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Sample records for affects skin temperature

  1. Procedure of rectal temperature measurement affects brain, muscle, skin, and body temperatures and modulates the effects of intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Bae, David D; Brown, P Leon; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2007-06-18

    Rectal probe thermometry is commonly used to measure body core temperature in rodents because of its ease of use. Although previous studies suggest that rectal measurement is stressful and results in long-lasting elevations in body temperatures, we evaluated how this procedure affects brain, muscle, skin, and core temperatures measured with chronically implanted thermocouple electrodes in rats. Our data suggest that the procedure of rectal measurement results in powerful locomotor activation, rapid and strong increases in brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures, as well as a biphasic, down-up fluctuation in skin temperature, matching the response pattern observed during tail-pinch, a representative stressful procedure. This response, moreover, did not habituate after repeated day-to-day testing. Repeated rectal probe insertions also modified temperature responses induced by intravenous cocaine. Under quiet resting conditions, cocaine moderately increased brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures. However, during repeated rectal measurements, which increased temperatures, cocaine induced both hyperthermic and hypothermic responses. Direct comparisons revealed that body temperatures measured by a rectal probe are typically lower (approximately 0.6 degrees C) and more variable than body temperatures recorded by chronically implanted electrodes; the difference is smaller at low and greater at high basal temperatures. Because of this difference and temperature increases induced by the rectal probe per se, cocaine had no significant effect on rectal temperatures compared to control animals exposed to repeated rectal probes. Therefore, although rectal temperature measurements provide a decent correlation with directly measured deep body temperatures, the arousing influence of this procedure may drastically modulate the effects of other arousing stimuli and drugs.

  2. Ambient temperature affects glabrous skin vasculature and sweating responses to mental task in humans.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Naoyuki; Someya, Nami; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Koga, Shunsaku

    2008-09-01

    We compared responses in heart rate (HR), mean blood pressure (MAP), sweating rate (SR), sweating expulsion (SwE), and skin vascular conductance (VC) to mental task among different ambient temperature (Ta) conditions, i.e., 12, 16, 20, and 24 degrees C. Seven subjects (27+/-5 yrs, 64+/-14 kg) underwent a 2-min color word conflict test (CWT) after 2 mins of baseline data acquisition following a 20-min resting period. All subjects wore long sleeve shirts and long pants. The skin blood flow was measured with a laser Doppler probe on the left index finger pulp to calculate skin VC, and the SR and sweating expulsion (SwE) were measured with a ventilated capsule on the left thenar. CWT significantly increased the HR and MAP, while there was no significant effect of Ta on the magnitudes of these responses. CWT significantly decreased the skin VC when the Ta was 24 degrees C, whereas it significantly increased the skin VC when the Ta was 12 or 16 degrees C. CWT significantly increased SR and SwE in all Ta conditions, and the SwE was greater in warmer conditions. These findings suggest that different ambient temperatures induce different responses in finger skin vasculature to mental task, implying the independent response of cutaneous vasomotor tone and sweat glands in glabrous skin to mental task.

  3. Environment and activity affect skin temperature in breeding adult male elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Norris, A L; Houser, D S; Crocker, D E

    2010-12-15

    The large body size and high rates of metabolic heat production associated with male mating success in polygynous systems creates potential thermoregulatory challenges for species breeding in warm climates. This is especially true for marine predators carrying large blubber reserves intended for thermoregulation in cold water and fuel provision during extended fasts. Thermographic images were used to measure changes in skin temperature (T(S)) in adult male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) over the breeding season. Environmental variables, primarily ambient temperature and solar radiation, were the principal determinants of mean and maximum T(S). When controlled for environmental variables, dominance rank significantly impacted mean T(S), being highest in alpha males. Behavioral activity significantly influenced T(S) but in a counter-intuitive way, with inactive males exhibiting the highest T(S). This was likely due to strong impacts of environmental variables on the kinds of behavior exhibited, with males being less active on warm, humid days at peak solar radiation. We classified thermal windows as areas in which T(S) was one standard deviation greater than mean T(S) for the individual seal within a thermograph. Thermal features suggest active physiological thermoregulation during and after combat and significant circulatory adaptations for heat dumping, as evidenced by recurring locations of thermal windows representing widely varying T(S) values. Frequent observations of localized T(S) above 37°C, particularly after combat, suggest the production of thermoregulatory stress during breeding behavior. Our findings demonstrate the importance of environmental drivers in shaping activity patterns during breeding and provide evidence for thermoregulatory costs of successful breeding in large polygynous males.

  4. A reduced core to skin temperature gradient, not a critical core temperature, affects aerobic capacity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Ruby, Brent C

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the core to skin temperature gradient during incremental running to volitional fatigue across varying environmental conditions. A secondary aim was to determine if a "critical" core temperature would dictate volitional fatigue during running in the heat. 60 participants (n=49 male, n=11 female; 24±5 yrs, 177±11 cm, 75±13 kg) completed the study. Participants were uniformly stratified into a specific exercise temperature group (18 °C, 26 °C, 34 °C, or 42 °C) based on a 3-mile run performance. Participants were equipped with core and chest skin temperature sensors and a heart rate monitor, entered an environmental chamber (18 °C, 26 °C, 34 °C, or 42 °C), and rested in the seated position for 10 min before performing a walk/run to volitional exhaustion. Initial treadmill speed was 3.2 km h(-1) with a 0% grade. Every 3 min, starting with speed, speed and grade increased in an alternating pattern (speed increased by 0.805 km h(-1), grade increased by 0.5%). Time to volitional fatigue was longer for the 18 °C and 26 °C group compared to the 42 °C group, (58.1±9.3 and 62.6±6.5 min vs. 51.3±8.3 min, respectively, p<0.05). At the half-way point and finish, the core to skin gradient for the 18 °C and 26 °C groups was larger compared to 42 °C group (halfway: 2.6±0.7 and 2.0±0.6 vs. 1.3±0.5 for the 18 °C, 26 °C and 42 °C groups, respectively; finish: 3.3±0.7 and 3.5±1.1 vs. 2.1±0.9 for the 26 °C, 34 °C, and 42 °C groups, respectively, p<0.05). Sweat rate was lower in the 18 °C group compared to the 26 °C, 34 °C, and 42 °C groups, 3.6±1.3 vs. 7.2±3.0, 7.1±2.0, and 7.6±1.7 g m(-2) min(-1), respectively, p<0.05. There were no group differences in core temperature and heart rate response during the exercise trials. The current data demonstrate a 13% and 22% longer run time to exhaustion for the 18 °C and 26 °C group, respectively, compared to the 42 °C group despite no differences

  5. Non-thermic skin affections.

    PubMed

    Broz, L; Kripner, J

    2000-01-01

    The Centre for Burns can help by its means (material, technical and personal) in the treatment of burns with extensive and deep losses of the skin cover and other tissue structures and in some affections with a different etiology (non-thermic affections). Indicated for admission are, in particular, extensive exfoliative affections--Stevens-Johnson's syndrome (SJS), Lyell's syndrome--toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS), deep skin and tissue affections associated with fulminant purpura (PF), possibly other affections (epidermolysis bullosa, posttraumatic avulsions etc.). The similarity with burn injuries with loss of the skin cover grade II is typical, in particular in exfoliative affections with a need for adequate fluid replacement in the acute stage and aseptic surgical treatment of the affected area from the onset of the disease. In conditions leading to full thickness skin loss, in addition to general treatment rapid plastic surgical interventions dominate.

  6. Molecular and functional properties of gelatin from the skin of unicorn leatherjacket as affected by extracting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kaewruang, Phanngam; Benjakul, Soottawat; Prodpran, Thummanoon

    2013-06-01

    Gelatins extracted from the skin of unicorn leatherjacket at different temperatures (45, 55, 65 and 75°C) in the presence and the absence of soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI; 100 units/g pretreated skin) for 12h were characterised. In general, the addition of SBTI resulted in the lower yield, regardless of extraction temperature. Higher yield was obtained when higher extraction temperature was used (P<0.05). Gelatin from skin extracted at 75°C in the absence of SBTI showed the highest yield (10.66 ± 0.41%) (based on dry weight). The highest α-amino group content was observed in gelatin extracted at 55°C without SBTI incorporated. The band intensity of β-chain and α-chains increased as the extraction temperature increased, particularly above 55°C. Gelatin extracted at 65°C with and without SBTI incorporation exhibited the highest gel strength (178.00 ± 7.50 g and 170.47 ± 1.30 g, respectively). FTIR spectra indicated that a greater loss of molecular order of triple helix with a higher degradation was found in gelatin extracted at 55°C in the absence SBTI. Gelatin extracted at 65°C, either with or without SBTI, had the highest EAI and ESI with high foam expansion and stability. Thus, the extraction of gelatin from the skin of unicorn leatherjacket at temperature sufficiently high could render the gelatin with less degradation.

  7. High temperature skin friction measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  8. Measurement of facial skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Ariyaratnam, S; Rood, J P

    1990-10-01

    It is essential to know the pattern of facial skin temperatures in normal subjects to be able to objectively assess differences in cases of nerve injury. Thirty healthy adults were selected at random to investigate the pattern of facial temperature using liquid crystal thermography and an electronic thermocouple system. The highest temperature of the face was in the forehead area (c, 34 degrees C) and the lowest (c. 32 degrees C) in the cheek area. If ambient temperature and humidity are controlled in a draught-free environment, symmetry of the facial skin temperature can be maintained. It is concluded that measurements of facial skin temperature may be used to investigate and assess lesions of peripheral branches of cranial nerves supplying the face.

  9. Low temperature skin treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipping, G.; Krishna, A.; Ruppert, U.; Srinivasan, R.; Walter, H.

    Although freezing has been a successful method of curing various kinds of skin lesions for at least 80 years, little progress has been made regarding the techniques and instruments available to the dermatoligist for applying cold. The attempts to improve this technique are reviewed, and the requirements is for successful cryotreatment are discussed taking warts as an example. With these requirements in mind, a simple and effective cryoprobe has been developed by the authors. Its design is described, and the experiences from a year's routine application of the probe to the treatment of warts are discussed.

  10. Skin rubdown with a dry towel, 'kanpu-masatsu' is an aerobic exercise affecting body temperature, energy production, and the immune and autonomic nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mayumi; Takano, Osamu; Tomiyama, Chikako; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Urahigashi, Nobuatsu; Urahigashi, Nobuatsu; Abo, Toru

    2012-01-01

    Skin rubdown using a dry towel (SRDT) to scrub the whole body is a traditional therapy for health promotion. To investigate its mechanism, 24 healthy male volunteers were studied. Body temperature, pulse rate, red blood cells (RBCs), serum levels of catecholamines and cortisol, blood gases (PO(2), sO(2), PCO(2) and pH), lactate and glucose, and the ratio and number of white blood cells (WBCs) were assessed before and after SRDT. After SRDT, pulse rate and body temperature were increased. PO(2), sO(2) and pH were also increased and there was no Rouleaux formation by RBCs. Lactate level tended to increase, whereas that of glucose did not. Adrenaline and noradrenaline levels increased, indicating sympathetic nerve (SN) dominance with increase in granulocytes. WBC number and ratio were divided into two groups according to granulocyte ratio (≤ or < 60%) before SRDT: a normal group and a SN group. Only in the SN group did the granulocyte ratio decrease and the lymphocyte ratio and number increase after SRDT. It is suggested that SRDT is a mild aerobic, systemic exercise that might affect the immune system via the autonomic nervous system.

  11. Skin Temperature Recording with Phosphors

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Ray N.; Alt, Leslie L.

    1965-01-01

    New knowledge of temperature irregularities associated with various disease states has resulted in increasing interest in the recording of heat radiation from the human body. Infrared radiation from the skin is a surface phenomenon and the amount of such radiation increases with temperature. Previous recording techniques have been not only crude but difficult and expensive. An unconventional thermal imaging system is described which gives superior temperature patterns and is also simpler and cheaper than any of the other available procedures. This system is based on the employment of thermally sensitive phosphors which glow when exposed to ultraviolet illumination, in inverse proportion to the underlying temperature. The thermal image can be directly observed or more critically analyzed and photographed on a simple closed-circuit television monitor. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14270208

  12. Evaluation of mean skin temperature formulas by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. K.; Miki, K.; Sagawa, S.; Shiraki, K.

    To study the reliabiliity of formulas for calculating mean skin temperature (Tsk), values were computed by 18 different techniques and were compared with the mean of 10,841 skin temperatures measured by infrared thermography. One hundred whole-body infrared thermograms were scanned in ten resting males while changing the air temperature from 40° C to 4° C. Local, regional average and mean skin temperatures were obtained using an image processing system. The agreement frequency, defined as the percentage of the calculated Tsk values which agreed with the corresponding infrared thermographic Tsk within +/-0.2° C, ranged for with the various formulas from 7% to 80%. In many sites, the local skin temperature did not coincide with the regional average skin temperature. When the local skin temperatures which showed the highest percentage similarity to the regional average skin temperature within +/-0.4° C were applied to the formula, the agreement frequency was markedly improved for all formulas. However, the agreement frequency was not affected by changing the weighting factors from specific constants to individually measured values of regional surface area. By applying the physiologically reliable accuracy range of +/-0.2° C in the moderate and +/-0.4° C in the cool condition, agreement frequencies of at least 95% were observed in formulas involving seven or more skin temperature measurement sites, including the hand and foot. We conclude that calculation of a reliable mean skin temperature must involve more than seven skin temperature measurement sites regardless of ambient temperature. Optimal sites for skin temperature measurement are proposed for various formulas.

  13. Treated-skin temperature regularities revealed by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Boris G.

    2001-03-01

    Experimental results disclosing temperature change of human skin affected by various unnatural factors are presented in detail. Thermograms are obtained with the IR thermograph containing high performance InAs CID FPA-based photosensitive unit. Using logarithmic scale of time, evolution of skin temperature after moistening, spirit sponging, and olive oil lubrication is investigated. A comparative analysis of the resulting effects of treatments including alpha-hydroxy acid, cosmetic regenerating cream, spirit, and water, is made. Quantitative distinctions between skin regions characterized by ordinary, and depleted blood supply, including areas located directly above surface main vessels, are revealed. Strongly logarithmic time- dependence of a skin temperature is discovered when the skin is cooled down after its preliminary heating with a hot wax. Non-monotonic change of a local temperature during electrically active procedure is described. Low level light therapy equipment is also applied. A special role of the temperature of nose is discussed.

  14. Skin Temperature Biofeedback in Children and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Steve; Loughry-Machado, Glenna

    1981-01-01

    Skin temperature biofeedback performance was studied in 38 6- to 10-year-old children and 38 of their parents across two sessions of audio biofeedback segments in which participants alternately attempted hand-warming and hand-cooling. Children were superior to adults in controlling skin temperature in the presence of biofeedback. (Author/DB)

  15. Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-07-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

  16. Correlated fluctuations of daytime skin temperature and vigilance.

    PubMed

    Romeijn, Nico; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2011-02-01

    Skin temperature shows spontaneous ultradian fluctuations during everyday-life wakefulness. Previous work showed that mild manipulations of skin temperature affect human sleep and vigilance, presumably by influencing neuronal systems involved in both thermal sensing and arousal regulation. We therefore examined whether fluctuations in skin temperature are associated with those in vigilance level under conditions similar to everyday-life situations requiring sustained attention. Eight healthy participants (30.1 ± 8.1 years, M ± SD) participated in a 2-day protocol, during which vigilance and skin temperature were assessed 4 times per day in a silent, dimly lit, temperature-controlled room. Vigilance was assessed by measuring reaction speed and lapses on a novel sustained vigilance task specifically designed to increase lapse rate and range of reaction times. Skin temperature was sampled at 30-second intervals from 3 locations: distal, intermediate, and proximal temperatures were obtained from the middle finger (T(finger) ), the wrist (T(wrist)), and the infraclavicular area (T(chest)), respectively. Furthermore, 3 distal to proximal gradients were calculated. Mixed-effect regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of the fluctuations in temperatures and gradients and those in response speed and lapse probability. Especially the spontaneous fluctuations in proximal temperature were negatively associated with fluctuations in response speed and positively with lapse rate. If individual T(chest) temperature ranges were classified into 10 deciles, they accounted for 23% of the variance in response speed and 11% of the variance in lapse rate. The findings indicate coupling between the spontaneous fluctuations in skin temperature and vigilance during the day and are compatible with the hypothesis of overlap in brain networks involved in the regulation of temperature and vigilance. From an applied point of view, especially proximal skin temperature

  17. Skin Temperature Recording with Phosphors

    PubMed Central

    Derse, Philip H.; Alt, Leslie L.

    1966-01-01

    In a previous communication in this journal, a method was described for converting invisible thermal patterns of the human skin into a detailed visible picture. At that time, the question of possible toxicity of the thermographic phosphor was raised. Toxicity studies conducted on laboratory animals indicate that the probability of toxic side reactions resulting from the use of zinc-cadmium sulfide phosphor spray is very low. PMID:5943198

  18. Skin and bulk temperature difference at Lake Tahoe: A case study on lake skin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. Chris; Hook, Simon J.; Schneider, Philipp; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2013-09-01

    water, infrared radiometers on satellites measure radiation leaving from the surface skin layer and therefore the retrieved temperature is representative of the skin layer. This is slightly different from the bulk layer deeper in the water where various floating thermometers take temperature measurements to validate satellite measurements. The difference between the bulk and skin temperature (skin effect) must be understood to properly validate schemes that use surface skin temperature to infer bulk temperatures. Further skin temperatures retrieved over inland waters may show different patterns to those retrieved over oceans due to differences in conditions such as wind speed, aerosols, and elevation. We have analyzed the differences between the skin and bulk temperatures at four permanent monitoring stations (buoys) located on Lake Tahoe since 1999 and compared the results with similar studies over the ocean typically obtained from boat cruises. Skin effect distributions were found to be consistent across the buoys; however, the diurnal behavior of the skin effect was slightly different and shown to be related to wind speed measured at an individual buoy. When wind speed was less than 2 m s-1, the skin temperature osclillated and greatly increased the uncertainty in the skin effect reported over Lake Tahoe. When downwelling sky radiation was increased from clouds or high humidity, this led to nighttime skin temperatures that were warmer than bulk temperatures by as much as 0.5 K. The size of the warm skin effect is larger than other ocean studies that observed warm nighttime skin values around 0.1 K. The nighttime skin effect was seen to be more consistent with a smaller standard deviation compared to the daytime skin effect. The nighttime skin behavior had a mean and standard deviation that ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 K and between 0.3 and 0.4 K, respectively. In contrast, daytime skin effect was strongly influenced by direct solar illumination and typically had a

  19. Laser-induced skin temperature oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podtaev, S.; Dumler, A.; Muravyov, N.; Myasnikov, M.; Tsiberkin, K.

    2010-11-01

    Adaptive wavelet analysis algorithms are used to study skin temperature oscillations caused by periodic changes in the blood flow resulting from oscillations in the vasomotor smooth muscle tone. Reduction in the amplitude of temperature fluctuations with frequency arises because the skin, owing to its low thermal diffusivity, has the properties of a lowfrequency filter. In view of their small amplitude, oscillations in the spectral range, reflecting the influence of heartbeat and respiration, cannot be distinguished from the external thermal noise. To analyze changes in oscillations of skin temperature during the laser stimulation (10 mW/cm2, 630 nm) we extract three frequency bands, corresponding to myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial vascular tone regulation mechanisms. Red laser irradiation causes temperature fluctuations changes within spectral ranges corresponding endothelial functioning and neurogenic activity.

  20. Thermistor holder for skin-temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Williams, B. A.

    1974-01-01

    Sensing head of thermistor probe is supported in center area of plastic ring which has tabs so that it can be anchored in place by rubber bands or adhesive tapes. Device attaches probes to human subjects practically, reliably, and without affecting characteristics of skin segment being measured.

  1. Second Skin Protection against Low Temperature Exposure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    against injurious effects from exposure to low temperatures. Vinyl plastisols with good viscosity stability have been developed. Accelerators are...of plasticol or silicone rubber foamed on the skin for thermal insulation and thin dense covering layer of plastisol or silicone rubber for abrasion resistance.

  2. Control of skin blood flow, sweating, and heart rate - Role of skin vs. core temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, C. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Johnson, J. M.; Rowell, L. B.; Niederberger, M.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to generate quantitative expressions for the influence of core temperature, skin temperature, and the rate of change of skin temperature on sweat rate, skin blood flow, and heart rate. A second goal of the study was to determine whether the use of esophageal temperature rather than the right atrial temperature as a measure of core temperature would lead to different conclusions about the control of measured effector variables.

  3. High skin temperature and hypohydration impair aerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Michael N; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    This paper reviews the roles of hot skin (>35°C) and body water deficits (>2% body mass; hypohydration) in impairing submaximal aerobic performance. Hot skin is associated with high skin blood flow requirements and hypohydration is associated with reduced cardiac filling, both of which act to reduce aerobic reserve. In euhydrated subjects, hot skin alone (with a modest core temperature elevation) impairs submaximal aerobic performance. Conversely, aerobic performance is sustained with core temperatures >40°C if skin temperatures are cool-warm when euhydrated. No study has demonstrated that high core temperature (∼40°C) alone, without coexisting hot skin, will impair aerobic performance. In hypohydrated subjects, aerobic performance begins to be impaired when skin temperatures exceed 27°C, and even warmer skin exacerbates the aerobic performance impairment (-1.5% for each 1°C skin temperature). We conclude that hot skin (high skin blood flow requirements from narrow skin temperature to core temperature gradients), not high core temperature, is the 'primary' factor impairing aerobic exercise performance when euhydrated and that hypohydration exacerbates this effect.

  4. Effect of tap-water iontophoresis on sweat gland recruitment, skin temperature and skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kolkhorst, Fred W; DiPasquale, Dana M; Buono, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    Our interest was to quantify the role of sweat gland activation on the maintenance of skin temperature during mild exercise in the heat. Seven days of tap-water iontophoresis decreased the number of active sweat glands by 72% which significantly increased forearm skin temperature and blood flow during mild exercise (70 W) in the heat (32 degrees C). Skin temperature of the treated forearm was 0.5 degrees C warmer (P=0.049); skin blood flow in the treated forearm was 13% higher than the control arm (P=0.021). These results illustrate the importance of sweat evaporation on skin temperature and blood flow during exercise.

  5. Evaluation of Skin Temperatures Retrieved from GOES-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Ronnie, J.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Lapenta, W. M.; Haines, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Skin temperatures derived from geostationary satellites have the potential of providing the temporal and spatial resolution needed for model assimilation. To adequately assess the potential improvements in numerical model forecasts that can be made by assimilating satellite data, an estimate of the accuracy of the skin temperature product is necessary. A particular skin temperature algorithm, the Physical Split Window Technique, that uses the longwave infrared channels of the GOES Imager has shown promise in recent model assimilation studies to provide land surface temperatures with reasonable accuracy. A comparison of retrieved GOES-8 skin temperatures from this algorithm with in situ measurements is presented. Various retrieval algorithm issues are addressed including surface emissivity

  6. Liquid crystal skin thermometry: an accurate reflection of core temperature?

    PubMed

    Brull, S J; Cunningham, A J; Connelly, N R; O'Connor, T Z; Silverman, D G

    1993-04-01

    Oesophageal, rectal, bladder, tympanic and pulmonary artery sites are used intraoperatively to measure body temperature. However, the temperatures measured at each site have different physiological and practical importance. The present two-part study sought to compare liquid crystal (CR) skin temperature with other temperature monitors which are used routinely during surgery. The first part compared CR with oesophageal (OS) temperature during general inhalational anaesthesia. The second part compared CR with OS, pulmonary artery (PA), and bladder (BL) temperatures during the periods of rapid temperature change associated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). During the first part, the mean difference between OS and CR was -0.14 +/- 0.85 degrees C; this difference remained consistent over time (P < 0.05 by repeated measures analysis of variance). During the second part, the difference in temperature readings between CR and each of the other monitors remained consistent except for CR vs PA and CR vs OS during the cooling period of CPB, when the iced cardioplegia slush directly affected the PA and OS temperatures. This study suggests that CR, an inexpensive and noninvasive means of temperature monitoring, reflects trends in temperature changes in the clinical setting.

  7. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  8. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-23

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one's thermal environment.

  9. Comparability of skin temperatures from three sites on the hand.

    PubMed

    Duckro, P N; Schultz, K; Shaffer, F

    1986-12-01

    Skin temperature from three recording sites (web dorsum and two digital sites) on one hand were compared over a 30-minute period during which room temperature was raised from 66 degrees to 80 degrees F causing skin temperatures to range from 78.5 degrees to 92.3 degrees F. The web dorsum remained significantly warmer than either digital site at the lowest skin temperatures; no significant inter-site differences were seen as skin temperature gradually increased. These findings imply that none of the three sites is more advantageous than the others when recording hand temperature values around or above 85 degrees F. However, at the lower levels of skin temperature, there is a "floor" below which the web dorsum is no longer a sensitive indicator. More generally, basic data of this type provide a necessary but often absent foundation for routine practice of clinical biofeedback.

  10. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  11. Therapeutic Magnets Do Not Affect Tissue Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Kathleen B.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Swez, John A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Manufacturers of commercially available “therapeutic” magnets claim that these magnets cause physiologic thermal effects that promote tissue healing. We conducted this study to determine if skin or intramuscular temperatures differed among magnet, sham, and control treatments during 60 minutes of application to the quadriceps muscle. Design and Setting: A 3 × 3 mixed-model, factorial design with repeated measures on both independent variables was used. The first independent variable, application duration, had 3 random levels (20, 40, and 60 minutes). The second independent variable, treatment, had 3 fixed levels (magnet, sham, and control). The dependent variable was tissue temperature (°C). Measurement depth served as a control variable, with 2 levels: skin and 1 cm below the fat layer. Data were collected in a thermoneutral laboratory setting and analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Subjects: The study included 13 healthy student volunteers (8 men, 5 women; age, 20.5 ± 0.9 years; height, 176.8 ± 10.4 cm; weight, 73.8 ± 11.8 kg; anterior thigh skinfold thickness, 16.9 ± 6.5 mm). Measurements: Temperatures were measured at 30-second intervals using surface and implantable thermocouples. Temperature data at 20, 40, and 60 minutes were used for analysis. Each subject received all 3 treatments on different days. Results: Neither skin nor intramuscular temperatures were different across the 3 treatments at any time. For both skin and intramuscular temperatures, a statistically significant but not clinically meaningful temperature increase (less than 1°C), was observed over time within treatments, but this increase was similar in all treatment groups. Conclusions: No meaningful thermal effect was observed with any treatment over time, and treatments did not differ from each other. We conclude that flexible therapeutic magnets were not effective for increasing skin or deep temperatures, contradicting one of the fundamental claims

  12. Breathable and Stretchable Temperature Sensors Inspired by Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Lu, Bingwei; Chen, Yihao; Feng, Xue

    2015-06-01

    Flexible electronics attached to skin for healthcare, such as epidermal electronics, has to struggle with biocompatibility and adapt to specified environment of skin with respect to breath and perspiration. Here, we report a strategy for biocompatible flexible temperature sensors, inspired by skin, possessing the excellent permeability of air and high quality of water-proof by using semipermeable film with porous structures as substrate. We attach such temperature sensors to underarm and forearm to measure the axillary temperature and body surface temperature respectively. The volunteer wears such sensors for 24 hours with two times of shower and the in vitro test shows no sign of maceration or stimulation to the skin. Especially, precise temperature changes on skin surface caused by flowing air and water dropping are also measured to validate the accuracy and dynamical response. The results show that the biocompatible temperature sensor is soft and breathable on the human skin and has the excellent accuracy compared to mercury thermometer. This demonstrates the possibility and feasibility of fully using the sensors in long term body temperature sensing for medical use as well as sensing function of artificial skin for robots or prosthesis.

  13. Breathable and Stretchable Temperature Sensors Inspired by Skin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lu, Bingwei; Chen, Yihao; Feng, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Flexible electronics attached to skin for healthcare, such as epidermal electronics, has to struggle with biocompatibility and adapt to specified environment of skin with respect to breath and perspiration. Here, we report a strategy for biocompatible flexible temperature sensors, inspired by skin, possessing the excellent permeability of air and high quality of water-proof by using semipermeable film with porous structures as substrate. We attach such temperature sensors to underarm and forearm to measure the axillary temperature and body surface temperature respectively. The volunteer wears such sensors for 24 hours with two times of shower and the in vitro test shows no sign of maceration or stimulation to the skin. Especially, precise temperature changes on skin surface caused by flowing air and water dropping are also measured to validate the accuracy and dynamical response. The results show that the biocompatible temperature sensor is soft and breathable on the human skin and has the excellent accuracy compared to mercury thermometer. This demonstrates the possibility and feasibility of fully using the sensors in long term body temperature sensing for medical use as well as sensing function of artificial skin for robots or prosthesis. PMID:26095941

  14. Characterizing human skin blood flow regulation in response to different local skin temperature perturbations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Nieuwenhoff, M D; Huygen, F J P M; van der Helm, F C T; Niehof, S; Schouten, A C

    2017-05-01

    Small nerve fibers regulate local skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbations. Small nerve fiber function is difficult to assess with classical neurophysiological tests. In this study, a vasomotor response model in combination with a heating protocol was developed to quantitatively characterize the control mechanism of small nerve fibers in regulating skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbation. The skin of healthy subjects' hand dorsum (n=8) was heated to 42°C with an infrared lamp, and then naturally cooled down. The distance between the lamp and the hand was set to three different levels in order to change the irradiation intensity on the skin and implement three different skin temperature rise rates (0.03°C/s, 0.02°C/s and 0.01°C/s). A laser Doppler imager (LDI) and a thermographic video camera recorded the temporal profile of the skin blood flow and the skin temperature, respectively. The relationship between the skin blood flow and the skin temperature was characterized by a vasomotor response model. The model fitted the skin blood flow response well with a variance accounted for (VAF) between 78% and 99%. The model parameters suggested a similar mechanism for the skin blood flow regulation with the thermal perturbations at 0.03°C/s and 0.02°C/s. But there was an accelerated skin vasoconstriction after a slow heating (0.01°C/s) (p-value<0.05). An attenuation of the skin vasodilation was also observed in four out of the seven subjects during the slow heating (0.01°C/s). Our method provides a promising way to quantitatively assess the function of small nerve fibers non-invasively and non-contact.

  15. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease.

  16. Ice-water hand immersion causes a reflex decrease in skin temperature in the contralateral hand.

    PubMed

    Isii, Youzou; Matsukawa, Kanji; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Nakamoto, Tomoko

    2007-08-01

    Cutaneous receptors stimulated by ice-water immersion of one hand will increase sympathetic nerve activity to the palm skin in the nonimmersed contralateral hand and reduce blood flow, reflecting on a decrease in skin surface temperature under a constant ambient environment. To test the hypothesis that gender might affect the contralateral vasoconstrictor response, we analyzed the spatiotemporal pattern of palm skin surface temperature during ice-water immersion for 10 min using thermography in eight males and eight females. As soon as the left hand was immersed in ice-water, palm skin temperature in the nonimmersed right hand quickly decreased in all subjects, particularly in the periphery of the digits and palm. The reduction in skin temperature was short-lasting in 63% of males and 38% of females, but it lasted throughout immersion in the remaining subjects. The average decrease in palm skin temperature was not significantly different between males and females, though it tended to be greater in males. The mean arterial blood pressure significantly increased and heart rate decreased during immersion in males, whereas no substantial cardiovascular changes were observed in females. Cold sensation was well coincident with the appearance of a reduction in the palm skin temperature. In consideration of all these results, we suggest that cutaneous cold stimuli increased skin sympathetic nerve activity in the nonimmersed hand and reduced skin blood flow. We also contend that gender difference in the contralateral vasoconstrictor response was denied because the time course and magnitude of the decrease in palm skin temperature were not different between males and females.

  17. Correlation analysis on alpha attenuation and nasal skin temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Akio; Tacano, Munecazu

    2009-01-01

    Some serious accidents caused by declines in arousal level, such as traffic accidents and mechanical control mistakes, have become issues of social concern. The physiological index obtained by human body measurement is expected to offer a leading tool for evaluating arousal level as an objective indicator. In this study, declines in temporal arousal levels were evaluated by nasal skin temperature. As arousal level declines, sympathetic nervous activity is decreased and blood flow in peripheral vessels is increased. Since peripheral vessels exist just under the skin on the fingers and nose, the psychophysiological state can be judged from the displacement of skin temperature caused by changing blood flow volume. Declining arousal level is expected to be observable as a temperature rise in peripheral parts of the body. The objective of this experiment was to obtain assessment criteria for judging declines in arousal level by nasal skin temperature using the alpha attenuation coefficient (AAC) of electroencephalography (EEG) as a reference benchmark. Furthermore, a psychophysical index of sleepiness was also measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Correlations between nasal skin temperature index and EEG index were analyzed. AAC and maximum displacement of nasal skin temperature displayed a clear negative correlation, with a correlation coefficient of -0.55.

  18. Effect of Acupuncture Manipulations at LI4 or LI11 on Blood Flow and Skin Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihui; Ahn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture induces physiological changes, and patients have reported warm or cool sensations with "Burning Fire" (BF) or "Penetrating Cool" (PC) manipulations. This study aimed to evaluate whether these techniques had distinct effects on skin temperature and blood flow and to examine whether skin temperature correlated with blood flow. The participants were 25 healthy volunteers, each receiving acupuncture manipulations on points LI4 and LI11 bilaterally. Skin temperatures and blood flow were recorded continuously on both arms. The study found that acupuncture significantly increased skin temperature on the needling arm by 0.3514°C on average, but decreased it on the contralateral arm by 0.2201°C on average. Blood flow decreased significantly in both arms during needling (-3.4% and -5.97% for the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides, respectively), but the changes in skin temperature did not correlate with the changes in blood flow. Furthermore, these changes were not significantly different between acupuncture techniques and acupuncture points. In conclusion, acupuncture changes local skin temperature and blood flow independent of the manipulation technique. Moreover, blood flow may not be affected by the increased temperature on the needling arm. These results help to verify traditional Chinese medicine concepts and may help in establishing standards for acupuncture treatments.

  19. Effects of pressure, cold and gloves on hand skin temperature and manual performance of divers.

    PubMed

    Zander, Joanna; Morrison, James

    2008-09-01

    Cold water immersion and protective gloves are associated with decreased manual performance. Although neoprene gloves slow hand cooling, there is little information on whether they provide sufficient protection when diving in cold water. Nine divers wearing three-fingered neoprene gloves and dry suits were immersed in water at 25 and 4 degrees C, at depths of 0.4 msw (101 kPa altitude adjusted) and 40 msw (497 kPa) in a hyperbaric chamber. Skin temperatures were measured at the fingers, hand, forearm, chest and head. Grip strength, tactile sensitivity and manual dexterity were measured at three time intervals. There was an exponential decay in finger and back of hand skin temperatures with exposure time in 4 degrees C water. Finger and back of hand skin temperatures were lower at 40 msw than at 0.4 msw (P < 0.05). There was no effect of pressure or temperature on grip strength. Tactile sensitivity decreased linearly with finger skin temperature at both pressures. Manual dexterity was not affected by finger skin temperature at 0.4 msw, but decreased with fall in finger skin temperature at 40 msw. Results show that neoprene gloves do not provide adequate thermal protection in 4 degrees C water and that impairment of manual performance is dependent on the type of task, depth and exposure time.

  20. Seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Sadibolova, Renata; Longo, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Vision of the body, even when non-informative about stimulation, affects somatosensory processing. We investigated whether seeing the body also modulates autonomic control in the periphery by measuring skin temperature while manipulating vision. Using a mirror box, the skin temperature was measured from left hand dorsum while participants: (i) had the illusion of seeing their left hand, (ii) had the illusion of seeing an object at the same location or (iii) looked directly at their contralateral right hand. Skin temperature of the left hand increased when participants had the illusion of directly seeing that hand but not in the other two view conditions. In experiment 2, participants viewed directly their left or right hand, or the box while we recorded both hand dorsum temperatures. Temperature increased in the viewed hand but not the contralateral hand. These results show that seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of thermal regulation.

  1. Skin Temperature Measurements on Small Bodies of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2002-11-26

    The temperature of the top millimeter of a water surface is generally a few tenths of a degree Celsius cooler than the 'bulk' temperature, i.e., the temperature approximately 1 meter deep, which is routinely measured by buoys and ships. This is because of a daytime temperature gradient between the bulk location and the surface, and because of the thin skin at the surface. This difference is important for climate and weather forecasting because of the atmospheric forcing by the oceans.

  2. THERMAL COMFORT IN RELATION TO MEAN SKIN TEMPERATURE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Nude men were exposed to a range of ambient temperatures and were brought to a condition of thermal comfort by adjustment of the incident radiation...was evident that mean skin temperature, per se, was not a dependable criterion of thermal comfort . (Author)

  3. NONINVASIVE, CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF RAT TAIL SKIN TEMPERATURE BY RADIOTELEMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tail skin temperature (Tsk) can provide a wealth of information on the thermoregulatory status of the rat. Drug- and toxic-induced changes in body temperature are often mediated by vasodilation or constriction of blood flow to the tail and Tsk can generally be used as an indica...

  4. Effects of graduated compression stockings on skin temperature after running.

    PubMed

    Priego Quesada, J I; Lucas-Cuevas, A G; Gil-Calvo, M; Giménez, J V; Aparicio, I; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, R M; Salvador Palmer, R; Llana-Belloch, S; Pérez-Soriano, P

    2015-08-01

    High skin temperatures reduce the thermal gradient between the core and the skin and they can lead to a reduction in performance and increased risk of injury. Graduated compression stockings have become popular among runners in the last years and their use may influence the athlete's thermoregulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of graduated compression stockings on skin temperature during running in a moderate indoor environment. Forty-four runners performed two running tests lasting 30min (10min of warm-up and 20min at 75% of their maximal aerobic speed) with and without graduated compressive stockings. Skin temperature was measured in 12 regions of interest on the lower limb by infrared thermography before and after running. Heart rate and perception of fatigue were assessed during the last minute of the running test. Compression stockings resulted in greater increase of temperature (p=0.002 and ES=2.2, 95% CI [0.11-0.45°C]) not only in the body regions in contact (tibialis anterior, ankle anterior and gastrocnemius) but also in the body regions that were not in contact with the garment (vastus lateralis, abductor and semitendinosus). No differences were observed between conditions in heart rate and perception of fatigue (p>0.05 and ES<0.8). In conclusion, running with graduated compression stockings produces a greater increase of skin temperature without modifying the athlete's heart rate and perception of fatigue.

  5. Skin Temperature Processes in the Presence of Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, S. E.; Zappa, C. J.; Brown, S.; McGillis, W. R.; Loose, B.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring the sea-ice margins of polar oceans and understanding the physical processes at play at the ice-ocean-air interface is essential in the perspective of a changing climate in which we face an accelerated decline of ice caps and sea ice. Remote sensing and in particular InfraRed (IR) imaging offer a unique opportunity not only to observe physical processes at sea-ice margins, but also to measure air-sea exchanges near ice. It permits monitoring ice and ocean temperature variability, and can be used for derivation of surface flow field allowing investigating turbulence and shearing at the ice-ocean interface as well as ocean-atmosphere gas transfer. Here we present experiments conducted with the aim of gaining an insight on how the presence of sea ice affects the momentum exchange between the atmosphere and ocean and investigate turbulence production in the interplay of ice-water shear, convection, waves and wind. A set of over 200 high resolution IR imagery records was taken at the US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL, Hanover NH) under varying ice coverage, fan and pump settings. In situ instruments provided air and water temperature, salinity, subsurface currents and wave height. Air side profiling provided environmental parameters such as wind speed, humidity and heat fluxes. The study aims to investigate what can be gained from small-scale high-resolution IR imaging of the ice-ocean-air interface; in particular how sea ice modulates local physics and gas transfer. The relationship between water and ice temperatures with current and wind will be addressed looking at the ocean and ice temperature variance. Various skin temperature and gas transfer parameterizations will be evaluated at ice margins under varying environmental conditions. Furthermore the accuracy of various techniques used to determine surface flow will be assessed from which turbulence statistics will be determined. This will give an insight on how ice presence

  6. Incisions for cochlear implant flaps and superficial skin temperature. Skin temperature/blood circulation in CI flaps.

    PubMed

    Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Sievert, Uwe; Graumüller, Sylke; Wild, Ernst

    2004-01-01

    Healing and integration of a cochlear implant is largely influenced by good blood circulation in the covering skin, which, on the other hand, is closely correlated to skin temperature. Measuring superficial flap temperatures by thermography is an easy way to get some clues about the corresponding blood supply. These data should allow some implications for the design of skin flaps in cochlear implant surgery. In 15 patients thermography was carried out prior to and after cochlear implantation, using the Agema 550 Thermovision system. It was evident, that the anatomic courses of the major superficial arteries were represented by areas of increased temperature. The pattern of temperature distribution may allow some conclusions concerning site and shape of surgical incisions. From our data we concluded, that most types of incisions do not interfere too much with the arterial blood supply. However, some types like the extended retroauricular C-incision may eventually cause problems. Our data suggest, that the straight or slightly curved vertical retroauricular incision causes the least impairment of blood circulation. After surgery, directly along the incisions (and later along the scars) temperature was diminished, indicating reduced blood circulation. In our series, the thickness of the implant did not impede blood circulation significantly. So far, we could not examine patients with local circulation disorders. Probably local scars, skin atrophies, angiopathies etc. may present typical patterns of temperature distribution, which require individual design of skin flaps. Thermography is an easy method which can give impressions of local blood circulation in skin flaps. If the courses of the major arteries and their branches are respected, blood circulation within the flap should not be problematic. Thermography is likely to help designing optimal flaps in cases with impeded blood circulation e.g. by pre-existing scar formations.

  7. Fingertip skin-inspired microstructured ferroelectric skins discriminate static/dynamic pressure and temperature stimuli.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghwa; Kim, Marie; Lee, Youngoh; Lee, Heon Sang; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2015-10-01

    In human fingertips, the fingerprint patterns and interlocked epidermal-dermal microridges play a critical role in amplifying and transferring tactile signals to various mechanoreceptors, enabling spatiotemporal perception of various static and dynamic tactile signals. Inspired by the structure and functions of the human fingertip, we fabricated fingerprint-like patterns and interlocked microstructures in ferroelectric films, which can enhance the piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and piezoresistive sensing of static and dynamic mechanothermal signals. Our flexible and microstructured ferroelectric skins can detect and discriminate between multiple spatiotemporal tactile stimuli including static and dynamic pressure, vibration, and temperature with high sensitivities. As proof-of-concept demonstration, the sensors have been used for the simultaneous monitoring of pulse pressure and temperature of artery vessels, precise detection of acoustic sounds, and discrimination of various surface textures. Our microstructured ferroelectric skins may find applications in robotic skins, wearable sensors, and medical diagnostic devices.

  8. The effects of sodium oxybate on core body and skin temperature regulation in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Pijl, Hanno; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert J; Van Someren, Eus J W; Fronczek, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering from narcolepsy type 1 show altered skin temperatures, resembling the profile that is related to sleep onset in healthy controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of sodium oxybate, a widely used drug to treat narcolepsy, on the 24-h profiles of temperature and sleep-wakefulness in patients with narcolepsy and controls. Eight hypocretin-deficient male narcolepsy type 1 patients and eight healthy matched controls underwent temperature measurement of core body and proximal and distal skin twice, and the sleep-wake state for 24 h. After the baseline assessment, 2 × 3 g of sodium oxybate was administered for 5 nights, immediately followed by the second assessment. At baseline, daytime core body temperature and proximal skin temperature were significantly lower in patients with narcolepsy (core: 36.8 ± 0.05 °C versus 37.0 ± 0.05 °C, F = 8.31, P = 0.01; proximal: 33.4 ± 0.26 °C versus 34.3 ± 0.26 °C, F = 5.66, P = 0.03). In patients, sodium oxybate administration increased proximal skin temperature during the day (F = 6.46, P = 0.04) to a level similar as in controls, but did not affect core body temperature, distal temperature or distal-proximal temperature gradient. Sodium oxybate administration normalised the predictive value of distal skin temperature and distal-proximal temperature gradient for the onset of daytime naps (P < 0.01). In conclusion, sodium oxybate administration resulted in a partial normalisation of the skin temperature profile, by increasing daytime proximal skin temperature, and by strengthening the known relationship between skin temperature and daytime sleep propensity. These changes seem to be related to the clinical improvement induced by sodium oxybate treatment. A causal relationship is not proven.

  9. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm – Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable. PMID:27695626

  10. Recipient Wound Bed Characteristics Affect Scarring and Skin Graft Contraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-13

    skin grafting onto hypodermis vs. onto fascia. Compared to autografts grafted onto fascia, identical thickness autografts grafted onto fat demonstrated...reduced contraction, enhanced mobility and vascularity, and reduced topographical variability. Grafts onto fat also showed reduced levels of...skin grafts onto fat report better range of motion compared with patients who receive skin grafts directly onto fascia.3 The same study also found that

  11. Uptake of topically applied 5-aminolevulinic acid and production of protoporphyrin IX in normal mouse skin: dependence on skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Juzenas, P; Sørensen, R; Iani, V; Moan, J

    1999-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the uptake phase of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and the following production phase of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in normal mouse skin was investigated. A cream containing 20% ALA was topically applied on the skin for 10 min. The amount of ALA-induced PpIX was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence of PpIX from the treated skin. No measurable amount of PpIX was found in the skin immediately after 10 min application of ALA. The penetration of ALA into the skin was almost temperature independent while the following production of PpIX was found to be a strongly temperature-dependent process. Practically no PpIX was formed in the skin as long as skin temperature was kept low (12 degrees C).

  12. Temperature Affects Fatty Acids In Methylococcus Capsulatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    According to report, temperature of growth of thermotolerant, methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) affects both proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and cis/trans ratio of these acids in cell membrane. Because suboptimum growth temperature is potential stress factor, it may be possible to use such cis/trans ratios as indices of stresses upon methane-oxidizing microbial communities. Research in microbiology of methanotrophs increasing because of possible commercial exploitation of these organisms as biocatalysts or as sources of useful polymers; knowledge of effect of temperature on ability of methanotrophs to utilize methane useful in optimization of conditions of growth.

  13. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Levels, Koen; de Koning, Jos J; Foster, Carl; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-09-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling time trial. Thirteen well-trained male subjects performed a 7.5-km cycling time trial at 15°C and 50% relative humidity (CONTROL), with radiative heat stress during the time trial, and with (PRECOOL) or without (HEAT) precooling. Heat stress was applied by infrared heaters positioned in front of the cycle ergometer between 1.5 and 6.0 km. Skin, rectal, and pill temperature, power output, heart rate, and RPE were measured during the trial. Despite the lower mean skin temperature at the start of the time trial for PRECOOL compared to HEAT (-2.1 ± 0.7°C; P < 0.01) and CONTROL (-1.8 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.05), and a greater increase in mean skin temperature during the heat stress period for PRECOOL (4.5 ± 1.0°C) and HEAT (3.9 ± 0.8°C) than for CONTROL (-0.3 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.01), no differences in power output were found between HEAT (273 ± 45 W) and CONTROL (284 ± 43 W; P = 0.11) and between HEAT and PRECOOL (266 ± 50 W; P = 0.47). Power output during the time trial was greater for CONTROL than for PRECOOL (P < 0.05). Additionally, no differences were observed in core temperature measures, HR, and RPE. Skin temperature does not affect the selection and modulation of exercise intensity in a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

  14. The effect of change in skin temperature due to evaporative cooling on sweating response during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kondo, N; Nakadome, M; Zhang, K; Shiojiri, T; Shibasaki, M; Hirata, K; Iwata, A

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are any effects of skin temperature changes on sweating response in the first few minutes of mild exercise. Six healthy males performed a bicycle exercise at 100 W (50 rpm) for 30 min under an ambient temperature of 23 degrees C (40% RH). Esophageal temperature (Tes), mean skin temperature (Tsk), local skin temperature at the lower left scapula (Tsl), local sweating rate (Msw) and cutaneous blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were measured continuously. Although Tsl decreased markedly just after the onset of sweating, Tsk did not change. Msw did not increase constantly in the early stages of exercise, and there was a temporary interruption in the increase of Msw. This interruption in sweating was affected by the rate of change in Tsl rather than by the absolute value of Tsl, since there was a positive and significant correlation between the time of the interruption in the increase of Msw and the rate of decrease in Tsl (y = 6.47 x +0.04; r = 0.86, P < 0.05). The results suggest that sweating response in the early stages of exercise may be influenced by changes in local skin temperature due to evaporative cooling.

  15. The effect of change in skin temperature due to evaporative cooling on sweating response during exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, N.; Nakadome, Manabu; Zhang, Keren; Shiojiri, Tomoyuki; Shibasaki, Manabu; Hirata, Kozo; Iwata, Atsushi

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are any effects of skin temperature changes on sweating response in the first few minutes of mild exercise. Six healthy males performed a bicycle exercise at 100 W (50 rpm) for 30 min under an ambient temperature of 23° C (40% RH). Esophageal temperature (Tes), mean skin temperature (T-sk), local skin temperature at the lower left scapula (Tsl), local sweating rate (M.sw), and cutaneous blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were measured continuously. Although Tsl decreased markedly just after the onset of sweating, T-sk did not change. M.sw did not increase constantly in the early stages of exercise, and there was a temporary interruption in the increase of M.sw. This interruption in sweating was affected by the rate of change in Tsl rather than by the absolute value of Tsl, since there was a positive and significant correlation between the time of the interruption in the increase of M.sw and the rate of decrease in Tsl (y=6.47x+0.04; r=0.86, P<0.05). The results suggest that sweating response in the early stages of exercise may be influenced by changes in local skin temperature due to evaporative cooling.

  16. Multicenter study on the asymmetry of skin temperature in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chan Woo; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Choi, Eunjoo; Lee, Pyung-Bok; Jang, In-Ki; Lee, Chul Joong; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract According to the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) and American Medical Association (AMA), the diagnostic criteria for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) require the presence of skin temperature asymmetry. In CRPS, it is generally accepted that the temperature of skin of affected limbs changes from warm to cold; however, in our clinical practice, we have experienced many cases with different thermographic characteristics. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective multicenter study that examined the distribution of skin temperature in patients with CRPS and skin temperature asymmetry versus symptom duration. Patients diagnosed with type 1 or 2 CRPS were recruited. After confirming CRPS according to the IASP diagnostic criteria, infrared thermographic images were evaluated for skin temperature differences (ΔT) between the affected and unaffected limbs. A total of 296 patients with CRPS were included in this study. The median duration of symptoms was 6 months and the mean ± standard deviation of ΔT was –0.72 ± 1.65°C. A skin temperature difference between bilateral limbs (|ΔT|) of 1°C or less was seen in 131 patients (44.3%); thus, these 131 patients did not meet the IASP criteria for CRPS. Further, cool skin temperature was not observed in 88 patients (29.7%), meaning that these patients did not meet the AMA criteria for CRPS. There was no correlation between the symptom duration and ΔT (Spearman's rho = –0.075, P = 0.196) and there was no significant difference in the average ΔT among the 4 symptom duration groups (0–3 months, 4–6 months, 7–12 months, >12 months, P = 0.08). In conclusion, a considerable proportion of the patients that participated in this study did not meet the thermal criteria set forth by the IASP and AMA. Further, there was no correlation between symptom duration and skin temperature difference. PMID:28033251

  17. Factors affecting skin tannin extractability in ripening grapes.

    PubMed

    Bindon, Keren A; Madani, S Hadi; Pendleton, Phillip; Smith, Paul A; Kennedy, James A

    2014-02-05

    The acetone-extractable (70% v/v) skin tannin content of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon grapes was found to increase during late-stage ripening. Conversely, skin tannin content determined following ethanol extraction (10, 20, and 50% v/v) did not consistently reflect this trend. The results indicated that a fraction of tannin became less extractable in aqueous ethanol during ripening. Skin cell walls were observed to become more porous during ripening, which may facilitate the sequestering of tannin as an adsorbed fraction within cell walls. For ethanol extracts, tannin molecular mass increased with advancing ripeness, even when extractable tannin content was constant, but this effect was negligible in acetone extracts. Reconstitution experiments with isolated skin tannin and cell wall material indicated that the selectivity of tannin adsorption by cell walls changed as tannin concentration increased. Tannin concentration, tannin molecular mass, and cell wall porosity are discussed as factors that may influence skin tannin extractability.

  18. The effect of environmental humidity and temperature on skin barrier function and dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, K A; Johansen, J D; Kezic, S; Linneberg, A; Thyssen, J P

    2016-02-01

    Physicians are aware that climatic conditions negatively affect the skin. In particular, people living in equator far countries such as the Northern parts of Europe and North America are exposed to harsh weather during the winter and may experience dry and itchy skin, or deterioration of already existing dermatoses. We searched the literature for studies that evaluated the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Commonly used meteorological terms such as absolute humidity, relative humidity and dew point are explained. Furthermore, we review the negative effect of low humidity, low temperatures and different seasons on the skin barrier and on the risk of dermatitis. We conclude that low humidity and low temperatures lead to a general decrease in skin barrier function and increased susceptible towards mechanical stress. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol are released by keratinocytes, and the number of dermal mast cells increases, the skin also becomes more reactive towards skin irritants and allergens. Collectively, published data show that cold and dry weather increase the prevalence and risk of flares in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  19. Skin temperature reveals the intensity of acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Herborn, Katherine A.; Graves, James L.; Jerem, Paul; Evans, Neil P.; Nager, Ruedi; McCafferty, Dominic J.; McKeegan, Dorothy E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute stress triggers peripheral vasoconstriction, causing a rapid, short-term drop in skin temperature in homeotherms. We tested, for the first time, whether this response has the potential to quantify stress, by exhibiting proportionality with stressor intensity. We used established behavioural and hormonal markers: activity level and corticosterone level, to validate a mild and more severe form of an acute restraint stressor in hens (Gallus gallus domesticus). We then used infrared thermography (IRT) to non-invasively collect continuous temperature measurements following exposure to these two intensities of acute handling stress. In the comb and wattle, two skin regions with a known thermoregulatory role, stressor intensity predicted the extent of initial skin cooling, and also the occurrence of a more delayed skin warming, providing two opportunities to quantify stress. With the present, cost-effective availability of IRT technology, this non-invasive and continuous method of stress assessment in unrestrained animals has the potential to become common practice in pure and applied research. PMID:26434785

  20. Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation colour affect perceived human health.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Ian D; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice.

  1. Fate of chemicals in skin after dermal application: does the in vitro skin reservoir affect the estimate of systemic absorption?

    PubMed

    Yourick, Jeffrey J; Koenig, Michael L; Yourick, Debra L; Bronaugh, Robert L

    2004-03-15

    Recent international guidelines for the conduct of in vitro skin absorption studies put forward different approaches for addressing the status of chemicals remaining in the stratum corneum and epidermis/dermis at the end of a study. The present study investigated the fate of three chemicals [dihydroxyacetone (DHA), 7-(2H-naphtho[1,2-d]triazol-2-yl)-3-phenylcoumarin (7NTPC), and disperse blue 1 (DB1)] in an in vitro absorption study. In these studies, human and fuzzy rat skin penetration and absorption were determined over 24 or 72 h in flow-through diffusion cells. Skin penetration of these chemicals resulted in relatively low receptor fluid levels but high skin levels. For DHA, penetration studies found approximately 22% of the applied dose remaining in the skin (in both the stratum corneum and viable tissue) as a reservoir after 24 h. Little of the DHA that penetrates into skin is actually available to become systemically absorbed. 7NTPC remaining in the skin after 24 h was approximately 14.7% of the applied dose absorbed. Confocal laser cytometry studies with 7NTPC showed that it is present across skin in mainly the epidermis and dermis with intense fluorescence around hair. For DB1, penetration studies found approximately 10% (ethanol vehicle) and 3% (formulation vehicle) of the applied dose localized in mainly the stratum corneum after 24 h. An extended absorption study (72 h) revealed that little additional DB1 was absorbed into the receptor fluid. Skin levels should not be considered as absorbed material for DHA or DB1, while 7NTPC requires further investigation. These studies illustrate the importance of determining the fate of chemicals remaining in skin, which could significantly affect the estimates of systemically available material to be used in exposure estimates. We recommend that a more conclusive means to determine the fate of skin levels is to perform an extended study as conducted for DB1.

  2. The relationship between local scalp skin temperature and cutaneous perfusion during scalp cooling.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Francis-Paul E M; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Gerard M J; van Steenhoven, Anton A

    2007-08-01

    Cooling the scalp during administration of chemotherapy can prevent hair loss. It reduces both skin blood flow and hair follicle temperature, thus affecting drug supply and drug effect in the hair follicle. The extent to which these mechanisms contribute to the hair preservative effect of scalp cooling remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between local scalp skin temperature and cutaneous blood flow during scalp cooling. We measured skin temperature and cutaneous perfusion during a cooling and re-warming experiment. Experiments on a single subject showed that the measurements were reproducible and that the response was identical for the two positions that were measured. Inter-subject variability was investigated on nine subjects. We found that for the first 10 degrees C of cooling, perfusion of the scalp skin decreases to below 40%. Perfusion can be further reduced to below 30% by a few degrees more cooling, but a plateau is reached after that. We found that a generally accepted relation in thermal physiology between temperature and perfusion (i.e. Q(10) relation) does not describe the data well, but we found an alternative relation that describes the average behavior significantly better.

  3. Sleep and Skin Temperature in Preschool Children and Their Mothers.

    PubMed

    Okamoto-Mizuno, Kazue; Mizuno, Koh; Shirakawa, Shuichiro

    2016-05-11

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare sleep and skin temperature (Tsk) of preschool children with those of their mothers. The subjects included 18 pairs of preschool children and their mothers. The actigraphic measurement of sleep, Tsk, heart rate, bedroom climate, and the microclimate temperature and humidity (bed climate) were measured. Proximal and distal Tsk, the temperature gradient of distal and proximal Tsk (DPG), and bed climate temperature were significantly lower in the children. Approximately 70% of the children slept without bed covering. Heat dissipation during sleep in preschool children may primarily rely on the proximal Tsk. The lower Tsk than adults, and behavioral thermoregulation, may be important for sleep in preschoolers.

  4. Prediction of Skin Temperature Distribution in Cosmetic Laser Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Kuen; Chen, Kuen-Tasnn; Cheng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Wen-Shiung; Chang, Cheng-Ren

    2008-01-01

    The use of lasers in cosmetic surgery has increased dramatically in the past decade. To achieve minimal damage to tissues, the study of the temperature distribution of skin in laser irradiation is very important. The phenomenon of the thermal wave effect is significant due to the highly focused light energy of lasers in very a short time period. The conventional Pennes equation does not take the thermal wave effect into account, which the thermal relaxation time (τ) is neglected, so it is not sufficient to solve instantaneous heating and cooling problem. The purpose of this study is to solve the thermal wave equation to determine the realistic temperature distribution during laser surgery. The analytic solutions of the thermal wave equation are compared with those of the Pennes equation. Moreover, comparisons are made between the results of the above equations and the results of temperature measurement using an infrared thermal image instrument. The thermal wave equation could likely to predict the skin temperature distribution in cosmetic laser surgery.

  5. Air conditioner operation behaviour based on students' skin temperature in a classroom.

    PubMed

    Song, Gook-Sup; Lim, Jae-Han; Ahn, Tae-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    A total of 25 college students participated in a study to determine when they would use an air conditioner during a lecture in a university classroom. The ambient temperature and relative humidity were measured 75 cm above the floor every minute. Skin temperatures were measured every minute at seven points, according to the recommendation of Hardy and Dubois. The average clothing insulation value (CLO) of subjects was 0.53 ± 0.07 CLO. The mean air velocity in the classroom was 0.13 ± 0.028 m/s. When the subjects turned the air conditioner both on and off, the average ambient temperatures, relative humidity and mean skin temperatures were 27.4 and 23.7 °C (p = 0.000), 40.9 and 40.0% (p = 0.528) and 32.7 and 32.2 °C (p = 0.024), respectively. When the status of the air conditioner was changed, the differences of skin temperatures in core body parts (head, abdomen and thigh) were not statistically significant. However, in the extremities (mid-lower arm, hand, shin and instep), the differences were statistically significant. Subjects preferred a fluctuating environment to a constant temperature condition. We found that a changing environment does not affect classroom study.

  6. Dietary water affects human skin hydration and biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Lídia; Marques, Liliana Tavares; Bujan, Julia; Rodrigues, Luís Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    It is generally assumed that dietary water might be beneficial for the health, especially in dermatological (age preventing) terms. The present study was designed to quantify the impact of dietary water on major indicators of skin physiology. A total of 49 healthy females (mean 24.5±4.3 years) were selected and characterized in terms of their dietary daily habits, especially focused in water consumption, by a Food Frequency Questionnaire. This allowed two groups to be set – Group 1 consuming less than 3,200 mL/day (n=38), and Group 2 consuming more than 3,200 mL/day (n=11). Approximately 2 L of water were added to the daily diet of Group 2 individuals for 1 month to quantify the impact of this surplus in their skin physiology. Measurements involving epidermal superficial and deep hydration, transepidermal water loss, and several biomechanical descriptors were taken at day 0 (T0), 15 (T1), and 30 (T2) in several anatomical sites (face, upper limb, and leg). This stress test (2 L/day for 30 days) significantly modified superficial and deep skin hydration, especially in Group 1. The same impact was registered with the most relevant biomechanical descriptors. Thus, in this study, it is clear that higher water inputs in regular diet might positively impact normal skin physiology, in particular in those individuals with lower daily water consumptions. PMID:26345226

  7. Low temperatures reduce skin healing in the Jacaré do Pantanal (Caiman yacare, Daudin 1802)

    PubMed Central

    Pressinotti, Leandro Nogueira; Borges, Ricardo Moraes; Alves De Lima, Angela Paula; Aleixo, Victor Manuel; Iunes, Renata Stecca; Borges, João Carlos Shimada; Cogliati, Bruno; Cunha Da Silva, José Roberto Machado

    2013-01-01

    Summary Studies of skin wound healing in crocodilians are necessary given the frequent occurrence of cannibalism in intensive farming systems. Air temperature affects tissue recovery because crocodilians are ectothermic. Therefore, the kinetics of skin wound healing in Caiman yacare were examined at temperatures of 33°C and 23°C. Sixteen caiman were selected and divided into two groups of eight maintained at 23°C or 33°C. The studied individuals' scars were photographed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of the experimental conditions, and samples were collected for histological processing after 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Macroscopically, the blood clot (heterophilic granuloma) noticeably remained in place covering the wound longer for the caiman kept at 23°C. Microscopically, the temperature of 23°C slowed epidermal migration and skin repair. Comparatively, new blood vessels, labeled using von Willebrand factor (vWF) antibody staining, were more frequently found in the scars of the 33°C group. The collagen fibers in the dermis were denser in the 33°C treatment. Considering the delayed healing at 23°C, producers are recommended to keep wounded animals at 33°C, especially when tanks are cold, to enable rapid wound closure and better repair of collagen fibers because such lesions tend to compromise the use of their skin as leather. PMID:24244853

  8. Patellar Skin Surface Temperature by Thermography Reflects Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Denoble, Anna E.; Hall, Norine; Pieper, Carl F.; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Digital infrared thermal imaging is a means of measuring the heat radiated from the skin surface. Our goal was to develop and assess the reproducibility of serial infrared measurements of the knee and to assess the association of knee temperature by region of interest with radiographic severity of knee Osteoarthritis (rOA). Methods: A total of 30 women (15 Cases with symptomatic knee OA and 15 age-matched Controls without knee pain or knee OA) participated in this study. Infrared imaging was performed with a Meditherm Med2000™ Pro infrared camera. The reproducibility of infrared imaging of the knee was evaluated through determination of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for temperature measurements from two images performed 6 months apart in Controls whose knee status was not expected to change. The average cutaneous temperature for each of five knee regions of interest was extracted using WinTes software. Knee x-rays were scored for severity of rOA based on the global Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Results: The knee infrared thermal imaging procedure used here demonstrated long-term reproducibility with high ICCs (0.50–0.72 for the various regions of interest) in Controls. Cutaneous temperature of the patella (knee cap) yielded a significant correlation with severity of knee rOA (R = 0.594, P = 0.02). Conclusion: The skin temperature of the patellar region correlated with x-ray severity of knee OA. This method of infrared knee imaging is reliable and as an objective measure of a sign of inflammation, temperature, indicates an interrelationship of inflammation and structural knee rOA damage. PMID:21151853

  9. The temperature difference across the cool skin of the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, C. A.; Simpson, J. J.

    1981-11-01

    The temperature difference ΔT across the cool skin of the ocean was determined from radiometric measurements of surface brightness temperature and conventional measurements of temperature at a depth of 1 m. Eleven days of measurements were made from the R/P Flip in February 1974 about 800 miles north of Hawaii (35°N, 155°W). The surface brightness temperature was corrected for nonblackness of the surface to obtain an estimate of the true surface temperature. The constant λ in Saunders' (1967a) formula, ΔT = λvQ/kU* was found to be λ = 6.5±0.6, where v is kinematic viscosity, Q the upward heat flux just below, the interface, k the thermal conductivity, and U* the friction velocity. The constant is independent of wind speed for winds ranging from 3 to 11 m/s. The use of subsurface rather than surface temperature in the bulk aerodynamic formulas results in an increase in the sum of the sensible and latent heat fluxes equal to 4-5% of Q. However, the percentage change in sensible and latent heat fluxes may be much greater. Spectra of surface and subsurface sea temperature exhibit a peak at low frequencies and fall off approximately proportional to ƒ-3/2; with increasing frequency ƒ. The variability of sea surface temperature was caused about equally by the variability of subsurface temperature and the variability of ΔT. Caution should therefore be exercised in the interpretation of radiometric surface temperature measurements as representative of subsurface temperature.

  10. Registered report: measuring unconscious deception detection by skin temperature.

    PubMed

    van ' T Veer, Anna E; Stel, Mariëlle; van Beest, Ilja; Gallucci, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Findings from the deception detection literature suggest that although people are not skilled in consciously detecting a liar, they may intuit that something about the person telling a lie is off. In the current proposal, we argue that observing a liar influences the observer's physiology even though the observer may not be consciously aware of being lied to (i.e., the observers' direct deception judgment does not accurately differentiate between liars and truth-tellers). To test this hypothesis, participants' finger temperature will be measured while they watch videos of persons who are either honest or dishonest about their identity. We hypothesize that skin temperature will be lower when observing a liar than when observing a truth-teller. Additionally, we test whether perceiving a liar influences finger skin temperature differently when an individual is, or is not, alerted to the possibility of deceit. We do this by varying participants' awareness of the fact that they might be lied to. Next to measuring physiological responses to liars and truth-tellers, self-reported direct and indirect veracity judgments (i.e., trustworthiness and liking) of the target persons will be assessed. We hypothesize that indirect veracity judgments will better distinguish between liars and truth-tellers than direct veracity judgments.

  11. Registered report: measuring unconscious deception detection by skin temperature

    PubMed Central

    van ’ t Veer, Anna E.; Stel, Mariëlle; van Beest, Ilja; Gallucci, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Findings from the deception detection literature suggest that although people are not skilled in consciously detecting a liar, they may intuit that something about the person telling a lie is off. In the current proposal, we argue that observing a liar influences the observer’s physiology even though the observer may not be consciously aware of being lied to (i.e., the observers’ direct deception judgment does not accurately differentiate between liars and truth-tellers). To test this hypothesis, participants’ finger temperature will be measured while they watch videos of persons who are either honest or dishonest about their identity. We hypothesize that skin temperature will be lower when observing a liar than when observing a truth-teller. Additionally, we test whether perceiving a liar influences finger skin temperature differently when an individual is, or is not, alerted to the possibility of deceit. We do this by varying participants’ awareness of the fact that they might be lied to. Next to measuring physiological responses to liars and truth-tellers, self-reported direct and indirect veracity judgments (i.e., trustworthiness and liking) of the target persons will be assessed. We hypothesize that indirect veracity judgments will better distinguish between liars and truth-tellers than direct veracity judgments. PMID:24904461

  12. Skin temperature as a thermal controller of exercise intensity.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Simmons, Shona E; Stannard, Stephen R; Mündel, Toby

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the role of skin temperature on self-selected exercise intensity (i.e., power output). Eight well-trained, male cyclists completed two 60 min self-paced cycling bouts during which they completed as much work as possible. Using a liquid-perfused suit, skin temperature (T (Sk)) was changed during the two trials such that T (Sk) either started hot and was cooled (H to C) or started cold and was heated (C to H) throughout exercise. Pre-exercise core temperatures (T (C)) and heart rates (HR) were similar between trials, while T (Sk), thermal comfort and thermal sensation were higher in H to C. The change in T (Sk) was similar in magnitude during the two trials. Work completed was greatest in C to H, which was attributed to a higher initial power output. T (C) was similar between trials. HR was similar until 35 min had elapsed, after which it became lower in H to C. The perception of effort increased similarly between the two trials, while thermal comfort and thermal sensation generally reflected the changes observed in T (Sk). These results indicate that upon exercise commencement T (Sk) and the accompanying thermal perceptions are important inputs in the initial selection of exercise intensity.

  13. Coupling of infraslow fluctuations in autonomic and central vigilance markers: skin temperature, EEG β power and ERP P300 latency.

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Jennifer R; Romeijn, Nico; Gómez-Herrero, Germán; Piantoni, Giovanni; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2013-08-01

    Even under thermoneutral conditions, skin temperature fluctuates spontaneously, most prominently at distal parts of the body. These fluctuations were shown to be associated with fluctuations in vigilance: mild manipulation of skin temperature during nocturnal sleep affects sleep depth and the power spectral density of the electroencephalogram (EEG), and fluctuations in skin temperature during daytime wakefulness are related to sleep propensity and task performance. The association of daytime skin temperature fluctuations with EEG markers of vigilance has not previously been investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association between daytime fluctuations in skin temperature with those in two quantitative EEG measures: the power spectral density of background EEG, and the event related potential (ERP) elicited by visual stimuli. High-density EEG and skin temperature were obtained in eight healthy adults five times a day while they performed a visual sustained-attention task. Assessments were made after a night of normal sleep and after the challenge of a night of total sleep deprivation. Fluctuations in the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient measured from the earlobe and mastoid were associated with fluctuations in parieto-occipital high beta band (20-40 Hz) power of the pre-stimulus background EEG, but only after sleep deprivation. The temperature fluctuations were moreover associated with fluctuations in the latency of the P300 elicited by the stimulus. The findings demonstrate close association between fluctuations in an autonomic correlate of the vigilance state (i.e. the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient), and fluctuations in central nervous system correlates of the vigilance state (i.e. background EEG and ERP). The findings are of theoretical and practical relevance for the assessment and manipulation of vigilance.

  14. Measurements of skin surface temperature during mobile phone use.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V; Rowley, J

    2007-02-01

    We measured maximum temperature rises on the side of the face after 6 min of continuous mobile phone operation using two models of AMPS analog phones operating in the 835 MHz band and three early model GSM digital phones operating in the 900 MHz band. For the GSM phones the highest recorded temperature rise difference was 2.3 degrees C and for the AMPS phones it was 4.5 degrees C, both at locations on the cheek. The higher differential temperature rise between AMPS and GSM may reflect the higher maximum average operating power of AMPS (600 mW) versus GSM900 (250 mW). Additionally, we compared temperature changes at a consistent location on the cheek for an AMPS phone that was inoperative (-0.7 degrees C), transmitting at full power (+2.6 degrees C) and in stand-by mode (+2.0 degrees C). Our results suggest that direct RF heating of the skin only contributes a small part of the temperature rise and that most is due to heat conduction from the handset.

  15. Skin friction measurements in high temperature high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, J. A.; Diller, Thomas E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to measure skin friction along the chamber walls of supersonic combustors. A direct force measurement device was used to simultaneously measure an axial and transverse component of the small tangential shear force passing over a non-intrusive floating element. The floating head is mounted to a stiff cantilever beam arrangement with deflection due to the flow on the order of 0.00254 mm (0.0001 in.). This allowed the instrument to be a non-nulling type. A second gauge was designed with active cooling of the floating sensor head to eliminate non-uniform temperature effects between the sensor head and the surrounding wall. Samples of measurements made in combustor test facilities at NASA Langley Research Center and at the General Applied Science Laboratory (GASL) are presented. Skin friction coefficients between 0.001 - 0.005 were measured dependent on the facility and measurement location. Analysis of the measurement uncertainties indicate an accuracy to within +/- 10-15 percent of the streamwise component.

  16. Depressed mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes at skin temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Lauwasser, M; Shands, J W

    1979-01-01

    The responsiveness of murine lymphocytes and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, and endotoxin was tested in vitro at 32, 35, and 37 degrees C. The responses at 32 degrees C were delayed and often depressed. Mouse cells responded equally well at 35 and 37 degrees C. Human lymphocytes often responded more rapidly at 37 than at 35 degrees C. Since skin temperature, particularly that of the distal extremities, is usually 32 degrees C or less, a relative deficiency in cell-mediated immunity may exist in these sites. This may be part of the reason for the usual localization of certain infections, such as sporotrichosis, to these coller areas. PMID:457281

  17. Using skin temperature gradients or skin heat flux measurements to determine thresholds of vasoconstriction and vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    Forearm-fingertip skin temperature differentials (T(sk-diff)) are used to indicate vasomotor tone, vasoconstriction defined as having occurred when T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C (Sessler et al. 1987, 1988a, b). This study was conducted to determine whether T(sk-diff) or finger pad heat flux (HF) can be used to predict when vasoconstriction and vasodilatation occur. Seven subjects (one female) sat in water at [mean (SD)] 40.7 (0.8) degrees C until their core temperature (T(c)) increased by 1 degrees C, ensuring vasodilatation. The water was then cooled [at a rate of 0.6 (0.1) degrees C x min(-1)] until T(c) fell to 0.5 degrees C below pretesting values, causing vasoconstriction. Subjects were then rewarmed in water [41.2 (1.0) degrees C]. Skin blood flow (SkBF) was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) on the left second finger pad [immersed in water at 10.4 (1.4) degrees C as part of another experiment], and infrared plethysmography on the third finger pad of both hands. T(sk-diff) and HF were measured on the right upper limb, which remained in air. When vasodilated, the subjects had a stable T(sk-diff) and HF. During cooling, rapid-onset vasoconstriction occurred coincidental with large gradient changes in HF and T(sk-diff) (inflection points). In two subjects the original vasoconstriction definition (T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C) was not attained, in the other five this was achieved 31-51 min after vasoconstriction. During rewarming, the T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points less accurately reflected the onset of vasodilatation, although with one exception they were within 5 min of the LDF changes. We conclude that T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points predict vasoconstriction accurately, and better than T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C.

  18. Skin temperature modifies the impact of hypohydration on aerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Kenefick, R W; Cheuvront, S N; Palombo, L J; Ely, B R; Sawka, M N

    2010-07-01

    This study determined the effects of hypohydration on aerobic performance in compensable [evaporative cooling requirement (E(req)) < maximal evaporative cooling (E(max))] conditions of 10 degrees C [7 degrees C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT)], 20 degrees C (16 degrees C WBGT), 30 degrees C (22 degrees C WBGT), and 40 degrees C (27 degrees C WBGT) ambient temperature (T(a)). Our hypothesis was that 4% hypohydration would impair aerobic performance to a greater extent with increasing heat stress. Thirty-two men [22 +/- 4 yr old, 45 +/- 8 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) peak O(2) uptake (Vo(2 peak))] were divided into four matched cohorts (n = 8) and tested at one of four T(a) in euhydrated (EU) and hypohydrated (HYPO, -4% body mass) conditions. Subjects completed 30 min of preload exercise (cycle ergometer, 50% Vo(2 peak)) followed by a 15 min self-paced time trial. Time-trial performance (total work, change from EU) was -3% (P = 0.1), -5% (P = 0.06), -12% (P < 0.05), and -23% (P < 0.05) in 10 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 30 degrees C, and 40 degrees C T(a), respectively. During preload exercise, skin temperature (T(sk)) increased by approximately 4 degrees C per 10 degrees C T(a), while core (rectal) temperature (T(re)) values were similar within EU and HYPO conditions across all T(a). A significant relationship (P < 0.05, r = 0.61) was found between T(sk) and the percent decrement in time-trial performance. During preload exercise, hypohydration generally blunted the increases in cardiac output and blood pressure while reducing blood volume over time in 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C T(a). Our conclusions are as follows: 1) hypohydration degrades aerobic performance to a greater extent with increasing heat stress; 2) when T(sk) is >29 degrees C, 4% hypohydration degrades aerobic performance by approximately 1.6% for each additional 1 degrees C T(sk); and 3) cardiovascular strain from high skin blood flow requirements combined with blood volume reductions induced by hypohydration

  19. Relationship between ambient temperature and heat flux in the scrotal skin.

    PubMed

    Song, G-S; Seo, J T

    2009-08-01

    Excessive scrotal heating or cooling may lead to the cessation of spermatogenesis. Data regarding heat exchange rates in scrotal skin can be used to control testicular temperature within the appropriate range. Heat flux (HF) in the scrotal skin surface is generated based on the surrounding environment. This study aims to elucidate the HF of scrotal skin by varying ambient temperature. Twenty college students including seven varicoceles volunteered as the subjects (mean age: 22.95 +/- SD 1.96 years; height: 175.00 +/- 5.17 cm; weight: 68.40 +/- 8.65 kg; body mass index: 22.28 +/- 2.15), and participated in the experiments from September 11 to October 4, 2006. The environmental temperature was controlled at 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C in the first and second experiment respectively. The HF and skin temperature on both sides of the scrotal surface were measured for 60 min in the environmental chamber. The results revealed that the HF was 87.64 +/- 12.69 W/m(2) and 78.91 +/- 12.09 W/m(2) in the left and right side of the scrotum respectively. The scrotal skin temperature (SST) was 30.28 +/- 0.75 degrees C and 30.24 +/- 0.62 degrees C on the left and right side of the scrotum in the 20 degrees C environment respectively. In the 25 degrees C environment the HF was 53.54 +/- 8.86 W/m(2) and 45.25 +/- 8.32 W/m(2), and the SST was 32.29 +/- 0.61 degrees C and 32.07 +/- 0.36 degrees C on the left and right side of the scrotum respectively. The cooling source power to decrease testicular temperature is suggested at 290 W/m(2). This suggested value could be adopted a cooling device as clinical therapy for a heat stress patient to decrease testicular temperature affecting spermatogenesis.

  20. The effect of a cryotherapy gel wrap on the microcirculation of skin affected by Chronic Venous Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Martina; Zapka, Jane G.; King, Dana E.

    2011-01-01

    Aim This randomized clinical trial was conducted 2008 – 2009 to investigate a cryotherapy (cooling) gel wrap applied to lower leg skin affected by chronic venous disorders to determine whether therapeutic cooling improves skin microcirculation. Impaired skin microcirculation contributes to venous leg ulcer development, thus new prevention therapies should address the microcirculation to prevent venous leg ulcers. Data Sources Sixty participants (n = 30 per group) were randomized to receive one of two daily 30-minute interventions for four weeks. The treatment group applied the cryotherapy gel wrap around the affected lower leg skin, or compression and elevated the legs on a special pillow each evening at bedtime. The standard care group wore compression and elevated the legs only. Laboratory pre- and post-measures included microcirculation measures of skin temperature with a thermistor, blood flow with a laser Doppler flowmeter, and venous refill time with a photoplethysmograph. Review methods Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, paired t-tests or Wilcoxon signed ranks tests, logistic regression analyses, and mixed model analyses. Results Fifty-seven participants (treatment = 28; standard care = 29) completed the study. The mean age was 62 years, 70% female, 50% African American. In the final adjusted model, there was a statistically significant decrease in blood flow between the two groups (−6.2[−11.8; −0.6], P = 0.03). No statistically significant differences were noted in temperature or venous refill time. Conclusion Study findings suggest that cryotherapy improves blood flow by slowing movement within the microcirculation and thus might potentially provide a therapeutic benefit to prevent leg ulcers. PMID:21592186

  1. The Skin Microbiome: Is It Affected by UV-induced Immune Suppression?

    PubMed Central

    Patra, VijayKumar; Byrne, Scott N.; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) from sunlight. UV-R is well known to modulate the immune system, which can be both beneficial and deleterious. By targeting the cells and molecules within skin, UV-R can trigger the production and release of antimicrobial peptides, affect the innate immune system and ultimately suppress the adaptive cellular immune response. This can contribute to skin carcinogenesis and the promotion of infectious agents such as herpes simplex virus and possibly others. On the other hand, a UV-established immunosuppressive environment may protect against the induction of immunologically mediated skin diseases including some of photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about the possibility that UV-induced immune suppression may alter the landscape of the skin’s microbiome and its components. Alternatively, or in concert with this, direct UV-induced DNA and membrane damage to the microbiome may result in pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that interfere with UV-induced immune suppression. PMID:27559331

  2. Visualizing Skin Temperature Before, During and After Exercise for Dynamic Area Telethermometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    paper, a specific exercise is designed; we visualize the skin temperature before, during and after the exercise. Over 2000 frames during the period...were captured, and the skin temperature of the regions of interest is analyzed statistically. In order to visualize the FFT to yield the relative

  3. SU-E-J-273: Skin Temperature Recovery Rate as a Potential Predictor for Radiation-Induced Skin Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, N C; Wu, Z; Chu, J; Sun, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the potential of dynamic infrared imaging to evaluate early skin reactions during radiation therapy in cancer patients. Methods: Thermal images were captured by our home-built system consisting of two flash lamps and an infrared (IR) camera. The surface temperature of the skin was first raised by ∼ 6 °C from ∼1 ms short flashes; the camera then captured a series of IR images for 10 seconds. For each image series, a basal temperature was recorded for 0.5 seconds before flash was triggered. The temperature gradients (ε) were calculated between a reference point (immediately after the flash) and at a time point of 2sec, 4sec and 9sec after that. A 1.0 cm region of interest (ROI) on the skin was drawn; the mean and standard deviations of the ROIs were calculated. The standard ε values for normal human skins were evaluated by imaging 3 healthy subjects with different skin colors. All of them were imaged on 3 separate days for consistency checks. Results: The temperature gradient, which is the temperature recovery rate, depends on the thermal properties of underlying tissue, i.e. thermal conductivity. The average ε for three volunteers averaged over 3 measurements were 0.64±0.1, 0.72±0.2 and 0.80±0.3 at 2sec, 4sec and 9sec respectively. The standard deviations were within 1.5%–3.2%. One of the volunteers had a prior small skin burn on the left wrist and the ε values for the burned site were around 9% (at 4sec) and 13% (at 9sec) lower than that from the nearby normal skin. Conclusion: The temperature gradients from the healthy subjects were reproducible within 1.5%–3.2 % and that from a burned skin showed a significant difference (9%–13%) from the normal skin. We have an IRB approved protocol to image head and neck patients scheduled for radiation therapy.

  4. The influence of internal and skin temperatures on active cutaneous vasodilation under different levels of exercise and ambient temperatures in humans.

    PubMed

    Demachi, Koichi; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kume, Masashi; Tsuji, Michio; Tsuneoka, Hideyuki

    2013-07-01

    To clarify the influence of internal and skin temperature on the active cutaneous vasodilation during exercise, the body temperature thresholds for the onset of active vasodilation during light or moderate exercise under different ambient temperature conditions were compared. Seven male subjects performed 30 min of a cycling exercise at 20 % or 50 % of peak oxygen uptake in a room maintained at 20, 24, or 28 °C. Esophageal (Tes) and mean skin temperature (Tsk) as measured by a thermocouple, deep thigh temperature (Tdt) by the zero-heat-flow (ZHF) method, and forearm skin blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were monitored. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) was also monitored non-invasively, and the cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as the LDF/MAP. Throughout the experiment, the Tsk at ambient temperatures of 20, 24, and 28 °C were approximately 30, 32, and 34 °C, respectively, for both 20 % and 50 % exercise. During 50 % exercise, the Tes or Tdt thresholds for the onset of the increase in CVC were observed to be similar among the 20, 24, and 28 °C ambient conditions. During 20 % exercise, the increase in Tes and Tdt was significantly lower than those found at 50 %, and the onset of the increase in CVC was only observed at 28 °C. These results suggest that the onset of active vasodilation was affected more strongly by the internal or exercising tissue temperatures than by the skin temperatures during exercise performed at a moderate load in comparison to a light load under Tsk variations ranging from 30 °C to 34 °C. Therefore, the modification by skin temperature of the central control on cutaneous vasomotor tone during exercise may differ between different exercise loads.

  5. The influence of internal and skin temperatures on active cutaneous vasodilation under different levels of exercise and ambient temperatures in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demachi, Koichi; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kume, Masashi; Tsuji, Michio; Tsuneoka, Hideyuki

    2013-07-01

    To clarify the influence of internal and skin temperature on the active cutaneous vasodilation during exercise, the body temperature thresholds for the onset of active vasodilation during light or moderate exercise under different ambient temperature conditions were compared. Seven male subjects performed 30 min of a cycling exercise at 20 % or 50 % of peak oxygen uptake in a room maintained at 20, 24, or 28 °C. Esophageal (Tes) and mean skin temperature (Tsk) as measured by a thermocouple, deep thigh temperature (Tdt) by the zero-heat-flow (ZHF) method, and forearm skin blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were monitored. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) was also monitored non-invasively, and the cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as the LDF/MAP. Throughout the experiment, the Tsk at ambient temperatures of 20, 24, and 28 °C were approximately 30, 32, and 34 °C, respectively, for both 20 % and 50 % exercise. During 50 % exercise, the Tes or Tdt thresholds for the onset of the increase in CVC were observed to be similar among the 20, 24, and 28 °C ambient conditions. During 20 % exercise, the increase in Tes and Tdt was significantly lower than those found at 50 %, and the onset of the increase in CVC was only observed at 28 °C. These results suggest that the onset of active vasodilation was affected more strongly by the internal or exercising tissue temperatures than by the skin temperatures during exercise performed at a moderate load in comparison to a light load under Tsk variations ranging from 30 °C to 34 °C. Therefore, the modification by skin temperature of the central control on cutaneous vasomotor tone during exercise may differ between different exercise loads.

  6. Dynamics of thermographic skin temperature response during squat exercise at two different speeds.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Michielon, Giovanni; Caumo, Andrea; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-07-01

    Low intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation has been shown to create blood flow restriction within muscles that may affect thermoregulation through the skin. We aimed to investigate the influence of two speeds of exercise execution on skin temperature dynamics using infrared thermography. Thirteen active males performed randomly two sessions of squat exercise (normal speed, 1s eccentric/1s concentric phase, 1s; slow speed, 5s eccentric/5s concentric phase, 5s), using ~50% of 1 maximal repetition. Thermal images of ST above muscles quadriceps were recorded at a rate of 0.05Hz before the exercise (to determine basal ST) and for 480s following the initiation of the exercise (to determine the nonsteady-state time course of ST). Results showed that ST changed more slowly during the 5s exercise (p=0.002), whereas the delta (with respect to basal) excursions were similar for the two exercises (p>0.05). In summary, our data provided a detailed nonsteady-state portrait of ST changes following squat exercises executed at two different speeds. These results lay the basis for further investigations entailing the joint use of infrared thermography and Doppler flowmetry to study the events taking place both at the skin and the muscle level during exercises executed at slow speed.

  7. Continuous monitoring of skin temperature using a liquid-crystal thermometer during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, G E; Cooper, J R; Marino, R J; Peuler, M J

    1978-05-01

    Forehead skin temperature measured by a stip of liquid-crystal material was compared to esophageal, rectal, and axillary temperatures measured by thermistor probes in patients having general anesthesia for coronary artery bypass grafting. Before extracorporeal circulation, forehead skin temperature was lower than axillary, rectal, and esophageal temperatures by approximately 2.2 C (4.0 F). During rapid warming, forehead skin temperature rose concurrently with the other temperatures measured but remained significantly different. The liquid-crystal strip may be useful as a safe, convenient method for routine monitoring of temperature trends during general anesthesia in patients whose exact core temperature need not be continuously monitored. We believe that infants, patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation, major abdominal, vascular, or neurosurgical procedures, or patients with a history of temperature regulatory problem are probably best monitored by a method which more exactly reflects core temperature.

  8. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  9. Numerical modelling of salt diapirism and the surrounding temperature field during thin-skinned extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Harms, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of salt diapirs is strongly associated with potential geothermal and hydrocarbon energy sources. Many numerical modelling studies of diapirism have been done in the past, though very few of these in fact use geologically realistic settings and materials. Besides, only analogue and structural studies have been done on full scale diapirism during thin-skinned extension. Two-dimensional numerical modelling of this problem using a Finite Element code aims at addressing the following questions: which geometrical or material parameters affect the growth rate and shape of the diapir and how? what is the effect of this diapirism on the temperature field and surface heat flux? How does the inclusion of simple surface processes influence these observations to first order ? Our results show that, in compliance with both analogue modelling and structural geological studies, a diapir formed during thin-skinned extension undergoes three phases: reactional piercement, active piercement and passive piercement. Extension rates directly influence the total time required for the diapir to reach the surface, as well as how long the system remains in a state of reactional diapirism, which both affect the shape of the resulting diapir. Erosion efficiency is found to affect the growth rate of the diapir during its active stage and the total rising time, which affects in turn its the shape. The density contrast between the salt and the sediments also influences the growth rate during active and passive piercement. Finally, the temperature surrounding a rising diapir (especially in the region above it) is found to be heightened by a few dozens of degrees.

  10. Research of temperature field measurement using a flexible temperature sensor array for robot sensing skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Siyu; Li, Ruiqi; Yang, Qinghua; Zhang, Yugang; Liu, Caixia

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a novel temperature sensor array by dispensing conductive composites on a flexible printed circuit board which is able to acquire the ambient temperature. The flexible temperature sensor array was fabricated by using carbon fiber-filled silicon rubber based composites on a flexible polyimide circuit board, which can both ensure their high flexibility. It found that CF with 12 wt% could be served as the best conductive filler for higher temperature sensitivity and better stability comparing with some other proportion for dynamic range from 30&° to 90°. The preparation of the temperature sensitive material has also been described in detail. Connecting the flexible sensor array with a data acquisition card and a personal computer (PC), some heat sources with different shapes were loaded on the sensor array; the detected results were shown in the interface by LabVIEW software. The measured temperature contours are in good agreement with the shapes and amplitudes of different heat sources. Furthermore, in consideration of the heat dissipation in the air, the relationship between the resistance and the distance of heat sources with sensor array was also detected to verify the accuracy of the sensor array, which is also a preparation for our future work. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the developed flexible sensor array, and it can be used as humanoid artificial skin for sensation system of robots.

  11. The use of infrared thermography to detect the skin temperature response to physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity has a noticeable effect on skin blood flow and temperature. The thermal regulatory and hemodynamic processes during physical activity are controlled by two conflicting mechanisms: the skin vasoconstriction induced by the blood flow demand to active muscles and the skin vasodilation required by thermoregulation to increase warm blood flow and heat conduction to the skin. The time-evolution of skin temperature during exercise can give useful information about the adaptation of the subject as a function of specific type, intensity and duration of exercise. In this paper, infrared thermography is used to investigate the thermal response of skin temperature during running exercise on treadmill for a group of seven healthy and trained runners. Two different treadmill exercises are considered: a graded load exercise and a constant load exercise; for both exercises the duration was 30 minutes. Within the limits due to the relatively small size of the sample group, results typically indicate a fall in skin temperature during the initial stage of running exercise. As the exercise progresses, the dynamics of the skin temperature response depends on the type of exercise (graded versus constant load) and probably on the level of training of the subject.

  12. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K; Matthew Brothers, R; Diller, Kenneth R

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC-skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy.

  13. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K.; Matthew Brothers, R.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC–skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy. PMID:26632263

  14. Skin blood flow and local temperature independently modify sweat rate during passive heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Brothers, R Matthew; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-11-01

    Sweat rate (SR) is reduced in locally cooled skin, which may result from decreased temperature and/or parallel reductions in skin blood flow. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature each independently attenuate sweating. In protocols I and II, eight subjects rested supine while wearing a water-perfused suit for the control of whole body skin and internal temperatures. While 34°C water perfused the suit, four microdialysis membranes were placed in posterior forearm skin not covered by the suit to manipulate skin blood flow using vasoactive agents. Each site was instrumented for control of local temperature and measurement of local SR (capacitance hygrometry) and skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry). In protocol I, two sites received norepinephrine to reduce skin blood flow, while two sites received Ringer solution (control). All sites were maintained at 34°C. In protocol II, all sites received 28 mM sodium nitroprusside to equalize skin blood flow between sites before local cooling to 20°C (2 sites) or maintenance at 34°C (2 sites). In both protocols, individuals were then passively heated to increase core temperature ~1°C. Both decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature attenuated the slope of the SR to mean body temperature relationship (2.0 ± 1.2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased skin blood flow, P = 0.01; 1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.07 ± 0.05 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased local temperature, P = 0.02). Furthermore, local cooling delayed the onset of sweating (mean body temperature of 37.5 ± 0.4 vs. 37.6 ± 0.4°C, P = 0.03). These data demonstrate that local cooling attenuates sweating by independent effects of decreased skin blood flow and decreased local skin temperature.

  15. Spatial Correlations of Anomaly Time Series of AIRS Version-6 Land Surface Skin Temperatures with the Nino-4 Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2013-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version-6 data set is a valuable resource for meteorological studies. Quality Controlled earth's surface skin temperatures are produced on a 45 km x 45 km spatial scale under most cloud cover conditions. The same retrieval algorithm is used for all surface types under all conditions. This study used eleven years of AIRS monthly mean surface skin temperature and cloud cover products to show that land surface skin temperatures have decreased significantly in some areas and increased significantly in other areas over the period September 2002 through August 2013. These changes occurred primarily at 1:30 PM but not at 1:30 AM. Cooling land areas contained corresponding increases in cloud cover over this time period, with the reverse being true for warming land areas. The cloud cover anomaly patterns for a given month are affected significantly by El Nino/La Nina activity, and anomalies in cloud cover are a driving force behind anomalies in land surface skin temperature.

  16. Normal range and lateral symmetry in the skin temperature profile of pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tânia; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Simoes, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Body skin temperature is a useful parameter for diagnosing diseases and infrared thermography can be a powerful tool in providing important information to detect body temperature changes in a noninvasive way. The aim of this work was to study the pattern of skin temperature during pregnancy, to establish skin temperature reference values and to find correlations between these and the pregnant population characteristics. Sixty-one healthy pregnant women (mean age 30.6 ± 5.1 years) in the 8th-40th gestational week with normal pregnancies were examined in 31 regions of interest (ROI). The ROIs were defined all over the body in order to determine the most influenced by factors such as age or body mass index (BMI). The results obtained in this work highlight that in normal pregnant women the skin temperature is symmetrically distributed, with the symmetrical areas differing less than 0.5 °C , with a mean value of 0.25 ± 0.23 °C . This study identified a significant negative correlation between the BMI and temperature. Age has been shown to have great influence on the skin temperature, with a significant increase of temperature observed with age. This work explores a novel medical application of infrared thermography and provides a characterization of thermal skin profile in human pregnancy for a large set of ROIs while also evaluating the effects of age and BMI.

  17. The Ocean? No Sweat! How the Oceans Affect Temperatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents an activity which helps students investigate how the ocean affects air temperature. Includes temperature data and a map for students to use in plotting and analyzing the temperature ranges of selected cities in Oregon. A supplementary laboratory activity is also offered. (ML)

  18. Determination of time-dependent skin temperature decrease rates in the case of abrupt changes of environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Mall, G; Hubig, M; Beier, G; Büttner, A; Eisenmenger, W

    2000-09-11

    The present study deals with the development of a method for determining time-dependent temperature decrease rates and its application to postmortem surface cooling. The study concentrates on evaluating skin cooling behavior since data on skin cooling in the forensic literature are scarce. Furthermore, all heat transfer mechanisms strongly depend on the temperature gradient between body surface and environment. One of the main problems in modelling postmortem cooling processes is the dependence on the environmental temperature. All models for postmortem rectal cooling essentially presuppose a constant environmental temperature. In medico-legal practice, the temperature of the surrounding of a corpse mostly varies; therefore, an approach for extending the models to variable environmental temperatures is desirable. It consists in 'localizing' them to infinitesimal small intervals of time. An extended model differential equation is obtained and solved explicitly. The approach developed is applied to the single-exponential Newtonian model of surface cooling producing the following differential equation:T(S)'(t)=-lambda(t)(T(S)(t)-T(E)(t))(with T(S)(t) the surface/skin temperature, T(E)(t) the environmental temperature, lambda(t) the temperature decrease rate and T(S)'(t) the actual change of skin temperature or first-order derivative of T(S)). The differential equation directly provides an estimator:lambda(t)=-T(S)'(t)T(S)(t)-T(E)(t)for the time-dependent temperature decrease rate. The estimator is applied to two skin cooling experiments with different types of abrupt changes of environmental temperature, peak-like and step-like; the values of the time-dependent temperature decrease rate function were calculated. By reinserting them, the measured surface temperature curve could be accurately reconstructed, indicating that the extended model is well suited for describing surface cooling in the case of abrupt changes of environmental temperature.

  19. Effect of skin temperature on the ion reabsorption capacity of sweat glands during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Shamsuddin, A K M; Kuwahara, T; Oue, A; Nomura, C; Koga, S; Inoue, Y; Kondo, N

    2005-07-01

    The effect of skin temperature on the ion reabsorption capacity of sweat glands during exercise in humans is unknown. In this study, eight healthy subjects performed a 60-min cycling exercise at a constant intensity (60% VO(2max)) under moderate (25 degrees C) and cool (15 degrees C) ambient temperatures at a constant relative humidity of 40%. The sweating rate (SR), index of sweat ion concentration (ISIC) by using sweat conductivity, esophageal temperature (Tes), mean skin temperature, and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously under both ambient temperatures. The SR and ISIC were significantly lower at the cool ambient temperature versus the moderate temperature. There were no significant differences in the changes in HR and esophageal temperature between these ambient temperature conditions, while the mean skin temperature was significantly lower at the cool ambient temperature by almost 3 degrees C (P < 0.05). The slopes of the relationships between Tes and the SR and ISIC were significantly lower and the thresholds of these relationships were significantly higher at the cool ambient temperature (P < 0.05). The ion reabsorption capacity of the sweat glands was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in a cool environment (0.21 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.52 +/- 0.06 mg/cm(2)/min at 15 and 25 degrees C, respectively) as evaluated using the relationships for SR and ISIC. The results suggest that the ion reabsorption capacity of the sweat glands is influenced by skin temperature during exercise in humans.

  20. The use of thermal imaging to monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy: A systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Filipe; Neves, Eduardo Borba; Norte, Marco; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado; Vilaça-Alves, José

    2015-11-01

    Cryotherapy has been applied on clinical injuries and as a method for exercise recovery. It is aimed to reduce edema, nervous conduction velocity, and tissue metabolism, as well as to accelerate the recovery process of the muscle injury induced by exercise. Objective: This review aim to investigate the applicability of thermal imaging as a method for monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy. Method: Search the Web of Science database using the terms "Cryotherapy", "Thermography", "Thermal Image" and "Cooling". Results: Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria and pass the PEDro scale quality evaluation. Evidence support the use of thermal imaging as a method for monitoring the skin temperature during cryotherapy, and it is superior to other contact methods and subjective methods of assessing skin temperature. Conclusion: Thermography seems to be an efficient, trustworthy and secure method in order to monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy application. Evidence supports the use of thermography in detriment of contact methods as well as other subjective ones.

  1. Evaluation of insulated miniature thermistors for skin temperature measurement in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlyk, Patricia C.; Sils, Ingrid V.; Ferguson, June D.; Matthew, William T.; Hubbard, Roger W.

    1986-08-01

    A miniature thermistor modified by covering its outer surface with insulating foam was evaluated as a temperature sensor at three skin sites in the adult male laboratory rat. A high precision thermistor was modified by covering the outer epoxy surface with about 1/4 inch of a commercially available insulating foam. Such foam thickness provided sufficient insulation to reduce the influence of ambient temperature on the thermistor reading yet contributed minimal additional probe weight. Results indicate that compared to the insulated thermistor, the uninsulated probe underestimated skin temperature measured at the midscapular region of the back, ventral surface of the foot, and dorsal base of the tail at cool ambient temperature (25c) and overestimated temperature at the back and tail skin sites at high ambient temperature (42c). The differences in temperature measured by the insulated and uninsulated thermistors were greastest at the back skin site, which was the only fur-covered and the least vascularized area of the rat that we studied. Using an insulated miniature thermistor to reduce the influence of environmental temperature on thermistor readings when measuring skin temperature in a furred laboratory animal is recommended.

  2. Human C-tactile afferents are tuned to the temperature of a skin-stroking caress.

    PubMed

    Ackerley, Rochelle; Backlund Wasling, Helena; Liljencrantz, Jaquette; Olausson, Håkan; Johnson, Richard D; Wessberg, Johan

    2014-02-19

    Human C-tactile (CT) afferents respond vigorously to gentle skin stroking and have gained attention for their importance in social touch. Pharmacogenetic activation of the mouse CT equivalent has positively reinforcing, anxiolytic effects, suggesting a role in grooming and affiliative behavior. We recorded from single CT axons in human participants, using the technique of microneurography, and stimulated a unit's receptive field using a novel, computer-controlled moving probe, which stroked the skin of the forearm over five velocities (0.3, 1, 3, 10, and 30 cm s(-1)) at three temperatures (cool, 18 °C; neutral, 32 °C; warm, 42 °C). We show that CTs are unique among mechanoreceptive afferents: they discharged preferentially to slowly moving stimuli at a neutral (typical skin) temperature, rather than at the cooler or warmer stimulus temperatures. In contrast, myelinated hair mechanoreceptive afferents proportionally increased their firing frequency with stroking velocity and showed no temperature modulation. Furthermore, the CT firing frequency correlated with hedonic ratings to the same mechano-thermal stimulus only at the neutral stimulus temperature, where the stimuli were felt as pleasant at higher firing rates. We conclude that CT afferents are tuned to respond to tactile stimuli with the specific characteristics of a gentle caress delivered at typical skin temperature. This provides a peripheral mechanism for signaling pleasant skin-to-skin contact in humans, which promotes interpersonal touch and affiliative behavior.

  3. Identification of functioning sweat pores and visualization of skin temperature patterns in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia by whole body thermography.

    PubMed

    Clark, R P; Goff, M R; MacDermot, K D

    1990-11-01

    In this preliminary study, non-invasive infrared thermography has been used to visualize individual sweat pores and whole body skin temperature patterns in subjects with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED) and normal controls. The findings in eight obligate heterozygotes and four affected males were compared to six normal female controls and to six non-manifesting females at risk for carrier status. Sweat secretion from individual pores in circumscribed areas was imaged using a high spatial resolution SPRITE infrared detector system working in the 8-14 microns band. In seven out of eight obligate heterozygotes, skin areas devoid of active sweat glands were found on the face, the hands or the trunk. Tear front movement over the cornea was also visualized and abnormal patterns were identified in obligate heterozygotes. Whole body skin temperature patterns, obtained with an Agema 780 Medical Thermovision system, identified abnormal skin temperature distributions, including characteristic aberrant "cascade" back patterns, in obligate carriers. Two out of six "at risk" females had skin temperature patterns comparable with obligate heterozygotes and we have tentatively concluded that they are carriers. Thermal imaging may be used for the examination of "at risk" non-manifesting females in families with a single affected male. The results of this study suggest that the random X-inactivation in females with XHED, as well as producing relatively large skin areas with sweat pore aplasia, is also associated with abnormal temperature patterns that are consistent with altered peripheral vascular perfusion.

  4. Calculations of atmospheric transmittance in the 11 micrometer window for estimating skin temperature from VISSR infrared brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating the atmospheric transmittance in the 10 to 20 micro m spectral band from a known temperature and dewpoint profile, and then using this transmittance to estimate the surface (skin) temperature from a VISSR observation in the 11 micro m window is presented. Parameterizations are drawn from the literature for computing the molecular absorption due to the water vapor continuum, water vapor lines, and carbon dioxide lines. The FORTRAN code is documented for this application, and the sensitivity of the derived skin temperature to variations in the model's parameters is calculated. The VISSR calibration uncertainties are identified as the largest potential source of error.

  5. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.; Emery, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. During this one year grant, design and construction of an improved infrared radiometer was completed and testing was initiated. In addition, development of an improved parametric model for the bulk-skin temperature difference was completed using data from the previous version of the radiometer. This model will comprise a key component of an improved procedure for estimating the bulk SST from satellites. The results comprised a significant portion of the Ph.D. thesis completed by one graduate student and they are currently being converted into a journal publication.

  6. A comparison of urban heat islands mapped using skin temperature, air temperature, and apparent temperature (Humidex), for the greater Vancouver area.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hung Chak; Knudby, Anders; Xu, Yongming; Hodul, Matus; Aminipouri, Mehdi

    2016-02-15

    Apparent temperature is more closely related to mortality during extreme heat events than other temperature variables, yet spatial epidemiology studies typically use skin temperature (also known as land surface temperature) to quantify heat exposure because it is relatively easy to map from satellite data. An empirical approach to map apparent temperature at the neighborhood scale, which relies on publicly available weather station observations and spatial data layers combined in a random forest regression model, was demonstrated for greater Vancouver, Canada. Model errors were acceptable (cross-validated RMSE=2.04 °C) and the resulting map of apparent temperature, calibrated for a typical hot summer day, corresponded well with past temperature research in the area. A comparison with field measurements as well as similar maps of skin temperature and air temperature revealed that skin temperature was poorly correlated with both air temperature (R(2)=0.38) and apparent temperature (R(2)=0.39). While the latter two were more similar (R(2)=0.87), apparent temperature was predicted to exceed air temperature by more than 5 °C in several urban areas as well as around the confluence of the Pitt and Fraser rivers. We conclude that skin temperature is not a suitable proxy for human heat exposure, and that spatial epidemiology studies could benefit from mapping apparent temperature, using an approach similar to the one reported here, to better quantify differences in heat exposure that exist across an urban landscape.

  7. Validation of the thermophysiological model by Fiala for prediction of local skin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Natividad; Psikuta, Agnes; Kuklane, Kalev; Quesada, José Ignacio Priego; de Anda, Rosa María Cibrián Ortiz; Soriano, Pedro Pérez; Palmer, Rosario Salvador; Corberán, José Miguel; Rossi, René Michel; Annaheim, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The most complete and realistic physiological data are derived from direct measurements during human experiments; however, they present some limitations such as ethical concerns, time and cost burden. Thermophysiological models are able to predict human thermal response in a wide range of environmental conditions, but their use is limited due to lack of validation. The aim of this work was to validate the thermophysiological model by Fiala for prediction of local skin temperatures against a dedicated database containing 43 different human experiments representing a wide range of conditions. The validation was conducted based on root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) and bias. The thermophysiological model by Fiala showed a good precision when predicting core and mean skin temperature (rmsd 0.26 and 0.92 °C, respectively) and also local skin temperatures for most body sites (average rmsd for local skin temperatures 1.32 °C). However, an increased deviation of the predictions was observed for the forehead skin temperature (rmsd of 1.63 °C) and for the thigh during exercising exposures (rmsd of 1.41 °C). Possible reasons for the observed deviations are lack of information on measurement circumstances (hair, head coverage interference) or an overestimation of the sweat evaporative cooling capacity for the head and thigh, respectively. This work has highlighted the importance of collecting details about the clothing worn and how and where the sensors were attached to the skin for achieving more precise results in the simulations.

  8. Validation of the thermophysiological model by Fiala for prediction of local skin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Natividad; Psikuta, Agnes; Kuklane, Kalev; Quesada, José Ignacio Priego; de Anda, Rosa María Cibrián Ortiz; Soriano, Pedro Pérez; Palmer, Rosario Salvador; Corberán, José Miguel; Rossi, René Michel; Annaheim, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The most complete and realistic physiological data are derived from direct measurements during human experiments; however, they present some limitations such as ethical concerns, time and cost burden. Thermophysiological models are able to predict human thermal response in a wide range of environmental conditions, but their use is limited due to lack of validation. The aim of this work was to validate the thermophysiological model by Fiala for prediction of local skin temperatures against a dedicated database containing 43 different human experiments representing a wide range of conditions. The validation was conducted based on root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) and bias. The thermophysiological model by Fiala showed a good precision when predicting core and mean skin temperature (rmsd 0.26 and 0.92 °C, respectively) and also local skin temperatures for most body sites (average rmsd for local skin temperatures 1.32 °C). However, an increased deviation of the predictions was observed for the forehead skin temperature (rmsd of 1.63 °C) and for the thigh during exercising exposures (rmsd of 1.41 °C). Possible reasons for the observed deviations are lack of information on measurement circumstances (hair, head coverage interference) or an overestimation of the sweat evaporative cooling capacity for the head and thigh, respectively. This work has highlighted the importance of collecting details about the clothing worn and how and where the sensors were attached to the skin for achieving more precise results in the simulations.

  9. A comparison of temperature profile depending on skin types for laser hair removal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Gwi-Won; Youn, Jong-In

    2014-11-01

    Although numerous lasers with different wavelengths are available for laser hair removal, their use in individuals with dark-pigmented skin remains a challenge. The present study aims to develop a numerical heat diffusion model considering skin types over various wavelengths. This numerical mode uses Pennes approximation to represent heat from metabolism, blood perfusion and an external heating source. The heat diffusion model is experimentally validated by using agar-based skin tissue phantoms. Diode lasers with four different wavelengths were used with two antithetical skin models. The pulse width and beam spot size were set to 200 ms and 1 cm(2), respectively. Temperature distribution along the hair structure and skin tissue was examined to determine both thermal confinement and heat transfer to the hair follicle. Experimental results are well matched with the numerical results. The results show that for the light skin model, thermal confinement is well achieved over various wavelengths, and treatment efficacy is expected to be better at a shorter wavelength. Otherwise, for the dark skin model, thermal confinement is poorly achieved as the wavelength decreases (<808 nm) and the temperature gap between the hair tip and the hair root is significantly large compared with the light skin model, which may lead to adverse effects. We believe that the developed numerical model will help to establish optimal laser parameters for different individuals during laser hair removal.

  10. Assessment of model land skin temperature and surface-atmosphere coupling using remotely sensed estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Isabel; Boussetta, Souhail; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Viterbo, Pedro; Beljaars, Anton; Sandu, Irina

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between land surface and the atmosphere is a key feature in Earth System Modelling for exploiting the predictability of slowly evolving geophysical variables (e.g., soil moisture or vegetation state), and for correctly representing rapid variations within the diurnal cycle, particularly relevant in data assimilation applications. Land Surface Temperature (LST) routinely estimated from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) by the LandSAF is used to assess the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) skin temperature. LST can be interpreted as a radiative temperature of the model surface, which is close to the ECMWF modelled skin temperature. It is shown that the model tends to slightly overestimate skin temperature during night-time and underestimate daytime values. Such underestimation of daily amplitudes is particularly pronounced in (semi-)arid regions, suggesting a misrepresentation of surface energy fluxes in those areas. The LST estimated from MSG is used to evaluate the impact of changes in some of the ECMWF model surface parameters. The introduction of more realistic model vegetation is shown to have a positive, but limited impact on skin temperature: long integration leads to an equilibrium state where changes in the latent heat flux and soil moisture availability compensate each other. Revised surface roughness lengths for heat and momentum, however, lead to overall positive impact on daytime skin temperature, mostly due to a reduction of sensible heat flux. This is particularly relevant in non-vegetated areas, unaffected by model vegetation. The reduction of skin conductivity, a parameter which controls the heat transfer to ground by diffusion, is shown to further improve the model skin temperature. A revision of the vertical soil discretization is also expected to improve the match to the LST, particularly over sparsely vegetated areas. The impact of a finer discretization (10-layer soil) is currently ongoing; preliminary

  11. Epidermal photonic devices for quantitative imaging of temperature and thermal transport characteristics of the skin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Zhang, Yihui; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jia, Lin; Jang, Kyung-In; Webb, R Chad; Fu, Haoran; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Guoyan; Shi, Luke; Shah, Deesha; Huang, Xian; Xu, Baoxing; Yu, Cunjiang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-09-19

    Characterization of temperature and thermal transport properties of the skin can yield important information of relevance to both clinical medicine and basic research in skin physiology. Here we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like, or 'epidermal', photonic device that combines colorimetric temperature indicators with wireless stretchable electronics for thermal measurements when softly laminated on the skin surface. The sensors exploit thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates; the electronics provide means for controlled, local heating by radio frequency signals. Algorithms for extracting patterns of colour recorded from these devices with a digital camera and computational tools for relating the results to underlying thermal processes near the skin surface lend quantitative value to the resulting data. Application examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with milli-Kelvin precision (±50 mK) and sub-millimetre spatial resolution. Demonstrations in reactive hyperaemia assessments of blood flow and hydration analysis establish relevance to cardiovascular health and skin care, respectively.

  12. Epidermal photonic devices for quantitative imaging of temperature and thermal transport characteristics of the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Zhang, Yihui; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jia, Lin; Jang, Kyung-In; Chad Webb, R.; Fu, Haoran; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Guoyan; Shi, Luke; Shah, Deesha; Huang, Xian; Xu, Baoxing; Yu, Cunjiang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-09-01

    Characterization of temperature and thermal transport properties of the skin can yield important information of relevance to both clinical medicine and basic research in skin physiology. Here we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like, or ‘epidermal’, photonic device that combines colorimetric temperature indicators with wireless stretchable electronics for thermal measurements when softly laminated on the skin surface. The sensors exploit thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates; the electronics provide means for controlled, local heating by radio frequency signals. Algorithms for extracting patterns of colour recorded from these devices with a digital camera and computational tools for relating the results to underlying thermal processes near the skin surface lend quantitative value to the resulting data. Application examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with milli-Kelvin precision (±50 mK) and sub-millimetre spatial resolution. Demonstrations in reactive hyperaemia assessments of blood flow and hydration analysis establish relevance to cardiovascular health and skin care, respectively.

  13. Cooling-sensitive TRPM8 is thermostat of skin temperature against cooling.

    PubMed

    Tajino, Koji; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Dhaka, Ajay; Kobayashi, Shigeo

    2011-03-02

    We have shown that cutaneous cooling-sensitive receptors can work as thermostats of skin temperature against cooling. However, molecule of the thermostat is not known. Here, we studied whether cooling-sensitive TRPM8 channels act as thermostats. TRPM8 in HEK293 cells generated output (y) when temperature (T) was below threshold of 28.4°C. Output (y) is given by two equations: At T >28.4°C, y = 0; At T <28.4°C, y  =  -k(T - 28.4°C). These equations show that TRPM8 is directional comparator to elicits output (y) depending on negative value of thermal difference (ΔT  =  T - 28.4°C). If negative ΔT-dependent output of TRPM8 in the skin induces responses to warm the skin for minimizing ΔT recursively, TRPM8 acts as thermostats against cooling. With TRPM8-deficient mice, we explored whether TRPM8 induces responses to warm the skin against cooling. In behavioral regulation, when room temperature was 10°C, TRPM8 induced behavior to move to heated floor (35°C) for warming the sole skin. In autonomic regulation, TRPM8 induced activities of thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT) against cooling. When menthol was applied to the whole trunk skin at neutral room temperature (27°C), TRPM8 induced a rise in core temperature, which warmed the trunk skin slightly. In contrast, when room was cooled from 27 to 10°C, TRPM8 induced a small rise in core temperature, but skin temperature was severely reduced in both TRPM8-deficient and wild-type mice by a large heat leak to the surroundings. This shows that TRPM8-driven endothermic system is less effective for maintenance of skin temperature against cooling. In conclusion, we found that TRPM8 is molecule of thermostat of skin temperature against cooling.

  14. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of temperature-related skin diseases in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., as measured by quantitative histology, skin transcriptomics and composition.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L B; Boltana, S; Obach, A; McGurk, C; Waagbø, R; MacKenzie, S

    2015-11-01

    Skin integrity is recognized as of vital consideration for both animal welfare and final product quality of farmed fish. This study examines the effects of three different rearing temperatures (4, 10 and 16 °C) on the skin of healthy Atlantic salmon post-smolts. Changes in skin condition were assessed by the means of skin composition analyses, quantitative histology assessments and transcriptome analysis. Level of protein, vitamin C and vitamin E was significantly higher at 16 °C compared with 4 °C. Quantitative histology measurements showed that the epidermal thickness decreased from low to high temperature, whereas the epidermal area comprising mucous cells increased. The difference was only significant between 4 and 16 °C. Both high and low temperature exhibited significant changes in the skin transcriptome. A number of immune-related transcripts responded at both temperatures. Contrary to well-described immunosuppressive effects of low water temperature on systemic immunity, a subtle increase in skin-mediated immunity was observed, suggesting a pre-activation of the mucosal system at 4 °C. Upregulation of a number of heat-shock proteins correlating with a decrease in epidermal thickness suggested a stress response in the skin at high temperature. The results demonstrate distinctive temperature-related effects on the skin of Atlantic salmon.

  15. A decorin-deficient matrix affects skin chondroitin/dermatan sulfate levels and keratinocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Nikolovska, Katerina; Renke, Jana K.; Jungmann, Oliver; Grobe, Kay; Iozzo, Renato V.; Zamfir, Alina D.; Seidler, Daniela G.

    2016-01-01

    Decorin is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan harboring a single glycosaminoglycan chain, which, in skin, is mainly composed of dermatan sulfate (DS). Mutant mice with targeted disruption of the decorin gene (Dcn−/−) exhibit an abnormal collagen architecture in the dermis and reduced tensile strength, collectively leading to a skin fragility phenotype. Notably, Ehlers-Danlos patients with mutations in enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of DS display a similar phenotype, and recent studies indicate that DS is involved in growth factor binding and signaling. To determine the impact of the loss of DS-decorin in the dermis, we analyzed the glycosaminoglycan content of Dcn−/− and wild-type mouse skin. The total amount of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) was increased in the Dcn−/− skin, but was overall less sulfated with a significant reduction in bisulfated ΔDiS2,X (X=4 or 6) disaccharide units, due to the reduced expression of uronyl 2-O sulfotransferase (Ust). With increasing age, sulfation declined; however, Dcn−/− CS/DS was constantly undersulfated vis-à-vis wild-type. Functionally, we found altered fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)-7 and -2 binding due to changes in the micro-heterogeneity of skin Dcn−/− CS/DS. To better delineate the role of decorin, we used a 3D Dcn−/− fibroblast cell culture model. We found that the CS/DS extracts of wild-type and Dcn−/− fibroblasts were similar to the skin sugars, and this correlated with the lack of uronyl 2-O sulfotransferase in the Dcn−/− fibroblasts. Moreover, Ffg7 binding to total CS/DS was attenuated in the Dcn−/− samples. Surprisingly, wild-type CS/DS significantly reduced the binding of Fgf7 to keratinocytes in concentration dependent manner unlike the Dcn−/− CS/DS that only affected the binding at higher concentrations. Although binding to cell-surfaces was quite similar at higher concentrations, keratinocyte proliferation was differentially affected. Higher concentration of

  16. Different responses of the skin temperature to physical exercise: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neves, Eduardo B; Vilaca-Alves, Jose; Antunes, Natacha; Felisberto, Ivo M V; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor M

    2015-08-01

    Studies suggest that skin temperature behavior varies according to the type of exercise, intensity, duration, muscle mass and subcutaneous fat layer. In this sense, the aim of this study was to investigate the skin temperature behavior in the active muscles and other body segments, during and after exercise, according to the type and intensity of the exercise. A systematic literature review was conducted between November 2014 and March 2015 in the Web of Science database, using the terms "thermography" and "exercise" and "muscle" to achieve the objective of this study. During the research were found 55 scientific articles which were subjected to a selection process. Inclusion criteria were: Studies in human beings and original research. The exclusion criterion was the presence of subjects with some kind of disease. The seven papers that make up the present review are dated between 2008 and 2015. From all analyzed studies, it was possible to understand the general behavior of the active muscle skin temperature during the exercise, immediately after and in the 48h after exercise, according to the type and intensity of the exercise performed, which are illustrated in two figures. It can be concluded that the skin temperature over active muscles increases during high intensity anaerobic exercise, decreases slowly after exercise and increases again in the days after the exercise. On the other hand, during low intensity aerobic exercise, skin temperature over active muscles decreases, returning to normal values a few minutes after it and present a small rise in the following days. With regard to the skin temperature over non-active muscles, it can be seen that it decreases during exercise, returning to normal values a few minutes after it and rise similarly to the skin temperature over active muscles in the following days, in all types of exercises studied.

  17. Wheelchair cushion effect on skin temperature, heat flux, and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S F; Palmieri, V; Cochran, G V

    1980-05-01

    For patients subject to decubitus ulcers, wheelchair cushions should be prescribed with knowledge of the cushion's effect on the thermal as well as mechanical environment of the skin. To define thermal effects that may be encountered during routine use, tests werr made on 24 commercially available cushions. Skin temperature, heat flux and relative humidity were measured under the ischial tuberosities of a normal 24-year-old man during a 1-hour period of sitting on each cushion. After 1 hour, skin temperatures increased by means of 3.4 C and 2.8 C on foams and viscoelastic foams and there were slight decreases in heat flux as compared with control values in air. On gels, skin temperatures remained constant and heat flux increased, while water "floatation" pads caused a mean skin temperature decreased of 2.7 C along with a marked increase in heat flux. Relative humidity at the skin cushion interface increased by 10.4%, 22.8% and 19.8% on foams, gels and water floatation pads, as compared with room air values. Representative cushions from each of the general types (foam, viscoelastic foam, gel and water floatation) also were subjected to 2-hour tests which indicated the measured parameters continued to change asymptotically.

  18. Skin temperature increase mediated by wearable, long duration, low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Matthew D.; Huang, Wenyi; Ghanem, Angi; Guo, Yuan; Lewis, George K.

    2017-03-01

    One of the safety concerns with the delivery of therapeutic ultrasound is overheating of the transducer-skin interface due to poor or improper coupling. The objective of this research was to define a model that could be used to calculate the heating in the skin as a result of a novel, wearable long-duration ultrasound device. This model was used to determine that the maximum heating in the skin remained below the minimum threshold necessary to cause thermal injury over multiple hours of use. In addition to this model data, a human clinical study used wire thermocouples on the skin surface to measure heating characteristics during treatment with the sustained ultrasound system. Parametric analysis of the model determined that the maximum temperature increase is at the surface of the skin ranged from 40-41.8° C when perfusion was taken into account. The clinical data agreed well with the model predictions. The average steady state temperature observed across all 44 subjects was 40°C. The maximum temperature observed was less than 44° C, which is clinically safe for over 5 hours of human skin contact. The resultant clinical temperature data paired well with the model data suggesting the model can be used for future transducer and ultrasound system design simulation. As a result, the device was validated for thermal safety for typical users and use conditions.

  19. Ontogeny and aging of the distal skin temperature rhythm in humans.

    PubMed

    Batinga, H; Martinez-Nicolas, A; Zornoza-Moreno, M; Sánchez-Solis, M; Larqué, E; Mondéjar, M T; Moreno-Casbas, M; García, F J; Campos, M; Rol, M A; Madrid, J A

    2015-01-01

    In circadian terms, human ontogeny is characterized by the emergence of a daily pattern, from a previous ultradian pattern, for most variables during the first 6 months of life. Circadian aging in humans is characterized by a phase advance, accompanied by rhythm fragmentation and flattening. Despite an expanding body of literature focused on distal skin temperature, little information is available about the ontogeny and practically nothing about age-related changes in this rhythm. Thus, the aim was to evaluate the degree of maturation and aging of the circadian pattern of distal skin temperature to identify those parameters that are modified throughout life and could be used to differentiate subjects according to their age. For this, distal skin temperature was measured in 197 volunteers (55 % women), including babies aged 15 days (30 subjects), 1 month (28 subjects), 3 months (31 subjects), and 6 months (10 subjects); young adults aged 19 years (37 subjects); middle-aged persons aged 46 years (27 subjects); older people aged 72 (34 subjects). Circadian system maturation was associated with an increase in amplitude and a reduction in skin temperature during sleep. During adulthood, women showed a more robust pattern (lower fragmentation, and higher night-time temperature, amplitude, circadian function index, and first harmonic relative power); however, these differences were lost with aging, a period of life that was consistently associated with a phase advance of the rhythm. In summary, distal skin temperature pattern can be used as a robust variable to discern between different ages throughout the life.

  20. Implementation of Coupled Skin Temperature Analysis and Bias Correction in a Global Atmospheric Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radakovich, Jon; Bosilovich, M.; Chern, Jiun-dar; daSilva, Arlindo

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/NCAR Finite Volume GCM (fvGCM) with the NCAR CLM (Community Land Model) version 2.0 was integrated into the NASA/GMAO Finite Volume Data Assimilation System (fvDAS). A new method was developed for coupled skin temperature assimilation and bias correction where the analysis increment and bias correction term is passed into the CLM2 and considered a forcing term in the solution to the energy balance. For our purposes, the fvDAS CLM2 was run at 1 deg. x 1.25 deg. horizontal resolution with 55 vertical levels. We assimilate the ISCCP-DX (30 km resolution) surface temperature product. The atmospheric analysis was performed 6-hourly, while the skin temperature analysis was performed 3-hourly. The bias correction term, which was updated at the analysis times, was added to the skin temperature tendency equation at every timestep. In this presentation, we focus on the validation of the surface energy budget at the in situ reference sites for the Coordinated Enhanced Observation Period (CEOP). We will concentrate on sites that include independent skin temperature measurements and complete energy budget observations for the month of July 2001. In addition, MODIS skin temperature will be used for validation. Several assimilations were conducted and preliminary results will be presented.

  1. Time required to document temperature by electronic skin thermometer in a healthy neonate.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananada Shankar; Chowdhury, T; Bandhopadhya, D; Ghosh, Gautam

    2009-12-01

    We studied the actual time taken to document temperature in a stable neonate by an electronic digital skin thermometer with automatic time beeper. We studied 100 neonates after initial stabilization. The mean time required for documenting the temperature by a electronic thermometer in axilla was 56.34+/-1.54 secs for term neonates (>2500g) and 54.87+/-1.23 secs for low birth weight (<2500g). The skin temperature measured simultaneously by the ordinary mercury thermometer kept for traditional 3 minutes supported the electronic measurement (P < 0.01).

  2. High Skin Temperature and Hypohydration Impair Aerobic Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    SkBF (I min-1) 38 30 8 1.1 38 32 6 1.5 38 34 4 2.2 38 36 2 4.4 39 30 9 1~ 39 32 7 1.3 39 34 5 1.8 39 36 3 2.9 * Equation for skin blood flow...significantly after 20 min of cycling when Tc was similar in both trials ( "-󈧪oC), while Tsk was already >5°C higher in the heat. Performance...common and not associated with reduced performance. Although Tsk was not measured, the Tsk prediction equation of Adams ( 1977) for outdoor running in

  3. Skin temperature profiles on the human chest and in the wrist area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissilae, Seppo M.; Ahola, Onni; Heikkilae, Ilkka; Ruha, Antti; Kopola, Harri K.

    1996-01-01

    Skin temperatures on the chest and in the wrist area are interesting for continuous monitoring because they can be easily instrumented using an elastic belt or wristband which do not hamper movement in sports, for example. An infrared thermograph camera and NTC thermistors were used to take temperature profiles at these sensing points with a resolution of 0.1 degrees Celsius, and colored thermograms were used to analyze and compare the results. The effect of environmental changes on the skin temperature in the wrist area was studied by cooling and heating the fingers in water at 10 degrees Celsius and 40 degrees Celsius, and the effects of a loading situation on the chest area and wrist area were tested by means of a 30 min bicycle ergometer exercise. NTC thermistors were also used to measure wrist and chest temperatures in two environmental tests at minus 10 degrees Celsius and plus 60 degrees Celsius. Cooling of the fingers naturally reduces the skin temperature in the wrist area and heating increases it due to the venous circulation. The area of the radial artery in the wrist seems to be the most stable temperature point, altering by only about 2 degrees Celsius, whereas the temperature change at other points is up to 4 degrees Celsius. The bicycle ergometer exercise caused a decrease in skin temperature on the chest because of sweating. At the same time the skin temperature on the wrist decreased by about 1.5 degrees Celsius after the first 20 minutes and then returned to its previous level. The area of the radial artery in the wrist seems to be an attractive point for continuous temperature monitoring, especially under normal conditions, and also seems to reflect body temperature quite well upon loading and under different environmental conditions.

  4. Do Haematophagous Bugs Assess Skin Surface Temperature to Detect Blood Vessels?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Raquel A.; Lazzari, Claudio R.; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.; Pereira, Marcos H.

    2007-01-01

    Background It is known that some blood-sucking insects have the ability to reach vessels under the host skin with their mouthparts to feed blood from inside them. However, the process by which they locate these vessels remains largely unknown. Less than 5% of the skin is occupied by blood vessels and thus, it is not likely that insects rely on a “random search strategy”, since it would increase the probability of being killed by their hosts. Indeed, heterogeneities along the skin surface might offer exploitable information for guiding insect's bites. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the bug Rhodnius prolixus can evaluate temperature discontinuities along the body surface in order to locate vessels before piercing the host skin. When placed over a rabbit ear, the bug's first bites were mostly directed towards the main vessels. When insects were confronted to artificial linear heat sources presenting a temperature gradient against the background, most bites were directly addressed to the warmer linear source, notwithstanding the temperature of both, the source and the background. Finally, tests performed using uni- and bilaterally antennectomized insects revealed that the bilateral integration of thermal inputs from both antennae is necessary for precisely directing bites. Conclusions/Significance R. prolixus may be able to exploit the temperature differences observed over the skin surface to locate blood vessles. Bugs bite the warmest targets regardless of the target/background temperatures, suggesting that they do not bite choosing a preferred temperature, but select temperature discontinuities along the skin. This strategy seems to be an efficient one for finding blood vessels within a wide temperature range, allowing finding them on different hosts, as well as on different areas of the host body. Our study also adds new insight about the use of antennal thermal inputs by blood sucking bugs. PMID:17895973

  5. Relationship between skin temperature and muscle activation during incremental cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Priego Quesada, Jose I; Carpes, Felipe P; Bini, Rodrigo R; Salvador Palmer, Rosario; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M

    2015-02-01

    While different studies showed that better fitness level adds to the efficiency of the thermoregulatory system, the relationship between muscular effort and skin temperature is still unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the relationship between neuromuscular activation and skin temperature during cycle exercise. Ten physically active participants performed an incremental workload cycling test to exhaustion while neuromuscular activations were recorded (via surface electromyography - EMG) from rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis. Thermographic images were recorded before, immediately after and 10 min after finishing the cycling test, at four body regions of interest corresponding to the muscles where neuromuscular activations were monitored. Frequency band analysis was conducted to assess spectral properties of EMG signals in order to infer on priority in recruitment of motor units. Significant inverse relationship between changes in skin temperature and changes in overall neuromuscular activation for vastus lateralis was observed (r<-0.5 and p<0.04). Significant positive relationship was observed between skin temperature and low frequency components of neuromuscular activation from vastus lateralis (r>0.7 and p<0.01). Participants with larger overall activation and reduced low frequency component for vastus lateralis activation presented a better adaptive response of their thermoregulatory system by showing fewer changes in skin temperature after incremental cycling test.

  6. Skin temperature, thermal comfort, sweating, clothing and activity of men sledging in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Budd, G. M.

    1966-01-01

    1. Three men were studied while dog-sledging 320 km in 12 days in Antarctica. Conventional Antarctic clothing (`sweaters and windproofs') was worn. Four hundred observations were made of medial thigh skin temperature, thermal comfort, sweating, clothing, activity and environmental conditions. 2. Work occupied an average of 11·0 hr/day and sleep 7·5 hr. Estimated daily energy expenditure averaged 5100 kcal (range 2740-6660 kcal). 3. Skin temperature fell on exposure to cold despite the clothing worn, but was not changed by the level of activity. Sweating, and thermal comfort, were directly related to both skin temperature and activity. 4. Inside the tent, the modal value of skin temperature was 33° C (range 27-36° C) and the men were comfortable in 94% of observations. 5. During the 9·2 hr/day spent outdoors the modal value of skin temperature was 27° C (range 18-33° C) and the men felt too cold (but did not shiver) in 11% (range 7-20%) of observations, suggesting that cold stress was not negligible. However, they also felt too hot in 20% of observations and were sweating in 23%. PMID:5914254

  7. Relationship of skin temperature to sympathetic dysfunction in diabetic at-risk feet.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pi-Chang; Lin, Hong-Da; Jao, Shyh-Hua Eric; Ku, Yan-Chiou; Chan, Rai-Chi; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2006-07-01

    The relationship of plantar skin temperature to diabetic neuropathy was studied using clinical, nerve conduction and autonomic evaluations. The sympathetic skin response (SSR) was found present in both feet of 25 control subjects and 29 (out of 69) diabetic patients (SSR+ group). For those diabetic patients absent with the SSR in both feet, 18 patients (at-risk group) had preulcerative skin lesions (dry and fissured skin) and 22 did not (SSR- group). The at-risk group showed significantly higher mean foot temperature (30.2+/-1.3 degrees Celsius) than the SSR- (27.9+/-1.7 degrees Celsius), the SSR+ (27.1+/-2.0 degrees Celsius) and the control group (26.8+/-1.8 degrees Celsius). The SSR- group had smaller temperature differences (7.2+/-1.7 degrees Celsius versus 8.6+/-1.6 degrees Celsius, p<0.05) and smaller normalized temperature (referencing to the forehead temperature) (0.19 versus 0.24, p<0.01) than the SSR+ group. Although the three diabetic groups had no significant differences in clinical and cardiovascular abnormalities, the at-risk group showed more nerve conduction abnormalities than the SSR- and SSR+ groups (55% versus 23% and 14%, p<0.02). This study indicated that the thermoregulatory sweating abnormality signified early sympathetic damage in diabetic feet. Assessing skin conditions and sudomotor activities should help identify small fiber neuropathy in diabetic patients with at-risk feet conditions.

  8. Integrating a human thermoregulatory model with a clothing model to predict core and skin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Weng, Wenguo; Wang, Faming; Song, Guowen

    2017-05-01

    This paper aims to integrate a human thermoregulatory model with a clothing model to predict core and skin temperatures. The human thermoregulatory model, consisting of an active system and a passive system, was used to determine the thermoregulation and heat exchanges within the body. The clothing model simulated heat and moisture transfer from the human skin to the environment through the microenvironment and fabric. In this clothing model, the air gap between skin and clothing, as well as clothing properties such as thickness, thermal conductivity, density, porosity, and tortuosity were taken into consideration. The simulated core and mean skin temperatures were compared to the published experimental results of subject tests at three levels of ambient temperatures of 20 °C, 30 °C, and 40 °C. Although lower signal-to-noise-ratio was observed, the developed model demonstrated positive performance at predicting core temperatures with a maximum difference between the simulations and measurements of no more than 0.43 °C. Generally, the current model predicted the mean skin temperatures with reasonable accuracy. It could be applied to predict human physiological responses and assess thermal comfort and heat stress.

  9. Thermal imaging of exercise-associated skin temperature changes in trained and untrained female subjects.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Gargano, Marco; Gondola, Marco; Dellerma, Nicoletta; Caumo, Andrea; Alberti, Giampietro

    2013-04-01

    Heat dissipation during sport exercise is an important physiological mechanism that may influence athletic performance. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that differences exist in the dynamics of exercise-associated skin temperature changes between trained and untrained subjects. We investigated thermoregulation of a local muscle area (muscle-tendon unit) involved in a localized steady-load exercise (standing heels raise) using infrared thermography. Seven trained female subjects and seven untrained female controls were studied. Each subject performed standing heels raise exercise for 2 min. Thermal images were recorded prior to exercise (1 min), during exercise (2 min), and after exercise (7 min). The analysis of thermal images provided the skin temperature time course, which was characterized by a set of descriptive parameters. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures detected a significant interaction (p = 0.03) between group and time, thus indicating that athletic subjects increased their skin temperature differently with respect to untrained subjects. This was confirmed by comparing the parameters describing the speed of rise of skin temperature. It was found that trained subjects responded to exercise more quickly than untrained controls (p < 0.05). In conclusion, physical training improves the ability to rapidly elevate skin temperature in response to a localized exercise in female subjects.

  10. Dysbiotic Bacterial and Fungal Communities Not Restricted to Clinically Affected Skin Sites in Dandruff

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Renan C.; Camargo-Penna, Pedro H.; de Moraes, Vanessa C. S.; De Vecchi, Rodrigo; Clavaud, Cécile; Breton, Lionel; Braz, Antonio S. K.; Paulino, Luciana C.

    2016-01-01

    Dandruff is a prevalent chronic inflammatory skin condition of the scalp that has been associated with Malassezia yeasts. However, the microbial role has not been elucidated yet, and the etiology of the disorder remains poorly understood. Using high-throughput 16S rDNA and ITS1 sequencing, we characterized cutaneous bacterial and fungal microbiotas from healthy and dandruff subjects, comparing scalp and forehead (lesional and non-lesional skin sites). Bacterial and fungal communities from dandruff analyzed at genus level differed in comparison with healthy ones, presenting higher diversity and greater intragroup variation. The microbial shift was observed also in non-lesional sites from dandruff subjects, suggesting that dandruff is related to a systemic process that is not restricted to the site exhibiting clinical symptoms. In contrast, Malassezia microbiota analyzed at species level did not differ according to health status. A 2-step OTU assignment using combined databases substantially increased fungal assigned sequences, and revealed the presence of highly prevalent uncharacterized Malassezia organisms (>37% of the reads). Although clinical symptoms of dandruff manifest locally, microbial dysbiosis beyond clinically affected skin sites suggests that subjects undergo systemic alterations, which could be considered for redefining therapeutic approaches. PMID:27909689

  11. Dysbiotic Bacterial and Fungal Communities Not Restricted to Clinically Affected Skin Sites in Dandruff.

    PubMed

    Soares, Renan C; Camargo-Penna, Pedro H; de Moraes, Vanessa C S; De Vecchi, Rodrigo; Clavaud, Cécile; Breton, Lionel; Braz, Antonio S K; Paulino, Luciana C

    2016-01-01

    Dandruff is a prevalent chronic inflammatory skin condition of the scalp that has been associated with Malassezia yeasts. However, the microbial role has not been elucidated yet, and the etiology of the disorder remains poorly understood. Using high-throughput 16S rDNA and ITS1 sequencing, we characterized cutaneous bacterial and fungal microbiotas from healthy and dandruff subjects, comparing scalp and forehead (lesional and non-lesional skin sites). Bacterial and fungal communities from dandruff analyzed at genus level differed in comparison with healthy ones, presenting higher diversity and greater intragroup variation. The microbial shift was observed also in non-lesional sites from dandruff subjects, suggesting that dandruff is related to a systemic process that is not restricted to the site exhibiting clinical symptoms. In contrast, Malassezia microbiota analyzed at species level did not differ according to health status. A 2-step OTU assignment using combined databases substantially increased fungal assigned sequences, and revealed the presence of highly prevalent uncharacterized Malassezia organisms (>37% of the reads). Although clinical symptoms of dandruff manifest locally, microbial dysbiosis beyond clinically affected skin sites suggests that subjects undergo systemic alterations, which could be considered for redefining therapeutic approaches.

  12. Facial cold-induced vasodilation and skin temperature during exposure to cold wind.

    PubMed

    Brajkovic, Dragan; Ducharme, Michel B

    2006-04-01

    One purpose of this study was to characterize the facial skin temperature and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) response of 12 subjects (six males and six females) during exposure to cold wind (i.e., -10 to 10 degrees C; 2, 5, and 8 m/s wind speed). This study found that at each wind speed, facial skin temperature decreased as ambient temperature decreased. The percentage of subjects showing facial CIVD decreased significantly at an ambient temperature above -10 degrees C. A similar CIVD percentage was observed between 0 degrees C dry and 10 degrees C wet (face sprayed with fine water mist) at each wind speed. No CIVDs were observed during the 10 degrees C dry condition at any wind speed. The incidence of CIVD response was more uniform across facial sites when there was a greater cold stress (i.e., -10 degrees C and 8 m/s wind). Another objective of the study was to examine the effect of the thermal state of the body (as reflected by core temperature) on the facial skin temperature response during rest and exercise. This study found that nose skin temperature was significantly higher in exercising subjects with an elevated core temperature even though there was no significant difference in face skin temperature between the two conditions. Therefore, this finding suggests that acral regions of the face, such as the nose, are more sensitive to changes in the thermal state of the body, and hence will stay warmer relative to other parts of the face during exercise in the cold.

  13. Temperature and burn injury prediction of human skin exposed to microwaves: a model analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Sukru; Helhel, Selcuk; Bilgin, Suleyman

    2011-08-01

    A one-dimensional multi-layer model is presented to characterize skin temperature rises and burn processes resulting from skin exposure to microwaves. Temperature variations and damage function analyses in the skin tissue exposed to microwaves were predicted depending on blood perfusion rate, thermal conductivity, power density, and exposure time. Thermal wave model was applied and the bio-heat transfer equation was solved using the finite difference time domain method. The thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer predicts a lower temperature rise than a model that uses Pennes' equation. When approaching steady state, the solutions overlaps with that obtained using the Pennes' equation. The results obtained may help to analyze the consequences of short-time high-power MW exposures in biological tissues.

  14. Characteristics of wettedness and equi-skin temperature line in the evaporative regulation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochida, T.

    1983-07-01

    As a result of the analysis of physiological experimental data, the characteristics of the wettedness were clarified, i.e., the value of the wettedness is not constant but differs in accordance with the environmental humidity even when the skin temperature is the same, and it was shown that the evaporative heat loss from the skin surface is inversely proportional to the wetttedness. Based on the properties of the wetedness observed, a new thermal sensation chart in the evaporative regulation region was proposed as an index for evaluating the warmth or the coldness in the environment. The feature of the present chart is that the locus of the equal skin temperature appears as a curved line on the psychrometric chart and that the wettedness on the equi-skin temperature line is not constant but takes varying values. The curved equal skin temperature line means that the influence of the environmental humidity on thermal sensation becomes smaller as the humidity of the environmental humidity on thermal sensation becomes smaller as the humidity of the environment is lowered.

  15. An assessment of skin temperature gradients in a tropical primate using infrared thermography and subcutaneous implants.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cynthia L; Scheidel, Caleb; Glander, Kenneth E; Williams, Susan H; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Infrared thermography has become a useful tool to assess surface temperatures of animals for thermoregulatory research. However, surface temperatures are an endpoint along the body's core-shell temperature gradient. Skin and fur are the peripheral tissues most exposed to ambient thermal conditions and are known to serve as thermosensors that initiate thermoregulatory responses. Yet relatively little is known about how surface temperatures of wild mammals measured by infrared thermography relate to subcutaneous temperatures. Moreover, this relationship may differ with the degree that fur covers the body. To assess the relationship between temperatures and temperature gradients in peripheral tissues between furred and bare areas, we collected data from wild mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in Costa Rica. We used infrared thermography to measure surface temperatures of the furred dorsum and bare facial areas of the body, recorded concurrent subcutaneous temperatures in the dorsum, and measured ambient thermal conditions via a weather station. Temperature gradients through cutaneous tissues (subcutaneous-surface temperature) and surface temperature gradients (surface-ambient temperature) were calculated. Our results indicate that there are differences in temperatures and temperature gradients in furred versus bare areas of mantled howlers. Under natural thermal conditions experienced by wild animals, the bare facial areas were warmer than temperatures in the furred dorsum, and cutaneous temperature gradients in the face were more variable than the dorsum, consistent with these bare areas acting as thermal windows. Cutaneous temperature gradients in the dorsum were more closely linked to subcutaneous temperatures, while facial temperature gradients were more heavily influenced by ambient conditions. These findings indicate that despite the insulative properties of fur, for mantled howling monkeys surface temperatures of furred areas still demonstrate a

  16. Effect of perspiration on skin temperature measurements by infrared thermography and contact thermometry during aerobic cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Martínez Guillamón, Natividad; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M.a.; Psikuta, Agnes; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René Michel; Corberán Salvador, José Miguel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Salvador Palmer, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors for measuring skin temperature during cycling in a moderate environment. Fourteen cyclists performed a 45-min cycling test at 50% of peak power output. Skin temperatures were simultaneously recorded by infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors before and immediately after cycling activity as well as after 10 min cooling-down, representing different skin wetness and blood perfusion states. Additionally, surface temperature during well controlled dry and wet heat exchange (avoiding thermoregulatory responses) using a hot plate system was assessed by infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors. In human trials, the inter-method correlation coefficient was high when measured before cycling (r = 0.92) whereas it was reduced immediately after the cycling (r = 0.82) and after the cooling-down phase (r = 0.59). Immediately after cycling, infrared thermography provided lower temperature values than thermal contact sensors whereas it presented higher temperatures after the cooling-down phase. Comparable results as in human trials were observed for hot plate tests in dry and wet states. Results support the application of infrared thermography for measuring skin temperature in exercise scenarios where perspiration does not form a water film.

  17. A generalized algorithm for retrieving cloudy sky skin temperature from satellite thermal infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Menglin; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2000-11-01

    A physical algorithm for calculating cloudy pixel skin temperature from its neighboring clear pixels is proposed generalizing that of Jin [2000]. Two neighboring pixels over the same land cover have a difference in temperature largely explained by surface insolation. Hence this algorithm starts from the surface energy balance equation (SEB) and expresses each energy term of SEB as a function of skin temperature. Then SEB is solved to derive cloudy pixel skin temperature from neighboring clear skin temperature plus a correction term determined by surface insolation, air temperature, and wind speed. This algorithm can be used for nights and winter hemisphere high latitudes where there is no surface insolation and is applicable to any surface where the principle of SEB is applicable. The algorithm is evaluated by using FIFE and BOREAS field experiments. Its global application has been examined through simulations with the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) coupled with the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) simulations. The accuracy of the algorithm is encouraging: the rms error at a monthly pixel level is 1-2 K. Observed errors are greater when there is precipitation.

  18. Cdk4 deficiency inhibits skin tumor development but does not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J

    2002-08-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue.

  19. Effects of Gloves, Temperature and Their Interaction on Finger, Hand, and Arm Blood Flow and Skin Temperature: A Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallbech, M. Susan

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of cold only, commercially available gloves only, and the combination of gloves and cold on the blood flow and surface (skin) temperature of the medial and proximal phalanxes of digit 3, the metacarpal region of the hand, and the forearm.

  20. Temperature and body weight affect fouling of pig pens.

    PubMed

    Aarnink, A J A; Schrama, J W; Heetkamp, M J W; Stefanowska, J; Huynh, T T T

    2006-08-01

    Fouling of the solid lying area in pig housing is undesirable for reasons of animal welfare, animal health, environmental pollution, and labor costs. In this study the influence of temperature on the excreting and lying behavior of growing-finishing pigs of different BW (25, 45, 65, 85, or 105 kg) was studied. Ten groups of 5 pigs were placed in partially slatted pens (60% solid concrete, 40% metal-slatted) in climate respiration chambers. After an adaptation period, temperatures were raised daily for 9 d. Results showed that above certain inflection temperatures (IT; mean 22.6 degrees C, SE = 0.78) the number of excretions (relative to the total number of excretions) on the solid floor increased with temperature (mean increase 9.7%/ degrees C, SE = 1.41). Below the IT, the number of excretions on the solid floor was low and not influenced by temperature (mean 13.2%, SE = 3.5). On average, the IT for excretion on the solid floor decreased with increasing BW, from approximately 25 degrees C at 25 kg to 20 degrees C at 100 kg of BW (P < 0.05). Increasing temperature also affected the pattern and postural lying. The temperature at which a maximum number of pigs lay on the slatted floor (i.e., the IT for lying) decreased from approximately 27 degrees C at 25 kg to 23 degrees C at 100 kg of BW (P < 0.001). At increasing temperatures, pigs lay more on their sides and less against other pigs (P < 0.001). Temperature affects lying and excreting behavior of growing-finishing pigs in partially slatted pens. Above certain IT, pen fouling increases linearly with temperature. Inflection temperatures decrease at increasing BW.

  1. Evolution of Skin Temperature after the Application of Compressive Forces on Tendon, Muscle and Myofascial Trigger Point

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Marina Figueiredo; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Girasol, Carlos Eduardo; de Oliveira, Alessandra Kelly; Dias, Fabiana Rodrigues Cancio; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Some assessment and diagnosis methods require palpation or the application of certain forces on the skin, which affects the structures beneath, we highlight the importance of defining possible influences on skin temperature as a result of this physical contact. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the ideal time for performing thermographic examination after palpation based on the assessment of skin temperature evolution. Randomized and crossover study carried out with 15 computer-user volunteers of both genders, between 18 and 45 years of age, who were submitted to compressive forces of 0, 1, 2 and 3 kg/cm2 for 30 seconds with a washout period of 48 hours using a portable digital dynamometer. Compressive forces were applied on the following spots on the dominant upper limb: myofascial trigger point in the levator scapulae, biceps brachii muscle and palmaris longus tendon. Volunteers were examined by means of infrared thermography before and after the application of compressive forces (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes). In most comparisons made over time, a significant decrease was observed 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the application of compressive forces (p < 0.05) on the palmaris longus tendon and biceps brachii muscle. However, no difference was observed when comparing the different compressive forces (p > 0.05). In conclusion, infrared thermography can be used after assessment or diagnosis methods focused on the application of forces on tendons and muscles, provided the procedure is performed 15 minutes after contact with the skin. Regarding to the myofascial trigger point, the thermographic examination can be performed within 60 minutes after the contact with the skin. PMID:26070073

  2. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  3. The effect of cushion properties on skin temperature and humidity at the body-support interface.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Wen; Yang, Shu-Yu; Liu, Jung-Tai; Pan, Cheng-Tang; Yang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-09-29

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of various cushions on skin temperature and moisture at the body-seat interface during a 2-hour period of continuous sitting. Seventy-eight participants were randomly assigned to sit on one of the three types of wheelchair cushions for unrelieved sitting for over 2 hours. Skin temperature and relative humidity (RH) were measured under the subjects' ischial tuberosities and thighs bilaterally with digital temperature and humidity sensors. Data were collected before sitting and at 15-minute intervals thereafter. Participants sitting on foam-fluid hybrid cushions showed significantly lower skin temperatures than those sitting on air-filled and foam cushions (p < 0.05), but RH did not differ significantly among the cushions (p = 0.97). The three cushions produced a similar increasing trend in RH over time and RH reached a plateau during the 2-hour sitting period. To select the appropriate wheelchair cushion, the microclimate (heat and moisture control) between the body-seat interface should be considered as well as pressure distribution. In comparison with foam-fluid hybrid cushions, the air-filled rubber and foam cushions tended to increase skin temperature by several degrees after prolonged sitting. However, cushion materials did not have significant differences in moisture accumulations.

  4. Comparison of infrared versus contact thermometry for measuring skin temperature during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Jechort, Amy; Marques, Raquel; Smith, Carrie; Welch, Jessica

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of non-contact infrared thermometry to measure mean skin temperature in resting and exercising subjects in cold, thermo-neutral and hot environments. The subjects for the study were six healthy volunteers. Skin temperature was measured at three sites: the forearm, chest and calf on each subject using both contact thermistors and a non-contact infrared thermometer. Data were collected at rest and during exercise in three different air temperatures (15, 25 and 35 degrees C). The correlation of resting mean skin temperature using infrared thermometry and contact thermistors was r = 0.95, while the correlation obtained during exercise was r = 0.98. The results of the current study strongly suggest that infrared thermometry is a valid measure of skin temperature during rest and exercise in both hot and cold environments. It is hoped that the results of this study will encourage the use of non-contact infrared thermometry by both clinicians and exercise, environmental, and sleep researchers in the future.

  5. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gowrishankar, TR; Stewart, Donald A; Martin, Gregory T; Weaver, James C

    2004-01-01

    Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1) surface contact heating and (2) spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the skin was solved by

  6. Thermography for skin temperature evaluation during dynamic exercise: a case study on an incremental maximal test in elite male cyclists.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Formenti, Damiano; Bosio, Andrea; Rampinini, Ermanno; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-12-01

    The use of thermal imaging in monitoring the dynamic of skin temperature during prolonged physical exercise is central to assess athletes' ability to dissipate heat from the skin surface to the environment. In this study, seven elite cyclists completed an incremental maximal cycling test to evaluate their skin temperature response under controlled-environment conditions. Thermal images have been analyzed using a method based on maxima detection (Tmax). Data confirmed a reduction in skin temperature due to vasoconstriction during the exercise, followed by a temperature increment after exhaustion. A characteristic hot-spotted thermal pattern was found over the skin surface in all subjects. This research confirmed also the notable ability by highly trained cyclists to modify skin temperature during an incremental muscular effort. This study gives additional contributions for understanding the capability of the Tmax method applied to the thermoregulatory physiological processes.

  7. Distributed landsurface skin temperature sensing in Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, N.; Baerenbold, F.; Nadeau, D. F.; Pardyjak, E.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    The ZyTemp TN9 is a mass-produced thermal infrared (TIR) sensor that is normally used to build handheld non-contact thermometers. The measurement principle of the TN9 is similar to that of very costly meteorological pyrgeometers. The costs of the TN9 are less than 10. The output of the TN9 consists of observed thermal radiation, the temperature of the measurement instrument, and the emissivity used. The output is provided through a Serial Peripheral Interface protocol. The TN9 was combined with an Arduino board that registered data onto a USB memory stick. A solar cell, lead acid battery, housing and stand completed the meausrement set up. Total costs per set was in the order of 200 Land surface atmosphere interactions in mountainous areas, such as the Swiss Alps, are spatially heterogeneous. Shading, multi-layer cloud formation, and up- and downdrafts make for a very dynamic exchange of mass and energy along and across slopes. In order to better understand these exchanges, the Swiss Slope Experiment at La Fouly (SELF) has built a distributed sensing network consisting of eight micro-met stations and two flux towers in the "La Fouly" watershed in the upper Alps. To obtain a better handle on surface temperature, fifteen TIR sensing stations were installed that made observations during the 2010 Summer. Methods and results will be presented. Overview La Fouly watershed (source: http://eflum.epfl.ch/research/images/fouly_2.jpg)

  8. Possible contributions of skin pigmentation and vitamin D in a polyfactorial model of seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Alan E; Roecklein, Kathryn A; Tanner, Susan; Kimlin, Michael G

    2014-11-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a polyfactorial and polygenetic disorder that involves biological and psychological sub-mechanisms that differentially involve depression, seasonality, circadian rhythms, retinal sensitivity, iris pigmentation, sleep factors, and the neurotransmitters involved with these systems. Within the framework of the polyfactorial conceptualization of SAD, we review the possible contributions of vitamin D3 with respect to the aforementioned sub-mechanisms. We hypothesize that rather than functioning primarily as a proximal or direct sub-mechanism in the etiology of SAD, vitamin D likely functions in a more foundational and regulative role in potentiating the sub-mechanisms associated with the depressive and seasonality factors. There are several reasons for this position: 1. vitamin D levels fluctuate in the body seasonally, with a lag, in direct relation to seasonally-available sunlight; 2. lower vitamin D levels have been observed in depressed patients (as well as in patients with other psychiatric disorders) compared to controls; 3. vitamin D levels in the central nervous system affect the production of both serotonin and dopamine; and 4. vitamin D and vitamin D responsive elements are found throughout the midbrain regions and are especially concentrated in the hypothalamus, a region that encompasses the circadian timing systems and much of its neural circuitry. We also consider the variable of skin pigmentation as this may affect levels of vitamin D in the body. We hypothesize that people with darker skin pigmentation may experience greater risks for lower vitamin D levels that, especially following their migration to regions of higher latitude, could contribute to the emergence of SAD and other psychiatric and physical health problems.

  9. AN INQUIRY INTO THE STRUCTURAL CONDITIONS AFFECTING FLUID TRANSPORT IN THE INTERSTITIAL TISSUE OF THE SKIN

    PubMed Central

    McMaster, Philip D.

    1941-01-01

    With the aim of determining the structural conditions which affect fluid movement in the cutaneous connective tissue of mice, various test fluids were brought into contact with it under conditions such that neither blood vessels nor lymphatics were directly entered. Locke's solution, mouse serum, and a mixture of Locke's solution with a dye which causes edema were all employed. At atmospheric pressure, Locke's solution entered the tissues intermittently. When subjected to very low pressures it continued to enter the skin intermittently and at approximately the same rate. At pressures above 4.5 cm. of water, however, the flow became continuous but it did not increase in rate significantly until pressures of about 8.5 cm. were employed. There was no relationship between the rate of flow and the pressure employed. At a pressure of about 8.5 cm. the resistance of the tissues seemed to give way abruptly as if the formed elements had been separated. This has been termed the "breaking point." After it had been reached each further increase of pressure produced a proportionately greater inflow. Under the conditions of our experiments, the dye-Locke"s solution and also the homologous serum failed to enter the tissues at atmospheric pressure. It was necessary to subject these fluids to pressure to force them into the skin at the same rate at which the Locke's solution entered it spontaneously. Under these circumstances the dye-Locke's solution and the serum entered the skin continuously, not intermittently like the plain Locke's solution. As the pressure was gradually raised, no significant increase of flow into the tissues occurred until a point was reached, on the average 8.5 cm. of water, at which fluid suddenly began to enter very rapidly. This point, the "breaking point" already mentioned, was reached at the same pressure irrespective of the character of the fluid employed, showing that the phenomenon was produced by the fluid bulk. Once it had been attained, further

  10. Fingertip skin–inspired microstructured ferroelectric skins discriminate static/dynamic pressure and temperature stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jonghwa; Kim, Marie; Lee, Youngoh; Lee, Heon Sang; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2015-01-01

    In human fingertips, the fingerprint patterns and interlocked epidermal-dermal microridges play a critical role in amplifying and transferring tactile signals to various mechanoreceptors, enabling spatiotemporal perception of various static and dynamic tactile signals. Inspired by the structure and functions of the human fingertip, we fabricated fingerprint-like patterns and interlocked microstructures in ferroelectric films, which can enhance the piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and piezoresistive sensing of static and dynamic mechanothermal signals. Our flexible and microstructured ferroelectric skins can detect and discriminate between multiple spatiotemporal tactile stimuli including static and dynamic pressure, vibration, and temperature with high sensitivities. As proof-of-concept demonstration, the sensors have been used for the simultaneous monitoring of pulse pressure and temperature of artery vessels, precise detection of acoustic sounds, and discrimination of various surface textures. Our microstructured ferroelectric skins may find applications in robotic skins, wearable sensors, and medical diagnostic devices. PMID:26601303

  11. Functional Assessment of Human Coding Mutations Affecting Skin Pigmentation Using Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tsetskhladze, Zurab R.; Canfield, Victor A.; Ang, Khai C.; Wentzel, Steven M.; Reid, Katherine P.; Berg, Arthur S.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Kawakami, Koichi; Cheng, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in personalized medicine is the lack of a standard way to define the functional significance of the numerous nonsynonymous, single nucleotide coding variants that are present in each human individual. To begin to address this problem, we have used pigmentation as a model polygenic trait, three common human polymorphisms thought to influence pigmentation, and the zebrafish as a model system. The approach is based on the rescue of embryonic zebrafish mutant phenotypes by “humanized” zebrafish orthologous mRNA. Two hypomorphic polymorphisms, L374F in SLC45A2, and A111T in SLC24A5, have been linked to lighter skin color in Europeans. The phenotypic effect of a second coding polymorphism in SLC45A2, E272K, is unclear. None of these polymorphisms had been tested in the context of a model organism. We have confirmed that zebrafish albino fish are mutant in slc45a2; wild-type slc45a2 mRNA rescued the albino mutant phenotype. Introduction of the L374F polymorphism into albino or the A111T polymorphism into slc24a5 (golden) abolished mRNA rescue of the respective mutant phenotypes, consistent with their known contributions to European skin color. In contrast, the E272K polymorphism had no effect on phenotypic rescue. The experimental conclusion that E272K is unlikely to affect pigmentation is consistent with a lack of correlation between this polymorphism and quantitatively measured skin color in 59 East Asian humans. A survey of mutations causing human oculocutaneous albinism yielded 257 missense mutations, 82% of which are theoretically testable in zebrafish. The developed approach may be extended to other model systems and may potentially contribute to our understanding the functional relationships between DNA sequence variation, human biology, and disease. PMID:23071798

  12. Wavelet-based correlations of skin temperature and blood flow oscillations.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, Sergey; Morozov, Matvey; Frick, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The wavelet transform-based correlation analysis has been used to study skin temperature fluctuations caused by periodic changes in blood flow resulting from oscillations in vasomotor smooth muscle tone. We considered two cases, one in which temperature measurements and blood flow recordings by laser Doppler flowmetry are made simultaneously and another in which two temperature signals are measured concurrently. Twelve healthy subjects participated in our study. The gapped wavelet technique was used to suppress artifacts caused by boundary effects. Simultaneous recordings of skin temperature fluctuations and the signal of the laser Doppler flowmeter provided correlation coefficients essentially exceeding the values obtained for noise signals within three spectral ranges corresponding to myogenic (0.05-0.14 Hz), neurogenic (0.02-0.05 Hz), and endothelial (0.0095-0.02 Hz) regulation mechanisms. Within the frequency range from 0.14 to 2 Hz the values of the correlation function are compatible with the values of noise correlations. The same results were obtained for two concurrently measured temperature signals. Reduction in the amplitude of temperature fluctuations and in the level of correlations with the frequency arises because the skin has the properties of a low-frequency filter. As temperature fluctuations propagate their amplitude decays as an exponential function of frequency. Hence small oscillations in the spectral range reflecting the influence of heartbeat and respiration cannot be distinguished from external thermal noise.

  13. Light and temperature effects on phenolics in dark-skinned grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade we refined our understanding of the effects of solar radiation and temperature on the accumulation of phenolic compounds in grapes in the field, particularly dark-skinned cultivars used for red wine. The work was precipitated by nearly universal prescriptive advice a decade pr...

  14. Observations and Model Predictions of Water Skin Temperatures at MTI Core Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.J.

    2001-01-26

    The work described in this paper focused on skin temperature measurement and prediction in heated and unheated lakes and reservoirs. This research is part of the ground truth program for the Department of Energy's Multi-spectral Thermal Imager demonstration satellite project.

  15. Inkjet-Printed Graphene/PEDOT:PSS Temperature Sensors on a Skin-Conformable Polyurethane Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, Tiina; Niittynen, Juha; Kankkunen, Timo; Kraft, Thomas M.; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2016-10-01

    Epidermal electronic systems (EESs) are skin-like electronic systems, which can be used to measure several physiological parameters from the skin. This paper presents materials and a simple, straightforward fabrication process for skin-conformable inkjet-printed temperature sensors. Epidermal temperature sensors are already presented in some studies, but they are mainly fabricated using traditional photolithography processes. These traditional fabrication routes have several processing steps and they create a substantial amount of material waste. Hence utilizing printing processes, the EES may become attractive for disposable systems by decreasing the manufacturing costs and reducing the wasted materials. In this study, the sensors are fabricated with inkjet-printed graphene/PEDOT:PSS ink and the printing is done on top of a skin-conformable polyurethane plaster (adhesive bandage). Sensor characterization was conducted both in inert and ambient atmosphere and the graphene/PEDOT:PSS temperature sensors (thermistors) were able reach higher than 0.06% per degree Celsius sensitivity in an optimal environment exhibiting negative temperature dependence.

  16. Stress Evaluation while Prolonged Driving Operation Using the Facial Skin Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hirotoshi; Muto, Takumi; Ide, Hideto

    There is a relation to the accident of a car and the physiological and psychological state of a driver. The stress may lead to the fall of a fatigue or attentiveness. Therefore, it is an important subject from viewpoint such as accident prevention to evaluate the mental state of a driver. The study aimed at the development of a quantitative instrumentation technology of the stress when a subject is driving for a long time. First of all, we measured the physiological and psychological stress of a driver. The facial skin temperature and ventricular rate that was driver's physiological amount were measured and compared it with visual analog scale of the subjective amount. It was able to be obtaining of the high correlation in facial skin temperature and visual analog scale from the outcome of the experiment. Therefore, the possibility of appreciable of driver's stress at a facial skin temperature was shown. As a result of the experiment, we showed a possibility that facial skin temperature could evaluate long driving stress.

  17. Inkjet-Printed Graphene/PEDOT:PSS Temperature Sensors on a Skin-Conformable Polyurethane Substrate.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Tiina; Niittynen, Juha; Kankkunen, Timo; Kraft, Thomas M; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2016-10-18

    Epidermal electronic systems (EESs) are skin-like electronic systems, which can be used to measure several physiological parameters from the skin. This paper presents materials and a simple, straightforward fabrication process for skin-conformable inkjet-printed temperature sensors. Epidermal temperature sensors are already presented in some studies, but they are mainly fabricated using traditional photolithography processes. These traditional fabrication routes have several processing steps and they create a substantial amount of material waste. Hence utilizing printing processes, the EES may become attractive for disposable systems by decreasing the manufacturing costs and reducing the wasted materials. In this study, the sensors are fabricated with inkjet-printed graphene/PEDOT:PSS ink and the printing is done on top of a skin-conformable polyurethane plaster (adhesive bandage). Sensor characterization was conducted both in inert and ambient atmosphere and the graphene/PEDOT:PSS temperature sensors (thermistors) were able reach higher than 0.06% per degree Celsius sensitivity in an optimal environment exhibiting negative temperature dependence.

  18. Inkjet-Printed Graphene/PEDOT:PSS Temperature Sensors on a Skin-Conformable Polyurethane Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Vuorinen, Tiina; Niittynen, Juha; Kankkunen, Timo; Kraft, Thomas M.; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal electronic systems (EESs) are skin-like electronic systems, which can be used to measure several physiological parameters from the skin. This paper presents materials and a simple, straightforward fabrication process for skin-conformable inkjet-printed temperature sensors. Epidermal temperature sensors are already presented in some studies, but they are mainly fabricated using traditional photolithography processes. These traditional fabrication routes have several processing steps and they create a substantial amount of material waste. Hence utilizing printing processes, the EES may become attractive for disposable systems by decreasing the manufacturing costs and reducing the wasted materials. In this study, the sensors are fabricated with inkjet-printed graphene/PEDOT:PSS ink and the printing is done on top of a skin-conformable polyurethane plaster (adhesive bandage). Sensor characterization was conducted both in inert and ambient atmosphere and the graphene/PEDOT:PSS temperature sensors (thermistors) were able reach higher than 0.06% per degree Celsius sensitivity in an optimal environment exhibiting negative temperature dependence. PMID:27752050

  19. Effects of different sitting positions on skin temperature of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Seung; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Shim, JungMyo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of different sitting positions on the skin temperature of the lower extremity. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 23 healthy university students (8 males, 15 females). [Methods] Normal sitting (NS), upper leg cross (ULC) and ankle on knee (AOK) positions were conducted to measure the changes in skin temperature using digital infrared thermographic imaging (DITI). [Results] ULC upper ankle, NS upper shin, ULC upper shin and NS lower shin showed significant declines in temperature with time. [Conclusion] These finding suggest that the ULC and NS sitting positions cause decline of blood flow volume to the lower extremity resulting in decrease of temperature of the lower extremity. Especially, sitting with the legs crossed interferes with the circulation of blood flowing volume much more than just sitting in a chair.

  20. Dominant factors affecting temperature rise in simulations of human thermoregulation during RF exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2011-12-01

    Numerical models of the human thermoregulatory system can be used together with realistic voxel models of the human anatomy to simulate the body temperature increases caused by the power absorption from radio-frequency electromagnetic fields. In this paper, the Pennes bioheat equation with a thermoregulatory model is used for calculating local peak temperatures as well as the body-core-temperature elevation in a realistic human body model for grounded plane-wave exposures at frequencies 39, 800 and 2400 MHz. The electromagnetic power loss is solved by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the discretized bioheat equation is solved by the geometric multigrid method. Human thermoregulatory models contain numerous thermophysiological and computational parameters—some of which may be subject to considerable uncertainty—that affect the simulated core and local temperature elevations. The goal of this paper is to find how greatly the computed temperature is influenced by changes in various modelling parameters, such as the skin blood flow rate, models for vasodilation and sweating, and clothing and air movement. The results show that the peak temperature rises are most strongly affected by the modelling of tissue blood flow and its temperature dependence, and mostly unaffected by the central control mechanism for vasodilation and sweating. Almost the opposite is true for the body-core-temperature rise, which is however typically greatly lower than the peak temperature rise. It also seems that ignoring the thermoregulation and the blood temperature increase is a good approximation when the local 10 g averaged specific absorption rate is smaller than 10 W kg-1.

  1. PERSPECTIVE Working towards a community-wide understanding of satellite skin temperature observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreve, Cheney

    2010-12-01

    With more than sixty free and publicly available high-quality datasets, including ecosystem variables, radiation budget variables, and land cover products, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS scientific team have contributed significantly to scientific investigations of ecosystems across the globe. The MODIS instrument, launched in December 1999, has 36 spectral bands, a viewing swath of 2330 km, and acquires data at 250 m, 500 m, and 1000 m spatial resolution every one to two days. Radiation budget variables include surface reflectance, skin temperature, emissivity, and albedo, to list a few. Ecosystem variables include several vegetation indices and productivity measures. Land cover characteristics encompass land cover classifications as well as model parameters and vegetation classifications. Many of these products are instrumental in constraining global climate models and climate change studies, as well as monitoring events such as the recent flooding in Pakistan, the unprecedented oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, or phytoplankton bloom in the Barents Sea. While product validation efforts by the MODIS scientific team are both vigorous and continually improving, validation is unquestionably one of the most difficult tasks when dealing with remotely derived datasets, especially at the global scale. The quality and availability of MODIS data have led to widespread usage in the scientific community that has further contributed to validation and development of the MODIS products. In their recent paper entitled 'Land surface skin temperature climatology: benefitting from the strengths of satellite observations', Jin and Dickinson review the scientific theory behind, and demonstrate application of, a MODIS temperature product: surface skin temperature. Utilizing datasets from the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN), daily skin and air temperature from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, and MODIS products (skin temperature, albedo, land

  2. An instrument using a multiple layer Peltier device to change skin temperature rapidly.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, G L; Giesler, G J

    1984-01-01

    A thermal stimulator that uses multiple layer Peltier devices produces rapid heating or cooling of the skin of experimental animals. Rate of change of temperature can be controlled from 1 degree C/sec to 5 degrees/sec (cooling) or to 10 degrees/sec (heating). Rapid thermal transients are not accompanied by thermal overshoot. Maintenance of and return to a preset temperature are within +/- 0.05 degrees.

  3. Wavelet-analysis of skin temperature oscillations during local heating for revealing endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, Sergey; Stepanov, Rodion; Smirnova, Elena; Loran, Evgenia

    2015-01-01

    Skin microvessels have proven to be a model to investigate the mechanisms of vascular disease; in particular, endothelial dysfunction. To analyze skin blood flow, high-resolution thermometry can be used because low-amplitude skin temperature oscillations are caused by changes in the tone of skin vessels. The aim of our study was to test the possibilities of wavelet analysis of skin temperature (WAST) for the diagnosis of impaired regulation of microvascular tone in patients with type 2 diabetes. A local heating functional test was used for the assessment of microvascular tone regulation. A control group consisted of healthy male and female volunteers (n=5 each), aged 39.1±5.3years. A group of patients with type 2 diabetes comprised thirteen people, seven men and six women, aged 36 to 51years old (43.2±3.4years). The diagnosis of diabetes was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO). The mean disease duration was 7.36±0.88years. Skin temperature oscillations, reflecting intrinsic myogenic activity (0.05-0.14Hz), neurogenic factors (0.02-0.05Hz) and endothelial activity (0.0095-0.02Hz) increase greatly during local heating for healthy subjects. In the group of patients with type 2 diabetes, no statistically significant differences in the amplitudes in the endothelial range were observed. Relative changes in the oscillation amplitudes in patients with type 2 diabetes were markedly lower compared to the control group. The latter indicates that the WAST method enables assessment of the state of vascular tone and the effects of mechanisms responsible for regulation of blood flow in the microvasculature.

  4. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    PubMed

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent.

  5. Influence of blood flow and millimeter wave exposure on skin temperature in different thermal models.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M C

    2009-01-01

    Recently we showed that the Pennes bioheat transfer equation was not adequate to quantify mm wave heating of the skin at high blood flow rates. To do so, it is necessary to incorporate an "effective" thermal conductivity to obtain a hybrid bioheat equation (HBHE). The main aim of this study was to determine the relationship between non-specific tissue blood flow in a homogeneous unilayer model and dermal blood flow in multilayer models providing that the skin surface temperatures before and following mm wave exposure were the same. This knowledge could be used to develop multilayer models based on the fitting parameters obtained with the homogeneous tissue models. We tested four tissue models consisting of 1-4 layers and applied the one-dimensional steady-state HBHE. To understand the role of the epidermis in skin models we added to the one- and three-layer models an external thin epidermal layer with no blood flow. Only the combination of models containing the epidermal layer was appropriate for determination of the relationship between non-specific tissue and dermal blood flows giving the same skin surface temperatures. In this case we obtained a linear relationship between non-specific tissue and dermal blood flows. The presence of the fat layer resulted in the appearance of a significant temperature gradient between the dermis and muscle layer which increased with the fat layer thickness.

  6. Global warming and urbanization affect springwater temperatures in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, H.

    2014-02-01

    Due to global warming and urbanization, air temperature in Tokyo has risen 1.6 degrees in the past 30-40 years which has also affected springwater temperatures. From 2005, we have proceeded with the observations of springs in Tokyo metropolis, Japan which had been conducted by Environment of Tokyo from the end of the 1980s to 2001. In the rainy season (October) and dry season (February), we have observed springwater temperatures in 25 springs. The field surveys have revealed that most springwater temperatures has steadly risen in the past 30 years. As of February 2013, water temperatures of 19/11 springs have risen with 5% level in the rainy/dry season. As of February 2006, water temperatures of 10/13 springs have risen with 5% level in the rainy/dry season, i.e., 9/2 springs have acquired/lost the significance as of February 2013. One possible reason is the recent hot summer/cold winter in Tokyo.

  7. Temperature-dependent interaction between vasoconstrictor and vasodilator mechanisms in human skin.

    PubMed

    Oberle, J; Elam, M; Karlsson, T; Wallin, B G

    1988-04-01

    The putative influence of the thermoregulatory state on skin blood-flow responses to various stimuli was studied in 17 healthy subjects exposed to different ambient temperatures. Skin blood flow was monitored by laser Doppler flowmeters and photoelectrical pulse plethysmographs. Stimuli included painful intraneural electrical stimulation (INS) in the median nerve at the wrist, mental stress, arousal stimuli and deep breaths. Intraneural electrical stimulation and mental stress were accompanied by virtually identical changes in skin blood flow, warm subjects responding with cutaneous vasoconstriction whereas cold subjects responded with vasodilatation. Similar but less pronounced responses were obtained with arousal stimuli and single deep breaths. The data indicate that the thermoregulatory state profoundly influences the extent and direction of various cutaneous vasomotor reflex responses. Furthermore, there were differences between responses in hands and feet, suggesting a spatial organization of vasomotor control.

  8. Ankle and Thigh Skin Surface Temperature Changes With Repeated Ice Pack Application

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Janice E.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Most of the research on cold applications has been performed on nonexercising supine subjects during a single cold pack application. Most athletic injuries occur during exercise, which increases skin temperature. Exercise before ice application will also increase ankle skin temperature during the rewarming phase. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of activity on subsequent ice pack applications and rewarming using standard immediate care procedures. Design and Setting: Three experimental conditions (20-, 30-, and 40-minute ice pack applications) were applied to 12 subjects in a repeated measures design. Subjects rode a bicycle ergometer for 15 minutes before ice application to the ankle and opposite thigh, and were active (walking with crutches, simulated showering and dressing) for 20 minutes following application. Subjects rested with the limb elevated for an additional 40 minutes. Ice packs were then reapplied for the appropriate time (20, 30, or 40 minutes) followed by 60 minutes of rest with the limb elevated. Subjects: Twelve (8 males, 4 females) college-aged volunteers. Only subjects with good-to-high fitness levels were accepted for this study. Measurements: Ankle skin, thigh skin, and atmospheric temperatures were measured every minute using an Isothermex (Columbus Instruments, Columbus, OH). Results: Thigh temperature changes during the first ice application were greater during the 30- and 40-minute conditions than the 20-minute condition. Ankle and thigh temperature changes during the first ice application and rewarming, and for the entire trial were greater during the 40-minute condition than the 20-or 30-minute conditions. Throughout the first ice application and rewarming, and the entire trial, thigh temperature changes were greater during the 30-minute condition than the 20-minute condition. Conclusions: During immediate care procedures following injury, ice packs should be reapplied immediately following showering

  9. Accuracy and response time comparisons of four skin temperature-monitoring devices.

    PubMed

    Krause, B F

    1993-06-01

    Although technological improvements in skin surface temperature-measurement devices have progressed since they were first used clinically, the question of their accuracy and reliability for skin temperature monitoring still remains. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy and response time to temperature change for four temperature-monitoring devices: liquid crystal (Crystaline ST, Sharn, Inc, Tampa, Fla), two different thermistor sensors (RSP, Respiratory Support Products, Inc, Irvine, Calif, and SHER-I-TEMP, Sheridan Catheter Corp, Argyle, NY), and one thermocouple-based temperature sensor (Mon-a-therm, Mallinckrodt, Inc, St. Louis, Mo). A temperature-controlled steel surface plate was used as the reference temperature source for test comparisons. The results showed that Crystaline ST (liquid crystal device) performed better in the accuracy and response time tests than the electronic thermistor and thermocouple temperature-sensor devices tested. Regression analysis of the reference temperature comparisons showed that although all four devices had high correlation coefficients Crystaline ST had the highest correlation (R = 0.99685). Also, the regression equation for Crystaline ST was closest to a perfect fit with reference temperatures, ie, slope = 1.00267 and intercept = 0.20333 (P = .0000). Crystaline ST responded consistently faster than the other devices for each change in temperature setting (5, 10, 15, and 20 degrees F). Crystaline ST responded within 3.5 to 4.4 seconds for every temperature gradient change tested. All three of the other sensor devices had increasingly longer response times as the temperature gradient increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Residual limb skin temperature and thermal comfort in people with amputation during activity in a cold environment.

    PubMed

    Segal, Ava D; Klute, Glenn K

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort remains a common problem for people with lower-limb amputation. Both donning a prosthesis and engaging in activity at room temperature can increase residual limb skin temperature; however, the effects of activity on skin temperature and comfort in more extreme environments remain unknown. We examined residual limb skin temperatures and perceived thermal comfort (PTC; 11-point Likert scale) of participants with unilateral transtibial amputation (n = 8) who were snowshoeing in a cold environment. Residual limb skin temperature increased by 3.9°C [3.0°C to 4.7°C] (mean difference [95% confidence interval (CI)], p < 0.001) after two 30 min exercise sessions separated by a 5 min rest session. Minimal cooling (-0.2°C [-1.1°C to 0.6°C]) occurred during the rest period. Similar changes in PTC were found for the residual limb, intact limb, and whole body, with a mean scale increase of 1.6 [1.1 to 2.1] and 1.3 [0.8 to 1.8] for the first and second exercise sessions, respectively (p < 0.001). Activity in a cold environment caused similar increases in residual limb skin temperature as those found in studies conducted at room temperature. Participants with amputation perceived warming as their skin temperature increased during exercise followed by the perception of cooling during rest, despite minimal associated decreases in skin temperature.

  11. Temperature and hydrology affect methane emissions from Prairie Pothole Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bansal, Sheel; Tangen, Brian; Finocchiaro, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) in central North America consists of millions of depressional wetlands that each have considerable potential to emit methane (CH4). Changes in temperature and hydrology in the PPR from climate change may affect methane fluxes from these wetlands. To assess the potential effects of changes in climate on methane emissions, we examined the relationships between flux rates and temperature or water depth using six years of bi-weekly flux measurements during the snow-free period from six temporarily ponded and six permanently ponded wetlands in North Dakota, USA. Methane flux rates were among the highest reported for freshwater wetlands, and had considerable spatial and temporal variation. Methane flux rates increased with increasing temperature and water depth, and were especially high when conditions were warmer and wetter than average (163 ± 28 mg CH4 m−2 h−1) compared to warmer and drier (37 ± 7 mg CH4 m−2 h−1). Methane emission rates from permanent wetlands were less sensitive to changes in temperature and water depth compared to temporary wetlands, likely due to higher sulfate concentrations in permanent wetlands. While the predicted increase in temperature with climate change will likely increase methane emission rates from PPR wetlands, drier conditions could moderate these increases.

  12. Factors affecting rectal temperature measurement using commonly available digital thermometers.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jonathan M; Streeter, Renee M; Torgerson, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Rectal temperature measurement is an essential part of physical examination of cattle and some physiological experiments. Modern digital thermometers are often used to measure rectal temperatures by students; this study describes their reliability and appropriate use. Students measured rectal temperature on 53 occasions using their personal digital thermometer and techniques gained from previous instruction, rectal temperature was also measured by an experienced person using a Cornell mercury thermometer completely inserted in the rectum. Cornell mercury thermometers values were 38.95±0.05°C (mean±1 SE, n=53). Student rectal temperature measurements using their initial technique were nearly 0.5°C lower, 38.46±0.07°C. After receiving instruction to insert the digital thermometer to the window, student obtained values were 38.77±0.06°C; these are significantly higher than with the student's initial technique and closer to those obtained with a Cornell thermometer. In a series of 53 water bath tests, student owned thermometers recorded similar mean values to those of a traceable (reference) digital thermometer, Cornell mercury thermometer readings were 0.2°C higher. 10 individual digital thermometers were repeatedly tested against a traceable thermometer in a water bath, one was inaccurate. In a separate experiment a trained clinician tested the effect of angle of insertion of a digital thermometer on temperature readings and the affect was <0.1°C. We conclude that accurate temperature measurements using digital thermometers are only likely if the thermometer is inserted to the beginning of the window and the thermometer's accuracy is checked periodically.

  13. Using skin temperature variability to quantify surface and subsurface estuarine processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, S. E.; Zappa, C. J.; Anderson, S. P.; Dugan, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    IR imagery is a unique tool to study nearshore processes. It not only provides a measure for surface skin temperature, but also permits the determination of surface currents. Variations in the skin temperature arise from disruption and renewal of the thermal boundary layer (TBL) as a result of wind forcing at the air-water interface, or due to turbulent eddies generated from below. The TBL plays a critical role in nearshore processes, in particular air-water heat and gas exchanges. It is essential to characterize the spatio-temporal scales of the disruption of the TBL and the extent to which it is renewed, as well as to understand how environmental factors relate to skin temperature variability. Furthermore, it is necessary to evaluate the ability not only to derive surface currents, but also to infer subsurface properties and processes from IR images. Estuarine and inlet environments such as the Hudson River are more complex, with multitude of additional processes at play, compared to the open ocean. For instance, the atmospheric boundary layer is complicated by the fact that that air is moving over both land and water, flow is fetch limited and there is orographic steering of winds. In addition, the subsurface turbulence is enhanced due to the bottom boundary layer. Here, high resolution IR imagery was collected from a ship stationed roughly 12 miles upstream of the New York Harbor in November 2010. On a nearby piling, several in situ instruments were mounted both above and below water, measuring environmental parameters such as wind speed, heat fluxes, air and water temperature, humidity as well as subsurface currents, turbulence, temperature and salinity. An IR imager installed on the cliff overlooking the river provided a complete view of the experiment area, with both the ship and the steel piling in its field of view. This study aims not only to characterize the skin temperature variability, but also to assess the validity of the various models for surface

  14. Satellite and Skin Layer Effects on the Accuracy of Sea Surface Temperature Measurements from the GOES Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Gary A.; Bates, John J.; Scott, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    The latest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have facilitated significant improvements in our ability to measure sea surface temperature (SST) from geostationary satellites. Nonetheless, difficulties associated with sensor calibration and oceanic near-surface temperature gradients affect the accuracy of the measurements and our ability to estimate and interpret the diurnal cycle of the bulk SST. Overall, measurements of SST from the GOES Imagers on the GOES 8-10 satellites are shown to have very small bias (less than 0.02 K) and rms differences of between 0.6 and 0.9 K relative to buoy observations. Separate consideration of individual measurement times, however, demonstrates systematic bias variations of over 0.6 K with measurement hour. These bias variations significantly affect both the amplitude and shape of estimates of the diurnal SST cycle. Modeled estimates of the temperature difference across the oceanic cool skin and diurnal thermocline show that bias variations up to 0.3 K can result from variability in the near-surface layer. Oceanic near-surface layer and known "satellite midnight" calibration effects, however, explain only a portion of the observed bias variations, suggesting other possible calibration concerns. Methods of explicitly incorporating skin layer and diurnal thermocline effects in satellite bulk SST measurements were explored in an effort to further improve the measurement accuracy. While the approaches contain more complete physics, they do not yet significantly improve the accuracy of bulk SST measurements due to remaining uncertainties in the temperature difference across the near-surface layer.

  15. The Effects of Skin-to-Skin Contact on Temperature and Breastfeeding Successfulness in Full-Term Newborns after Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Beiranvand, Shourangiz; Valizadeh, Fatemeh; Hosseinabadi, Reza; Pournia, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Background. The skin-to-skin contact (SSC) of mother and newborn is uncommon full-term newborns after delivering via cesarean section due to the possibility of hypothermia in the infants. The aim of this study was to compare mothers' and infant's temperatures after delivering via cesarean section. Material and Methods. In this randomized clinical trial, 90 infant/mothers dyads delivered via cesarean section were randomized to SSC (n = 46) and routine care (n = 44). In experimental group, skin-to-skin contact was performed for one hour and in the routine group the infant was dressed and put in the cot according to hospital routine care. The newborns' mothers' temperatures in both groups were taken at half-hour intervals. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, and chi-square tests. Results. The means of the newborns' temperatures immediately after SSC (P = 0.86), half an hour (P = 0.31), and one hour (P = 0.52) after the intervention did not show statistically significant differences between the two groups. The mean scores of the infants' breastfeeding assessment in SSC (8.76±3.63) and routine care (7.25±3.5) groups did not show significant differences (P = 0.048). Conclusion. Mother and infant's skin-to-skin contact is possible after delivering via cesarean section and does not increase the risk of hypothermia. PMID:25610472

  16. Temperature Affects Human Sweet Taste via At Least Two Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Green, Barry G; Nachtigal, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    The reported effects of temperature on sweet taste in humans have generally been small and inconsistent. Here, we describe 3 experiments that follow up a recent finding that cooling from 37 to 21 °C does not reduce the initial sweetness of sucrose but increases sweet taste adaptation. In experiment 1, subjects rated the sweetness of sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions at 5-41 °C by dipping the tongue tip into the solutions after 0-, 3-, or 10-s pre-exposures to the same solutions or to H2O; experiment 2 compared the effects of temperature on the sweetness of 3 artificial sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, and saccharin); and experiment 3 employed a flow-controlled gustometer to rule out the possibility the effects of temperature in the preceding experiments were unique to dipping the tongue into a still taste solution. The results (i) confirmed that mild cooling does not attenuate sweetness but can increase sweet taste adaptation; (ii) demonstrated that cooling to 5-12 °C can directly reduce sweetness intensity; and (iii) showed that both effects vary across stimuli. These findings have implications for the TRPM5 hypothesis of thermal effects on sweet taste and raise the possibility that temperature also affects an earlier step in the T1R2-T1R3 transduction cascade.

  17. Temperature Affects Human Sweet Taste via At Least Two Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nachtigal, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The reported effects of temperature on sweet taste in humans have generally been small and inconsistent. Here, we describe 3 experiments that follow up a recent finding that cooling from 37 to 21 °C does not reduce the initial sweetness of sucrose but increases sweet taste adaptation. In experiment 1, subjects rated the sweetness of sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions at 5–41 °C by dipping the tongue tip into the solutions after 0-, 3-, or 10-s pre-exposures to the same solutions or to H2O; experiment 2 compared the effects of temperature on the sweetness of 3 artificial sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, and saccharin); and experiment 3 employed a flow-controlled gustometer to rule out the possibility the effects of temperature in the preceding experiments were unique to dipping the tongue into a still taste solution. The results (i) confirmed that mild cooling does not attenuate sweetness but can increase sweet taste adaptation; (ii) demonstrated that cooling to 5–12 °C can directly reduce sweetness intensity; and (iii) showed that both effects vary across stimuli. These findings have implications for the TRPM5 hypothesis of thermal effects on sweet taste and raise the possibility that temperature also affects an earlier step in the T1R2–T1R3 transduction cascade. PMID:25963040

  18. How does temperature affect the function of tissue macrophages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages create a major danger signal following injury or infection and upon activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn help to generate febrile conditions. Thus, like other cells of the body, tissue macrophages are often exposed to naturally occurring elevations in tissue temperature during inflammation and fever. However, whether macrophages sense and respond to temperature changes in a specific manner which modulates their function is still not clear. In this brief review, we highlight recent studies which have analyzed the effects of temperatures on macrophage function, and summarize the possible underlying molecular mechanisms which have been identified. Mild, physiological range hyperthermia has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and at the meeting presentation, we will show new data demonstrating that hyperthermia can indeed exert both positive and negative signals to macrophages. While some thermal effects are correlated with the induction of heat shock factors/heat shock proteins, overall it is not clear how mild hyperthermia can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We also summarize data which shows that hyperthermia can affect other macrophage effector functions, including the anti-tumor cytotoxicity. Overall, these studies may help us to better understand the immunological role of tissue temperature and may provide important information needed to maximize the application of heat in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

  19. Feasibility study on driver's stress detection from differential skin temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, T; Yamakoshi, K; Tanaka, S; Nogawa, M; Park, S B; Shibata, M; Sawada, Y; Rolfe, P; Hirose, Y

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged monotonous driving may lower a driver's awareness level as well as increasing their stress level due to the compulsion to maintain safe driving, which may result in an increased risk of a traffic accident. There is therefore an opportunity for technological assessment of driver physiological status to be applied in-car, hopefully reducing the incidence of potentially dangerous situations. As part of our long-term aim to develop such a system, we describe here the investigation of differential skin temperature measurement as a possible marker of a driver's stress level. In this study, healthy male (n=18) & female (n=7) subjects were investigated under environment-controlled conditions, whilst being subjected to simulated monotonous travel at constant speed on a test-course. We acquired physiological variables, including facial skin temperature which consists of truncal and peripheral skin temperatures (Ts) using thermography, beat-by-beat blood pressure (BP), cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance (TPR), and normalized pulse volume (NPV) used as an indicator of local peripheral vascular tone. We then investigated the driver's reactivity in terms of skin temperatures with this background of cardiovascular haemodynamics. We found that the simulated monotonous driving produced a gradual drop in peripheral Ts following the driving stress, which, through interpretation of the TPR and NPV recordings, could be explained by peripheral sympathetic activation. On the other hand, the truncal Ts was not influenced by the stress. These findings lead us to suggest that truncal-peripheral differential Ts could be used as a possible index indicative of the driver's stress.

  20. Arterio-venous anastomoses in the human skin and their role in temperature control

    PubMed Central

    Walløe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) are direct connections between small arteries and small veins. In humans they are numerous in the glabrous skin of the hands and feet. The AVAs are short vessel segments with a large inner diameter and a very thick muscular wall. They are densely innervated by adrenergic axons. When they are open, they provide a low-resistance connection between arteries and veins, shunting blood directly into the venous plexuses of the limbs. The AVAs play an important role in temperature regulation in humans in their thermoneutral zone, which for a naked resting human is about 26°C to 36°C, but lower when active and clothed. From the temperature control center in the hypothalamus, bursts of nerve impulses are sent simultaneously to all AVAs. The AVAs are all closed near the lower end and all open near the upper end of the thermoneutral zone. The small veins in the skin of the arms and legs are also contracted near the lower end of the thermoneutral zone and relax to a wider cross section as the ambient temperature rises. At the cold end of the thermoneutral range, the blood returns to the heart through the deep veins and cools the arterial blood through a countercurrent mechanism. As the ambient temperature rises, more blood is returned through the superficial venous plexuses and veins and heats the skin surface of the full length of the 4 limbs. This skin surface is responsible for a large part of the loss of heat from the body toward the upper end of the thermoneutral zone. PMID:27227081

  1. [The graphic representation of the temperature field of the skin surface in the orbital area].

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, V M; Barsukov, V V

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes results of researches on the possibility of graphic presentation of a temperature field of skin surface of the orbital area. A method of liquid crystal thermography and electron thermometry was used for examination of 30 patients with practically healthy eyes. It was shown that graphic presentation of data of liquid crystal thermography and electron thermometry remarkably facilitates documentation and analysis of the results obtained.

  2. Arterio-venous anastomoses in the human skin and their role in temperature control.

    PubMed

    Walløe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) are direct connections between small arteries and small veins. In humans they are numerous in the glabrous skin of the hands and feet. The AVAs are short vessel segments with a large inner diameter and a very thick muscular wall. They are densely innervated by adrenergic axons. When they are open, they provide a low-resistance connection between arteries and veins, shunting blood directly into the venous plexuses of the limbs. The AVAs play an important role in temperature regulation in humans in their thermoneutral zone, which for a naked resting human is about 26°C to 36°C, but lower when active and clothed. From the temperature control center in the hypothalamus, bursts of nerve impulses are sent simultaneously to all AVAs. The AVAs are all closed near the lower end and all open near the upper end of the thermoneutral zone. The small veins in the skin of the arms and legs are also contracted near the lower end of the thermoneutral zone and relax to a wider cross section as the ambient temperature rises. At the cold end of the thermoneutral range, the blood returns to the heart through the deep veins and cools the arterial blood through a countercurrent mechanism. As the ambient temperature rises, more blood is returned through the superficial venous plexuses and veins and heats the skin surface of the full length of the 4 limbs. This skin surface is responsible for a large part of the loss of heat from the body toward the upper end of the thermoneutral zone.

  3. Evaluation of Insulated Miniature Thermistors for Skin Temperature Measurement in the Rat,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    storage thermoregulatory mechanisms. Although the laboratory rat is used extensively as a model for human heat injury, no equation exists for... laboratory rat even though the hyperthermic rat is widely used as a research tool for studying the pathophysiology of human heatstroke. The present...heat storage calculation. Surprisingly, an equation for calculating mean skin temperature and hence, heat storage, has not been developed for the

  4. Differentially expressed proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Phil; Bridle, Andrew; Leef, Melanie; Wilson, Richard; Nowak, Barbara F

    2014-09-01

    The external surfaces of fish, such as gill and skin, are covered by mucus, which forms a thin interface between the organism and water. Amoebic gill disease (AGD) is a parasitic condition caused by Neoparamoeba perurans that affects salmonids worldwide. This disease induces excessive mucus production in the gills. The host immune response to AGD is not fully understood, and research tools such as genomics and proteomics could be useful in providing further insight. Gill and skin mucus samples were obtained from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which were infected with N. perurans on four successive occasions. NanoLC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to identify proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon affected by AGD. A total of 186 and 322 non-redundant proteins were identified in gill and skin mucus respectively, based on stringent filtration criteria, and statistics demonstrated that 52 gill and 42 skin mucus proteins were differentially expressed in mucus samples from AGD-affected fish. By generating protein-protein interaction networks, some of these proteins formed part of cell to cell signalling and inflammation pathways, such as C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein 1, granulin, cathepsin, angiogenin-1. In addition to proteins that were entirely novel in the context in the host response to N. perurans, our results have confirmed the presence of protein markers in mucus that have been previously predicted on the basis of modified mRNA expression, such as anterior gradient-2 protein, annexin A-1 and complement C3 factor. This first proteomic analysis of AGD-affected salmon provides new information on the effect of AGD on protein composition of gill and skin mucus. Future research should focus on better understanding of the role these components play in the response against infection with N. perurans.

  5. Changes in skin surface temperature at an acupuncture point with moxibustion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Mei; Wang, Shu-Fang; Lee, Ru-Ping; Hsu, Bang-Gee; Tsai, Nu-Man; Peng, Tai-Chu

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluates the thermographic changes associated with moxa burner moxibustion at the SP6 acupuncture point to establish an appropriate, safe distance of efficacy for moxibustion. Methods Baseline temperature changes using a moxa burner were obtained for a paper substrate at various distances and times, and the tested with volunteers in a pilot study. A single-group trial was then conducted with 36 healthy women to monitor temperature changes on the body surface at the acupuncture point (SP6). Results Based on the temperature changes seen for the paper substrate and in the pilot study, a distance of 3 cm was chosen as the intervention distance. Moxibustion significantly increased the SP6 point skin surface temperature, with a peak increase of 11°C at 4 min (p <0.001). This study also found that during moxibustion the temperature of the moxa burner's rubber layer and moxa cautery were 56.9±0.9°C and 65.8±1.2°C, as compared to baseline values of 35.1°C and 43.8°C (p<0.001). Conclusions We determined 3 cm was a safe distance between the moxa burner and acupuncture point. Moxibustion can increase the skin surface temperature at the SP6 point. This data will aid traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners in gauging safer treatment distances when using moxibustion treatments. PMID:23598824

  6. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off

    PubMed Central

    Bracci, Massimo; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Barbaresi, Mariella; Manzella, Nicola; Tomasetti, Marco; Gaetani, Simona; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Santarelli, Lory

    2016-01-01

    The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers. PMID:27128899

  7. Low-temperature atmospheric plasma increases the expression of anti-aging genes of skin cells without causing cellular damages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Jae-Koo; Hong, Jin-woo; Kim, Gyoo-cheon

    2013-03-01

    Efforts to employ various types of plasma in the field of skin care have increased consistently because it can regulate many biochemical reactions that are normally unaffected by light-based therapy. One method for skin rejuvenation adopted a high-temperature plasma generator to remove skin epithelial cells. In this case, the catalyzing effects of the plasma were rarely used due to the high temperature. Hence, the benefits of the plasma were not magnified. Recently, many types of low-temperature plasma devices have been developed for medical applications but their detailed functions and working mechanisms are unclear. The present study examined the effect of low-temperature microwave plasma on skin cells. Treatment with low-temperature plasma increased the expression of anti-aging genes in skin cells, including collagen, fibronectin and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, the plasma treatment did not cause cell death, but only induced slight cell growth arrest at the G2 phase. Although the cells treated with low-temperature plasma showed moderate growth arrest, there were no signs of thermal or genetic damage of skin cells. Overall, this low-temperature microwave plasma device induces the expressions of some anti-aging-related genes in skin cells without causing damage.

  8. Different vascular responses in glabrous and nonglabrous skin with increasing core temperature during exercise.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Sone, Ryoko

    2006-07-01

    To elucidate the characteristics of vasomotor control in glabrous and nonglabrous skin during dynamic exercise, we compared the vascular responses in both areas to increasing core temperature during the cycle exercise for 30 min at different intensities in the range 20-60% of peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)) in a total of 13 male and four female subjects in two experimental protocols. Skin blood flow was monitored using laser Doppler flowmetry. In protocol 1, the slope of the relationship between esophageal temperature (T (es)) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) in the early phase of the exercise decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing exercise intensity at glabrous sites (palm) but not nonglabrous sites (dorsal hand). In protocol 2, to examine whether a difference in vascular responses in the two areas is due to the adrenergic vasoconstrictor system, the release of norepinephrine from adrenergic nerves in forearm and palmar skin was blocked locally by iontophoresis of bretylium tosylate (BT). The administration of BT diminished completely the change of CVC in the palm during the exercise but did not alter the response in the forearm compared with the untreated site. In the two areas, neither the T (es) threshold for vasodilation nor the change in CVC above the threshold in the middle and late phase of the exercise was influenced by the intensity of the exercise. These results suggest that, in the early phase of the exercise, light-to-moderate exercise reduces in an intensity-dependent manner the thermal sensitivity for vasodilation in glabrous skin but not nonglabrous skin via an adrenergic vasoconstrictor pathway.

  9. Dermatoses affecting desmosomes in animals: a mechanistic review of acantholytic blistering skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry; Linder, Keith E

    2009-10-01

    Failure of desmosomal adhesion with ensuing keratinocyte separation - a phenomenon called acantholysis - can result from genetic, autoimmune or infectious proteolytic causes. Rare hereditary disorders of desmosomal formation have been identified in animals. Familial acantholysis of Angus calves and hereditary suprabasal acantholytic mechanobullous dermatosis of buffaloes appear to be similar to acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa of human beings. A genetic acantholytic dermatosis resembling human Darier disease has been rarely recognized in dogs. In autoimmune blistering dermatoses, circulating autoantibodies bind to the extracellular segments of desmosomal proteins and induce acantholysis. Autoantibodies against desmoglein-3 are found in canine pemphigus vulgaris and paraneoplastic pemphigus. Autoantibodies against desmoglein-1 have been rarely detected in dogs with pemphigus foliaceus. When circulating autoantibodies target desmogleins-1 and -3, mucocutaneous pemphigus vulgaris develops in dogs. Finally, several infectious agents can release proteases that cleave desmosomal bonds. In superficial pustular dermatophytosis of dogs and horses, Trichophyton hyphae colonize the stratum corneum, and acantholysis presumably develops because of proteases secreted by the dermatophytes. In exudative epidermitis of piglets, Staphylococcus bacteria - usually Staphylococcus hyicus- release exfoliatin toxins that bind to and specifically cleave desmoglein-1. Any of the above mechanisms can result in impairment of desmosomal function with subsequent acantholysis. The end point of adhesion failure is identical among these diseases: there is cleft formation where desmosomes are affected. The similarity of mechanisms explains why clinical and microscopic skin lesions overlap between entities, thus leaving clinicians and dermatopathologists with the conundrum of determining whether the acantholysis is of genetic, autoimmune or infectious origin.

  10. Application of vibration to wrist and hand skin affects fingertip tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Lauer, Abigail W; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Webster, John G; Seo, Na Jin

    2015-07-14

    A recent study showed that fingertip pads' tactile sensation can improve by applying imperceptible white-noise vibration to the skin at the wrist or dorsum of the hand in stroke patients. This study further examined this behavior by investigating the effect of both imperceptible and perceptible white-noise vibration applied to different locations within the distal upper extremity on the fingertip pads' tactile sensation in healthy adults. In 12 healthy adults, white-noise vibration was applied to one of four locations (dorsum hand by the second knuckle, thenar and hypothenar areas, and volar wrist) at one of four intensities (zero, 60%, 80%, and 120% of the sensory threshold for each vibration location), while the fingertip sensation, the smallest vibratory signal that could be perceived on the thumb and index fingertip pads, was assessed. Vibration intensities significantly affected the fingertip sensation (P < 0.01) in a similar manner for all four vibration locations. Specifically, vibration at 60% of the sensory threshold improved the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (P < 0.01), while vibration at 120% of the sensory threshold degraded the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (P < 0.01) and the 80% vibration did not significantly change the fingertip sensation (P > 0.01), all compared with the zero vibration condition. This effect with vibration intensity conforms to the stochastic resonance behavior. Nonspecificity to the vibration location suggests the white-noise vibration affects higher level neuronal processing for fingertip sensing. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural pathways for distal upper extremity vibration to impact fingertip pad tactile sensation.

  11. Correlation Study Of Diffenrential Skin Temperatures (DST) For Ovulation Detection Using Infra-Red Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. H. S.; Shah, A. v.; Ruedi, B.

    1982-11-01

    The importance of ovulation time detection in the Practice of Natural Birth Control (NBC) as a contraceptive tool, and for natural/artificial insemination among women having the problem of in-fertility, is well known. The simple Basal Body Temperature (BBT) method of ovulation detection is so far unreliable. A newly proposed Differential Skin Temperature (DST) method may help minimize disturbing physiological effects and improve reliability. This paper explains preliminary results of a detailed correlative study on the DST method, using Infra-Red Thermography (IRT) imaging, and computer analysis techniques. Results obtained with five healthy, normally menstruating women volunteers will be given.

  12. Impact of skin temperature and hydration on plasma volume responses during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kenefick, Robert W; Sollanek, Kurt J; Charkoudian, Nisha; Sawka, Michael N

    2014-08-15

    Heat stress and hydration may both alter plasma volume (PV) responses during acute exercise; potential interactions have not been fully studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of graded elevations in skin temperature (Tsk) on PV changes during steady-state exercise under conditions of euhydration (EU) and hypohydration (HYPO, -4% of body mass). Thirty-two men (22 ± 4 yr) were divided into four cohorts (n = 8 each) and completed EU and HYPO trials in one environment [ambient temperature (Ta) 10, 20, 30, and 40°C]. Thirty minutes of cycle ergometry (50% V̇o2peak) was performed. Core (Tre) and mean skin (Tsk) temperatures were measured; changes in PV, total circulating protein (TCP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were calculated; and skin blood flow (SkBF) was estimated. Hypohydration decreased (P < 0.05) PV by 200 ml (-5.7%) but did not alter TCP. Plasma loss was not different between EU and HYPO during exercise at any Ta. Plasma losses were greater (P < 0.05) with elevated Ta with an average -130, -174, -294, and -445 ml losses during the 10, 20, 30, and 40°C trials, respectively. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations (r = 0.50 to 0.84) were found between ΔTCP and ΔPV during exercise when Tsk was cool/warm (<33°C; Ta 10, 20, and 30°C), but not at 40°C (high Tsk). We conclude that 1) graded skin warming proportionally accentuated plasma loss; 2) plasma loss was associated with plasma protein efflux at lower Tsk and SkBF; 3) at high Tsk, additional plasma loss likely results from increased net filtration at the capillaries; and 4) HYPO did not alter vascular fluid loss during exercise in any environment.

  13. The affective and cognitive processing of touch, oral texture, and temperature in the brain.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2010-02-01

    Some of the principles of the representation of affective touch in the brain are described. Positively affective touch and temperature are represented in parts of the orbitofrontal and pregenual cingulate cortex. The orbitofrontal cortex is implicated in some of the affective aspects of touch that may be mediated through C fibre touch afferents, in that it is activated more by light touch to the forearm (a source of C-tactile (CT) afferents) than by light touch to the glabrous skin of the hand. Oral somatosensory afferents implicated in sensing the texture of food including fat in the mouth also activate the orbitofrontal and pregenual cingulate cortex, as well as the insular taste cortex. Top-down cognitive modulation of the representation of affective touch produced by word labels is found in parietal cortex area 7, the insula and ventral striatum. The cognitive labels also influence activations to the sight of touch and also the correlations with pleasantness in the pregenual cingulate/orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum.

  14. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM DT104 ON CHICKEN SKIN DURING TEMPERATURE ABUSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better predict risk of Salmonella infection from chicken subjected to temperature abuse, a study was undertaken to develop a predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin with native micro flora. For model development, chicken skin portions were inocula...

  15. Skin temperature changes in wild chimpanzees upon hearing vocalizations of conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Zuberbühler, Klaus; Davila-Ross, Marina; Dahl, Christoph D.

    2017-01-01

    A growing trend of research using infrared thermography (IRT) has shown that changes in skin temperature, associated with activity of the autonomic nervous system, can be reliably detected in human and non-human animals. A contact-free method, IRT provides the opportunity to uncover emotional states in free-ranging animals during social interactions. Here, we measured nose and ear temperatures of wild chimpanzees of Budongo Forest, Uganda, when exposed to naturally occurring vocalizations of conspecifics. We found a significant temperature decrease over the nose after exposure to conspecifics' vocalizations, whereas we found a corresponding increase for ear temperature. Our study suggests that IRT can be used in wild animals to quantify changes in emotional states in response to the diversity of vocalizations, their functional significance and acoustical characteristics. We hope that it will contribute to more research on physiological changes associated with social interactions in wild animals. PMID:28280584

  16. Mathematical modeling of temperature mapping over skin surface and its implementation in thermal disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Jing

    2004-09-01

    In non-invasive thermal diagnostics, accurate correlations between the thermal image on skin surface and interior human pathophysiology are often desired, which require general solutions for the bioheat equation. In this study, the Monte Carlo method was implemented to solve the transient three-dimensional bio-heat transfer problem with non-linear boundary conditions (simultaneously with convection, radiation and evaporation) and space-dependent thermal physiological parameters. Detailed computations indicated that the thermal states of biological bodies, reflecting physiological conditions, could be correlated to the temperature or heat flux mapping recorded at the skin surface. The effect of the skin emissivity and humidity, the convective heat transfer coefficient, the relative humidity and temperature of the surrounding air, the metabolic rate and blood perfusion rate in the tumor, and the tumor size and number on the sensitivity of thermography are comprehensively investigated. Moreover, several thermal criteria for disease diagnostic were proposed based on statistical principles. Implementations of this study for the clinical thermal diagnostics are discussed.

  17. Effect of storage time and temperature on Poisson ratio of tomato fruit skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuna-Broniowska, I.; Gładyszewska, B.; Ciupak, A.

    2012-02-01

    The results of studies investigating the effects of storage time and temperature on variations in Poisson ratio of the skin of two greenhouse tomato varieties - Admiro and Encore were presented. In the initial period of the study, Poisson ratio of the skin of tomato fruit cv. Admiro, stored at 13°C, varied between 0.7 and 0.8. After the successive 10 days of the experiment, it decreased to approximately 0.6 and was stabilized until the end of study. By contrast, the skin of tomatoes cv. Encore was characterized by lower values and lower variability of Poisson ratio in the range of 0.4 to 0.5 during storage. The examinations involving tomato fruit cv. Admiro stored at 21°C were completed after 12 days due to fruit softening and progressive difficulty with preparing analytical specimens. The value of Poisson ratio for both varieties stored at room temperature fluctuated throughout the experiment to approximate 0.5.

  18. Temperature trends in regions affected by increasing aridity/humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip D.; Reid, Phillip A.

    A paper in 1991 claimed that regions affected by desertification experience warming trends relative to neighbouring areas. To assess this, an index of aridity/humidity based on the ratio of annual precipitation to annual potential evapotranspiration totals (P/PET) is developed. This index is used to define regions experiencing increases (and those where the increase is statistically significant) in aridity and humidity. We also consider regions always arid (average values of P/PET <0.5) and always humid (P/PET >2.0). Trends of average annual and summer surface air temperature are then calculated for regions in the various aridity/humidity categories and compared to most of the rest of the world's land areas equatorward of 60°. The results indicate that most of the differences in trends between categories are not statistically significant.

  19. Factors affecting characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Three major factors affect the characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors in terms of their levitation properties during interaction with permanent magnets. First, the appropriate parameter for the permanent magnet is internal magnetization, not the value of the magnetic field measured at the magnet`s surface. Second, although levitation force grows with superconductor thickness and surface area, for a given permanent magnet size, comparison of levitation force between samples is meaningful when minimum values are assigned to the superconductor size parameters. Finally, the effect of force creep must be considered when time-averaging the force measurements. In addition to levitational force, the coefficient of friction of a levitated rotating permanent magnet may be used to characterize the superconductor.

  20. No effect of skin temperature on human ventilation response to hypercapnia during light exercise with a normothermic core temperature.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Jesse G; Clegg, Miriam E; Walsh, Michael L; White, Matthew D

    2010-05-01

    Hyperthermia potentiates the influence of CO(2) on pulmonary ventilation (.V(E)). It remains to be resolved how skin and core temperatures contribute to the elevated exercise ventilation response to CO(2). This study was conducted to assess the influences of mean skin temperature (_T(SK)) and end-tidal PCO(2) (P(ET)CO(2)) on .V(E) during submaximal exercise with a normothermic esophageal temperature (T(ES)). Five males and three females who were 1.76 +/- 0.11 m tall (mean +/- SD), 75.8 +/- 15.6 kg in weight and 22.0 +/- 2.2 years of age performed three 1 h exercise trials in a climatic chamber with the relative humidity (RH) held at 31.5 +/- 9.5% and the ambient temperature (T (AMB)) maintained at one of 25, 30, or 35 degrees C. In each trial, the volunteer breathed eucapnic air for 5 min during a rest period and subsequently cycle ergometer exercised at 50 W until T (ES) stabilized at approximately 37.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C. Once T (ES) stabilized in each trial, the volunteer breathed hypercapnic air twice for approximately 5 min with P(ET)CO(2) elevated by approximately +4 or +7.5 mmHg. The significantly (P < 0.05) different increases of P(ET)CO(2) of +4.20 +/- 0.49 and +7.40 +/- 0.51 mmHg gave proportionately larger increases in .V(E) of 10.9 +/- 3.6 and 15.2 +/- 3.6 L min(-1) (P = 0.001). This hypercapnia-induced hyperventilation was uninfluenced by varying the _T(SK) to three significantly different levels (P < 0.001) of 33.2 +/- 1.2 degrees C, to 34.5 +/- 0.8 degrees C to 36.4 +/- 0.5 degrees C. In conclusion, the results support that skin temperature between approximately 33 and approximately 36 degrees C has neither effect on pulmonary ventilation nor on hypercapnia-induced hyperventilation during a light exercise with a normothermic core temperature.

  1. Skin temperature increase caused by a mobile phone: a methodological infrared camera study.

    PubMed

    Straume, Aksel; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Johnsson, Anders

    2005-09-01

    Mobile phone users often complain about burning sensations or a heating of the ear region. The increase in temperature may be due to thermal insulation by the phone, heating of the mobile phone resulting from its electrical power dissipation, and radio frequency (RF) exposure. The main objective of this study was to use infrared (IR) camera techniques to find how much each of these factors contributes to the increase in skin temperature resulting from the use of one GSM 900 phone. One subject, a healthy male, took part in the study. He was holding the phone in a normal position when the phone was switched off, when it was switched on but with the antenna replaced by a 50 Omega load to eliminate the RF exposure, and when it was transmitting RF fields. The output power could be fixed, and the minimal and the maximal power levels of the phone were used. The study was designed as a double blind experiment. The changes in temperature after 15 and 30 min of mobile phone use were calculated on the exposed side of the head relative to the unexposed side. The insulation and the electrical power dissipation led to statistically significant rises in the skin temperature, while the RF exposure did not.

  2. Topical anaesthesia does not affect cutaneous vasomotor or sudomotor responses in human skin.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, K; Wilson, T E

    2013-10-01

    (1) The effects of local sensory blockade (topical anaesthesia) on eccrine sweat glands and cutaneous circulation are not well understood. This study aimed to determine whether topical lidocaine/prilocaine alters eccrine sweat gland and cutaneous blood vessel responses. (2) Sweating (capacitance hygrometry) was induced via forearm intradermal microdialysis of five acetylcholine (ACh) doses (1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10(0) m, 10-fold increments) in control and treated forearm sites in six healthy subjects. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatory (sodium nitroprusside) and adrenergic vasoconstrictor (noradrenaline) agonists were iontophoresed in lidocaine/prilocaine-treated and control forearm skin in nine healthy subjects during blood flow assessment (laser Doppler flowmetry, expressed as% from baseline cutaneous vascular conductance; CVC; flux/mean arterial pressure). (3) Non-linear regression curve fitting identified no change in the ED50 of ACh-induced sweating after sensory blockade (-1.42 ± 0.23 logM) compared to control (-1.27 ± 0.23 logM; P > .05) or in Emax (0.43 ± 0.08 with, 0.53 ± 0.16 mg cm(-2) min(-1) without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > .05). Sensory blockade did not alter the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside (1280 ± 548% change from baseline CVC with, 1204 ± 247% without lidocaine/prilocaine) or vasoconstrictor response to noradrenaline (-14 ± 4% change from baseline CVC with, -22 ± 14% without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > 0.05). (4) Cutaneous sensory blockade does not appear to alter nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation, adrenergic vasoconstriction, or cholinergic eccrine sweating dose-response sensitivity or responsiveness to maximal dose. Thus, lidocaine/prilocaine treatment should not affect sweat gland function or have blood flow implications for subsequent research protocols or clinical procedures.

  3. Comparison of model land skin temperature with remotely sensed estimates and assessment of surface-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, I. F.; Boussetta, S.; Viterbo, P.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Sandu, I.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling between land surface and the atmosphere is a key feature in Earth System Modeling for exploiting the predictability of slowly evolving geophysical variables (e.g., soil moisture or vegetation state), and for correctly representing rapid variations within the diurnal cycle, particularly relevant in data assimilation applications. In this study, land surface temperature (LST) estimated from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) is used to assess the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) skin temperature, which can be interpreted as a radiative temperature of the model surface. It is shown that the ECMWF model tends to slightly overestimate skin temperature during nighttime and underestimate daytime values. Such underestimation of daily amplitudes is particularly pronounced in (semiarid) arid regions, suggesting a misrepresentation of surface energy fluxes in those areas. The LST estimated from MSG is used to evaluate the impact of changes in some of the ECMWF model surface parameters. The introduction of more realistic model vegetation is shown to have a positive but limited impact on skin temperature: long integration leads to an equilibrium state where changes in the latent heat flux and soil moisture availability compensate each other. Revised surface roughness lengths for heat and momentum, however, lead to overall positive impact on daytime skin temperature, mostly due to a reduction of sensible heat flux. This is particularly relevant in nonvegetated areas, unaffected by model vegetation. The reduction of skin conductivity, a parameter which controls the heat transfer to ground by diffusion, is shown to further improve the model skin temperature.

  4. Global Distribution and Variability of Surface Skin and Surface Air Temperatures as Depicted in the AIRS Version-6 Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will briefly describe the significant improvements made in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm, especially as to how they affect retrieved surface skin and surface air temperatures. The global distribution of seasonal 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time 12 year climatologies of Ts,a will be presented for the first time. We will also present the spatial distribution of short term 12 year anomaly trends of Ts,a at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM, as well as the spatial distribution of temporal correlations of Ts,a with the El Nino Index. It will be shown that there are significant differences between the behavior of 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM Ts,a anomalies in some arid land areas.

  5. Spatial Mathematical Model of Heat Transfer in Human Skin Influenced by Heated up to High Temperatures Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskiy, Nikolay V.; Solodkin, Andrey S.; Stuparenko, Alexandr A.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical research results of heat transfer in system "air-heated particle-skin layer" presented. Skin was influenced by heated up to high temperatures particle. The problem is solved in tree-dimensional statement in Cartesian system of coordinates. The typical range of influence parameters of heated particle considered. Temperature distributions in different moments of time obtained. Condition of burn occurrence by heated particle is under consideration in this research.

  6. Impact of ultraviolet radiation and ozone on the transepidermal water loss as a function of skin temperature in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Thiele, J J; Dreher, F; Maibach, H I; Packer, L

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation or ozone leads to skin damage including oxidation of skin biomolecules, as well as to depletion of constitutive antioxidants. The highly organized stratum corneum forming the main barrier against most xenobiotics is particularly susceptible to such damage and possible barrier perturbation may be the consequence. Whereas ample evidence exists for an increased permeability for different solutes including water after exposure to ultraviolet radiation, such an effect has not yet been reported for ozone. This study reports on the effect of such oxidative stressors using the hairless mouse as the skin model and measuring temperature-controlled transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as an indicator for skin barrier integrity. First, a strong dependency of the TEWL on skin temperature was observed, an effect that was clearly more pronounced than that found in man. Given this temperature dependency in untreated animals, we proceeded to determine the effects of both ultraviolet radiation and ozone on TEWL over a relevant physiological skin temperature range. Solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation (0.75-3 minimal erythemal dose) resulted in a delayed and dose-dependent skin barrier disruption over the entire temperature range investigated. Conversely, daily ozone exposure at 2 ppm for 1 week, however, did not significantly alter TEWL up to 72 h after the last exposure. The results demonstrate a differential response of the epidermis to two environmental stressors associated with oxidative damage; they suggest that chronic ozone exposure at relevant environmental levels does not lead to a detectable skin barrier defect, while solar UV exposure was demonstrated to increase epidermal water loss. Furthermore, experimental evidence clearly suggests that future studies applying TEWL measurements in animal models should be performed under carefully controlled skin temperature conditions.

  7. Altered manifestations of skin disease at sites affected by neurological deficit

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, E.; Lerner, E.A.; Elmariah, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of the nervous system to inflammation in general and inflammatory skin disease in particular has been underappreciated. It is now apparent that the conventional clinical manifestations of many inflammatory skin diseases require an intact neural component. We reviewed the literature and identified 23 cases of alterations in the appearance or distribution of skin disorders in patients with acquired central or peripheral neural damage or dysfunction. In 19 cases, near or complete resolution of pre-existing skin lesions occurred in areas directly or indirectly supplied by a subsequently injured nervous system. Exacerbation or new onset of skin lesions occurred in only 4 cases. The neural deficits described included damage within the peripheral or central nervous system resulting in pure sensory, pure motor, or combined sensory and motor deficits. These cases highlight the importance of neural innervation and neurogenic inflammation in the development of inflammatory skin disease and prompt further examination of the use of neural blockade as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses. PMID:25132518

  8. Investigating the roles of core and local temperature on forearm skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Mallette, Matthew M; Hodges, Gary J; McGarr, Gregory W; Gabriel, David A; Cheung, Stephen S

    2016-07-01

    We sought to isolate the contributions of core and local temperature on forearm skin blood flow (SkBF), and to examine the interaction between local- and reflexive-mechanisms of SkBF control. Forearm SkBF was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry in eight males and eight females during normothermia and hyperthermia (+1.2°C rectal temperature). Mean experimental forearm temperature was manipulated in four, 5min blocks between neutral (A: 33.0°C) and warm (B: 38.5°C) in an A-B-A-B fashion during normothermia, and B-A-B-A during hyperthermia. Mean control forearm skin temperature was maintained at ~33°C. Finally, local heating to 44°C was performed on both forearms to elicit maximal SkBF. Data are presented as a percentage of maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), calculated as laser-Doppler flux divided by mean arterial pressure. No sex differences were observed in any CVC measures (P>0.05). During normothermia, increasing experimental forearm temperature to 38.5°C elevated CVC by 42±8%max (d=3.1, P<0.001). Subsequently decreasing experimental forearm temperature back down to 33.0°C reduced CVC by 36±7%max (d=2.5, P<0.001). Finally, the second increase in experimental forearm temperature to 38.5°C increased CVC by 25±6%max (d=1.9, P<0.0001). During hyperthermia, decreasing experimental forearm temperature to 33.0°C reduced CVC by 6±1%max (d=0.5, P<0.001). Increasing experimental forearm temperature to 38.5°C increased CVC by 4±2%max (d=0.4, P<0.001). Finally, decreasing experimental forearm temperature to 33.0°C reduced CVC by 8±2%max (d=0.7, P<0.001). Compared to normothermia, CVC responses to local temperature changes during hyperthermia were almost abolished (normothermia: d=1.9-3.1; hyperthermia: d=0.4-0.7). These data indicate that local temperature drives SkBF during normothermia, while reflexive mechanisms regulate SkBF during hyperthermia.

  9. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Gary A.; Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work was performed in two different major areas. The first centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. The second involved a modeling and data analysis effort whereby modeled near-surface temperature profiles were integrated into the retrieval of bulk SST estimates from existing satellite data. Under the first work area, two different seagoing infrared radiometers were designed and fabricated and the first of these was deployed on research ships during two major experiments. Analyses of these data contributed significantly to the Ph.D. thesis of one graduate student and these results are currently being converted into a journal publication. The results of the second portion of work demonstrated that, with presently available models and heat flux estimates, accuracy improvements in SST retrievals associated with better physical treatment of the near-surface layer were partially balanced by uncertainties in the models and extra required input data. While no significant accuracy improvement was observed in this experiment, the results are very encouraging for future applications where improved models and coincident environmental data will be available. These results are included in a manuscript undergoing final review with the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology.

  10. Land and Ocean Surface Skin Temperature from Geostationary and Low Earth Orbit Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarino, B. R.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Heck, P.; Bedka, K.

    2013-12-01

    Observations from imagers aboard Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites allow for spatially detailed, near-real-time retrievals of cloud and surface radiation properties. Validating and improving the quality of these observations is important for the advancement of climate studies. Compared to GEO sensors, LEO-based instruments can typically provide higher-spatial-resolution datasets, but at the cost of limited areal coverage and reduced sampling frequency at any given location. Conversely, the persistence and coverage of GEO-based imagers offer the opportunity for more frequent retrievals of near-instantaneous, near-global surface properties. Among other cloud and clear-sky retrieval parameters, NASA Langley provides pixel-level land and ocean skin temperature datasets by comparing clear-pixel top-of-atmosphere infrared temperature observations with modeled, atmospheric-absorption-corrected surface temperature values. Depending on cloud-cover thresholds, this method yields surface temperature values that are within 0.5 to 2.0 K of measurements from ground-based networks including the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, the U.S. Climate Reference Network, and the global Baseline Surface Radiation Network. Furthermore, monthly mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are within 0.5 to 2.0 K of NOAA-based SST climatology records, and have an uncertainty of less than 1 K. These data will be useful for assimilation into atmospheric models, which offer improved performance when high-accuracy, high-resolution initial radiometric and surface conditions are included. Modelers should find the immediate availability and broad coverage of these skin temperature observations valuable, which can lead to improved forecasting and more advanced global climate models.

  11. Temperature dependence of the symmetry energy and neutron skins in Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, A. N.; Kadrev, D. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Sarriguren, P.; de Guerra, E. Moya

    2017-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the symmetry energy for isotopic chains of even-even Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei is investigated in the framework of the local density approximation (LDA). The Skyrme energy density functional with two Skyrme-class effective interactions, SkM* and SLy4, is used in the calculations. The temperature-dependent proton and neutron densities are calculated through the hfbtho code that solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov problem by using the cylindrical transformed deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In addition, two other density distributions of 208Pb, namely the Fermi-type density determined within the extended Thomas-Fermi (TF) method and symmetrized-Fermi local density obtained within the rigorous density functional approach, are used. The kinetic energy densities are calculated either by the hfbtho code or, for a comparison, by the extended TF method up to second order in temperature (with T2 term). Alternative ways to calculate the symmetry energy coefficient within the LDA are proposed. The results for the thermal evolution of the symmetry energy coefficient in the interval T =0 -4 MeV show that its values decrease with temperature. The temperature dependence of the neutron and proton root-mean-square radii and corresponding neutron skin thickness is also investigated, showing that the effect of temperature leads mainly to a substantial increase of the neutron radii and skins, especially in the more neutron-rich nuclei, a feature that may have consequences on astrophysical processes and neutron stars.

  12. About possibility of temperature trace observing on the human skin using commercially available IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Shestakov, Ivan L.; Blednov, Roman G.

    2016-09-01

    One of urgent security problems is a detection of objects placed inside the human body. Obviously, for safety reasons one cannot use X-rays for such object detection widely and often. Three years ago, we have demonstrated principal possibility to see a temperature trace, induced by food eating or water drinking, on the human body skin by using a passive THz camera. However, this camera is very expensive. Therefore, for practice it will be very convenient if one can use the IR camera for this purpose. In contrast to passive THz camera using, the IR camera does not allow to see the object under clothing, if an image, produced by this camera, is used directly. Of course, this is a big disadvantage for a security problem solution based on the IR camera using. To overcome this disadvantage we develop novel approach for computer processing of IR camera images. It allows us to increase a temperature resolution of IR camera as well as increasing of human year effective susceptibility. As a consequence of this, a possibility for seeing of a human body temperature changing through clothing appears. We analyze IR images of a person, which drinks water and eats chocolate. We follow a temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body. Some experiments were made with measurements of a body temperature covered by T-shirt. Shown results are very important for the detection of forbidden objects, cancelled inside the human body, by using non-destructive control without using X-rays.

  13. Conductive and evaporative precooling lowers mean skin temperature and improves time trial performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, S H; Hupperets, M; Hodder, S G; Havenith, G

    2015-06-01

    Self-paced endurance performance is compromised by moderate-to-high ambient temperatures that are evident in many competitive settings. It has become common place to implement precooling prior to competition in an attempt to alleviate perceived thermal load and performance decline. The present study aimed to investigate precooling incorporating different cooling avenues via either evaporative cooling alone or in combination with conductive cooling on cycling time trial performance. Ten trained male cyclists completed a time trial on three occasions in hot (35 °C) ambient conditions with the cooling garment prepared by (a) immersion in water (COOL, evaporative); (b) immersion in water and frozen (COLD, evaporative and conductive); or (c) no precooling (CONT). COLD improved time trial performance by 5.8% and 2.6% vs CONT and COOL, respectively (both P < 0.05). Power output was 4.5% higher for COLD vs CONT (P < 0.05). Mean skin temperature was lower at the onset of the time trial following COLD compared with COOL and CONT (both P < 0.05) and lasted for the first 20% of the time trial. Thermal sensation was perceived cooler following COOL and COLD. The combination of evaporative and conductive cooling (COLD) had the greatest benefit to performance, which is suggested to be driven by reduced skin temperature following cooling.

  14. Riverine skin temperature response to subsurface processes in low wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, Sophia E.; Zappa, Christopher J.; Anderson, Steven P.; Dugan, John P.

    2016-03-01

    Both surface and subsurface processes modulate the surface thermal skin and as such the skin temperature may serve as an indicator for coastal, estuarine, and alluvial processes. Infrared (IR) imagery offers the unique tool to survey such systems, allowing not only to assess temperature variability of the thermal boundary layer, but also to derive surface flow fields through digital particle image velocimetry, optical flow techniques, or spectral methods. In this study, IR time-series imagery taken from a boat moored in the Hudson River estuary is used to determine surface flow, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, and characteristic temperature and velocity length scales. These are linked to subsurface measurements provided by in situ instruments. Under the low wind conditions and weak stratification, surface currents and dissipation rate are found to reflect subsurface mean flow (r2 = 0.89) and turbulence (r2 = 0.75). For relatively low dissipation rates, better correlations are obtained by computing dissipation rates directly from wavenumber spectra rather than when having to assume the validity of the Taylor hypothesis. Furthermore, the subsurface dissipation rate scales with the surface length scales (L) and mean flow (U) using ɛ ∝ U3/L (r2 = 0.9). The surface length scale derived from the thermal fields is found to have a strong linear relationship (r2 = 0.88) to water depth (D) with (D/L) ˜ 13. Such a relation may prove useful for remote bathymetric surveys when no waves are present.

  15. Estimation of the Ocean Skin Temperature using the NASA GEOS Atmospheric Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Akella, Santha; Todling, Ricardo; Suarez, Max

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the status of the development of a sea surface temperature (SST) analysis for the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Version-5 atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS). Its implementation is part of the steps being taken toward the development of an integrated earth system analysis. Currently, GEOS-ADAS SST is a bulk ocean temperature (from ocean boundary conditions), and is almost identical to the skin sea surface temperature. Here we describe changes to the atmosphere-ocean interface layer of the GEOS-atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) to include near surface diurnal warming and cool-skin effects. We also added SST relevant Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations to the GEOS-ADAS observing system. We provide a detailed description of our analysis of these observations, along with the modifications to the interface between the GEOS atmospheric general circulation model, gridpoint statistical interpolation-based atmospheric analysis and the community radiative transfer model. Our experiments (with and without these changes) show improved assimilation of satellite radiance observations. We obtained a closer fit to withheld, in-situ buoys measuring near-surface SST. Evaluation of forecast skill scores corroborate improvements seen in the observation fits. Along with a discussion of our results, we also include directions for future work.

  16. Plant Canopy Temperature and Heat Flux Profiles: What Difference Does an Isothermal Skin Make?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.; Qualls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature Ts plays a vital role in the determination of sensible (H) and latent heat flux, upwelling long-wave radiation, and ground heat flux. While it is widely recognized that there is a range of skin temperatures represented in even a homogeneous canopy, it is often necessary or convenient to treat the surface as isothermal. This study investigates, at the sub-canopy scale, the implications of assuming that a canopy is isothermal. The focus is on profiles within the canopy of air, foliage, and soil surface temperature, and of sensible and latent heat flux source strength. Data from a dense grassland at the Southern Great Plains experiment in 1997 (SGP97) were used to assess the ability of a multi-layer canopy model to match measured sensible and latent heat fluxes along with radiometric surface temperatures. In its standard mode, the model solves the energy balance for each canopy layer and uses Localized Near Field (LNF) theory to model the turbulent transport. The results suggest the model captures the most important features of canopy flux generation and transport, and support its use to investigate scalar profiles within canopies. For 112 data points at SGP97, the model produced realistic temperature and sensible heat flux source profiles. In addition, it was run in a mode that seeks the isothermal (soil and foliage) skin temperature (Ti) that provides the same Hproduced by the model in its standard mode. This produces profiles of air and foliage temperature and of sensible heat source strength that differ significantly from profiles from the standard mode. Based on these simulations, realistic canopies may have a mixture of positive and negative sensible heat flux sources at various heights, typically with large contributions from the soil surface. There is frequently a discontinuity between foliage temperatures near the soil and the actual soil surface temperature. For isothermal canopies, heat sources at all levels had the same sign and

  17. A coupling system to predict the core and skin temperatures of human wearing protective clothing in hot environments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Weng, Wenguo; Fu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to predict the core and skin temperatures of human wearing protective clothing in hot environments using the coupling system. The coupling system consisted of a sweating manikin Newton controlled by a multi-node human thermal model, and responded dynamically to the thermal environment as human body. Validation of the coupling system results was conducted by comparison with the subject tests. Five healthy men wearing protective clothing were exposed to the thermal neutral and high temperature environments. The skin temperatures of seven body segments and the rectal temperatures were recorded continuously. The predictions of core temperatures made by the coupling system showed good agreement with the experimental data, with maximum difference of 0.19 °C and RMSD of 0.12 °C. The predicted mean skin temperatures fell outside of the 95% CI for most points, whereas the difference between the simulated results and measured data was no more than 1 °C which is acceptable. The coupling system predicted the local skin temperatures reasonably with the maximum local skin temperature of 1.30 °C. The coupling system has been validated and exhibited reasonable accuracy compared with the experimental results.

  18. Temperature Scanning SAXD/WAXD Measurements On Stratum Corneum Of Mammalian Skin To Separate Entangled Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Ichiro; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The outermost layer of skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is composed of corneocytes and an intercellular lipid matrix. The matrix acts as the main barrier. In the SC, the longitudinal arrangement of the lipid molecules consists of long and short lamellar structures and the lateral arrangement consists of hexagonal and orthorhombic hydrocarbon-chain packings. From the temperature dependence of SAXD/WAXD, we revealed that a long lamellar structure is formed by hexagonal hydrocarbon-chain packing and a short lamellar structure by orthorhombic hydrocarbon-chain packing.

  19. Differential effects of dopamine and opioid receptor blockade on motivated Coca-Cola drinking behavior and associated changes in brain, skin and muscle temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, E A

    2010-05-05

    Although pharmacological blockade of both dopamine (DA) and opiate receptors has an inhibiting effect on appetitive motivated behaviors, it is still unclear which physiological mechanisms affected by these treatments underlie the behavioral deficit. To clarify this issue, we examined how pharmacological blockade of either DA (SCH23390+eticlopride at 0.2 mg/kg each) or opioid receptors (naloxone 1 mg/kg) affects motor activity and temperature fluctuations in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), temporal muscle, and facial skin associated with motivated Coca-Cola drinking behavior in rats. In drug-free conditions, presentation of a cup containing 5 ml of Coca-Cola induced locomotor activation and rapid NAcc temperature increases, which both transiently decreased during drinking, and phasically increased again after the cup was emptied. Muscle temperatures followed this pattern, but increases were weaker and more delayed than those in the NAcc. Skin temperature rapidly dropped after cup presentation, remained at low levels during consumption, and slowly restored during post-consumption behavioral activation. By itself, DA receptor blockade induced robust decrease in spontaneous locomotion, moderate increases in brain and muscle temperatures, and a relative increase in skin temperatures, suggesting metabolic activation coupled with adynamia. Following this treatment (approximately 180 min), motor activation to cup presentation and Coca-Cola consumption were absent, but rats showed NAcc and muscle temperature increases following cup presentation comparable to control. Therefore, DA receptor blockade does not affect significantly central and peripheral autonomic responses to appetitive stimuli, but eliminates their behavior-activating effects, thus disrupting appetitive behavior and blocking consumption. Naloxone alone slightly decreased brain and muscle temperatures and increased skin temperatures, pointing at the enhanced heat loss and possible minor inhibition of basal

  20. Bead temperature effects on FCAW heat-affected zone hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Hardness limits for welding procedure qualification are often imposed to lessen the chances of delayed hydrogen cracking during production fabrication. Temper bead techniques have been used by fabricators during these qualifications to improve their chances of success. This practice involves using the heat of additional weld beads to soften the heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness in the base metal next to the weld where the hardness is the greatest. The technique works under controlled conditions, but the consistency for field use was questionable. This report describes an investigate of the effect of welding parameters, base metal chemical composition, and weld bead placement on HAZ softening. An empirical formula developed from base plate chemical composition, weld cooling time, and temper bead placement can be used to estimate the amount of HAZ tempering. Combined with an appropriate hardness prediction formula, it can help find the welding procedure needed to achieve a desired maximum HAZ hardness, or predict the HAZ hardness of existing welds. Based on the results of the study, bead temperature is not recommended for HAZ hardness control on large scale fabrications.

  1. Dermal mast cells affect the development of sunlight-induced skin tumours.

    PubMed

    Sarchio, Seri N E; Kok, Lai-Fong; O'Sullivan, Clare; Halliday, Gary M; Byrne, Scott N

    2012-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation contained in sunlight is considered a major risk in the induction of skin cancer. While mast cells are best known for their role in allergic responses, they have also been shown to play a crucial role in suppressing the anti-tumour immune response following UV exposure. Evidence is now emerging that UV may also trigger mast cell release of cutaneous tissue remodelling and pro-angiogenic factors. In this review, we will focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which UV recruits and then activates mast cells to initiate and promote skin cancer development.

  2. Regional Skin Temperature Response to Moderate Aerobic Exercise Measured by Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Bouzas Marins, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infrared thermography (IRT) does not require contact with the skin, and it is a convenient, reliable and non-invasive technique that can be used for monitoring the skin temperature (TSK). Objectives: The aim of this study was to monitor the variations in the regional TSK during exercise on 28 regions of interest (ROIs) (forehead, face, chest, abdomen, back, lumbar, anterior and posterior neck, and posterior and anterior views of the right and left hands, forearms, upper arms, thighs, and legs) with IRT. Patients and Methods: 12 physically active young males were monitored with IRT during the following three phases: a) 30 minutes before exercise b) while performing one hour of moderate intensity exercise on a treadmill at 60% of the VO2max, and c) 60 minutes after exercise. Results: During pre-exercise, all TSK reached a steady-state (P ≤ 0.05), which ensured adequate thermal stabilisation. At the beginning of exercise, there was a significant reduction in the TSK in most ROIs after 10 minutes of activity, except for the lower limbs (legs and thighs). After one hour of recovery, in the anterior view of the hands and thighs and in the posterior view of the legs, there were significant increases in the TSK compared to pre-exercise. Conclusions: There were significant distinctions in the skin temperature distribution during exercise according to the activity of the area under consideration during exercise, which may be important in the development of physiological models and heat flux analyses for different purposes. PMID:27217931

  3. Measuring skin temperature before, during and after exercise: a comparison of thermocouples and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; de Moura, Anselmo Gomes; Moreira, Danilo Gomes; Costa, Carlos Magno Amaral; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas

    2014-02-01

    Measuring skin temperature (TSK) provides important information about the complex thermal control system and could be interesting when carrying out studies about thermoregulation. The most common method to record TSK involves thermocouples at specific locations; however, the use of infrared thermal imaging (IRT) has increased. The two methods use different physical processes to measure TSK, and each has advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the mean skin temperature (MTSK) measurements using thermocouples and IRT in three different situations: pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise. Analysis of the residual scores in Bland-Altman plots showed poor agreement between the MTSK obtained using thermocouples and those using IRT. The averaged error was -0.75 °C during pre-exercise, 1.22 °C during exercise and -1.16 °C during post-exercise, and the reliability between the methods was low in the pre- (ICC = 0.75 [0.12 to 0.93]), during (ICC = 0.49 [-0.80 to 0.85]) and post-exercise (ICC = 0.35 [-1.22 to 0.81] conditions. Thus, there is poor correlation between the values of MTSK measured by thermocouples and IRT pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise, and low reliability between the two forms of measurement.

  4. Changes of Locoregional Skin Temperature in Neonates Undergoing Laser Needle Acupuncture at the Acupuncture Point Large Intestine 4

    PubMed Central

    Kurath-Koller, Stefan; Gross, Anna; Freidl, Thomas; Urlesberger, Berndt; Raith, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Laser acupuncture bears a potential risk for the skin surface, especially in neonates whose skin has histological and physiological peculiarities. We evaluated thermal changes of skin temperature in neonates during laser acupuncture by using a thermal camera (Flir i5, Flir Systems Inc., Portland, USA). Laserneedles (Laserneedle GmbH, Glienicke/Nordbahn, Germany) were fixed to the skin at Large Intestine 4 (LI 4, Hegu), bilaterally. Before application of laser acupuncture (685 nm, 15 mW, 500 μm), as well as after 1, 5, and 10 min, thermographic pictures of both hands were taken. The measuring was carried out on the 23rd day after birth (20 neonates, mean postmenstrual gestational age 38 + 2, mean weight 2604 g). Compared to the initial temperature of 34.2°C on the right hand, the skin temperature had increased to 35.3°C (P < 0.05) after 5 min and up to 36.1°C (P < 0.05) after 10 min of stimulation. Equally, on the left hand, an increase of the skin temperature from 34.5°C to 35.9°C (P < 0.05) and 35.9°C (P < 0.05) was measured. The highest measured skin temperature after 10 min of stimulation amounted to 38.7°C, without any clinically visible changes on the skin surface. PMID:25922612

  5. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model.

    PubMed

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to "hot-wet" (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or "cold-dry" (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot-wet and cold-dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold-dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment.

  6. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    PubMed Central

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment. PMID:28243135

  7. Factors affecting growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum type E on irradiated (0. 3 Mrad) chicken skins

    SciTech Connect

    Firstenberg-Eden, R.; Rowley, D.B.; Shattuck, G.E.

    1982-05-01

    A model system (chicken skins with chicken exudate) was used to determine if Clostridium botulinum type E (Beluga) spores, stressed by low dose irradiation, would develop and produce toxin at abuse temperatures of 10 and 30/sup 0/C in the absence of characteristic spoilage. Unstressed spores germinated, multiplied, and produced toxin on vacuum-packed chicken skins, stored at either 30 or 10/sup 0/C. Cell numbers increased faster and toxin was evident sooner at 30/sup 0/C than at 10/sup 0/C. At 30/sup 0/C, growth occurred and toxin was produced more slowly when samples were incubated aerobically than anaerobically. When samples were incubated aerobically at 10/sup 0/C, no toxin was detected within a test period of 14 days. An irradiation dose of 0.3 Mrad at 5/sup 0/C reduced a spore population on vacuum-sealed chicken skins by about 90%. The surviving population produced toxin at 30/sup 0/C under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, at 10/sup 0/C no toxin was detected even on skins incubated anaerobically. Under the worst conditions (30/sup 0/C, vacuum packed) toxin was not detected prior to characteristic spoilage caused by the natural flora surviving 0.3 Mrad.

  8. Relationships of skin depths and temperatures when varying pulse repetition frequencies from 2.0-μm laser light incident on pig skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, David; Johnson, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Human perception of 2.0-μm infrared laser irradiation has become significant in such disparate fields as law enforcement, neuroscience, and pain research. Several recent studies have found damage thresholds for single-pulse and continuous wave irradiations at this wavelength. However, the only publication using multiple-pulse irradiations was investigating the cornea rather than skin. Literature has claimed that the 2.0-μm light characteristic thermal diffusion time was as long as 300-ms. Irradiating the skin with 2.0-μm lasers to produce sensation should follow published recommendations to use pulses on the order of 10 to 100 ms, which approach the theoretical thermal diffusion time. Therefore, investigation of the heating of skin for a variety of laser pulse combinations was undertaken. Temperatures of ex vivo pig skin were measured at the surface and at three depths from pulse sequences of six different duty factors. Differences were found in temperature rise per unit exposure that did not follow a linear relation to duty factor. The differences can be explained by significant heat conduction during the pulses. Therefore, the common heat modeling assumption of thermal confinement during a pulse may need to be experimentally verified if the pulse approaches the theoretical thermal confinement time.

  9. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  10. Tribute to R. G. Boutilier: skin colour and body temperature changes in basking Bokermannohyla alvarengai (Bokermann 1956).

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Glenn J; Eterovick, Paula C; de Andrade, Denis V

    2006-04-01

    In amphibians solar basking far from water sources is relatively uncommon since the highly permeable amphibian skin does not represent a significant barrier to the accompanying risk of losing water by evaporation. A South American frog, Bokermannohyla alvarengai (Bokermann 1956), however, spends a significant amount of the day exposed to full sun and relatively high temperatures. The means by which this frog copes with potentially high rates of evaporative water loss and high body temperatures are unknown. Thus, in this study, skin colour changes, body surface temperature, and evaporative water loss rates were examined under a mixture of field and laboratory conditions to ascertain whether changes in skin reflectivity play an important role in this animal's thermal and hydric balance. Field data demonstrated a tight correlation between the lightness of skin colour and frog temperature, with lighter frogs being captured possessing higher body temperatures. Laboratory experiments supported this relationship, revealing that frogs kept in the dark or at lower temperatures (20 degrees C) had darker skin colours, whereas frogs kept in the light or higher temperatures (30 degrees C) had skin colours of a lighter hue. Light exhibited a stronger influence on skin colour than temperature alone, suggesting that colour change is triggered by the increase in incident solar energy and in anticipation of changes in body temperature. This conclusion is corroborated by the observation that cold, darkly coloured frogs placed in the sun rapidly became lighter in colour during the initial warming up period (over the first 5 min), after which they warmed up more slowly and underwent a further, albeit slower, lightening of skin colour. Surprisingly, despite its natural disposition to bask in the sun, this species does not possess a ;waterproof' skin, since its rates of evaporative water loss were not dissimilar from many hylid species that live in arboreal or semi-aquatic environments

  11. What's in a face? The role of skin tone, facial physiognomy, and color presentation mode of facial primes in affective priming effects.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Elena V; Strube, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Participants (N = 106) performed an affective priming task with facial primes that varied in their skin tone and facial physiognomy, and, which were presented either in color or in gray-scale. Participants' racial evaluations were more positive for Eurocentric than for Afrocentric physiognomy faces. Light skin tone faces were evaluated more positively than dark skin tone faces, but the magnitude of this effect depended on the mode of color presentation. The results suggest that in affective priming tasks, faces might not be processed holistically, and instead, visual features of facial priming stimuli independently affect implicit evaluations.

  12. Thermographic evaluation of hind paw skin temperature and functional recovery of locomotion after sciatic nerve crush in rats

    PubMed Central

    Z. Sacharuk, Viviane; A. Lovatel, Gisele; Ilha, Jocemar; Marcuzzo, Simone; Severo do Pinho, Alexandre; L. Xavier, Léder; A. Zaro, Milton; Achaval, Matilde

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Peripheral nerves are often damaged by direct mechanical injury, diseases, and tumors. The peripheral nerve injuries that result from these conditions can lead to a partial or complete loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, which in turn are related to changes in skin temperature, in the involved segments of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in hind paw skin temperature after sciatic nerve crush in rats in an attempt to determine whether changes in skin temperature correlate with the functional recovery of locomotion. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (n = 7), sham (n = 25), and crush (n = 25). All groups were subjected to thermographic, functional, and histological assessments. RESULTS: ΔT in the crush group was different from the control and sham groups at the 1st, 3rd and 7rd postoperative days (p<0.05). The functional recovery from the crush group returned to normal values between the 3rd and 4th week post-injury, and morphological analysis of the nerve revealed incomplete regeneration at the 4th week after injury. DISCUSSION: This study is the first demonstration that sciatic nerve crush in rats induces an increase in hind paw skin temperature and that skin temperature changes do not correlate closely with functional recovery PMID:21876984

  13. Exercise status affects skin perfusion via prostaglandin, nitric oxide, and EDHF pathways in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Colberg, Sheri R; Azoury, Krystel R; Parson, Henri K; Vinik, Aaron I

    2009-03-01

    Participation in regular exercise training improves dorsal skin perfusion, while type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2 DM) often limits it via reductions in the action or release of vasodilatory compounds. This study was undertaken to investigate the relative contributions of prostaglandins (PG), nitric oxide (NO), and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in dorsal foot skin perfusion in individuals with and without T2 DM and a sedentary lifestyle. Participants included 24 individuals with T2 DM and 28 nondiabetic controls whose exercise status was determined via questionnaire. Their dorsal foot skin perfusion was measured at rest using laser Doppler assessment during localized heating to 44 degrees C with oral aspirin (ASA, 325 mg) treatment. In addition, they received an infusion via a subcutaneous microdialysis probe of either saline (left foot) or L-NAME, a NOS-inhibitor (right foot). Compared to normative data without ASA, heat-stimulated perfusion in regular exercisers (n=22) was significantly more suppressed by ASA and by ASA/L-NAME than in sedentary individuals (n=30). Chronic exercisers exhibit a greater reliance on PG and lesser involvement of EDHF with unchanged NO compared to sedentary individuals, who rely more on EDHF and less on PG release. One possible exception may be diabetic, sedentary individuals, who may rely somewhat more on NO than EDHF. These results suggest that regular exercise may exhibit the greatest effect on the normal functioning of these vasodilatory pathways, although diabetes and a sedentary state together may somewhat alter their relative importance.

  14. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  15. Social Attention, Affective Arousal and Empathy in Men with Klinefelter Syndrome (47,XXY): Evidence from Eyetracking and Skin Conductance

    PubMed Central

    van Rijn, Sophie; Barendse, Marjolein; van Goozen, Stephanie; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with an extra X chromosome (Klinefelter syndrome) are at risk for problems in social functioning and have an increased vulnerability for autism traits. In the search for underlying mechanisms driving this increased risk, this study focused on social attention, affective arousal and empathy. Seventeen adults with XXY and 20 non-clinical controls participated in this study. Eyetracking was used to investigate social attention, as expressed in visual scanning patterns in response to the viewing of empathy evoking video clips. Skin conductance levels, reflecting affective arousal, were recorded continuously during the clips as well. Empathic skills, i.e. participants' understanding of own and others' emotions in response to the clips was also assessed. Results showed reduced empathic understanding, decreased visual fixation to the eye region, but increased affective arousal in individuals with Klinefelter syndrome. We conclude that individuals with XXY tend to avoid the eye region. Considering the increased affective arousal, we speculate that this attentional deployment strategy may not be sufficient to successfully downregulate affective hyper-responsivity. As increased affective arousal was related to reduced empathic ability, we hypothesize that own affective responses to social cues play an important role in difficulties in understanding the feelings and intentions of others. This knowledge may help in the identification of risk factors for psychopathology and targets for treatment. PMID:24416272

  16. Anthocyanin yield and skin softening during maceration, as affected by vineyard row orientation and grape ripeness of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz.

    PubMed

    Giacosa, Simone; Marengo, Fabio; Guidoni, Silvia; Rolle, Luca; Hunter, Jacobus J

    2015-05-01

    Anthocyanin and mechanical properties were evaluated on Shiraz grapes, picked from both sides of North-South and East-West vineyard row orientations at two harvest dates. Wines were made from each combination. The evaluation and evolution of crushed skin mechanical properties during maceration-fermentation, as also affected by grape ripeness, are shown for the first time. No significant differences in anthocyanin content were found in the grapes between the two vineyard row orientations. However, a significant decrease in anthocyanins and berry skin break force (also referred as skin hardness or strength) was found between the two harvest dates. During maceration, a reduction in the crushed berry skin break force of more than 15% occurred. The intact berries and macerated skins showed similarity in skin break energy values. The anthocyanin profile of the grapes and of the wines prominently displayed malvidin forms, changed mainly by the ripeness level of the grapes.

  17. Temperature Features of Enzymes Affecting Crassulacean acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, P. C.

    1967-01-01

    Enzymes involved in malic acid production via a pathway with 2 carboxylation reactions and in malic acid conversion via total oxidation have been demonstrated in mitochondria of Bryophyllum tubiflorum Harv. Activation of the mitochondria by Tween 40 was necessary to reveal part of the enzyme activities. The temperature behavior of the enzymes has been investigated, revealing optimal activity of acid-producing enzymes at 35°. Even at 53° the optimum for acid-converting enzymes was not yet reached. From the simultaneous action of acid-producing and acid-converting enzyme systems the overall result at different temperatures was established. Up to 15° the net result was a malic acid production. Moderate temperatures brought about a decrease in this accumulation, which was partly accompanied by a shift to isocitrate production, while at higher temperatures total oxidation of the acids exceeded the production. PMID:16656606

  18. Temperature can interact with landscape factors to affect songbird productivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Reidy, Jennifer L; Faaborg, John

    2013-04-01

    Increased temperatures and more extreme weather patterns associated with global climate change can interact with other factors that regulate animal populations, but many climate change studies do not incorporate other threats to wildlife in their analyses. We used 20 years of nest-monitoring data from study sites across a gradient of habitat fragmentation in Missouri, USA, to investigate the relative influence of weather variables (temperature and precipitation) and landscape factors (forest cover and edge density) on the number of young produced per nest attempt (i.e., productivity) for three species of songbirds. We detected a strong forest cover × temperature interaction for the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) on productivity. Greater forest cover resulted in greater productivity because of reduced brood parasitism and increased nest survival, whereas greater temperatures reduced productivity in highly forested landscapes because of increased nest predation but had no effect in less forested landscapes. The Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) exhibited a similar pattern, albeit with a marginal forest cover × temperature interaction. By contrast, productivity of the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) was not influenced by landscape effects or temperature. Our results highlight a potential difficulty of managing wildlife in response to global change such as habitat fragmentation and climate warming, as the habitat associated with the greatest productivity for flycatchers was also that most negatively influenced by high temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on nest predation (and therefore, nest predators) underscores the need to acknowledge the potential complexity of species' responses to climate change by incorporating a more thorough consideration of community ecology in the development of models of climate impacts on wildlife.

  19. Does close temperature regulation affect surgical site infection rates?

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira L; Wick, Elizabeth C; Melton, Genevieve B

    2014-01-01

    The argument for close temperature control, to which regulatory bodies have held health systems in an effort to reduce the burden of hospital-acquired infections, is not fully supported by current evidence. The literature is complex on the topic, and overinterpretation of historical data supporting close temperature regulation does not preclude an important recognition of these early works' contribution to high-quality surgical care. Avoidance of hypothermia through the regular use of active rewarming should be a routine part of safe surgical care. The biochemical basis of emphasizing temperature regulation is sound, and ample evidence shows the frank physiologic derangements seen when biological processes occur at suboptimal temperature. It is also recognized that patients tend to do better when warmed during the perioperative period, suggesting that warming devices are an important and essential adjunct to good perioperative care. Clinicians, researchers, and policymakers must be careful in how they apply these well-supported findings to process metrics in an era of limited resources with increasingly stringent quality guidelines and outcomes measures. Discrete temperature targets in current measures are not supported by the existing literature. Not only do these targets artificially anchor clinicians to temperature values with an inadequate scientific basis but they demand intensive resources from health institutions that could potentially be better used on quality requirements with stronger evidence of their ultimate effect on patient care.

  20. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G M; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Tijssen, Henk J; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; Koenen, Hans J P M; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+)CD141(+)DC-SIGN(+) DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+) subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, migration of immature CD14(+) DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  1. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  2. Temperature affects the morphology and calcification of Emiliania huxleyi strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Navarro, Anaid; Langer, Gerald; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The global warming debate has sparked an unprecedented interest in temperature effects on coccolithophores. The calcification response to temperature changes reported in the literature, however, is ambiguous. The two main sources of this ambiguity are putatively differences in experimental setup and strain specificity. In this study we therefore compare three strains isolated in the North Pacific under identical experimental conditions. Three strains of Emiliania huxleyi type A were grown under non-limiting nutrient and light conditions, at 10, 15, 20 and 25 °C. All three strains displayed similar growth rate versus temperature relationships, with an optimum at 20-25 °C. Elemental production (particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), particulate organic carbon (POC), total particulate nitrogen (TPN)), coccolith mass, coccolith size, and width of the tube element cycle were positively correlated with temperature over the sub-optimum to optimum temperature range. The correlation between PIC production and coccolith mass/size supports the notion that coccolith mass can be used as a proxy for PIC production in sediment samples. Increasing PIC production was significantly positively correlated with the percentage of incomplete coccoliths in one strain only. Generally, coccoliths were heavier when PIC production was higher. This shows that incompleteness of coccoliths is not due to time shortage at high PIC production. Sub-optimal growth temperatures lead to an increase in the percentage of malformed coccoliths in a strain-specific fashion. Since in total only six strains have been tested thus far, it is presently difficult to say whether sub-optimal temperature is an important factor causing malformations in the field. The most important parameter in biogeochemical terms, the PIC : POC ratio, shows a minimum at optimum growth temperature in all investigated strains. This clarifies the ambiguous picture featuring in the literature, i.e. discrepancies between PIC : POC-temperature

  3. Interrelationships in lactating Holsteins of rectal and skin temperatures, milk yield and composition, dry matter intake, body weight, and feed efficiency in summer in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Umphrey, J E; Moss, B R; Wilcox, C J; Van Horn, H H

    2001-12-01

    Thirty-two lactating, multiparous Holstein cows were utilized in a 91-d experiment in Auburn, Alabama, during summer to determine whether rectal and skin temperatures and respiration rates are repeatable and interrelated and whether whole cottonseed or calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids (Megalac, Church & Dwight Co., Inc., Princeton, NJ) affected milk production or its constituents. Treatments were (I) control, (II) I plus 10.4% whole cottonseed, (III) I plus 2.6% Megalac, and (IV) I plus 5.2% whole cottonseed plus 1.3% Megalac. Data included 358 to 2644 measurements analyzed as a split-plot design of experiment. Only milk protein percentage and protein-to-fat ratio were significantly affected by dietary treatment. Milk protein percentage was depressed by dietary fat additions, especially by the combination of whole cottonseed and Megalac. Within lactation repeatabilities for milk, fat, protein, and SCM yields ranged from 0.44 to 0.66; two percentages and protein to fat ratio, 0.21 to 0.32; feed efficiency, 0.18; dry matter intake (DMI) and body weight, 0.98 and 0.84; rectal and skin temperatures and respiration rate, 0.001 to 0.055. Partial and simple correlations were similar in sign and magnitude. Noteworthy were partial correlations between milk yield and DMI, 0.367; milk yield and rectal temperature, -0.135; milkyield and respiration rate, 0.102. Skin temperature was unrelated to other variables. Respiration rate was correlated with DMI, 0.270. Results should help researchers designing future experiments involving these responses to predict the number of measures needed to detect differences.

  4. Comparison of abdominal skin temperature between fertile and infertile women by infrared thermography: A diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Jo, Junyoung; Kim, Hyunho

    2016-10-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the differences in abdominal temperature (AT) between fertile (n=206; age) and infertile (n=250) women between the ages of 30 and 39 years. We evaluated the differences in two distinctive skin temperatures by thermography: ΔT1 (CV8 index) - difference in temperature between the mid-abdomen (CV8 acupuncture area) and ventral upper arm (VUA) and ΔT2 (CV4 index) - difference in temperature between the lower abdomen (CV4 acupuncture area) and VUA. The results indicated that the ΔT1 and ΔT2 of infertile women were significantly lower (by 1.05°C and 0.79°C, respectively; p<0.001, both) compared to those of fertile women. Additionally, the area under the curve of ΔT1 (0.78) was greater compared to that of ΔT2 (0.736), and its threshold was set at 0.675°C, by which, the sensitivity and specificity of ΔT1 for determination of fertility were found to be 80.8% and 68.4%, respectively. In conclusion, infertility is associated with lower AT. The decrease in AT in infertile women might be due to poor blood perfusion to the core muscles and tissues of the body. These findings provide a basis for further research for evaluation of clinical feasibility of thermography for analysis of infertility in women. Further evaluation of the influence of AT on fertility outcomes is required to determine the causal relationship between AT and infertility.

  5. Phasic temperature change patterns affect growth and tuberization in potatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T.W. . Dept. of Horticulture)

    1994-07-01

    This study determined the response of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Norland) plants to various patterns of air temperature changes over different growth periods. In each of two experiments under controlled environments, eight treatments of temperature changes were carried out in two growth rooms maintained at 17 and 22 C and a constant vapor pressure deficit of 0.60 kPa and 14-hour photoperiod. Plants were grown for 63 days after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets in 20-liter pots containing peat-vermiculite mix. Temperature changes were imposed on days 21 and 42, which were essentially at the beginning of tuber initiation and tuber enlargement, respectively, for this cultivar. Plants were moved between two temperature rooms to obtain eight temperature change patterns: 17-17-17, 17-17-22, 17-22-17, 22-17-17, 17-22-22, 22-17-22, 22-22-17, and 22-22-22C over three 21-day growth periods. At harvest on day 63, total plant dry weight was higher for the treatments beginning with 22 C than for those beginning with 17C, with highest biomass obtained at 22-22-17 and 22-17-17C. Shoot dry weight increased with temperature increased from 17-17-17 to 22-22-22C during the three growth periods. Tuber dry weight was highest with 22-17-17C, and lowest with 17-17-22 and 17-22-22C. With 22-17-17C, both dry weights of stolons and roots were lowest. Total tuber number and number of small tubers were highest with 17-17-17 and 17-17-22C, and lowest with 17-22-22 and 22-22-22C, whereas number of medium tubers was highest with 22-17-22C, and number of large tubers was highest with 22-17-17C. This study indicates that tuber development of potatoes is optimized with a phasic pattern of high temperature during early growth and low temperature during later growth.

  6. Effects of caffeine on skin and core temperatures, alertness, and recovery sleep during circadian misalignment.

    PubMed

    McHill, Andrew W; Smith, Benjamin J; Wright, Kenneth P

    2014-04-01

    Caffeine promotes wakefulness during night shift work, although it also disturbs subsequent daytime sleep. Increased alertness by caffeine is associated with a higher core body temperature (CBT). A lower CBT and a narrow distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG) have been reported to be associated with improved sleep, yet whether caffeine influences the DPG is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the use caffeine during nighttime total sleep deprivation would reduce the DPG, increase CBT and alertness, and disturb subsequent daytime recovery sleep. We also expected that a greater widening of the DPG prior to sleep would be associated with a greater degree of sleep disturbance. Thirty healthy adults (9 females) aged 21.6 ± 3.5 years participated in a double-blind, 28-h modified constant routine protocol. At 23 h of wakefulness, participants in the treatment condition (n = 10) were given 2.9 mg/kg caffeine, equivalent to ~200 mg (or 2 espressos) for a 70-kg adult, 5 h before a daytime recovery sleep episode. Throughout the protocol, core and skin body temperatures, DPG, sleep architecture, and subjective alertness and mood were measured. Prior to sleep, caffeine significantly widened the DPG and increased CBT, alertness, and clear-headedness (p < 0.05). Caffeine also disturbed daytime recovery sleep (p < 0.05). Increased CBT and a wider DPG prior to sleep were associated with a longer latency to sleep, and a wider DPG was associated with disturbed recovery sleep (i.e., increased wakefulness after sleep onset, increased stage 1 sleep, decreased sleep efficiency, and decreased slow wave sleep) (p < 0.05). A widening of the DPG following nighttime caffeine may represent a component of the integrated physiological response by which caffeine improves alertness and disturbs subsequent daytime recovery sleep. Furthermore, our findings highlight that sleep disturbances associated with caffeine consumed near the circadian trough of alertness are still present when

  7. The Human Touch: Skin Temperature during the Rubber Hand Illusion in Manual and Automated Stroking Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Marieke; Wold, Andrew; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Ernst, Marc O.

    2013-01-01

    A difference in skin temperature between the hands has been identified as a physiological correlate of the rubber hand illusion (RHI). The RHI is an illusion of body ownership, where participants perceive body ownership over a rubber hand if they see it being stroked in synchrony with their own occluded hand. The current study set out to replicate this result, i.e., psychologically induced cooling of the stimulated hand using an automated stroking paradigm, where stimulation was delivered by a robot arm (PHANToMTM force-feedback device). After we found no evidence for hand cooling in two experiments using this automated procedure, we reverted to a manual stroking paradigm, which is closer to the one employed in the study that first produced this effect. With this procedure, we observed a relative cooling of the stimulated hand in both the experimental and the control condition. The subjective experience of ownership, as rated by the participants, by contrast, was strictly linked to synchronous stroking in all three experiments. This implies that hand-cooling is not a strict correlate of the subjective feeling of hand ownership in the RHI. Factors associated with the differences between the two designs (differences in pressure of tactile stimulation, presence of another person) that were thus far considered irrelevant to the RHI appear to play a role in bringing about this temperature effect. PMID:24260454

  8. A real-time heat strain risk classifier using heart rate and skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Buller, Mark J; Latzka, William A; Yokota, Miyo; Tharion, William J; Moran, Daniel S

    2008-12-01

    Heat injury is a real concern to workers engaged in physically demanding tasks in high heat strain environments. Several real-time physiological monitoring systems exist that can provide indices of heat strain, e.g. physiological strain index (PSI), and provide alerts to medical personnel. However, these systems depend on core temperature measurement using expensive, ingestible thermometer pills. Seeking a better solution, we suggest the use of a model which can identify the probability that individuals are 'at risk' from heat injury using non-invasive measures. The intent is for the system to identify individuals who need monitoring more closely or who should apply heat strain mitigation strategies. We generated a model that can identify 'at risk' (PSI 7.5) workers from measures of heart rate and chest skin temperature. The model was built using data from six previously published exercise studies in which some subjects wore chemical protective equipment. The model has an overall classification error rate of 10% with one false negative error (2.7%), and outperforms an earlier model and a least squares regression model with classification errors of 21% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, the model allows the classification criteria to be adjusted based on the task and acceptable level of risk. We conclude that the model could be a valuable part of a multi-faceted heat strain management system.

  9. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  10. Seasonal Temperature Changes Do Not Affect Cardiac Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schildt, Jukka; Loimaala, Antti; Hippeläinen, Eero; Nikkinen, Päivi; Ahonen, Aapo

    2015-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT is widely used to diagnose cardiac inflammation such as cardiac sarcoidosis. Physiological myocardial FDG uptake often creates a problem when assessing the possible pathological glucose metabolism of the heart. Several factors, such as fasting, blood glucose, and hormone levels, influence normal myocardial glucose metabolism. The effect of outdoor temperature on myocardial FDG uptake has not been reported before. We retrospectively reviewed 29 cancer patients who underwent PET scans in warm summer months and again in cold winter months. We obtained myocardial, liver, and mediastinal standardized uptake values (SUVs) as well as quantitative cardiac heterogeneity and the myocardial FDG uptake pattern. We also compared age and body mass index to other variables. The mean myocardial FDG uptake showed no significant difference between summer and winter months. Average outdoor temperature did not correlate significantly with myocardial SUVmax in either summer or winter. The heterogeneity of myocardial FDG uptake did not differ significantly between seasons. Outdoor temperature seems to have no significant effect on myocardial FDG uptake or heterogeneity. Therefore, warming the patients prior to attending cardiac PET studies in order to reduce physiological myocardial FDG uptake seems to be unnecessary. PMID:26858844

  11. Factors affecting the mechanical behavior of collagen hydrogels for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pensalfini, Marco; Ehret, Alexander E; Stüdeli, Silvia; Marino, Daniela; Kaech, Andres; Reichmann, Ernst; Mazza, Edoardo

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the production factors yielding a functional dermal substitute was investigated by means of monotonic and cyclic uniaxial tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy visualizations. The role of (i) plastic compression, (ii) product incubation, and (iii) cell permanence in the collagenous matrix in order to achieve a skin-like behavior were characterized in terms of material and structural stiffness, in-plane kinematics, and cyclic response, as well as pore size and network density. The plastic compression resulted in a denser and stiffer material, while no corresponding change was observed in the behavior of the entire structure. This was related to the progressive reduction in product thickness and amount of excess water, rather than to formation of new crosslinks between fibers. Contrary, irrespective of the presence of human fibroblasts, the product incubation induced both material and structural stiffening, indicating the formation of a denser network. These results were confirmed by similar evolutions in the construct in-plane kinematics and cyclic stress reduction. Finally, comparison of constructs incubated in different culture media indicated a determinant contribution of the biochemical environment, rather than of the seeded cells, to the achieved mechanical properties. The observed features are relevant in terms of mechanical biocompatibility of the implant and might direct future optimizations of the production process in order to rapidly attain the desired mechanical properties.

  12. Body visual discontinuity affects feeling of ownership and skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Tieri, Gaetano; Tidoni, Emmanuele; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-01-01

    When we look at our hands we are immediately aware that they belong to us and we rarely doubt about the integrity, continuity and sense of ownership of our bodies. Here we explored whether the mere manipulation of the visual appearance of a virtual limb could influence the subjective feeling of ownership and the physiological responses (Skin Conductance Responses, SCRs) associated to a threatening stimulus approaching the virtual hand. Participants observed in first person perspective a virtual body having the right hand-forearm (i) connected by a normal wrist (Full-Limb) or a thin rigid wire connection (Wire) or (ii) disconnected because of a missing wrist (m-Wrist) or a missing wrist plus a plexiglass panel positioned between the hand and the forearm (Plexiglass). While the analysis of subjective ratings revealed that only the observation of natural full connected virtual limb elicited high levels of ownership, high amplitudes of SCRs were found also during observation of the non-natural, rigid wire connection condition. This result suggests that the conscious embodiment of an artificial limb requires a natural looking visual body appearance while implicit reactivity to threat may require physical body continuity, even non-naturally looking, that allows the implementation of protective reactions to threat. PMID:26602036

  13. Effects of temperature on embryonic and early larval growth and development in the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa).

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey D; Hopkins, Gareth R; Mohammadi, Shabnam; M Skinner, Heather; Hansen, Tyler; Brodie, Edmund D; French, Susannah S

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of temperature on the growth and development of embryonic and early larval stages of a western North American amphibian, the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa). We assigned newt eggs to different temperatures (7, 14, or 21°C); after hatching, we re-assigned the newt larvae into the three different temperatures. Over the course of three to four weeks, we measured total length and developmental stage of the larvae. Our results indicated a strong positive relationship over time between temperature and both length and developmental stage. Importantly, individuals assigned to cooler embryonic temperatures did not achieve the larval sizes of individuals from the warmer embryonic treatments, regardless of larval temperature. Our investigation of growth and development at different temperatures demonstrates carry-over effects and provides a more comprehensive understanding of how organisms respond to temperature changes during early development.

  14. Spatially defined modulation of skin temperature and hand ownership of both hands in patients with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Gallace, Alberto; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2012-12-01

    Numerous clinical conditions, including complex regional pain syndrome, are characterized by autonomic dysfunctions (e.g. altered thermoregulation, sometimes confined to a single limb), and disrupted cortical representation of the body and the surrounding space. The presence, in patients with complex regional pain syndrome, of a disruption in spatial perception, bodily ownership and thermoregulation led us to hypothesize that impaired spatial perception might result in a spatial-dependent modulation of thermoregulation and bodily ownership over the affected limb. In five experiments involving a total of 23 patients with complex regional pain syndrome of one arm and 10 healthy control subjects, we measured skin temperature of the hand with infrared thermal imaging, before and after experimental periods of either 9 or 10 min each, during which the hand was held on one or the other side of the body midline. Tactile processing was assessed by temporal order judgements of pairs of vibrotactile stimuli, delivered one to each hand. Pain and sense of ownership over the hand were assessed by self-report scales. Across experiments, when kept on its usual side of the body midline, the affected hand was 0.5 ± 0.3°C cooler than the healthy hand (P < 0.02 for all, a common finding in cold-type complex regional pain syndrome), and tactile stimuli delivered to the healthy hand were prioritized over those delivered to the affected hand. Simply crossing both hands over the midline resulted in (i) warming of the affected hand (the affected hand became 0.4 ± 0.3°C warmer than when it was in the uncrossed position; P = 0.01); (ii) cooling of the healthy hand (by 0.3 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.02); and (iii) reversal of the prioritization of tactile processing. When only the affected hand was crossed over the midline, it became warmer (by 0.5 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.01). When only the healthy hand was crossed over the midline, it became cooler (by 0.3 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.01). The temperature change of

  15. Determination of the amplitude and phase relationships between oscillations in skin temperature and photoplethysmography-measured blood flow in fingertips.

    PubMed

    Sagaidachnyi, A A; Skripal, A V; Fomin, A V; Usanov, D A

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that skin temperature oscillations in fingertips coexist with blood flow oscillations and there is a certain correlation between them. At the same time, the reasons for differences in waveform and the delay between the blood flow and temperature oscillations are far from being fully understood. In this study we determine the relationships between spectral components of the blood flow and temperature oscillations in fingertips, and we ascertain the frequency dependences of amplitude attenuation and delay time for the temperature oscillations. The blood flow oscillations were considered as a source of thermal waves propagating from micro-vessels towards the skin surface and manifesting as temperature oscillations. The finger temperature was measured by infrared thermography and blood flow was assessed by photoplethysmography for ten healthy subjects. The time-frequency analysis of oscillations was based on the Morlet wavelet transform. The frequency dependences of delay time and amplitude attenuation in temperature compared with blood flow oscillations have been determined in endothelial (0.005-0.02 Hz) and neurogenic (0.02-0.05 Hz) frequency bands using the wavelet spectra. We approximated the experimental frequency dependences by equations describing thermal wave propagation through the medium and taking into account the thermal properties and thickness of a tissue. Results of analysis show that with the increase of frequency f the delay time of temperature oscillations decreases inversely proportional to f(1/2), and the attenuation of the amplitude increases directly proportional to exp f(1/2). Using these relationships allows us to increase correlation between the processed temperature oscillations and blood flow oscillations from 0.2 to 0.7 within the frequency interval 0.005-0.05 Hz. The established experimental and theoretical relationships clarify an understanding of interrelation between the dynamics of blood flow and skin

  16. Observation of temperature trace, induced by changing of temperature inside the human body, on the human body skin using commercially available IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2015-05-01

    As it is well-known, application of the passive THz camera for the security problems is very promising way. It allows seeing concealed object without contact with a person and this camera is non-dangerous for a person. In previous papers, we demonstrate new possibility of the passive THz camera using for a temperature difference observing on the human skin if this difference is caused by different temperatures inside the body. For proof of validity of our statement we make the similar physical experiment using the IR camera. We show a possibility of temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body due to water drinking. We use as a computer code that is available for treatment of images captured by commercially available IR camera, manufactured by Flir Corp., as well as our developed computer code for computer processing of these images. Using both codes we demonstrate clearly changing of human body skin temperature induced by water drinking. Shown phenomena are very important for the detection of forbidden samples and substances concealed inside the human body using non-destructive control without X-rays using. Early we have demonstrated such possibility using THz radiation. Carried out experiments can be used for counter-terrorism problem solving. We developed original filters for computer processing of images captured by IR cameras. Their applications for computer processing of images results in a temperature resolution enhancing of cameras.

  17. A comparison of whole body vibration and moist heat on lower extremity skin temperature and skin blood flow in healthy older individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Everett B.; Sackiriyas, Kanikkai Steni Balan; Bains, Gurinder S.; Calandra, Giovanni; Lobo, Crystal; Nakhro, Daniel; Malthankar, Gauri; Paul, Sherwine

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Tissue healing is an intricate process that is regulated by circulation. Heat modalities have been shown to improve skin circulation. Recent research supports that passive vibration increases circulation without risk of burns. Study purpose is to compare and determine effects of short duration vibration, moist heat, and a combination of the two on skin blood flow (SBF) and skin temperature (ST) in elderly, non-diabetic individuals following short-term exposure. Material/Methods Ten subjects, 3 female and 7 male (55–73 years of age), received two interventions over three days: 1 – Active vibration, 2 – passive vibration, 3 – moist heat, 4 – moist heat combined with passive vibration (MHPV), 5 – a commercial massaging heating pad, and 6 – no intervention. SBF and ST were measured using a MOOR Laser Doppler before and after the intervention and the third measurement were taken 10 minutes following. Results Mean SBF following a ten-minute intervention were significantly different in the combination of moist heat and passive vibration from the control, active vibration, and the commercial massaging heating pad. Compared to baseline measurements, this resulted in mean SBF elevation to 450% (at conclusion of 10 minutes of intervention) and 379% (10 minutes post). MHPV (p=0.02) showed significant changes in ST from the commercial massaging heating pad, passive vibration, and active vibration interventions. Conclusions SBF in the lower legs showed greatest increase with MHPV. Interventions should be selected that are low risk while increasing lower extremity skin blood flow. PMID:22739731

  18. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis.

  19. Deregulated expression of Cdc6 in the skin facilitates papilloma formation and affects the hair growth cycle

    PubMed Central

    Búa, Sabela; Sotiropoulou, Peggy; Sgarlata, Cecilia; Borlado, Luis R; Eguren, Manuel; Domínguez, Orlando; Ortega, Sagrario; Malumbres, Marcos; Blanpain, Cedric; Méndez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cdc6 encodes a key protein for DNA replication, responsible for the recruitment of the MCM helicase to replication origins during the G1 phase of the cell division cycle. The oncogenic potential of deregulated Cdc6 expression has been inferred from cellular studies, but no mouse models have been described to study its effects in mammalian tissues. Here we report the generation of K5-Cdc6, a transgenic mouse strain in which Cdc6 expression is deregulated in tissues with stratified epithelia. Higher levels of CDC6 protein enhanced the loading of MCM complexes to DNA in epidermal keratinocytes, without affecting their proliferation rate or inducing DNA damage. While Cdc6 overexpression did not promote skin tumors, it facilitated the formation of papillomas in cooperation with mutagenic agents such as DMBA. In addition, the elevated levels of CDC6 protein in the skin extended the resting stage of the hair growth cycle, leading to better fur preservation in older mice. PMID:26697840

  20. Theoretical modeling of time-dependent skin temperature and heat losses during whole-body cryotherapy: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Polidori, G; Marreiro, A; Pron, H; Lestriez, P; Boyer, F C; Quinart, H; Tourbah, A; Taïar, R

    2016-11-01

    This article establishes the basics of a theoretical model for the constitutive law that describes the skin temperature and thermolysis heat losses undergone by a subject during a session of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC). This study focuses on the few minutes during which the human body is subjected to a thermal shock. The relationship between skin temperature and thermolysis heat losses during this period is still unknown and have not yet been studied in the context of the whole human body. The analytical approach here is based on the hypothesis that the skin thermal shock during a WBC session can be thermally modelled by the sum of both radiative and free convective heat transfer functions. The validation of this scientific approach and the derivation of temporal evolution thermal laws, both on skin temperature and dissipated thermal power during the thermal shock open many avenues of large scale studies with the aim of proposing individualized cryotherapy protocols as well as protocols intended for target populations. Furthermore, this study shows quantitatively the substantial imbalance between human metabolism and thermolysis during WBC, the explanation of which remains an open question.

  1. Fully printed flexible fingerprint-like three-axis tactile and slip force and temperature sensors for artificial skin.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shingo; Kanao, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2014-12-23

    A three-axis tactile force sensor that determines the touch and slip/friction force may advance artificial skin and robotic applications by fully imitating human skin. The ability to detect slip/friction and tactile forces simultaneously allows unknown objects to be held in robotic applications. However, the functionalities of flexible devices have been limited to a tactile force in one direction due to difficulties fabricating devices on flexible substrates. Here we demonstrate a fully printed fingerprint-like three-axis tactile force and temperature sensor for artificial skin applications. To achieve economic macroscale devices, these sensors are fabricated and integrated using only printing methods. Strain engineering enables the strain distribution to be detected upon applying a slip/friction force. By reading the strain difference at four integrated force sensors for a pixel, both the tactile and slip/friction forces can be analyzed simultaneously. As a proof of concept, the high sensitivity and selectivity for both force and temperature are demonstrated using a 3×3 array artificial skin that senses tactile, slip/friction, and temperature. Multifunctional sensing components for a flexible device are important advances for both practical applications and basic research in flexible electronics.

  2. Temperature-controlled laser-soldering system and its clinical application for bonding skin incisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhon, David; Gabay, Ilan; Shpolyansky, Gregory; Vasilyev, Tamar; Nur, Israel; Meidler, Roberto; Hatoum, Ossama Abu; Katzir, Abraham; Hashmonai, Moshe; Kopelman, Doron

    2015-12-01

    Laser tissue soldering is a method of repairing incisions. It involves the application of a biological solder to the approximated edges of the incision and heating it with a laser beam. A pilot clinical study was carried out on 10 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Of the four abdominal incisions in each patient, two were sutured and two were laser soldered. Cicatrization, esthetical appearance, degree of pain, and pruritus in the incisions were examined on postoperative days 1, 7, and 30. The soldered wounds were watertight and healed well, with no discharge from these wounds or infection. The total closure time was equal in both methods, but the net soldering time was much shorter than suturing. There was no difference between the two types of wound closure with respect to the pain and pruritus on a follow-up of one month. Esthetically, the soldered incisions were estimated as good as the sutured ones. The present study confirmed that temperature-controlled laser soldering of human skin incisions is clinically feasible, and the results obtained were at least equivalent to those of standard suturing.

  3. Habituation of thermal sensations, skin temperatures, and norepinephrine in men exposed to cold air.

    PubMed

    Leppäluoto, J; Korhonen, I; Hassi, J

    2001-04-01

    We studied habituation processes by exposing six healthy men to cold air (2 h in a 10 degrees C room) daily for 11 days. During the repeated cold exposures, the general cold sensations and those of hand and foot became habituated so that they were already significantly less intense after the first exposure and remained habituated to the end of the experiment. The decreases in skin temperatures and increases in systolic blood pressure became habituated after four to six exposures, but their habituations occurred only at a few time points during the 120-min cold exposure and vanished by the end of the exposures. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, total thyroxine and triiodothyronine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, cortisol, and total proteins were measured before and after the 120-min cold exposure on days 0, 5, and 10. The increase in norepinephrine response became reduced on days 5 and 10 and that of proteins on day 10, suggesting that the sympathetic nervous system became habituated and hemoconcentration became attenuated. Thus repeated cold-air exposures lead to habituations of cold sensation and norepinephrine response and to attenuation of hemoconcentration, which provide certain benefits to those humans who have to stay and work in cold environments.

  4. Comparison of Land Skin Temperature from a Land Model, Remote Sensing, and In-situ Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Aihui; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Draper, Clara Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Land skin temperature (Ts) is an important parameter in the energy exchange between the land surface and atmosphere. Here hourly Ts from the Community Land Model Version 4.0, MODIS satellite observations, and in-situ observations in 2003 were compared. Compared with the in-situ observations over four semi-arid stations, both MODIS and modeled Ts show negative biases, but MODIS shows an overall better performance. Global distribution of differences between MODIS and modeled Ts shows diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. Over sparsely vegetated areas, the model Ts is generally lower than the MODIS observed Ts during the daytime, while the situation is opposite at nighttime. The revision of roughness length for heat and the constraint of minimum friction velocity from Zeng et al. [2012] bring the modeled Ts closer to MODIS during the day, and have little effect on Ts at night. Five factors contributing to the Ts differences between the model and MODIS are identified, including the difficulty in properly accounting for cloud cover information at the appropriate temporal and spatial resolutions, and uncertainties in surface energy balance computation, atmospheric forcing data, surface emissivity, and MODIS Ts data. These findings have implications for the cross-evaluation of modeled and remotely sensed Ts, as well as the data assimilation of Ts observations into Earth system models.

  5. Inter-Comparison of GOES-8 Imager and Sounder Skin Temperature Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Stephanie L.; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Skin temperature (ST) retrievals derived from geostationary satellite observations have both high temporal and spatial resolutions and are therefore useful for applications such as assimilation into mesoscale forecast models, nowcasting, and diagnostic studies. Our retrieval method uses a Physical Split Window technique requiring at least two channels within the longwave infrared window. On current GOES satellites, including GOES-11, there are two Imager channels within the required spectral interval. However, beginning with the GOES-M satellite the 12-um channel will be removed, leaving only one longwave channel. The Sounder instrument will continue to have three channels within the longwave window, and therefore ST retrievals will be derived from Sounder measurements. This research compares retrievals from the two instruments and evaluates the effects of the spatial resolution and sensor calibration differences on the retrievals. Both Imager and Sounder retrievals are compared to ground-truth data to evaluate the overall accuracy of the technique. An analysis of GOES-8 and GOES-11 intercomparisons is also presented.

  6. Preliminary Study of Altered Skin Temperature at Body Sites Associated with Self-Injurious Behavior in Adults Who Have Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Sutton, Kelly A.; Bodfish, James W.

    2001-01-01

    The sensory status of four nonverbal adults with mental retardation and severe self-injury was examined using skin temperature measures prior to opiate antagonist treatment. For each participant, the body site targeted most frequently for self-injury was associated with altered skin temperature and reduced by naltrexone treatment. In all cases,…

  7. Effect of temperature difference between manikin and wet fabric skin surfaces on clothing evaporative resistance: how much error is there?

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Kuklane, Kalev; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2012-01-01

    Clothing evaporative resistance is one of the inherent factors that impede heat exchange by sweating evaporation. It is widely used as a basic input in physiological heat strain models. Previous studies showed a large variability in clothing evaporative resistance both at intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory testing. The errors in evaporative resistance may cause severe problems in the determination of heat stress level of the wearers. In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between the manikin nude surface and wet textile skin surface on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. It was found that the temperature difference between the skin surface and the manikin nude surface could lead to an error of up to 35.9% in evaporative resistance of the boundary air layer. Similarly, this temperature difference could also introduce an error of up to 23.7% in the real clothing total evaporative resistance (R ( et_real ) < 0.1287 kPa m(2)/W). Finally, it is evident that one major error in the calculation of evaporative resistance comes from the use of the manikin surface temperature instead of the wet textile fabric skin temperature.

  8. Effect of temperature difference between manikin and wet fabric skin surfaces on clothing evaporative resistance: how much error is there?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faming; Kuklane, Kalev; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2012-01-01

    Clothing evaporative resistance is one of the inherent factors that impede heat exchange by sweating evaporation. It is widely used as a basic input in physiological heat strain models. Previous studies showed a large variability in clothing evaporative resistance both at intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory testing. The errors in evaporative resistance may cause severe problems in the determination of heat stress level of the wearers. In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between the manikin nude surface and wet textile skin surface on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. It was found that the temperature difference between the skin surface and the manikin nude surface could lead to an error of up to 35.9% in evaporative resistance of the boundary air layer. Similarly, this temperature difference could also introduce an error of up to 23.7% in the real clothing total evaporative resistance ( R et_real < 0.1287 kPa m2/W). Finally, it is evident that one major error in the calculation of evaporative resistance comes from the use of the manikin surface temperature instead of the wet textile fabric skin temperature.

  9. Unconscious deception detection measured by finger skin temperature and indirect veracity judgments-results of a registered report.

    PubMed

    van 't Veer, Anna E; Gallucci, Marcello; Stel, Mariëlle; van Beest, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    A pre-registered experiment was conducted to examine psychophysiological responses to being lied to. Bridging research on social cognition and deception detection, we hypothesized that observing a liar compared to a truth-teller would decrease finger skin temperature of observers. Participants first watched two targets while not forewarned that they would later be asked to judge (direct and indirect) veracity, and then watched another two targets while forewarned about this. During both these phases finger skin temperature was measured. Findings pertaining to temperature partly confirmed our main hypothesis. When participants were observing a liar, irrespective of being forewarned, on average finger skin temperature declined over time. In the forewarned phase, temperature trajectories of truth-tellers were higher than those of liars, however, in the not forewarned phase, this pattern was reversed. Results confirmed our further hypotheses that participants judge liars as less likeable and less trustworthy than truth-tellers-an indication of indirect deception detection. Our hypothesis that the effect size for trustworthiness would be bigger than that of liking was not supported by the data. Additionally, and also confirming our hypothesis, participants performed around chance level when directly judging whether the target person was lying. Exploratory analyses are reported with regard to truth bias and dependency between direct and indirect veracity judgments. Limitations and directions for future work related to the existence of psychophysiological indicators of deception detection are discussed.

  10. Unconscious deception detection measured by finger skin temperature and indirect veracity judgments—results of a registered report

    PubMed Central

    van ’t Veer, Anna E.; Gallucci, Marcello; Stel, Mariëlle; van Beest, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    A pre-registered experiment was conducted to examine psychophysiological responses to being lied to. Bridging research on social cognition and deception detection, we hypothesized that observing a liar compared to a truth-teller would decrease finger skin temperature of observers. Participants first watched two targets while not forewarned that they would later be asked to judge (direct and indirect) veracity, and then watched another two targets while forewarned about this. During both these phases finger skin temperature was measured. Findings pertaining to temperature partly confirmed our main hypothesis. When participants were observing a liar, irrespective of being forewarned, on average finger skin temperature declined over time. In the forewarned phase, temperature trajectories of truth-tellers were higher than those of liars, however, in the not forewarned phase, this pattern was reversed. Results confirmed our further hypotheses that participants judge liars as less likeable and less trustworthy than truth-tellers—an indication of indirect deception detection. Our hypothesis that the effect size for trustworthiness would be bigger than that of liking was not supported by the data. Additionally, and also confirming our hypothesis, participants performed around chance level when directly judging whether the target person was lying. Exploratory analyses are reported with regard to truth bias and dependency between direct and indirect veracity judgments. Limitations and directions for future work related to the existence of psychophysiological indicators of deception detection are discussed. PMID:26106339

  11. The influence of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity and beta-1 receptor selectivity on the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling in normotensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Lenders, J W; Salemans, J; de Boo, T; Lemmens, W A; Thien, T; van't Laar, A

    1986-03-01

    A double-blind randomized study was designed to investigate differences in the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling during dosing with placebo or one of four beta-blockers: propranolol, atenolol, pindolol, and acebutolol. In 11 normotensive nonsmoking subjects, finger skin temperature was measured with a thermocouple before and 20 minutes after immersion of one hand in a water bath at 16 degrees C. This finger cooling test caused no significant changes in systemic hemodynamics such as arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and forearm blood flow. The recovery of finger skin temperature during propranolol dosing was better than that during pindolol and atenolol dosing. There were no differences between the recoveries of skin temperature during pindolol, atenolol, and acebutolol dosing. Thus we could demonstrate no favorable effect of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity or beta 1-selectivity on the recovery of finger skin temperature after finger cooling.

  12. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I.; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.; Groot, Steven P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  13. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H; Groot, Steven P C

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes.

  14. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-12

    Estimated Heat -Affected-Zone Edges October 12, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. S.G. LambrakoS Center for Computational Materials...PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat -Affected-Zone Edges S.G. Lambrakos...experimentally measured estimates of the heat -affected-zone edge to examine the consistency of calculated temperature histories for steel welds. 12-10-2016 NRL

  15. Analysing visual pattern of skin temperature during submaximal and maximal exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Gorkem Aybars; Basaran, Tahsin; Colakoglu, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    Aims of this study were to examine our hypotheses assuming that (a) skin temperature patterns would differ between submaximal exercise (SE) and graded maximal exercise test (GXT) and (b) thermal kinetics of Tskin occurring in SE and GXT might be similar in a homogenous cohort. Core temperature (Tcore) also observed in order to evaluate thermoregulatory responses to SE and GXT. Eleven moderately to well-trained male athletes were volunteered for the study (age: 22.2 ± 3.7 years; body mass: 73.8 ± 6.9 kg; height: 181 ± 6.3 cm; body surface area 1.93 ± 0.1 m2; body fat: 12.6% ± 4.2%; V ˙ O2max: 54 ± 9.9 mL min-1 kg-1). Under stabilized environmental conditions in climatic chamber, GXT to volitional exhaustion and 20-min SE at 60% of VO2max were performed on cycle ergometer. Thermal analyses were conducted in 2-min intervals throughout exercise tests. Tskin was monitored by a thermal camera, while Tcore was recorded via an ingestible telemetric temperature sensor. Thermal kinetic analyses showed that Tskin gradually decreased till the 7.58 ± 1.03th minutes, and then initiated to increase till the end of SE (Rsqr = 0.97), while Tskin gradually decreased throughout the GXT (Rsqr = 0.89). Decrease in the level of Tskin during the GXT was significantly below from the SE [F (4, 40) = 2.67, p = 0.07, ηp2 = 0.211]. In the meantime, Tcore continuously increased throughout the SE and GXT (p < 0.05). Both GXT and SE were terminated at very close final Tcore values (37.8 ± 0.3 °C and 38.0 ± 0.3 °C, respectively; p > 0.05). However, total heat energies were calculated as 261.5 kJ/m2 and 416 kJ/m2 for GXT and SE, respectively (p < 0.05). Thus, it seems that SE may be more advantageous than GXT in thermoregulation. In conclusion, Tcore gradually increased throughout maximal and submaximal exercises as expected. Tskin curves patterns found to be associated amongst participants at both GXT and SE. Therefore, Tskin kinetics may ensure an important data for monitoring

  16. [Study on the skin-core evolvement of carbon fibers as a function of heat treatment temperature by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-jie; Fan, Li-dong; Wang, Hao-jing; Zhu, Zhen-ping

    2008-08-01

    The skin-core evolvement of the carbon fibers was studied as a function of heat-treatment temperature though the analysis of Raman spectroscopy of the carbon fibers surface and core. It was found that the change of the Raman spectra of the carbon fibers core was similar to that on the surface with the increase in heat-treatment temperature. At 1600 degrees C, the Rs and Rc values were almost equal, indicating that the degrees of the graphitization of the carbon fibers surface and core were almost uniform. The Rs and Rc values decreased dramatically with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, and Rs decreased more. At 2800 degrees C, the Rs value came to 0.429, lowered 77.2%, while the Rc value then came to 1.101, lowered 38.7% only. It implied that the graphitization degree of the carbon fibers was enhanced with increasing the heat treatment temperature, and that of carbon fibers surface was enhanced more. The graphite characters of the carbon of the carbon fibers surface were different from that of the carbon fibers core. The former is close to soft carbon, which is easy to graphitize, while the latter is close to hard carbon, which is difficult to graphitize, and it may be resin carbon Skin-core structure gene Rsc (= Rs/Rc) which denoted the skin-core degree of the carbon fibers was first brought forward and adopted. The Rsc value is between 0 and 1. When the Rsc value is equal to 1, the carbon fibers are homogenous. When the Rsc value is close to zero, there are serious skin-core structures in the carbon fibers. The Rsc value reduced linearly with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, indicating that the homogeneous degrees of the carbon fibers decreased and the skin-core degrees of the carbon fibers increased. The crystallite size of the carbon fibers surface and core increased gradually with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, but the surface's increased more quickly, indicating that the carbon of the carbon fibers surface was easier to

  17. [Problems of using a thermocouple for measurements of skin temperature rise during the exposure to millimeter waves].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M S; Fesenko, E E

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of using thermocouples for the artifact-free measurements of skin temperature during millimeter wave exposure was studied. The distributions of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human skin were calculated for different orientations of the thermocouple relative to the E-field of exposure. It was shown that, at the parallel orientation of a thermocouple relative to the E-field, SAR significantly increased at the tip of the thermocouple. This can result in an overheating of the thermocouple. At the perpendicular orientation of a thermocouple, the distortions of the SAR were insignificant. The data obtained confirm that the skin temperature can be measured with a thermocouple during exposure under the condition that the thermocouple is located perpendicular to the E-vector of the electromagnetic field. For the accurate determination of SAR from the rate of the initial temperature rise, it is necessary to fit the temperature kinetics measured with the thermocouple to the solution of the bio-heat transfer equation.

  18. Effects of relative humidity and ambient temperature on the ballistic delivery of micro-particles to excised porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Mark; Rishworth, Stephen; Carter, Fiona; Mitchell, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The effectiveness of ballistic particle delivery to the skin is often dependent upon breaching the stratum corneum (SC) and targeting cells within defined layers of the viable epidermis. This paper experimentally determines the influence of relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the ballistic delivery of particles to the skin. Gold particles of radius 0.9+/-0.6 microm were accelerated by a hand-held supersonic device to impact freshly excised porcine skin at 410-665 m per s. Increasing the RH from 15% to 95% (temperature at 25 degrees C) led to a particle penetration increase by a factor of 1.8. Temperature increases from 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C (RH at 15%) enhanced particle penetration 2-fold. In both cases, these increases were sufficient to move the target layer from the SC to the viable epidermis. Relative trends in particle penetration compared well with predictions from a theoretical model well. Calculated absolute penetration depths are 6-fold greater than the measurements. The inversely calculated dynamic yield stress of the SC is up to a factor of 10 higher than reported quasi-static measurements, due to changes in tissue failure modes over a strain-rate range spanning 10 orders of magnitude. If targeted particle delivery is required, it is recommended that the environmental RH and temperature be monitored.

  19. Reliability and validity of skin temperature measurement by telemetry thermistors and a thermal camera during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    James, C A; Richardson, A J; Watt, P W; Maxwell, N S

    2014-10-01

    New technologies afford convenient modalities for skin temperature (TSKIN) measurement, notably involving wireless telemetry and non-contact infrared thermometry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of skin temperature measurements using a telemetry thermistor system (TT) and thermal camera (TC) during exercise in a hot environment. Each system was compared against a certified thermocouple, measuring the surface temperature of a metal block in a thermostatically controlled waterbath. Fourteen recreational athletes completed two incremental running tests, separated by one week. Skin temperatures were measured simultaneously with TT and TC compared against a hard-wired thermistor system (HW) throughout rest and exercise. Post hoc calibration based on waterbath results displayed good validity for TT (mean bias [MB]=-0.18 °C, typical error [TE]=0.18 °C) and reliability (MB=-0.05 °C, TE=0.31 °C) throughout rest and exercise. Poor validity (MB=-1.4 °C, TE=0.35 °C) and reliability (MB=-0.65 °C, TE=0.52 °C) was observed for TC, suggesting it may be best suited to controlled, static situations. These findings indicate TT systems provide a convenient, valid and reliable alternative to HW, useful for measurements in the field where traditional methods may be impractical.

  20. Skin-deep diagnosis: affective bias and zebra retreat complicating the diagnosis of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad S

    2013-01-01

    Nearly half of medical errors can be attributed to an error of clinical reasoning or decision making. It is estimated that the correct diagnosis is missed or delayed in between 5% and 14% of acute hospital admissions. Through understanding why and how physicians make these errors, it is hoped that strategies can be developed to decrease the number of these errors. In the present case, a patient presented with dyspnea, gastrointestinal symptoms and weight loss; the diagnosis was initially missed when the treating physicians took mental short cuts and used heuristics as in this case. Heuristics have an inherent bias that can lead to faulty reasoning or conclusions, especially in complex or difficult cases. Affective bias, which is the overinvolvement of emotion in clinical decision making, limited the available information for diagnosis because of the hesitancy to acquire a full history and perform a complete physical examination in this patient. Zebra retreat, another type of bias, is when a rare diagnosis figures prominently on the differential diagnosis but the physician retreats for various reasons. Zebra retreat also factored in the delayed diagnosis. Through the description of these clinical reasoning errors in an actual case, it is hoped that future errors can be prevented or inspiration for additional research in this area will develop.

  1. Assimilation of Satellite-Derived Skin Temperature Observations into Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Mahanama, P. P.; Koster, Randal D.; Liu, Q.

    2010-01-01

    Land surface (or "skin") temperature (LST) lies at the heart of the surface energy balance and is a key variable in weather and climate models. Here we assimilate LST retrievals from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) into the Noah and Catchment (CLSM) land surface models using an ensemble-based, off-line land data assimilation system. LST is described very differently in the two models. A priori scaling and dynamic bias estimation approaches are applied because satellite and model LST typically exhibit different mean values and variability. Performance is measured against 27 months of in situ measurements from the Coordinated Energy and Water Cycle Observations Project at 48 stations. LST estimates from Noah and CLSM without data assimilation ("open loop") are comparable to each other and superior to that of ISCCP retrievals. For LST, RMSE values are 4.9 K (CLSM), 5.6 K (Noah), and 7.6 K (ISCCP), and anomaly correlation coefficients (R) are 0.62 (CLSM), 0.61 (Noah), and 0.52 (ISCCP). Assimilation of ISCCP retrievals provides modest yet statistically significant improvements (over open loop) of up to 0.7 K in RMSE and 0.05 in anomaly R. The skill of surface turbulent flux estimates from the assimilation integrations is essentially identical to the corresponding open loop skill. Noah assimilation estimates of ground heat flux, however, can be significantly worse than open loop estimates. Provided the assimilation system is properly adapted to each land model, the benefits from the assimilation of LST retrievals are comparable for both models.

  2. Predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin during temperature abuse.

    PubMed

    Oscar, T P

    2009-02-01

    To better predict risk of Salmonella infection from chicken subjected to temperature abuse, a study was undertaken to develop a predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin with native flora. For model development, chicken skin portions (2.14 cm2) were inoculated with 0.85 log of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (ATCC 700408) and then stored at 5 to 50 degrees C for 8 h. Kinetic data from the storage trials were fit to a primary model to determine lag time (lamda), specific growth rate (micrro), and the 95% prediction interval (PI). Secondary models for lamda, mu, and PI as a function of storage temperature were developed and then combined with the primary model to create a tertiary model. Performance of the tertiary model was evaluated against dependent data, independent data for interpolation, and independent data for extrapolation to kosher chicken skin by using an acceptable prediction zone from -1 (fail-safe) to 0.5 (fail-dangerous) log per skin portion. Survival of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin was observed during 8 h of storage at 5 to 20 degrees C and at 50 degrees C, whereas growth was observed from 25 to 45 degrees C and was optimal at 40 degrees C with a lamda of 2.5 h and a mu of 1.1 log/h. Variation of pathogen growth, as assessed by PI, increased in a nonlinear manner as a function of temperature and was greater for growth conditions than no-growth conditions. The percentage of acceptable prediction errors was 82.6% for dependent data, 83.7% for independent data for interpolation, and 81.6% for independent data for extrapolation to kosher skin, which all exceeded the performance criterion of 70% acceptable predictions. Thus, it was concluded that the tertiary model provided valid predictions for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 from a low initial dose on both nonkosher and kosher chicken skin with native flora.

  3. Histological Lesions and Cellular Response in the Skin of Alpine Chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra) Spontaneously Affected by Sarcoptic Mange

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Claudia; Lazzarotti, Camilla; Trogu, Tiziana; Lanfranchi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Population dynamics of chamois (genus Rupicapra, subfamily Caprinae) can be influenced by infectious diseases epizootics, of which sarcoptic mange is probably the most severe in the Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra). In this study, skin lesions and cellular inflammatory infiltrates were characterized in 44 Alpine chamois affected by sarcoptic mange. Dermal cellular responses were evaluated in comparison with chamois affected by trombiculosis and controls. In both sarcoptic mange and trombiculosis, a significantly increase of eosinophils, mast cells, T and B lymphocytes, and macrophages was detected. Moreover, in sarcoptic mange significant higher numbers of T lymphocytes and macrophages compared to trombiculosis were observed. Lesions in sarcoptic mange were classified in three grades, according to crusts thickness, correlated with mite counts. Grade 3 represented the most severe form with crust thickness more than 3.5 mm, high number of mites, and severe parakeratosis with diffuse bacteria. Evidence of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity was detected in all three forms associated with diffuse severe epidermal hyperplasia. In grade 3, a significant increase of B lymphocytes was evident compared to grades 1 and 2, while eosinophil counts were significantly higher than in grade 1, but lower than in grade 2 lesions. An involvement of nonprotective Th2 immune response could in part account for severe lesions of grade 3. PMID:27403422

  4. MO-D-213-04: The Proximity to the Skin of PTV Affects PTV Coverage and Skin Dose for TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Watanabe, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The proximity to the skin surface of the PTV for the patients with skin disease could be a concern in terms of the PTV coverage and actual surface dose (SD). IMRT optimization algorithms increase the beam intensity close to the skin in order to compensate for lack of scattering material, leading to enhanced SD but potential hot spots. This study aims to investigate the effect of PTV proximity to the skin on planning and measured SD Methods: All measurements were done for 6 MV X-ray beam of Helical TomoTherapy. An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned in a CT simulator in a routine manner with thermoplastic mask immobilization. PTVs were created with varying distances to the skin of 0 mm -(PTV1), 1 mm- (PTV2), 2 mm-(PTV3) and 3 mm-(PTV4). Also, a 5 mm bolus was used with PTV1 (PTV5). All planning constraints were kept the same in all studies (hard constraint: 95% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV). Gafchromic film (EBT3) was placed under the mask on the phantom surface, and the resulting dose was estimated using RIT software. Results: Optimizing the dose using different PTVs lead to average planned target doses of 10.8, 10.3, 10.2, 10.3 and 10.0 Gy, with maximum doses 12.2, 11.2, 11.1, 11.1 and 10.0 Gy for PTV1, PTV2, PTV3, PTV4 and PTV5, respectively. EBT3 measurements indicated a significant decrease of SD with skin distance by 12.7% (PTV1), 21.9% (PTV2), 24.8% (PTV3) and 28.4% (PTV4) comparing to prescription dose. Placement of a 5 mm bolus on the phantom surface resulted in a SD close to prescribed (+0.5%). Conclusion: This work provides a clear demonstration of the relationship between the skin dose and the PTV to the skin distance. The results indicate the necessity of a bolus even for TomoTherapy when high skin dose is required.

  5. Elderly and sun-affected skin. Distinguishing between changes caused by aging and changes caused by habitual exposure to sun.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review and distinguish between skin changes produced by aging and changes produced by habitual exposure to sun. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The literature was searched from 1969 to 1999 for articles on dermatoheliosis and sun-damaged skin. Surprisingly few were found comparing the difference between elderly skin and sun-damaged skin. A few articles focused on certain small aspects of sun-damaged skin. Many excellent articles described particular changes (e.g., actinic keratosis), but few covered all the changes due to aging and to sun. MAIN MESSAGE: Skin changes due to aging can be distinguished from those due to sun damage. All changes due to sun exposure can be grouped under the term dermatoheliosis; five parts of the skin are involved: epidermis (actinic keratosis), dermis (solar elastosis), blood vessels (telangiectasia), sebaceous glands (solar comedones), and melanocytes (diffuse or mottled brown patches). Habitual exposure to sun and a white skin are prerequisites for developing these changes. Knowing the difference between changes caused by sun and by aging can help physicians predict which patients are most likely to get skin cancers. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of these common skin changes will help physicians diagnose and manage the skin abnormalities of elderly people and of people with dermatoheliosis. PMID:11421052

  6. Selective mass treatment with ivermectin to control intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in a severely affected population.

    PubMed Central

    Heukelbach, Jörg; Winter, Benedikt; Wilcke, Thomas; Muehlen, Marion; Albrecht, Stephan; de Oliveira, Fabíola Araújo Sales; Kerr-Pontes, Lígia Regina Sansigolo; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the short-term and long-term impact of selective mass treatment with ivermectin on the prevalence of intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in an economically depressed community in north-east Brazil. METHODS: An intervention was carried out in a traditional fishing village in north-east Brazil where the population of 605 is heavily affected by ectoparasites and enteroparasites. The prevalence of intestinal helminths was determined by serial stool examination and the prevalence of parasitic skin diseases by clinical inspection. A total of 525 people out of a target population of 576 were treated at baseline. The majority of these were treated with ivermectin (200 microg/kg with a second dose given after 10 days). If ivermectin was contraindicated, participants were treated with albendazole or mebendazole for intestinal helminths or with topical deltamethrin for ectoparasites. Follow-up examinations were performed at 1 month and 9 months after treatment. FINDINGS: Prevalence rates of intestinal helminthiases before treatment and at 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: hookworm disease 28.5%, 16.4% and 7.7%; ascariasis 17.1%, 0.4% and 7.2%; trichuriasis 16.5%, 3.4% and 9.4%; strongyloidiasis 11.0%, 0.6% and 0.7%; and hymenolepiasis 0.6%; 0.4% and 0.5%, respectively. Prevalence rates of parasitic skin diseases before treatment and 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: active pediculosis 16.1%, 1.0% and 10.3%; scabies 3.8%, 1.0% and 1.5%; cutaneous larva migrans 0.7%, 0% and 0%; tungiasis 51.3%, 52.1% and 31.2%, respectively. Adverse events occurred in 9.4% of treatments. They were all of mild to moderate severity and were transient. CONCLUSION: Mass treatment with ivermectin was an effective and safe means of reducing the prevalence of most of the parasitic diseases prevalent in a poor community in north-east Brazil. The effects of treatment lasted for a prolonged period of time. PMID:15375445

  7. Relationships between facial temperature changes, end-exercise affect and during-exercise changes in affect: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Fabien D; Bertucci, William M; Arfaoui, Ahlem

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed as an evaluation of the relationships between changes in facial temperature and self-reported pleasure-displeasure during an acute aerobic exercise bout. Ninety-two students performed a 10-minute long session of cycle ergometry at 80-85% of age-predicted maximal heart rate. Using infrared thermography and a single-item measure of pleasure-displeasure (the Feeling Scale, FS), facial temperature and the FS score were sampled at the beginning (Min1:00) and at the end of the exercise session (Min9:00). Statistical analyses revealed that cheek (but not forehead) temperature was higher at the end of the exercise bout compared to Min1:00 (it increased by about 5%). Change in cheek temperature was negatively related to end-exercise affect (β = -0.28, P < 0.001) and to during-exercise affective changes (β = -0.35, P < 0.001). No significant relationship with forehead temperature was found. Some of the possible reasons for this differential effect as well as theoretical and practical implications of our findings are discussed.

  8. Tension responses to joule temperature jump in skinned rabbit muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

    1992-01-01

    1. Joule temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 5-9 degrees C up to 40 degrees C were used to study the cross-bridge kinetics and thermodynamics in skinned rabbit muscle fibres. To produce a T-jump, an alternating current pulse was passed through a fibre 5 s after removing the activating solution (pCa congruent to 4.5) from the experimental trough. The pulse frequency was congruent to 30 kHz, amplitude less than or equal to 3 kV, and duration 0.2 ms. The pulse energy liberated in the fibre was calculated using a special analog circuit and then used for estimation of the T-jump amplitude. 2. The T-jump induced a tri-exponential tension transient. Phases 1 and 2 had rate constants k1 = 450-1750 s-1 and k2 = 60-250 s-1 respectively, characterizing the tension rise, whereas phase 3 had a rate constant k3 = 5-10 s-1 representing tension recovery due to the fibre cooling. 3. An increase from 13 to 40 degrees C for the final temperature achieved by the T-jump led to an increase in the amplitudes of phases 1 and 2. After T-jumps to 30-40 degrees C during phase 1, tension increased by 50-80%. During phase 2 an approximately 2-fold tension increase continued. Rate constants k1 and k2 increased with temperature and temperature coefficients (Q10) were 1.6 and 1.7, respectively. 4. To study which processes in the cross-bridges are involved in phases 1 and 2, a series of experiments were made where step length changes of -9 to +3 nm (hs)-1 (nanometres per half-sarcomere length) were applied to the fibre 4 ms before the T-jump. 5. After the step shortening, the rate constant of phase 1 increased, whereas its amplitude decreased compared to those without a length change. This indicates that phase 1 is determined by some force-generating process in the cross-bridges attached to the thin filaments. This process is, most probably, the same as that producing the early tension recovery following the length change. The enthalpy change (delta H) associated with the reaction controlling this

  9. Skin-infiltrating T cells and cytokine expression in Icelandic horses affected with insect bite hypersensitivity: a possible role for regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Mareike; Janda, Jozef; Sigurdardottir, Olöf G; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Klukowska, Jolanta; von Tscharner, Claudia; Doherr, Marcus; Broström, Hans; Andersson, Lisa S; Einarsson, Sigurjón; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjörg

    2011-03-15

    Equine insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a seasonally recurrent, pruritic skin disorder caused by an IgE-mediated reaction to salivary proteins of biting flies, predominantly of the genus Culicoides. The aim of this study was to define T cell subsets and cytokine profile in the skin of IBH-affected Icelandic horses with particular focus on the balance between T helper (Th) 1, Th2 and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Distribution and number of CD4+, CD8+ and Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells were characterized by immunohistochemical staining in lesional and non-lesional skin of moderately and severely IBH-affected horses (n=14) and in the skin of healthy control horses (n=10). Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, mRNA expression levels of Th2 cytokines (Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13), Th1 cytokines (Interferon-γ), regulatory cytokines (Transforming Growth Factor β1, IL-10) and the Treg transcription factor FoxP3 were measured in skin and blood samples. Furthermore, Culicoides nubeculosus specific serum IgE levels were assessed. Lesions of IBH-affected horses contained significantly higher numbers of CD4+ cells than skin of healthy control horses. Furthermore, the total number of T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) was significantly increased in lesional compared to non-lesional skin and there was a tendency (p=0.07) for higher numbers of CD4+ cells in lesional compared to non-lesional skin. While the number of FoxP3+ T cells did not differ significantly between the groups, the ratio of Foxp3 to CD4+ cells was significantly lower in lesions of severely IBH-affected horses than in moderately affected or control horses. Interestingly, differences in FoxP3 expression were more striking at the mRNA level. FoxP3 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in lesional skin, compared both to non-lesional and to healthy skin and were also significantly lower in non-lesional compared to healthy skin. Expression levels of IL-13, but not IL-4 or IL-5

  10. Effects of pressure exerted on the skin by elastic cord on the core temperature, body weight loss and salivary secretion rate at 35 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sawako; Midorikawa, Tomoko; Tokura, Hiromi

    2006-03-01

    Effects of pressure exerted on the skin by elastic cord on the core temperature, body weight loss and salivary secretion rate were studied under conditions of ambient temperature of 35 degrees C and a relative humidity of 60%. Twelve healthy females, aged 18-23 years, served as subjects. The subjects entered a bioclimatic chamber and rested quietly in a chair for 80 min. Then, skin pressure was exerted by applying elastic cord (8.5 mm wide) to six different skin areas, such as axilla, under-bust, waist, inguines, thighs and ankles. The values of skin pressure by elastic cord ranged from 11.9 to 33.3 g/cm(2). In the control experiment, wrapping with an elastic cord was loosely performed without any skin pressure. Rectal and skin temperatures, body weight loss by sweating and salivary secretion rate were measured throughout the 160 min experimental period. Core temperature increased more significantly under pressure exerted on the skin. Body weight loss by mainly sweating and salivary secretion rate were significantly suppressed under pressure exerted on the skin. We discussed the physiological mechanisms in terms of suppression of central nervous activity as to why significant increase of core temperatures, inhibition of body weight loss mainly by sweating and of salivary secretion rate occurred, and furthermore practical significance of these findings for impairment of digestion, swallowing, vocalizing, defense against disease bacteria and sport activity.

  11. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can get infected by them. Some common types of skin infections are Bacterial: Cellulitis and impetigo. Staphylococcal infections can also affect the skin. Viral: Shingles, warts, and herpes simplex Fungal: Athlete's foot and yeast infections Parasitic: Body lice, head lice, and scabies ...

  12. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios. PMID:26028216

  13. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-06-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios.

  14. High-Salt Diet Causes Osmotic Gradients and Hyperosmolality in Skin Without Affecting Interstitial Fluid and Lymph.

    PubMed

    Nikpey, Elham; Karlsen, Tine V; Rakova, Natalia; Titze, Jens M; Tenstad, Olav; Wiig, Helge

    2017-02-06

    The common notion is that the body Na(+) is maintained within narrow limits for fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. Several studies have, however, shown that considerable amounts of Na(+) can be retained or removed from the body without commensurate water loss and that the skin can serve as a major salt reservoir. Our own data from rats have suggested that the skin is hypertonic compared with plasma on salt storage and that this also applies to skin interstitial fluid. Even small electrolyte gradients between plasma and interstitial fluid would represent strong edema-generating forces. Because the water accumulation has been shown to be modest, we decided to reexamine with alternative methods in rats whether interstitial fluid is hypertonic during salt accumulation induced by high-salt diet (8% NaCl and 1% saline to drink) or deoxycorticosterone pellet implantation. These treatments resulted both in increased systemic blood pressure, skin salt, and water accumulation and in skin hyperosmolality. Interstitial fluid isolated from implanted wicks and lymph draining the skin was, however, isosmotic, and Na(+) concentration in fluid isolated by centrifugation and in lymph was not different from plasma. Interestingly, by eluting layers of the skin, we could show that there was an osmolality and urea gradient from epidermis to dermis. Collectively, our data suggest that fluid leaving the skin as lymph is isosmotic to plasma but also that the skin can differentially control its own electrolyte microenvironment by creating local gradients that may be functionally important.

  15. Occupational dermal exposure to nanoparticles and nano-enabled products: Part I-Factors affecting skin absorption.

    PubMed

    Larese Filon, Francesca; Bello, Dhimiter; Cherrie, John W; Sleeuwenhoek, Anne; Spaan, Suzanne; Brouwer, Derk H

    2016-08-01

    The paper reviews and critically assesses the evidence on the relevance of various skin uptake pathways for engineered nanoparticles, nano-objects, their agglomerates and aggregates (NOAA). It focuses especially in occupational settings, in the context of nanotoxicology, risk assessment, occupational medicine, medical/epidemiological surveillance efforts, and the development of relevant exposure assessment strategies. Skin uptake of nanoparticles is presented in the context of local and systemic health effects, especially contact dermatitis, skin barrier integrity, physico-chemical properties of NOAA, and predisposing risk factors, such as stratum corneum disruption due to occupational co-exposure to chemicals, and the presence of occupational skin diseases. Attention should be given to: (1) Metal NOAA, since the potential release of ions may induce local skin effects (e.g. irritation and contact dermatitis) and absorption of toxic or sensitizing metals; (2) NOAA with metal catalytic residue, since potential release of ions may also induce local skin effects and absorption of toxic metals; (3) rigid NOAA smaller than 45nm that can penetrate and permeate the skin; (4) non rigid or flexible NOAA, where due to their flexibility liposomes and micelles can penetrate and permeate the intact skin; (5) impaired skin condition of exposed workers. Furthermore, we outline possible situations where health surveillance could be appropriate where there is NOAA occupational skin exposures, e.g. when working with nanoparticles made of sensitizer metals, NOAA containing sensitizer impurities, and/or in occupations with a high prevalence of disrupted skin barrier integrity. The paper furthermore recommends a stepwise approach to evaluate risk related to NOAA to be applied in occupational exposure and risk assessment, and discusses implications related to health surveillance, labelling, and risk communication.

  16. Ambient Temperature and 17β-Estradiol Modify Fos Immunoreactivity in the Median Preoptic Nucleus, a Putative Regulator of Skin Vasomotion

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Penny A.; Krajewski, Sally J.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen has pronounced effects on thermoregulation, but the anatomic sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes are unknown. In this study, we tested whether estradiol-17β (E2) treatment would alter the activity of thermoregulatory brain regions responding to mild changes in ambient temperature (TAMBIENT). Core and tail skin temperatures were recorded at the ambient temperatures of 20, 24, or 31 C in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with and without E2. Neuronal activity was evaluated by counting the number of Fos-immunoreactive cells in the brains of rats killed 90 min after exposure to one of the three ambient temperatures. Of 14 brain areas examined, the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) was the only site that exhibited increased Fos immunoreactivity at the high TAMBIENT of 31 C. At 24 C, OVX rats exhibited increased numbers of MnPO Fos-immunoreactive cells, compared with OVX + E2 rats. Interestingly, tail skin vasomotion and MnPO Fos expression were affected in a similar manner by TAMBIENT and E2 treatment. In the arcuate nucleus and anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), Fos immunoreactivity was highest at the low TAMBIENT of 20 C, with inhibitory (arcuate nucleus) and stimulatory (AVPV) effects of E2. No other areas responded to both TAMBIENT and E2 treatment. These results implicate the MnPO, the arcuate nucleus, and the AVPV as sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes. Combined with studies showing the importance of MnPO neurons in heat-defense pathways, the MnPO emerges as a likely site for E2 modulation of thermoregulatory vasomotion. PMID:21521752

  17. Ambient temperature and 17β-estradiol modify Fos immunoreactivity in the median preoptic nucleus, a putative regulator of skin vasomotion.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Penny A; Krajewski, Sally J; Rance, Naomi E

    2011-07-01

    Estrogen has pronounced effects on thermoregulation, but the anatomic sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes are unknown. In this study, we tested whether estradiol-17β (E(2)) treatment would alter the activity of thermoregulatory brain regions responding to mild changes in ambient temperature (T(AMBIENT)). Core and tail skin temperatures were recorded at the ambient temperatures of 20, 24, or 31 C in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with and without E(2). Neuronal activity was evaluated by counting the number of Fos-immunoreactive cells in the brains of rats killed 90 min after exposure to one of the three ambient temperatures. Of 14 brain areas examined, the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) was the only site that exhibited increased Fos immunoreactivity at the high T(AMBIENT) of 31 C. At 24 C, OVX rats exhibited increased numbers of MnPO Fos-immunoreactive cells, compared with OVX + E(2) rats. Interestingly, tail skin vasomotion and MnPO Fos expression were affected in a similar manner by T(AMBIENT) and E(2) treatment. In the arcuate nucleus and anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), Fos immunoreactivity was highest at the low T(AMBIENT) of 20 C, with inhibitory (arcuate nucleus) and stimulatory (AVPV) effects of E(2). No other areas responded to both T(AMBIENT) and E(2) treatment. These results implicate the MnPO, the arcuate nucleus, and the AVPV as sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes. Combined with studies showing the importance of MnPO neurons in heat-defense pathways, the MnPO emerges as a likely site for E(2) modulation of thermoregulatory vasomotion.

  18. Skin temperature evaluation by infrared thermography: Comparison of two image analysis methods during the nonsteady state induced by physical exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Rossi, Alessio; Trecroci, Athos; Alberti, Giampietro; Gargano, Marco; Merla, Arcangelo; Ammer, Kurt; Caumo, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The most common method to derive a temperature value from a thermal image in humans is the calculation of the average of the temperature values of all the pixels confined within a demarcated boundary defined region of interest (ROI). Such summary measure of skin temperature is denoted as Troi in this study. Recently, an alternative method for the derivation of skin temperature from the thermal image has been developed. Such novel method (denoted as Tmax) is based on an automated (software-driven) selection of the warmest pixels within the ROI. Troi and Tmax have been compared under basal, steady-state conditions, resulting very well correlated and characterized by a bias of approximately 1 °C (Tmax > Troi). Aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Tmax and Troi under the nonsteady-state conditions induced by physical exercise. Thermal images of quadriceps of 13 subjects performing a squat exercise were recorded for 120 s before (basal steady state) and for 480 s after the initiation of the exercise (nonsteady state). The thermal images were then analysed to extract Troi and Tmax. Troi and Tmax changed almost in parallel during the nonstead -state. At a closer inspection, it was found that during the nonsteady state the bias between the two methods slightly increased (from 0.7 to 1.1 °C) and the degree of association between them slightly decreased (from Pearson's r = 0.96 to 0.83). Troi and Tmax had different relationships with the skin temperature histogram. Whereas Tmax was the mean, which could be interpreted as the centre of gravity of the histogram, Tmax was related with the extreme upper tail of the histogram. During the nonsteady state, the histogram increased its spread and became slightly more asymmetric. As a result, Troi deviated a little from the 50th percentile, while Tmax remained constantly higher than the 95th percentile. Despite their differences, Troi and Tmax showed a substantial agreement in assessing the changes in skin

  19. Environmental temperature affects the dynamics of ingestion in the nectivorous ant Camponotus mus.

    PubMed

    Falibene, Agustina; Josens, Roxana

    2014-12-01

    Environmental temperature influences physiology and behavior in animals in general and is particularly determinant in ectotherms. Not least because temperature defines metabolism and body temperature, muscle activity in insects also strongly depends on this factor. Here, we analyzed how environmental temperature influences the dynamics of ingestion due to its effect on the sucking pump muscles in the nectivorous ants Camponotus mus. Feeding behavior and sucking pump activity during sucrose solution ingestion were first recorded in a natural environment in an urban setting throughout the day and in different seasons. Then, controlled temperature experiments were performed in the laboratory. In both situations, feeding time decreased and pumping frequency increased with temperature. However, different pumping frequencies under a same temperature were also observed in different seasons. Besides, in the laboratory, the volume of solution ingested increased with temperature. Consequently, intake rate increased when temperature rose. This change was exclusively promoted by a variation in the pumping frequency while volume taken in per pump contraction was not affected by temperature. In summary, environmental temperature modified the dynamics of ingestion and feeding behavior by directly affecting pumping frequency.

  20. Skin Temperature Feedback Increases Thermoregulatory Efficiency and Decreases Required Microclimate Cooling Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    and ratings of thermal comfort (TC) were measured at regular intervals. 3.0 RESULTS In study one, all IR1-4 paradigms significantly reduced... Thermal comfort and sensation in men wearing a cooling system controlled by skin temperatrure. Human Factors 49: 1033-1044, 2007. [7] Xu X

  1. Caterpillar biomass depends on temperature and precipitation, but does not affect bird reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eva Maria; Ohm, Judith; Hoffmann, Konstantin Frank; Hille, Sabine Marlene

    2016-07-01

    Complex changes in phenological events appear as temperatures are increasing: In deciduous forests bud burst, hatching of herbivorous caterpillars, egg laying and nestling time of birds when feeding chicks on caterpillars, may differentially shift into early season and alter synchronization. If timing of bird reproduction has to match with short periods of food availability, phenological mismatch could negatively affect reproductive success. Using a unique empirical approach along an altitudinal temperature gradient, we firstly asked whether besides temperature, also precipitation and leaf phenology interplay and affect caterpillar biomass, since impacts of rainfall on caterpillars have been largely neglected so far. Secondly, we asked whether abundance of caterpillars and thereby body mass of great tit nestlings, which are mainly fed with caterpillars, vary along the altitudinal temperature gradient. We demonstrated that next to temperature also precipitation and leaf phenology affected caterpillar biomass. In our beech forest, even along altitudes, caterpillars were available throughout the great tit breeding season but in highly variable amounts. Our findings revealed that although timing of leaf phenology and great tit breeding season were delayed with decreasing temperature, caterpillars occurred synchronously and were not delayed according to altitude. However, altitude negatively affected caterpillar biomass, but body mass of fledglings at high altitude sites was not affected by lower amounts of caterpillar biomass. This might be partially outweighed by larger territory sizes in great tits.

  2. Osteopontin deficiency affects imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like murine skin inflammation and lymphocyte distribution in skin, draining lymph nodes and spleen.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Denis F; Borkner, Lisa; Scheurmann, Jan; Singh, Kamayani; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Weiss, Johannes M

    2015-04-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) that enhances autoimmunity is expressed in psoriasis lesions; however, its functions in psoriatic inflammation are unknown. We investigated the role of OPN in OPN deficient mice (OPN-/-) by inducing psoriasis-like inflammation through skin application of imiquimod (IMQ). OPN-/- mice treated with IMQ showed delayed onset ear swelling and attracted less inflammatory cells to the skin. IMQ-induced lymph node swelling was reduced in the absence of OPN, and IMQ-mediated expansion of B cells was inhibited. Further, reduction of CD4(+) T-cell numbers by IMQ in lymph nodes was suppressed in OPN-/- mice, with an increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio. A comparable pattern was found in spleen. Importantly, IMQ-induced IL-17 and IL-4 expression by CD4(+) lymph node T cells was reduced in OPN-/- mice. In conclusion, OPN may modulate psoriasis-like inflammation through altering lymphocyte distribution in skin and draining lymph nodes and by inducing IL-17 expression of inflammatory T cells.

  3. Monitoring changes in skin temperature associated with exercise in horses on a water treadmill by use of infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Kelly; Fleming, Jennifer; Stratton, Tim D; Brassington, Rebecca

    2014-10-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) was used to assess surface temperature change as an indirect measure of muscle activity and exercise associated changes in blood flow in the working hind limb muscles of horses (n=7) undergoing water treadmill exercise. Three treatments were investigated including the treadmill ran dry (TD), water at the height of the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) and water at the height of the carpus (CP). Maximum skin surface temperature was recorded from the region of the semitendinosus muscle during exercise at each water height. There was a significant difference in surface hind limb temperature between exercise on the water treadmill ran dry and with water at the height of the PIP and CP (P<0.0001) with hotter temperatures recorded during the TD treatment. There was a greater increase in surface temperature of the hind limbs from pre exercise to maximum temperature during the PIP and CP treatments when compared to the TD treatment, however, this was not significant (P=0.58). There was no significant difference in surface hind limb temperature found between exercise in water at the height of the PIP and water at the height of the CP. The findings from this study suggest that IRT is able to non-invasively detect muscle activity and associated changes in blood flow whilst horses are exercised on a water treadmill. IRT could potentially be used as an alternative method to assess muscle activity and temperature change in an aquatic environment where existing methods present methodological challenges.

  4. Temperature affects leaf litter decomposition in low-order forest streams: field and microcosm approaches.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Aingeru; Larrañaga, Aitor; Pérez, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Despite predicted global warming, the temperature effects on headwater stream functioning are poorly understood. We studied these effects on microbial-mediated leaf decomposition and the performance of associated aquatic hyphomycete assemblages. Alder leaves were incubated in three streams differing in winter water temperature. Simultaneously, in laboratory, leaf discs conditioned in these streams were incubated at 5, 10 and 15 °C. We determined mass loss, leaf N and sporulation rate and diversity of aquatic hyphomycete communities. In the field, decomposition rate correlated positively with temperature. Decomposition rate and leaf N presented a positive trend with dissolved nutrients, suggesting that temperature was not the only factor determining the process velocity. Under controlled conditions, it was confirmed that decomposition rate and leaf N were positively correlated with temperature, leaves from the coldest stream responding most clearly. Sporulation rate correlated positively with temperature after 9 days of incubation, but negatively after 18 and 27 days. Temperature rise affected negatively the sporulating fungi richness and diversity only in the material from the coldest stream. Our results suggest that temperature is an important factor determining leaf processing and aquatic hyphomycete assemblages and that composition and activity of fungal communities adapted to cold environments could be more affected by temperature rises. Highlight: Leaf decomposition rate and associated fungal communities respond to temperature shifts in headwater streams.

  5. Abscisic acid metabolism and anthocyanin synthesis in grape skin are affected by light emitting diode (LED) irradiation at night.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Satoru; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Rodyoung, Abhichartbut; Okawa, Katsuya; Ohara, Hitoshi; Sugaya, Sumiko; Terahara, Norihiko; Hirai, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-15

    The effects of blue and red light irradiation at night on abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and anthocyanin synthesis were examined in grape berries. The expressions of VlMYBA1-2, VlMYBA2, UDP-glucose-flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (VvUFGT), 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (VvNCED1), and ABA 8'-hydroxylase (VvCYP707A1) were also investigated. Endogenous ABA, its metabolite phaseic acid (PA), and the expressions of VvNCED1 and VvCYP707A1 were highest in red light-emitting diode (LED)-treated skin. In contrast, anthocyanin concentrations were highest in blue LED-treated skin, followed by red LED treatment. However, the expressions of VlMYBA1-2, VlMYBA2, and VvUFGT did not necessarily coincide with anthocyanin concentrations. The quality of coloring may depend on the amount of malvidin-based anthocyanin, which increased toward harvest in blue and red LED-treated skin, unlike in untreated controls. An increase in sugars was also observed in blue and red LED-treated skin. These results suggest that blue LED irradiation at night may be effective in increasing anthocyanin and sugar concentrations in grape berries. However, there is evidence that another factor may influence anthocyanin concentrations in grape berry skin significantly more than endogenous ABA: ABA concentrations were highest in red LED-treated skin, which had lower anthocyanin concentrations than blue LED-treated skin.

  6. Local Effects of Ice Floes on Skin Sea Surface Temperature in the Marginal Ice Zone from UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, C. J.; Brown, S.; Emery, W. J.; Adler, J.; Wick, G. A.; Steele, M.; Palo, S. E.; Walker, G.; Maslanik, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent years have seen extreme changes in the Arctic. Particularly striking are changes within the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean, and especially in the seas north of the Alaskan coast. These areas have experienced record warming, reduced sea ice extent, and loss of ice in areas that had been ice-covered throughout human memory. Even the oldest and thickest ice types have failed to survive through the summer melt period in areas such as the Beaufort Sea and Canada Basin, and fundamental changes in ocean conditions such as earlier phytoplankton blooms may be underway. Marginal ice zones (MIZ), or areas where the "ice-albedo feedback" driven by solar warming is highest and ice melt is extensive, may provide insights into the extent of these changes. Airborne remote sensing, in particular InfraRed (IR), offers a unique opportunity to observe physical processes at sea-ice margins. It permits monitoring the ice extent and coverage, as well as the ice and ocean temperature variability. It can also be used for derivation of surface flow field allowing investigation of turbulence and mixing at the ice-ocean interface. Here, we present measurements of visible and IR imagery of melting ice floes in the marginal ice zone north of Oliktok Point AK in the Beaufort Sea made during the Marginal Ice Zone Ocean and Ice Observations and Processes EXperiment (MIZOPEX) in July-August 2013. The visible and IR imagery were taken from the unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) ScanEagle. The visible imagery clearly defines the scale of the ice floes. The IR imagery show distinct cooling of the skin sea surface temperature (SST) as well as a intricate circulation and mixing pattern that depends on the surface current, wind speed, and near-surface vertical temperature/salinity structure. Individual ice floes develop turbulent wakes as they drift and cause transient mixing of an influx of colder surface (fresh) melt water. The upstream side of the ice floe shows the coldest skin SST, and

  7. Mathematical models to predict kinetic behavior and growth probabilities of Listeria monocytogenes on pork skin at constant and dynamic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soomin; Lee, Heeyoung; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Skandamis, Panagiotis; Park, Beom-Young; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Yoon, Yohan

    2013-11-01

    In this study, mathematical models were developed to predict the growth probability and kinetic behavior of Listeria monocytogenes on fresh pork skin during storage at different temperatures. A 10-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated on fresh pork skin (3 by 5 cm) at 4 log CFU/cm(2). The inoculated samples were stored aerobically at 4, 7, and 10 °C for 240 h, at 15 and 20 °C for 96 h, and at 25 and 30 °C for 12 h. The Baranyi model was fitted to L. monocytogenes growth data on PALCAM agar to calculate the maximum specific growth rate, lag-phase duration, the lower asymptote, and the upper asymptote. The kinetic parameters were then further analyzed as a function of storage temperature. The model simulated growth of L. monocytogenes under constant and changing temperatures, and the performances of the models were evaluated by the root mean square error and bias factor (Bf). Of the 49 combinations (temperature × sampling time), the combinations with significant growth (P < 0.05) of L. monocytogenes were assigned a value of 1, and the combinations with nonsignificant growth (P > 0.05) were given a value of 0. These data were analyzed by logistic regression to develop a model predicting the probabilities of L. monocytogenes growth. At 4 to 10 °C, obvious L. monocytogenes growth was observable after 24 h of storage; but, at other temperatures, the pathogen had obvious growth after 12 h of storage. Because the root mean square error value (0.184) and Bf (1.01) were close to 0 and 1, respectively, the performance of the developed model was acceptable, and the probabilistic model also showed good performance. These results indicate that the developed model should be useful in predicting kinetic behavior and calculating growth probabilities of L. monocytogenes as a function of temperature and time.

  8. Diurnal Temperature Variations Affect Development of a Herbivorous Arthropod Pest and its Predators

    PubMed Central

    Vangansbeke, Dominiek; Audenaert, Joachim; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Verhoeven, Ruth; Gobin, Bruno; Tirry, Luc; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The impact of daily temperature variations on arthropod life history remains woefully understudied compared to the large body of research that has been carried out on the effects of constant temperatures. However, diurnal varying temperature regimes more commonly represent the environment in which most organisms thrive. Such varying temperature regimes have been demonstrated to substantially affect development and reproduction of ectothermic organisms, generally in accordance with Jensen’s inequality. In the present study we evaluated the impact of temperature alternations at 4 amplitudes (DTR0, +5, +10 and +15°C) on the developmental rate of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and their natural prey, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). We have modelled their developmental rates as a function of temperature using both linear and nonlinear models. Diurnally alternating temperatures resulted in a faster development in the lower temperature range as compared to their corresponding mean constant temperatures, whereas the opposite was observed in the higher temperature range. Our results indicate that Jensen’s inequality does not suffice to fully explain the differences in developmental rates at constant and alternating temperatures, suggesting additional physiological responses play a role. It is concluded that diurnal temperature range should not be ignored and should be incorporated in predictive models on the phenology of arthropod pests and their natural enemies and their performance in biological control programmes. PMID:25874697

  9. Diurnal temperature variations affect development of a herbivorous arthropod pest and its predators.

    PubMed

    Vangansbeke, Dominiek; Audenaert, Joachim; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Verhoeven, Ruth; Gobin, Bruno; Tirry, Luc; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The impact of daily temperature variations on arthropod life history remains woefully understudied compared to the large body of research that has been carried out on the effects of constant temperatures. However, diurnal varying temperature regimes more commonly represent the environment in which most organisms thrive. Such varying temperature regimes have been demonstrated to substantially affect development and reproduction of ectothermic organisms, generally in accordance with Jensen's inequality. In the present study we evaluated the impact of temperature alternations at 4 amplitudes (DTR0, +5, +10 and +15°C) on the developmental rate of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and their natural prey, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). We have modelled their developmental rates as a function of temperature using both linear and nonlinear models. Diurnally alternating temperatures resulted in a faster development in the lower temperature range as compared to their corresponding mean constant temperatures, whereas the opposite was observed in the higher temperature range. Our results indicate that Jensen's inequality does not suffice to fully explain the differences in developmental rates at constant and alternating temperatures, suggesting additional physiological responses play a role. It is concluded that diurnal temperature range should not be ignored and should be incorporated in predictive models on the phenology of arthropod pests and their natural enemies and their performance in biological control programmes.

  10. A preliminary study on driver's stress index using a new method based on differential skin temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, T; Yamakoshi, K; Tanaka, S; Nogawa, M; Shibata, M; Sawada, Y; Rolfe, P; Hirose, Y

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged periods of driving in monotonous situations may lower a driver's activation state as well as increasing their stress level due to the compulsion to maintain safe driving, which may result in an increased risk of a traffic accident. There is therefore an opportunity for technological assessment of driver physiological status to be applied in-car, hopefully reducing the incidence of potentially dangerous situations. As part of our long-term aim to develop such a system, we describe here the investigation of differential skin temperature measurement as a possible marker of a driver's stress level. 10 healthy male subjects were studied, under environment-controlled conditions, whilst being subjected to simulated monotonous travel at constant speed on a test-course. We acquired measurements of relevant physiological variables, including truncal and peripheral skin temperatures (T(s)), beat-by-beat blood pressure (BP), cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance (TPR), and normalized pulse volume (NPV) used as an indicator of local peripheral vascular tone. We then investigated the driver's reactivity in terms of cardiovascular haemodynamics and skin temperatures. We found that the simulated monotonous driving produced a gradual drop in peripheral T(s) following the driving stress, which, through interpretation of the TPR and NPV recordings, could be explained by peripheral sympathetic activation. On the other hand, the truncal T(s) was not influenced by the stress. These findings lead us to suggest that truncal-peripheral differential T(s) might be used as a possible index indicative of the driver's stress.

  11. Comparison of changes in facial skin temperature caused by ethyl chloride spraying, ice block rubbing and cold gel packing in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Im, Y-G; Park, H-J; Chae, H-Y; Kim, B-G; Lim, H-S; Park, J-I; Kim, J-H

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of three cryotherapeutic modalities (ethyl chloride spraying, ice block rubbing and cold gel packing) on facial skin temperature. Thirty healthy volunteers (15 men, 15 women; mean age, 29·4 ± 3·2 years) participated in this study. Each of the three modalities was randomly applied to the skin over the right masseter muscle. The skin surface temperature was recorded at baseline and every 5 min for 60 min after the application of one of the three cryotherapeutic modalities. Immediately after application, cold gel packing demonstrated the greatest reduction in surface temperature (10·6 °C), followed by ethyl chloride spraying (4·3 °C) and ice block rubbing (3·7 °C) (P < 0·001). During the 60-min post-application period, ethyl chloride spraying and ice block rubbing produced similar skin surface temperature changes. The skin surface remained coldest for the longest period of time after cold gel packing. The median time for recovery of the baseline temperature after application of the cold gel pack was about three to four times longer than that for the other modalities (P < 0·001). Ethyl chloride spraying and ice block rubbing resulted in less reduction and faster recovery of skin surface temperature than did cold gel packing. In conclusion, ethyl chloride spraying and ice block rubbing had a limited cooling effect on the facial skin tissue and could not reduce the skin surface temperature enough for local analgesia. Moreover, the cooling effect of cold gel packing was remarkable, but not sufficient for local analgesia.

  12. Forearm-finger skin temperature gradient as an index of cutaneous perfusion during steady-state exercise.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Michail E; Geladas, Nickos D; Mekjavic, Igor B; Kounalakis, Stylianos N

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the forearm-finger skin temperature gradient (T(forearm-finger)), an index of vasomotor tone during resting conditions, can also be used during steady-state exercise. Twelve healthy men performed three cycling trials at an intensity of ~60% of their maximal oxygen uptake for 75 min separated by at least 48 h. During exercise, forearm skin blood flow (BFF ) was measured with a laser-Doppler flowmeter, and finger skin blood flow (PPG) was recorded from the left index fingertip using a pulse plethysmogram. T(forearm-finger) of the left arm was calculated from the values derived by two thermistors placed on the radial side of the forearm and on the tip of the middle finger. During exercise, PPG and BFF increased (P<0.001), and T(forearm-finger) decreased (P<0.001) from their resting values, indicating a peripheral vasodilatation. There was a significant correlation between T(forearm-finger) and both PPG (r = -0.68; P<0.001) and BFF (r = -0.50; P<0.001). It is concluded that T(forearm-finger) is a valid qualitative index of cutaneous vasomotor tone during steady-state exercise.

  13. Relationships Between the Bulk-Skin Sea Surface Temperature Difference, Wind, and Net Air-Sea Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of this project was to evaluate and improve models for the bulk-skin temperature difference to the point where they could accurately and reliably apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. To accomplish this goal, work was conducted in three primary areas. These included production of an archive of available data sets containing measurements of the skin and bulk temperatures and associated environmental conditions, evaluation of existing skin layer models using the compiled data archive, and additional theoretical work on the development of an improved model using the data collected under diverse environmental conditions. In this work we set the basis for a new physical model of renewal type, and propose a parameterization for the temperature difference across the cool skin of the ocean in which the effects of thermal buoyancy, wind stress, and microscale breaking are all integrated by means of the appropriate renewal time scales. Ideally, we seek to obtain a model that will accurately apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. A summary of the work in each of these areas is included in this report. A large amount of work was accomplished under the support of this grant. The grant supported the graduate studies of Sandra Castro and the preparation of her thesis which will be completed later this year. This work led to poster presentations at the 1999 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting and 2000 IGARSS meeting. Additional work will be presented in a talk at this year's American Meteorological Society Air-Sea Interaction Meeting this May. The grant also supported Sandra Castro during a two week experiment aboard the R/P Flip (led by Dr. Andrew Jessup of the Applied Physics Laboratory) to help obtain additional shared data sets and to provide Sandra with a fundamental understanding of the physical processes needed in the models. In a related area, the funding also partially supported Dr. William Emery and Daniel

  14. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-08-04

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates.

  15. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  16. Temperature and dietary starch level affected protein but not starch digestibility in gilthead sea bream juveniles.

    PubMed

    Couto, A; Enes, P; Peres, H; Oliva-Teles, A

    2012-06-01

    A study was carried out with gilthead sea bream juveniles to assess the effect of water temperature (18 and 25°C) and dietary pregelatinized starch level (10, 20 and 30%) on digestibility of protein and starch and on the activity of proteolytic and amylolytic enzymes. ADC of pregelatinized starch was very high (>99%) irrespectively of dietary inclusion level, and it was not affected by water temperature. ADC of protein was also high (>90%) but improved at the higher water temperature. Dietary starch interacted with protein digestibility, which decreased as dietary starch level increased. Temperature affected both acid and basic protease activities, with acid protease activity being higher at 25°C and basic protease activity being higher at 18°C. However, total proteolytic activity and amylase activities were not affected by water temperature. Dietary carbohydrate exerted no effect on proteolytic or amylolitic activities. It is concluded that gilthead sea bream juveniles digest pregelatinized starch very efficiently irrespective of water temperature, due to adjustments of amylase activity to cope with temperature differences. Pregelatinized starch interacts negatively with protein digestibility, with the ADC of protein decreasing as dietary starch levels increase.

  17. Morphometry and average temperature affect lake stratification responses to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M.; Anneville, Orlane; Chandra, Sudeep; Dix, Margaret; Kuusisto, Esko; Livingstone, David M.; Rimmer, Alon; Schladow, S. Geoffrey; Silow, Eugene; Sitoki, Lewis M.; Tamatamah, Rashid; Vadeboncoeur, Yvonne; McIntyre, Peter B.

    2015-06-01

    Climate change is affecting lake stratification with consequences for water quality and the benefits that lakes provide to society. Here we use long-term temperature data (1970-2010) from 26 lakes around the world to show that climate change has altered lake stratification globally and that the magnitudes of lake stratification changes are primarily controlled by lake morphometry (mean depth, surface area, and volume) and mean lake temperature. Deep lakes and lakes with high average temperatures have experienced the largest changes in lake stratification even though their surface temperatures tend to be warming more slowly. These results confirm that the nonlinear relationship between water density and water temperature and the strong dependence of lake stratification on lake morphometry makes lake temperature trends relatively poor predictors of lake stratification trends.

  18. The relevance of low skin temperature inhibiting histamine-induced itch to the location of contact urticarial symptoms in the fish processing industry.

    PubMed

    Halkier-Sørensen, L; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1989-09-01

    We have studied the influence of cold exposure on itch, erythema and wheal, in response to histamine scratch tests, in 14 volunteers. Cooling of the skin to less than 20 degrees C, by application of an ice cube for 30 min on the inside of the forearm, abolished itch and reduced erythema by approximately 50%, whereas the size of the wheal was unaffected by cooling. The observations bear significance for an explanation of the well-known observation that cold relieves itch. A normal itch response seems to require a continuous metabolic process in the skin, which is inhibited at temperatures less than 20 degrees C. The skin symptoms, itching and erythema, among workers in the fish processing industry are mainly localized to the forearms and backs of the hands, but only seldom to the fingers and palms, although they are in direct contact with fish products. Skin temperature measurements have shown that the temperature on the fingers and palms is less than 20 degrees C, while the temperature on the backs of the hands and forearms ranges from 25 to 30 degrees C. We therefore conclude that the skin temperature is an important factor for the location of skin symptoms among workers in the fish processing industry.

  19. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Veijgen, N K; Masen, M A; van der Heide, E

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the human skin, subject characteristics and environmental conditions on skin friction. The data are obtained on 50 subjects (34 males and 16 females). Friction measurements represent the friction between in vivo human skin and an aluminium sample, assessed on three anatomical locations. The coefficient of friction increased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing age, increasing ambient temperature and increasing relative air humidity. A significant inversely proportional relationship was found between friction and both the amount of hair present on the skin and the height of the subject. Other outcome variables in this study were the hydration of the skin and the skin temperature.

  20. Duration of Exposure to Elevated Temperature Affects Competitive Interactions in Juvenile Reef Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Donald T.; Donelson, Jennifer M.; McCormick, Mark I.; Ferrari, Maud C. O.; Munday, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will affect key ecological processes that structure natural communities, but the outcome of interactions between individuals and species will depend on their thermal plasticity. We tested how short- and long-term exposure to projected future temperatures affects intraspecific and interspecific competitive interactions in two species of coral reef damselfishes. In conspecific contests, juvenile Ambon damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, exhibited no change in aggressive interactions after 4d exposure to higher temperatures. However, after 90d of exposure, fish showed a nonadaptive reduction in aggression at elevated temperatures. Conversely, 4d exposure to higher temperature increased aggression towards conspecifics in the lemon damselfish, Pomacentrus moluccensis. 90d exposure began to reduce this pattern, but overall there was little effect of temperature. Aggression in interspecific contests increased with short-term exposure, but was significantly lower after long-term exposure indicative of acclimation. Our results show how the length of exposure to elevated temperature can affect the outcome of competitive interactions. Furthermore, we illustrate that results from intraspecific contests may not accurately predict interspecific interactions, which will challenge our ability to generalise the effects of warming on competitive interactions. PMID:27736924

  1. Wrist skin temperature, motor activity, and body position as determinants of the circadian pattern of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, A; Martinez-Nicolas, A; Salazar, F J; Rol, M A; Madrid, J A

    2012-07-01

    Although the circadian blood pressure (BP) pattern has been extensively studied, the determinants of this rhythm are not fully understood. Peripheral vasodilatation is a regulatory mechanism for BP maintenance. However, it remains to be established whether the increase of nocturnal distal skin temperature associated with heat loss could also reflect the dipping status. For the first time, this paper investigates the relationship between BP and skin wrist temperature (WT), to evaluate whether the WT circadian rhythm can serve as screening procedure to detect dipping/non-dipping BP patterns. In addition, the authors compare the relationship between WT and other variables previously described as determinants of the BP pattern, such as physical activity and body position. Measurements of WT, motor activity, and body position for 5 d, plus ambulatory BP for 24-h during that span, were obtained from 28 diurnally active normotensive volunteers. WT was negatively correlated, whereas activity and body position were positively correlated, with systolic and diastolic BPs. However, these relationships were stronger during the rest than activity phase. In addition, a 78.6% concordance was detected between the observed dips in BP and the predicted BP pattern calculated based on the WT rhythm. Thus, these results suggest that the increase in WT produced by heat loss during the rest phase through peripheral skin blood vessels is the result of blood vessel vasodilatation reflexes in response to a shift from a standing to a supine position, together with shift in the circadian sympathetic/parasympathetic balance (nocturnal parasympathetic activation). In conclusion, WT could be considered as a potential new screening procedure to implement the diagnosis of non-dipping BP pattern.

  2. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, ... to make it feel and look better. Dry Skin and Itching Click for more information Many older ...

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Skin Lipids: Effects of the Molar Ratio of Individual Components over a Wide Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh; Rai, Beena

    2015-09-03

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to systematically investigate the effects of the molar ratio of the individual components cholesterol (CHOL), free fatty acid (FFA), and ceramides (CER) on the properties of the skin lipid bilayer over a wide temperature range (300-400 K). Several independent simulations were performed for bilayers comprised of only CER, CHOL, or FFA molecules as well as those made up of a mixture of CER:CHOL:FFA molecules in different molar ratios. It was found that CHOL increases the stability of the bilayer, since the mixed (CER:CHOL:FFA) 1:1:0, 1:1:1, and 2:2:1 bilayers remained stable until 400 K while the pure ceramide bilayer disintegrated around ∼390 K. It was also observed that CHOL reduces the volume spanned by ceramide molecules, thereby leading to a higher area per CER and FFA molecule in the mixed bilayer system. The CHOL molecule provided more rigidity to the mixed bilayer and led to a more ordered phase at elevated temperatures. The CHOL molecule provided fluidity to the bilayer below the phase transition temperature of CER and kept the bilayer rigid above the phase transition temperature. The FFA interdigitizes with CER molecules and increases the thickness of the bilayer, while rigid CHOL decreases the bilayer thickness. The presence of CHOL increases the compressibility of the bilayer which is responsible for the high barrier function of skin. The CER molecule forms inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, while CHOL only forms intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  4. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Bodnár, E.; Borbíró, I.; Angyal, A.; Csedreki, L.; Furu, E.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.; Hunyadi, J.

    2011-10-01

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: “Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles” European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  5. Temporal and spatial temperature distribution in the glabrous skin of rats induced by short-pulse CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Pen-Li; Hsu, Shu-Shen; Tsai, Meng-Li; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Wang, An-Bang; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2012-11-01

    Pain is a natural alarm that aids the body in avoiding potential danger and can also present as an important indicator in clinics. Infrared laser-evoked potentials can be used as an objective index to evaluate nociception. In animal studies, a short-pulse laser is crucial because it completes the stimulation before escape behavior. The objective of the present study was to obtain the temporal and spatial temperature distributions in the skin caused by the irradiation of a short-pulse laser. A fast speed infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature caused by a CO2 laser of different durations (25 and 35 ms) and power. The measured results were subsequently implemented with a three-layer finite element model to predict the subsurface temperature. We found that stratum corneum was crucial in the modeling of fast temperature response, and escape behaviors correlated with predictions of temperature at subsurface. Results indicated that the onset latency and duration of activated nociceptors must be carefully considered when interpreting physiological responses evoked by infrared irradiation.

  6. Simulating soybean canopy temperature as affected by weather variables and soil water potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Hourly weather data for several clear sky days during summer at Phoenix and Baltimore which covered a wide range of variables were used with a plant atmosphere model to simulate soybean (Glycine max L.) leaf water potential, stomatal resistance and canopy temperature at various soil water potentials. The air and dew point temperatures were found to be the significant weather variables affecting the canopy temperatures. Under identical weather conditions, the model gives a lower canopy temperature for a soybean crop with a higher rooting density. A knowledge of crop rooting density, in addition to air and dew point temperatures is needed in interpreting infrared radiometric observations for soil water status. The observed dependence of stomatal resistance on the vapor pressure deficit and soil water potential is fairly well represented. Analysis of the simulated leaf water potentials indicates overestimation, possibly due to differences in the cultivars.

  7. Study of the structure of synthetic opals affected by temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somenkov, V. A.; Agafonov, S. S.; Glazkov, V. P.; Kovalenko, E. S.; Shushunov, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated that synthetic opals, like most natural ones, have a cristobalite rather than quartz basis, change their color from white to blue after losing their water-containing component, and form superlattices. Being affected by temperature and pressure, they undergo partial or complete crystallization to the corresponding polymorphic modifications.

  8. Do Changes in Tympanic Temperature Predict Changes in Affective Valence during High-Intensity Exercise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legrand, Fabien D.; Joly, Philippe M.; Bertucci, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Increased core (brain or body) temperature that accompanies exercise has been posited to play an influential role in affective responses to exercise. However, findings in support of this hypothesis have been equivocal, and most of the performed studies have been done in relation to anxiety. The aim of the present study was to investigate…

  9. Temperature stress affects the expression of immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata) is affected by a fungal disease called chalkbrood. In several species of bees, chalkbrood is more likely to occur in larvae kept at 25-30 C than at 35 C. We found that both high and low temperature stress increased the expression of immune response g...

  10. Fish pre-acclimation temperature only modestly affects cadmium toxicity in Atlantic salmon hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Søfteland, Liv; Hevrøy, Ernst M; Rasinger, Josef D; Waagbø, Rune

    2016-04-01

    An emerging focus in environmental toxicology is how climate change will alter bioavailability and uptake of contaminants in organisms. Ectothermic animals unable to adjust their temperature by local migration, such as farmed fish kept in net pens, may become more vulnerable to contaminants in warmer seas. The aim of this work was to study cadmium (Cd) toxicity in cells obtained from fish acclimated to sub-optimal growth temperature. Atlantic salmon hepatocytes, harvested from fish pre-acclimated either at 15°C (optimal growth temperature) or 20°C (heat-stressed), were exposed in vitro to two concentrations of Cd (control, 1 and 100µM Cd) for 48h. Cd-induced cytotoxicity, determined with the xCELLigence system, was more pronounced in cells from fish pre-acclimated to a high temperature than in cells from fish grown at optimal temperature. A feed spiked with antioxidants could not ameliorate the Cd-induced cytotoxicity in cells from temperature-stressed fish. At the transcriptional level, Cd exposure affected 11 out of 20 examined genes, of which most are linked to oxidative stress. The transcriptional levels of a majority of the altered genes were changed in cells harvested from fish grown at sub-optimal temperature. Interaction effects between Cd exposure and fish pre-acclimation temperature were seen for four transcripts, hmox1, mapk1, fth1 and mmp13. Overall, this study shows that cells from temperature-stressed fish are modestly more vulnerable to Cd stress, and indicate that mechanisms linked to oxidative stress may be differentially affected in temperature-stressed cells.

  11. Global clear-sky surface skin temperature from multiple satellites using a single-channel algorithm with angular anisotropy corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarino, Benjamin R.; Minnis, Patrick; Chee, Thad; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Yost, Christopher R.; Palikonda, Rabindra

    2017-01-01

    Surface skin temperature (Ts) is an important parameter for characterizing the energy exchange at the ground/water-atmosphere interface. The Satellite ClOud and Radiation Property retrieval System (SatCORPS) employs a single-channel thermal-infrared (TIR) method to retrieve Ts over clear-sky land and ocean surfaces from data taken by geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite imagers. GEO satellites can provide somewhat continuous estimates of Ts over the diurnal cycle in non-polar regions, while polar Ts retrievals from LEO imagers, such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), can complement the GEO measurements. The combined global coverage of remotely sensed Ts, along with accompanying cloud and surface radiation parameters, produced in near-realtime and from historical satellite data, should be beneficial for both weather and climate applications. For example, near-realtime hourly Ts observations can be assimilated in high-temporal-resolution numerical weather prediction models and historical observations can be used for validation or assimilation of climate models. Key drawbacks to the utility of TIR-derived Ts data include the limitation to clear-sky conditions, the reliance on a particular set of analyses/reanalyses necessary for atmospheric corrections, and the dependence on viewing and illumination angles. Therefore, Ts validation with established references is essential, as is proper evaluation of Ts sensitivity to atmospheric correction source.This article presents improvements on the NASA Langley GEO satellite and AVHRR TIR-based Ts product that is derived using a single-channel technique. The resulting clear-sky skin temperature values are validated with surface references and independent satellite products. Furthermore, an empirically adjusted theoretical model of satellite land surface temperature (LST) angular anisotropy is tested to improve satellite LST retrievals. Application of the anisotropic correction

  12. Infrared thermography for examination of skin temperature in the dorsal hand of office workers.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Cherniack, Martin; Buchholz, Bryan

    2004-10-01

    Reduced blood flow may contribute to the pathophysiology of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSD), such as tendinitis and carpal tunnel syndrome. The study objective was to characterize potential differences in cutaneous temperature, among three groups of office workers assessed by dynamic thermography following a 9-min typing challenge: those with UEMSD, with ( n=6) or without ( n=10) cold hands exacerbated by keyboard use, and control subjects ( n=12). Temperature images of the metacarpal region of the dorsal hand were obtained 1 min before typing, and during three 2-min sample periods [0-2 min (early), 3-5 min (middle), and 8-10 min (late)] after typing. Mean temperature increased from baseline levels immediately after typing by a similar magnitude, 0.7 (0.3) degrees C in controls and 0.6 (0.2) degrees C in UEMSD cases without cold hands, but only by 0.1 (0.3) degrees C in those with cold hands. Using paired t-tests for within group comparisons of mean dorsal temperature between successive imaging periods, three patterns of temperature change were apparent during 10 min following typing. Controls further increased mean temperature by 0.1 degrees C ( t-test, P=0.001) at 3-5 min post-typing before a late temperature decline of -0.3 degrees C ( t-test, P=0.04), while cases without cold hands showed no change from initial post-typing mean temperature rise during middle or late periods. In contrast, subjects with keyboard-induced cold hands had no change from initial post-typing temperature until a decrease at the late period of -0.3 degrees C ( t-test, P=0.06). Infrared thermography appears to distinguish between the three groups of subjects, with keyboard-induced cold hand symptoms presumably due, at least partially, to reduced blood flow.

  13. Moisturizing Different Racial Skin Types

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor W.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a complex organ involved in thermoregulation, gas exchange, protection against pathogens, and barrier function to maintain proper hydration. When dry, the ability for skin to execute these tasks becomes impaired. Dry skin affects almost everyone as we age, but it is also dependent on external factors, such as dry climate, colder temperatures, and repeated washing. In addition, increasing evidence has shown racial variability in the physiological properties of skin, which directly impacts water content of the stratum corneum and sensitivity to exogenously applied agents. A multitude of products have been developed to treat dry skin, and as a group, moisturizers have been designed to either impart or restore hydration in the stratum corneum. Given the large number of moisturizers presently available, depending on individual components, several different mechanisms may be employed to promote skin hydration. As there exists dramatic racial variability in skin properties, certain moisturizers may thus be more effective in some and less effective in others to treat the common condition of dry skin. PMID:25013536

  14. Seawater Acidification and Elevated Temperature Affect Gene Expression Patterns of the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenguang; Huang, Xiande; Lin, Jianshi; He, Maoxian

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide results in decrease in seawater pH and increase in temperature. In this study, we demonstrated the synergistic effects of elevated seawater temperature and declined seawater pH on gene expression patterns of aspein, calmodulin, nacrein, she-7-F10 and hsp70 in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Under ‘business-as-usual’ scenarios, four treatments were examined: (1) ambient pH (8.10) and ambient temperature (27°C) (control condition), (2) ambient pH and elevated temperature (+3°C), (3) declined pH (7.70) and ambient temperature, (4) declined pH and elevated temperature. The results showed that under warming and acidic seawater conditions, expression of aspein and calmodulin showed no significant differences among different time point in condition 8.10 T. But the levels of aspein and calmodulin in conditions 8.10 T+3, 7.70 T and 7.70 T+3, and levels of nacrein, she-7-F10 in all the four treatments changed significantly. Low pH and pH×temperature interaction influenced the expression of aspein and calmodulin significantly after hours 48 and 96. Significant effects of low pH and pH×temperature interaction on the expression of nacrein were observed at hour 96. The expression level of she-7-F10 was affected significantly by pH after hours 48 and 96. The expression of hsp70 was significantly affected by temperature, pH, temperature×pH interaction at hour 6, and by temperature×pH interaction at hour 24. This study suggested that declined pH and pH×temperature interaction induced down regulation of calcification related genes, and the interaction between declined seawater pH and elevated temperature caused up regulation of hsp70 in P. facata. These results demonstrate that the declined seawater pH and elevated temperature will impact the physiological process, and potentially the adaptability of P. fucata to future warming and acidified ocean. PMID:22438983

  15. Evaluation of the Cadi ThermoSENSOR wireless skin-contact thermometer against ear and axillary temperatures in children.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kim-Gau; Wong, Sook-Thow; Lim, Soh-Min; Goh, Zenton

    2010-06-01

    The Cadi ThermoSENSOR skin-contact thermometer measures body temperature continuously and transmits readings wirelessly to a central server. This study evaluated the ThermoSENSOR against ear temperatures (ETs) measured by a Braun ThermoScan ear thermometer and axillary temperatures (ATs) measured by a Terumo digital clinical thermometer. The test participants consisted of 109 children aged 6 months to 16 years from a pediatric ward. The sensor was attached to the lower abdomen at least 15 minutes before the first measurement. ET, AT, and ThermoSENSOR temperatures (TTs) were recorded up to three times at the usual measurement times. The TTs differed from ETs by -0.23 degrees C +/- 0.47 degrees C (mean +/- standard deviation, n = 271) and from ATs by +0.21 degrees C +/- 0.46 degrees C (n = 270). The ETs differed from ATs by +0.43 degrees C +/- 0.42 degrees C (n = 315). These results suggest that the TTs were comparable to the ETs and ATs.

  16. Factors affecting prescription of ultra-high potency topical corticosteroids in skin disease: an analysis of US national practice data.

    PubMed

    Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Camacho, Fabian T; Pearce, Daniel J; Kulkarni, Amit S; Spencer, Lori; Fleischer, Alan B; Feldman, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    Of the topical preparations available, the ultra-high potency corticosteroids have an important role in treating psoriasis. However, the use of these agents in many other conditions and patient populations may not be appropriate. This study examines the prescribing patterns of Class I topical corticosteroids in patients with skin disease by analyzing data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (1990-2000). Of the nearly 718 million visits for skin disease, Class I topical corticosteroids were prescribed in nearly 3% of all skin disease-related visits, with prescription rates being highest in psoriasis (22%). The study found greater prescription rates of Class I topical steroids by dermatologists compared to non-dermatologists [Odds Ratio (OR) = 4.39 (95% CI: 2.15, 8.99)]. However, there were also a large number of questionable prescriptions for other conditions, which could be construed as misuse of these medications. Despite limitations and the potential dubious use seen here, Class I topical corticosteroid use is relatively commonplace. Education efforts and novel preparations of Class I agents will help to ensure the best possible care for patients suffering from significant skin diseases like psoriasis.

  17. Skin temperature evaluation by infrared thermography: Comparison of image analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, N.; Formenti, D.; Gargano, M.; Alberti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Body temperature in medicine is a parameter indicating abnormal activity of human tissues; it is used to diagnose specific pathologies or as an indicator of the muscle activity during physical exercise.

  18. Skin Temperature Analysis and Bias Correction in a Coupled Land-Atmosphere Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Radakovich, Jon D.; daSilva, Arlindo; Todling, Ricardo; Verter, Frances

    2006-01-01

    In an initial investigation, remotely sensed surface temperature is assimilated into a coupled atmosphere/land global data assimilation system, with explicit accounting for biases in the model state. In this scheme, an incremental bias correction term is introduced in the model's surface energy budget. In its simplest form, the algorithm estimates and corrects a constant time mean bias for each gridpoint; additional benefits are attained with a refined version of the algorithm which allows for a correction of the mean diurnal cycle. The method is validated against the assimilated observations, as well as independent near-surface air temperature observations. In many regions, not accounting for the diurnal cycle of bias caused degradation of the diurnal amplitude of background model air temperature. Energy fluxes collected through the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) are used to more closely inspect the surface energy budget. In general, sensible heat flux is improved with the surface temperature assimilation, and two stations show a reduction of bias by as much as 30 Wm(sup -2) Rondonia station in Amazonia, the Bowen ratio changes direction in an improvement related to the temperature assimilation. However, at many stations the monthly latent heat flux bias is slightly increased. These results show the impact of univariate assimilation of surface temperature observations on the surface energy budget, and suggest the need for multivariate land data assimilation. The results also show the need for independent validation data, especially flux stations in varied climate regimes.

  19. High summer temperatures affect the survival and reproduction of olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Geng; Johnson, Marshall W; Daane, Kent M; Nadel, Hannah

    2009-10-01

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is an invasive pest in California. Identifying environmental constraints that affect the geographic distribution and abundance of any invasive insect pest is fundamental to its effective management. California's Central Valley, where most commercial olives are grown, is extremely hot during the summer, with maximum daily temperatures consistently >35.0 degrees C. This study examined the effects of two diurnal temperature regimens (low 18.3 degrees C, high 35.0 or 37.8 degrees C) reflecting summer conditions in the valley, and one control temperature regimen (low 18.3 degrees C, high 23.9 degrees C) on the fly's survival and reproductive success in the laboratory. The temperature regimen of 18.3-35.0 degrees C resulted in delayed egg maturation and reduced production of mature eggs compared with the control temperature regimen. Egg maturation was possible at the higher temperature regimen when females were provided with water and food, and egg-laying occurred during the cold phase of the temperature cycle. Access to olive fruit and oviposition itself further promoted egg maturation. Under exposure to the 18.3-35.0 degrees C temperature regimen, approximately 50% of eggs died, and the remainder that hatched died as first instars. No egg hatch occurred at the temperature treatment of 18.3-37.8 degrees C. We confirmed these laboratory results through field cage studies with adult B. oleae, conducted in the summer of 2007 and 2008. Under ambient summer temperatures, adult B. oleae survived for 1-2 wk, and females readily laid eggs when provided water and food. No offspring developed in midsummer of 2007, and <2% of the offspring developed to adults in summer 2008 trials. These results suggest that high summer temperatures limit the fly's abundance in California's Central Valley.

  20. Preliminary study on direct assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sibo; Guan, Li

    2017-02-01

    Direct assimilation of cloud-affected microwave brightness temperatures from AMSU-A into the GSI three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) assimilation system is preliminarily studied in this paper. A combination of cloud microphysics parameters retrieved by the 1D-Var algorithm (including vertical profiles of cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) and atmospheric state parameters from objective analysis fields of an NWP model are used as background fields. Three cloud microphysics parameters (cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) are applied to the control variable. Typhoon Halong (2014) is selected as an example. The results show that direct assimilation of cloud-affected AMSU-A observations can effectively adjust the structure of large-scale temperature, humidity and wind analysis fields due to the assimilation of more AMSU-A observations in typhoon cloudy areas, especially typhoon spiral cloud belts. These adjustments, with temperatures increasing and humidities decreasing in the movement direction of the typhoon, bring the forecasted typhoon moving direction closer to its real path. The assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures can provide better analysis fields that are more similar to the actual situation. Furthermore, typhoon prediction accuracy is improved using these assimilation analysis fields as the initial forecast fields in NWP models.

  1. Do colonization by dark septate endophytes and elevated temperature affect pathogenicity of oomycetes?

    PubMed

    Tellenbach, Christoph; Sieber, Thomas N

    2012-10-01

    Phialocephala subalpina is one of the most frequent dark septate root endophytes in tree roots but its function in forest ecosystems is largely unknown. A full-factorial infection experiment was performed, using six P. subalpina isolates, two pathogenic oomycetes (Phytophthora plurivora [syn. Phytophthora citricola s.l.] and Elongisporangium undulatum [syn. Pythium undulatum]) and two temperature regimes (17.9 and 21.6 °C) to examine the ability of P. subalpina to protect Norway spruce seedlings against root pathogens. Seedling survival, disease intensity and seedling growth were affected by P. subalpina genotype, temperature and pathogen species. Some P. subalpina isolates effectively reduced mortality and disease intensity caused by the two pathogens. Elevated temperature adversely affected seedling growth but did not aggravate the effect of the pathogens. Elongisporangium undulatum but not P. plurivora significantly reduced plant growth. Colonization density of P. subalpina measured by quantitative PCR was not affected by temperature or the presence of the pathogens. In conclusion, P. subalpina confers an indirect benefit to its host and might therefore be tolerated in natural ecosystems, despite negative effects on plant health and plant growth.

  2. Ambient temperature: a factor affecting performance and physiological response of broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkoh, A.

    1989-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to elucidate the influence of four constant ambient temperatures (20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C) on the performance and physiological reactions of male commercial broiler chicks from 3 to 7 weeks of age. A 12 h light-dark cycle was operated, while relative humidity and air circulation were not controlled. Exposure of broiler chickens to the 20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C treatments showed highly significant ( P<0.0001) depression in growth rate, food intake and efficiency of food utilization, and a significant increase in water consumption for the 30° and 35°C groups. Mortality was, however, not affected by the temperature treatments. Changes in physiological status, such as increased rectal temperatures, decreased concentration of red blood cells, haemoglobin, haematocrit, and total plasma protein were observed in birds housed in the higher temperature (30° and 35°C) environments. Moreover, in these broiler chickens, there was an increased blood glucose concentration and a decreased thyroid gland weight. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to high ambient temperatures markedly affects their performance and physiological response.

  3. Skin Temperatures During Unaided Egress: Unsuited and While Wearing the NASA Launch and Entry or Advanced Crew Escape Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Kristin K.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Greenisen, Michael C.; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    The two flight suits currently worn by crew members during Shuttle launch and landing, the Launch and Entry Suit (LES) and the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), are designed to protect crew members in the case of emergency. Although the Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG) worn under the flight suits was designed to counteract the heat storage of the suits, the suits may increase thermal stress and limit the astronaut's egress capabilities. The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal loads experienced by crew members during a simulated emergency egress before and after spaceflight. Comparisons of skin temperatures were made between the preflight unsuited and suited conditions. between the pre- and postflight suited conditions, and between the two flight suits.

  4. Sensitivity of Satellite-Based Skin Temperature to Different Surface Emissivity and NWP Reanalysis Sources Demonstrated Using a Single-Channel, Viewing-Angle-Corrected Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarino, B. R.; Minnis, P.; Yost, C. R.; Chee, T.; Palikonda, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single-channel algorithms for satellite thermal-infrared- (TIR-) derived land and sea surface skin temperature (LST and SST) are advantageous in that they can be easily applied to a variety of satellite sensors. They can also accommodate decade-spanning instrument series, particularly for periods when split-window capabilities are not available. However, the benefit of one unified retrieval methodology for all sensors comes at the cost of critical sensitivity to surface emissivity (ɛs) and atmospheric transmittance estimation. It has been demonstrated that as little as 0.01 variance in ɛs can amount to more than a 0.5-K adjustment in retrieved LST values. Atmospheric transmittance requires calculations that employ vertical profiles of temperature and humidity from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Selection of a given NWP model can significantly affect LST and SST agreement relative to their respective validation sources. Thus, it is necessary to understand the accuracies of the retrievals for various NWP models to ensure the best LST/SST retrievals. The sensitivities of the single-channel retrievals to surface emittance and NWP profiles are investigated using NASA Langley historic land and ocean clear-sky skin temperature (Ts) values derived from high-resolution 11-μm TIR brightness temperature measured from geostationary satellites (GEOSat) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR). It is shown that mean GEOSat-derived, anisotropy-corrected LST can vary by up to ±0.8 K depending on whether CERES or MODIS ɛs sources are used. Furthermore, the use of either NOAA Global Forecast System (GFS) or NASA Goddard Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for the radiative transfer model initial atmospheric state can account for more than 0.5-K variation in mean Ts. The results are compared to measurements from the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD), an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground

  5. Differential regulation of dehydrin expression and trehalose levels in Cardinal table grape skin by low temperature and high CO2.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Sara; Vazquez-Hernandez, María; Rosales, Raquel; Sanchez-Ballesta, María Teresa; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Dehydrins and trehalose are multifunctional protective biomolecules that play a role in counteracting cellular damage during dehydrative stresses. In this paper, we studied dehydrin isoform patterns, dehydrin gene expression and trehalose levels in the skin of Cardinal (Vitis vinifera L.) table grapes, along with their regulation by different cold postharvest storage conditions. Immunoanalysis with K-segment antibody recognizes four constitutive dehydrins (from 17 to 44 kDa) that are tightly regulated by low temperature and high CO2. Phosphatase treatment showed that DHN44 and DHN22 isoforms are phosphorylated polypeptides, while MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS analysis suggested that 44 kDa polypeptide may be a dehydrin homodimer. At the transcriptional level, dehydrins are also regulated by low temperature and high CO2, showing a fairly good correlation with their mRNA levels. Trehalose was quantified by high performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), revealing a progressive increase of this metabolite throughout storage at 0 °C and the sudden transitory increases in short-term high CO2-treated fruit. We propose that the constitutive presence and up-regulation of dehydrins and trehalose during low temperature postharvest storage could be positively correlated with the relative chilling tolerance of table grapes and the adaptive responses activated by high CO2 levels to preserve cell water status and to counteract the disruption of physiological processes during cold storage.

  6. Association between skin surface pH, temperature and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in dogs with immunomodulatory-responsive lymphocytic-plasmacytic pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Rory M; Quinn, Patrick J; Baker, Kenneth P; McGeady, Thomas; Strobl, Eric; Abbott, Yvonne; Jones, Boyd R

    2011-08-01

    Secondary bacterial infection is a frequent complication in lesional skin of dogs with immunomodulatory-responsive lymphocytic-plasmacytic pododermatitis (ImR-LPP). However, the influence of skin pH and temperature in determining the composition of the cutaneous microflora at lesional sites has not been investigated. The association between ImR-LPP and pedal skin temperature, pH and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates was thus evaluated. Temperature and pH were measured in 20 dogs with ImR-LPP and in 30 clinically healthy control dogs, and S. pseudintermedius was cultured from interdigital and palmoplantar swabs in both groups and scored semi-quantitatively for bacterial growth. In the ImR-LPP group, mean skin pH was slightly, but significantly, higher at both interdigital and palmoplantar sites. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated more frequently, and scores for bacterial growth were also significantly higher. However, mean skin temperatures were not significantly different from those in the control group. The isolation of S. pseudintermedius was significantly associated with ImR-LPP, with the single exception of isolates on Columbia blood agar from the palmoplantar region. However, pH and temperature were not significantly associated with the disease, and were not associated with the isolation of S. pseudintermedius at most sites sampled. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was not isolated from all feet sampled in dogs with ImR-LPP. Taken together, these data would suggest that S. pseudintermedius infection is most likely to be a secondary phenomenon in dogs with ImR-LPP, and that changes in skin pH and temperature are not significant risk factors for this disease.

  7. Correlation between skin temperature and heart rate during exercise and recovery, and the influence of body position in these variables in untrained women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Cunha, Raphael Martins; Rosa, Claudio; Antunes, Natacha Sousa; Felisberto, Ivo Miguel Vieira; Vilaça-Alves, José; Reis, Victor Machado

    2016-03-01

    It was known that the thermal response varies according to some variables. Until now, there are no studies that have investigated the relationship of skin temperature and heart rate during and after the workout, either the thermal behavior during postural changes. Objective: the aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of skin temperature and heart rate, during exercise and up to an hour of recovery (with postural change), performed in two different intensities sessions (70% and 85% of 10 repetitions maximum) and observe the correlation between them. Method: This was a short longitudinal study, carried out with women aged from 18 to 30 years. A sample of 31 untrained women, aged 18 and 30 was used. The volunteers were randomized into two groups: Biceps Group (BG), with 15 women, and Quadriceps Group (QG) with 16 women. Results: During and after completion of the exercise session, there was a significant reduction in skin temperature on the active muscles in both groups (BG and QG), with similar thermal responses for the two intensities studied (70% and 85%) to the minute 15 (which marks the end of the recovery in the standing position). From minute 15 to minute 20-60, the skin temperature increases abruptly and significantly, returning to levels close to those observed before exercise. Conclusion: There were no statistical differences in thermal response to exercises in 70% or 85% of 10RM. There is a negative correlation between heart rate and skin temperature when untrained women perform anaerobic exercise. It was observed that after a change of posture (from a standing position to a sitting posture) skin temperature increased abruptly and significantly.

  8. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  9. Chronic transplantation immunity in newts: temperature susceptibility of an effector phase in allo-skin graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kinefuchi, Kenjiroh; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Johnouchi, Masato; Shimizu, Yuiko; Ohneda, Hikaru; Fujii, Masato; Hosono, Masamichi

    2011-07-01

    Urodele amphibians are unique due to their greatly reduced immune responsiveness compared to bony fishes, which show acute immune responsiveness. In newts, the mean survival time of allogenic skin grafts in the transplantation immunity was 48.8 ± 8.3 days at 25°C, suggesting that it occurs in a chronic manner. The graft rejection process was categorized into three stages: a latent stage with frequent blood circulation, or the immune induction phase; a vascular stoppage stage with dominant infiltrating cells of T cells; and a rejection stage showing the change of the dominant cells to monocytes/macrophages, probably as effector cells, tetntatively referred to as the immune effector phase. The immune induction phase is susceptible to the cyclophosphamide (CY) mitosis inhibitor, but not to a temperature shift from 18 to 27°C, while the immune effector phase is susceptible to temperature shifts, but not CY-treatment, although the temperature shift failed to shorten the graft survival time to less than 25 days, which nearly equals that of the secondary set of grafts where the lack of complete blood circulation is remarkable and graft rejection is resistant to CY-treatment. In contrast, a very low temperature (5-10°C) completely prevented effector generation in newts; in frogs, however, it is reported that such low temperatures did not prevent the generation of effectors. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic responses in newts are due to effector cells other than cytotoxic T cells; possible effector cells are discussed.

  10. Local divergence of thermal reaction norms among amphibian populations is affected by pond temperature variation.

    PubMed

    Richter-Boix, Alex; Katzenberger, Marco; Duarte, Helder; Quintela, María; Tejedo, Miguel; Laurila, Anssi

    2015-08-01

    Although temperature variation is known to cause large-scale adaptive divergence, its potential role as a selective factor over microgeographic scales is less well-understood. Here, we investigated how variation in breeding pond temperature affects divergence in multiple physiological (thermal performance curve and critical thermal maximum [CTmax]) and life-history (thermal developmental reaction norms) traits in a network of Rana arvalis populations. The results supported adaptive responses to face two main constraints limiting the evolution of thermal adaptation. First, we found support for the faster-slower model, indicating an adaptive response to compensate for the thermodynamic constraint of low temperatures in colder environments. Second, we found evidence for the generalist-specialist trade-off with populations from colder and less thermally variable environments exhibiting a specialist phenotype performing at higher rates but over a narrower range of temperatures. By contrast, the local optimal temperature for locomotor performance and CTmax did not match either mean or maximum pond temperatures. These results highlight the complexity of the adaptive multiple-trait thermal responses in natural populations, and the role of local thermal variation as a selective force driving diversity in life-history and physiological traits in the presence of gene flow.

  11. Skin to skin care:heat balance.

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, H

    1996-01-01

    Skin to skin care has been practised in primitive and high technology cultures for body temperature preservation in neonates. Regional skin temperature and heat flow was measured in moderately hypothermic term neonates to quantitate the heat transfer occurring during one hour of skin to skin care. Nine healthy newborns with a mean rectal temperature of 36.3 degrees C were placed skin to skin on their mothers' chests. The mean (SD) rectal temperature increased by 0.7 (0.4) degrees C to 37.0 degrees C. The heat loss was high (70 Wm-2) from the unprotected skin of the head to the surrounding air. Minute heat losses occurred from covered areas; and heat was initially gained from areas in contact with the mother's skin. The total dry heat loss during skin to skin care corresponded to heat loss during incubator care at 32-32.5 degrees C. The reduced heat loss, and to a minor extent, the initial heat flux from the mothers allowed heat to be conserved, leading to rewarming. PMID:8949698

  12. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  13. Swimming performance of hatchling green turtles is affected by incubation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Elizabeth A.; Booth, David T.; Lanyon, Janet M.

    2006-08-01

    In an experiment repeated for two separate years, incubation temperature was found to affect the body size and swimming performance of hatchling green turtles ( Chelonia mydas). In the first year, hatchlings from eggs incubated at 26°C were larger in size than hatchlings from 28 and 30°C, whilst in the second year hatchlings from 25.5°C were similar in size to hatchings from 30°C. Clutch of origin influenced the size of hatchlings at all incubation temperatures even when differences in egg size were taken into account. In laboratory measurements of swimming performance, in seawater at 28°C, hatchlings from eggs incubated at 25.5 and 26°C had a lower stroke rate frequency and lower force output than hatchlings from 28 and 30°C. These differences appeared to be caused by the muscles of hatchlings from cooler temperatures fatiguing at a faster rate. Clutch of origin did not influence swimming performance. This finding that hatchling males incubated at lower temperature had reduced swimming ability may affect their survival whilst running the gauntlet of predators in shallow near-shore waters, prior to reaching the relative safety of the open sea.

  14. Temperature and duration of heating of sunflower oil affect ruminal biohydrogenation of linoleic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Privé, F; Combes, S; Cauquil, L; Farizon, Y; Enjalbert, F; Troegeler-Meynadier, A

    2010-02-01

    Sunflower oil heated at 110 or 150 degrees C for 1, 3, or 6h was incubated with ruminal content in order to investigate the effects of temperature and duration of heating of oil on the ruminal biohydrogenation of linoleic acid in vitro. When increased, these 2 parameters acted together to decrease the disappearance of linoleic acid in the media by inhibiting the isomerization of linoleic acid, which led to a decrease in conjugated linoleic acids and trans-C18:1 production. Nevertheless, trans-10 isomer production increased with heating temperature, suggesting an activation of Delta(9)-isomerization, whereas trans-11 isomer production decreased, traducing an inhibition of Delta(12)-isomerization. The amount of peroxides generated during heating was correlated with the proportions of biohydrogenation intermediates so that they might explain, at least in part, the observed effects. The effects of heating temperature and duration on ruminal bacteria community was assessed using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism. Ruminal bacterial population significantly differed according to heating temperature, but was not affected by heating duration. Heating of fat affected ruminal biohydrogenation, at least in part because of oxidative products generated during heating, by altering enzymatic reactions and bacterial population.

  15. Winter temperature affects the prevalence of ticks in an Arctic seabird.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic is rapidly warming and host-parasite relationships may be modified by such environmental changes. Here, I showed that the average winter temperature in Svalbard, Arctic Norway, explained almost 90% of the average prevalence of ticks in an Arctic seabird, the Brünnich's guillemot Uria lomvia. An increase of 1°C in the average winter temperature at the nesting colony site was associated with a 5% increase in the number of birds infected by these ectoparasites in the subsequent breeding season. Guillemots were generally infested by only a few ticks (≤5) and I found no direct effect of tick presence on their body condition and breeding success. However, the strong effect of average winter temperature described here clearly indicates that tick-seabird relationships in the Arctic may be strongly affected by ongoing climate warming.

  16. Temperature-induced elevation of basal metabolic rate does not affect testis growth in great tits.

    PubMed

    Caro, Samuel P; Visser, Marcel E

    2009-07-01

    The timing of reproduction varies from year to year in many bird species. To adjust their timing to the prevailing conditions of that year, birds use cues from their environment. However, the relative importance of these cues, such as the initial predictive (e.g. photoperiod) and the supplemental factors (e.g. temperature), on the seasonal sexual development are difficult to distinguish. In particular, the fine-tuning effect of temperature on gonadal growth is not well known. One way temperature may affect timing is via its strong effect on energy expenditure as gonadal growth is an energy-demanding process. To study the interaction of photoperiod and temperature on gonadal development, we first exposed 35 individually housed male great tits (Parus major) to mid-long days (after 6 weeks of 8 h L:16 h D at 15 degrees C, photoperiod was set to 13 h L:11 h D at 15 degrees C). Two weeks later, for half of the males the temperature was set to 8 degrees C, and for the other half to 22 degrees C. Unilateral laparotomies were performed at weeks 5 (i.e one week before the birds were transferred to mid-long days), 8 and 11 to measure testis size. Two measures of basal metabolic rate (BMR) were performed at the end of the experiment (weeks 11 and 12). Testis size increased significantly during the course of the experiment, but independently of the temperature treatment. BMR was significantly higher in birds exposed to the cold treatment. These results show that temperature-related elevation of BMR did not impair the long-day-induced testis growth in great tits. As a consequence, temperature may not be a crucial cue and/or constraint factor in the fine-tuning of the gonadal recrudescence in male great tits, and testis growth is not a high energy-demanding seasonal process.

  17. Investigation of body and udder skin surface temperature differentials as an early indicator of mastitis in Holstein Friesian crossbred cows using digital infrared thermography technique

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyabarathi, M.; Jeyakumar, S.; Manimaran, A.; Pushpadass, Heartwin A.; Sivaram, M.; Ramesha, K. P.; Das, D. N.; Kataktalware, Mukund A.; Jayaprakash, G.; Patbandha, Tapas Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the ability of infrared thermography (IRT) technique and its interrelationship with conventional mastitis indicators for the early detection of mastitis in Holstein Friesian (HF) crossbred cows. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 quarters of lactating HF crossbred (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) cows (n=19) were monitored for body temperature (i.e., eye temperature) and udder skin surface temperature (USST) before milking using forward-looking infrared (FLIR) i5 camera. Milk samples were collected from each quarter and screened for mastitis using Somatic Cell Count (SCC), Electrical Conductivity (EC), and California mastitis test. Thermographic images were analyzed using FLIR Quick Report 1.2 image analysis software. Data on body and USST were compiled and analyzed statistically using SPSS 16.0 and Sigmaplot 11. Results: The mean±standard deviation (SD) body (37.23±0.08°C) and USST (37.22±0.04°C) of non-mastitic cow did not differ significantly; however, the mean USST of the mastitis-affected quarters were significantly higher than the body temperature and USST of unaffected quarters (p<0.001). The mean±SD USST of the subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis-affected quarters were 38.08±0.17 °C and 38.25±0.33 °C, respectively, which is 0.72 and 1.05 °C higher than the USST temperature of unaffected quarters. The USST was positively correlated with EC (r=0.95) and SCC (r=0.93). The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed a higher sensitivity for USST in early prediction of SCM with a cut-off value of >37.61°C. Conclusion: It is concluded that infrared thermal imaging technique could be used as a potential noninvasive, quick cow-side diagnostic technique for screening and early detection of SCM and clinical mastitis in crossbred cows. PMID:28096610

  18. Increased Night Temperature Negatively Affects Grain Yield, Biomass and Grain Number in Chilean Quinoa

    PubMed Central

    Lesjak, Jurka; Calderini, Daniel F.

    2017-01-01

    Quinoa high nutritive value increases interest worldwide, especially as a crop that could potentially feature in different cropping systems, however, climate change, particularly rising temperatures, challenges this and other crop species. Currently, only limited knowledge exists regarding the grain yield and other key traits response to higher temperatures of this crop, especially to increased night temperatures. In this context, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased night temperature on quinoa yield, grain number, individual grain weight and processes involved in crop growth under the environmental conditions (control treatment) and night thermal increase at two phases: flowering (T1) and grain filling (T2) in southern Chile. A commercial genotype, Regalona, and a quinoa accession (Cod. BO5, N°191, grain bank from Semillas Baer, hereby referred to as Accession) were used, due to their adaptability to Southern Chilean conditions and contrasting grain yield potential, grain weight and size of plants. Temperature was increased ≈4°C above the ambient from 8 pm until 9 am the next morning. Control treatments reached a high grain yield (600 and 397 g m-2, i.e., Regalona and Accession). Temperature increase reduced grain yield by 31% under T1 treatment and 12% when under T2 in Regalona and 23 and 26% in Accession, respectively. Aboveground biomass was negatively affected by the thermal treatments and a positive linear association was found between grain yield and aboveground biomass across treatments. By contrast, the harvest index was unaffected either by genotype, or by thermal treatments. Grain number was significantly affected between treatments and this key trait was linearly associated with grain yield. On the other hand, grain weight showed a narrow range of variation across treatments. Additionally, leaf area index was not affected, but significant differences were found in SPAD values at the end of T1 treatment, compared

  19. Staphylococcus aureus colonization of teat skin as affected by postmilking teat treatment when exposed to cold and windy conditions.

    PubMed

    Fox, L K; Norell, R J

    1994-08-01

    Study 1 was conducted to determine whether postmilking teat treatment with ointment before exposure to cold and wind resulted in better skin health than standard teat treatment. Teat treatments tested were 1% I2 and 10% glycerin, ointment with 1% chloroxylenol, ointment with .3% 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate, and no treatment (control). Teats were treated 7 d prior to chapping. A broth culture of Staphylococcus aureus was applied once to teats after chapping was established. Treatments were applied after milking and before sample collection for 11 d following S. aureus application. Milk samples were collected aseptically, teat skin swabbing solutions were collected, and teat condition was scored. Cows were exposed to ambient winter conditions, and a wind velocity of 152.4 m/min was applied to the mammary gland surface for 15 min immediately postmilking. Ointment and control teats had significantly better skin condition than teats treated with I2 solution. Colonization of S. aureus was greatest on ointment treated teats. Study 2 was conducted to determine whether teat condition of cows receiving postmilking I2 solution treatments would be improved if teats were blotted dry before exposure to wind and cold ambient conditions. Two mammary quarters of each cow received I2 solution treatment of study 1, but teats were blotted dry prior to exit from the milking parlor. No treatment was applied to the other teats. Teat condition scores were similar between treatments, but S. aureus colonization was significantly greater on control teats. Results indicate a possible disadvantage to treating teats with ointments after milking, as evidenced by increased S. aureus colonization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Prediction of mean skin temperature for use as a heat strain scale by introducing an equation for sweating efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, H.; Kuwabara, K.; Hamada, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper made the heat balance equation (HBE) for nude or minimally clad subjects a linear function of mean skin temperature ( t sk) by applying new equations for sweating efficiency ( η sw) and thermoregulatory sweat rate ( S wR). As the solution of the HBE, the equation predicting t sk was derived and used for a heat strain scale of subjects. The η sw was proportional to the reciprocal of S w/ E max ( S w, sweat rate; E max maximum evaporative capacity) and the S wR was proportional to t sk with a parameter of the sweating capacity of the subject. The errors of predicted t sk from observations due to the approximation of η sw were examined based on experimental data conducted on eight young male subjects. The value of errors of t sk was -0.10 ± 0.42 °C (mean ± sample standard deviation (SSD)). We aim to apply the predicted t sk of a subject at a level of sweating capacity as a heat strain scale of a function of four environmental factors (dry- and wet-bulb temperatures, radiation, and air velocity) and three human factors (metabolic rate, sweating capacity, and clothing (≤0.2clo)).

  1. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  2. Sitting in the sun: Nest microhabitat affects incubation temperatures in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Hart, Lorinda A; Downs, Colleen T; Brown, Mark

    2016-08-01

    During incubation parent birds are committed to a nest site and endure a range of ambient conditions while regulating egg temperatures. Using artificial eggs containing temperature loggers alongside ambient temperature (Ta) controls, incubation profiles were determined for four tropical seabird species at different nest site locations. Camera traps were used for ad-hoc behavioural incubation observations. Eggs experienced a range of temperatures during incubation and varied significantly between species and in some cases between different microhabitats within a species. Such variation has important consequences in the phenotypic expression of both physical and physiological traits of chicks, and ultimately species fitness. Exposed nest sites were more strongly correlated to Tas. Camera traps highlighted different incubation strategies employed by these species that could be related to trade-offs in predator defence, feeding habits, and temperature regulation of eggs. This study provides evidence that species with similar breeding habits could be affected by environmental stressors in similar ways and that the differences shown in nest site selection could negate some of these effects. We propose that habitats providing suitable nest microclimates will become increasingly important for the successful breeding of seabird species, particularly under predicted climate change scenarios.

  3. Temperature affects the timing of spawning and migration of North Sea mackerel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Teunis; Gislason, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Climate change accentuates the need for knowing how temperature impacts the life history and productivity of economically and ecologically important species of fish. We examine the influence of temperature on the timing of the spawning and migrations of North Sea Mackerel using data from larvae CPR surveys, egg surveys and commercial landings from Danish coastal fisheries in the North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat and inner Danish waters. The three independent sources of data all show that there is a significant relationship between the timing of spawning and sea surface temperature. Large mackerel are shown to arrive at the feeding areas before and leave later than small mackerel and the sequential appearance of mackerel in each of the feeding areas studied supports the anecdotal evidence for an eastward post-spawning migration. Occasional commercial catches taken in winter in the Sound N, Kattegat and Skagerrak together with catches in the first quarter IBTS survey furthermore indicate some overwintering here. Significant relationships between temperature and North Sea mackerel spawning and migration have not been documented before. The results have implications for mackerel resource management and monitoring. An increase in temperature is likely to affect the timing and magnitude of the growth, recruitment and migration of North Sea mackerel with subsequent impacts on its sustainable exploitation.

  4. [State temperature-pain sensitivity and morphological features of the skin back in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with stage III-IV].

    PubMed

    Gorbach, E N; Shchurova, E N; Kobyzev, A E; Ryabykh, S O; Ochirova, P V

    2015-03-01

    This study was aimed at revealing the features condition of thermal, pain sensitivity and morphological pattern of the skin of the human back at the apex of spinal deformity in the thoracic area in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with stage III-IV. The study included 41 adolescent with idiopathic scoliosis with stage III-IV. Temperature-pain sensitivity was studied in Th6-Th10 dermatomes on the right and the left. Biopsies (skin) for histological examination were taken intraoperatively in projection corresponding to the apex of the arc scoliosis of the spine. Significant disorders of the sensitivity to temperature and pain were found in the dermatomes to the apex of the thoracic spine deformity that were hyperesthesia, hypoesthesia, or absent thermal sensitivity. Histostrukturnye changes of the skin are significantly decreasing the thickness of the epidermis and dermis, reduction of capillaries and changing the structure of the small vessels, destruction of individual nerve fibers and free nerve endings.

  5. Light intensity and temperature affect systemic spread of silencing signal in transient agroinfiltration studies.

    PubMed

    Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Fauquet, Claude M

    2015-06-01

    RNA silencing is a sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene inactivation mechanism that operates in diverse organisms and that can extend beyond its site of initiation, owing to the movement of the silencing signal, called non-autonomous gene silencing. Previous studies have shown that several factors manifest the movement of the silencing signal, such as the size (21 or 24 nucleotides) of the secondary small interfering RNA (siRNA) produced, the steady-state concentration of siRNAs and their cognate messenger RNA (mRNA) or a change in the sink-source status of plant parts affecting phloem translocation. Our study shows that both light intensity and temperature have a significant impact on the systemic movement of the silencing signal in transient agroinfiltration studies in Nicotiana benthamiana. At higher light intensities (≥ 450 μE/m(2)/s) and higher temperatures (≥ 30 °C), gene silencing was localized to leaf tissue that was infiltrated, without any systemic spread. Interestingly, in these light and temperature conditions (≥ 450 μE/m(2) /s and ≥ 30 °C), the N. benthamiana plants showed recovery from the viral symptoms. However, the reduced systemic silencing and reduced viral symptom severity at higher light intensities were caused by a change in the sink-source status of the plant, ultimately affecting the phloem translocation of small RNAs or the viral genome. In contrast, at lower light intensities (<300 μE/m(2)/s) with a constant temperature of 25 °C, there was strong systemic movement of the silencing signal in the N. benthamiana plants and reduced recovery from virus infections. The accumulation of gene-specific siRNAs was reduced at higher temperature as a result of a reduction in the accumulation of transcript on transient agroinfiltration of RNA interference (RNAi) constructs, mostly because of poor T-DNA transfer activity of Agrobacterium, possibly also accompanied by reduced phloem translocation.

  6. Thermography Examination of Abdominal Area Skin Temperatures in Individuals With and Without Focal-Onset Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    King, Hollis H; Cayce, Charles Thomas; Herrin, Jeph

    Early osteopathic theory and practice, and the work of the medical intuitive Edgar Cayce suggested that the abdominal areas of individuals with epilepsy would manifest "cold spots." The etiology for this phenomenon was thought to be abdominal adhesions caused by inflammation and viscero-somatic reflexes caused by adhesions or injury to visceral or musculoskeletal system structures. Indeed, until that advent of electroencephalography in the 1930s, medical practice regarding epilepsy focused on abdominal neural and visceral structures. Following two hypotheses were formulated to evaluate any abdominal temperature phenomena: (1) an abdominal quadrant division analysis would find one or more quadrants "colder" in the focal-onset epilepsy group (ICD9-CM 345.4 and 345.5) compared to controls. (2) Total abdominal areas of individuals with focal-onset epilepsy wound be colder than a control group.

  7. Does temperature of charcoal creation affect subsequent mineralization of soil carbon and nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier-Bergeron, S.; Bradley, R.; Munson, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fire is the most common form of natural disturbance of boreal forest ecosystems and has primordial influence on successional processes. This may be due in part to the pre-disturbance vegetation development stage and species composition, but these successional pathways could also vary with differences in fire behavior and consequently in fire intensity, defined as the energy released during various phases of a fire. Fire intensity may also affect soil C and N cycling by affecting the quality of the charcoal that is produced. For example, the porosity of coal tends to increase with increasing temperature at which it is produced Higher porosity would logically increase the surface area to which dissolved soil molecules, such as tannins and other phenolics, may be adsorbed. We report on a microcosm study in which mineral and organic soils were jointly incubated for eight weeks with a full factorial array of treatments that included the addition of Kalmia tannins, protein, and wood charcoal produced at five different temperatures. A fourth experimental factor comprised the physical arrangement of the material (stratified vs. mixed), designed to simulate the effect of soil scarification after fire and salvage harvest. We examined the effects of these treatments on soil C and N mineralisation and soil microbial biomass. The furnace temperature at which the charcoal was produced had a significant effect on its physico-chemical properties; increasing furnace temperatures corresponded to a significant increase in % C (P<0.001), and a significant decrease in %O (P<0.001) and %H (P<0.001). Temperature also had significant impacts on microporosity (surface area and volume). Temperature of production had no effect (P=0.1355) on soil microbial biomass. We observed a linear decreasing trend (P<0.001) in qCO2 with increasing temperature of production, which was mainly reflected in a decline in basal respiration. Finally, we found a significant interaction (P=0.010) between

  8. The Clinical Relevance of Maintaining the Functional Integrity of the Stratum Corneum in both Healthy and Disease-affected Skin

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.; Levin, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    It has been recognized for approximately 50 years that the stratum corneum exhibits biological properties that contribute directly to maintaining and sustaining healthy skin. Continued basic science and clinical research coupled with keen clinical observation has led to more recent recognition and general acceptance that the stratum corneum completes many vital “barrier” tasks, including but not limited to regulating epidermal water content and the magnitude of water loss; mitigating exogenous oxidants that can damage components of skin via an innate antioxidant system; preventing or limiting cutaneous infection via multiple antimicrobial peptides; responding via innate immune mechanisms to “cutaneous invaders” of many origins, including microbes, true allergens, and other antigens; and protecting its neighboring cutaneous cells and structures that lie beneath from damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation. Additionally, specific abnormalities of the stratum corneum are associated with the clinical expression of certain disease states. This article provides a thorough “primer” for the clinician, reviewing the multiple normal homeostatic functions of the stratum corneum and the cutaneous challenges that arise when individual functions of this thin yet very active epidermal layer are compromised by exogenous and/or endogenous factors. PMID:21938268

  9. UVB radiation generates sunburn pain and affects skin by activating epidermal TRPV4 ion channels and triggering endothelin-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Carlene; Cevikbas, Ferda; Pasolli, H. Amalia; Chen, Yong; Kong, Wei; Kempkes, Cordula; Parekh, Puja; Lee, Suk Hee; Kontchou, Nelly-Ange; Yeh, Iwei; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Fuchs, Elaine; Steinhoff, Martin; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2013-01-01

    At our body surface, the epidermis absorbs UV radiation. UV overexposure leads to sunburn with tissue injury and pain. To understand how, we focus on TRPV4, a nonselective cation channel highly expressed in epithelial skin cells and known to function in sensory transduction, a property shared with other transient receptor potential channels. We show that following UVB exposure mice with induced Trpv4 deletions, specifically in keratinocytes, are less sensitive to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli than control animals. Exploring the mechanism, we find that epidermal TRPV4 orchestrates UVB-evoked skin tissue damage and increased expression of the proalgesic/algogenic mediator endothelin-1. In culture, UVB causes a direct, TRPV4-dependent Ca2+ response in keratinocytes. In mice, topical treatment with a TRPV4-selective inhibitor decreases UVB-evoked pain behavior, epidermal tissue damage, and endothelin-1 expression. In humans, sunburn enhances epidermal expression of TRPV4 and endothelin-1, underscoring the potential of keratinocyte-derived TRPV4 as a therapeutic target for UVB-induced sunburn, in particular pain. PMID:23929777

  10. UVB radiation generates sunburn pain and affects skin by activating epidermal TRPV4 ion channels and triggering endothelin-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Moore, Carlene; Cevikbas, Ferda; Pasolli, H Amalia; Chen, Yong; Kong, Wei; Kempkes, Cordula; Parekh, Puja; Lee, Suk Hee; Kontchou, Nelly-Ange; Yeh, Iwei; Ye, Iwei; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Fuchs, Elaine; Steinhoff, Martin; Liedtke, Wolfgang B

    2013-08-20

    At our body surface, the epidermis absorbs UV radiation. UV overexposure leads to sunburn with tissue injury and pain. To understand how, we focus on TRPV4, a nonselective cation channel highly expressed in epithelial skin cells and known to function in sensory transduction, a property shared with other transient receptor potential channels. We show that following UVB exposure mice with induced Trpv4 deletions, specifically in keratinocytes, are less sensitive to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli than control animals. Exploring the mechanism, we find that epidermal TRPV4 orchestrates UVB-evoked skin tissue damage and increased expression of the proalgesic/algogenic mediator endothelin-1. In culture, UVB causes a direct, TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) response in keratinocytes. In mice, topical treatment with a TRPV4-selective inhibitor decreases UVB-evoked pain behavior, epidermal tissue damage, and endothelin-1 expression. In humans, sunburn enhances epidermal expression of TRPV4 and endothelin-1, underscoring the potential of keratinocyte-derived TRPV4 as a therapeutic target for UVB-induced sunburn, in particular pain.

  11. Short communication: Changes in body temperature of calves up to 2 months of age as affected by time of day, age, and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Suarez-Mena, F X; Dennis, T S; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2016-11-01

    Extensive measurements of calf body temperature are limited in the literature. In this study, body temperatures were collected by taping a data logger to the skin over the tail vein opposing the rectum of Holstein calves between 4 and 60d of age during 3 different periods of the summer and fall. The summer period was separated into moderate (21-33°C average low to high) and hot (25-37°C) periods, whereas the fall exhibited cool (11-19°C) ambient temperatures. Tail temperatures were compared in a mixed model ANOVA using ambient temperature, age of calf, and time of day (10-min increments) as fixed effects and calf as a random effect. Measures within calf were modeled as repeated effects of type autoregressive 1. Calf temperature increased 0.0325°C (±0.00035) per 1°C increase in ambient temperature. Body temperature varied in a distinct, diurnal pattern with time of day, with body temperatures being lowest around 0800h and highest between 1700 and 2200h. During periods of hot weather, the highest calf temperature was later in the day (~2200h). Calf minimum, maximum, and average body temperatures were all higher in hot than in moderate periods and higher in moderate than in cool periods.

  12. Modeling the Growth of Archaeon Halobacterium halobium Affected by Temperature and Light.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Cheng, Jay; Rose, Robert B; Classen, John J; Simmons, Otto D

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop sigmoidal models, including three-parameter (Quadratic, Logistic, and Gompertz) and four-parameter models (Schnute and Richards) to simulate the growth of archaeon Halobacterium halobium affected by temperature and light. The models were statistically compared by using t test and F test. In the t test, confidence bounds for parameters were used to distinguish among models. For the F test, the lack of fit of the models was compared with the prediction error. The Gompertz model was 100 % accepted by the t test and 97 % accepted by the F test when the temperature effects were considered. Results also indicated that the Gompertz model was 94 % accepted by the F test when the growth of H. halobium was studied under varying light intensities. Thus, the Gompertz model was considered the best among the models studied to describe the growth of H. halobium affected by temperature or light. In addition, the biological growth parameters, including specific growth rate, lag time, and asymptote changes under Gompertz modeling, were evaluated.

  13. Effect of ThermaCare HeatWraps and Icy Hot Cream/Patches on Skin and Quadriceps Muscle Temperature and Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Laymon, Michael; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of over-the-counter treatments—ThermaCare HeatWraps (chemical reaction to produce heat above the skin), Icy Hot Patch, and Icy Hot Cream (topically applied menthol)—on skin and deep tissue temperature. Methods This was a longitudinal crossover study. On each of 3 days, a ThermaCare HeatWrap, Icy Hot Cream, or Icy Hot Patch was applied randomly over the quadriceps muscle in 15 healthy volunteers with normal body mass. Skin and muscle temperature and blood flow were measured by laser flowmetry every 15 minutes for 2 hours. Results After 2 hours, mean temperature decreased by 2.1°C (7.0%; P = .02) in skin and 1.0°C (2.9%; P = .01) in muscle with Icy Hot Cream. Icy Hot Patch decreased skin and muscle temperature by 1.7°C (5.4%; P = .03) and 1.3°C (3.8%; P = .01), respectively. In contrast, ThermaCare raised skin and muscle temperature by 7.8°C (25.8%; P = .001) and 2.7°C (7.7%; P = .002), respectively; both were significantly warmer with ThermaCare vs either Icy Hot product (all P < .007). Icy Hot products produced a net decrease in skin blood flow (Cream: 56.7 flux [39.3%; P = .003]; Patch: 19.1 flux [16.7%; P = .045]). Muscle blood flow decreased with the Patch (6.7 flux [7.0%; P = .02]). After a period of fluctuations, Icy Hot Cream produced a net increase vs baseline of 7.0 flux (16.9%; P = .02). ThermaCare more than doubled blood flow in skin (83.3 flux [109.7%; P = .0003]) and muscle (25.1 flux [148.5%; P = .004]). Conclusions In this group of 15 healthy volunteers, ThermaCare HeatWraps provided the greatest degree of tissue warming and increase in tissue blood flow. PMID:27069427

  14. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  15. Effect of joule temperature jump on tension and stiffness of skinned rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bershitsky SYu; Tsaturyan, A K

    1989-11-01

    The effects of a temperature jump (T-jump) from 5-7 degrees C to 26-33 degrees C were studied on tension and stiffness of glycerol-extracted fibers from rabbit psoas muscle in rigor and during maximal Ca2+ activation. The T-jump was initiated by passing an alternating current pulse (30 kHz, up to 2.5 kV, duration 0.2 ms) through a fiber suspended in air. In rigor the T-jump induces a drop of both tension and stiffness. During maximal activation, the immediate stiffness dropped by (4.4 +/- 1.6) x 10(-3)/1 degree C (mean + SD) in response to the T-jump, and this was followed by a monoexponential stiffness rise by a factor of 1.59 +/- 0.14 with a rate constant ks = 174 +/- 42 s-1 (mean +/- SD, n = 8). The data show that the fiber stiffness, determined by the cross-bridge elasticity, in both rigor and maximal activation is not rubber-like. In the activated fibers the T-jump induced a biexponential tension rise by a factor of 3.45 +/- 0.76 (mean +/- SD, n = 8) with the rate constants 500-1,000 s-1 for the first exponent and 167 +/- 39 s-1 (mean +/- SD, n = 8) for the second exponent. The data are in accordance with the assumption that the first phase of the tension transient after the T-jump is due to a force-generating step in the attached cross-bridges, whereas the second one is related to detachment and reattachment of cross-bridges.

  16. Calcium-activated force responses in fast- and slow-twitch skinned muscle fibres of the rat at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, D G; Williams, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. Force responses from mechanically skinned fibres of rat skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus and soleus) were measured at different temperatures in the range 3-35 degrees C following sudden changes in Ca2+ concentration in the preparations. 2. At all temperatures there were characteristic differences between the slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres with respect to the relative steady-state force-[Ca2+] relation: such as a lower [Ca2+] threshold for activation and a less steep force-pCa curve in slow-twitch muscle fibres. 3. At 3-5 degrees C the force changes in both types of muscle fibres lagged considerably behind the estimated changes in [Ca2+] within the preparations and this enabled us to perform a comparative analysis of the Ca2+ kinetics in the process of force development in both muscle fibre types. This analysis suggest that two and six Ca2+ ions are involved in the regulatory unit for contraction of slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres respectively. 4. The rate of relaxation following a sudden decrease in [Ca2+] was much lower in the slow-twitch than in the fast-twitch muscle at 5 degrees C, suggesting that properties of the contractile apparatus could play an essential role in determining the rate of relaxation in vivo. 5. There was substantial variation in Ca2+ sensitivity between muscle fibres of the same type from different animals at each temperature. However the steepness of the force-[Ca2+] relation was essentially the same for all fibres of the same type. 6. A change in temperature from 5 to 25 degrees C had a statistically significant effect on the sensitivity of the fast-twitch muscle fibres, rendering them less sensitive to Ca2+ by a factor of 2. However a further increase in temperature from 25 to 35 degrees C did not have any statistically significant effect on the force-[Ca2+] relation in fast-twitch muscle fibres. 7. The effect of temperature on the Ca2+ sensitivity of slow-twitch muscle fibres was not statistically significant

  17. Provocative motion causes fall in brain temperature and affects sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Flavia; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Cerri, Matteo; Luppi, Marco; Amici, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    Neural substrate of nausea is poorly understood, contrasting the wealth of knowledge about the emetic reflex. One of the reasons for this knowledge deficit is limited number and face validity of animal models of nausea. Our aim was to search for new physiological correlates of nausea in rats. Specifically, we addressed the question whether provocative motion (40-min rotation at 0.5 Hz) affects sleep architecture, brain temperature, heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure. Six adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were instrumented for recordings of EEG, nuchal electromyographic, hypothalamic temperature and arterial pressure. Provocative motion had the following effects: (1) total abolition of REM sleep during rotation and its substantial reduction during the first hour post-rotation (from 20 ± 3 to 5 ± 1.5%); (2) reduction in NREM sleep, both during rotation (from 57 ± 6 to 19 ± 5%) and during the first hour post-rotation (from 56 ± 3 to 41 ± 9%); (3) fall in the brain temperature (from 37.1 ± 0.1 to 36.0 ± 0.1 °C); and (4) reduction in HR (from 375 ± 6 to 327 ± 7 bpm); arterial pressure was not affected. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, had no major effect on all observed parameters during both baseline and provocative motion. We conclude that in rats, provocative motion causes prolonged arousing effects, however without evidence of sympathetic activation that usually accompanies heightened arousal. Motion induced fall in the brain temperature complements and extends our previous observations in rats and suggests that similar to humans, provocative motion triggers coordinated thermoregulatory response, leading to hypothermia in this species.

  18. A new technique for controlling the finger skin temperature in microcirculatory research demonstrated in a local cold stress test in healthy controls and patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Hahn, M; Klyscz, T; Bohnenberger, G; Jünger, M

    1996-01-01

    Changes in skin temperature cause great changes in blood flow and capillary blood pressure. The new technique presented here makes it possible to control the temperature of the finger during nailfold capillaroscopy. Automatic temperature control, both for warming and cooling, is made possible with the aid of a temperature-controlled finger holder. The temperature of the finger holder can be automatically matched to the spontaneous skin temperature of the examined finger, or the finger holder temperature and temperature change velocity can be set digitally to a desired value. We used this new technique in a local cold stress test on 9 healthy controls (3 men, 6 women) and 9 patients (3 men, 6 women) with Raynaud's phenomenon due to systemic sclerosis. We simultaneously measured capillary red blood cell velocity (CBV) and laser Doppler flux (LDF) in adjacent areas of the finger nailfold with three different cooling procedures (8, 10, 12 degrees C for 5 min). CBV and LDF values showed the most pronounced differences between patients and controls at 12 degrees C. This new technique supplements capillaroscopy with full temperature control and defined temperature changes. It can also be combined with measurements of LDF and capillary blood pressure. In view of the disadvantages of other cooling methods we recommend this new and easy-to-handle technique for clinical practice and research.

  19. Weight Loss via exercise with controlled dietary intake may affect phospholipid profile for cancer prevention in murine skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ping; Jiang, Yu; Doan, Hieu M; Xie, Linglin; Vasquez, David; Welti, Ruth; Su, Xiaoyu; Lu, Nanyan; Herndon, Betty; Yang, Shie-Shien; Jeannotte, Richard; Wang, Weiqun

    2010-04-01

    Exercise has been linked to a reduced cancer risk in animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study assessed the effect of exercise with dietary consideration on the phospholipid profile in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin tissues. CD-1 mice were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: ad libitum-fed sedentary control; ad libitum-fed treadmill exercise at 13.4 m/min for 60 min/d, 5 d/wk (Ex+AL); and treadmill-exercised but pair-fed with the same amount as the control (Ex+PF). After 14 weeks, Ex+PF but not Ex+AL mice showed approximately 25% decrease in both body weight and body fat when compared with the controls. Of the total 338 phospholipids determined by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, 57 were significantly changed, and 25 species could distinguish effects of exercise and diet treatments in a stepwise discriminant analysis. A 36% to 75% decrease of phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels in Ex+PF mice occurred along with a significant reduction of PI 3-kinase in TPA-induced skin epidermis, as measured by both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition, approximately 2-fold increase of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, docosahexaenoic and docosapentaenoic acids, in phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines, and lysophosphatidylethanolamines was observed in the Ex+PF group. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression of fatty acid elongase-1 increased. Taken together, these data indicate that exercise with controlled dietary intake, but not exercise alone, significantly reduced body weight and body fat as well as modified the phospholipid profile, which may contribute to cancer prevention by reducing TPA-induced PI 3-kinase and by enhancing omega-3 fatty acid elongation.

  20. A Comparison of Skin Interface Temperature Response Between the ProHeat™ Instant Reusable Hot Pack and the Standard Hydrocollator Steam Pack

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Donald; Dandorph, Michael J.; Manning, James

    1992-01-01

    The ProHeat™ reusable hot pack is being used increasingly as a substitute for the standard hydrocollator steam pack. This study evaluated the effects of these two modalities on skin temperature. Seventeen subjects were studied during separate 30-minute applications of a ProHeat pack with a wet barrier, a ProHeat pack with a dry barrier, a hydrocollator pack, and a control pack on their nondominant calf. We measured the skin interface temperature and pack surface temperature during each application with surface thermocouples. The skin interface temperature rise time to the minimum therapeutic temperature (104°F) and the total time at and above the minimum therapeutic temperature, for each application, were analyzed using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures (p<.05). The ProHeat pack application, with one layer of wet toweling as a barrier, was not significantly different from the hydrocollator steam pack application. We conclude that the ProHeat pack, prepared with a wet barrier, can be considered a viable alternative to the standard hydrocollator steam pack. PMID:16558193

  1. Increased temperatures negatively affect Juniperus communis seeds: evidence from transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Gruwez, R; De Frenne, P; Vander Mijnsbrugge, K; Vangansbeke, P; Verheyen, K

    2016-05-01

    With a distribution range that covers most of the Northern hemisphere, common juniper (Juniperus communis) has one of the largest ranges of all vascular plant species. In several regions in Europe, however, populations are decreasing in size and number due to failing recruitment. One of the main causes for this failure is low seed viability. Observational evidence suggests that this is partly induced by climate warming, but our mechanistic understanding of this effect remains incomplete. Here, we experimentally assess the influence of temperature on two key developmental phases during sexual reproduction, i.e. gametogenesis and fertilisation (seed phase two, SP2) and embryo development (seed phase three, SP3). Along a latitudinal gradient from southern France to central Sweden, we installed a transplant experiment with shrubs originating from Belgium, a region with unusually low juniper seed viability. Seeds of both seed phases were sampled during three consecutive years, and seed viability assessed. Warming temperatures negatively affected the seed viability of both SP2 and SP3 seeds along the latitudinal gradient. Interestingly, the effect on embryo development (SP3) only occurred in the third year, i.e. when the gametogenesis and fertilisation also took place in warmer conditions. We found strong indications that this negative influence mostly acts via disrupting growth of the pollen tube, the development of the female gametophyte and fertilisation (SP2). This, in turn, can lead to failing embryo development, for example, due to nutritional problems. Our results confirm that climate warming can negatively affect seed viability of juniper.

  2. Pyrolysis temperature affects phosphorus transformation in biochar: Chemical fractionation and (31)P NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, You; Shao, Hongbo; Sun, Junna

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling or reuse by pyrolyzing crop residue has recently elicited increased research interest. However, the effects of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions on P species have not been fully understood. Such knowledge is important in identifying the agronomic and environmental uses of biochar. Residues of three main Chinese agricultural crops and the biochars (produced at 300°C-600°C) derived from these crops were used to determine P transformations during pyrolysis. Hedley sequential fractionation and (31)P NMR analyses were used in the investigation. Our results showed that P transformation in biochar was significantly affected by pyrolysis temperature regardless of feedstock (Wheat straw, maize straw and peanut husk). Pyrolysis treatment transformed water soluble P into a labile (NaHCO3-Pi) or semi-labile pool (NaOH-Pi) and into a stable pool (Dil. HCl P and residual-P). At the same time, organic P was transformed into inorganic P fractions which was identified by the rapid decomposition of organic P detected with solution (31)P NMR. The P transformation during pyrolysis process suggested more stable P was formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. This result was also evidenced by the presence of less soluble or stable P species, such as such as poly-P, crandallite (CaAl3(OH)5(PO4)2) and Wavellite (Al3(OH)3(PO4)2·5H2O), as detected by solid-state (31)P NMR in biochars formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, a significant proportion of less soluble pyrophosphate was identified by solution (2%-35%) and solid-state (8%-53%) (31)P NMR, which was also responsible for the stable P forms at higher pyrolysis temperature although their solubility or stability requires further investigation. Results suggested that a relatively lower pyrolysis temperature retains P availability regardless of feedstock during pyrolysis process.

  3. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived Surface Skin Temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) of 2003-2014 were investigated and the three datasets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically up to 1.65 K warmer at the sea ice boundary and up to 2.04 K colder in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a~less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally-varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three datasets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high latitude regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  4. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived surface skin temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) 2003-2014 were investigated and the three data sets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. The AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically warmer up to 1.65 K at the sea ice boundary and colder down to -2.04 K in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three data sets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~ 2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  5. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  6. Changes of skin temperature of parts of the body and serum asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in type-2 diabetes mellitus Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Anburajan, M; Sivanandam, S; Bidyarasmi, S; Venkatraman, B; Menaka, M; Raj, Baldev

    2011-01-01

    In India, number of people with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) would be 87 million by the year 2030. DM disturbs autonomic regulation of skin micro-circulation, and causes decrease in resting blood flows through the skin. The skin blood flow has a major effect on its temperature. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes of skin temperature of all parts of the body and serum asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA (μmol/L) in type-2 DM Indian patients. Group-I: Normal (n = 17; M/F: 10/15, mean ± SD = 43.2 ± 9.4 years); Group-II: Type-2 DM without cardiovascular (CV) complications (n = 15; M/F: 10/7, mean ± SD = 46.3 ± 14.0 years); Thermograms of all parts of the body were acquired using a non-contact infrared (IR) thermography camera (ThermaCAM T400, FLIR Systems, Sweden). Blood parameters and thyroid hormone were measured biochemically. Indian diabetic risk score (IDRS) was calculated for each subject. In type-2 DM patients without CV group (n = 15), there was a statistically significant (p = 0.01) negative correlations between HbA(1c) and skin temperature of eye and nose (r = -0.57 and r = -0.55 respectively). ADMA was correlated significantly (p = 0.01) with HbA(1c) (r = 0.65) and estimated average glucose, eAG (r = 0.63). In normal subjects, mean minimum and maximum values of skin temperatures were observed at posterior side of sole (26.89 °C) and ear (36.85 °C) respectively. In type-2 DM without CV, mean values of skin temperature in different parts of the body from head to toe were lesser than those values in control group; but this decreases were statistically significant in nose (32.66 Vs 33.99 °C, p = 0.024) as well as in tibia (32.78 Vs 33.13 °C, p = 0.036) regions.

  7. Temperature affects expression of symptoms induced by soybean mosaic virus in homozygous and heterozygous plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Dexiao; Chen, Pengyin; Shi, Ainong; Shakiba, Ehsan; Gergerich, Rose; Chen, Yaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Seven strains (G1 to G7) of soybean mosaic virus (SMV) and 3 resistance loci (Rsv1, Rsv3, and Rsv4) have been identified in soybean. The interaction of SMV strains and host resistance genes results in resistant (symptomless), susceptible (mosaic), or necrotic (leaf and stem necrosis) reactions. The necrotic reaction may be gene dosage dependent and influenced by temperature. Using a set of soybean isolines and hybrids containing homozygous or heterozygous alleles of rsv, Rsv1, Rsv1-n, Rsv3, or Rsv4, this study has explored the relationship of SMV-induced symptoms and resistance gene dosage at different temperatures. Results showed that SMV-inoculated plants carrying Rsv3 or Rsv4 were symptomless at both homozygous and heterozygous states at all temperature regimes. Threshold temperatures for symptoms changing from stem tip necrosis (STN) to mosaic were 30, 33, and 33 degrees C in G7-inoculated homozygous genotypes V94-3971(Rsv1) and PI 96983 (Rsv1) and G1-inoculated V262 (Rsv1-n), respectively. However, at the heterozygous state, threshold temperature was 30 degrees C in G7-inoculated V94-3971 x Essex F(1) for the symptom change from STN to mosaic, 31 degrees C in G7-inoculated Essex x PI 96983 F(1) from STN to mixture of necrosis and mosaic (N-M), and 32 degrees C in G1-inoculated V262 x Essex F(1) from N-M to mosaic. Incomplete necrosis was observed in the heterozygous state in G1-inoculated V262 x Essex F(1) and G7-inoculated PI 96983 x Essex F(1) where necrotic and mosaic symptoms were mixed. High temperature (37 degrees C) tends to mask the expression of mosaic symptoms in both homozygous and heterozygous plants. STN expression in response to temperature was affected by resistance gene, gene dosage, host genetic background, and specific SMV strains. Thus, Rsv3 and Rsv4 are a better choice as source of genetic resistance for breeding SMV-resistant cultivars.

  8. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  9. Skin blood flow differentially affects near-infrared spectroscopy-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation and blood volume at rest and during dynamic leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Ruddock, Alan D; Saxton, John M

    2010-11-01

    The impact of skin blood flow changes on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation (SmO(2)) and blood volume has not been fully established. We measured SmO(2) and total hemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) responses of the right vastus lateralis during rest and dynamic knee extension exercise in ten young, healthy males. The protocol was repeated four times: twice without thigh heating for reliability, and twice with different grades of thigh heating for assessing the impact of cutaneous vasodilation on SmO(2) and Δ[tHb]. The reliability of our SmO(2) and [tHb] measurements was good. Thigh heating at 37 and 42°C caused marked increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during rest and exercise (P < 0.001 between each condition), and small increases in SmO(2) during rest (from 69 ± 8% to 71 ± 7% and 73 ± 6%, respectively; P < 0.05 between each condition), but not during exercise (e.g. 1 min exercise: 51 ± 11% vs. 51 ± 11% and 52 ± 11%, respectively; P > 0.05 at all time points). In contrast, heating-induced increases in %CVC(peak) were accompanied by increases in [tHb] at rest and during exercise and a decrease in Δ[tHb] during exercise (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that NIRS-derived measures of SmO(2) and blood volume are differentially affected by skin blood flow at rest and during exercise. The findings from this study should be considered in NIRS experiments where skin blood flow can change markedly (e.g. high-intensity and/or prolonged exercise).

  10. Analysing Thermal Response Test Data Affected by Groundwater Flow and Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Imitazione, Gianmario; Chiozzi, Paolo; Orsi, Marco; Armadillo, Egidio

    2014-05-01

    Tests that record the underground temperature variation due to a constant heat injected into a borehole (or extracted from it) by means of a carrier fluid are routinely performed to infer subsurface thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance, which are needed to size geothermal heat pump systems. The most popular model to analyse temperature-time curves obtained from these tests is the infinite line source (ILS). This model gives appropriate estimations of thermal parameters only if particular hydro-geological conditions are fulfilled. Several flaws can however affect data interpretation with ILS, which is based on strong assumptions like those of a purely conductive heat transfer regime in a homogeneous medium, no vertical heat flow and infinite length of the borehole. Other drawbacks can arise from the difficulty in the proper thermal insulation of the test equipment, and consequently with oscillations of the carrier fluid temperature due to surface temperature changes. In this paper, we focused on the treatment of thermal response test data when both advection and periodic changes of surface temperature occur. We used a moving line source model to simulate temperature-time signals under different hypothesis of Darcy velocity and thermal properties. A random noise was added to the signal in order to mimic high frequency disturbances, possibly caused by equipment operating conditions and/or geological variability. The subsurface thermal conductivity, the Darcy velocity and the borehole thermal resistance were inferred by minimising the root mean square error between the synthetic dataset and the theoretical model. The optimisation was carried out with the Nelder-Mead algorithm, and thermal and hydraulic properties were determined by iterative reprocessing according to a trial-and-error procedure. The inferred thermal and hydraulic parameters are well consistent with the 'a priory' values, and the presence of noise in the synthetic data does not produce

  11. Determination of body heat storage: how to select the weighting of rectal and skin temperatures for clothed subjects.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Y; McLellan, T M; Shephard, R J

    1996-01-01

    Two methods of estimating body heat storage were compared under differing conditions of clothing and acclimation to heat. Sixteen male subjects underwent 6 consecutive days or two 6-day periods, separated by a 1-day rest period of heat acclimation, exercising 60 min.day-1 at 45%-55% of maximal aerobic power in a hot, dry environment (dry bulb temperature 40 degrees C; relative humidity 30%; and wind speed 0.3 m.s-1). Before and after acclimation, the subjects entered the same environment, wearing either normal light combat clothing or clothing protective against nuclear, biological, and chemical agents; they walked on a treadmill at 1.34 m.s-1, 0% slope continuously (n = 11 for normal clothing) or as repeated 15-min bouts of exercise followed by 15-min sitting rest (n = 5 for normal clothing and n = 16 for protective clothing). Average exposure times were 147 min (preacclimation) and 150 min (postacclimation) for continuous exercise and 150 min (both pre- and postacclimation) for intermittent exercise while wearing normal clothing, and 103 min (preacclimation) and 116 min (postacclimation) for intermittent exercise while wearing protective clothing. Heat storage was determined calorimetrically (from heat gains and heat losses) and thermometrically [using various weightings of rectal temperature (Tre) and mean skin temperature (Tsk)]. There were only minor (<5%) differences in estimated heat storage, whether calculations used a single specific heat (3.47 kJ.kg-1.degree C-1) or a value computed according to the subject's body composition. When wearing normal clothing, a formula with an invariant relative weighting for Tre to Tsk of 4:1 provided the best thermometric estimate of heat storage. When wearing protective clothing, the invariant relative weighting of 4:1 underestimated heat storage by 2%-12%; underestimation was attenuated by using respective relative weightings for a thermoneutral and hot environment of 2:1 and 2:1 or 4:1 and 9:1 before acclimation and 4

  12. Docosahexaenoic diet supplementation, exercise and temperature affect cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Batle, Juan Miguel; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise induces changes in peripheral mononuclear cells' (PBMCs) capabilities to produce cytokines. The aim was to investigate the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) diet supplementation on cytokine production, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMCs after exercise, and the in vitro influence of temperature. Fifteen male soccer players were randomly assigned to a placebo or an experimental group. The experimental group consumed an almond-based beverage enriched with DHA (1.16 g DHA/day) for 8 weeks, whereas the placebo group consumed a similar non-enriched beverage. Blood samples were taken before and after the nutritional intervention in basal conditions and 2 h after acute exercise. Nutritional intervention significantly increased the DHA content in erythrocytes only in experimental group (from 34 ± 3.6 to 43 ± 3.6 nmols DHA/10(9) erythrocytes). Exercise significantly increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in PBMCs but only in the placebo group (203 %). Exercise also significantly increased IL6, IL8, VEGF, INFγ, TNFα, IL1α, IL1β, MCP1, and EGG production rates by LPS-stimulated PBMCs, and this response was attenuated by DHA supplementation. Temperature but not DHA also affected the pattern of cytokine production increasing IL6, IL8, IL1β, and MCP1 synthesis. The higher change was evidenced in IL1β increasing the production rate at 39.5 °C from 3.19 ± 0.77 to 22.4 ± 6.1 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in placebo and from 2.36 ± 0.11 to 10.6 ± 0.38 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in the supplemented group. The profile of affected cytokines differs between temperature and exercise, suggesting a different PBMC activation pathway. DHA diet supplementation only attenuated cytokine production after exercise and not that induced by temperature.

  13. Does correlated color temperature affect the ability of humans to identify veins?

    PubMed

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate statistically that white illumination settings can affect the human ability to identify veins in the inner hand vasculature. A special light-emitting diode lamp with high color rendering index (CRI 84-95) was developed and the effect of correlated color temperature was evaluated, in the range between 2600 and 5700 K at an illuminance of 40±9  lx on the ability of adult humans to identify veins. It is shown that the ability to identify veins can, on average, be increased up to 24% when white illumination settings that do not resemble incandescent light are applied. The illuminance reported together with the effect of white illumination settings on direct visual perception of biosamples are relevant for clinical investigations during the night.

  14. Muscimol microinjected in the arcuate nucleus affects metabolism, body temperature & ventilation.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H

    2016-06-15

    Effects of microinjection of 2 doses of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor agonist, muscimol (M), into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus on oxygen consumption and control of ventilation over time and body temperature (BT) at the end of the experiment were compared in adult male and female rats. Relative to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, 0 nmol), BT was decreased only in male rats with both doses of M, while in female rats, the 5 nmol dose depressed oxygen consumption. Ventilation was depressed by 5 nmol M in male and 10 nmol M in female rats by decreasing tidal volume. M did not affect the ventilatory response of male or female rats to hypoxia, whereas in females 5 and 10 nmol M and in males 10 nmol M depressed the ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Thus, in rats GABAA receptors in the arcuate nucleus modulate BT, oxygen consumption, and ventilation in air and in response to hypercapnia in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  15. Small changes in ambient temperature affect alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Streitner, Corinna; Simpson, Craig G.; Shaw, Paul; Danisman, Selahattin; Brown, John W.S.; Staiger, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) gives rise to multiple mRNA isoforms from the same gene, providing possibilities to regulate gene expression beyond the level of transcription. In a recent paper in Nucleic Acids Research we used a high resolution RT-PCR based panel to study changes in AS patterns in plants with altered levels of an hnRNP-like RNA-binding protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we detected significant changes in AS patterns between different Arabidopsis ecotypes. Here we investigated how small changes in ambient temperature affect AS. We found significant changes in AS for 12 of 28 investigated events (43%) upon transfer of Arabidopsis plants from 20°C to 16°C and for 6 of the 28 investigated events (21%) upon transfer from 20°C to 24°C. PMID:23656882

  16. Comparison of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and Gaussian processes for machine learning (GPML) algorithms for the prediction of skin temperature in lower limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Neha; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Arjan

    2016-10-01

    Monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used impeding the required consistent positioning of the temperature sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the in-socket residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. In this work, we propose to implement an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference strategy (ANFIS) to predict the in-socket residual limb temperature. ANFIS belongs to the family of fused neuro fuzzy system in which the fuzzy system is incorporated in a framework which is adaptive in nature. The proposed method is compared to our earlier work using Gaussian processes for machine learning. By comparing the predicted and actual data, results indicate that both the modeling techniques have comparable performance metrics and can be efficiently used for non-invasive temperature monitoring.

  17. Lower temperature during the dark cycle affects disease development on Lygodium microphyllum (Old World climbing fern) by Bipolaris sacchari

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth chamber studies were conducted to examine environmental parameters affecting disease development by the indigenous pathogen Bipolaris sacchari isolate LJB-1L on the invasive weed Lygodium microphyllum (Old World climbing fern). Initial studies examined three different temperature regimes (20...

  18. Temperature and Transpiration Resistances of Xanthium Leaves as Affected by Air Temperature, Humidity, and Wind Speed 1

    PubMed Central

    Drake, B. G.; Raschke, K.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1970-01-01

    Transpiration and temperatures of single, attached leaves of Xanthium strumarium L. were measured in high intensity white light (1.2 calories per square centimeter per minute on a surface normal to the radiation), with abundant water supply, at wind speeds of 90, 225, and 450 centimeters per second, and during exposure to moist and dry air. Partitioning of absorbed radiation between transpiration and convection was determined, and transpiration resistances were computed. Leaf resistances decreased with increasing temperature (down to a minimum of 0.36 seconds per centimeter). Silicone rubber replicas of leaf surfaces proved that the decrease was due to increased stomatal apertures. At constant air temperature, leaf resistances were higher in dry than in moist air with the result that transpiration varied less than would have been predicted on the basis of the water-vapor pressure difference between leaf and air. The dependence of stomatal conductance on temperature and moisture content of the air caused the following effects. At air temperatures below 35 C, average leaf temperatures were above air temperature by an amount dependent on wind velocity; increasing wind diminished transpiration. At air temperatures above 35 C, leaf temperatures were below air temperatures, and increasing wind markedly increased transpiration. Leaf temperatures equaled air temperature near 35 C at all wind speeds and in moist as well as in dry air. PMID:16657458

  19. Different types of stainless steel used in equipment in meat plants do not affect the initial microbial transfer, including pathogens, from pork skin

    PubMed Central

    Larivière-Gauthier, Guillaume; Quessy, Sylvain; Fournaise, Sylvain; Letellier, Ann; Fravalo, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This study describes and measures the impact of different compositions and finishes of stainless steel used in equipment in the meat industry on the transfer of natural flora and selected pathogens from artificially contaminated pork skin. It is known that the adhesion to surfaces of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella, 2 pathogens frequently found in contaminated pork meat, depends on the nature and roughness of the surface. Our results show no statistically significant differences in microbial transfer regardless of the types of stainless steel considered, with the highest measured transfer difference being 0.18 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/800 cm2. Moreover, no differences in total microbial community were observed after transfer on the 5 types of stainless steel using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). It was concluded that the different characteristics of the stainless steel tested did not affect the initial bacterial transfer in this study. PMID:26130860

  20. Different types of stainless steel used in equipment in meat plants do not affect the initial microbial transfer, including pathogens, from pork skin.

    PubMed

    Larivière-Gauthier, Guillaume; Quessy, Sylvain; Fournaise, Sylvain; Letellier, Ann; Fravalo, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    This study describes and measures the impact of different compositions and finishes of stainless steel used in equipment in the meat industry on the transfer of natural flora and selected pathogens from artificially contaminated pork skin. It is known that the adhesion to surfaces of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella, 2 pathogens frequently found in contaminated pork meat, depends on the nature and roughness of the surface. Our results show no statistically significant differences in microbial transfer regardless of the types of stainless steel considered, with the highest measured transfer difference being 0.18 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/800 cm(2). Moreover, no differences in total microbial community were observed after transfer on the 5 types of stainless steel using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). It was concluded that the different characteristics of the stainless steel tested did not affect the initial bacterial transfer in this study.

  1. A Dynamic Approach to Addressing Observation-Minus-Forecast Mean Differences in a Land Surface Skin Temperature Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Clara; Reichle, Rolf; De Lannoy, Gabrielle; Scarino, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    In land data assimilation, bias in the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals is typically removed from the observations prior to assimilation by rescaling the observations to have the same long-term mean (and higher-order moments) as the corresponding model forecasts. Such observation rescaling approaches require a long record of observed and forecast estimates, and an assumption that the O-F mean differences are stationary. A two-stage observation bias and state estimation filter is presented, as an alternative to observation rescaling that does not require a long data record or assume stationary O-F mean differences. The two-stage filter removes dynamic (nonstationary) estimates of the seasonal scale O-F mean difference from the assimilated observations, allowing the assimilation to correct the model for synoptic-scale errors without adverse effects from observation biases. The two-stage filter is demonstrated by assimilating geostationary skin temperature (Tsk) observations into the Catchment land surface model. Global maps of the O-F mean differences are presented, and the two-stage filter is evaluated for one year over the Americas. The two-stage filter effectively removed the Tsk O-F mean differences, for example the GOES-West O-F mean difference at 21:00 UTC was reduced from 5.1 K for a bias-blind assimilation to 0.3 K. Compared to independent in situ and remotely sensed Tsk observations, the two-stage assimilation reduced the unbiased Root Mean Square Difference (ubRMSD) of the modeled Tsk by 10 of the open-loop values.

  2. Temperature and Time of Steeping Affect the Antioxidant Properties of White, Green, and Black Tea Infusions.

    PubMed

    Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Sanusi, Junedah; Kanthimathi, M S

    2016-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is the most highly consumed beverage in the world next to water. The common way of preparation is steeping in hot water which is varying for different type of tea. We investigated the antioxidant properties of 6 type of tea leaves under different time and temperatures of extraction method used. In general, all samples tested in this study demonstrated high levels of antioxidant capacity and antioxidant activity. The results indicate that the antioxidants activity is significantly affected by time and temperature of steeping and the highest was depending on the variety. White state values, green and black teas showed different levels of antioxidants under different extraction conditions. Overall, the highest activity for white tea was in prolonged hot and in some assays prolonged hot and cold extracts, whereas for green tea the highest activity observed in prolonged cold steeping while, for black tea was in short hot water infusion. The results of this study showed the antioxidant capacity of white and green tea was greater than black tea.

  3. Do circadian genes and ambient temperature affect substrate-borne signalling during Drosophila courtship?

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Izarne; Casal, José; Fabre, Caroline C. G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Courtship vibratory signals can be air-borne or substrate-borne. They convey distinct and species-specific information from one individual to its prospective partner. Here, we study the substrate-borne vibratory signals generated by the abdominal quivers of the Drosophila male during courtship; these vibrations travel through the ground towards courted females and coincide with female immobility. It is not known which physical parameters of the vibrations encode the information that is received by the females and induces them to pause. We examined the intervals between each vibratory pulse, a feature that was reported to carry information for animal communication. We were unable to find evidence of periodic variations in the lengths of these intervals, as has been reported for fly acoustical signals. Because it was suggested that the genes involved in the circadian clock may also regulate shorter rhythms, we search for effects of period on the interval lengths. Males that are mutant for the period gene produced vibrations with significantly altered interpulse intervals; also, treating wild type males with constant light results in similar alterations to the interpulse intervals. Our results suggest that both the clock and light/dark cycles have input into the interpulse intervals of these vibrations. We wondered if we could alter the interpulse intervals by other means, and found that ambient temperature also had a strong effect. However, behavioural analysis suggests that only extreme ambient temperatures can affect the strong correlation between female immobility and substrate-borne vibrations. PMID:26519517

  4. Survival of Enterobacter sakazakii in infant cereal as affected by composition, water activity, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Chun; Beuchat, Larry R

    2007-01-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii infections in preterm neonates and infants have been epidemiologically associated with consumption of reconstituted powdered infant formula. The bacterium has been isolated from grain, infant cereals, and cereal factory environments. A study was done to determine the survival characteristics of E. sakazakii initially at populations of 0.31 and 5.03 logCFU/g of infant rice cereal (a(w) 0.30, 0.45-0.46, and 0.68-0.69). Cereal was stored at 4, 21, and 30 degrees C and populations were monitored for up to 12 months. Survival of the pathogen in infant rice, barley, oatmeal, and mixed grain cereals (a(w) 0.63-0.66, 0.76, or 0.82-0.83) initially containing a population of 4.93-5.64 logCFU/g and held at 4, 21, and 30 degrees C up to 24 weeks was determined. Populations decreased significantly (p < or = 0.05) in all cereals stored at 21 and 30 degrees C regardless of a(w). Increases in a(w) or storage temperature accelerated the rate of death of E. sakazakii in dry infant cereals. However, at an initial population of 0.31 logCFU/g, E. sakazakii survived in rice cereal (a(w) 0.30-0.69) for up to 12 months at all storage temperatures. Survival of E. sakazakii was not affected by the composition of dry infant rice, barley, mixed grain, and oatmeal cereals (initial a(w) 0.63-0.83) stored for up to 24 weeks at 4, 21, or 30 degrees C. This study demonstrated that E. sakazakii can survive for up to 12 months in infant cereals having a wide range of a(w) when storage is at temperatures simulating those to which they may be exposed during distribution, at retail, and in the home.

  5. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Cancer What is Skin Cancer? Skin cancer is the most common type ... of approximately 9,480 Americans in 2013. Can Skin Cancer Be Treated? Most basal cell and squamous ...

  6. A New Approach to Defining Human Touch Temperature Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene; Stroud, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Defining touch temperature limits for skin contact with both hot and cold objects is important to prevent pain and skin damage, which may affect task performance or become a safety concern. Pain and skin damage depend on the resulting skin temperature during contact, which depends on the object s initial temperature, its material properties and its ability to transfer heat. However, previous spacecraft standards have incorrectly defined touch temperature limits in terms of a single object temperature value for all materials, or have provided limited material-specific values which do not cover the gamut of most designs. A new approach is being used in new NASA standards, which defines touch temperature limits in terms of skin temperature at pain onset for bare skin contact with hot and cold objects. The authors have developed an analytical verification method for safe hot and cold object temperatures for contact times from 1 second to infinity.

  7. A New Approach to Defining Human Touch Temperature Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene; Stroud, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Defining touch temperature limits for skin contact with both hot and cold objects is important to prevent pain and skin damage, which may affect task performance or become a safety concern. Pain and skin damage depend on the skin temperature during contact, which depends on the contact thermal conductance, the object's initial temperature, and its material properties. However, previous spacecraft standards have incorrectly defined touch temperature limits in terms of a single object temperature value for all materials, or have provided limited material-specific values which do not cover the gamut of likely designs. A new approach has been developed for updated NASA standards, which defines touch temperature limits in terms of skin temperature at pain onset for bare skin contact with hot and cold objects. The authors have developed an analytical verification method for safe hot and cold object temperatures for contact times from 1 second to infinity.

  8. Efficacy of keishibukuryogan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, in treating cold sensation and numbness after stroke: clinical improvement and skin temperature normalization in 22 stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Keishi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Cold sensation and numbness have been reported as post-stroke sensory sequelae attributable to distal axonopathy, which is caused by chronic ischemia of diseased limbs resulting from dysfunction of vasomotor regulatory systems. Keishibukuryogan is a traditional herbal medicine used to treat symptoms of peripheral ischemia such as cold extremities. This study investigated clinical improvement and skin temperature in peripheral ischemia patients to determine the efficacy of keishibukuryogan in alleviating post-stroke cold sensation and numbness. Twenty-two stroke patients with cold sensation and/or numbness were enrolled in this study. Subjective cold sensation and numbness, evaluated using the visual analogue scale, were found in 21 and 31 limbs, respectively. The skin temperature of diseased and healthy limbs was recorded. We observed all patients for 4 weeks and 17 patients for 8 weeks after administration of keishibukuryogan. The skin temperature of diseased limbs was significantly higher than baseline at 4 weeks and 8 weeks, whereas that of healthy limbs did not change significantly. Cold sensation and numbness were significantly improved at 4 weeks and 8 weeks compared to baseline. Keishibukuryogan administration resulted in warming of diseased limbs and improved cold sensation and numbness, probably by increasing peripheral blood flow.

  9. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C) for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and citrate synthase (CS), which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan (ACAN), was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  10. Identifying biologically meaningful hot-weather events using threshold temperatures that affect life-history.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan J; Kruger, Andries C; Nxumalo, Mthobisi P; Hockey, Philip A R

    2013-01-01

    Increases in the frequency, duration and intensity of heat waves are frequently evoked in climate change predictions. However, there is no universal definition of a heat wave. Recent, intense hot weather events have caused mass mortalities of birds, bats and even humans, making the definition and prediction of heat wave events that have the potential to impact populations of different species an urgent priority. One possible technique for defining biologically meaningful heat waves is to use threshold temperatures (T(thresh)) above which known fitness costs are incurred by species of interest. We set out to test the utility of this technique using T(thresh) values that, when exceeded, affect aspects of the fitness of two focal southern African bird species: the southern pied babbler Turdiodes bicolor (T(thresh) = 35.5 °C) and the common fiscal Lanius collaris (T(thresh) = 33 °C). We used these T(thresh) values to analyse trends in the frequency, duration and intensity of heat waves of magnitude relevant to the focal species, as well as the annual number of hot days (maximum air temperature > T(thresh)), in north-western South Africa between 1961 and 2010. Using this technique, we were able to show that, while all heat wave indices increased during the study period, most rapid increases for both species were in the annual number of hot days and in the maximum intensity (and therefore intensity variance) of biologically meaningful heat waves. Importantly, we also showed that warming trends were not uniform across the study area and that geographical patterns in warming allowed both areas of high risk and potential climate refugia to be identified. We discuss the implications of the trends we found for our focal species, and the utility of the T(thresh) technique as a conservation tool.

  11. Litter decay controlled by temperature, not soil properties, affecting future soil carbon.

    PubMed

    Gregorich, Edward G; Janzen, Henry; Ellert, Benjamin H; Helgason, Bobbi L; Qian, Budong; Zebarth, Bernie J; Angers, Denis A; Beyaert, Ronald P; Drury, Craig F; Duguid, Scott D; May, William E; McConkey, Brian G; Dyck, Miles F

    2017-04-01

    Widespread global changes, including rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate warming and loss of biodiversity, are predicted for this century; all of these will affect terrestrial ecosystem processes like plant litter decomposition. Conversely, increased plant litter decomposition can have potential carbon-cycle feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 levels, climate warming and biodiversity. But predicting litter decomposition is difficult because of many interacting factors related to the chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, as well as to climate and agricultural management practices. We applied (13) C-labelled plant litter to soil at ten sites spanning a 3500-km transect across the agricultural regions of Canada and measured its decomposition over five years. Despite large differences in soil type and climatic conditions, we found that the kinetics of litter decomposition were similar once the effect of temperature had been removed, indicating no measurable effect of soil properties. A two-pool exponential decay model expressing undecomposed carbon simply as a function of thermal time accurately described kinetics of decomposition. (R(2)  = 0.94; RMSE = 0.0508). Soil properties such as texture, cation exchange capacity, pH and moisture, although very different among sites, had minimal discernible influence on decomposition kinetics. Using this kinetic model under different climate change scenarios, we projected that the time required to decompose 50% of the litter (i.e. the labile fractions) would be reduced by 1-4 months, whereas time required to decompose 90% of the litter (including recalcitrant fractions) would be reduced by 1 year in cooler sites to as much as 2 years in warmer sites. These findings confirm quantitatively the sensitivity of litter decomposition to temperature increases and demonstrate how climate change may constrain future soil carbon storage, an effect apparently not influenced by soil properties.

  12. G364R mutation of MCM4 detected in human skin cancer cells affects DNA helicase activity of MCM4/6/7 complex.

    PubMed

    Ishimi, Yukio; Irie, Daiki

    2015-06-01

    A number of gene mutations are detected in cells derived from human cancer tissues, but roles of these mutations in cancer cell development are largely unknown. We examined G364R mutation of MCM4 detected in human skin cancer cells. Formation of MCM4/6/7 complex is not affected by the mutation. Consistent with this notion, the binding to MCM6 is comparable between the mutant MCM4 and wild-type MCM4. Nuclear localization of this mutant MCM4 expressed in HeLa cells supports this conclusion. Purified MCM4/6/7 complex containing the G364R MCM4 exhibited similar levels of single-stranded DNA binding and ATPase activities to the complex containing wild-type MCM4. However, the mutant complex showed only 30-50% of DNA helicase activity of the wild-type complex. When G364R MCM4 was expressed in HeLa cells, it was fractionated into nuclease-sensitive chromatin fraction, similar to wild-type MCM4. These results suggest that this mutation does not affect assembly of MCM2-7 complex on replication origins but it interferes some step at function of MCM2-7 helicase. Thus, this mutation may contribute to cancer cell development by disturbing DNA replication.

  13. Phasic and tonic fluctuations in brain, muscle, and skin temperatures during motivated drinking behavior in rats: physiological correlates of motivation and reward.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Michael S; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2010-01-15

    Since brain metabolism is accompanied by heat production, measurement of brain temperature offers a method for assessing global alterations in metabolic neural activity. This approach, high-resolution (5-s bin) temperature recording from the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), temporal muscle, and facial skin, was used to study motivated drinking behavior in rats. Experienced animals were presented with a cup containing 5-ml of Coca-Cola(R) (Coke) beverage that resulted, within certain latencies, in initiation of a continuous chain of licking until all liquid was fully consumed. While cup presentation induced rapid, gradual NAcc temperature increase peaking at the start of drinking, temperatures slowly decreased during Coke consumption, but phasically increased again in the post-consumption period when rats were hyperactive, showing multiple interactions with an empty cup. Muscle temperatures followed a similar pattern, but the changes were weaker and delayed compared to those in the brain. Skin temperature rapidly dropped after cup presentation, steadily maintained at low levels during consumption, and slowly restored during the post-consumption period. Substitution of the expected Coke with either sugar-free Diet Coke(R) or water resulted in numerous drinking attempts but ultimately no consumption. During these tests, locomotor activation was much greater and more prolonged, brain and muscle temperatures increased monophasically, and their elevation was significantly greater than that with regular Coke tests. Food deprivation decreased drinking latencies, did not change the pattern of temperature fluctuations during Coke consumption, but temperature elevations were greater than in controls. Our data suggest sustained neural activation triggered by appetitive stimuli and associated with activational (seeking) aspects of appetitive motivated behavior. This seeking-related activation is rapidly ceased following consumption, suggesting this change as a neural correlate of

  14. Consumption of oxygen and blood flow during exercise and recovery phase evaluated by near-infrared spectroscopy and its relationship to skin forehead, quadriceps, tympanic, and rectal temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaguer-Codina, Joan; Pujol, P.; Drobnic, F.; Galilea, P.; Riera, J.; Pons, V.; Banquells, M.; Ruiz, O.

    1995-12-01

    The availability of oxygen in the human vastus medialis muscle and the tympanic, skin forehead, quadriceps, and rectal temperatures has been investigated during exercise test and post-exercise with non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopy, infrared thermometer, and an array of four thermistors, respectively. During exercise time rectal temperature was not recorded, before exercise basal values were obtained, and after exercise all the data for two hours were recorded. The signals from near-infrared spectroscopy have been studied by analogy to forced vibration and viscously damped free vibration. Other models have been used to evaluate the temperatures. The time necessary for the reoxygenation signal to cross the baseline during the post exercise period was from 30 min to over 100 min. The peak of pH values was 5 min post-exercise and to arrive at basal levels needed 25 min to more than 40 min. The peak of rectal temperature starts around 20 - 30 min post-exercise remaining 25 - 40 min at the same value, starting to slip down slowly at variable intervals of several minutes requiring over two hours to arrive at basal levels. The data obtained by near-infrared spectroscopy and skin quadriceps, rectal temperatures confirm that the oxygen consumption remains after exercise in the muscle studied.

  15. Ballistics ordnance gelatine - How different concentrations, temperatures and curing times affect calibration results.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Fisk, Wesley; Wachsberger, Christian; Byard, Roger W

    2015-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether different concentrations of ordnance gelatine, water types, temperatures and curing times would have an effect on projectile penetration of a gelatine tissue surrogate. Both Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) specified gelatines were compared against the FBI calibration standard. 10% w/w and 20% w/w concentrations of gelatine with Bloom numbers of 250 and 285 were prepared and cured at variable temperatures (3-20°C) for 21 hours-3 weeks. Each block was shot on four occasions on the same range using steel calibre 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) air rifle at the required standard velocity of 180 ± 4.5 m/s, to ascertain the mean penetration depth. The results showed no significant difference in mean penetration depth using the three different water types (p > 0.05). Temperature changes and curing times did affect penetration depth. At 10°C, mean penetration depth with 20% gelatine 285 Bloom for the two water types tested was 49.7 ± 1.5 mm after 21 h curing time, whereas the same formulation at 20°C using two different water types was 79.1 ± 2.1 mm after 100 h curing time (p < 0.001). Neither of the NATO 20% concentrations of gelatine at 10°C or a 20% concentration of 285 Bloom gelatine at 10°C met the same calibration standard as the FBI recommended 10% formulation at 4°C. A 20% concentration of 285 Bloom at 20°C met the same calibration/penetration criteria as a 10% concentration of 250 Bloom at 4 °C after 100 h of curing, therefore matching the FBI calibration standard for a soft tissue simulant for wound ballistics research. These results demonstrate significant variability in simulant properties. Failure to standardise ballistic simulants may invalidate experimental results.

  16. Factors Affecting Process Temperature and Biogas Production in Small-scale Rural Biogas Digesters in Winter in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Pham, C. H.; Vu, C. C.; Sommer, S. G.; Bruun, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the main factors influencing digester temperature and methods to reduce heat losses during the cold season in the subtropics. Four composite digesters (two insulated and two uninsulated) were buried underground to measure their internal temperature (°C) at a depth of 140 cm and 180 cm, biogas production and methane (CH4) concentration in biogas from August to February. In parallel the temperature of the air (100 cm above ground), in the slurry mixing tank and in the soil (10, 100, 140, and 180 cm depth) was measured by thermocouple. The influent amount was measured daily and the influent chemical composition was measured monthly during the whole experimental period. Seasonal variations in air temperature significantly affected the temperature in the soil, mixing tank and digester. Consequently, biogas production, which is temperature dependent, was influenced by the season. The main factors determining the internal temperature in the digesters were insulation with Styrofoam, air temperature and temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. Biogas production is low due to the cold climate conditions in winter in Northern Vietnam, but the study proved that storing slurry in the mixing tank until its temperature peak at around 14:00 h will increase the temperature in the digester and thus increase potential biogas production. Algorithms are provided linking digester temperature to the temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. PMID:25050049

  17. Sustained sleep fragmentation affects brain temperature, food intake and glucose tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Baud, Maxime O; Magistretti, Pierre J; Petit, Jean-Marie

    2013-02-01

    Sleep fragmentation is present in numerous sleep pathologies and constitutes a major feature of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. A prevalence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity has been shown to be associated to obstructive sleep apnea. While sleep fragmentation has been shown to impact sleep homeostasis, its specific effects on metabolic variables are only beginning to emerge. In this context, it is important to develop realistic animal models that would account for chronic metabolic effects of sleep fragmentation. We developed a 14-day model of instrumental sleep fragmentation in mice, and show an impact on both brain-specific and general metabolism. We first report that sleep fragmentation increases food intake without affecting body weight. This imbalance was accompanied by the inability to adequately decrease brain temperature during fragmented sleep. In addition, we report that sleep-fragmented mice develop glucose intolerance. We also observe that sleep fragmentation slightly increases the circadian peak level of glucocorticoids, a factor that may be involved in the observed metabolic effects. Our results confirm that poor-quality sleep with sustained sleep fragmentation has similar effects on general metabolism as actual sleep loss. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that sleep fragmentation is an aggravating factor for the development of metabolic dysfunctions that may be relevant for sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea.

  18. White wine proteins: how does the pH affect their conformation at room temperature?

    PubMed

    Dufrechou, Marie; Vernhet, Aude; Roblin, Pierre; Sauvage, François-Xavier; Poncet-Legrand, Céline

    2013-08-20

    Our studies focused on the determination of aggregation mechanisms of proteins occurring in wine at room temperature. Even if the wine pH range is narrow (2.8 to 3.7), some proteins are affected by this parameter. At low pH, the formation of aggregates and the development of a haze due to proteins sometimes occur. The objective of this work was to determine if the pH impacted the conformational stability of wine proteins. Different techniques were used: circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the modification of their secondary and tertiary structure and also SAXS to determine their global shape. Four pure proteins were used, two considered to be stable (invertase and thaumatin-like proteins) and two considered to be unstable (two chitinase isoforms). Two pH values were tested to emphasize their behavior (pH 2.5 and 4.0). The present work highlighted the fact that the conformational stability of some wine proteins (chitinases) was impacted by partial modifications, related to the exposure of some hydrophobic sites. These modifications were enough to destabilize the native state of the protein. These modifications were not observed on wine proteins determined to be stable (invertase and thaumatin-like proteins).

  19. Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 5 (ITIH5) is overexpressed in inflammatory skin diseases and affects epidermal morphology in constitutive knockout mice and murine 3D skin models.

    PubMed

    Huth, Sebastian; Heise, Ruth; Vetter-Kauczok, Claudia S; Skazik, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Knüchel, Ruth; Merk, Hans F; Dahl, Edgar; Baron, Jens M

    2015-09-01

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitors are protease inhibitors that are thought to be important regulators in various acute-phase processes. They are composed of one light chain (bikunin) and different heavy chains (ITIHs). The only function known so far of ITIHs is the covalent linkage to hyaluronan (HA). As there is virtually no knowledge on the distribution and function of ITIH proteins in skin tissue, we performed a systematic characterization of ITIH expression in healthy and diseased skin. Using GeneChip(®) Human Exon 1.0 ST expression profiling, we found that ITIH5 represents the major ITIH family member expressed in human skin. Moreover, the use of quantitative reverse transcription PCR and a customized ITIH5-specific antibody indicated that ITIH5 is predominantly produced by dermal fibroblasts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a clearly detectable ITIH5 protein expression in normal skin. Interestingly, ITIH5 expression was significantly up-regulated in inflammatory skin diseases. Furthermore, 3D skin models employing murine Itih5(-/-) epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts as well as skin specimens of Itih5(-/-) mice revealed a significantly altered epidermal structure compared to wild-type controls. Hence, we can strengthen the presumption that ITIH5 may constitute a novel regulatory molecule of the human skin that could play an important role in inflammation via its interaction with HA.

  20. Nocturnal body temperature in wintering blue tits is affected by roost-site temperature and body reserves.

    PubMed

    Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Johan F; Nilsson, J-Å

    2011-09-01

    Birds commonly use rest-phase hypothermia, a controlled reduction of body temperature (T(b)), to conserve energy during times of high metabolic demands. We assessed the flexibility of this heterothermic strategy by increasing roost-site temperature and recording the subsequent T(b) changes in wintering blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus L.), assuming that blue tits would respond to treatment by increasing T(b). We found that birds increased T(b) when roost-site temperature was increased, but only at low ambient temperatures. Moreover, birds with larger fat reserves regulated T(b) at higher levels than birds carrying less fat. This result implies that a roosting blue tit maintains its T(b) at the highest affordable level, as determined by the interacting effect of ecophysiological costs associated with rest-phase hypothermia and energy reserves, in order to minimize potential fitness costs associated with a low T(b).

  1. [Skin diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Segovia, Carolina; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem worldwide. It predominates in industrialized countries; however, it is prevalent in all nations. It is defined as a condition of excess adipose tissue and is the result of changes in lifestyle, excessive consumption of energy-dense foods with poor nutritional value, physical inactivity and the reduction of open space where one can practice a sport. Although obesity is associated with multiple diseases, it is important to stress that the metabolic changes caused by it affect skin physiology and play a predisposing factor for the development of skin diseases. Very little has been studied on the impact of obesity on the skin. The purpose of this article is to review the most frequently skin diseases in obesity. Some skin pathologies in obesity are caused by changes in skin physiology, others are related to insulin resistance or constitute an exacerbating factor for dermatitis. This article covers the clinical features of obesity related skin disease and its management.

  2. Hiding from the moonlight: luminosity and temperature affect activity of Asian nocturnal primates in a highly seasonal forest.

    PubMed

    Starr, Carly; Nekaris, K A I; Leung, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The effect of moonlight and temperature on activity of slow lorises was previously little known and this knowledge might be useful for understanding many aspects of their behavioural ecology, and developing strategies to monitor and protect populations. In this study we aimed to determine if the activity of the pygmy loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is affected by ambient temperature and/or moonlight in a mixed deciduous forest. We radio-collared five females and five males in the Seima Protection Forest, Cambodia, in February to May, 2008 and January to March, 2009 and recorded their behaviour at 5 minutes intervals, totalling 2736 observations. We classified each observation as either inactive (sleeping or alert) or active behaviour (travel, feeding, grooming, or others). Moon luminosity (bright/dark) and ambient temperature were recorded for each observation. The response variable, activity, was binary (active or inactive), and a logit link function was used. Ambient temperature alone did not significantly affect mean activity. Although mean activity was significantly affected by moonlight, the interaction between moonlight and temperature was also significant: on bright nights, studied animals were increasingly more active with higher temperature; and on dark nights they were consistently active regardless of temperature. The most plausible explanation is that on bright cold nights the combined risk of being seen and attacked by predators and heat loss outweigh the benefit of active behaviours.

  3. Sex, season, and time of day interact to affect body temperatures of the Giant Gartersnake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, M.L.; Halstead, B.J.; Gregory, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    1.We examined multiple hypotheses regarding differences in body temperatures of the Giant Gartersnake using temperature-sensitive radio telemetry and an information-theoretic analytical approach.2.Giant Gartersnakes selected body temperatures near 30 ??C, and males and females had similar body temperatures most of the year, except during the midsummer gestation period.3.Seasonal differences in the body temperatures of males and females may relate to both the costs associated with thermoregulatory behavior, such as predation, and the benefits associated with maintaining optimal body temperatures, such as successful incubation.

  4. Biothermomechanics of skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Lu, T. J.; Seffen, K. A.

    Biothermomechanics of skin is highly interdisciplinary involving bioheat transfer, burn damage, biomechanics and neurophysiology. During heating, thermally induced mechanical stress arises due to the thermal denaturation of collagen, resulting in macroscale shrinkage. Thus, the strain, stress, temperature and thermal pain/damage are highly correlated; in other words, the problem is fully coupled. The aim of this study is to develop a computational approach to examine the heat transfer process and the heat-induced mechanical response, so that the differences among the clinically applied heating modalities can be quantified. Exact solutions for temperature, thermal damage and thermal stress for a single-layer skin model were first derived for different boundary conditions. For multilayer models, numerical simulations using the finite difference method (FDM) and finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the temperature, burn damage and thermal stress distributions in the skin tissue. The results showed that the thermomechanical behavior of skin tissue is very complex: blood perfusion has little effect on thermal damage but large influence on skin temperature distribution, which, in turn, influences significantly the resulting thermal stress field; the stratum corneum layer, although very thin, has a large effect on the thermomechanical behavior of skin, suggesting that it should be properly accounted for in the modeling of skin thermal stresses; the stress caused by non-uniform temperature distribution in the skin may also contribute to the thermal pain sensation.

  5. Evaluation of the parameters affecting bone temperature during drilling using a three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chuan; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Zhuang, Jun-Yan; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Hsiao, Chih-Kun

    2017-03-28

    A three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model was constructed and experimentally validated and was used to investigate the parameters which influence bone temperature during drilling, including the drill speed, feeding force, drill bit diameter, and bone density. Results showed the proposed three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model can effectively simulate the temperature elevation during bone drilling. The bone temperature rise decreased with an increase in feeding force and drill speed, however, increased with the diameter of drill bit or bone density. The temperature distribution is significantly affected by the drilling duration; a lower drilling speed reduced the exposure duration, decreases the region of the thermally affected zone. The constructed model could be applied for analyzing the influence parameters during bone drilling to reduce the risk of thermal necrosis. It may provide important information for the design of drill bits and surgical drilling powers.

  6. Temperature abuse timing affects the quality deterioration of commercially packaged ready-to-eat baby spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature abuse of fresh-cut products occurs routinely during transportation and retail store display. However, the stage of product shelf life during temperature abuse and its impact on sensory attributes and product quality have not been studied. This study evaluated the effect of temperature ab...

  7. KINETICS OF LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION AFFECT ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA) LEAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the rate of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission from plants is highly temperature-dependent, we investigated the natural fluctuations on leaf temperature and the effects of rapid temperature change on isoprene emission of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves at the to...

  8. Effects of color temperature of fluorescent lamps on body temperature regulation in a moderately cold environment.

    PubMed

    Yasukouchi, A; Yasukouchi, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2000-05-01

    A study on the effects of different color temperatures of fluorescent lamps on skin and rectal temperatures in a moderately cold environment involving (i) changes in skin temperature of 7 male subjects exposed to an ambient temperature ranging from 28 degrees C to 18 degrees C (experiment I) and (ii) changes in skin and rectal temperatures and metabolic heat production of 11 male subjects exposed to ambient temperature of 15 degrees C for 90 min (Experiment II) was conducted. In Experiment I, the reduction of mean skin temperature from the control value was significantly greater under 3000 K than under 5000 K or 7500 K lighting. In Experiment II, the reductions in mean skin temperature and rectal temperature were respectively greater and smaller under 3000 K than those under 5000 K or 7500 K lighting. However, metabolic heat production was not affected by color temperature conditions. The relationships between morphological and physiological parameters revealed that no significant relation of rectal temperature to body surface area per unit body weight was found only under 3000 K. Furthermore, while the mean skin temperature was independent on the mean skinfold thickness under 3000 K, a significant negative correlation between the rectal and mean skin temperatures was observed. Therefore, body heat loss might be suppressed effectively by increasing the vasoconstrictor tone under a color temperature of 3000 K, and the body shell was dependent only on morphological factors under 5000 K and 7500 K lighting.

  9. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  10. Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  11. Is an increase in skin temperature predictive of neuropathic foot ulceration in people with diabetes? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the strength of the existing research to answer the question: Is an increase in skin temperature predictive of neuropathic foot ulceration in people with diabetes? Methods This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis of temperature-monitoring in the prediction and prevention of diabetic foot ulceration. Two investigators conducted a literature search for all relevant articles from 1960 until July 2011. During this process the following data bases were searched: MEDLINE, Science Direct, AMED, Australian Medical Index, APAIS-Health, ATSIhealth, EMBASE, Web of Science and OneSearch. Keywords used in this search included diabetes, foot complications, ulceration, temperature-monitoring, prediction and prevention. Results Results of the meta-analysis support the theory that an increase in skin temperature is predictive of foot ulceration when compared with the same site on the contralateral limb. The theory that there is a mean norm foot temperature which can be used as a benchmark to monitor pathological change was unsupported by this meta-analysis. Conclusions The conclusions derived from this review are based on the best available scientific evidence in this field. It is intended that the results of this study will improve clinical decision-making and encourage the appropriate measures used to predict and prevent ulceration in people with diabetes at high risk of foot complications. Based on quality studies in this area, the results of this review have indicated that the use of temperature-monitoring is an effective way to predict, and thus prevent, diabetic foot ulceration. PMID:23919736

  12. Oxytetracycline depletion from skin-on fillet tissue of coho salmon fed oxytetracycline medicated feed in freshwater at temperatures less than 9°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Stehly, Guy R.; Gingerich, William H.; Evered, Joy A.

    2001-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a broad spectrum antibacterial agent approved in the USA for treating certain bacterial diseases in salmonids cultured in freshwater at temperatures greater than or equal to 9°C. This study was conducted to provide the information necessary to expand the OTC label to include treatment of diseased salmonids cultured in freshwater at temperatures below 9°C. The study was designed to treat juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) with OTC-medicated feed and determine the depletion of OTC from the skin-on fillet tissue. Oxytetracycline depletion was evaluated in juvenile coho salmon (weight range, 13–62 g) fed OTC-medicated feed at a rate of 88.2 mg OTC/kg body weight/day for 10 days. Pairs of skin-on fillets were taken from individual fish on days 4 and 10 during the treatment phase and on days 1, 4, 8, 14, and 19 during the depletion phase. Water temperatures during the study period ranged from 4.1°C to 8.5°C. The OTC concentrations in medicated feed and skin-on fillets were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography methods. The maximum mean OTC concentration in fillet tissue was 932 ng/g, 1 day after the last treatment and decreased to 32 ng/g 19 days after the last treatment. The log-linear loss of OTC from the fillet tissue was biphasic with a terminal phase half-life of 4.9 days.

  13. Incubation temperature affects the behavior of adult leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius).

    PubMed

    Flores, D; Tousignant, A; Crews, D

    1994-06-01

    The leopard gecko has temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); females are predominantly produced when incubated at 26 degrees C (100%), 30 degrees C (70%), and 34 degrees C (95%), whereas males are predominantly produced at 32.5 degrees C (75%). Exogenous estradiol can override the effect of temperature on sex determination. To compare temperature-determined females with hormone-determined females, eggs from the male-biased temperature were treated with estradiol benzoate during incubation. As adults, animals from a male-biased incubation temperature were more likely to exhibit aggression than animals from female-biased incubation temperatures. Furthermore, females from a male-biased incubation temperature tended to be less attractive than females from female-biased temperatures. Hormone-determined females were both attractive and aggressive. This suggests that incubation temperature is an important development determinant of adult aggressiveness and attractiveness. The 26 degrees C animals ovariectomized on the day of hatch exhibited more frequent aggression and were unreceptive to males, indicating that postnatal ovarian hormones also play a role in adult sociosexual behaviors. The parallel between incubation temperature and intrauterine position in laboratory mammals is discussed.

  14. Operative treatment of functional facial skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, Marc Oliver; Rettinger, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The skin is the principal interface between the body and the surrounding world and thus serves as a protective barrier against trauma, temperature extremes and radiation. With receptors for pressure, movement, heat and cold, it also acts as sensory organ and through sweat secretion plays a role in thermoregulation and electrolyte metabolism. Not all of these functions are relevant to facial skin, however, cosmetic aspects are of vital importance.Disorders primarily affect the protective skin function in defect and scar areas. For operative correction, the following principles should be applied: Minimization of scar development by adherence to indicated incision lines in the face, preferred use of local skin flaps for defect coverage in order to obtain optimal results regarding texture, complexion and sensitivity of skin, as well as consideration of aesthetic units. Recent developments in this field are tissue culture, occlusive dressings, and the use of growth factors. Age-related skin changes with impairment of cosmetic function are characterized by the development of creases and looseness of skin. Rejuvenation has become an important segment of skin surgery. For surface treatment, especially of creases and acne scars, various types of laser treatment are employed. Deeper lines can be filled with filler materials. The integration of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) into face lift procedures has lead to more viable and natural results. Due to protruding tissue, blepharoplasty of the upper lid is often carried out in combination with forehead lift and eyebrow lift procedures.The optimized use of growth factors and synthetic materials, which serve as a matrix, are aimed at skin replacement which mimics the quality and functions of skin as closely as possible. On the whole, however, the reconstruction of defect through local tissue transfer is still considered as the treatment of choice.

  15. Operative treatment of functional facial skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scheithauer, Marc Oliver; Rettinger, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The skin is the principal interface between the body and the surrounding world and thus serves as a protective barrier against trauma, temperature extremes and radiation. With receptors for pressure, movement, heat and cold, it also acts as sensory organ and through sweat secretion plays a role in thermoregulation and electrolyte metabolism. Not all of these functions are relevant to facial skin, however, cosmetic aspects are of vital importance. Disorders primarily affect the protective skin function in defect and scar areas. For operative correction, the following principles should be applied: Minimization of scar development by adherence to indicated incision lines in the face, preferred use of local skin flaps for defect coverage in order to obtain optimal results regarding texture, complexion and sensitivity of skin, as well as consideration of aesthetic units. Recent developments in this field are tissue culture, occlusive dressings, and the use of growth factors. Age-related skin changes with impairment of cosmetic function are characterized by the development of creases and looseness of skin. Rejuvenation has become an important segment of skin surgery. For surface treatment, especially of creases and acne scars, various types of laser treatment are employed. Deeper lines can be filled with filler materials. The integration of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) into face lift procedures has lead to more viable and natural results. Due to protruding tissue, blepharoplasty of the upper lid is often carried out in combination with forehead lift and eyebrow lift procedures. The optimized use of growth factors and synthetic materials, which serve as a matrix, are aimed at skin replacement which mimics the quality and functions of skin as closely as possible. On the whole, however, the reconstruction of defect through local tissue transfer is still considered as the treatment of choice. PMID:22073066

  16. [Use of the rectal-skin temperature gradient for the rapid evaluation of the severity and prediction of the outcomes in critical states].

    PubMed

    Nazarenko, G I

    1986-10-01

    Results of the monitor observation of the recto-skin temperature gradient in 263 patients are described. Among them 199 patients were in critical condition (traumatic shock--in 51; burn--in 99; cardiogenic shock--in 33; septic collapse--in 11). The elevation of this parameter more than 9 degrees C shows the presence of shock. It can be used for control of the efficiency of the antishock therapy and represents a simple, reliable and highly informative method not requiring an expensive equipment.

  17. Previous chronic exogenous glucocorticoid administration in vivo does not affect functional characteristics and cellular lifespan of human skin fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pratsinis, Harris; Dimozi, Anastasia; Pilichos, Konstantinos; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Yiacoumettis, Andreas M; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2011-06-01

    Excess of glucocorticoids (GCs) has been reported to lead to skin atrophy and impaired wound healing. The present study investigates whether human skin fibroblasts suffer permanent damages due to a long-term exposure to GC excess. Fibroblasts obtained from patients being under GC treatment for periods over one year were cultured under standard conditions in vitro, and studied regarding pivotal parameters involved in skin homeostasis and aging, i.e. collagen production, cell proliferation, and cellular replicative lifespan. No statistical differences were observed regarding these functions compared to those of normal human skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, no differences between normal and patient-derived cells were observed regarding their sensitivity to a supra-physiological cortisol concentration. In conclusion, the prolonged exposure of human skin fibroblasts in vivo to high concentrations of exogenously-administered GC does not lead to persistent adverse effects on their physiology.

  18. Temperature and resource availability may interactively affect over-wintering success of juvenile fish in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Jakob; Rodriguez-Gil, José Luis; Jönsson, Mikael; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer; Nilsson, P Anders; Nicolle, Alice; Berglund, Olof

    2011-01-01

    The predicted global warming may affect freshwater systems at several organizational levels, from organism to ecosystem. Specifically, in temperate regions, the projected increase of winter temperatures may have important effects on the over-winter biology of a range of organisms and especially for fish and other ectothermic animals. However, temperature effects on organisms may be directed strongly by resource availability. Here, we investigated whether over-winter loss of biomass and lipid content of juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus) was affected by the physiologically relatively small (2-5 °C) changes of winter temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), under both natural and experimental conditions. This was investigated in combination with the effects of food availability. Finally, we explored the potential for a correlation between lake temperature and resource levels for planktivorous fish, i.e., zooplankton biomass, during five consecutive winters in a south Swedish lake. We show that small increases in temperature (+2 °C) affected fish biomass loss in both presence and absence of food, but negatively and positively respectively. Temperature alone explained only a minor part of the variation when food availability was not taken into account. In contrast to other studies, lipid analyses of experimental fish suggest that critical somatic condition rather than critical lipid content determined starvation induced mortality. Our results illustrate the importance of considering not only changes in temperature when predicting organism response to climate change but also food-web interactions, such as resource availability and predation. However, as exemplified by our finding that zooplankton over-winter biomass in the lake was not related to over-winter temperature, this may not be a straightforward task.

  19. Temperature and Resource Availability May Interactively Affect Over-Wintering Success of Juvenile Fish in a Changing Climate

    PubMed Central

    Brodersen, Jakob; Rodriguez-Gil, José Luis; Jönsson, Mikael; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer; Nilsson, P. Anders; Nicolle, Alice; Berglund, Olof

    2011-01-01

    The predicted global warming may affect freshwater systems at several organizational levels, from organism to ecosystem. Specifically, in temperate regions, the projected increase of winter temperatures may have important effects on the over-winter biology of a range of organisms and especially for fish and other ectothermic animals. However, temperature effects on organisms may be directed strongly by resource availability. Here, we investigated whether over-winter loss of biomass and lipid content of juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus) was affected by the physiologically relatively small (2-5°C) changes of winter temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), under both natural and experimental conditions. This was investigated in combination with the effects of food availability. Finally, we explored the potential for a correlation between lake temperature and resource levels for planktivorous fish, i.e., zooplankton biomass, during five consecutive winters in a south Swedish lake. We show that small increases in temperature (+2°C) affected fish biomass loss in both presence and absence of food, but negatively and positively respectively. Temperature alone explained only a minor part of the variation when food availability was not taken into account. In contrast to other studies, lipid analyses of experimental fish suggest that critical somatic condition rather than critical lipid content determined starvation induced mortality. Our results illustrate the importance of considering not only changes in temperature when predicting organism response to climate change but also food-web interactions, such as resource availability and predation. However, as exemplified by our finding that zooplankton over-winter biomass in the lake was not related to over-winter temperature, this may not be a straightforward task. PMID:21998627

  20. Loss of Drosophila melanogaster TRPA1 Function Affects "Siesta" Behavior but Not Synchronization to Temperature Cycles.

    PubMed

    Roessingh, Sanne; Wolfgang, Werner; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    To maintain synchrony with the environment, circadian clocks use a wide range of cycling sensory cues that provide input to the clock (zeitgebers), including environmental temperature cycles (TCs). There is some knowledge about which clock neuronal groups are important for temperature synchronization, but we currently lack knowledge on the temperature receptors and their signaling pathways that feed temperature information to the (neuronal) clock. Since TRPA1 is a well-known thermosensor that functions in a range of temperature-related behaviors, and it is potentially expressed in clock neurons, we set out to test the putative role of TRPA1 in temperature synchronization of the circadian clock. We found that flies lacking TRPA1 are still able to synchronize their behavioral activity to TCs comparable to wild-type flies, both in 16°C : 25°C and 20°C : 29°C TCs. In addition, we found that flies lacking TRPA1 show higher activity levels during the middle of the warm phase of 20°C : 29°C TCs, and we show that this TRPA1-mediated repression of locomotor activity during the "siesta" is caused by a lack of sleep. Based on these data, we conclude that the TRPA1 channel is not required for temperature synchronization in this broad temperature range but instead is required to repress activity during the warm part of the day.

  1. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    MedlinePlus

    ... and water, helps regulate body temperature through perspiration (sweating), and protects from the sun's damaging ultraviolet rays. ... skin contains thousands of cells and hundred