the BEF. PMID:17941989

  18. Phytoplankton absorption, photosynthetic parameters, and primary production off Baja California: summer and autumn 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Hernández, Elsa; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Nájera-Martínez, Sila; Baumgartner, Timothy; Kahru, Mati; Greg Mitchell, B.

    2004-03-01

    To estimate ocean primary production at large space and time scales, it is necessary to use models combined with ocean-color satellite data. Detailed estimates of primary production are typically done at only a few representative stations. To get survey-scale estimates of primary production, one must introduce routinely measured Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) into models. For best precision, models should be based on accurate parameterizations developed from optical and photosynthesis data collected in the region of interest. To develop regional model parameterizations 14C-bicarbonate was used to estimate in situ primary production and photosynthetic parameters (α* ,Pm* , and Ek) derived from photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments from IMECOCAL cruises to the southern California Current during July and October 1998. The P-E experiments were done for samples collected from the 50% surface light depth for which we also determined particle and phytoplankton absorption coefficients (ap, aφ, and aφ*). Physical data collected during both surveys indicated that the 1997-1998 El Niño was abating during the summer of 1998, with a subsequent transition to the typical California Current circulation and coastal upwelling conditions. Phytoplankton chl-a and in situ primary production were elevated at coastal stations for both surveys, with the highest values during summer. Phytoplankton specific absorption coefficients in the blue peak (aφ* (440)) ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 m2 (mg Chl-a)-1 with largest values in offshore surface waters. In general aφ* was lower at depth compared to the surface. P-E samples were collected at the 50% light level that was usually in the surface mixed layer. Using α* and spectral absorption, we estimated maximum photosynthetic quantum yields (φmax; mol C/mol quanta). φmax values were lowest in offshore surface waters, with a total range of 0.01-0.07. Mean values of φmax for July and October were 0.011 and 0.022, respectively. In July Pm* was

  19. How polyamine synthesis inhibitors and cinnamic acid affect tropane alkaloid production.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Patricia L; Alvarez, María A; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra I

    2007-01-01

    Hairy roots of Brugmansia candida produce the tropane alkaloids scopolamine and hyoscyamine. In an attempt to divert the carbon flux from competing pathways and thus enhance productivity, the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors cyclohexylamine (CHA) and methylglyoxal-bis-guanylhydrazone (MGBG) and the phenylalanine-ammonia-lyase inhibitor cinnamic acid were used. CHA decreased the specific productivity of both alkaloids but increased significantly the release of scopolamine (approx 500%) when it was added in the mid-exponential phase. However, when CHA was added for only 48 h during the exponential phase, the specific productivity of both alkaloids increased (approx 200%), favoring scopolamine. Treatment with MGBG was detrimental to growth but promoted release into the medium of both alkaloids. However, when it was added for 48 h during the exponential phase, MGBG increased the specific productivity (approx 200%) and release (250- 1800%) of both alkaloids. Cinnamic acid alone also favored release but not specific productivity. When a combination of CHA or MGBG with cinnamic acid was used, the results obtained were approximately the same as with each polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor alone, although to a lesser extent. Regarding root morphology, CHA inhibited growth of primary roots and ramification. However, it had a positive effect on elongation of lateral roots. PMID:17416978

  20. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP build up and dinitrogen fixation - a mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Neulinger, S. C.; Reichel, A. F.; Loginova, A.; Borchard, C.; Schmitz, R. A.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-07-01

    Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) deoxygenates further and microbially-driven nitrogen (N) loss processes are promoted. Consequently, water masses with a low N : P ratio could reach the euphotic layer, possibly influencing primary production in those waters. Previous mesocosm studies in the oligotrophic Atlantic Ocean identified N availability as controlling of primary production, while a possible co-limitation of nitrate and phosphate (P) could not be ruled out. To better understand the impact of changing N : P ratios on primary production and on N2 fixation in the ETNA surface ocean, we conducted land-based mesocosm experiments with natural plankton communities and applied a broad range of N : P ratios (2.67-48). Silicate was supplied at 15 μmol L-1 in all mesocosms. We monitored nutrient drawdown, bloom formation, biomass build up and diazotrophic feedback in response to variable nutrient stoichiometry. Our results confirmed N to be limiting to primary production. We found that excess P was channeled through particulate organic matter (POP) into the dissolved organic matter (DOP) pool. In mesocosms with low P availability, DOP was utilized while N2 fixation increased, suggesting a link between those two processes. Interestingly this observation was most pronounced in mesocosms where inorganic N was still available, indicating that bioavailable N does not necessarily has to have a negative impact on N2 fixation. We observed a shift from a mixed cyanobacterial/proteobacterial dominated active diazotrophic community towards diazotrophic diatom symbionts of the Richelia-Rhizosolenia symbiosis. We hypothesize that a potential change in nutrient stoichiometry in the ETNA might lead to a general shift within the diazotrophic community

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis affects biosurfactant production and cell attachment to hydrocarbons in Pseudomonas sp. KA-08.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Carla; Catone, Mariela V; López, Nancy I; Raiger Iustman, Laura J

    2014-06-01

    Stressful conditions prevailing in hydrocarbon-contaminated sites influence the diversity, distribution, and activities of microorganisms. Oil bioremediation agents should develop special characteristics to cope with these environments like surfactant production and cellular affinity to hydrocarbons. Additionally, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation was proven to improve tolerance to stressful conditions. Pseudomonas sp. KA-08 was isolated from a chronic oil-contaminated environment, it is highly tolerant to xylene, and it is able to accumulate PHA and to produce surfactant compounds that lower the water surface tension (ST) as well as bioemulsifiers. In this work, we studied the effect of the capability to accumulate PHAs on biosurfactant production and microbial attachment to hydrocarbons (MATH). Our results showed that PHA synthesis capability has a favorable effect in the production of compounds which affect the ST but not on the production of bioemulsifiers. On the other hand, PHA accumulation affects cellular affinity to xylene. MATH analysis showed that a PHA-negative mutant increased its affinity to xylene compared with the wild-type strain. This result was also observed in Pseudomonas putida GPp104 (a PHA(-) mutant), suggesting that this effect could be generalized to other Pseudomonas strains. PMID:24519857

  2. Cellular microenvironment dictates androgen production by murine fetal Leydig cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen M; Muszynski, Jessica L; Strotman, Lindsay N; Lewis, Samantha R; O'Connell, Rachel L; Beebe, David J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3-5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  3. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  4. Benthic Primary Production Budget of a Caribbean Reef Lagoon (Puerto Morelos, Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Malik S.; Jantzen, Carin; Haas, Andreas F.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    High photosynthetic benthic primary production (P) represents a key ecosystem service provided by tropical coral reef systems. However, benthic P budgets of specific ecosystem compartments such as macrophyte-dominated reef lagoons are still scarce. To address this, we quantified individual and lagoon-wide net (Pn) and gross (Pg) primary production by all dominant functional groups of benthic primary producers in a typical macrophyte-dominated Caribbean reef lagoon near Puerto Morelos (Mexico) via measurement of O2 fluxes in incubation experiments. The photosynthetically active 3D lagoon surface area was quantified using conversion factors to allow extrapolation to lagoon-wide P budgets. Findings revealed that lagoon 2D benthic cover was primarily composed of sand-associated microphytobenthos (40%), seagrasses (29%) and macroalgae (27%), while seagrasses dominated the lagoon 3D surface area (84%). Individual Pg was highest for macroalgae and scleractinian corals (87 and 86 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area d−1, respectively), however seagrasses contributed highest (59%) to the lagoon-wide Pg. Macroalgae exhibited highest individual Pn rates, but seagrasses generated the largest fraction (51%) of lagoon-wide Pn. Individual R was highest for scleractinian corals and macroalgae, whereas seagrasses again provided the major lagoon-wide share (68%). These findings characterise the investigated lagoon as a net autotrophic coral reef ecosystem compartment revealing similar P compared to other macrophyte-dominated coastal environments such as seagrass meadows and macroalgae beds. Further, high lagoon-wide P (Pg: 488 and Pn: 181 mmol O2 m−2 lagoon area d−1) and overall Pg:R (1.6) indicate substantial benthic excess production within the Puerto Morelos reef lagoon and suggest the export of newly synthesised organic matter to surrounding ecosystems. PMID:24367570

  5. Estimating crop net primary production using inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2013-06-03

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale and over national and continental extents. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. A new Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois in years 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), shortwave radiation data estimated using Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that correspond to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. The modeling framework represented well the gradient of NPP across Iowa and Illinois, and also well represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 980 g C m-2 yr-1 and 420 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Estimated gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from AgI-LUE were in close agreement with eddy flux tower estimates. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  6. Algal pigments record shifts in dominant primary productivity through the Holocene in an arctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, C.; Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The character and magnitude of primary productivity in arctic lakes is largely controlled by climate. Organic compounds derived from pigments and preserved in lake sediments allow reconstruction of past abundances of algae that do not leave silicious microfossils. Fossil algal pigments are abundant in lake sediment and can be accurately quantified using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Several groups of algae produce unique pigments that can be used to reconstruct their past abundance. In Qivitu Highlands Lake, eastern central Baffin Island, the ratio of pigments diatoxantin and lutein exhibits coherent changes through the Holocene. Diatoxanthin is produced by diatoms and chrysophytes, whereas lutein is produced by green algae and higher plants. Because these pigments are the dominant carotenoids in the sediment, they serve as proxies for the dominant group of primary producers. During the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the past century, lutein is much more abundant than diatoxanthin. During Neoglacial cooling and into the Little Ice Age, diatoxanthin becomes the dominant carotenoid. This shift reveals that there was a change in not only the magnitude of algal production, but also the most abundant type. The adaptation of aquatic algal assemblages to changing climate suggests that gross changes in primary productivity may not be suitable to track the abundance of one type of algal microfossil (such as diatoms) without considering the other algal groups. Higher plants also produce lutein, and its abundance is additionally influenced by the presence of terrestrial organic matter as well as aquatic macrophyte plants. We hypothesize that the prevalence of lutein during warm summers is due to a longer ice-free season, allowing the development of a greater biomass of green algae and macrophyte plants as well as possible increases of terrestrial higher plant communities. This is part of a larger study where the lutein to diatoxanthin ratio is compared to organic

  7. Toward Describing the Effects of Ozone Depletion on Marine Primary Productivity and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    This project was aimed at improved predictions of the effects of UVB and ozone depletion on marine primary productivity and carbon flux. A principal objective was to incorporate a new analytical description of photosynthesis as a function of UV and photosynthetically available radiation (Cullen et. al., Science 258:646) into a general oceanographic model. We made significant progress: new insights into the kinetics of photoinhibition were used in the analysis of experiments on Antarctic phytoplankton to generate a general model of UV-induced photoinhibition under the influence of ozone depletion and vertical mixing. The way has been paved for general models on a global scale.

  8. Worldwide estimates and bibliography of net primary productivity derived from pre-1982 publications

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, G.; Lieth, H.F.H.; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Olson, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    An extensive compilation of more than 700 field estimates of net primary productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems worldwide was synthesized in Germany in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although the Osnabrueck data set has not been updated since the 1980s, it represents a wealth of information for use in model development and validation. This report documents the development of this data set, its contents, and its recent availability on the Internet from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics. Caution is advised in using these data, which necessarily include assumptions and conversions that may not be universally applicable to all sites.

  9. Global land-surface primary productivity based upon Nimbus-7 37 GHz data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Accumulation and renewal of organic matter as quantified through net primary productivity (NPP) is considered a very major function of the biosphere, and its estimation is crucial in understanding the carbon cycle. A physically-based model relating NPP to the difference of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (Delta T) observed at 37 GHz frequency of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on board the Nimbus-7 satellite is used for fitting areally averaged values of NPP and Delta T for five biomes. The land-surface NPP within 80 deg N to 55 deg S is then calculated using the Delta T data and compared with other estimates.

  10. Comparing global models of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP): Global pattern and differentiation by major biomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kicklighter, D.W.; Bondeau, A.; Schloss, A.L.; Kaduk, J.; McGuire, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    Annual and seasonal net primary productivity estimates (NPP) of 15 global models across latitudinal zones and biomes are compared. The models simulated NPP for contemporary climate using common, spatially explicit data sets for climate, soil texture, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Differences among NPP estimates varied over space and time. The largest differences occur during the summer months in boreal forests (50??to 60??N) and during the dry seasons of tropical evergreen forests. Differences in NPP estimates are related to model assumptions about vegetation structure, model parameterizations, and input data sets.

  11. Spatial pattern affects diversity-productivity relationships in experimental meadow communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamošová, Tereza; Doležal, Jiří; Lanta, Vojtěch; Lepš, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Plant species create aggregations of conspecifics as a consequence of limited seed dispersal, clonal growth and heterogeneous environment. Such intraspecific aggregation increases the importance of intraspecific competition relative to interspecific competition which may slow down competitive exclusion and promote species coexistence. To examine how spatial aggregation impacts the functioning of experimental assemblages of varying species richness, eight perennial grassland species of different growth form were grown in random and aggregated patterns in monocultures, two-, four-, and eight-species mixtures. In mixtures with an aggregated pattern, monospecific clumps were interspecifically segregated. Mixed model ANOVA was used to test (i) how the total productivity and productivity of individual species is affected by the number of species in a mixture, and (ii) how these relationships are affected by spatial pattern of sown plants. The main patterns of productivity response to species richness conform to other studies: non-transgressive overyielding is omnipresent (the productivity of mixtures is higher than the average of its constituent species so that the net diversity, selection and complementarity effects are positive), whereas transgressive overyielding is found only in a minority of cases (average of log(overyielding) being close to zero or negative). The theoretical prediction that plants in a random pattern should produce more than in an aggregated pattern (the distances to neighbours are smaller and consequently the competition among neighbours stronger) was confirmed in monocultures of all the eight species. The situation is more complicated in mixtures, probably as a consequence of complicated interplay between interspecific and intraspecific competition. The most productive species ( Achillea, Holcus, Plantago) were competitively superior and increased their relative productivity with mixture richness. The intraspecific competition of these species is

  12. Proximity to forest edge does not affect crop production despite pollen limitation

    PubMed Central

    Chacoff, Natacha P; Aizen, Marcelo A; Aschero, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    A decline in pollination function has been linked to agriculture expansion and intensification. In northwest Argentina, pollinator visits to grapefruit, a self-compatible but pollinator-dependent crop, decline by approximately 50% at 1 km from forest edges. We evaluated whether this decrease in visitation also reduces the pollination service in this crop. We analysed the quantity and quality of pollen deposited on stigmas, and associated limitation of fruit production at increasing distances (edge: 10, 100, 500 and 1000 m) from the remnants of Yungas forest. We also examined the quantitative and qualitative efficiency of honeybees as pollen vectors. Pollen receipt and pollen tubes in styles decreased with increasing distance from forest edge; however, this decline did not affect fruit production. Supplementation of natural pollen with self- and cross-pollen revealed that both pollen quantity and quality limited fruit production. Despite pollen limitation, honeybees cannot raise fruit production because they often do not deposit sufficient high-quality pollen per visit to elicit fruit development. However, declines in visitation frequency well below seven visits during a flower's lifespan could decrease production beyond current yields. In this context, the preservation of forest remnants, which act as pollinator sources, could contribute to resilience in crop production. Like wild plants, pollen limitation of the yield among animal-pollinated crops may be common and indicative not only of pollinator scarcity, but also of poor pollination quality, whereby pollinator efficiency, rather than just abundance, can play a broader role than previously appreciated. PMID:18230596

  13. A review on factors affecting microcystins production by algae in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruihua; Wang, Pinfei; Jia, Peili; Zhang, Yi; Chu, Xincheng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-03-01

    Microcystins, a toxin produced by Microcystis aeruginosa have become a global environmental issue in recent years. As a consequence of eutrophication, microcystins have become widely disseminated in drinking water sources, seriously impairing drinking water quality. This review focuses on the relationship between microcystins synthesis and physical, chemical, and biological environmental factors that are significant in controlling their production. Light intensity and temperature are the more important physical factors, and in many cases, an optimum level for these two factors has been observed. Nitrogen and phosphorus are the key chemical factors causing frequent occurrence of harmful algal blooms and microcystins production. The absorption of nutrients and metabolic activities of algae are affected by different concentrations and forms of nitrogen and phosphorus, leading to variations in microcystins production Metal ions and emerging pollutants are other significant chemical factors, whose comprehensive impact is still being studied. Algae can also interact with biological agents like predators and competitors in aquatic environments, and such interactions are suggested to promote MCs production and release. This review further highlights areas that require further research in order to gain a better understanding of microcystins production. It provides a theoretical basis for the control of microcystins production and releasing into aquatic environments. PMID:26874538

  14. Nutrient dynamics and primary production in a pristine coastal mangrove ecosystem: Andaman Islands, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, E. N.; Nickodem, K.; Siemann, A. L.; Hoeher, A.; Sundareshwar, P. V.; Ramesh, R.; Purvaja, R.; Banerjee, K.; Manickam, S.; Haran, H.

    2012-12-01

    Mangrove ecosystems play a key role in supporting coastal food webs and nutrient cycles in the coastal zone. Their strategic position between the land and the sea make them important sites for land-ocean interaction. As part of an Indo-US summer field course we investigated changes in the water chemistry in a pristine mangrove creek located at Wright Myo in the Andaman Islands, India. This study was conducted during the wet season (June 2012) to evaluate the influence of the coastal mangrove wetlands on the water quality and productivity in adjoining pelagic waters. Over a full tidal cycle spanning approximately 24 hrs, we measured nutrient concentrations and other ancillary parameters (e.g. dissolved oxygen, turbidity, salinity, etc.) hourly to evaluate water quality changes in incoming and ebbing tides. Nutrient analyses had the following concentration ranges (μM): nitrite 0.2-0.9, nitrate 2.0-11.5, ammonium 1.3-7.5, dissolved inorganic phosphate 0.7-2.8. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen to dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIN/DIP) ratio was very low relative to an optimal ratio, suggesting growth is nitrogen limited. In addition, we conducted primary production assays to investigate the factors that controlled primary production in this pristine creek. The experiment was carried out in situ using the Winkler method at low and high tide. Four-hour incubation of light and dark bottles representing a fixed control, non-fertilized, fertilized with nitrate, and fertilized with phosphate enabled the measurement of both net oxygen production and dark respiration. The low tide experiment suggests the ecosystem is heterotrophic because the oxygen measured in the light bottles was consistently less than that of the dark bottles. This result may be an experimental artifact of placing the glass bottles in the sun for too long prior to incubation, potentially leading to photolysis of large organic molecules in the light bottles. The high tide experiment also displayed

  15. Hydrologic remediation for the Deepwater Horizon incident drove ancillary primary production increase in coastal swamps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; Johnson, Darren; Roberts, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    As coastal wetlands subside worldwide, there is an urgency to understand the hydrologic drivers and dynamics of plant production and peat accretion. One incidental test of the effects of high rates of discharge on forested wetland production occurred in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident, in which all diversions in Louisiana were operated at or near their maximum discharge level for an extended period to keep offshore oil from threatened coastal wetlands. Davis Pond Diversion was operated at six times the normal discharge levels for almost 4 months, so that Taxodium distichum swamps downstream of the diversion experienced greater inundation and lower salinity. After this remediation event in 2010, above-ground litter production increased by 2.7 times of production levels in 2007–2011. Biomass of the leaf and reproductive tissues of several species increased; wood litter was minimal and did not change during this period. Root production decreased in 2010 but subsequently returned to pre-remediation values in 2011. Both litter and root production remained high in the second growing season after hydrologic remediation. Annual tree growth (circumference increment) was not significantly altered by the remediation. The potential of freshwater pulses for regulating tidal swamp production is further supported by observations of higher T. distichum growth in lower salinity and/or pulsed environments across the U.S. Gulf Coast. Usage of freshwater pulses to manage altered estuaries deserves further consideration, particularly because the timing and duration of such pulses could influence both primary production and peat accretion.

  16. Recent Warming, Rather than Industrial Emissions of Bioavailable Nutrients, Is the Dominant Driver of Lake Primary Production Shifts across the Athabasca Oil Sands Region.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jamie C; Kurek, Joshua; Kirk, Jane L; Muir, Derek C G; Wang, Xiaowa; Wiklund, Johan A; Cooke, Colin A; Evans, Marlene S; Smol, John P

    2016-01-01

    Freshwaters in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) are vulnerable to the atmospheric emissions and land disturbances caused by the local oil sands industry; however, they are also affected by climate change. Recent observations of increases in aquatic primary production near the main development area have prompted questions about the principal drivers of these limnological changes. Is the enhanced primary production due to deposition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from local industry or from recent climatic changes? Here, we use downcore, spectrally-inferred chlorophyll-a (VRS-chla) profiles (including diagenetic products) from 23 limnologically-diverse lakes with undisturbed catchments to characterize the pattern of primary production increases in the AOSR. Our aim is to better understand the relative roles of the local oil sands industry versus climate change in driving aquatic primary production trends. Nutrient deposition maps, generated using geostatistical interpolations of spring-time snowpack measurements from a grid pattern across the AOSR, demonstrate patterns of elevated total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and bioavailable nitrogen deposition around the main area of industrial activity. However, this pattern is not observed for bioavailable phosphorus. Our paleolimnological findings demonstrate consistently greater VRS-chla concentrations compared to pre-oil sands development levels, regardless of morphological and limnological characteristics, landscape position, bioavailable nutrient deposition, and dibenzothiophene (DBT)-inferred industrial impacts. Furthermore, breakpoint analyses on VRS-chla concentrations across a gradient of DBT-inferred industrial impact show limited evidence of a contemporaneous change among lakes. Despite the contribution of bioavailable nitrogen to the landscape from industrial activities, we find no consistency in the spatial pattern and timing of VRS-chla shifts with an industrial fertilizing signal. Instead

  17. Recent Warming, Rather than Industrial Emissions of Bioavailable Nutrients, Is the Dominant Driver of Lake Primary Production Shifts across the Athabasca Oil Sands Region

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Jamie C.; Kurek, Joshua; Kirk, Jane L.; Muir, Derek C. G.; Wang, Xiaowa; Wiklund, Johan A.; Cooke, Colin A.; Evans, Marlene S.; Smol, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwaters in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) are vulnerable to the atmospheric emissions and land disturbances caused by the local oil sands industry; however, they are also affected by climate change. Recent observations of increases in aquatic primary production near the main development area have prompted questions about the principal drivers of these limnological changes. Is the enhanced primary production due to deposition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from local industry or from recent climatic changes? Here, we use downcore, spectrally-inferred chlorophyll-a (VRS-chla) profiles (including diagenetic products) from 23 limnologically-diverse lakes with undisturbed catchments to characterize the pattern of primary production increases in the AOSR. Our aim is to better understand the relative roles of the local oil sands industry versus climate change in driving aquatic primary production trends. Nutrient deposition maps, generated using geostatistical interpolations of spring-time snowpack measurements from a grid pattern across the AOSR, demonstrate patterns of elevated total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and bioavailable nitrogen deposition around the main area of industrial activity. However, this pattern is not observed for bioavailable phosphorus. Our paleolimnological findings demonstrate consistently greater VRS-chla concentrations compared to pre-oil sands development levels, regardless of morphological and limnological characteristics, landscape position, bioavailable nutrient deposition, and dibenzothiophene (DBT)-inferred industrial impacts. Furthermore, breakpoint analyses on VRS-chla concentrations across a gradient of DBT-inferred industrial impact show limited evidence of a contemporaneous change among lakes. Despite the contribution of bioavailable nitrogen to the landscape from industrial activities, we find no consistency in the spatial pattern and timing of VRS-chla shifts with an industrial fertilizing signal. Instead

  18. Uncertainty analysis of terrestrial net primary productivity and net biome productivity in China during 1901-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junjiong; Zhou, Xuhui; Luo, Yiqi; Zhang, Guodong; Yan, Wei; Li, Jiaxuan; Li, Bo; Dan, Li; Fisher, Joshua B.; Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Yong; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jain, Atul K.; Mao, Jiafu; Meng, Jihua; Michalak, Anna M.; Parazoo, Nicholas C.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Sun, Rui; Tao, Fulu; Tian, Hanqin; Wei, Yaxing; Zeng, Ning; Zhu, Qiuan; Zhu, Wenquan

    2016-05-01

    Despite the importance of net primary productivity (NPP) and net biome productivity (NBP), estimates of NPP and NBP for China are highly uncertain. To investigate the main sources of uncertainty, we synthesized model estimates of NPP and NBP for China from published literature and the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). The literature-based results showed that total NPP and NBP in China were 3.35 ± 1.25 and 0.14 ± 0.094 Pg C yr-1, respectively. Classification and regression tree analysis based on literature data showed that model type was the primary source of the uncertainty, explaining 36% and 64% of the variance in NPP and NBP, respectively. Spatiotemporal scales, land cover conditions, inclusion of the N cycle, and effects of N addition also contributed to the overall uncertainty. Results based on the MsTMIP data suggested that model structures were overwhelmingly important (>90%) for the overall uncertainty compared to simulations with different combinations of time-varying global change factors. The interannual pattern of NPP was similar among diverse studies and increased by 0.012 Pg C yr-1 during 1981-2000. In addition, high uncertainty in China's NPP occurred in areas with high productivity, whereas NBP showed the opposite pattern. Our results suggest that to significantly reduce uncertainty in estimated NPP and NBP, model structures should be substantially tested on the basis of empirical results. To this end, coordinated distributed experiments with multiple global change factors might be a practical approach that can validate specific structures of different models.

  19. Fermentation Conditions that Affect Clavulanic Acid Production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid is frequently used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics to treat a wide spectrum of infectious diseases. Clavulanic acid prevents drug resistance by pathogens against these β-lactam antibiotics by preventing the degradation of the β-lactam ring, thus ensuring eradication of these harmful microorganisms from the host. This systematic review provides an overview on the fermentation conditions that affect the production of clavulanic acid in the firstly described producer, Streptomyces clavuligerus. A thorough search was conducted using predefined terms in several electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, EBSCO), from database inception to June 30th 2015. Studies must involve wild-type Streptomyces clavuligerus, and full texts needed to be available. A total of 29 eligible articles were identified. Based on the literature, several factors were identified that could affect the production of clavulanic acid in S. clavuligerus. The addition of glycerol or other vegetable oils (e.g., olive oil, corn oil) could potentially affect clavulanic acid production. Furthermore, some amino acids such as arginine and ornithine, could serve as potential precursors to increase clavulanic acid yield. The comparison of different fermentation systems revealed that fed-batch fermentation yields higher amounts of clavulanic acid as compared to batch fermentation, probably due to the maintenance of substrates and constant monitoring of certain entities (such as pH, oxygen availability, etc.). Overall, these findings provide vital knowledge and insight that could assist media optimization and fermentation design for clavulanic acid production in S. clavuligerus. PMID:27148211

  20. Fermentation Conditions that Affect Clavulanic Acid Production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid is frequently used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics to treat a wide spectrum of infectious diseases. Clavulanic acid prevents drug resistance by pathogens against these β-lactam antibiotics by preventing the degradation of the β-lactam ring, thus ensuring eradication of these harmful microorganisms from the host. This systematic review provides an overview on the fermentation conditions that affect the production of clavulanic acid in the firstly described producer, Streptomyces clavuligerus. A thorough search was conducted using predefined terms in several electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, EBSCO), from database inception to June 30th 2015. Studies must involve wild-type Streptomyces clavuligerus, and full texts needed to be available. A total of 29 eligible articles were identified. Based on the literature, several factors were identified that could affect the production of clavulanic acid in S. clavuligerus. The addition of glycerol or other vegetable oils (e.g., olive oil, corn oil) could potentially affect clavulanic acid production. Furthermore, some amino acids such as arginine and ornithine, could serve as potential precursors to increase clavulanic acid yield. The comparison of different fermentation systems revealed that fed-batch fermentation yields higher amounts of clavulanic acid as compared to batch fermentation, probably due to the maintenance of substrates and constant monitoring of certain entities (such as pH, oxygen availability, etc.). Overall, these findings provide vital knowledge and insight that could assist media optimization and fermentation design for clavulanic acid production in S. clavuligerus. PMID:27148211

  1. Quantifying subtropical North Pacific gyre mixed layer primary productivity from Seaglider observations of diel oxygen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David P.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Doney, Scott C.; Karl, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Using autonomous underwater gliders, we quantified diurnal periodicity in dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and temperature in the subtropical North Pacific near the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Station ALOHA during summer 2012. Oxygen optodes provided sufficient stability and precision to quantify diel cycles of average amplitude of 0.6 µmol kg-1. A theoretical diel curve was fit to daily observations to infer an average mixed layer gross primary productivity (GPP) of 1.8 mmol O2 m-3 d-1. Cumulative net community production (NCP) over 110 days was 500 mmol O2 m-2 for the mixed layer, which averaged 57 m in depth. Both GPP and NCP estimates indicated a significant period of below-average productivity at Station ALOHA in 2012, an observation confirmed by 14C productivity incubations and O2/Ar ratios. Given our success in an oligotrophic gyre where biological signals are small, our diel GPP approach holds promise for remote characterization of productivity across the spectrum of marine environments.

  2. Net primary production of a temperate deciduous forest exhibits a threshold response to increasing disturbance severity.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Haëntjens, Ellen J; Curtis, Peter S; Fahey, Robert T; Vogel, Christoph S; Gough, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    The global carbon (C) balance is vulnerable to disturbances that alter terrestrial C storage. Disturbances to forests occur along a continuum of severity, from low-intensity disturbance causing the mortality or defoliation of only a subset of trees to severe stand- replacing disturbance that kills all trees; yet considerable uncertainty remains in how forest production changes across gradients of disturbance intensity. We used a gradient of tree mortality in an upper Great Lakes forest ecosystem to: (1) quantify how aboveground wood net primary production (ANPP,) responds to a range of disturbance severities; and (2) identify mechanisms supporting ANPPw resistance or resilience following moderate disturbance. We found that ANPPw declined nonlinearly with rising disturbance severity, remaining stable until >60% of the total tree basal area senesced. As upper canopy openness increased from disturbance, greater light availability to the subcanopy enhanced the leaf-level photosynthesis and growth of this formerly light-limited canopy stratum, compensating for upper canopy production losses and a reduction in total leaf area index (LAI). As a result, whole-ecosystem production efficiency (ANPPw/LAI) increased with rising disturbance severity, except in plots beyond the disturbance threshold. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for a nonlinear relationship between ANPPw, and disturbance severity, in which the physiological and growth enhancement of undisturbed vegetation is proportional to the level of disturbance until a threshold is exceeded. Our results have important ecological and management implications, demonstrating that in some ecosystems moderate levels of disturbance minimally alter forest production. PMID:26594704

  3. A conceptual model of primary productivity in shallow streams using biomass simulation. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.C.; McDonnell, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    A conceptual model for primary productivity was developed for application to rooted aquatic macrophytes in streams to assist studies of eutrophication and control of water quality in supplementing outputs of dissolved oxygen (DO) models of pollution loads. This model included a first-order differential equation of biomass, with specific rates for photosynthesis, respiration, and death. A model component was developed to describe available light spatially/temporally in the weed bed, as reduced from extraterrestrial solar radiation. A DO model component included terms for photosynthetic production, plant respiration, and a benthal sink due to dead plant matter decay. The latter, a first-order exponential oxygen sink, had not been previously included in DO models.

  4. Oceanic primary production: 2. Estimation at global scale from satellite (coastal zone color scanner) chlorophyll

    SciTech Connect

    Antione, D.; Andre, J.M.; Morel, A.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the oceanic seasonal evolution and spatial distribution of photosynthetic carbon fixation. Computation of primary production from the upper ocean chlorophyll-like pigment concentrations were made from monthly global maps from the coastal zone color scanner data archive. Relative contributions of various oceans and zonal belts were identified. Depending on the ratio used for active pigments to total pigments, the calculated global annual production ranges from 36.5 and 45.6 G tons (metric) carbon per year. These values are among the highest estimates proposed to date; although the absolute values may be somewhat questionable, the relative contribution of the various zonal belts and oceans are considered to have a high degree of accuracy. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Observation and simulation of net primary productivity in Qilian Mountain, western China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Zhu, Q; Chen, J M; Wang, Y Q; Liu, J; Sun, R; Tang, S

    2007-11-01

    We modeled net primary productivity (NPP) at high spatial resolution using an advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) image of a Qilian Mountain study area using the boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS). Two key driving variables of the model, leaf area index (LAI) and land cover type, were derived from ASTER and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Other spatially explicit inputs included daily meteorological data (radiation, precipitation, temperature, humidity), available soil water holding capacity (AWC), and forest biomass. NPP was estimated for coniferous forests and other land cover types in the study area. The result showed that NPP of coniferous forests in the study area was about 4.4 tCha(-1)y(-1). The correlation coefficient between the modeled NPP and ground measurements was 0.84, with a mean relative error of about 13.9%. PMID:17129660

  6. The whale pump: marine mammals enhance primary productivity in a coastal basin.

    PubMed

    Roman, Joe; McCarthy, James J

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that microbes, zooplankton, and fish are important sources of recycled nitrogen in coastal waters, yet marine mammals have largely been ignored or dismissed in this cycle. Using field measurements and population data, we find that marine mammals can enhance primary productivity in their feeding areas by concentrating nitrogen near the surface through the release of flocculent fecal plumes. Whales and seals may be responsible for replenishing 2.3×10(4) metric tons of N per year in the Gulf of Maine's euphotic zone, more than the input of all rivers combined. This upward "whale pump" played a much larger role before commercial harvest, when marine mammal recycling of nitrogen was likely more than three times atmospheric N input. Even with reduced populations, marine mammals provide an important ecosystem service by sustaining productivity in regions where they occur in high densities. PMID:20949007

  7. The Whale Pump: Marine Mammals Enhance Primary Productivity in a Coastal Basin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Joe; McCarthy, James J.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that microbes, zooplankton, and fish are important sources of recycled nitrogen in coastal waters, yet marine mammals have largely been ignored or dismissed in this cycle. Using field measurements and population data, we find that marine mammals can enhance primary productivity in their feeding areas by concentrating nitrogen near the surface through the release of flocculent fecal plumes. Whales and seals may be responsible for replenishing 2.3×104 metric tons of N per year in the Gulf of Maine's euphotic zone, more than the input of all rivers combined. This upward “whale pump” played a much larger role before commercial harvest, when marine mammal recycling of nitrogen was likely more than three times atmospheric N input. Even with reduced populations, marine mammals provide an important ecosystem service by sustaining productivity in regions where they occur in high densities. PMID:20949007

  8. High Primary Production Contrasts with Intense Carbon Emission in a Eutrophic Tropical Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rafael M.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Junger, Pedro C.; Figueiredo, Aline V.; Andrade, Anízio S.; de Moura, Caroline G. B.; Tonetta, Denise; Oliveira, Ernandes S.; Araújo, Fabiana; Rust, Felipe; Piñeiro-Guerra, Juan M.; Mendonça, Jurandir R.; Medeiros, Leonardo R.; Pinheiro, Lorena; Miranda, Marcela; Costa, Mariana R. A.; Melo, Michaela L.; Nobre, Regina L. G.; Benevides, Thiago; Roland, Fábio; de Klein, Jeroen; Barros, Nathan O.; Mendonça, Raquel; Becker, Vanessa; Huszar, Vera L. M.; Kosten, Sarian

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies from temperate lakes indicate that eutrophic systems tend to emit less carbon dioxide (CO2) and bury more organic carbon (OC) than oligotrophic ones, rendering them CO2 sinks in some cases. However, the scarcity of data from tropical systems is critical for a complete understanding of the interplay between eutrophication and aquatic carbon (C) fluxes in warm waters. We test the hypothesis that a warm eutrophic system is a source of both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere, and that atmospheric emissions are larger than the burial of OC in sediments. This hypothesis was based on the following assumptions: (i) OC mineralization rates are high in warm water systems, so that water column CO2 production overrides the high C uptake by primary producers, and (ii) increasing trophic status creates favorable conditions for CH4 production. We measured water-air and sediment-water CO2 fluxes, CH4 diffusion, ebullition and oxidation, net ecosystem production (NEP) and sediment OC burial during the dry season in a eutrophic reservoir in the semiarid northeastern Brazil. The reservoir was stratified during daytime and mixed during nighttime. In spite of the high rates of primary production (4858 ± 934 mg C m-2 d-1), net heterotrophy was prevalent due to high ecosystem respiration (5209 ± 992 mg C m-2 d-1). Consequently, the reservoir was a source of atmospheric CO2 (518 ± 182 mg C m-2 d-1). In addition, the reservoir was a source of ebullitive (17 ± 10 mg C m-2 d-1) and diffusive CH4 (11 ± 6 mg C m-2 d-1). OC sedimentation was high (1162 mg C m-2 d-1), but our results suggest that the majority of it is mineralized to CO2 (722 ± 182 mg C m-2 d-1) rather than buried as OC (440 mg C m-2 d-1). Although temporally resolved data would render our findings more conclusive, our results suggest that despite being a primary production and OC burial hotspot, the tropical eutrophic system studied here was a stronger CO2 and CH4 source than a C sink, mainly because of high

  9. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2015-02-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady-state conditions in phosphorus-controlled chemostats (N:P = 29, growth rate of μ = 0.2 d-1) at present-day and high-CO2 concentrations. 14C incubations were performed to determine primary production (PP), comprised of particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C). Concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO) and high-molecular-weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) were determined by ion chromatography. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (<0.4 μm (DO14C), <0.45 μm (HMW-dCCHO), <1000, <100 and <10 kDa) of DO14CC and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady-state growth, corresponding to ~4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size fraction (<10 kDa) of HMW-dCCHO exhibited a similar sugar composition, dominated by high percentage of glucose (74-80 mol%), the composition of HMW-dCCHO size classes >10 kDa was significantly different, with a higher mol% of arabinose. The mol% of acidic sugars increased and that of glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  10. High Primary Production Contrasts with Intense Carbon Emission in a Eutrophic Tropical Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rafael M; Nóbrega, Gabriel N; Junger, Pedro C; Figueiredo, Aline V; Andrade, Anízio S; de Moura, Caroline G B; Tonetta, Denise; Oliveira, Ernandes S; Araújo, Fabiana; Rust, Felipe; Piñeiro-Guerra, Juan M; Mendonça, Jurandir R; Medeiros, Leonardo R; Pinheiro, Lorena; Miranda, Marcela; Costa, Mariana R A; Melo, Michaela L; Nobre, Regina L G; Benevides, Thiago; Roland, Fábio; de Klein, Jeroen; Barros, Nathan O; Mendonça, Raquel; Becker, Vanessa; Huszar, Vera L M; Kosten, Sarian

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies from temperate lakes indicate that eutrophic systems tend to emit less carbon dioxide (CO2) and bury more organic carbon (OC) than oligotrophic ones, rendering them CO2 sinks in some cases. However, the scarcity of data from tropical systems is critical for a complete understanding of the interplay between eutrophication and aquatic carbon (C) fluxes in warm waters. We test the hypothesis that a warm eutrophic system is a source of both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere, and that atmospheric emissions are larger than the burial of OC in sediments. This hypothesis was based on the following assumptions: (i) OC mineralization rates are high in warm water systems, so that water column CO2 production overrides the high C uptake by primary producers, and (ii) increasing trophic status creates favorable conditions for CH4 production. We measured water-air and sediment-water CO2 fluxes, CH4 diffusion, ebullition and oxidation, net ecosystem production (NEP) and sediment OC burial during the dry season in a eutrophic reservoir in the semiarid northeastern Brazil. The reservoir was stratified during daytime and mixed during nighttime. In spite of the high rates of primary production (4858 ± 934 mg C m(-2) d(-1)), net heterotrophy was prevalent due to high ecosystem respiration (5209 ± 992 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). Consequently, the reservoir was a source of atmospheric CO2 (518 ± 182 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). In addition, the reservoir was a source of ebullitive (17 ± 10 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) and diffusive CH4 (11 ± 6 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). OC sedimentation was high (1162 mg C m(-2) d(-1)), but our results suggest that the majority of it is mineralized to CO2 (722 ± 182 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) rather than buried as OC (440 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). Although temporally resolved data would render our findings more conclusive, our results suggest that despite being a primary production and OC burial hotspot, the tropical eutrophic system studied here was a stronger CO2 and CH4 source than a C

  11. Metrology requirements for the serial production of ELT primary mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Paul C. T.; Gray, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The manufacture of the next generation of large astronomical telescopes, the extremely large telescopes (ELT), requires the rapid manufacture of greater than 500 1.44m hexagonal segments for the primary mirror of each telescope. Both leading projects, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), have set highly demanding technical requirements for each fabricated segment. These technical requirements, when combined with the anticipated construction schedule for each telescope, suggest that more than one optical fabricator will be involved in the delivery of the primary mirror segments in order to meet the project schedule. For one supplier, the technical specification is challenging and requires highly consistent control of metrology in close coordination with the polishing technologies used in order to optimize production rates. For production using multiple suppliers, however the supply chain is structured, consistent control of metrology along the supply chain will be required. This requires a broader pattern of independent verification than is the case of a single supplier. This paper outlines the metrology requirements for a single supplier throughout all stages of the fabrication process. We identify and outline those areas where metrology accuracy and duration have a significant impact on production efficiency. We use the challenging ESO E-ELT technical specification as an example of our treatment, including actual process data. We further develop this model for the case of a supply chain consisting of multiple suppliers. Here, we emphasize the need to control metrology throughout the supply chain in order to optimize net production efficiency.

  12. Assessing the uncertainties of model estimates of primary productivity in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Carr, Mary-Elena; Barber, Richard T.; Scardi, Michele; Antoine, David; Armstrong, Robert A.; Asanuma, Ichio; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Chai, Fei; Christian, James R.; Ciotti, Aurea M.; Doney, Scott C.; Dowell, Mark; Dunne, John; Gentili, Bernard; Gregg, Watson; Hoepffner, Nicolas; Ishizaka, Joji; Kameda, Takahiko; Lima, Ivan; Marra, John; Mélin, Frédéric; Moore, J. Keith; Morel, André; O'Malley, Robert T.; O'Reilly, Jay; Saba, Vincent S.; Schmeltz, Marjorie; Smyth, Tim J.; Tjiputra, Jerry; Waters, Kirk; Westberry, Toby K.; Winguth, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Depth-integrated primary productivity (PP) estimates obtained from satellite ocean color-based models (SatPPMs) and those generated from biogeochemical ocean general circulation models (BOGCMs) represent a key resource for biogeochemical and ecological studies at global as well as regional scales. Calibration and validation of these PP models are not straightforward, however, and comparative studies show large differences between model estimates. The goal of this paper is to compare PP estimates obtained from 30 different models (21 SatPPMs and 9 BOGCMs) to a tropical Pacific PP database consisting of ˜ 1000 14C measurements spanning more than a decade (1983-1996). Primary findings include: skill varied significantly between models, but performance was not a function of model complexity or type (i.e. SatPPM vs. BOGCM); nearly all models underestimated the observed variance of PP, specifically yielding too few low PP (< 0.2 g C m - 2 d - 1 ) values; more than half of the total root-mean-squared model-data differences associated with the satellite-based PP models might be accounted for by uncertainties in the input variables and/or the PP data; and the tropical Pacific database captures a broad scale shift from low biomass-normalized productivity in the 1980s to higher biomass-normalized productivity in the 1990s, which was not successfully captured by any of the models. This latter result suggests that interdecadal and global changes will be a significant challenge for both SatPPMs and BOGCMs. Finally, average root-mean-squared differences between in situ PP data on the equator at 140°W and PP estimates from the satellite-based productivity models were 58% lower than analogous values computed in a previous PP model comparison 6 years ago. The success of these types of comparison exercises is illustrated by the continual modification and improvement of the participating models and the resulting increase in model skill.

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources As stated...

  14. 40 CFR 63.6004 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.6004 Section 63.6004 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Continuous Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.6004 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for...

  15. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As stated in §...

  16. 40 CFR 63.5987 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources? 63.5987 Section 63.5987 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5987 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord...

  17. 40 CFR 63.5996 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5996 Section 63.5996 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire... tire production affected sources? (a) You must demonstrate initial compliance with each emission...

  18. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As stated in § 63.5999,...

  19. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As stated in § 63.5999,...

  20. 40 CFR 63.5996 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5996 Section 63.5996 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5996 How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for...

  1. 40 CFR 63.6004 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.6004 Section 63.6004 Protection... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Continuous Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.6004 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire...

  2. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As...

  3. 40 CFR 63.6004 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.6004 Section 63.6004 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Continuous Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.6004 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for...

  4. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources As stated...

  5. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As stated in §...

  6. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources As stated...

  7. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5986 - What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tire cord production affected sources? 63.5986 Section 63.5986 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5986 What emission limits must...

  9. 40 CFR 63.5996 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5996 Section 63.5996 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.5996 How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for...

  10. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected...

  11. 40 CFR 63.5987 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources? 63.5987 Section 63.5987 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5987 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord...

  12. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As...

  13. 40 CFR 63.5996 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5996 Section 63.5996 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire... tire production affected sources? (a) You must demonstrate initial compliance with each emission...

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources As stated in § 63.5996, you...

  15. 40 CFR 63.6004 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.6004 Section 63.6004 Protection... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Continuous Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.6004 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire...

  16. 40 CFR 63.5996 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.5996 Section 63.5996 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements for Tire... tire production affected sources? (a) You must demonstrate initial compliance with each emission...

  17. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources As...

  18. 40 CFR 63.5987 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the emission limits for tire cord production affected sources? 63.5987 Section 63.5987 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5987 What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limits for tire cord...

  19. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected...

  20. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources As stated in § 63.5996, you...

  1. 40 CFR 63.6004 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.6004 Section 63.6004 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Continuous Compliance Requirements for Tire Production Affected Sources § 63.6004 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for...

  2. 40 CFR 63.5986 - What emission limits must I meet for tire cord production affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tire cord production affected sources? 63.5986 Section 63.5986 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources § 63.5986 What emission limits must...

  3. Primary production of edaphic algal communities in a Mississippi salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.J.; Moncreiff, C.A.

    1988-03-01

    Primary production rates of edaphic algae associated with the sediments beneath four monospecific canopies of vascular plants were determined over an annual cycle in a Mississippi salt marsh. The edaphic algal flora was dominated by small, motile pennate diatoms. Algal production (as measured by /sup 14/C uptake) was generally highest in spring-early summer and lowest in fall. Hourly rates ranged from a low of 1.4 mg C/m/sup 2/ in Juncus roemerianus Scheele to a high of 163 mg C/m/sup 2/ beneath the Scirpus olneyi Gray canopy. Stepwise multiple regressions identified a soil moisture index and chlorophyll a as the best environmental predictors of hourly production; light energy reaching the marsh surface and sediment and air temperature proved of little value. Adding the relative abundances of 33 diatom taxa to the set of independent variables only slightly increased R/sup 2/; however, virtually all variables selected were diatom taxa. R/sup 2/ was only 0.38 for the Spartina alterniflora Loisel. habitat but ranged from 0.70 to 0.87 for the remaining three vascular plant zones. Annual rates of algal production (g C/m/sup 2/) were estimated as follows: Juncus (28), Spartina (57), Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene (88), and Scirpus (151). The ratio of annual edaphic algal production to vascular plant net aerial production (EAP/VPP) was 10-12% for the first three habitats and 61% for Scirpus. Chlorophyll a concentrations, annual algal production rates, and EAP/VPP values were comparable to those determined in Texas, Delaware, and Massachusetts salt marshes but lower than those reported for Georgia and particularly California marshes.

  4. Climate change induced rainfall patterns affect wheat productivity and agroecosystem functioning dependent on soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabi Tataw, James; Baier, Fabian; Krottenthaler, Florian; Pachler, Bernadette; Schwaiger, Elisabeth; Whylidal, Stefan; Formayer, Herbert; Hösch, Johannes; Baumgarten, Andreas; Zaller, Johann G.

    2014-05-01

    Wheat is a crop of global importance supplying more than half of the world's population with carbohydrates. We examined, whether climate change induced rainfall patterns towards less frequent but heavier events alter wheat agroecosystem productivity and functioning under three different soil types. Therefore, in a full-factorial experiment Triticum aestivum L. was cultivated in 3 m2 lysimeter plots containing the soil types sandy calcaric phaeozem, gleyic phaeozem or calcic chernozem. Prognosticated rainfall patterns based on regionalised climate change model calculations were compared with current long-term rainfall patterns; each treatment combination was replicated three times. Future rainfall patterns significantly reduced wheat growth and yield, reduced the leaf area index, accelerated crop development, reduced arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonisation of roots, increased weed density and the stable carbon isotope signature (δ13C) of both old and young wheat leaves. Different soil types affected wheat growth and yield, ecosystem root production as well as weed abundance and biomass. The interaction between climate and soil type was significant only for the harvest index. Our results suggest that even slight changes in rainfall patterns can significantly affect the functioning of wheat agroecosystems. These rainfall effects seemed to be little influenced by soil types suggesting more general impacts of climate change across different soil types. Wheat production under future conditions will likely become more challenging as further concurrent climate change factors become prevalent.

  5. Quantitative estimates of changes in marine and terrestrial primary productivity over the past 300 million years

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in marine primary production over geological time have influenced a network of global biogeochemical cycles with corresponding feedbacks on climate. However, these changes continue to remain largely unquantified because of uncertainties in calculating global estimates from sedimentary palaeoproductivity indicators. I therefore describe a new approach to the problem using a mass balance analysis of the stable isotopes (18O/16O) of oxygen with modelled O2 fluxes and isotopic exchanges by terrestrial vegetation for 300, 150, 100 and 50 million years before present, and the treatment of the Earth as a closed system, with respect to the cycling of O2. Calculated in this way, oceanic net primary productivity was low in the Carboniferous but high (up to four times that of modern oceans) during the Late Jurassic, mid-Cretaceous and early Eocene greenhouse eras with a greater requirement for key nutrients. Such a requirement would be compatible with accelerated rates of continental weathering under the greenhouse conditions of the Mesozoic and early Tertiary. These results indicate possible changes in the strength of a key component of the oceanic carbon (organic and carbonate) pump in the geological past, with a corresponding feedback on atmospheric CO2 and climate, and provide an improved framework for understanding the role of ocean biota in the evolution of the global biogeochemical cycles of C, N and P.

  6. Primary production of coral ecosystems in the Vietnamese coastal and adjacent marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tac-An, Nguyen; Minh-Thu, Phan; Cherbadji, I. I.; Propp, M. V.; Odintsov, V. S.; Propp, L. H.

    2013-11-01

    Coral reef ecosystems in coastal waters and islands of Vietnam have high primary production. Average gross primary production (GPP) in coral reef waters was 0.39 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of corals ranged from 3.12 to 4.37 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of benthic microalgae in coral reefs ranged from 2 to 10 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of macro-algae was 2.34 g C m-2 day-1. Therefore, the total of GPP of whole coral reef ecosystems could reach 7.85 to 17.10 g C m-2 day-1. Almost all values of the ratio of photosynthesis to respiration in the water bodies are higher than 1, which means these regions are autotrophic systems. Wire variation of GPP in coral reefs was contributed by species abundance of coral and organisms, nutrient supports and environmental characteristics of coral ecosystems. Coral reefs play an important ecological role of biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in waters around the reefs. These results contribute valuable information for the protection, conservation and sustainable exploitation of the natural resources in coral reef ecosystems in Vietnam.

  7. Re-evaluating Primary Biotic Resource Use for Marine Biomass Production: A New Calculation Framework.

    PubMed

    Luong, Anh D; Schaubroeck, Thomas; Dewulf, Jo; De Laender, Frederik

    2015-10-01

    The environmental impacts of biomass harvesting can be quantified through the amount of net primary production required to produce one unit of harvested biomass (SPPR-specific primary production required). This paper presents a new calculation framework that explicitly takes into account full food web complexity and shows that the resulting SPPR for toothed whales in the Icelandic marine ecosystem is 2.8 times higher than the existing approach based on food web simplification. In addition, we show that our new framework can be coupled to food web modeling to examine how uncertainty on ecological data and processes can be accounted for while estimating SPPR. This approach reveals that an increase in the degree of heterotrophy by flagellates from 0% to 100% results in a two-fold increase in SPPR estimates in the Barents Sea. It also shows that the estimated SPPR is between 3.9 (herring) and 5.0 (capelin) times higher than that estimated when adopting food chain theory. SPPR resulting from our new approach is only valid for the given time period for which the food web is modeled and cannot be used to infer changes in SPPR when the food web is altered by changes in human exploitation or environmental changes. PMID:26348118

  8. The Dependence of the Distortion Product 2f1-f2 on Primary Levels in Non-Impaired Human Ears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahr, Sumit; Long, Glenis R.; Culpepper, N. Brandt

    1998-01-01

    The ILO92 was used to determine the level of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) at 2f1-f2 for 16 combinations of primary levels in the range of 40 to 80 dB SPL from 40 unimpaired adult ears. An overall increase of DPOAE amplitude with increase in primary level was observed. (Author/CR)

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt....

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt....

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt....

  12. Photophysiological variability and its influence on primary production in the NW Africa-Canary Islands coastal transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiras, F. G.; Arbones, B.; Montero, M. F.; Barton, E. D.; Arístegui, J.

    2016-05-01

    Photophysiological variability and its influence on primary production were studied in the NW Africa-Canary Islands coastal transition zone. The region showed strong mesoscale activity, in which upwelling filaments and island eddies interacted to cause significant vertical displacements of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Oligotrophic stations both in the open ocean and within anticyclonic eddies were characterised by low values of integrated chlorophyll (33 ± 4 mg chl a m- 2) and dominance of pico- and nanophytoplankton, while stations associated with filaments and cyclonic eddies showed moderate chl a values (50 ± 17 mg m- 2). Shelf stations affected by upwelling exhibited the highest chl a (112 ± 36 mg m- 2) with microphytoplankton dominance. Photosynthetic variables in the three groups of stations showed similar depth gradients, with maximum photosynthetic rates (PmB) decreasing with depth and maximum quantum yields (ϕm) increasing with depth. However, the increase with depth of ϕm was not so evident in shelf waters where nutrients were not depleted at the surface. Primary production (PP) displayed a coast-ocean gradient similar to that of chl a, with highest values (2.5 ± 1.2 g C m- 2 d- 1) at the eutrophic shelf stations and lowest (0.36 ± 0.11 g C m- 2 d- 1) at the oligotrophic stations. Nevertheless, integrated PP at the oligotrophic stations was not related to integrated chl a concentration but was positively (r = 0.95) correlated to carbon fixation at the DCM and negatively (r = - 0.85) correlated to the depth of the DCM, suggesting that light, and not phytoplankton biomass, was the main factor controlling PP in oligotrophic environments. It is concluded that downward displacements of the DCM, either by convergence fronts or downwelling at the core of anticyclones can significantly reduce PP in the oligotrophic ocean.

  13. Productive Lytic Replication of a Recombinant Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus in Efficient Primary Infection of Primary Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shou-Jiang; Deng, Jian-Hong; Zhou, Fu-Chun

    2003-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a vascular spindle cell tumor primarily consisting of proliferating endothelial cells. Although KSHV has been shown to infect primary human endothelial cells and convert them into spindle shapes, KSHV infection is largely latent, and efforts to establish a highly efficient and sustainable infection system have been unsuccessful. A recombinant KSHV, BAC36, that has high primary-infection efficiency in 293 cells has been obtained (F. C. Zhou, Y. J. Zhang, J. H. Deng, X. P. Wang, H. Y. Pan, E. Hettler, and S. J. Gao, J. Virol. 76:6185-6196, 2002). BAC36 contains a green fluorescent protein cassette which can be used to conveniently monitor viral infection. Here, we describe the establishment of a KSHV lytic-replication-permissive infection cell model using BAC36 virions to infect primary human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures. BAC36 infection of HUVEC cultures has as high as 90% primary-infection efficiency and consists of two phases: a permissive phase, in which the cultures undergo active viral lytic replication, producing a large number of virions and concomitantly resulting in large-scale cell death, and a latent phase, in which the surviving cells from the permissive phase switch into latent infection, with a small number of cells undergoing spontaneous viral lytic replication, and proliferate into bundles of spindle cells with KS slit-like spaces. An assay for determining the KSHV titer in a virus preparation has also been developed. The cell model should be useful for examining KSHV infection and replication, as well as for understanding the development of KS. PMID:12941882

  14. Condition-dependent ejaculate production affects male mating behavior in the common bedbug Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Kaldun, Bettina; Otti, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Food availability in the environment is often low and variable, constraining organisms in their resource allocation to different life-history traits. For example, variation in food availability is likely to induce condition-dependent investment in reproduction. Further, diet has been shown to affect ejaculate size, composition and quality. How these effects translate into male reproductive success or change male mating behavior is still largely unknown. Here, we concentrated on the effect of meal size on ejaculate production, male reproductive success and mating behavior in the common bedbug Cimex lectularius. We analyzed the production of sperm and seminal fluid within three different feeding regimes in six different populations. Males receiving large meals produced significantly more sperm and seminal fluid than males receiving small meals or no meals at all. While such condition-dependent ejaculate production did not affect the number of offspring produced after a single mating, food-restricted males could perform significantly fewer matings than fully fed males. Therefore, in a multiple mating context food-restricted males paid a fitness cost and might have to adjust their mating strategy according to the ejaculate available to them. Our results indicate that meal size has no direct effect on ejaculate quality, but food availability forces a condition-dependent mating rate on males. Environmental variation translating into variation in male reproductive traits reveals that natural selection can interact with sexual selection and shape reproductive traits. As males can modulate their ejaculate size depending on the mating situation, future studies are needed to elucidate whether environmental variation affecting the amount of ejaculate available might induce different mating strategies. PMID:27066237

  15. Net primary productivity of some aquatic macrophytes in sewage-sullage mixture.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, V K; Sinha, S; Naik, M L

    2001-07-01

    Sewage-sullage mixture from Raipur city is spread over a vast area surrounding the city. This mixture has a pH always above neutrality with high turbidity. Transparency was nil with the absence of phenolphthalein alkalinity and dissolved oxygen. Hardness was high with low nitrogen and phosphorus concentration. Human consumable. acquatic macrophytes are cultivated in such waste water. Net primary productivity of three macrophytes: Ipomoea aquatica, Marsilea quadrifolia and Nelumbo nucifera were evaluated while being cultivated in such sewage-sullage mixture. Productivity was determined either with periodic biomass removal (I. aquatica and M. quadrifolia) or through removing the biomass only once at the time of growing season (N. nucifera). Growing season productivity of up to 27.48. 19.81 and 9.49 g m(-2) and day(-1) and extrapolated productivity of up to 100.30, 72.31 and 34.64 mt. ha(-1) yr(-1) was recorded for I. aquatica. M. quadrifolia and N. nucifera respectively. Thus, these macrophytes are yielding a high amount of human consumable biomass from an area which neither be a useless wetland. PMID:12017265

  16. Assessment of the Impact of Urban Sprawl on Net Primary Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milesi, C.; Elvidge, C. D.; Nemani, R. R.; Running, S. W.

    2002-12-01

    While urban areas are generally thought to reduce the photosynthetic capacity of the land, little research has been devoted to quantifying the net effect of urbanization on net primary productivity (NPP). The southeastern United States has undergone one of the highest rates of landscape change and urban sprawl in the country, representing an ideal study area in which to develop a remote sensing based methodology for a regional assessment of the impact or urbanization on ecosystem productivity. We used a combination of MODIS and nighttime Defense Meteorological Satellite Program / Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) data to estimate the extent of recent urban sprawl and its impact on regional NPP in the southeastern United States. The analysis based on the nighttime data indicated that in 1992/93 urban areas amount to 4.5 % of the total surface in the region. In the year 2000, the nighttime data revealed an increase in urban developed land by 1.9 %. Estimates derived from the MODIS data indicated that land cover changes due to urban development that took place during the analyzed period reduced annual NPP of the southeastern United States by 0.4 %. Results from this study indicated that the combination of MODIS products such as NPP with nighttime data could provide rapid assessment of urban land cover changes and their impact on ecosystem productivity.

  17. Relationships between primary production and crop yields in semi-arid and arid irrigated agro-ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, H. H.; Ahmad, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    In semi-arid areas within the MENA region, food security problems are the main problematic imposed. Remote sensing can be a promising too early diagnose food shortages and further prevent the population from famine risks. This study is aimed at examining the possibility of forecasting yield before harvest from remotely sensed MODIS-derived Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Net photosynthesis (net PSN), and Gross Primary Production (GPP) in semi-arid and arid irrigated agro-ecosystems within the conflict affected country of Syria. Relationships between summer yield and remotely sensed indices were derived and analyzed. Simple regression spatially-based models were developed to predict summer crop production. The validation of these models was tested during conflict years. A significant correlation (p<0.05) was found between summer crop yield and EVI, GPP and net PSN. Results indicate the efficiency of remotely sensed-based models in predicting summer yield, mostly for cotton yields and vegetables. Cumulative summer EVI-based model can predict summer crop yield during crisis period, with deviation less than 20% where vegetables are the major yield. This approach prompts to an early assessment of food shortages and lead to a real time management and decision making, especially in periods of crisis such as wars and drought.

  18. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2014-10-01

    Residential wood burning contributes significantly to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming significant quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle and gas phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings, however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ± 2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in

  19. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Residential wood burning contributes to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas-phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming considerable quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA, and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle- and gas-phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings; however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ±2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high-load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average-load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average-load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in PAH and

  20. Does humor in radio advertising affect recognition of novel product brand names?

    PubMed

    Berg, E M; Lippman, L G

    2001-04-01

    The authors proposed that item selection during shopping is based on brand name recognition rather than recall. College students rated advertisements and news stories of a simulated radio program for level of amusement (orienting activity) before participating in a surprise recognition test. Humor level of the advertisements was varied systematically, and content was controlled. According to signal detection analysis, humor did not affect the strength of recognition memory for brand names (nonsense units). However, brand names and product types were significantly more likely to be associated when appearing in humorous advertisements than in nonhumorous advertisements. The results are compared with prior findings concerning humor and recall. PMID:11506048