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Sample records for affects surface photometry

  1. How the extinction of extragalactic background light affects surface photometry of galaxies, groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, E.; Micheva, G.; Östlin, G.

    2009-08-01

    The faint regions of galaxies, groups and clusters hold important clues about how these objects formed, and surface photometry at optical and near-infrared wavelengths represents a powerful tool for studying such structures. Here, we identify a hitherto unrecognized problem with this technique, related to how the night sky flux is typically measured and subtracted from astronomical images. While most of the sky flux comes from regions between the observer and the target object, a small fraction - the extragalactic background light (EBL) - comes from behind. We argue that since this part of the sky flux can be subjected to extinction by dust present in the galaxy/group/cluster studied, standard reduction procedures may lead to a systematic oversubtraction of the EBL. Even very small amounts of extinction can lead to spurious features in radial surface brightness profiles and colour maps of extended objects. We assess the likely impact of this effect on a number of topics in extragalactic astronomy where very deep surface photometry is currently attempted, including studies of stellar haloes, starburst host galaxies, disc truncations and diffuse intragroup/intracluster light. We argue that EBL extinction may provide at least a partial explanation for the anomalously red colours reported for the haloes of disc galaxies and for the hosts of local starburst galaxies. EBL extinction effects also mimic truncations in discs with unusually high dust opacities, but are unlikely to be the cause of such features in general. Failure to account for EBL extinction can also give rise to a non-negligible underestimate of intragroup and intracluster light at the faintest surface brightness levels currently probed. Finally, we discuss how EBL extinction effects may be exploited to provide an independent constraint on the surface brightness of the EBL, using a combination of surface photometry and direct star counts.

  2. Classical photometry of prefractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shkuratov, Yuriy; Petrov, Dmitriy; Videen, Gorden

    2003-11-01

    Using the scale invariance of classical photometry, we develop an approach to finding the photometric function of prefractal structures that form a random topography. The photometric function of the prefractal surfaces is found as the general solution of the resulting differential equation in partial derivatives. The function depends on two parameters: the number of hierarchical levels of the prefractal structures and the roughness parameter of the single-level generation. As a limiting case, the approach includes our previous theory that considered fractoids.

  3. Surface Photometry of NGC 4656/4657

    SciTech Connect

    Stayton, L.C.; Angione, R.J.; Talbert, F.D.

    1983-05-01

    An analysis by surface photometry of the galaxy system NGC 4656/4657 yields the following results. First, NGC 4656 and NGC 4657 appear to be parts of the same galaxy. Second, the system bears a strong resemblance to both the SMC and NGC 55. Third, although the outermost isophotes in B and G light show coincidences with radio continuum, we found no conclusive optical indications of an interaction with the galaxy NGC 4631.

  4. Surface photometry of WINGS galaxies with GASPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Bindoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moretti, A.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Varela, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present the B, V, and K band surface photometry catalogs obtained by running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey with isophotal areas larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg. Methods: The luminosity growth curves of stars and galaxies in a given catalog relative to a given cluster image were obtained simultaneously by slicing the image with a fixed surface brightness step in several SExtractor runs. Then, using a single Sersic law convolved with a space-varying point spread function (PSF), GASPHOT performed a simultaneous χ2 best-fit of the major- and minor-axis luminosity growth curves of galaxies. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT, and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy that is generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results: The GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law that fit the luminosity profiles for each galaxy and for each photometric band. They are the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (RA, Dec), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b/a), and a flag parameter (QFLAG) that generally indicates the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41 463 galaxies in the B band, 42 275 in the V band, and 71 687 in the K band. The bright early-type galaxies have higher Sersic indices and larger effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general, the effective radii increase systematically from the K to the V and B band. Conclusions: The GASPHOT photometry agrees well with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, and with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. In particular, the direct comparison of structural parameters derived by different

  5. Surface Photometry of Local Volume Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shoko; van Zee, Liese; Lee, Janice C.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Funes, Jose G.

    2009-08-01

    We propose to obtain UBVR images of a statistically complete sample of spiral and irregular galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey to investigate the correlation between past star formation activity and other physical properties such as SFR, dust content, and metallicity. The proposed optical imaging observations of 34 galaxies (27 southern, 7 northern) will be combined with existing UV, H(alpha), and IR observations, and will serve to nearly complete the optical imaging coverage of the full LVL sample of 258 galaxies. As expected for a volume limited sample, the majority of galaxies targeted here are low luminosity dwarf galaxies. The observed optical colors, in addition to optical-IR colors, will be compared with stellar population models to estimate the past history of star formation in these low mass galaxies and to provide constraints on the stellar mass-to-light ratios. The observed surface photometry will also allow us to study the photometric properties, the morphology, and spatial distributions of the different stellar populations in these low mass systems.

  6. Surface photometry of comet P/Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Spinrad, H.

    1985-01-01

    A scheme to clean cometary digital images from offending background-star trails, and this technique has been applied to a pair of deep Kitt Peak 4-m plates of comet P/Encke, taken in October 1980. Simultaneous and subsequent digital spectra have been obtained at Lick Observatory. The non-polluted coma images show a strong asymmetric sunward-oriented fan/jet, and an extended and rounder (mostly gaseous) main coma, out to approximately 100,000 km radius. The stellar-trail point-spread function has a narrow width (sigma approximately 0.6 arcsec), so that spatial resolution better than approximately 300 km is achieved at the comet. The photometric gradient near the nucleus is very steep, strongly suggesting an icy-grain component which evaporates quickly (at radii equal to or less than 500 km) in the sunlight. Further from the nucleus, the profile becomes shallower, bluer, and more gas dominated. The effect of solar radiation pressure on C2, CN, and other molecules is probably responsible for the rounding of the outer, fainter isophotes. The source of the molecules is likely to be larger than the nucleus itself, and a substantial fraction may originate in the jet. The technique described here may also be applicable in surface photometry of galaxies, in cases where the heavy image pollution by foreground stars is present.

  7. Surface photometry of comet P/Encke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Spinrad, H.

    1985-05-01

    A scheme to clean cometary digital images from offending background-star trails, and this technique has been applied to a pair of deep Kitt Peak 4-m plates of comet P/Encke, taken in October 1980. Simultaneous and subsequent digital spectra have been obtained at Lick Observatory. The non-polluted coma images show a strong asymmetric sunward-oriented fan/jet, and an extended and rounder (mostly gaseous) main coma, out to approximately 100,000 km radius. The stellar-trail point-spread function has a narrow width (sigma approximately 0.6 arcsec), so that spatial resolution better than approximately 300 km is achieved at the comet. The photometric gradient near the nucleus is very steep, strongly suggesting an icy-grain component which evaporates quickly (at radii equal to or less than 500 km) in the sunlight. Further from the nucleus, the profile becomes shallower, bluer, and more gas dominated. The effect of solar radiation pressure on C2, CN, and other molecules is probably responsible for the rounding of the outer, fainter isophotes. The source of the molecules is likely to be larger than the nucleus itself, and a substantial fraction may originate in the jet. The technique described here may also be applicable in surface photometry of galaxies, in cases where the heavy image pollution by foreground stars is present.

  8. Multicolor surface photometry of powerful radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    CCD images of 72 powerful radio galaxies have been obtained with the KPNO 2.1m, 4m and CTIO 4m telescopes utilizing B, V, and R filters to study the colors and other photometric properties of these large systems. The GASP software package was used for the data reduction and detailed 2-d surface photometry. In addition, image modeling techniques were employed to investigate the contributions to galaxy properties by point-like nuclear sources seen in some of these galaxies. It was found that powerful radio galaxies show a much higher frequency than normal bright ellipticals of having optical morphologies which deviate from elliptical symmetry. Approximately 50% of the sample exhibit non-elliptically symmetric isophotes. These prominent distortions are present at surface brightness levels of {le} 25 V mag/(arc sec){sup 2}. In addition, a large fraction ({approximately}50%) of the remaining radio galaxies without the aforementioned morphological peculiarities have large isophotal twists ({Delta}P.A. {ge} 10{degree}) or ellipticity gradients. Significantly {approximately}50% of the galaxies with strong optical emission lines in their spectra display optically peculiar structures very similar to those found by Toomre and Toomre (1972) in their simulations of interacting disk galaxies. The galaxies with weak emission lines in their spectra are less frequently ({approximately}10%) distorted from elliptical shape. Those that are exhibit features like isophote twists, double nuclei and close companion galaxies embedded in the radio galaxy optical isophotes. The (B-V) colors of many of the powerful radio galaxies with strong emission lines are blue relative to normal giant ellipticals at the same redshift.

  9. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  10. BVRI SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF ISOLATED GALAXY TRIPLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Toledo, H. M.; Mendez-Hernandez, H.; Aceves, H.; OlguIn, L. E-mail: hmendez@astroscu.unam.mx E-mail: lorenzo@astro.uson.mx

    2011-03-15

    of the late-type triplet components relative to an isolated galaxy control sample is also interpreted as consistent with interactions in physically bounded aggregates. Our results lead us to suggest that non-negligible populations of physical triplets might be found in complete and well-observed samples. We provide individual mosaics for the 54 galaxies containing (1) logarithmic-scaled R-band images, (2) R-band sharp/filtered images, (3) (B - I) color index maps, (4) RGB images from the SDSS database, (5) co-added J + H + K images generated from the 2MASS archives that were also sharp/filtered, and (6) {epsilon}, position angle radial profiles from a surface photometry analysis of (a) the R band and (b) the co-added near-infrared images, all used for the present analysis.

  11. The photometry of flat, basaltic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. R.; Meador, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A photometer was developed and successfully operated to obtain photometric measurements on several flat, particulate surfaces of basalt for coplanar scattering geometries. The test materials were two size ranges each of two different basalts with significantly different albedos. The measurements include a range of phase angles from 30 to 80 degrees and were obtained by varying the angles of incidence and emission such that the phase angle remained constant. The data were used elsewhere in the verification of the Meador-Weaver photometric function and are presented here in the form of Minnaert plots. In this form the data offered the first support for the accuracy of the Meador-Weaver photometric function because of a deviation of the data from a straight line trend at larger departures from the mirror point geometry. This trend is predicted by the Meador-Weaver function but not by the Minnaert function. The failure of photometric data to support the Minnaert function was not evident in earlier measurements because of the restriction of planetary data to small departures from the mirror point geometry and to small values of the phase angle.

  12. CCD surface photometry of galaxies with dynamical data. II. UBR photometry of 39 elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Peletier, R.F.; Davies, R.L.; Davis, L.E.; Illingworth, G.D.; Cawson, M. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA National Optical Astronomical Observatory, Tucson, AZ Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Manchester Victoria Univ. )

    1990-10-01

    Intrinsic properties of elliptical galaxies and the mechanisms of their formation and evolution are discussed on the basis of high-precision, multicolor, surface photometry of 39 elliptical galaxies and measurements of rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles. Using the data collected, a number of correlations between the characteristic parameters of the stellar population of the galaxies have been made to explore their structure and kinematics. The luminosity dependence of color gradients is a good discriminant among various models of galaxy formation. The lowest luminosity galaxies in the sample do not show any color gradients. They have boxy isophotes, and are also rotationally flattened. These properties may be related to the fact that they are companions of larger ellipsoidal systems and it could also provide an important clue to the formation of ellipticals. 78 refs.

  13. UIT Ultraviolet Surface Photometry of the Spiral Galaxy M74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. H.; Greason, M. R.; Offenberg, J. D.; Bohlin, R. C.; Cheng, K. P.; O'Connell, R. W.; Roberts, M. R.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, E. P.; Angione, R. J.; Talbert, F. D.; Stecher, T. P.

    1993-05-01

    UV photometry from Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) images at 1520 Angstroms (magnitudes mbone) and 2490 Angstroms (maone) of the spiral galaxy M74 (NGC628) is compared with ha, R, V, and B surface photometry and models. M74's surface brightness profiles have central peaks with exponential falloffs; the profiles' exponential scale lengths increase with decreasing continuum wavelength. The slope of the continuum-subtracted ha profile is between those of FUV and NUV profiles, consistent with related origins of ha and UV emission in extreme Population I material. M74's color profiles have small gradients, all becoming bluer with increasing radius. The UIT color (mbone-maone) averages near 0.0, the color of an A0 star, over the central 20 arcsec radius, and slopes from ~ -0.2 to ~ -0.4 from 20 to 200 arcsec. Spiral arms dominate surface photometry colors; interarm regions are slightly redder. In the UV, M74's nuclear region resembles disk/spiral arm material in color and morphology, unlike M81. (mbone-maone) colors and models of M74's central region clearly demonstrate that there are no O or B stars in the central 10 arcsec. M74's (mbone-maone) profile is similar to M33's but is ~ 0.5 mag redder. M74 is ~ 0.4 mag bluer than M81 in its outer disk. We investigate explanations for both the color profiles and the differences among the galaxies. M74's maone-V and mbone-V color profiles cannot be explained by a disk of uniform color behind a screen of dust with a known reddening function, distributed like the neutral gas with a fixed gas-to-dust ratio. Known abundance variations could produce the observed color gradient in M74; however, evolutionary cluster models show that sensible time parameters, including star formation start time and exponential decay rate, also produce the observed colors of M74, M33, and M81.

  14. Surface photometry of Virgo cluster galaxies - Barred galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Photographic surface photometry in B and V is presented for three barred galaxies in the Virgo cluster: N4548, N4596, and N4608. Intercomparisons of luminosity and color profiles and standard photometric parameters indicate that for these galaxies: (1) the nuclear component follows the fourth-root-of-radius luminosity law for both B and V, (2) the luminosity profiles along the bar show a characteristic shoulder with a slight fall in B-V color profile at the brightest point in the bar, the strength of the effect declining from N4548 to N4608, (3) the integrated bar component is slightly bluer than the nucleus, and (4) as the disk, arm, and ring components contribute less to the total luminosity of the system, the contribution of the bar increases as does the equivalent gradient.

  15. Surface photometry of a sample of elliptical and S0 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    De carvalho, R.R.; Da costa, L.N.; Djorgovski, S. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1991-08-01

    The results are reported of surface photometry of 38 early-type galaxies, located mainly in the Fornax Cluster. Detailed comparisons with previously published work are given along with internal and external error estimates for all quantities, and some serious systematic discrepancies in the older aperture photometry of some of the galaxies in the present sample are pointed out. 15 refs.

  16. CCD surface photometry of field galaxies. I - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Images of 105 galaxies selected from a larger complete sample of intrinsically luminous galaxies have been obtained for the purpose of computing surface brightness profiles. The intensity profiles along the major and minor axes are computed by a method in which elliptical contours whose position angle and ellipticity are allowed to vary with radius are fitted to the true isophotes of a galaxy. The resulting profiles and ellipse parameters are listed for each object. An extensive comparison of the present photometry with that of other workers is made to assess the reliability of the data. For most objects, additional photometric information is given, including an isophotal radius and magnitude within a limiting isophote of 24.0 mag/sq arcsec, an approximate total magnitude, the effective radius containing one-half the total light, and the mean surface brightness inside this radius. A full analysis of the data is deferred to a second paper where the profiles will be decomposed into bulge and disk components.

  17. Surface Photometry of Reverberation-Mapped Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    I present a statistical analysis of the surface photometry obtained for a sample of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archival images of the host galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGN), whose time-delay between continuum and broad emission line variations have been analyzed (i.e., reverberation mapping). For quiescent galaxies, strong correlations exist between central black hole mass and host galaxy structure. If there are similar correlations for AGN between central black hole masses derived from reverberation mapping and the host galaxy structure that I have derived from archival HST images, this would imply some validation of the assumptions underlying reverberation mapping concerning the structure, kinematics, and orientation of the broad line regions in AGN.The correlations for quiescent galaxies bewteen central black hole mass and host galaxy structure imply that there might be a strong causal connection between the formation and evolution of the black hole and the galaxy bulge. A current hypothesis is that bulges, black holes, and quasars formed, grew, or turned on as parts of the same process, in part because the collapse or merger of bulges might provide a rich fuel supply to a central black hole. One way of testing this hypothesis would be to plot AGN as a function of redshift on these correlations. However, two severe obstacles limit the ability to measure black hole masses in AGN using HST to analyze the central stellar and/or gas dynamics: (1) since spatial resolution becomes more limited at larger distances, only two reverberation-mapped AGN are close enough to Earth to render the analysis feasible, and (2) it isdifficult to obtain useful spectra of the stars and/or gas in the presence of the bright nonstellar nucleus. The most useful alternative is to exploit reverberation mapping, which uses the time delay in a given AGN between variations in the continuum emission and broad emission lines.

  18. Planetary surface photometry and imaging: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Goguen, Jay D

    2014-10-01

    Spacecraft have visited and returned many thousands of images and spectra of all of the planets, many of their moons, several asteroids, and a few comet nuclei during the golden age of planetary exploration. The signal in each pixel of each image or spectral channel is a measurement of the radiance of scattered sunlight into a specific direction. The information on the structure and composition of the surface that is contained in variation of the radiance with scattering geometry and wavelength, including polarization state, has only just begun to be exploited and is the topic of this review. The uppermost surfaces of these bodies are mainly composed of particles that are continuously generated by impacts of micrometeoroids and larger impactors. Models of light scattering by distributions of sizes and irregular shapes of particles and by closely packed particles within a surface are challenging. These are active topics of research where considerable progress has recently been made. We focus on the surfaces of bodies lacking atmospheres.These surfaces are diverse and their morphologies give evidence of their evolution by impacts and resurfacing by a variety of processes including down slope movement and electrostatic transport of particles, gravitational accumulation of debris, volatile outgassing and migration, and magnetospheric interactions. Sampling of scattering geometries and spatial resolution is constrained by spacecraft trajectories. However, the large number of archived images and spectra demand more quantitative interpretation. The scattering geometry dependence of the radiance is underutilized and promises constraints on the compositions and structure of the surface for materials that lack diagnostic wavelength dependence. The general problem is considered in terms of the lunar regolith for which samples have been returned to Earth.

  19. Surface properties and photometry of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B.; Wong, F.; Mosher, J.

    1990-03-01

    Voyager photographic images and photopolarimetric experiment observations have been used to obtain the spectral geometric and Bond albedos, phase integrals, color-dependent phase coefficients, and integrated solar phase-curve parameters of the five Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon. While the results obtained confirm those of Nelson et al. (1987) and Veverka et al. (1987) that these five largest Uranian satellites constitute a unique class of low-albedo and spectrally flat objects, attention is presently given to important differences among the five moons' surface physical properties.

  20. Surface properties and photometry of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie; Wong, Felicity; Mosher, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Voyager photographic images and photopolarimetric experiment observations have been used to obtain the spectral geometric and Bond albedos, phase integrals, color-dependent phase coefficients, and integrated solar phase-curve parameters of the five Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon. While the results obtained confirm those of Nelson et al. (1987) and Veverka et al. (1987) that these five largest Uranian satellites constitute a unique class of low-albedo and spectrally flat objects, attention is presently given to important differences among the five moons' surface physical properties.

  1. Studying Titan's surface photometry in the 5 microns atmospheric window with the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, T.; Altobelli, N.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Philippe, S.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the influence of methane gas and a thick aerosols haze in the atmosphere, Titan's surface is only visible in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centered at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns with the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The 5 microns atmospheric window constitutes the only one being almost insensitive to the haze scattering and which presents only a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by the instrument. Despite these advantages leading to the almost direct view of the surface, the 5 microns window is also the noisiest spectral window of the entire VIMS spectrum (an effect highly dependent on the time exposure used for the observations), and it is not totally free from atmospheric contributions, enough to keep "artefacts" in mosaics of several thousands of cubes due to atmospheric and surface photometric effects amplified by the very heterogeneous viewing conditions between each Titan flyby. At first order, a lambertian surface photometry at 5 microns has been used as an initial parameter in order to estimate atmospheric opacity and surface photometry in all VIMS atmospheric windows and to determine the albedo of the surface, yet unknown, both using radiative transfer codes on single cubes or empirical techniques on global hyperspectral mosaics. Other studies suggested that Titan's surface photometry would not be uniquely lambertian but would also contain anisotropic lunar-like contributions. In the present work, we aim at constraining accurately the surface photometry of Titan and residual atmospheric absorption effects in this 5 microns window using a comprehensive study of relevant sites located at various latitudes. Those include bright and dark (dunes) terrains, 5-microns bright terrains (Hotei Regio and Tui Regio), the Huygens Landing Site and high latitudes polar lakes and seas. The VIMS 2004 to 2014 database, composed of more than 40,000 hyperspectral cubes acquired on

  2. Comparison of the ISOPHOT and COBE/DIRBE Absolute Photometry in the Low Surface Brightness Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Héraudeau, Ph.; Ábrahám, P.; del Burgo, C.; Klaas, U.; Kiss, C.

    The DIRBE database is the most extensively used reference for absolute sky surface brightness in the infrared. We performed a thorough analysis of the ISOPHOT surface brightness calibration using a large number of observations. We have built up a large data base of suitable fields where an ISOPHOT vs. DIRBE comparison can be performed. This includes all large rasters of low surface brightness, absolute photometry observations and minimaps in the ISO archive. We use this database for a systematic comparison of the ISOPHOT and COBE/DIRBE surface brightness calibration for all filters and all detectors of the ISOPHOT instrument. We describe the steps of the comparison: a) retrieve DIRBE values for each ISOPHOT observation, b) interpolate DIRBE values at the proper wavelength; c) colour correct the data and d) take into account the smaller beam size of ISOPHOT using the ISSA maps. Finally we present our preliminary results with PIA V7 for all filters as transformations between the 2 photometric systems.

  3. Radiative transfer in the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. III - Interpretation of lunar photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumme, K.; Irvine, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Narrowband and UBV photoelectric phase curves of the entire lunar disk and surface photometry of some craters have been interpreted using a newly developed generalized radiative transfer theory for planetary regoliths. The data are well fitted by the theory, yielding information on both macroscopic and microscopic lunar properties. Derived values for the integrated disk geometric albedo are considerably higher than quoted previously, because of the present inclusion of an accurately determined opposition effect. The mean surface roughness, defined as the ratio of the height to the radius of a typical irregularity, is found to be 0.9 + or - 0.1, or somewhat less than the mean value of 1.2 obtained for the asteroids. From the phase curves, wavelength-dependent values of the single scattering albedo and the Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry factor for the average surface particle are derived.

  4. Surface waves affect frontogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Hamlington, Peter E.; Van Roekel, Luke P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of momentum, angular momentum, vorticity, and energy budgets of a submesoscale front undergoing frontogenesis driven by an upper-ocean, submesoscale eddy field in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The LES solves the wave-averaged, or Craik-Leibovich, equations in order to account for the Stokes forces that result from interactions between nonbreaking surface waves and currents, and resolves both submesoscale eddies and boundary layer turbulence down to 4.9 m × 4.9 m × 1.25 m grid scales. It is found that submesoscale frontogenesis differs from traditional frontogenesis theory due to four effects: Stokes forces, momentum and kinetic energy transfer from submesoscale eddies to frontal secondary circulations, resolved turbulent stresses, and unbalanced torque. In the energy, momentum, angular momentum, and vorticity budgets for the frontal overturning circulation, the Stokes shear force is a leading-order contributor, typically either the second or third largest source of frontal overturning. These effects violate hydrostatic and thermal wind balances during submesoscale frontogenesis. The effect of the Stokes shear force becomes stronger with increasing alignment of the front and Stokes shear and with a nondimensional scaling. The Stokes shear force and momentum transfer from submesoscale eddies significantly energize the frontal secondary circulation along with the buoyancy.

  5. Near-infrared surface photometry and morphology in virgo cluster spiral galaxy nuclear regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents very high spatial resolution (seeing 0.75 arcsec FWHM) K band surface photometry of 15 Virgo cluster spiral galaxy nuclear regions (radii less then 1 kpc). It presents B and I CCD images of 13 of these galaxies. The goals of the study were: (1) to begin to establish a K band baseline of normal spiral galaxy nuclear regions against which peculiar galaxies may be compared, (2) to provide better contsraints on N-body models, and (3) to complement near-infrared studies of large scale structure in spiral galaxies with very high resolution imaging of the important nuclear regions. The principle findings are (1) between 1/4 and 1/3 of these nuclear regions show K band evidence of traxiality, (2) approximately 1/2 of these galaxies have axisymmetric nuclear regions, and (3) NGC 4321 has a bar that is not detectable in the optical images.

  6. Disk Galaxies in the Outer Local Supercluster: Optical CCD Surface Photometry and Distribution of Galaxy Disk Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, N. Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report new B-band CCD surface photometry on a sample of 76 disk galaxies brighter than BT = 14.5 mag in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies, which are confined within a volume located in the outer part of the Local Supercluster.

  7. Detailed surface photometry of the cD galaxies NGC 4839 and NGC 4874

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Gamal B.; Shaban, Eman A.; Amin, Magdy Y.; Rassem, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    We present a detailed photometric study of the cD galaxies NGC 4839 and NGC 4874 based on the technique of surface photometry by fitting ellipses to the isophotes of the galaxies in the u, g, r, i, and z bands using Data Release 7 (DR7) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The motivation of this paper is to study the properties (e.g. break radius and surface brightness, color gradient, etc.) of the extended envelope of the two cD galaxies. The surface brightness profile in each band is obtained and fitted to the de Vaucouleurs r 1/4 model. A deviation of the observed profile brighter than the fitted r 1/4 model is noticed especially in the outer part of each galaxy. The profiles of ellipticity, position angle, B4 and shifts with respect to the center of each isophote are also obtained. The color index profiles, u-g, g-r, r-i, and i-z are also obtained and no significant color gradients are noticed except in the outer parts of the two galaxies. The integrated magnitude in each band and color indices are obtained and found to be in good agreement with the published ones.

  8. HST observations of globular clusters in M 31. 1: Surface photometry of 13 objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecci, F. Fusi; Battistini, P.; Bendinelli, O.; Bonoli, F.; Cacciari, C.; Djorgovski, S.; Federici, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Parmeggiani, G.; Weir, N.

    1994-01-01

    We present the initial results of a study of globular clusters in M 31, using the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The sample of objects consists of 13 clusters spanning a range of properties. Three independent image deconvolution techniques were used in order to compensate for the optical problems of the HST, leading to mutually fully consistent results. We present detailed tests and comparisons to determine the reliability and limits of these deconvolution methods, and conclude that high-quality surface photometry of M 31 globulars is possible with the HST data. Surface brightness profiles have been extracted, and core radii, half-light radii, and central surface brightness values have been measured for all of the clusters in the sample. Their comparison with the values from ground-based observations indicates the later to be systematically and strongly biased by the seeing effects, as it may be expected. A comparison of the structural parameters with those of the Galactic globulars shows that the structural properties of the M 31 globulars are very similar to those of their Galactic counterparts. A candidate for a post-core-collapse cluster, Bo 343 = G 105, has been already identified from these data; this is the first such detection in the M 31 globular cluster system.

  9. DEEP K{sub s} -NEAR-INFRARED SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF 80 DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Fingerhut, Robin L.; McCall, Marshall L.; Argote, Mauricio; Cluver, Michelle E.; Nishiyama, Shogo; Rekola, Rami T. F.; Richer, Michael G.; Vaduvescu, Ovidiu; Woudt, Patrick A. E-mail: mccall@yorku.c E-mail: mcluver@ipac.caltech.ed E-mail: rareko@utu.f E-mail: ovidiuv@ing.iac.e

    2010-06-10

    We present deep near-infrared (K{sub s}) images and surface photometry for 80 dwarf irregular galaxies (dIs) within {approx}5 Mpc of the Milky Way. The galaxy images were obtained at five different facilities between 2004 and 2006. The image reductions and surface photometry have been performed using methods specifically designed for isolating faint galaxies from the high and varying near-infrared sky level. Fifty-four of the 80 dIs have surface brightness profiles which could be fit to a hyperbolic-secant (sech) function, while the remaining profiles could be fit to the sum of a sech and a Gaussian function. From these fits, we have measured central surface brightnesses, scale lengths, and integrated magnitudes. This survey is part of a larger study of the connection between large-scale structure and the global properties of dIs, the hypothesized building-blocks of more massive galaxies.

  10. UIT: Ultraviolet surface photometry of the spiral galaxy M74 (NGC 628)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, Robert H.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Greason, Michael R.; Offenberg, Joel D.; Angione, Ronald J.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Cheng, K. P.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    Ultraviolet photometry, obtained from Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) images at 1520 A (far-UV; magnitudes m(152)) and 2490 A (near-UV; magnitudes m(249)), of the spiral galaxy M74 (NGC 628) is compared with H-alpha, R, V, and B surface photometry and with models. M74's surface brightness profiles have a central peak with an exponential falloff; the exponential scale lengths of the profiles increase with decreasing wavelength for the broad-band images. The slope of the continuum-subtracted H-alpha profile is intermediate between those of far-UV and near-UV profiles, consistent with the related origins of H-alpha and UV emission in extreme Population I material. M74's color profiles all become bluer with increasing radius. The (m(152) - m(249)) color as measured by UIT averages near 0.0 (the color of an A0 star) over the central 20 sec radius and decreases from approximately -0.2 to approximately -0.4 from 20 sec to 200 sec. The spiral arms are the dominant component of the surface photometry colors; interarm regions are slightly redder. In the UV, M74's nuclear region resembles its disk/spiral arm material in colors and morphology, unlike galaxies such as M81. No UV 'bulge' is apparent. The m(152) - m(249) colors and models of M74's central region clearly demonstrate that there is no significant population of O or B stars present in the central 10 sec. M74's UV morphology and (m(152) - m(249)) color profiles are similar to those of M33, although M74 is approximately 0.5 mag redder. M81 has a smooth UV bulge which is much redder than the nuclear regions of M74 and M33. M74 is approximately 0.4 mag bluer than M81 in its outer disk, although M81 has bright UV sources only in spiral arms more than 5 kpc from its center. We investigate possible explanations for the color profiles of the galaxies and the differences among the galaxies: abundances; reddening due to internal dust; interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) variations, and the history of formation of the

  11. Stellar populations in edge-on galaxies from deep CCD surface photometry, 1: NGC 5907

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Heather L.; Boroson, Todd A.; Harding, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We present extremely deep charge coupled device (CCD) surface photometry of the edge-on Sc galaxy NGC 5907. Our data reach reliably to a surface brightness of R=27 mag/sq arcsec, some two magnitudes fainter than any previous work. We obtained this improvement using a 2048X2048 CCD with a wide (approximately 24 min) field, which made it possible to sky subtract directly from the galaxy frame, and by taking many dark sky flatfields. Our analysis of these data, using a full 2D model fitting procedure with a detailed error model, confirm the thin disk parameters of van der Kruit & Searle (1981). In particular, we confirm that the galaxy's disk has a radial cutoff and a constant scale height with radius. We find evidence for a stellar warp in this system, which has the same orientation as the H I warp. Our deep data also confirm that NGC 5907 has no thick disk. This suggests that theories of thick disk formation from star formation in the early stages of disk collapse, or by secular heating mechanisms, are unlikely to be correct, because they would predict that every galaxy would have a thick disk. Thick disk formation from the accretion of satellite galaxies is more likely.

  12. NGC 4314. I - Visible and short-wavelength infrared surface photometry of the nucleus and bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. F.; Higdon, J. L.; Tollestrup, E. V.; Hahn, J. M.; Harvey, P. M.

    1992-03-01

    BVI (TI CCD) and JHK (University of Texas IR Camera) surface photometry of NGC 4314, an SB (rs)ap anemic spiral with a nuclear ring containing recent star formation, is presented. The shortwave IR (SWIR) frames reveal a nuclear bar of length 2 arcsec at PA of 0 deg. The nuclear ring and associated dust were detected in all SWIR color indices. A nuclear spiral was detected in the visible and SWIR just exterior to the ring. Extremely low-amplitude spiral-shaped deficits were found in the stellar distribution in the SWIR in this same region. These are attributed to dust, since CO is detectable at or near these locations. Average minor-axis profiles show this galaxy to have a nuclear bulge obeying the de Vaucouleurs r exp 1/4 law for values in the range 2-7 arcsec. The extinction and scattering characteristics of dust near the sites of recent star formation in the nuclear ring are discussed.

  13. The stellar content of central dominant galaxies. I. CCD surface photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, G.; Visvanathan, N.; Carter, D. Royal Greenwich Observatory, Santa Cruz de la Palma )

    1990-08-01

    UBVRI CCD surface photometry and color gradients are presented for 10 central dominant galaxies (CDGs), comprising gE, D, and cD morphological types and covering the range of Bautz-Morgan cluster types. The mean magnitude of the color gradients to a radius of 20 kpc is in agreement with those found in recent CCD studies of bright ellipticals in Virgo. The size of the gradients are consistent with N-body model predictions in which these galaxies are formed or enhanced by merger events. Parameters such as ellipticity, position angle of the major axis, and deviation from ellipticity for eight single-nucleus CDGs are also given. All galaxies show large changes in ellipticity and position angle with radius, and can be considered similar to Kormendy's T3 class of galaxies, in which tidal effects on isophotal structure are very probable. Three out of eight single-nucleus CDGs, NGC 1399, NGC 6876 and IC 1860, show evidence of isochromal flattening inside 10 kpc. Five (three boxy, two disk) out of the eight single-nucleus CDGs display nonelliptical isophotes. 111 refs.

  14. THE MID-INFRARED TULLY-FISHER RELATION: SPITZER SURFACE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Courtois, Helene M.; Tully, R. Brent

    2012-11-01

    The availability of photometric imaging of several thousand galaxies with the Spitzer Space Telescope enables a mid-infrared calibration of the correlation between luminosity and rotation in spiral galaxies. The most important advantage of the new calibration in the 3.6 {mu}m band, IRAC Channel 1, is photometric consistency across the entire sky. Additional advantages are minimal obscuration, observations of flux dominated by old stars, and sensitivity to low surface brightness levels due to favorable backgrounds. Roughly 3000 galaxies have been observed through Spitzer cycle 7 and images of these are available from the Spitzer archive. In cycle 8, a program called Cosmic Flows with Spitzer was initiated, which will increase the available sample of spiral galaxies with inclinations greater than 45 Degree-Sign from face-on that are suitable for distance measurements by 1274. This paper describes procedures, based on the photometry package Archangel, that are being employed to analyze both the archival and new data in a uniform way. We give results for 235 galaxies, our calibrator sample for the Tully-Fisher relation. Galaxy magnitudes are determined with uncertainties held below 0.05 mag for normal spiral systems. A subsequent paper will describe the calibration of the [3.6] luminosity-rotation relation.

  15. Near-infrared surface photometry of a sample of barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadotti, D. A.; Athanassoula, E.; Carrasco, L.; Bosma, A.; de Souza, R. E.; Recillas, E.

    2007-11-01

    We have obtained deep J and Ks images of a sample of nine barred galaxies in order to collect a reliable and homogeneous set of images to which N-body simulations of barred galaxies will be compared. The observations were performed using the new near-infrared camera available at the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro (OAGH) in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. We present the results of surface photometry techniques applied to the observed images, as well as to the deprojected images. These results include radial profiles of surface brightness (elliptically averaged), colour, position angle, ellipticity and the b4 Fourier component. In addition, we present isophotal maps, colour maps, surface brightness profiles along the bar major and minor axes, characteristic radial scalelengths and bar length estimates. We discuss how projection effects can influence these measurements and the uncertainties introduced by deprojecting galaxy images. We show that analytical expressions can be used to obtain reliable estimates of deprojected bar lengths, ellipticities and position angles directly from the observed images. These expressions are based on the assumption that the outer parts of the bar are vertically thin, as shown by theoretical work. The usefulness of our data in addressing issues on bar formation and evolution is also discussed. In particular, we present results showing a steep drop in the ellipticity profile, as expected for bar formation processes in which the dark matter halo plays a fundamental role. Furthermore, we show that the location of this drop is a good indicator of the end of the bar in strongly barred galaxies, as predicted by numerical models.

  16. Photometric calibration of NGS/POSS and ESO/SRC plates using the NOAO PDS measuring engine. II - Surface photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, Roc M.; Low, Frank J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to calibrate surface photometry of faint sources measured from direct photographic plates, such as those of the NGS/POSS and ESO/SRC Sky Survey. This calibration procedure does not require scanning sensitometer spots on the plates, but instead uses measurements of the brightness profiles of many faint stars of known brightness to fit a linearized approximation to the characteristic curve. The approximation is valid for only low- to medium-density emulsions, so this technique is appropriate only for relatively faint emission. Comparison between measurements of representative extended sources on the NGS/POSS and CCD images indicates that surface photometry can be obtained from the Sky Survey plates accurate to 0.1-0.3 mag in the range mu(B) between 23 and 27 and mu(R) between 22 and 26 mag/sq arcsec.

  17. Multicolor surface photometry of a sample of low luminosity radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal Kumar; Pandey, S. K.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Baburao Pandge, Mahadev

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed multiband photometric study of five galaxies, selected from a sample of low luminosity early-type galaxies from B2 sample, which have mpg = 15.7, mV = 16.5, redshifts up to 0.2, radio powers P408 = 1023 - 1026.5 W Hz-1 and between 1022 - 1025 W Hz-1 at 1.4 GHz. We have used observed BVR and Hα images from IGO 2m telescope (Pune, India) and 2m HCT, Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO Hanle, India), and archival multiband data from SDSS (ugriz), 2MASS (JHKs ), WISE, Spitzer (mid-IR), XMM, CHANDRA (X-ray), UV (GALEX) and radio from VLA, IRAM for this study.We used standard technique of surface photometry by fitting ellipses to the isophotes for studying the distribution of light in the galaxies by studying their surface brightness profiles, ellipticity profiles, position angle profiles, variation of center of isophotes along semi-major axis, shapes of isophotes, radial color gradients, twists in isophotes and fine structure variations from smooth light profile. The obtained surface brightness profiles are fitted to the core-Sersic model for decomposing the galaxy light profiles and quantify the radial stellar distributions of the sample galaxies.The multiband color index profiles, e.g. u-g, g-r, r-i, i-z, B-R, B-V, J-Hs , J-Ks , H-Ks , R-Ks , 3.4-4.6 μm, 4.6-12 μm (mid-IR) and FUV-NUV(UV), are obtained and combined with various maps e.g . unsharp-masked images, residual maps, quotient maps, dust extinction maps, Hα emission maps, CO intensity maps, diffuse X-ray emission maps and extinction curves of the galaxies to study the morphology, properties and physical correlations of different phases (e.g cool gas, dust, ionized gas and hot gases) of Inter Stellar Medium and to examine various star formation related processes in the galaxies.

  18. Astronomical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, Arne A.; Kaitchuck, Ronald H.

    A handbook of astronomical photometry is presented in a format amenable to both professional and amateur use. The fundamental equipment, procedures, theory, and applications of photometry are described. Photometric systems such as the UBV, M-K, and Stromgren classification methods are explained, together with statistical treatments of photometric data. Data reduction techniques and applications in air-mass calculations, the determination of first-order extinction, and for computing zero-point values are defined. Baseline standards such as solar, universal,and sidereal time, and dating methods are provided. Instructions for constructing photometer heads are given, and the operational principles and techniques for using pulse-counting and dc electronics are explored. Finally, observational techniques and applications of photoelectric photometry are suggested and targets are indicated. A review is also offered of the theoretical basis and computational tools involved in the science of astronomical photometry.

  19. Titan: Preliminary results on surface properties and photometry from VIMS observations of the early flybys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Hicks, M.D.; Clark, R.N.; Mosher, J.A.; McCord, T.B.; Jaumann, R.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Momary, T.; Simonelli, D.P.; Sicardy, B.

    2006-01-01

    Cassini observations of the surface of Titan offer unprecedented views of its surface through atmospheric windows in the 1-5 ??m region. Images obtained in windows for which the haze opacity is low can be used to derive quantitative photometric parameters such as albedo and albedo distribution, and physical properties such as roughness and particle characteristics. Images from the early Titan flybys, particularly T0, Ta, and T5 have been analyzed to create albedo maps in the 2.01 and 2.73 ??m windows. We find the average normal reflectance at these two wavelengths to be 0.15??0.02 and 0.035??0.003, respectively. Titan's surface is bifurcated into two albedo regimes, particularly at 2.01 ??m. Analysis of these two regimes to understand the physical character of the surface was accomplished with a macroscopic roughness model. We find that the two types of surface have substantially different roughness, with the low-albedo surface exhibiting mean slope angles of ???18??, and the high-albedo terrain having a much more substantial roughness with a mean slope angle of ???34??. A single-scattering phase function approximated by a one-term Henyey-Greenstein equation was also fit to each unit. Titan's surface is back-scattering (g???0.3-0.4), and does not exhibit substantially different backscattering behavior between the two terrains. Our results suggest that two distinct geophysical domains exist on Titan: a bright region cut by deep drainage channels and a relatively smooth surface. The two terrains are covered by a film or a coating of particles perhaps precipitated from the satellite's haze layer and transported by eolian processes. Our results are preliminary: more accurate values for the surface albedo and physical parameters will be derived as more data is gathered by the Cassini spacecraft and as a more complete radiative transfer model is developed from both Cassini orbiter and Huygens Lander measurements. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface roughness rather than surface chemistry essentially affects insect adhesion

    PubMed Central

    England, Matt W; Sato, Tomoya; Yagihashi, Makoto; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    Summary The attachment ability of ladybird beetles Coccinella septempunctata was systematically investigated on eight types of surface, each with different chemical and topographical properties. The results of traction force tests clearly demonstrated that chemical surface properties, such as static/dynamic de-wettability of water and oil caused by specific chemical compositions, had no significant effect on the attachment of the beetles. Surface roughness was found to be the dominant factor, strongly affecting the attachment ability of the beetles. PMID:27826522

  1. Surface roughness rather than surface chemistry essentially affects insect adhesion.

    PubMed

    England, Matt W; Sato, Tomoya; Yagihashi, Makoto; Hozumi, Atsushi; Gorb, Stanislav N; Gorb, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    The attachment ability of ladybird beetles Coccinella septempunctata was systematically investigated on eight types of surface, each with different chemical and topographical properties. The results of traction force tests clearly demonstrated that chemical surface properties, such as static/dynamic de-wettability of water and oil caused by specific chemical compositions, had no significant effect on the attachment of the beetles. Surface roughness was found to be the dominant factor, strongly affecting the attachment ability of the beetles.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Surface photometry of GHASP galaxies (Barbosa+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, C. E.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Amram, P.; Ferrari, F.; Russeil, D.; Epinat, B.; Perret, V.; Adami, C.; Marcelin, M.

    2016-04-01

    Our data set is constructed using new Rc-band observations taken at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, supplemented with Sloan Digital Sky Survey archival data, obtained with the purpose of deriving homogeneous photometric profiles and parameters. Our results include Rc-band surface brightness profiles for 170 galaxies and ugriz profiles for 108 of these objects. We catalogue several parameters of general interest for further reference, such as total magnitude, effective radius and isophotal parameters (magnitude, position angle, ellipticity and inclination). We also perform a structural decomposition of the surface brightness profiles using a multi-component method to separate discs from bulges and bars, and to observe the main scaling relations involving luminosities, sizes and maximum velocities. We determine the Rc-band Tully-Fisher relation using maximum velocities derived solely from Hα rotation curves for a sample of 80 galaxies, resulting in a slope of -8.1+/-0.5, zero-point of -3.0+/-1.0 and an estimated intrinsic scatter of 0.28+/-0.07. We note that, unlike the Tully-Fisher relation in the near-infrared derived for the same sample, no change in the slope of the relation is seen at the low-mass end (for galaxies with Vmax<125km/s). We suggest that this different behaviour of the Tully-Fisher relation (with the optical relation being described by a single power law while the near-infrared has two), may be caused by differences in the stellar mass-to-light ratio for galaxies with Vmax<125km/s. (4 data files).

  3. Surface photometry of brightest cluster galaxies and intracluster stars in ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, A. P.; Gao, L.; Guo, Q.; Frenk, C. S.; Jenkins, A.; Springel, V.; White, S. D. M.

    2015-08-01

    We simulate the phase-space distribution of stellar mass in nine massive Λ cold dark matter galaxy clusters by applying the semi-analytic particle tagging method of Cooper et al. to the Phoenix suite of high-resolution N-body simulations (M200 ≈ 7.5-33 × 1014 M⊙). The resulting surface brightness (SB) profiles of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) match well to observations. On average, stars formed in galaxies accreted by the BCG account for ≳90 per cent of its total mass (the remainder is formed in situ). In circular BCG-centred apertures, the superposition of multiple debris clouds (each ≳10 per cent of the total BCG mass) from different progenitors can result in an extensive outer diffuse component, qualitatively similar to a `cD envelope'. These clouds typically originate from tidal stripping at z ≲ 1 and comprise both streams and the extended envelopes of other massive galaxies in the cluster. Stars at very low SB contribute a significant fraction of the total cluster stellar mass budget: in the central 1 Mpc2 of a z ˜ 0.15 cluster imaged at SDSS-like resolution, our fiducial model predicts 80-95 per cent of stellar mass below a SB of μV ˜ 26.5 mag arcsec-2 is associated with accreted stars in the envelope of the BCG. The ratio of BCG stellar mass (including this diffuse component) to total cluster stellar mass is ˜30 per cent.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Surface Photometry of ESO-Uppsala Galaxies (Lauberts+ 1989)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauberts, A.; Valentijn, E. A.

    2006-04-01

    The 15467 southern galaxies in this catalog were scanned from 407 blue and 407 red original ESO-Schmidt plates using a PDS microdensitometer. The galaxies were selected from the ESO-Uppsala Catalogue (VII/34). The original selection criterion was a minimum visual angular diameter of 1arcmin. The plates were calibrated using a catalog of photo- electric standards of 1700 standard galaxies transformed to a photometric standard system (Cousins) created by the authors. The result is a catalog acquired in a homogeneous fashion for all types of galaxies in various environments. The extracted parameters include radial surface brightness profiles, magnitudes at several isophotal levels, colors, color gradients, effective radius parameters, structural parameters such as axial ratios, position angles, and profile gradients. The full version of the catalog, made of 190 columns, is available as the file "esolv.fit" in FITS table format. The ascii file "esolv1.dat" contains a subset of these columns which includes those parameters listed in the printed book version. Detailed discussion of the catalog creation is given in the published book version (ISBN 3-923524-31-5) (2 data files).

  5. Photutils: Photometry tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Larry; Sipocz, Brigitta; Robitaille, Thomas; Tollerud, Erik; Deil, Christoph; Vinícius, Zè; Barbary, Kyle; Günther, Hans Moritz; Bostroem, Azalee; Droettboom, Michael; Bray, Erik; Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Pickering, T. E.; Craig, Matt; Pascual, Sergio; Greco, Johnny; Donath, Axel; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Littlefair, Stuart; Barentsen, Geert; D'Eugenio, Francesco; Weaver, Benjamin Alan

    2016-09-01

    Photutils provides tools for detecting and performing photometry of astronomical sources. It can estimate the background and background rms in astronomical images, detect sources in astronomical images, estimate morphological parameters of those sources (e.g., centroid and shape parameters), and perform aperture and PSF photometry. Written in Python, it is an affiliated package of Astropy (ascl:1304.002).

  6. GHASP: an Hα kinematic survey of spiral galaxies - X. Surface photometry, decompositions and the Tully-Fisher relation in the Rc band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, C. E.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Amram, P.; Ferrari, F.; Russeil, D.; Epinat, B.; Perret, V.; Adami, C.; Marcelin, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present Rc-band surface photometry for 170 of the 203 galaxies in GHASP, the Gassendi H-alpha survey of spirals, a sample of late-type galaxies for which high-resolution Fabry-Perot Hα maps have previously been obtained. Our data set is constructed using new Rc-band observations taken at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, supplemented with Sloan Digital Sky Survey archival data, obtained with the purpose of deriving homogeneous photometric profiles and parameters. Our results include Rc-band surface brightness profiles for 170 galaxies and ugriz profiles for 108 of these objects. We catalogue several parameters of general interest for further reference, such as total magnitude, effective radius and isophotal parameters (magnitude, position angle, ellipticity and inclination). We also perform a structural decomposition of the surface brightness profiles using a multi-component method to separate discs from bulges and bars, and to observe the main scaling relations involving luminosities, sizes and maximum velocities. We determine the Rc-band Tully-Fisher relation using maximum velocities derived solely from Hα rotation curves for a sample of 80 galaxies, resulting in a slope of -8.1 ± 0.5, zero-point of -3.0 ± 1.0 and an estimated intrinsic scatter of 0.28 ± 0.07. We note that, unlike the Tully-Fisher relation in the near-infrared derived for the same sample, no change in the slope of the relation is seen at the low-mass end (for galaxies with Vmax < 125 km s-1). We suggest that this different behaviour of the Tully-Fisher relation (with the optical relation being described by a single power law while the near-infrared has two), may be caused by differences in the stellar mass-to-light ratio for galaxies with Vmax < 125 km s-1.

  7. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3° × 1° disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ∼0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  8. QDPHOT: Quick & Dirty PHOTometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    QDPHOT is a fast CCD stellar photometry task which quickly produces CCD stellar photometry from two CCD images of a star field. It was designed to be a data mining tool for finding high-quality stellar observations in the data archives of the National Virtual Observatory. QDPHOT typically takes just a few seconds to analyze two Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 observations of Local Group star clusters. It is also suitable for real-time data-quality analysis of CCD observations; on-the-fly instrumental color-magnitude diagrams can be produced at the telescope console during the few seconds between CCD readouts.

  9. How surface roughness affects chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness affects transport processes, e.g., runoff generation, infiltration, sediment detachment, etc., occurring on the surface. Nevertheless, how soil roughness affects chemical transport is less known. In this study, we partitioned roughness elements into mounds which diverge water ...

  10. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  11. THE SL2S GALAXY-SCALE LENS SAMPLE. III. LENS MODELS, SURFACE PHOTOMETRY, AND STELLAR MASSES FOR THE FINAL SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Marshall, Philip J.

    2013-11-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) near-infrared ground-based images for the final sample of 56 candidate galaxy-scale lenses uncovered in the CFHT Legacy Survey as part of the Strong Lensing in the Legacy Survey project. The new images are used to perform lens modeling, measure surface photometry, and estimate stellar masses of the deflector early-type galaxies (ETGs). Lens modeling is performed on the HST images (or CFHT when HST is not available) by fitting the spatially extended light distribution of the lensed features assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid mass profile and by reconstructing the intrinsic source light distribution on a pixelized grid. Based on the analysis of systematic uncertainties and comparison with inference based on different methods, we estimate that our Einstein radii are accurate to ∼3%. HST imaging provides a much higher success rate in confirming gravitational lenses and measuring their Einstein radii than CFHT imaging does. Lens modeling with ground-based images, however, when successful, yields Einstein radius measurements that are competitive with space-based images. Information from the lens models is used together with spectroscopic information from companion Paper IV to classify the systems, resulting in a final sample of 39 confirmed (grade A) lenses and 17 promising candidates (grade B,C). This represents an increase of half an order of magnitude in sample size with respect to the sample of confirmed lenses studied in Papers I and II. The Einstein radii of the confirmed lenses in our sample span the range 5-15 kpc and are typically larger than those of other surveys, probing the mass in regions where the dark matter contribution is more important. Stellar masses are in the range 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub ☉}, covering the range of massive ETGs. The redshifts of the main deflector span a range 0.3 ≤ z{sub d} ≤ 0.8, which nicely complements low

  12. Context affects lightness at the level of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Marianne; Wichmann, Felix A; Shapley, Robert

    2015-01-14

    Visual perception of object attributes such as surface lightness is crucial for successful interaction with the environment. How the visual system assigns lightness to image regions is not yet understood. It has been shown that the context in which a surface is embedded influences its perceived lightness, but whether that influence involves predominantly low-, mid-, or high-level visual mechanisms has not been resolved. To answer this question, we measured whether perceptual attributes of target image regions affected their perceived lightness when they were placed in different contexts. We varied the sharpness of the edge while keeping total target flux fixed. Targets with a sharp edge were consistent with the perceptual interpretation of a surface, and in that case, observers perceived significant brightening or darkening of the target. Targets with blurred edges rather appeared to be spotlights instead of surfaces; for targets with blurred edges, there was much less of a contextual effect on target lightness. The results indicate that the effect of context on the lightness of an image region is not fixed but is strongly affected by image manipulations that modify the perceptual attributes of the target, implying that a mid-level scene interpretation affects lightness perception.

  13. DOLPHOT: Stellar photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    DOLPHOT is a stellar photometry package that was adapted from HSTphot for general use. It supports two modes; the first is a generic PSF-fitting package, which uses analytic PSF models and can be used for any camera. The second mode uses ACS PSFs and calibrations, and is effectively an ACS adaptation of HSTphot. A number of utility programs are also included with the DOLPHOT distribution, including basic image reduction routines.

  14. Third Workshop on Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor); Lasher, Lawrence E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries of extrasolar planets by Wolszczan, Mayor and Queloz, Butler et al., and others have stimulated a widespread effort to obtain a body of data sufficient to understand their occurrence and characteristics. Doppler velocity techniques have found dozens of extrasolar planets with masses similar to that of Jupiter. Approximately ten percent of the stars that show planets with orbital periods of a few days to a week are expected to show transits. With the mass obtained from Doppler velocity measurements and the size from transit photometry, the densities of the planets can be determined. Theoretical models of the structure of "hot Jupiters" (i.e., those planets within a tenth of an astronomical unit (AU) of the parent star) indicate that these planets should be substantially larger in size and lower in density than Jupiter. Thus the combination of transit and Doppler velocity measurements provide a critical test of the theories of planetary structure. Furthermore, because photometry can be done with small-aperture telescopes rather than requiring the use of much larger telescopes, transit photometry should also reduce the cost of discovering extrasolar planets.

  15. The 2060 Chiron: CCD photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bus, Schelte J.; Bowell, Edward; Harris, Alan W.

    1987-01-01

    R-band CCD photometry of 2060 was carried out on nine nights in Nov. and Dec. 1986. The rotation period is 5.9181 + or - 0.0003 hr and the peak to peak lightcurve amplitude is 0.088 + or - 0.0003 mag. Photometric parameters are H sub R = 6.24 + or - 0.02 mag and G sub R = + or - 0.15, though formal errors may not be realistic. The lightcurve has two pairs of extrema, but its asymmetry, as evidenced by the presence of significant odd Fourier harmonics, suggests macroscopic surface irregularities and/or the presence of some large scale albedo variegation. The observational rms residual is + or - 0.015 mag. On time scales from minutes to days there is no evidence for nonperiodic (cometary) brightness changes at the level of a few millimagnitudes.

  16. HST BVI Photometry of Triton and Proteus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-15

    rights reserved. Keywords: Triton ; Satellites, surfaces; Neptune , magnetosphere1. Introduction Triton is an enigmatic satellite—seemingly without a...2003. The BVRI and methane lightcurve of Triton in 2003. Bull. Am. As- tron. Soc. 35, 1483. Smith, B., and 64 colleagues, 1989. Voyager 2 at Neptune ...Icarus 185 (2006) 487–491 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus HST BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus Dan Pascu a,∗, Alex D. Storrs b, Eddie N. Wells c,1

  17. Structural features affecting variant surface glycoprotein expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Böhme, Ulrike; Cross, George A M

    2003-05-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of Trypanosoma brucei is the most abundant GPI-anchored protein expressed on any cell, and is an essential virulence factor. To determine what structural features affect efficient expression of VSG, we made a series of mutations in two VSGs. Inserting 18 amino acids, between the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, reduced the expression of VSG 221 to about 3% of the wild-type level. When this insertion was combined with deletion of the single carboxy-terminal subdomain, expression was reduced a further three-fold. In VSG 117, which contains two carboxy-terminal subdomains, point mutation of the intervening N-glycosylation site reduced expression about 15-fold. Deleting the most carboxy-terminal subdomain and intervening region, including the N-glycosylation site, reduced expression to 15-20% of wild type VSG, and deletion of both subdomains reduced expression to <1%. Despite their low abundance, all VSG mutants were GPI anchored on the cell surface. Our results suggest that, for a protein to be efficiently displayed on the surface of bloodstream-form T. brucei, it is essential that it contains the conserved structural motifs of a T. brucei VSG. Serum resistance-associated protein (SRA), which confers human infectivity on T. brucei, strongly resembles a VSG deletion mutant. Expression of three epitope-tagged versions of SRA in T. brucei conferred total resistance to human serum. SRA possesses a canonical GPI signal sequence, but we were unable to obtain unequivocal evidence for the presence of a GPI anchor. SRA was not released during osmotic lysis, indicating that it is not GPI anchored on the cell surface.

  18. Exploration mode affects visuohaptic integration of surface orientation.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, Myrthe A; van Dam, Loes C J; Glowania, Catharina; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-11-20

    We experience the world mostly in a multisensory fashion using a combination of all of our senses. Depending on the modality we can select different exploration strategies for extracting perceptual information. For instance, using touch we can enclose an object in our hand to explore parts of the object in parallel. Alternatively, we can trace the object with a single finger to explore its parts in a serial fashion. In this study we investigated whether the exploration mode (parallel vs. serial) affects the way sensory signals are combined. To this end, participants visually and haptically explored surfaces that varied in roll angle and indicated which side of the surface was perceived as higher. In Experiment 1, the exploration mode was the same for both modalities (i.e., both parallel or both serial). In Experiment 2, we introduced a difference in exploration mode between the two modalities (visual exploration was parallel while haptic exploration was serial or vice versa). The results showed that visual and haptic signals were combined in a statistically optimal fashion only when the exploration modes were the same. In case of an asymmetry in the exploration modes across modalities, integration was suboptimal. This indicates that spatial-temporal discrepancies in the acquisition of information in the two senses (i.e., haptic and visual) can lead to the breakdown of sensory integration.

  19. THE IMPACT OF CONTAMINATED RR LYRAE/GLOBULAR CLUSTER PHOTOMETRY ON THE DISTANCE SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Majaess, D.; Turner, D.; Lane, D.; Gieren, W.

    2012-06-10

    RR Lyrae variables and the stellar constituents of globular clusters are employed to establish the cosmic distance scale and age of the universe. However, photometry for RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters M3, M15, M54, M92, NGC 2419, and NGC 6441 exhibit a dependence on the clustercentric distance. For example, variables and stars positioned near the crowded high-surface brightness cores of the clusters may suffer from photometric contamination, which invariably affects a suite of inferred parameters (e.g., distance, color excess, absolute magnitude, etc.). The impetus for this study is to mitigate the propagation of systematic uncertainties by increasing awareness of the pernicious impact of contaminated and radial-dependent photometry.

  20. k2photometry: Read, reduce and detrend K2 photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Nowak, Grzegorz; Albrecht, Simon; Palle, Enric; Ribas, Ignasi; Bruntt, Hans; Perger, Manuel; Gandolfi, Davide; Hirano, Teriyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Kiilerich, Amanda; Arranz, Jorge P.; Badenas, Mariona; Dai, Fei; Deeg, Hans J.; Guenther, Eike W.; Montanes-Rodriguez, Pilar; Narita, Norio; Rogers, Leslie A.; Bejar, Victor J. S.; Shrotriya, Tushar S.; Winn, Joshua N.; Sebastian, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    k2photometry reads, reduces and detrends K2 photometry and searches for transiting planets. MAST database pixel files are used as input; the output includes raw lightcurves, detrended lightcurves and a transit search can be performed as well. Stellar variability is not typically well-preserved but parameters can be tweaked to change that. The BLS algorithm used to detect periodic events is a Python implementation by Ruth Angus and Dan Foreman-Mackey (https://github.com/dfm/python-bls).

  1. Marathon Race Affects Neutrophil Surface Molecules: Role of Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; Sierra, Ana Paula Renno; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Caçula, Kim Guimarães; Momesso, César Miguel; Sato, Fabio Takeo; Silva, Maysa Braga Barros; Oliveira, Heloisa Helena; Passos, Maria Elizabeth Pereira; de Souza, Diego Ribeiro; Gondim, Olivia Santos; Benetti, Marino; Levada-Pires, Adriana Cristina; Ghorayeb, Nabil; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tânia Cristina; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue induced by marathon races was observed in terms of inflammatory and immunological outcomes. Neutrophil survival and activation are essential for inflammation resolution and contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marathon races on surface molecules related to neutrophil adhesion and extrinsic apoptosis pathway and its association with inflammatory markers. We evaluated 23 trained male runners at the São Paulo International Marathon 2013. The following components were measured: hematological and inflammatory mediators, muscle damage markers, and neutrophil function. The marathon race induced an increased leukocyte and neutrophil counts; creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), CK-MB, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-8 levels. C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plasma concentrations were significantly higher 24 h and 72 h after the marathon race. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels decreased 72 h after the marathon race. We also observed an increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and decreasedTNF receptor-1 (TNFR1) expression immediately after and 24 h after the marathon race. We observed an increased DNA fragmentation and L-selectin and Fas receptor expressions in the recovery period, indicating a possible slow rolling phase and delayed neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Marathon racing affects neutrophils adhesion and survival in the course of inflammation, supporting the "open-window" post-exercise hypothesis.

  2. Marathon Race Affects Neutrophil Surface Molecules: Role of Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue induced by marathon races was observed in terms of inflammatory and immunological outcomes. Neutrophil survival and activation are essential for inflammation resolution and contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marathon races on surface molecules related to neutrophil adhesion and extrinsic apoptosis pathway and its association with inflammatory markers. We evaluated 23 trained male runners at the São Paulo International Marathon 2013. The following components were measured: hematological and inflammatory mediators, muscle damage markers, and neutrophil function. The marathon race induced an increased leukocyte and neutrophil counts; creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), CK-MB, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-8 levels. C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plasma concentrations were significantly higher 24 h and 72 h after the marathon race. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels decreased 72 h after the marathon race. We also observed an increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and decreasedTNF receptor-1 (TNFR1) expression immediately after and 24 h after the marathon race. We observed an increased DNA fragmentation and L-selectin and Fas receptor expressions in the recovery period, indicating a possible slow rolling phase and delayed neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Marathon racing affects neutrophils adhesion and survival in the course of inflammation, supporting the “open-window” post-exercise hypothesis. PMID:27911915

  3. Heterochromatic flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Bone, Richard A; Landrum, John T

    2004-10-15

    Measurement of the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) by heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) is accomplished by viewing a small circular stimulus that alternates between a test wavelength that is absorbed by the MP (typically--blue, 460 nm) and a reference wavelength that is not absorbed (typically-green, 540 nm). Flicker observed by the subject is reduced to a null point by adjusting the intensity of the former while viewing the stimulus centrally, and then peripherally. A higher intensity, I, of the blue component of the stimulus is needed under central viewing conditions owing to attenuation by the MP. The MPOD at the test wavelength is given by log (Icentral/Iperipheral). Variation of the test wavelength has been used to measure the MPOD spectrum. This in vitro MPOD spectrum matches that of the carotenoids present in the macular region of the retina and demonstrates the validity and specificity of this methodology. The distribution of MPOD in the retina can be determined with HFP using a series of annular stimuli of different diameters.

  4. Titanium surface topography affects collagen biosynthesis of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Daniela B S; Miguez, Patrícia A; Mendonça, Gustavo; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2011-09-01

    Collagen-dependent microstructure and physicochemical properties of newly formed bone around implant surfaces represent key determinants of implant biomechanics. This study investigated the effects of implant surface topography on collagen biosynthesis of adherent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown for 0 to 42 days on titanium disks (20.0 × 1.0 mm) with smooth or rough surfaces. Cell attachment and spreading were evaluated by incubating cells with Texas-Red-conjugated phalloidin antibody. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA levels of Col1α1 and collagen modifying genes including prolyl hydroxylases (PHs), lysyl oxidases (LOXs) and lysyl hydroxylases (LHs). Osteogenesis was assessed at the level of osteoblast specific gene expression and alizarin red staining for mineralization. Cell layer-associated matrix and collagen content were determined by amino acid analysis. At 4h, 100% cells were flattened on both surfaces, however the cells on smooth surface had a fibroblast-like shape, while cells on rough surface lacked any defined long axis. PH, LH, and most LOX mRNA levels were greater in hMSCs grown on rough surfaces for 3 days. The mineralized area was greater for rough surface at 28 and 42 days. The collagen content (percent total protein) was also greater at rough surface compared to smooth surface at 28 (36% versus 26%) and 42 days (46% versus 29%), respectively (p<.05). In a cell culture model, rough surface topography positively modulates collagen biosynthesis and accumulation and the expression of genes associated with collagen cross-linking in adherent hMSC. The altered biosynthesis of the collagen-rich ECM adjacent to endosseous implants may influence the biomechanical properties of osseointegrated endosseous implants.

  5. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  6. Photometry of Pluto during the 1982 opposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Mulholland, J. D.

    1983-02-01

    Observations of Pluto's brightness were obtained by two-channel photometry on 18 nights during the 1982 opposition, using the 2.1-m and 91-cm reflectors at Mt. Locke. The resulting light curve suggests that the 'secular' decrease in intrinsic brightness is flattening, qualitatively consistent with a latitude dependence of the surface albedo distribution. Speculations are projected for the long-term behavior of the apparent light curve. Understanding of the current rotational brightness variation is important to the maximum utilization of photometric observations obtained during the imminent series of mutual eclipses between Pluto and its satellite.

  7. The RINGS Survey: Optical Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Mitchell, Carl; Spekkens, Kristine; Sellwood, Jerry; Williams, Ted

    2016-01-01

    We have targeted a sample of 19 nearby spiral galaxies, the RSS Imaging and Spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey (RINGS), for detailed study of their mass distributions. We have obtained Fabry-Perot Halpha velocity fields using the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), 21-cm HI observations using the Very Large Array (VLA), and optical broadband BVRI photometry using the CTIO 0.9m and KPNO 2.1m telescopes. We present the results of the photometric component of the survey including multicolor images, surface brightness profiles, and DiskFit structural models.

  8. Detection by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon M.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A periodic sequence of planetary transits provides a valid detection of an orbiting planet and provides the relative size of the planet and its orbital period. Ancillary measurements of the stellar spectrum and the variations of the star's radial velocity or position combined with stellar models allow the absolute size of the planet and its mass to be obtained. The results of this approach have already shown that the planet orbiting HD209458 has only 70% of the mass of Jupiter, but is nearly 50% larger in radius. Based on models of planetary structure, these results imply that the planet must have spent most of its lifetime so close to the star that it has not been able to cool and contract as have the giant planets in our Solar System. Thus its density is much less than Jupiter and Saturn and is actually less than that of water; i.e., about 0.4 gr/cu cm. If more sensitive measurements of the light curve of stars with closely orbiting planets can be made that provide the varying amplitude of the light reflected by the planet at various phases in its orbit, then characteristics of the planetary atmosphere can be obtained. Potentially, these data can identify major molecular species present in the atmosphere and tell us if clouds are present and yield the phase function of the aerosols. Although such detail cannot be obtained for Earth-size planets because their signal amplitudes are too small, it is possible to get data critical to the determination of the structure of extrasolar planetary systems. In particular, the size distributions and their orbital distributions can be measured by the transit photometry missions now in development. The COROT mission should be able to find large terrestrial planets in short-period orbits while the more ambitious Kepler and Eddington missions should be able to detect planets even smaller than the Earth and at orbital distances that place them in the habitable zone of their stars.

  9. How Direction of Illumination Affects Visually Perceived Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yun-Xian; Landy, Michael S.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2009-01-01

    We examined visual estimation of surface roughness using random computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) surfaces rendered under a mixture of diffuse lighting and a punctate source. The angle between the tangent to the plane containing the surface texture and the direction to the punctate source was varied from 50 to 70 degrees across lighting conditions. Observers were presented with pairs of surfaces under different lighting conditions and indicated which 3D surface appeared rougher. Surfaces were viewed either in isolation or in scenes with added objects whose shading, cast shadows and specular highlights provided information about the spatial distribution of illumination. All observers perceived surfaces to be markedly rougher with decreasing illuminant angle. Performance in scenes with added objects was no closer to constant than that in scenes without added objects. We identified four novel cues that are valid cues to roughness under any single lighting condition but that are not invariant under changes in lighting condition. We modeled observers’ deviations from roughness constancy as a weighted linear combination of these “pseudo-cues” and found that they account for a substantial amount of observers’ systematic deviations from roughness constancy with changes in lighting condition. PMID:16881794

  10. Second Workshop on Improvements to Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers in these proceedings show that a major effort is under way to improve all aspects of photometry. Astronomical multichannel photometry, photodiodes, analog-to-digital converters, data reduction techniques, interference filters and optical fibers are discussed.

  11. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  12. Free-surface stability criterion as affected by velocity distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng-Lung, Chen

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines how the velocity distribution of flow in open channels affects the kinematic and dynamic wave velocities, from which the various forms of the Vedernikov number V can be formulated. When V >1, disturbances created in open-channel flow will amplify in the form of roll waves; when V <1, some (though not all) disturbances will attenuate. A study of the Vedernikov stability criterion reveals that it can be readily deduced within the framework of the kinematic and dynamic wave theories by comparing the kinematic wave velocity to the corresponding dynamic wave velocity. -from Author

  13. On the surface physics affecting solar oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdek, G.; Trampedach, R.; Aarslev, M. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2017-01-01

    Adiabatic oscillation frequencies of stellar models, computed with the standard mixing-length formulation for convection, increasingly deviate with radial order from observations in solar-like stars. Standard solar models overestimate adiabatic frequencies by as much as ˜ 20 μHz. In this Letter, we address the physical processes of turbulent convection that are predominantly responsible for the frequency differences between standard models and observations, also called `surface effects'. We compare measured solar frequencies from the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft with frequency calculations that include 3D hydrodynamical simulation results in the equilibrium model, non-adiabatic effects, and a consistent treatment of the turbulent pressure in both the equilibrium and stability computations. With the consistent inclusion of the above physics in our model computation, we are able to reproduce the observed solar frequencies to ≲3 μHz without the need of any additional ad hoc functional corrections.

  14. Quantitative evolution of volcanic surfaces affected by erosional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahitte, Pierre; Boillot-Airaksinen, Kim; Germa, Aurélie; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Variations through time of erosion dynamics, a key point to investigate correlation between climates and landform evolution, still remains poorly documented. One of the main issue in this type of study is the difficulty in determining for how long the erosion has operated. For this purpose, volcanic contexts are particularly suitable for defining the temporal dynamics governing erosion since the age of volcanic activity also constrains the age of emplacement of the surface today eroded, and thus the erosion duration. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of river profiles offers the opportunity to discriminate, among the wide variety of geological phenomena influencing erosion, their respective influence. Quantification of erosion processes and constrain of their signature on reliefs can be addressed by a morphometric approach of river profiles in volcanic environment through the analysis of digital topography (DEM). Break in slope zones, the so-called knickpoints, are usually related to a retreat of the point between the relict channel, upstream, and the adjusted channel, downstream. They are induced by either a lithological contrast, a change in the base level, uplift or eustatism, or a rejuvenation of the age of the volcanic surface. The stream long-profile and its watershed is also investigated by their concavity and hypsometric indexes to determine for how long the complexity and its heterogeneity along the valley incision remain visible. The present study focusses on the erosion of volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles, Reunion Island and Lombok Island (Indonesia). All located in tropical environments, these volcanoes offer a wide diversity of age (30 - 0 Ma) and lithology for investigating the respective influence of geological processes that have induced a large variety of shapes and volcanic history that we try to correlate to geometry of river profiles.

  15. Does mineral surface area affect chemical weathering rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salome Eiriksdottir, Eydis; Reynir Gislason, Sigurdur; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2010-05-01

    Iceland is a basaltic volcanic island representative of the high relief, volcanic and tectonic active islands that contribute over 45% of river suspended material to the oceans worldwide (Milliman and Syvitski, 1992). These islands have enormous mechanical and chemical weathering rates due to the combined effects of high relief, high runoff, the presence of glaciers and easily weathered volcanic rocks, and a lack of sedimentary traps. In total, Iceland delivers 0.7% of the worldwide river suspended matter flux to the ocean, which is approximately one fourth that of Africa (Tómasson, 1990). River suspended matter from volcanic islands is highly reactive in seawater and might play an important role in the global carbon cycle (Gislason et al., 2006). Thus it is important to define and understand the mechanical and chemical weathering rates of these islands. Experimental dissolution experiments performed in the laboratory suggest that chemical weathering rates should be proportional to rock-water interfacial surface area. This hypothesis is tested in the present study through a study of the chemical composition of suspended material collected from rivers located in Northeast Iceland. These rivers were selected for this study because their catchments essentially monolithic, consisting of uniform compositioned and aged basalts. Gaillardet (1999) described weathering intensities of the worlds river systems to be from 1 (low weathering intensity) to 25 (high weathering intensity). These indexes were calculated to be from 1.8 to 3.2 in rivers in NE-Iceland (Eiriksdottir et al., 2008). The surface area of sediments is inversely proportional to particle size; smaller particles have larger specific surface areas. As a result, smaller particles should weather faster. This trend is confirmed by the measured compositions of analyzed suspended material. The concentration of insoluble elements (Zr, Fe, Cu, Ni, Y) is found to increase in the suspended material, whereas the

  16. Characterisation of the Gaia photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.; Voss, H.; Weiler, M.

    2014-07-01

    Our team at the University of Barcelona has contributed since the early phases of the mission to the definition, evaluation and calibration modelling of the Gaia photometry. To maximise the Gaia scientific exploitation, we have frequently shared many different tools and data with the astronomical community. Among this information we have defined several relationships among colours involving Gaia magnitudes and colours from other commonly used photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, SDSS, Hipparcos, Tycho and 2MASS) for several types of stars (including white dwarfs). These relationships can be used for planning scientific exploitation of Gaia data, performing simulations of the Gaia-like sky, planning ground-based complementary observations and for building catalogues with auxiliary validation data. During the commissioning phase our team (as part of the Payload Experts group) has been intensively checking the first photometric data to analyse the health and properties of the real instrument. These preliminary analyses allowed us to monitor the throughput variations with time, assess the spectral resolution and re-evaluate the performances of the end-of-mission photometry. The Payload Experts group activities continue beyond the commissioning phase aiming to optimize the operations onboard for maximizing the scientific return. Some example of first spectra and photometry are shown.

  17. UBVR and Hubble Space Telescope Mid-Ultraviolet and Near-Infrared Surface Photometry and Radial Color Gradients of Late-Type, Irregular, and Peculiar Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Violet A.; Jansen, Rolf A.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Odewahn, Stephen C.; Hibbard, John E.

    2005-09-01

    We introduce a data set of 142 mostly late-type spiral, irregular, and peculiar (interacting or merging) nearby galaxies observed in UBVR at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT), and we present an analysis of their radial color gradients. We confirm that nearby elliptical and early- to mid-type spiral galaxies show either no or only small color gradients, becoming slightly bluer with radius. In contrast, we find that late-type spiral, irregular, peculiar, and merging galaxies become on average redder with increasing distance from the center. The scatter in radial color gradient trends increases toward later Hubble type. As a preliminary analysis of a larger data set obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we also analyze the color gradients of six nearby galaxies observed with NICMOS in the near-IR (H) and with WFPC2 in the mid-UV (F300W) and red (F814W). We discuss the possible implications of these results on galaxy formation and compare our nearby galaxy color gradients to those at high redshift. We present examples of images and UBVR radial surface brightness and color profiles, as well as of the tables of measurements; the full atlas and tables are published in the electronic edition only. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs 8645, 9124, and 9824.

  18. Factors affecting the surface shape and removal rate of workpiece in CMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Quantang; Zhu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Baoan; Shen, Weixing

    2006-02-01

    The factors affecting the removal rate and surface shape in CMP is introduced. The edge effect is a critical problem in CMP process, which behaves on the global planarization of workpiece-pad interface and change on local planarization and results in collapse or rise in workpiece edges. One of the main factors of edge effect is Von Mises stress, which is a composition stress. The main affecting factor of Von Mises is the axial stress component. The factors affecting the material removal rate (MRR) of workpiece surface and surface nonuniformity include shape, material properties and thickness of pad and polishing media. Factors of load and relative velocity in CMP are also discussed.

  19. Photometry of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Schmitt, B.; Moynier, F.; Barrat, J.-A.

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the bi-directional reflectance phase function on selected meteorite samples (1 howardite, 1 eucrite, 1 diogenite, Orgeuil (CI), Tagish Lake (CC), Allende (CV), Lunar meteorite (MAC 88105), Forest Vale (H4)) covering part of the geochemical and petrologic diversity expected for asteroid surfaces. Samples were measured as powders, for which we achieved reflectance measurements from phase angles down to 3°, and up to 150°, at five different wavelengths covering the VIS-NIR spectral region. The data were fitted by the photometric model of Hapke (Hapke, B. [1993]. Theory of reflectance and emittance spectroscopy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge). The physical sense of the retrieved Hapke’s parameters seems unclear but they permit to interpolate the data to any observation geometry. Strong opposition effects were observed for all samples. The absolute intensity of this effect appears moderately variable among our sample suite, and is not correlated with the average sample reflectance. We interpret this observation as Shadow-Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE). In the case of samples presenting intense absorption bands (the Fe crystal field band at 1 μm of HED and the ordinary chondrite), we observe significant dependence of band depth to phase angle, up to 70°, even for moderate variation of phase angle. In addition, a general trend of spectral reddening with phase angle is observed. This reddening, linear with phase angle, is present in all meteorites studied. This behavior is not predicted by classical radiative theories. We propose that small-scale roughness (of the order of or below the wavelength) may induce such a behavior.

  20. Generalized Stellar Parametrizer with Gaia Photometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.

    GSP-Phot (Generalized Stellar Parametrizer—Photometry) is a software package in the Gaia Astrophysical parameters processing chain (Apsis) which estimates the astrophysical parameters of all stars in the Gaia catalogue. The inputs of GSP-Phot are the low-resolution spectra from the Gaia photometers as well as parallaxes, while the outputs consist of effective temperatures (T eff), extinction parameters (A 0), metallicities ([Fe/H] and surface gravities (logg). Three algorithms are developed in GSP-Phot: (a) support vector machine regression (SVR), a pattern recognition method; (b) ILIUM, a forward model based on discrete synthetic parameter grid; and (c) q-method, a Bayesian method which combines a forward model with parallaxes and the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) as a prior. The performance of the three algorithms is investigated for a range of spectral types with arbitrary apparent magnitudes.

  1. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  2. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  3. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. X. ULTRAVIOLET TO INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF 117 MILLION EQUIDISTANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Byler, Nell; Johnson, L. C. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: lcjohnso@astro.washington.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    We have measured stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) bands for 117 million resolved stars in M31. As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey, we measured photometry with simultaneous point-spread function (PSF) fitting across all bands and at all source positions after precise astrometric image alignment (<5-10 mas accuracy). In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W ∼ 28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W ∼ 25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest-resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) that are up to 2.5 mag deeper when compared with CMDs from WFC3/IR photometry alone. We present extensive analysis of the data quality including comparisons of luminosity functions and repeat measurements, and we use artificial star tests to quantify photometric completeness, uncertainties and biases. We find that the largest sources of systematic error in the photometry are due to spatial variations in the PSF models and charge transfer efficiency corrections. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community.

  4. How surface density of galaxy disks affects metallicity? Outflow and Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Tully, R. Brent; Neill, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    The surface density of disk is considered as a second parameter affecting the evolution of disk galaxies other than mass. Several physical and chemical properties of galaxies are found to be correlated with surface density of disk galaxies. However, the surface density, or surface brightness, is also strongly correlated with mass. It's not clear whether surface density really plays a role, or those correlations simply reflect the effect from stellar mass. To ask the question properly, one should take away the dependence on mass of galaxies, i.e., compare galaxies with the same mass but different surface densities.In this study, we ask, besides stellar mass, whether the surface density of disks also affects chemical evolution of galaxies. We demonstrate that, after removing the dependence on stellar mass and gas mass, the metallicity of galaxy still correlates with surface density of the galaxy disk. At the same stellar and gas mass, higher surface brightness galaxies on average possess both higher stellar and gas-phase metallicity, inferred from broadband color and spectrosopy of HII regions, respectively.We use an analytical model of chemical evolution involving gas outflow and accretion to explore possible reasons causing the difference in metallicity. Accroding to the model, at the same mass, lower metallicity galaxies should have experienced severer mass loss during star-formation events, and/or be inert to gas accretion. Both scenarios are consistent with general expections from properties of low surface density disks of shallow potential wells and dynamical stability.

  5. Nutrient losses in runoff from feedlot surfaces as affected by unconsolidated surface materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated surface materials (USM) (loose manure pack) that accumulate within feedlot pens during a feeding cycle. The effects of varying amounts of USM on feedlot runoff water quality are not well defined. The objectives of this field investigation were to: a) compa...

  6. Does the Economy or Surface Warfare Officer Career Pay Affect Surface Warfare Officer Retention?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Table 13.  OLS coefficients and T-stat for female data set .................................. 35  Table 14.  Summary of expected and observed...retention to the economy, SWO career pay (SWOCP), and an interaction of the economy and SWOCP. B. EXPECTED BENEFITS A better understanding of...insufficient evidence to support H2, that career pay positively affects the female SWO population. 36 (3) Female Data Set—H3 The female data set is

  7. High Speed Photometry for BUSCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, O.; Reif, K.

    The camera BUSCA (Bonn University Simultaneous CAmera) is a standard instrument at the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) since 2001. At the moment some modifications of BUSCA are planned and partially realised. One major goal is the replacement of the old thick CCDs in the blue, yellow-green, and near-infrared channels. The newer CCDs have better cosmetics and performance in sensitivity. The other goal is to replace the old "Heidelberg"-style controller with a newly designed controller with the main focus on high-speed readout and on an advanced windowing mechanism. We present a theoretical analysis of the new controller design and its advantage in high speed photometry of rapidly pulsating stars. As an example PG1605+072 was chosen which was observed with BUSCA before in 2001 and 2002.

  8. Theory of wide-angle photometry from standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1989-01-01

    Wide angle celestial structures, such as bright comet tails and nearby galaxies and clusters of galaxies, rely on photographic methods for quantified morphology and photometry, primarily because electronic devices with comparable resolution and sky coverage are beyond current technological capability. The problem of the photometry of extended structures and of how this problem may be overcome through calibration by photometric standard stars is examined. The perfect properties of the ideal field of view are stated in the guise of a radiometric paraxial approximation, in the hope that fields of view of actual telescopes will conform. Fundamental radiometric concepts are worked through before the issue of atmospheric attenuation is addressed. The independence of observed atmospheric extinction and surface brightness leads off the quest for formal solutions to the problem of surface photometry. Methods and problems of solution are discussed. The spectre is confronted in the spirit of standard stars and shown to be chimerical in that light, provided certain rituals are adopted. After a brief discussion of Baker-Sampson polynomials and the vexing issue of saturation, a pursuit is made of actual numbers to be expected in real cases. While the numbers crunched are gathered ex nihilo, they demonstrate the feasibility of Newton's method in the solution of this overdetermined, nonlinear, least square, multiparametric, photometric problem.

  9. Characterization of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukugita, Masataka; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Gunn, James E.; York, Donald G.

    2011-02-01

    We study the photometric properties of stars in the data archive of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the prime aim being to understand the photometric calibration over the entire data set. It is confirmed that the photometric calibration of point sources is accurately on the system defined by the SDSS standard stars. We have also confirmed that the photometric synthesis of the SDSS spectrophotometric data gives broadband fluxes that agree with the photometry with errors of no more than 0.04 mag and little systematic tilt with wavelength. This verifies that the response functions of the 2.5 m telescope system are well characterized. We locate stars in the SDSS photometric system, so that stars can roughly be classified into spectral classes from the color information. We show how metallicity and surface gravity affect colors, and that stars contained in the SDSS general catalog, plotted in color space, show a distribution that matches well with what is anticipated from the variations of metallicity and surface gravity. The color-color plots are perfectly consistent among the three samples—stars in the SDSS general catalog, SDSS standard stars, and spectrophotometric stars of Gunn & Stryker—especially when some considerations are taken into account of the differences (primarily metallicity) of the samples. We show that the g - r-inverse temperature relation is tight and can be used as a good estimator of the effective temperature of stars over a fairly wide range of effective temperatures. We also confirm that the colors of G2V stars in the SDSS photometric system match well with the Sun.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY STELLAR PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, Masataka; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Gunn, James E.; York, Donald G.

    2011-02-15

    We study the photometric properties of stars in the data archive of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the prime aim being to understand the photometric calibration over the entire data set. It is confirmed that the photometric calibration of point sources is accurately on the system defined by the SDSS standard stars. We have also confirmed that the photometric synthesis of the SDSS spectrophotometric data gives broadband fluxes that agree with the photometry with errors of no more than 0.04 mag and little systematic tilt with wavelength. This verifies that the response functions of the 2.5 m telescope system are well characterized. We locate stars in the SDSS photometric system, so that stars can roughly be classified into spectral classes from the color information. We show how metallicity and surface gravity affect colors, and that stars contained in the SDSS general catalog, plotted in color space, show a distribution that matches well with what is anticipated from the variations of metallicity and surface gravity. The color-color plots are perfectly consistent among the three samples-stars in the SDSS general catalog, SDSS standard stars, and spectrophotometric stars of Gunn and Stryker-especially when some considerations are taken into account of the differences (primarily metallicity) of the samples. We show that the g - r-inverse temperature relation is tight and can be used as a good estimator of the effective temperature of stars over a fairly wide range of effective temperatures. We also confirm that the colors of G2V stars in the SDSS photometric system match well with the Sun.

  11. Ground-base multicolour photometry of NGC 6811

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocando, S.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Rodríguez, E.

    2017-03-01

    NGC 6811 is one of the four open clusters in the field of view of the Kepler space mission. Among its members there are several known pulsating A-F stars of the δ Scuti, γ Doradus, and hybrid type, which makes this cluster a very interesting object to study its pulsational content. During the summers of 2013 and 2014 we performed an extensive observational campaign using the 1.5 m telescope at the Sierra Nevada Observatory and multicolour photometry. New pulsating variables candidates were detected in this work. We fulfilled a frequency analysis for the known variables, with very good agreement with previous results. By using Str ̈omgren photometry we were able to obtain the main physical parameters of the stars such as temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and luminosity. We have also determined the corresponding frequency phase-shifts and amplitude ratios between different filters as a first step to identify the pulsational modes of the variables.

  12. Probing Stellar Dynamics With Space Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Rafael A.; Salabert, D.; Ballot, J.; Beck, P. G.; Bigot, L.; Corsaro, E.; Creevey, O.; Egeland, R.; Jiménez, A.; Mathur, S.; Metcalfe, T.; do Nascimento, J.; Pallé, P. L.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Regulo, C.

    2016-08-01

    The surface magnetic field has substantial influence on various stellar properties that can be probed through various techniques. With the advent of new space-borne facilities such as CoRoT and Kepler, uninterrupted long high-precision photometry is available for hundred of thousand of stars. This number will substantially grow through the forthcoming TESS and PLATO missions. The unique Kepler observations -covering up to 4 years with a 30-min cadence- allows studying stellar variability with different origins such as pulsations, convection, surface rotation, or magnetism at several time scales from hours to years. We study the photospheric magnetic activity of solar-like stars by means of the variability induced in the observed signal by starspots crossing the visible disk. We constructed a solar photometric magnetic activity proxy, Sph from SPM/VIRGO/SoHO, as if the Sun was a distant star and we compare it with several solar well-known magnetic proxies. The results validate this approach. Thus, we compute the Sph proxy for a set of CoRoT and Kepler solar-like stars for which pulsations were already detected. After characterizing the rotation and the magnetic properties of 300 solar-like stars, we use their seismic properties to characterize 18 solar analogs for which we study their magnetism. This allows us to put the Sun into context of its siblings.

  13. Photometry of the cometary atmosphere: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanysek, V.

    1976-01-01

    Photometry and polarimetry of the cometary heads one of the most important sources of information about the physical processes in comets is reviewed. Methods of inspection discussed include: narrow band photometry, wide band photometry, color photography, tilting filter techniques, and photoelectric spectrum scanning. Results of photoelectric observations of comets are described including photoelectric and infrared measurements of comet Kohoutek. Photometric profiles of the coma in monochromatic light are used to determine the lifetime of the parent molecules for the observed radicals, CN and C2.

  14. Irregular Variability In Kepler Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlecker, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The transit method is the most successful tool for exoplanet discovery to date. With more than half of all known exoplanets discovered by Kepler using this method, the mission also revealed a number of objects with dimming events that defy the common explanations, the most prominent being KIC 8462852 aka ``Tabby's star''. I embarked on a search for objects with such irregular transit signatures in the data of K2, the two-wheeled successor mission of Kepler. My method is a combination of automated pre-selection of targets showing downward flux excursions and visual light curve inspection of the selected subset comprising about SI{1.5}% of the initial sample. In addition, I developed a tool to constrain the effective temperature of a planet-hosting star from photometry alone. This software finds broad application in any science case where a photometric spectral type estimate is necessary. I used existing transit models and Bayesian inference to perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of a planetary candidate I discovered. This putative gas giant is in a SI{1.32}day circular orbit with an exceptionally tight orbital radius of a ≈ 0.012 AU. My analysis revealed a scaled planetary radius of R_{p}/R_star = 0.0927±0.0026 and an edge-on orientation with an inclination i=89.8+3.0-3.4. EPIC 217393088.01 is one of the closest-orbiting exoplanets ever detected and the first giant planet with such a small orbital radius. An additional major finding of my search is EPIC 220262993, which exhibits aperiodic, asymmetric dips in flux with rapid dimming rates and up to SI{˜25}% depth, lasting for SIrange{2}{4} day. In previous works based on optical and mid-infrared photometry, this object was inconsistently classified as a possible quasar or a white dwarf. We conducted follow-up observations both photometrically with GROND on the MPI/ESO SI{2.2} meter telescope in La Silla (Chile) and spectroscopically with FIRE on the Magellan/Baade SI{6.5} meter telescope. With

  15. WFPC2 Stellar Photometry with HSTphot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    HSTphot, a photometry package designed to handle the undersampled PSFs found in WFPC2 images, is introduced and described, as well as some of the considerations that have to be made in order to obtain accurate PSF-fitting stellar photometry with WFPC2 data. Tests of HSTphot's internal reliability are made using multiple observations of the same field, and tests of external reliability are made by comparing with DoPHOT reductions of the same data. Subject headz'ngs: techniques: photometric

  16. L' AND M' Photometry Of Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, M. S.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Luginbuhl, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    We have compiled L' (3.4-4.1 microns) and M' (4.6- 4.8 microns) photometry of 63 single and binary M, L, and T dwarfs obtained at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope using the Mauna Kea Observatory filter set. This compilation includes new L' measurements of eight L dwarfs and 13 T dwarfs and new M' measurements of seven L dwarfs, five T dwarfs, and the M1 dwarf Gl 229A. These new data increase by factors of 0. 6 and 1.6, respectively, the numbers of ultracool dwarfs T (sub eff) photometry, and trigonometric parallaxes are available, and we estimate these quantities for nine other dwarfs whose parallaxes and flux-calibrated spectra have been obtained. BC(SUB K) is a well-behaved function of near-infrared spectral type with a dispersion of approx. 0.1 mag for types M6-T5 it is significantly more scattered for types T5-T9. T (sub eff) declines steeply and monotonically for types M6-L7 and T4-T9, but it is nearly constant at approx. 1450 K for types L7-T4 with assumed ages of approx. 3 Gyr. This constant T(sub eff) is evidenced by nearly unchanging values of L'-M' between types L6 and T3. It also supports recent models that attribute the changing near-infrared luminosities and spectral features across the L-T transition to the rapid migration, disruption, and/or thinning of condensate clouds over a narrow range of T(sub eff). The L' and M' luminosities of early-T dwarfs do not exhibit the pronounced humps or inflections previously noted in l through K bands, but insufficient data exist for types L6-T5 to assert that M(Sub L') and M(sub M') are strictly monotonic within this range of typew. We compare the observed K, L', and M' luminosities of L and T dwarfs in our sample with those predicted by precipitation-cloud-free models for varying surface gravities and sedimentation efficiencies.

  17. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image's plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length 'streak' meteor photometry and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  18. First photometry results from Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the Gaia Photometric Processing is presented. The Gaia photometry consists of the white light (330-1050 nm) G-band, and low resolution spectrophotometry realized by two prisms dispersing all the light entering the field of view. One disperser - called BP for Blue Photometer- operates in the wavelength range 330-680 nm; the other - called RP for Red Photometer - covers the wavelength range 640-1050 nm. The light collected by BP and RP can also be integrated into two broad bands, G_BP and G_RP.This photometric data reduction is based on the overall principle of a self-calibrating system improved by iteration. The input data includes flux (G, G_BP, G_RP) and the low-resolution spectral data. The calibration models and algorithms used are described. Initial validation results are shown which indicate the photometric quality of the preliminary calibrated data. Expectations for the quality of the photometric data to be included in the first public data release (mid-2016) are discussed.

  19. Multicolor Photometry for Mode Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, M. D.

    The goal of asteroseismology is to discern the physical conditions of stars by comparing observed pulsations with models. To obtain this goal, the observed pulsation periods and the spherical harmonics (n, l, and m) need to match the theoretical model. Typically the most difficult part in this process is the identification of the pulsation modes in the observations. Multicolour photometry is one method that has proven useful for identifying pulsation modes. By observing stars through various wavebands, and comparing the amplitudes and phases, it is possible to determine the spherical harmonics. This contribution will emphasize the work of Watson (1988), which has since been applied to many different types of variable stars including δ Scuti (Garrido et al., 1990), γ Doradus (Breger et al., 1997), β Cepheid (Cugier et al., 1994), and EC 14026 (Koen, 1998) stars. I will also discuss the technique of summing spectra (especially UV) into various wavebands which are then used to identify modes as pioneered by Robinson, Kepler, and Nather (1982) and applied to white dwarf stars (Kepler et al., 2000).

  20. Nanoscale topographic changes on sterilized glass surfaces affect cell adhesion and spreading.

    PubMed

    Wittenburg, Gretel; Lauer, Günter; Oswald, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk; Franz, Clemens M

    2014-08-01

    Producing sterile glass surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of laboratory and medical applications, including in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering. However, sterilization may change the surface properties of glass and thereby affect its use for medical applications, for instance as a substrate for culturing cells. To investigate potential effects of sterilization on glass surface topography, borosilicate glass coverslips were left untreated or subjected to several common sterilization procedures, including low-temperature plasma gas, gamma irradiation and steam. Imaging by atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the surface of untreated borosilicate coverslips features a complex landscape of microislands ranging from 1000 to 3000 nm in diameter and 1 to 3 nm in height. Steam treatment completely removes these microislands, producing a nanosmooth glass surface. In contrast, plasma treatment partially degrades the microisland structure, while gamma irradiation has no effect on microisland topography. To test for possible effects of the nanotopographic structures on cell adhesion, human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on untreated or sterilized glass surfaces. Analyzing fibroblast adhesion 3, 6, and 24 h after cell seeding revealed significant differences in cell attachment and spreading depending on the sterilization method applied. Furthermore, single-cell force spectroscopy revealed a connection between the nanotopographic landscape of glass and the formation of cellular adhesion forces, indicating that fibroblasts generally adhere weakly to nanosmooth but strongly to nanorough glass surfaces. Nanotopographic changes induced by different sterilization methods may therefore need to be considered when preparing sterile glass surfaces for cell culture or biomedical applications.

  1. BVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 53 UNUSUAL ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Q.-Z.

    2011-02-15

    We present the results of BVRI photometry and classification of 53 unusual asteroids, including 35 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), 6 high eccentricity/inclination asteroids, and 12 recently identified asteroid-pair candidates. Most of these asteroids were not classified prior to this work. For the few asteroids that have been previously studied, the results are generally in agreement. In addition to observing and classifying these objects, we merge the results from severalphotometric/spectroscopic surveys to create the largest-ever sample with 449 spectrally classified NEAs for statistical analysis. We identify a 'transition point' of the relative number of C/X-like and S-like NEAs at H {approx} 18 {r_reversible} D {approx} 1 km with confidence level at {approx}95% or higher. We find that the C/X-like:S-like ratio for 18 {<=} H < 22 is about twice as high as that of H < 18 (0.33 {+-} 0.04 versus 0.17 {+-} 0.02), virtually supporting the hypothesis that smaller NEAs generally have less weathered surfaces (therefore less reddish appearance) due to younger collision ages.

  2. One Percent Strömvil Photometry in M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham is being used in a program of CCD photometry of open and globular clusters. We are using the Ströomvil System (Straižys et al. 1996), a combination of the Strömgren and Vilnius Systems. This system allows stars to be classified as to temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening from the photometric measures alone. However, to make accurate estimates of the stellar parameters the photometry should be accurate to 1 or 1.5 percent. In our initial runs on the VATT we did not achieve this accuracy. The problem turned out to be scattered light in the telescope and this has now been reduced so we can do accurate photometry. Boyle has written a routine in IRAF which allows us to correct the flats for any differences. We take rotated frames and also frames which are offset in position by one third of a frame, east-west and north-south. Measures of the offset stars give us the corrections that need to be made to the flat. Robert Janusz has written a program, the CommandLog, which allows us to paste IRAF commands in the correct order to reduce measures made on a given observing run. There is an automatic version where one can test various parameters and get a set of solutions. Now we have a set of Strömvil frames in the open cluster, M 67 and we compare our color-magnitude diagram with those of BATC (Fan et al. 1996) and Vilnius (Boyle et al. 1998). A preliminary report of the M 67 photometry will be found in Laugalys et al. (2004). Here we report on a selected set of stars in the M 67 frames, those with errors 1 percent or less.

  3. Do Aging and Tactile Noise Stimulation Affect Responses to Support Surface Translations in Healthy Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate neuromuscular responses to support surface perturbations are crucial to prevent falls, but aging-related anatomical and physiological changes affect the appropriateness and efficiency of such responses. Low-level noise application to sensory receptors has shown to be effective for postural improvement in a variety of different balance tasks, but it is unknown whether this intervention may have value for improvement of corrective postural responses. Ten healthy younger and ten healthy older adults were exposed to sudden backward translations of the support surface. Low-level noise (mechanical vibration) to the foot soles was added during random trials and temporal (response latency) and spatial characteristics (maximum center-of-pressure excursion and anterior-posterior path length) of postural responses were assessed. Mixed-model ANOVA was applied for analysis of postural response differences based on age and vibration condition. Age affected postural response characteristics, but older adults were well able to maintain balance when exposed to a postural perturbation. Low-level noise application did not affect any postural outcomes. Healthy aging affects some specific measures of postural stability, and in high-functioning older individuals, a low-level noise intervention may not be valuable. More research is needed to investigate if recurring fallers and neuropathy patients could benefit from the intervention in postural perturbation tasks. PMID:27195007

  4. Surface chemical functionalities affect the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xujie; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in vitro. Plasma polymerized films rich in amine (sbnd NH2), carboxyl (sbnd COOH) and methyl (sbnd CH3), were generated on hydroxyapatite (HAp) substrates. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ability of different substrates to absorb proteins was evaluated. The results showed that substrates modified with hydrophilic functional group (sbnd COOH and sbnd NH2) can absorb more proteins than these modified with more hydrophobic functional group (sbnd CH3). The behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on different substrates was investigated in vitro: cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis was used to characterize cell proliferation, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis was used to characterize cell morphology and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis was used to account for differentiation. The results of this study demonstrated that the sbnd NH2 modified surfaces encourage osteogenic differentiation; the sbnd COOH modified surfaces promote cell adhesion and spreading and the sbnd CH3 modified surfaces have the lowest ability to induce osteogenic differentiation. These findings confirmed that the surface chemical states of biomaterials can affect the behavior of hASCs in vitro.

  5. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  6. Eos, Koronis, and Maria Family Asteroids: Infrared (JHK) Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Tedesco, Edward F.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared photometry at 1.2, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer (JHK) is reported for 56 asteroids in the Eos, Koronis and, Maria dynamical families. These data are consistent with similar surface composition for all of the asteroids of each family. The infrared colors within each family cluster in the region observed for the S taxonomic class, but Eos asteroids may belong to a separable K class. Asteroid 243 Ida, which was observed by the Galileo spacecraft, is a typical member of the Koronis family. The average infrared colors of the Maria family are slightly redder than those of the Eos and Koronis families.

  7. Photographic stellar photometry with the PDS microdensitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetson, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for photographic stellar photometry with the PDS microdensitometer is described. It employs a least-squares fit to a model density profile to derive an instrumental magnitude index, an image-abnormality index, and the local value of the background density for each image. The instrumental magnitude index is calibrated in terms of true magnitude by the same methods as for iris photometry. A preliminary test of the method using plates of the open cluster NGC 188 indicates that a precision comparable to or slightly better than that of conventional iris photometry or other methods of PDS reduction may easily be attained. Possibilities for the future elaboration of the technique are mentioned.

  8. Detection of Terrestrial Planets Using Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Boruci, William; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transit photometry detection of planets offers many advantages: an ability to detect terrestrial size planets, direct determination of the planet's size, applicability to all main-sequence stars, and a differential brightness change of the periodic signature being independent of stellar distance or planetary orbital semi-major axis. Ground and space based photometry have already been successful in detecting transits of the giant planet HD209458b. However, photometry 100 times better is required to detect terrestrial planets. We present results of laboratory measurements of an end-to-end photometric system incorporating all of the important confounding noise features of both the sky and a space based photometer including spacecraft jitter. In addition to demonstrating an instrumental noise of less than 10 ppm (an Earth transit of a solar-like star is 80 ppm), the brightnesses of individual stars were dimmed to simulate Earth-size transit signals. These 'transits' were reliably detected as part of the tests.

  9. Distant Comets Photometry and Dust Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittichova, Jana; Meech, K. J.; Bar-Nun, A.; Notesco, G.

    2008-09-01

    Several comets have been observed to develop coma on their in-bound leg at heliocentric distances from 5.84 to 11.49 AU. We will present the observational evidence for their activity and propose an explanation based on experiments carried out on amorphous, gas-laden ice samples that are 0.1 to 100 microns thick and formed by flowing water vapor and CO onto a cold surface. The considerable gas emission occurs when the amorphous ice anneals before 135K, where it transforms into a crystalline structure. This activity was found experimentally to be associated with gas release during annealing of the gas-laden amorphous ice. We observed and measured optical CCD photometry for two short-period and five long-period, dynamically new comets, that have enter the inner solar system directly from the Oort cloud for the first time. All of these comets have been observed pre-perihelion. Observations were done with the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope on Mauna Kea with the Tektronix 2x2K CCD camera through the Kron-Cousins B, V, R, I filter system. In order to observationally distinguish the physical causes of activity, not only is it important to observe comets at large heliocentric distances, but also those that are dynamically new and on the in-bound leg of their orbits at distances beyond where the amorphous to crystalline ice phase transition can occur. This research includes observations of the level of nucleus activity as a function of distance. We also would like to present Finson-Probstein (FP) dust modeling investigation on select comets. From the FP dust modeling of a cometary tail we can determine three basic parameters: the dust production rate, the particle distribution, and the emission velocity of the grains.

  10. TRIPPy: Python-based Trailed Source Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michael E.; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, JJ; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-05-01

    TRIPPy (TRailed Image Photometry in Python) uses a pill-shaped aperture, a rectangle described by three parameters (trail length, angle, and radius) to improve photometry of moving sources over that done with circular apertures. It can generate accurate model and trailed point-spread functions from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. Appropriate aperture correction provides accurate, unbiased flux measurement. TRIPPy requires numpy, scipy, matplotlib, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and stsci.numdisplay; emcee (ascl:1303.002) and SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) are optional.

  11. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  12. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  13. How will surface treatments affect the translucency of porcelain laminate veneers?

    PubMed Central

    Turgut, Sedanur; Ayaz, Elif Aydogan; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Ulusoy, Kıvanç Utku; Bagis, Yildirim Hakan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether surface treatments affect the translucency of laminate veneers with different shades and thicknesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 224 disc-shaped ceramic veneers were prepared from A1, A3, HT (High Translucent) and HO (High Opaque) shades of IPS e.max Press (Ivoclar Vivadent) with 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm thicknesses. The ceramics were divided into four groups for surface treatments. Group C: no surface treatments; Group HF: etched with hydrofluoric acid; Group SB: sandblasted with 50-µm Al2O3; and Group L; irradiated with an Er;YAG laser. A translucent shade of resin cement (Rely X Veneer, 3M ESPE) was chosen for cementation. The color values of the veneers were measured with a colorimeter and translucency parameter (TP) values were calculated. A three-way ANOVA with interactions for TP values was performed and Bonferroni tests were used when appropriate (α=0.05). RESULTS There were significant interactions between the surface treatments, ceramic shades and thicknesses (P=.001). For the 0.5-mm-thick specimens there were significant differences after the SB and L treatments. There was no significant difference between the HF and C treatments for any shades or thicknesses (P>.05). For the 1-mm-thick ceramics, there was only a significant difference between the L and C treatments for the HT shade ceramics (P=.01). There were also significant differences between the SB and C treatments except not for the HO shades (P=.768). CONCLUSION The SB and L treatments caused laminate veneers to become more opaque; however, HF treatment did not affect the TP values. When the laminate veneers were thinner, both the shade of the ceramic and the SB and laser treatments had a greater effect on the TP values. PMID:24605200

  14. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule.

  15. Seat surface inclination may affect postural stability during Boccia ball throwing in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Shen; Yu, Yi-Chen; Huang, Po-Chang; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine how seat surface inclination affects Boccia ball throwing movement and postural stability among children with cerebral palsy (CP). Twelve children with bilateral spastic CP (3 with gross motor function classification system Level I, 5 with Level II, and 4 with Level III) participated in this study. All participants underwent pediatric reach tests and ball throwing performance analyses while seated on 15° anterior- or posterior-inclined, and horizontal surfaces. An electromagnetic motion analysis system was synchronized with a force plate to assess throwing motion and postural stability. The results of the pediatric reach test (p = 0.026), the amplitude of elbow movement (p = 0.036), peak vertical ground reaction force (PVGRF) (p < 0.001), and movement range of the center of pressure (COP) (p < 0.020) were significantly affected by seat inclination during throwing. Post hoc comparisons showed that anterior inclination allowed greater amplitude of elbow movement and PVGRF, and less COP movement range compared with the other inclines. Posterior inclination yielded less reaching distance and PVGRF, and greater COP movement range compared with the other inclines. The anterior-inclined seat yielded superior postural stability for throwing Boccia balls among children with bilateral spastic CP, whereas the posterior-inclined seat caused difficulty.

  16. Photoelectric photometry era at the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences III. Fast photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaňko, M.; Kollár, V.; Komžík, R.; Koza, J.; Pribulla, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a continuation of the article series describing the photoelectric photometry era at the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. The paper aims to provide a comprehensive technical description of implementation of the fast photometry at the Stará Lesná Observatory and estimates its photometric precision. Using integration times of 0.1 s and 0.01 s, an estimated photometric precision of the fast photometry is about 0.02 mag and 0.06 mag, respectively. Here, we also show the observation principles of the fast photometry and its use in positive observation of stellar occultation lasting 18.44 s by the asteroid (85) Io.

  17. OAUNI photometry of ASASSN-16hw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Ricra, J.; Zevallos, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report optical photometry of Type Ia SN ASASSN-16hw (=SN 2016ekt, ATel #9278, ATel #9289, ATel #9300) on 2016-08-06 (UT) gathered with the OAUNI 51cm telescope (Pereyra et al. 2015;arXiv:1512.03104) at Huancayo Observatory, Peru.

  18. ATel 7543: NIR photometry of SNhunt 275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Noel; Artigau, Etienne

    2015-05-01

    SNhunt 275 (PSN J09093496+3307204) appears to be behaving similarly to SN 2009ip with an eruptive mass-loss event followed by a supernova explosion. We obtained a few epochs of NIR photometry using the Observatoire du Mont Megantic 1.6 m telescope and the CPAPIR instrument (Artigau et al. ...

  19. Seasonal Influences on Ground-Surface Water Interactions in an Arsenic-Affected Aquifer in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, L. A.; Magnone, D.; Van Dongen, B.; Bryant, C.; Boyce, A.; Ballentine, C. J.; Polya, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Millions of people in South and Southeast Asia consume drinking water daily which contains dangerous levels of arsenic exceeding health-based recommendations [1]. A key control on arsenic mobilization in aquifers in these areas has been controversially identified as the interaction of 'labile' organic matter contained in surface waters with groundwaters and sediments at depth [2-4], which may trigger the release of arsenic from the solid- to aqueous-phase via reductive dissolution of iron-(hyr)oxide minerals [5]. In a field site in Kandal Province, Cambodia, which is an arsenic-affected area typical to others in the region, there are strong seasonal patterns in groundwater flow direction, which are closely related to monsoonal rains [6] and may contribute to arsenic release in this aquifer. The aim of this study is to explore the implications of the high susceptibility of this aquifer system to seasonal changes on potential ground-surface water interactions. The main objectives are to (i) identify key zones where there are likely ground-surface water interactions, (ii) assess the seasonal impact of such interactions and (iii) quantify the influence of interactions using geochemical parameters (such as As, Fe, NO3, NH4, 14C, 3T/3He, δ18O, δ2H). Identifying the zones, magnitude and seasonal influence of ground-surface water interactions elucidates new information regarding potential locations/pathways of arsenic mobilization and/or transport in affected aquifers and may be important for water management strategies in affected areas. This research is supported by NERC (NE/J023833/1) to DP, BvD and CJB and a NERC PhD studentship (NE/L501591/1) to DM. References: [1] World Health Organization, 2008. [2] Charlet & Polya (2006), Elements, 2, 91-96. [3] Harvey et al. (2002), Science, 298, 1602-1606. [4] Lawson et al. (2013), Env. Sci. Technol. 47, 7085 - 7094. [5] Islam et al. (2004), Nature, 430, 68-71. [6] Benner et al. (2008) Appl. Geochem. 23(11), 3072 - 3087.

  20. Near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the unusual minor planet 5145 Pholus (1992AD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, John K.; Sykes, Mark V.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1993-01-01

    Near-IR photometry and spectroscopy of 5145 Pholus reveals that the visual to IR colors are unusually red and appear to show evidence for complex organic solids and/or ices on the surface. No compelling match is found with any present measurements of single-component ice or tholin samples.

  1. PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE - An Automated Pipeline for Calibrated Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Trilling, David E.

    2016-10-01

    Telescopes acquire massive amounts of imaging data every night. The goal of a large fraction of these observations is to obtain calibrated photometry for point sources - stars or moving Solar System targets - in different filters.We present PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE (PP, github.com/mommermi/photometrypipeline), an automated pipeline to obtain calibrated photometry from imaging data. PP is an open-source Python 2.7 software suite that provides image registration, aperture photometry, photometric calibration, and target identification with only minimal human interaction. For image registration, PP utilizes Source Extractor (Bertin & Arnouts 1996, A&AS, 117) and SWARP (Bertin et al. 2002, ASP Conf. S., 228) to find a plate solution for each frame, providing accurate target astrometry. Circular aperture photometry is performed using Source Extractor; an optimum aperture radius is identified using a curve-of-growth analysis. Photometric calibration is obtained through matching the background source catalog with star catalogs with reliable photometry (e.g., SDSS, URAT-1) in an iterative process; magnitude zeropoint accuracies are usually of the order of 0.03 mag, or better. Final calibrated photometry for each field source is written into a queriable database; target photometry is extracted from this database. Moving targets are identified using JPL Horizons (Giorgini et al. 1996, BAAS, 28) ephemerides. Image combination capabilities (using SWARP, Bertin 2006, ASP Conf. S., 112) are also available to improve the target's signal.PP is well-suited for data covering a few square arcminutes of the sky due to its dependence on background sources for registration and calibration. PP can be run on Unix-based systems on a simple desktop machine and is capable of realtime data analysis. PP has been developed for observations of moving targets, but can also be used on other observations. Efforts to improve the sky coverage for phometric calibration are in progress. Also, a module will be

  2. Osteoclasts but not osteoblasts are affected by a calcified surface treated with zoledronic acid in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Schindeler, Aaron . E-mail: AaronS@chw.edu.au; Little, David G.

    2005-12-16

    Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Recent interest has centered on the effects of bisphosphonates on osteoblasts. Chronic dosing of osteoblasts with solubilized bisphosphonates has been reported to enhance osteogenesis and mineralization in vitro. However, this methodology poorly reflects the in vivo situation, where free bisphosphonate becomes rapidly bound to mineralized bone surfaces. To establish a more clinically relevant cell culture model, we cultured bone cells on calcium phosphate coated quartz discs pre-treated with the potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (ZA). Binding studies utilizing [{sup 14}C]-labeled ZA confirmed that the bisphosphonate bound in a concentration-dependent manner over the 1-50 {mu}M dose range. When grown on ZA-treated discs, the viability of bone-marrow derived osteoclasts was greatly reduced, while the viability and mineralization of the osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line were largely unaffected. This suggests that only bone resorbing cells are affected by bound bisphosphonate. However, this system does not account for transient exposure to unbound bisphosphonate in the hours following a clinical dosing. To model this event, we transiently treated osteoblasts with ZA in the absence of a calcified surface. Osteoblasts proved highly resistant to all transitory treatment regimes, even when utilizing ZA concentrations that prevented mineralization and/or induced cell death when dosed chronically. This study represents a pharmacologically more relevant approach to modeling bisphosphonate treatment on cultured bone cells and implies that bisphosphonate therapies may not directly affect osteoblasts at bone surfaces.

  3. Occurrence of perchloroethylene in surface water and fish in a river ecosystem affected by groundwater contamination.

    PubMed

    Wittlingerová, Zdena; Macháčková, Jiřina; Petruželková, Anna; Zimová, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Long-term monitoring of the content of perchloroethylene (PCE) in a river ecosystem affected by groundwater contamination was performed at a site in the Czech Republic. The quality of surface water was monitored quarterly between 1994 and 2013, and fish were collected from the affected ecosystem to analyse the content of PCE in their tissue in 1998, 2011 and 2012. Concentrations of PCE (9-140 μg/kg) in the tissue of fish collected from the contaminated part of the river were elevated compared to the part of the river unaffected by the contamination (ND to 5 μg/kg PCE). The quality of surface water has improved as a result of groundwater remediation during the evaluated period. Before the remedial action, PCE concentrations ranged from 30 to 95 μg/L (1994-1997). Following commencement of remedial activities in September 1997, a decrease in the content of PCE in the surface water to 7.3 μg/L (1998) and further to 1 μg/L (2011) and 1.1 μg/L (2012) led to a progressive decrease in the average concentration of PCE in the fish muscle tissue from 79 μg/kg (1998) to 24 (2011) and 30 μg/kg (2012), respectively. It was determined that the bioconcentration of PCE does not have a linear dependence because the decrease in contamination in the fish muscle tissue is not directly proportional to the decrease in contamination in the river water. The observed average bioconcentration factors were 24 and 28 for the lower concentrations of PCE and 11 for the higher concentrations of PCE in the river. In terms of age, length and weight of the collected fish, weight had the greatest significance for bioconcentration, followed by the length, with age being evaluated as a less significant factor.

  4. Light-induced heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on indoor surfaces: How they affect the balance of nitrous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Alvarez, E.; Soergel, M.; Bassil, S.; Zetzsch, C.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important indoor pollutant. The adverse health effects due to the formation of nitrosamines are well known. HONO acts as a nitrosating agent after wall reactions of HONO with nicotine [Sleiman et al., 2010]. Indoor air can be surprisingly rich in HONO (homes with fireplaces, stoves, gas heating and cooking) and also surfaces are abundant. High HONO concentrations have been measured in indoor environments, from the direct emissions and heterogeneous reactions of NO2 in darkness. However, the measured HONO concentrations do not correspond to the HONO levels determined by the models [Carslaw, 2007]. We have tested in a flow tube reactor on-line coupled to a NOx analyzer and a sensitive Long Path Absorption Photometry instrument, the behaviour of various indoor surfaces towards NO2 under simulated solar light irradiation (λ= 300-700 nm). Our study has allowed us to obtain a deeper knowledge on the mechanisms of heterogeneous formation of HONO, quantifying the dependence of HONO formation on behalf of NO2 concentration and relative humidity and the enhancement of HONO formation in the presence of light. Pyrex, acidic detergent, alkaline detergent, paint and lacquer were tested on behalf of their heterogeneous reactivity towards NO2 in the absence and in presence of light. The results obtained demonstrated that indoor surfaces are photo-chemically active under atmospherically relevant conditions. The strongly alkaline surfaces (such as certain types of detergent) show a strong long-term uptake capacity. However, other surfaces such as detergents with a more acidic character released HONO. In some cases such as paint and varnish, a strong HONO release with light was detected, which was significantly higher than that obtained over clean glass surfaces. Certain organics present on their composition could exert a photo-sensitizing effect that may explain their increased reactivity. Unfortunately, the final balance points towards an important net

  5. Biofilm Formation by the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: Development and Parameters Affecting Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is a bacterial fish pathogen that affects many freshwater species worldwide. The natural reservoir of this pathogen is unknown, but its resilience in closed aquaculture systems posits biofilm as the source of contagion for farmed fish. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the dynamics of biofilm formation and morphology under static and flow conditions and (ii) to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, salinity, hardness, and carbohydrates on biofilm formation. Nineteen F. columnare strains, including representatives of all of the defined genetic groups (genomovars), were compared in this study. The structure of biofilm was characterized by light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. F. columnare was able to attach to and colonize inert surfaces by producing biofilm. Surface colonization started within 6 h postinoculation, and microcolonies were observed within 24 h. Extracellular polysaccharide substances and water channels were observed in mature biofilms (24 to 48 h). A similar time course was observed when F. columnare formed biofilm in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions. The virulence potential of biofilm was confirmed by cutaneous inoculation of channel catfish fingerlings with mature biofilm. Several physicochemical parameters modulate attachment to surfaces, with the largest influence being exerted by hardness, salinity, and the presence of mannose. Maintenance of hardness and salinity values within certain ranges could prevent biofilm formation by F. columnare in aquaculture systems. PMID:23851087

  6. Waving and skewing: how gravity and the surface of growth media affect root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Michele; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis seedlings growing on inclined agar surfaces exhibit characteristic root behaviours called 'waving' and 'skewing': the former consists of a series of undulations, whereas the latter is a deviation from the direction of gravity. Even though the precise basis of these growth patterns is not well understood, both gravity and the contact between the medium and the root are considered to be the major players that result in these processes. The influence of these forces on root surface-dependent behaviours can be verified by growing seedlings at different gel pitches: plants growing on vertical plates present roots with slight waving and skewing when compared with seedlings grown on plates held at minor angles of < 90 degrees . However, other factors are thought to modulate root growth on agar; for instance, it has been demonstrated that the presence and concentration of certain compounds in the medium (such as sucrose) and of drugs able to modify the plant cell cytoskeleton also affect skewing and waving. The recent discovery of an active role of ethylene on surface-dependent root behaviour, and the finding of new mutants showing anomalous growth, pave the way for a more detailed description of these phenomena.

  7. Nature of immobilization surface affects antibody specificity to placental alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Khan, Imran; Sinha, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Retention of native conformation of immobilized protein is essential for various applications including selection and detection of specific recombinant antibodies (scFvs). Placental alkaline phosphatase (PAP), an onco-fetal antigen expressed on the surface of several tumors, was immobilized on supermagnetic particles for selection of recombinant antibodies from a human phage display antibody library. The isolated antibodies were found to be cross-reactive to either of the isozymes of alkaline phosphatase, i.e., bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) or intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and could not be used for tumor targeting. A specific anti-PAP monoclonal antibody H17E2 was tested for retention of specificity under these conditions. Binding of the antibody to magnetic beads conjugated IAP and BAP along with PAP and the ability of the two isozymes to inhibit its binding to PAP depicted the loss of isozyme specificity of the antibody. However, the antibody retained its specificity to PAP immobilized on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surface. Enzyme activity was observed on both surfaces. This demonstrates that nature of immobilization may affect antigen-antibody binding in subtle ways, resulting in alteration of conformation of the epitopes. This may have consequences for determining the specificity of antibody binding for proteins that share a high degree of homology.

  8. Biofilm formation by the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: development and parameters affecting surface attachment.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenlong; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Arias, Covadonga R

    2013-09-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is a bacterial fish pathogen that affects many freshwater species worldwide. The natural reservoir of this pathogen is unknown, but its resilience in closed aquaculture systems posits biofilm as the source of contagion for farmed fish. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the dynamics of biofilm formation and morphology under static and flow conditions and (ii) to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, salinity, hardness, and carbohydrates on biofilm formation. Nineteen F. columnare strains, including representatives of all of the defined genetic groups (genomovars), were compared in this study. The structure of biofilm was characterized by light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. F. columnare was able to attach to and colonize inert surfaces by producing biofilm. Surface colonization started within 6 h postinoculation, and microcolonies were observed within 24 h. Extracellular polysaccharide substances and water channels were observed in mature biofilms (24 to 48 h). A similar time course was observed when F. columnare formed biofilm in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions. The virulence potential of biofilm was confirmed by cutaneous inoculation of channel catfish fingerlings with mature biofilm. Several physicochemical parameters modulate attachment to surfaces, with the largest influence being exerted by hardness, salinity, and the presence of mannose. Maintenance of hardness and salinity values within certain ranges could prevent biofilm formation by F. columnare in aquaculture systems.

  9. Precision Multiband Photometry with a DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based exoplanet surveys such as SuperWASP, HAT Network of Telescopes (HATNet), and KELT have discovered close to two hundred transiting extrasolar planets in the past several years. The strategy of these surveys is to look at a large field of view and measure the brightnesses of its bright stars to around half a percent per point precision, which is adequate for detecting hot Jupiters. Typically, these surveys use CCD detectors to achieve high precision photometry. These CCDS, however, are expensive relative to other consumer-grade optical imaging devices, such as digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLRs). We look at the possibility of using a DSLR camera for precision photometry. Specifically, we used a Canon EOS 60D camera that records light in three colors simultaneously. The DSLR was integrated into the HATNet survey and collected observations for a month, after which photometry was extracted for 6600 stars in a selected stellar field. We found that the DSLR achieves a best-case median absolute deviation of 4.6 mmag per 180 s exposure when the DSLR color channels are combined, and 1000 stars are measured to better than 10 mmag (1%). Also, we achieve 10 mmag or better photometry in the individual colors. This is good enough to detect transiting hot Jupiters. We performed a candidate search on all stars and found four candidates, one of which is KELT-3b, the only known transiting hot Jupiter in our selected field. We conclude that the Canon 60D is a cheap, lightweight device capable of useful photometry in multiple colors.

  10. Surface coating affects behavior of metallic nanoparticles in a biological environment

    PubMed Central

    Jurašin, Darija Domazet; Ćurlin, Marija; Capjak, Ivona; Crnković, Tea; Lovrić, Marija; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver (AgNPs) and maghemite, i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising candidates for new medical applications, which implies the need for strict information regarding their physicochemical characteristics and behavior in a biological environment. The currently developed AgNPs and SPIONs encompass a myriad of sizes and surface coatings, which affect NPs properties and may improve their biocompatibility. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of surface coating on colloidal stability and behavior of AgNPs and SPIONs in modelled biological environments using dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering techniques, as well as transmission electron microscopy to visualize the behavior of the NP. Three dispersion media were investigated: ultrapure water (UW), biological cell culture medium without addition of protein (BM), and BM supplemented with common serum protein (BMP). The obtained results showed that different coating agents on AgNPs and SPIONs produced different stabilities in the same biological media. The combination of negative charge and high adsorption strength of coating agents proved to be important for achieving good stability of metallic NPs in electrolyte-rich fluids. Most importantly, the presence of proteins provided colloidal stabilization to metallic NPs in biological fluids regardless of their chemical composition, surface structure and surface charge. In addition, an assessment of AgNP and SPION behavior in real biological fluids, rat whole blood (WhBl) and blood plasma (BlPl), revealed that the composition of a biological medium is crucial for the colloidal stability and type of metallic NP transformation. Our results highlight the importance of physicochemical characterization and stability evaluation of metallic NPs in a variety of biological systems including as many NP properties as possible. PMID:26977382

  11. Elucidating Sources and Factors Affecting Delivery of Nitrogen to Surface Waters of New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, H. E.; Boyer, E. W.; Burns, D. A.; Elliott, E.; Kendall, C.; Butler, T.

    2005-12-01

    Rapid changes in power generation, transportation, and agriculture have appreciably altered nitrogen (N) cycling at regional scales, increasing N inputs to landscapes and surface waters. Numerous studies have linked this surplus N to a host of concerns, including eutrophication and violations in drinking water standards. Inputs of N nation-wide have increased during recent decades, primarily from the production and use of fertilizers, the planting of N-fixing crops, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The role of atmospheric N sources is of particular concern in New York, as rates of atmospheric N deposition in the northeast are among the highest in the nation. Our work aims to quantify nitrogen sources and fate in watersheds throughout the state. Further, we intend to elucidate factors controlling the retention and release of N to surface waters. We quantify nitrogen inputs through both measurement data (e.g., from wet and dry atmospheric deposition, precipitation, streamflow, water quality, and isotopic tracers) and from synoptic spatial databases (e.g., of terrain, land use, and fertilizer inputs). We present preliminary results from large catchments in contrasting spatial settings across the state (different land use configurations and atmospheric deposition gradients), illustrating the contribution of nitrogen sources to each region and factors affecting delivery to surface waters. Further, we present 30 years of temporal data from a large watershed (Fall Creek) in the Finger Lakes region of the state to demonstrate how hydrological and biogeochemical factors, over seasons and under varying hydrological regimes, combine to control N dynamics in surface waters. Our collective work provides information that is necessary to develop sound strategies for understanding and managing nutrients at regional scales.

  12. The threat of a support surface translation affects anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Phanthanourak, Angel L; Cleworth, Taylor W; Adkin, Allan L; Carpenter, Mark G; Tokuno, Craig D

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how postural threat in the form of a potential perturbation affects an individual's ability to perform a heel raise. Seventeen adults completed three conditions: i) low threat, where participants performed a heel raise in response to a "go" tone, ii) high threat, where participants either heard the same "go" tone, for which they performed a heel raise, or experienced a support surface translation in the medio-lateral direction that disturbed their balance, and iii) choice reaction time task, where participants either completed a heel raise in response to the same "go" tone or a toe raise in response to a lower pitched tone. For all heel raise trials, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) were quantified from center of pressure (COP) recordings and electromyographic (EMG) activity from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL). Results indicated that participants exhibited larger APAs, as reflected by the greater backward COP displacement (p=0.038) and velocity (p=0.022) as well as a larger TA EMG amplitude (p=0.045), during the high threat condition. During the execution phase of the heel raise, an earlier (p=0.014) and larger (p=0.041) SOL EMG activation were observed during the high threat condition. These results contrast with previous findings of reduced APAs when the postural threat was evoked through changes in surface height. Therefore, the characteristics of the postural threat must be considered to isolate the effects of threat on anticipatory movement control.

  13. UBV photometry of hot white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheselka, Mathew; Holberg, J. B.; Watkins, Ron; Collins, James; Tweedy, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Johnson UBV photometry has been obtained for a set of hot degenerate stars, primarily DA and DO white dwarfs from among those detected in the Palomar-Green survey of UV excess objects. Most of our program stars have estimated effective temperatures (Teff) in the range 22,000 to 80,000 K and have no previous photometry. Some objects selected are also x-ray and extreme ultraviolet sources from the ROSAT all sky survey. The importance of precise photometric measurements in the analysis of x-ray data is discussed. A discrepancy between the observed colors and predicted colors is noted, and possibly accounted for by difficulties in defining the atmospheric cutoff of the U band and a general lack of hot stars used to define the photometric transformation between theoretical and observed colors.

  14. How Venus surface conditions evolution can be affected by large impacts at long timescales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, Cedric; Golabek, Gregor; Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate how the evolution of Venus' atmosphere and mantle is modified by large impacts, during Late Veneer and Late Heavy Bombardment. We propose a coupled model of mantle/atmosphere feedback. We also focus on volatile fluxes in and out of the atmosphere: atmospheric escape and degassing. The solid part of the planet is simulated using the StagYY code (Armann and Tackley, 2012) and releases volatiles into the atmosphere through degassing. Physical properties are depth-dependent. The assumed rheology is Newtonian diffusion creep plus plastic yielding. Atmospheric escape modeling involves two different aspects: hydrodynamic escape (0-500 Myr) and non-thermal escape mechanisms (dominant post 4 Ga). Hydrodynamic escape is the massive outflow of volatiles occurring when the solar energy input is strong. Post 4 Ga escape from non-thermal processes is comparatively low. The evolution of surface temperature is calculated from the greenhouse effect dependent on CO2 and water concentrations in the atmosphere, using a one-dimensional gray radiative-convective atmosphere model. It allows us to complete the coupling of the model: feedback of the atmosphere on the mantle is obtained by using surface temperature as a boundary condition for the convection. Large impacts are capable of contributing to (i) atmospheric escape, (ii) volatile replenishment and (iii) energy transfer to the mantle of the solid planet. We test a wide range of impactor parameters (size, velocity, timing) and different assumptions related to impact erosion (Shuvalov, 2010). For energy transfer, 2D distribution of the thermal anomaly created by the impact is used, leading to melting and subjected to transport by the mantle convection. Small (0-50 km) meteorites have a negligible effect on the global scale: they only affect the impact point and do not have lasting consequences on surface conditions. Medium ones (50-150 km) have strong short term influence through volatile

  15. WISE PHOTOMETRY FOR 400 MILLION SDSS SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Dustin; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.

    2016-02-15

    We present photometry of images from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) of over 400 million sources detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use a “forced photometry” technique, using measured SDSS source positions, star–galaxy classification, and galaxy profiles to define the sources whose fluxes are to be measured in the WISE images. We perform photometry with The Tractor image modeling code, working on our “unWISE” coaddds and taking account of the WISE point-spread function and a noise model. The result is a measurement of the flux of each SDSS source in each WISE band. Many sources have little flux in the WISE bands, so often the measurements we report are consistent with zero given our uncertainties. However, for many sources we get 3σ or 4σ measurements; these sources would not be reported by the “official” WISE pipeline and will not appear in the WISE catalog, yet they can be highly informative for some scientific questions. In addition, these small-signal measurements can be used in stacking analyses at the catalog level. The forced photometry approach has the advantage that we measure a consistent set of sources between SDSS and WISE, taking advantage of the resolution and depth of the SDSS images to interpret the WISE images; objects that are resolved in SDSS but blended together in WISE still have accurate measurements in our photometry. Our results, and the code used to produce them, are publicly available at http://unwise.me.

  16. WISE Photometry for 400 Million SDSS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dustin; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We present photometry of images from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) of over 400 million sources detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use a “forced photometry” technique, using measured SDSS source positions, star-galaxy classification, and galaxy profiles to define the sources whose fluxes are to be measured in the WISE images. We perform photometry with The Tractor image modeling code, working on our “unWISE” coaddds and taking account of the WISE point-spread function and a noise model. The result is a measurement of the flux of each SDSS source in each WISE band. Many sources have little flux in the WISE bands, so often the measurements we report are consistent with zero given our uncertainties. However, for many sources we get 3σ or 4σ measurements; these sources would not be reported by the “official” WISE pipeline and will not appear in the WISE catalog, yet they can be highly informative for some scientific questions. In addition, these small-signal measurements can be used in stacking analyses at the catalog level. The forced photometry approach has the advantage that we measure a consistent set of sources between SDSS and WISE, taking advantage of the resolution and depth of the SDSS images to interpret the WISE images; objects that are resolved in SDSS but blended together in WISE still have accurate measurements in our photometry. Our results, and the code used to produce them, are publicly available at http://unwise.me.

  17. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 April-June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  18. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2017 January-March

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  19. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 July-September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  20. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 October-December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  1. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2017 April-June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2017-04-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  2. Variable Star Photometry at West Challow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the facilities and observing programme of a small personal observatory set up in the UK for CCD photometry of variable stars. Its development has been driven by the belief that committed amateurs can make a valuable scientific contribution to the study of variable stars. Observing projects carried out at WCO are described including examples of Pro-Am collaboration and contributions to the observing programmes of the BAAVSS, AAVSO and CBA.

  3. Galileo Photometry of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Lee, P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Breneman, H.; Head, J.W.; Murchie, S.; Fanale, F.; Robinson, M.; Clark, B.; Granahan, J.; Garbeil, H.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Davies, M.; Neukum, G.; Mottola, S.; Wagner, R.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.; Pilcher, C.

    1994-01-01

    Galileo images of Gaspra make it possible for the first time to determine a main-belt asteroid's photometric properties accurately by providing surface-resolved coverage over a wide range of incidence and emission angles and by extending the phase angle coverage to phases not observable from Earth. We combine Earth-based telescopic photometry over phase angles 2?? ??? ?? ??? 25?? with Galileo whole-disk and disk-resolved data at 33?? ??? ?? ??? 51?? to derive average global photometric properties in terms of Hapke's photometric model. The microscopic texture and particle phase-function behavior of Gaspra's surface are remarkably like those of other airless rocky bodies such as the Moon. The macroscopic surface roughness parameter, ??̄ = 29??, is slightly larger than that reported for typical lunar materials. The particle single scattering albedo, ??́0 = 0.36 ?? 0.07, is significantly larger than for lunar materials, and the opposition surge amplitude, B0 = 1.63 ?? 0.07, is correspondingly smaller. We determine a visual geometric albedo pv = 0.22 ?? 0.06 for Gaspra, in close agreement with pv = 0.22 ?? 0.03 estimated from Earth-based observations. Gaspra's phase integral is 0.47, and the bolometric Bond albedo is estimated to be 0.12 ?? 0.03. An albedo map derived by correcting Galileo images with our average global photometric function reveals subdued albedo contrasts of ??10% or less over Gaspra's northern hemisphere. Several independent classification algorithms confirm the subtle spectral heterogeneity reported earlier (S. Mottola, M. DiMartino, M. Gonano-Beurer, H. Hoffman, and G. Neukum, 1993, Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, pp. 421-424; M. J. S. Belton et al., 1992, Science 257, 1647-1652). Whole-disk colors (0.41 ??? ?? ??? 0.99 ??m) vary systematically with longitude by about ??5%, but color differences as large as 30% occur locally. Colors vary continuously between end-member materials whose areal distribution correlates with regional topography. Infrared

  4. PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE: An automated pipeline for calibrated photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.

    2017-01-01

    PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE (PP) is an automated pipeline that produces calibrated photometry from imaging data through image registration, aperture photometry, photometric calibration, and target identification with only minimal human interaction. PP utilizes the widely used Source Extractor software for source identification and aperture photometry; SCAMP is used for image registration. Both image registration and photometric calibration are based on matching field stars with star catalogs, requiring catalog coverage of the respective field. A number of different astrometric and photometric catalogs can be queried online. Relying on a sufficient number of background stars for image registration and photometric calibration, PP is well-suited to analyze data from small to medium-sized telescopes. Calibrated magnitudes obtained by PP are typically accurate within ≤0.03 mag and astrometric accuracies are of the order of 0.3 arcsec relative to the catalogs used in the registration. The pipeline consists of an open-source software suite written in Python 2.7, can be run on Unix-based systems on a simple desktop machine, and is capable of realtime data analysis. PP has been developed for observations of moving targets, but can be used for analyzing point source observations of any kind.

  5. Sorption processes affecting arsenic solubility in oxidized surface sediments from Tulare Lake Bed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gao, S.; Goldberg, S.; Herbel, M.J.; Chalmers, A.T.; Fujii, R.; Tanji, K.K.

    2006-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in shallow groundwater in Tulare Basin pose an environmental risk because of the carcinogenic properties of As and the potential for its migration to deep aquifers that could serve as a future drinking water source. Adsorption and desorption are hypothesized to be the major processes controlling As solubility in oxidized surface sediments where arsenate [As(V)] is dominant. This study examined the relationship between sorption processes and arsenic solubility in shallow sediments from the dry Tulare Lake bed by determining sorption isotherms, pH effect on solubility, and desorption-readsorption behavior (hysteresis), and by using a surface complexation model to describe sorption. The sediments showed a high capacity to adsorb As(V). Estimates of the maximum adsorption capacity were 92 mg As kg- 1 at pH 7.5 and 70 mg As kg- 1 at pH 8.5 obtained using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Soluble arsenic [> 97% As(V)] did not increase dramatically until above pH 10. In the native pH range (7.5-8.5), soluble As concentrations were close to the lowest, indicating that As was strongly retained on the sediment. A surface complexation model, the constant capacitance model, was able to provide a simultaneous fit to both adsorption isotherms (pH 7.5 and 8.5) and the adsorption envelope (pH effect on soluble As), although the data ranges are one order of magnitude different. A hysteresis phenomenon between As adsorbed on the sediment and As in solution phase was observed in the desorption-readsorption processes and differs from conventional hysteresis observed in adsorption-desorption processes. The cause is most likely due to modification of adsorbent surfaces in sediment samples upon extensive extractions (or desorption). The significance of the hysteresis phenomenon in affecting As solubility and mobility may be better understood by further microscopic studies of As interaction mechanisms with sediments subjected to extensive leaching

  6. Investigation of a Novel Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen (HBsAg) Escape Mutant Affecting Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Golzar; Ueda, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Mutation in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) may affect the efficiency of diagnostic immunoassays or success of vaccinations using HBsAg. Thus, antigenicity and immunogenicity analyses of the mutated HBsAg are necessary to develop novel diagnostic tools and efficient vaccinations. Here, the in vitro antigenicity of three wild-type HBsAg open reading frames (ORFs) (adr4, W1S [subtype adr] and W3S [subtype adr]) isolated from clinically infected patients and nineteen synthesized single/double/multiple amino acid-substituted mutants were tested with commercial ELISA kits. Immunofluorescence staining of transfected cells and Western blot analysis confirmed that these ORFs were expressed at comparable levels in HEK-293 cells. W1S and adr4 were clearly detected, whereas W3S could not be detected. Using the same commercial immunoassay kit, we found that the single mutants, K120P and D123T, were marginally reactive, whereas W3S-aW1S and the double mutant, K120P/D123T, exhibited antigenicity roughly equivalent to the wild-type wako1S. On the other hand, the single mutants of W1S, P120K and T123D, significantly impaired the reactivity, while W1S-aW3S and the double mutant of W1S, P120K/T123D, resulted in a complete loss of antigenicity. In addition, ELISA revealed reduced HBs antigenicity of two mutants, W1S N146G and W1S Q129R/G145R. These commercial ELISA-based antigenic reactivities of HBsAg were also strongly correlated with the predicted Ai alterations of affected amino acids due to the specific mutation. In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that lysine (K120) and aspartate (D123) simultaneously affected HBsAg antigenicity, leading to diagnostic failure. These findings will improve diagnostic assays and vaccine development. PMID:28045894

  7. Photometry of AM Herculis - A slow optical pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Krzeminski, W.

    1978-01-01

    Multicolor photometry of the X-ray binary AM Her suggests that the red component of the optical flux is closely related to the source of optical circular polarization in the system. It is concluded from the periodic modulation of flux in the U through R bands, which is particularly well-defined when plotted as color curves, that the primary and secondary minima are neither eclipses by a secondary star nor eclipses by a hot spot. It is suggested that the primary minimum in the visual light curve is the eclipse of a region of intense optical emission in the magnetic field near the surface of a degenerate dwarf by that dwarf itself.

  8. Marine organic geochemistry in industrially affected coastal areas in Greece: Hydrocarbons in surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant components of the organic material in coastal zones. Their sources are mainly anthropogenic, but several natural ones have also been recognized. Among hydrocarbons, the polycyclic aromatic ones (PAHs) have received special attention since they considered as hazardous environmental chemicals and are included in priority pollutant lists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, sources and transport pathways of hydrocarbons in marine areas in Greece directly influenced from the operation of major industrial units in the coastal zone by using a molecular marker approach, characteristic compositional patterns and related indices and also to evaluate their potential toxicity. Thirty two surface sediment samples were collected from three marine areas: a) Antikyra bay in Korinthiakos gulf, affected from the operation of an alumina and production plant b) Larymna bay in Noth Evoikos, affected from the operation of a nickel production plant and c) Aliveri bay in South Evoikos Gulf, affected from a cement production plant. In all the studied areas aquaculture and fishing activities have been also developed in the coastal zone. High aliphatic hydrocarbon (AHC) concentrations (~500 μg/g), indicating significant petroleum related inputs, were measured only in Antikyra bay. In all the other samples, AHC values were below 100 μg/g. N-alkanes were the most prominent resolved components (R) with an elevated odd to even carbon number preference, revealing the high importance of terrestrial inputs in the study areas. The unresolved complex mixture (UCM) was the major component of the aliphatic fraction (UCM/R > 4), indicating a chronic oil pollution. A series of hopanes were also identified, with patterns characteristic of oil-derived hydrocarbons, further confirming the presence of pollutant inputs from fossil fuel products. Extremely high PAH concentrations (> 100,000 ng/g) were found in the close vicinity of the alumina production

  9. Photometry and polarimetry of V 1057 Cygni.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G.; Lee, T.; Coyne, G.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of extensive photometric and polarimetric data over a six-month interval for V 1057 Cyg. The polarization appears to be constant and of interstellar origin; the photometry, which extends nearly six octaves from the ultraviolet to 22 microns in the infrared, indicates that the total observed luminosity is decreasing - having now declined about 10% from its earlier level. A model characterized by two circumstellar shells which absorb and reradiate short-wavelength stellar flux from an underlying A1-type star provides the best fit to the observational data. The present variability, however, cannot be due to circumstellar activity, but appears to originate in the star itself.

  10. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    SciTech Connect

    Goguen, J.D.; Hammel, H.B.; Brown, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however. 39 references.

  11. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, J. D.; Hammel, H. B.; Brown, R. H.

    1989-02-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however.

  12. Quick and Dirty WFPC2 Stellar Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    The latest release of the IRAF (Image Reduction and Analysis Facility) MXTOOLS package includes the new tasks QDWFPC2 (Quick and Dirty Wide Field and Planetary Camera, which does quick CCD (charge-coupled device) stellar photometry on two Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 (Wide Field and Planetary Camera) observations: WFPC2COLOR, which converts HST WFPC2 instrumental magnitudes to standard colors using the Holtzman et al. color equations, and QDCMD (Quick and Dirty Color Magnitude Diagram), which reads the output of WFPC2COLOR and displays a color-magnitude diagram on a user-chosen graphics device.

  13. Photometry of six radar target asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisniewski, W. Z.

    1987-01-01

    Photoelectric photometry of six earth-approaching asteroids is presented. The selection criterion was that they were close enough in 1986 to be observed by radar. Rotation periods were obtained for 1986 DA, 3199, 3103, and 1983 RD. 1986 JK and 1986 RA showed no detectable brightness variations during the monitoring time on several nights each, and therefore were either seen pole-on or have long rotation periods. Asteroids 1986 JK and 1986 RA are of taxonomic class C, 1986 DA and 3103 of class X, 1983 RD of class Q, and only 3199 of the class S that was previously believed to be predominant among earth-approaching asteroids.

  14. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, J. D.; Hammel, H. B.; Brown, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however.

  15. Dynamics between fruit cuticles and surface microflora can affect sanitizing methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms held together by substances such as polysaccharides which form on surfaces. These communities do not need to be on living tissue but form on any available surface such as rocks in a stream, interior of pipes and on teeth. On surfaces, including fruit, these...

  16. Calibration of the MACHO photometry database

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, A

    1998-10-23

    The MACHO Project is a microlensing survey that monitors the brightnesses of ~60 million stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and Galactic bulge. The database presently contains more photometric measurements than previously recorded in the history of astronomy. We describe the calibration of the MACHO two-color photometry and transformation to the standard Kron-Cousins V and R system. This allows for proper comparison with all other observations on the Kron-Cousins standard system. The highest precision calibrations are for ~9 million stars in the LMC bar. For these stars, independent photometric measurements in field-overlap regions indicate standard deviations δvR = 0.020 mag. Calibrated MACHO photometry data are compared with published photometric sequences and with new Hubble Space Telescope observations. We additionally describe the first application of these calibrated data: the construction of the "efficiency" color-magnitude diagram which will be used to calculate our experimental sensitivity for detecting microlensing in the LMC.

  17. Hubble Deep Field guide star photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwintz, K.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; Gray, R. O.; Jenkner, H.

    1999-03-01

    Since the advent of asteroseismology as a promising innovative tool for investigating internal stellar structure, numerous attempts to detect solar type oscillations in distant stars have been conducted. The three Fine Guidance Sensors of the Hubble Space Telescope can contribute to asteroseismology, but only after the data have been corrected for systematic effects, the South Atlantic Anomaly and terrestrial stray light being the most important. We have applied these corrections and obtained essentially photon noise-limited photometry for two guide stars used during the Hubble Deep Field program. Ground-based spectral classification has revealed that the brighter of the two guide stars is a solar-type star with a spectral type of G2mG0iv. Fine Guidance Sensor photometry for this star gives a noise level in the amplitude spectrum of only 23 ppm, which makes it a good candidate for detecting stochastically driven oscillations. We compare our result with theoretical predictions. The second guide star was classified as K1v and therefore is not a candidate for solar type oscillations. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA {\\it Hubble Space Telescope}, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. TRIPPy: Trailed Image Photometry in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michaël; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Photometry of moving sources typically suffers from a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) or flux measurements biased to incorrect low values through the use of circular apertures. To address this issue, we present the software package, TRIPPy: TRailed Image Photometry in Python. TRIPPy introduces the pill aperture, which is the natural extension of the circular aperture appropriate for linearly trailed sources. The pill shape is a rectangle with two semicircular end-caps and is described by three parameters, the trail length and angle, and the radius. The TRIPPy software package also includes a new technique to generate accurate model point-spread functions (PSFs) and trailed PSFs (TSFs) from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. The TSF is merely the convolution of the model PSF, which consists of a moffat profile, and super-sampled lookup table. From the TSF, accurate pill aperture corrections can be estimated as a function of pill radius with an accuracy of 10 mmag for highly trailed sources. Analogous to the use of small circular apertures and associated aperture corrections, small radius pill apertures can be used to preserve S/Ns of low flux sources, with appropriate aperture correction applied to provide an accurate, unbiased flux measurement at all S/Ns.

  19. Hydrogen abstraction from metal surfaces: when electron-hole pair excitations strongly affect hot-atom recombination.

    PubMed

    Galparsoro, Oihana; Pétuya, Rémi; Busnengo, Fabio; Juaristi, Joseba Iñaki; Crespos, Cédric; Alducin, Maite; Larregaray, Pascal

    2016-11-23

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict that the inclusion of nonadiabatic electronic excitations influences the dynamics of preadsorbed hydrogen abstraction from the W(110) surface by hydrogen scattering. The hot-atom recombination, which involves hyperthermal diffusion of the impinging atom on the surface, is significantly affected by the dissipation of energy mediated by electron-hole pair excitations at low coverage and low incidence energy. This issue is of importance as this abstraction mechanism is thought to largely contribute to molecular hydrogen formation from metal surfaces.

  20. Analysing Thermal Response Test Data Affected by Groundwater Flow and Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Imitazione, Gianmario; Chiozzi, Paolo; Orsi, Marco; Armadillo, Egidio

    2014-05-01

    Tests that record the underground temperature variation due to a constant heat injected into a borehole (or extracted from it) by means of a carrier fluid are routinely performed to infer subsurface thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance, which are needed to size geothermal heat pump systems. The most popular model to analyse temperature-time curves obtained from these tests is the infinite line source (ILS). This model gives appropriate estimations of thermal parameters only if particular hydro-geological conditions are fulfilled. Several flaws can however affect data interpretation with ILS, which is based on strong assumptions like those of a purely conductive heat transfer regime in a homogeneous medium, no vertical heat flow and infinite length of the borehole. Other drawbacks can arise from the difficulty in the proper thermal insulation of the test equipment, and consequently with oscillations of the carrier fluid temperature due to surface temperature changes. In this paper, we focused on the treatment of thermal response test data when both advection and periodic changes of surface temperature occur. We used a moving line source model to simulate temperature-time signals under different hypothesis of Darcy velocity and thermal properties. A random noise was added to the signal in order to mimic high frequency disturbances, possibly caused by equipment operating conditions and/or geological variability. The subsurface thermal conductivity, the Darcy velocity and the borehole thermal resistance were inferred by minimising the root mean square error between the synthetic dataset and the theoretical model. The optimisation was carried out with the Nelder-Mead algorithm, and thermal and hydraulic properties were determined by iterative reprocessing according to a trial-and-error procedure. The inferred thermal and hydraulic parameters are well consistent with the 'a priory' values, and the presence of noise in the synthetic data does not produce

  1. LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Ainelo, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Kivisaar, Maia; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Teras, Riho

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida. PMID:27812186

  2. JHK photometry of selected Trojan and Hilda asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dale W.; Johnson, Paul E.; Buckingham, William L.; Shorthill, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    No entirely satisfactory match has been established between the present JHK photometry of selected Hilda and Trojan asteroids and photometry for both main belt asteroids and laboratory samples. It is noted that while the leading Trojans and Hildas exhibit similar and homogeneous JHK colors, the trailing Trojans appear to be more heterogeneous. Charcoal and magnetite provide the best match in terms of JHK colors.

  3. Subnanometric Roughness Affects the Deposition and Mobile Adhesion of Escherichia coli on Silanized Glass Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumedha; Jaimes-Lizcano, Yuly Andrea; McLay, Ryan B; Cirino, Patrick C; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-05-31

    We investigate the deposition and transient adhesion of Escherichia coli on alkyl and fluoroalkyl silanized glass surfaces of different carbon chain lengths. The rate at which bacteria deposit onto these surfaces decreases as the shear stress is increased from 3 to 67 mPa, but trends in the deposition rate across all surfaces cannot be predicted from extended DLVO calculations of the interaction potential. As the surface root-mean-square (rms) roughness increases, the deposition rate increases and the percentage of motile tethered cells decreases. Furthermore, on surfaces of root-mean-square roughness of less than 0.2 nm, bacteria exhibit mobile adhesion, for which surface-associated cells linearly translate distances greater than approximately 1.5 times their average body length along the flow direction. E. coli bacteria with and without flagella exhibit mobile adhesion, indicating that this behavior is not driven by these appendages. Cells that express fimbriae do not exhibit mobile adhesion. These results suggest that even subnanoscale roughness can influence the deposition and transient adhesion of bacteria and imply that strategies to reduce frictional interactions by making cells or surfaces smoother may help to control the initial fouling of surfaces by E. coli bacteria.

  4. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models.

    PubMed

    Holland, Marika M; Landrum, Laura

    2015-07-13

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state.

  5. Nutrient concentrations of runoff as affected by the diameter of unconsolidated material from feedlot surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated material that accumulates on the feedlot surface during a feeding cycle. This study was conducted to measure the effects of varying diameters of unconsolidated surface material and varying flow rates on nutrient concentrations in runoff. Unconsolidated sur...

  6. Inflammatory cytokine release is affected by surface morphology and chemistry of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Östberg, Anna-Karin; Dahlgren, Ulf; Sul, Young-Taeg; Johansson, Carina B

    2015-04-01

    To investigate in vitro cellular cytokine expression in relation to commercially pure titanium discs, comparing a native surface to a fluorinated oxide nanotube surface. Control samples pure titanium discs with a homogenous wave of the margins and grooves and an often smeared-out surface structure. Test samples pure titanium discs with a fluorinated titanium oxide chemistry and surface morphology with nanopore/tube geometry characterized by ordered structures of nanotubes with a diameter of ≈ 120 nm, a spacing of ≈ 30 nm, and a wall thickness of ≈ 10 nm. Cross-section view showed vertically aligned nanotubes with similar lengths of ≈ 700 nm. Peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes were cultured for 1, 3, and 6 days according to standard procedures. BioPlex Pro™ assays were used for analysis and detection of cytokines. Selected inflammatory cytokines are reported. A pronounced difference in production of the inflammatogenic cytokines was observed. Leucocytes exposed to control coins produced significantly more TNF-α, IL-1ß, and IL-6 than the test nanotube coins. The effect on the TH2 cytokine IL-4 was less pronounced at day 6 compared to days 1 and 3, and slightly higher expressed on the control coins. The morphology and surface chemistry of the titanium surface have a profound impact on basic cytokine production in vitro. Within the limitations of the present study, it seems that the fluorinated oxide nanotube surface results in a lower inflammatory response compared to a rather flat surface that seems to favour inflammation.

  7. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  8. Nanoscale Roughness and Morphology Affect the IsoElectric Point of Titania Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Francesca; Vyas, Varun; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We report on the systematic investigation of the role of surface nanoscale roughness and morphology on the charging behaviour of nanostructured titania (TiO2) surfaces in aqueous solutions. IsoElectric Points (IEPs) of surfaces have been characterized by direct measurement of the electrostatic double layer interactions between titania surfaces and the micrometer-sized spherical silica probe of an atomic force microscope in NaCl aqueous electrolyte. The use of a colloidal probe provides well-defined interaction geometry and allows effectively probing the overall effect of nanoscale morphology. By using supersonic cluster beam deposition to fabricate nanostructured titania films, we achieved a quantitative control over the surface morphological parameters. We performed a systematical exploration of the electrical double layer properties in different interaction regimes characterized by different ratios of characteristic nanometric lengths of the system: the surface rms roughness Rq, the correlation length ξ and the Debye length λD. We observed a remarkable reduction by several pH units of IEP on rough nanostructured surfaces, with respect to flat crystalline rutile TiO2. In order to explain the observed behavior of IEP, we consider the roughness-induced self-overlap of the electrical double layers as a potential source of deviation from the trend expected for flat surfaces. PMID:23874708

  9. How Surface Heterogeneity Affects Protein Adsorption: Annealing of OTS Patterns and Albumin Adsorption Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Gerald N.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy and intensity histogram analysis techniques were used to monitor spatially-resolved albumin adsorption kinetics to model heterogeneous surfaces on sub-μm scales. Several distinct protein subpopulations were resolved, each represented by a normal distribution of adsorption densities on the adsorbent surface. Histogram analyses provided dynamic information of mean adsorption density, spread in adsorption density, and surface area coverage for each distinct protein subpopulation. A simple adsorption model is proposed in which individual protein binding events are predicted by the summation of multiple protein's surface sub-site interactions with different binding energy sub-sites on adsorbent surfaces. This model is predictive of the albumin adsorption on the patterns produced by one step μ-contact printing (μCP) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on glass but fails to describe adsorption once the same patterns are altered by a thermal annealing step. PMID:19746205

  10. PSF reconstruction for AO photometry and astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenso, J.; Neichel, B.; Silva, M.; Fusco, T.; Garcia, P.

    2015-12-01

    Extracting accurate photometry (and astrometry) from images taken with adaptive optics assisted instruments is particularly challenging. Current post-processing tools are not prepared to achieve high accuracy from AO data, especially in limiting cases of crowded fields and marginally resolved sources. We quantify the limitations of these tools with synthetic images, and present a proof-of-concept study showing the potential of using reconstructed PSFs from the (GL)AO system telemetry to increase the measured photometric accuracy. We show that the photometric accuracy is significantly improved with a good PSF reconstruction in considerably crowded regions. We demonstrate the need for a dedicated post-processing tool that incorporates available information about the PSF, as well as the ability to adjust to the spatial variations of the PSF characteristic of AO data.

  11. Techniques for Automated Single-Star Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.

    2001-01-01

    Tennessee State University operates several automatic photoelectric telescopes (APTs) located at Fairborn Observatory in the Patagonia Mountains of southern Arizona. The APTs are dedicated to photometric monitoring programs that would be expensive and difficult to accomplish without the advantages of automation. I review the operation of two of the telescopes (a 0.75- and 0.80-meter (m) APT) and the quality-control techniques that result in the routine acquisition of single-star differential photometry with a precision of 0.001 mag for single observations and 0.0001 - 0.0002 mag for seasonal means. I also illustrate the capabilities of the APTS with sample results from a program to measure luminosity cycles in sun-like stars and a related program to search for the signatures of extrasolar planets around these stars.

  12. Supernova Classification Using Swift UVOT Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Madison; Brown, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    With the great influx of supernova discoveries over the past few years, the observation time needed to acquire the spectroscopic data needed to classify supernova by type has become unobtainable. Instead, using the photometry of supernovae could greatly reduce the amount of time between discovery and classification. For this project we looked at the relationship between colors and supernova types through machine learning packages in Python. Using data from the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT), each photometric point was assigned values corresponding to colors, absolute magnitudes, and the relative times from the peak brightness in several filters. These values were fed into three classifying methods, the nearest neighbors, decision tree, and random forest methods. We will discuss the success of these classification systems, the optimal filters for photometric classification, and ways to improve the classification.

  13. TERMS PHOTOMETRY OF KNOWN TRANSITING EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Payne, Alan; Ramirez, Solange V.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wyatt, Pamela; Pilyavsky, Genady; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wright, Jason T.; Zachary Gazak, J.; Rabus, Markus

    2011-10-15

    The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey conducts radial velocity and photometric monitoring of known exoplanets in order to refine planetary orbits and predictions of possible transit times. This effort is primarily directed toward planets not known to transit, but a small sample of our targets consists of known transiting systems. Here we present precision photometry for six WASP (Wide Angle Search for Planets) planets acquired during their transit windows. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis for each planet and combine these data with previous measurements to redetermine the period and ephemerides for these planets. These observations provide recent mid-transit times which are useful for scheduling future observations. Our results improve the ephemerides of WASP-4b, WASP-5b, and WASP-6b and reduce the uncertainties on the mid-transit time for WASP-29b. We also confirm the orbital, stellar, and planetary parameters of all six systems.

  14. Photoelectric photometry of comet Kohoutek (1973f)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohoutek, L.

    1976-01-01

    Comet Kohoutek was observed with the 50 cm (f/15) reflecting telescope of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, on fourteen nights between January 16 and 30, when the heliocentric and geocentric distances of the comet were r=0.66 - 1.00 A.U. and delta=0.81 - 0.96 A.U., respectively. The 40 inch and 80 inch diaphragms were used for the photometry of the cometary head in the UBV system and with six interference filters. The atmospheric conditions were good but the accuracy of observations was low due to large extinction and twilight. The mean error of one measurement of log F in all but Na 5893 A filters can be estimated at plus or minus 0.02, whereas the accuracy through the Na filter was substantially lower.

  15. Spectroscopy and Photometry of MWC 137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimardanova, F.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Zharikov, S. V.; Rudy, R. J.; Manset, N.; Kusakin, A. V.; Kuratov, K. S.; Khokhlov, S.

    2017-02-01

    MWC 137 is an object with a strong emission-line spectrum associated with an 1'-size H Imall> region Sharpless 266. It was included in a catalog of planetary nebulae in 1967, in the first list of objects with the B[e] phenomenon in 1976, and in a list of Herbig Ae/Be stars in 1984. A recent analysis of the stellar and nebular spectra of MWC 137 by several authors suggested that it is most likely a B[e] supergiant located at a distance 4-6 kpc away from the Sun. No high-resolution spectra of the object have been published so far. We present the results of our analysis of high-resolution optical spectra of MWC 137 obtained in 2004-2016 and UBVRI photometry.

  16. Climatological Factors Affecting Electromagnetic Surface Ducting in the Aegean Sea Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    19  x Figure 11.  The Azores or Bermuda High and southwest and south-central Asia thermal low tend to produce a...of Frequency (green lines with triangle markers), moisture mixing ratio at the surface level (blue lines with rhombus markers) and moisture mixing...of Frequency (green lines with triangle markers), moisture mixing ratio at the surface level (blue lines with rhombus markers) and moisture mixing

  17. Factors affecting the spontaneous motion of condensate drops on superhydrophobic copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Qin, Zhaoqian; Yao, Shuhuai

    2012-04-10

    The coalescence-induced condensate drop motion on some superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) has attracted increasing attention because of its potential applications in sustained dropwise condensation, water collection, anti-icing, and anticorrosion. However, an investigation of the mechanism of such self-propelled motion including the factors for designing such SHSs is still limited. In this article, we fabricated a series of superhydrophobic copper surfaces with nanoribbon structures using wet chemical oxidation followed by fluorization treatment. We then systematically studied the influence of surface roughness and the chemical properties of as-prepared surfaces on the spontaneous motion of condensate drops. We quantified the "frequency" of the condensate drop motion based on microscopic sequential images and showed that the trend of this frequency varied with the nanoribbon structure and extent of fluorination. More obvious spontaneous condensate drop motion was observed on surfaces with a higher extent of fluorization and nanostructures possessing sufficiently narrow spacing and higher perpendicularity. We attribute this enhanced drop mobility to the stable Cassie state of condensate drops in the dynamic dropwise condensation process that is determined by the nanoscale morphology and local surface energy.

  18. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements.

  19. Colloidal mobilization of arsenic from mining-affected soils by surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Voegelin, Andreas; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Bolea, Eduardo; Laborda, Francisco; Garrido, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Scorodite-rich wastes left as a legacy of mining and smelting operations pose a threat to environmental health. Colloids formed by the weathering of processing wastes may control the release of arsenic (As) into surface waters. At a former mine site in Madrid (Spain), we investigated the mobilization of colloidal As by surface runoff from weathered processing wastes and from sediments in the bed of a draining creek and a downstream sedimentation-pond. Colloids mobilized by surface runoff during simulated rain events were characterized for their composition, structure and mode of As uptake using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively plasma mass spectrometry (AF4-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the As and Fe K-edges. Colloidal scorodite mobilized in surface runoff from the waste pile is acting as a mobile As carrier. In surface runoff from the river bed and the sedimentation pond, ferrihydrite was identified as the dominant As-bearing colloidal phase. The results from this study suggest that mobilization of As-bearing colloids by surface runoff may play an important role in the dispersion of As from metallurgical wastes deposited above ground and needs to be considered in risk assessment.

  20. Abiotic factors affecting the persistence of avian influenza virus in surface waters of waterfowl habitats.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Shamus P; Dalton, Melinda S; Cressler, Alan M; Berghaus, Roy D; Stallknecht, David E

    2014-05-01

    Avian influenza (AI) virus can remain infectious in water for months, and virus-contaminated surface water is considered to be a source of infection within wild waterfowl populations. Previous work has characterized the effects of pH, salinity, and temperature on viral persistence in water, but most of that work was done with modified distilled water. The objective of this study was to identify the abiotic factors that influence the duration of AI virus persistence in natural surface water. Surface water samples were collected from 38 waterfowl habitats distributed across the United States. Samples were submitted to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for chemical analysis and the University of Georgia for viral reduction time analysis. Samples were filtered with 0.22-μm filters, and the durations of persistence of three wild-bird-derived influenza A viruses within each water sample at 10, 17, and 28°C were determined. The effects of the surface water physicochemical factors on the duration of AI viral persistence in laboratory experiments were evaluated by multivariable linear regression with robust standard errors. The duration of AI virus persistence was determined to be longest in filtered surface water with a low temperature (<17°C), a neutral-to-basic pH (7.0 to 8.5), low salinity (<0.5 ppt), and a low ammonia concentration (<0.5 mg/liter). Our results also highlighted potential strain-related variation in the stability of AI virus in surface water. These results bring us closer to being able to predict the duration of AI virus persistence in surface water of waterfowl habitats.

  1. Abiotic Factors Affecting the Persistence of Avian Influenza Virus in Surface Waters of Waterfowl Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Melinda S.; Cressler, Alan M.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) virus can remain infectious in water for months, and virus-contaminated surface water is considered to be a source of infection within wild waterfowl populations. Previous work has characterized the effects of pH, salinity, and temperature on viral persistence in water, but most of that work was done with modified distilled water. The objective of this study was to identify the abiotic factors that influence the duration of AI virus persistence in natural surface water. Surface water samples were collected from 38 waterfowl habitats distributed across the United States. Samples were submitted to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for chemical analysis and the University of Georgia for viral reduction time analysis. Samples were filtered with 0.22-μm filters, and the durations of persistence of three wild-bird-derived influenza A viruses within each water sample at 10, 17, and 28°C were determined. The effects of the surface water physicochemical factors on the duration of AI viral persistence in laboratory experiments were evaluated by multivariable linear regression with robust standard errors. The duration of AI virus persistence was determined to be longest in filtered surface water with a low temperature (<17°C), a neutral-to-basic pH (7.0 to 8.5), low salinity (<0.5 ppt), and a low ammonia concentration (<0.5 mg/liter). Our results also highlighted potential strain-related variation in the stability of AI virus in surface water. These results bring us closer to being able to predict the duration of AI virus persistence in surface water of waterfowl habitats. PMID:24584247

  2. How disorder affects topological surface states in the limit of ultrathin Bi2Se3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kenan; Soriano, David; Robles, Roberto; Ordejon, Pablo; Roche, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    We present a first-principles study of electronic properties of ultrathin films of topological insulators (TIs) and scrutinize the role of disorder on the robustness of topological surface states, which can be analysed through their spin textures. The presence of twin grain boundaries is found to increase the band gap of the film, while preserving the spin texture of states in first conduction and valence bands. Differently, partial hydrogenation of one surface not only results in some self-doping effect, but also provokes some alteration of the spin texture symmetry of the electronic states. The formation of a new Dirac cone at M-point of the Brillouin zone of the hydrogenated surface, together with a modified spin texture characteristics are consistent with a dominant Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction type, more usually observed in 3D materials. Our findings indicate that defects can either be detrimental or beneficial for exploring spin transport of surface states in the limit of ultrathin films of TIs, which maximizes surface over bulk phenomena.

  3. H II region spectroscopy and two dimensional stellar photometry of the barred Seyfert NGC 1566

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckman, J. E.; Bransgrove, S. G.; Phillips, J. P.

    1986-03-01

    Radial velocities of 14 H II regions were obtained using reticon spectroscopy at H-alpha for the barred spiral NGC 1566. The same spectra also yield N II/H and S II/H ratios, and give values of the electron densities in the range of 10/cu cm. Kinematic and dynamic arguments are used to show that nonradial gas velocities are present, especially outflow at the ends of the bar. Two-dimensional isophotes at high angular resolution (approximately 1 arcsec) are presented in V, R and I. Comparison of M/L ratios based on surface photometry, and based on the inferred rotational dynamics, shows that no missing mass is required in NGC 1566 out to 13.5 kpc from the center. The photometry also shows that the Seyfert nucleus is bluer by over a magnitude than the rest of the central bulge.

  4. Surface and subsurface geologic risk factors to ground water affecting brownfield redevelopment potential.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Martin M; Murray, Kent S; Rogers, Daniel T

    2003-01-01

    A model is created for assessing the redevelopment potential of brownfields. The model is derived from a space and time conceptual framework that identifies and measures the surface and subsurface risk factors present at brownfield sites. The model then combines these factors with a contamination extent multiplier at each site to create an index of redevelopment potential. Results from the application of the model within an urbanized watershed demonstrate clear differences between the redevelopment potential present within five different near-surface geologic units, with those units containing clay being less vulnerable to subsurface contamination. With and without the extent multiplier, the total risk present at the brownfield sites within all the geologic units is also strongly correlated to the actual costs of remediation. Thus, computing the total surface and subsurface risk within a watershed can help guide the remediation efforts at broad geographic scales, and prioritize the locations for redevelopment.

  5. Surface applied water treatment residuals affect bioavailable phosphorus losses in Florida sands.

    PubMed

    Oladeji, Olawale O; O'Connor, George A; Brinton, Scott R

    2008-09-01

    Water treatment residuals (WTR) can reduce runoff P loss and surface co-application of P-sources and WTR is a practical way of land applying the residuals. In a rainfall simulation study, we evaluated the effects of surface co-applied P-sources and an Al-WTR on runoff and leacheate bioavailable P (BAP) losses from a Florida sand. Four P-sources, namely poultry manure, Boca Raton biosolids (high water-soluble P), Pompano biosolids (moderate water-soluble P), and triple super phosphate (TSP) were surface applied at 56 and 224 kg P ha(-1) (by weight) to represent low and high soil P loads typical of P- and N-based amendments rates. The treatments further received surface applied WTR at 0 or 10 g WTR kg(-1) soil. BAP loss masses were greater in leachate (16.4-536 mg) than in runoff (0.91-46 mg), but were reduced in runoff and leachate by surface applied WTR. Masses of total BAP lost in the presence of surface applied WTR were less than approximately 75% of BAP losses in the absence of WTR. Total BAP losses from each of the organic sources applied at N-based rates were not greater than P loss from TSP applied at a P-based rate. The BAP loss at the N-based rate of moderate water-soluble P-source (Pompano biosolids) was not greater than BAP losses at the P-based rates of other organic sources tested. The hazards of excess P from applying organic P-sources at N-based rates are not greater than observed at P-based rates of mineral fertilizer. Results suggest that management of the environmental P hazards associated with N-based rates of organic materials in Florida sands is possible by either applying P-sources with WTR or using a moderate water-soluble P-source.

  6. Chemical and physical modifications to poly(dimethylsiloxane) surfaces affect adhesion of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Sun, Bing; Ziemer, Katherine S; Barabino, Gilda A; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2010-06-15

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone elastomer is extensively used in soft lithography processes to fabricate microscale or nano scale systems for microfluidic or cell culture applications. Though PDMS is biocompatible, it is not an ideal material for cell culture due to its poor cell adhesion properties. In this study, PDMS surfaces were modified to promote intestinal cell adhesion, in the interest of testing feasibility of using microfabricated PDMS systems for high throughput drug screening. Modification techniques included changing chemical composition of PDMS (i.e., varying curing to mixing agent ratio, and oxidization of PDMS surface by oxygen plasma), surface treatment of PDMS by coating with charged molecules (i.e., poly-D-lysine, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine, and a layer bylayer coating), and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (i.e., laminin, fibronectin, and collagen). The influence of these modifications on PDMS properties, including elastic modulus and surface properties (wettability, chemical composition, topography, and protein adsorption) were characterized. Modification techniques were all found to change PDMS properties and influence the attachment and proliferation of Caco-2 cells over three days of culture to varying degrees. Generally, Caco-2 cells preferred to attach on collagen-coated, fibronectin-coated, and fibronectin-coated oxygen-plasma treated PDMS. The results highlight the importance of considering multiple physical and chemical factors that may be influenced by biomaterial modification and result in altered cell attachment to microfabricated systems, including surface hydrophobicity, chemical composition, stiffness, and topography. This study provides a foundation for further miniaturization, utilizing soft lithography techniques, of Caco-2 cell-based system for high-throughput screening of drug intestinal absorption during lead optimization in drug discovery. The understanding of different surface modifications on

  7. Cobalt and chromium exposure affects osteoblast function and impairs the mineralization of prosthesis surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karan M; Wilkinson, Jeremy Mark; Gartland, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) ions and nanoparticles equivalent to those released through tribo-corrosion of prosthetic metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings and taper junctions are detrimental to osteoblast activity and function in vitro when examined as individual species. Here we examined the effects of Co(2+):Cr(3+) and Co(2+):Cr(6+) combinations on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cellular activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization to better reflect clinical exposure conditions in vivo. We also assessed the effect of Co(2+):Cr(3+) combinations and Co:Cr nanoparticles on SaOS-2 cell osteogenic responses on grit-blasted, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated, and hydroxyapatite-coated prosthesis surfaces. Cellular activity and ALP activity were reduced to a greater extent with combination treatments compared to individual ions. Co(2+) and Cr(3+) interacted additively and synergistically to reduce cellular activity and ALP activity, respectively, while the Co(2+) with Cr(6+) combination was dominated by the effect of Cr(6+) alone. Mineralization by osteoblasts was greater on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces compared to grit-blasted and plasma-sprayed titanium-coated surfaces. Treatments with Co(2+):Cr(3+) ions and Co:Cr nanoparticles reduced the percentage mineralization on all surfaces, with hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces having the least reduction. In conclusion, our data suggests that previous studies investigating individual metal ions underestimate their potential clinical effects on osteoblast activity. Furthermore, the data suggests that hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces may modulate osteoblast responses to metal debris.

  8. Intermediate-band photometry of faint standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    The David Dunlap Observatory system uses six intermediate-band filters whose central wavelengths were chosen to cover important features in the spectrum of a late-type star. Calibrations of the color indices with physical parameters, allow one to estimate T sub eff, log g, Fe/H, M sub v and reddening directly from the photometry. Although a number of standards lists exist, only a small fraction of the stars is fainter than V=6. It is desirable to add to the numbers of faint standards. Results are presented of photometry of sixteen stars obtained during a program of variable-star photometry at Blue Mesa Observatory.

  9. Surface and ground water quality in a restored urban stream affected by road salts

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001 research began in Minebank Run, MD to examine the impact of restoration on water quality. Our research area was to determine if road salts in the surface and ground waters are detrimental to the stream channel restoration. The upstream reach (UP), above the Baltimore I-...

  10. Sub-surface soil carbon changes affects biofuel greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in direct soil organic carbon (SOC) can have a major impact on overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from biofuels when using life-cycle assessment (LCA). Estimated changes in SOC, when accounted for in an LCA, are typically derived from near-surface soil depths (<30 cm). Changes in subsurf...

  11. Investigations on temperature distribution of satellite surfaces affected by solar absorptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Pan, X. X.; Li, G. H.; Liu, X.; Jiang, L. X.

    2010-09-01

    Based on the Monte Carlo ray-tracing method, the network coefficients of thermal network model describing the radiation heat transfer among satellite surfaces is solved by considering the surface material optical characters. It is superiority to the conventional Gebhart's method in view of the grey body and the diffuse reflection assumptions. The zone leveling method is used to discrete the governing equations and the solar absorpivity is separated and considered to be an important correction parameter. Effects of the solar incidence round angle, the zenith angle and the ratio of absorpivity to emissivity (RAE) on temperature distribution are numerically simulated and discussed in detail. The higher or the lower the RAE may be lead to the alternative heating and cooling tend with a larger heating or cooling velocity of main body surfaces than the solar array surfaces. Furthermore, maximum temperature of main body is almost larger than solar arrays. Under the same RAE, solar incidence angle make a great effect on the uniform character of temperature distribution.

  12. Factors affecting temperature rise on the external root surface during ultrasonic retrieval of intracanal separated files.

    PubMed

    Madarati, Ahmad A; Qualtrough, Alison J; Watts, David C

    2008-09-01

    Temperature rise (TR) on the external root surface during ultrasonic removal of separated files (SFs) from 50 lower incisors roots of 10-mm length was investigated. CPR ultrasonic tips (Obtura-Spartan, Fenton, MO) were used dry to retrieve F2 ProTaper (Dentsply, Surrey, UK) segments fractured 2.5 mm from the coronal access in five groups: CPR2, CPR5, and CPR6 at power setting 1 and CPR5 at power settings 2.5 and 5. Temperature changes were inspected at 30-second intervals up to 120 seconds at three different sites: two at mesiodistal and buccolingual surfaces adjacent to the most coronal aspect of the SF and the third adjacent to the most apical aspect. Overall, the highest mean TR was at the buccolingual root surface followed by that at the mesiodistal and the more apical site surfaces. At power setting 1, CPR6 produced a significantly lower TR than CPR5, and both can be used for 120 and 60 seconds, respectively. Power setting 5 is not recommended for the removal of SF because this induces a hazardous TR.

  13. Role of surface recombination in affecting the efficiency of nanostructured thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Da, Yun; Xuan, Yimin

    2013-11-04

    Nanostructured light trapping is a promising way to improve the efficiency in thin-film solar cells recently. In this work, both the optical and electrical properties of thin-film solar cells with 1D periodic grating structure are investigated by using photoelectric coupling model. It is found that surface recombination plays a key role in determining the performance of nanostructured thin-film solar cells. Once the recombination effect is considered, the higher optical absorption does not mean the higher conversion efficiency as most existing publications claimed. Both the surface recombination velocity and geometric parameters of structure have great impact on the efficiency of thin-film solar cells. Our simulation results indicate that nanostructured light trapping will not only improve optical absorption but also boost the surface recombination simultaneously. Therefore, we must get the tradeoffs between optical absorption and surface recombination to obtain the maximum conversion efficiency. Our work makes it clear that both the optical absorption and electrical recombination response should be taken into account simultaneously in designing the nanostructured thin-film solar cells.

  14. Biogenic nanoparticulate UO2: Synthesis, characterization, and factors affecting surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, D. M.; Farges, F.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    The surface reactivity of biogenic, nanoparticulate UO2 with respect to sorption of aqueous Zn(II) and particle annealing is different from that of bulk uraninite because of differences in particle size and the presence of surface-associated organic matter on the biogenic UO2. Synthesis of biogenic UO2 was accomplished by reduction of aqueous uranyl ions, UO22+ by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and the resulting nanoparticles were washed using one of two protocols: (1) 10 percent NaOH, followed by 4 mM KHCO3/KCl (particles referred to as NAUO2) to remove surface-associated organic matter and soluble uranyl species, or (2) 4 mM KHCO3-KCl (particles referred to as BIUO2) to remove only soluble uranyl species. A suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques was used to examine bulk and biogenic, nanoparticulate UO2 as a function of particle size and surface-associated organic matter. The N2-BET surface areas of the two biogenic UO2 samples following the washing procedures are 128.63 m2g-1 (NAUO2) and 92.56 m2g-1 (BIUO2), and the average particle sizes range from 5-10 nm based on TEM imaging. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicate that the surface charge behavior of biogenic, nanoparticulate UO2 over the pH range 3-9 is the same as that of bulk uraninite (avg. diameter = 500 nm) (pHpzc = 5.6±0.03) and that there is no observed effect on surface charge caused by surface-associated organic matter for sample BIUO2. Both XPS and U LIII-edge XANES spectroscopy revealed that the uranium oxidation state of the biogenic, nanoparticulate samples is 4+, which is consistent with stoichiometric UO2. The EXAFS spectra for biogenic UO2 were best fit with half the number of second-shell uranium neighbors compared to bulk uraninite, and no oxygen neighbors were detected beyond the first shell around U(IV) in the biogenic UO2. At pH 7, sorption of Zn(II) onto both finely ground, bulk uraninite (500 nm average particle diameter) and biogenic, nanoparticulate UO2 is

  15. Disk-resolved photometry of Asteroid (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjuth, S.; Jorda, L.; Lamy, P. L.; Keller, H. U.; Li, J.-Y.

    2012-11-01

    We present a new method to perform disk-resolved photometry in order to investigate the intrinsic photometric properties of the surface of small Solar System bodies. We adopt the standard approach where a shape model is combined with a photometric formalism - in practise the Hapke formalism - to remove the effects of topography and recover the photometric (Hapke) parameters of either the global surface or, in its most elaborated form, the spatial variations of these parameters across the surface. Our method operates in the space of the facets representing the three-dimensional shape of the body, whereas all past analysis have always been performed in the space of the image pixels although they are not intrinsic to the surface of the body. This has the advantage of automatically tracking the same local surface element on a series of images. We first apply our method to images of the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 obtained by the High-Resolution Imager (HRI) instrument on board the Deep Impact spacecraft and our derived Hapke parameters are in good agreement with those published by Li et al. (Li, J.-Y. et al. [2007]. Icarus 187, 41-55) within their respective uncertainties. We confirm the presence of an extended region of higher roughness in the southern hemisphere of the nucleus and the higher albedo of the ice-rich regions identified by Sunshine et al. (Sunshine, J.M. et al. [2006]. Science 311, 1453-1455) near the equator. The photometric properties of Asteroid (2867) Steins are then studied from multi-spectral images obtained with the OSIRIS Wide Angle Camera (WAC) on board the Rosetta spacecraft during its flyby on 5 September 2008. Our analysis indicates that the surface is highly porous (∼84%) and that it exhibits both a shadow-hiding opposition effect (SHOE) and probably, a coherent-backscatter opposition effect (CBOE). The single scattering albedo is the highest (SSA = 0.57) ever observed among small bodies visited by spacecrafts. Our modelled roughness

  16. SPARC: Mass Models for 175 Disk Galaxies with Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce SPARC (Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves): a sample of 175 nearby galaxies with new surface photometry at 3.6 μm and high-quality rotation curves from previous H i/Hα studies. SPARC spans a broad range of morphologies (S0 to Irr), luminosities (∼5 dex), and surface brightnesses (∼4 dex). We derive [3.6] surface photometry and study structural relations of stellar and gas disks. We find that both the stellar mass–H i mass relation and the stellar radius–H i radius relation have significant intrinsic scatter, while the H i mass–radius relation is extremely tight. We build detailed mass models and quantify the ratio of baryonic to observed velocity (V bar/V obs) for different characteristic radii and values of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (ϒ⋆) at [3.6]. Assuming ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.5 M ⊙/L ⊙ (as suggested by stellar population models), we find that (i) the gas fraction linearly correlates with total luminosity (ii) the transition from star-dominated to gas-dominated galaxies roughly corresponds to the transition from spiral galaxies to dwarf irregulars, in line with density wave theory; and (iii) V bar/V obs varies with luminosity and surface brightness: high-mass, high-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly maximal, while low-mass, low-surface-brightness galaxies are submaximal. These basic properties are lost for low values of ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.2 M ⊙/L ⊙ as suggested by the DiskMass survey. The mean maximum-disk limit in bright galaxies is ϒ⋆ ≃ 0.7 M ⊙/L ⊙ at [3.6]. The SPARC data are publicly available and represent an ideal test bed for models of galaxy formation.

  17. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of 137Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of 137Cs in forest surface (0–3 cm) soils. The K2SO4 extraction process liberated 2.1%–12.8% of the total 137Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher 137Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the 137Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout 137Cs. The results indicate that uptake of 137Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile 137Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  18. Cell surface sialylation affects binding of enterovirus 71 to rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), and infection of EV71 to central nerve system (CNS) may result in a high mortality in children less than 2 years old. Although there are two highly glycosylated membrane proteins, SCARB2 and PSGL-1, which have been identified as the cellular and functional receptors of EV71, the role of glycosylation in EV71 infection is still unclear. Results We demonstrated that the attachment of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells was diminished after the removal of cell surface sialic acids by neuraminidase. Sialic acid specific lectins, Maackia amurensis (MAA) and Sambucus Nigra (SNA), could compete with EV71 and restrained the binding of EV71 significantly. Preincubation of RD cells with fetuin also reduced the binding of EV71. In addition, we found that SCARB2 was a sialylated glycoprotein and interaction between SCARB2 and EV71 was retarded after desialylation. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that cell surface sialic acids assist in the attachment of EV71 to host cells. Cell surface sialylation should be a key regulator that facilitates the binding and infection of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells. PMID:22853823

  19. Different Culture Media Affect Proliferation, Surface Epitope Expression, and Differentiation of Ovine MSC

    PubMed Central

    Tolba, René; Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm; Lethaus, Bernd; Neuss, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic implants including engineered bone tissue are commonly tested in sheep. To avoid rejection of heterologous or xenogeneic cells, autologous cells are preferably used, that is, ovine mesenchymal stem cells (oMSC). Unlike human MSC, ovine MSC are not well studied regarding isolation, expansion, and characterization. Here we investigated the impact of culture media composition on growth characteristics, differentiation, and surface antigen expression of oMSC. The culture media varied in fetal calf serum (FCS) content and in the addition of supplements and/or additional epidermal growth factor (EGF). We found that FCS strongly influenced oMSC proliferation and that specific combinations of supplemental factors (MCDB-201, ITS-plus, dexamethasone, and L-ascorbic acid) determined the expression of surface epitopes. We compared two published protocols for oMSC differentiation towards the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic fate and found (i) considerable donor to donor variations, (ii) protocol-dependent variations, and (iii) variations resulting from the preculture medium composition. Our results indicate that the isolation and culture of oMSC in different growth media are highly variable regarding oMSC phenotype and behaviour. Furthermore, variations from donor to donor critically influence growth rate, surface marker expression, and differentiation. PMID:24228035

  20. Polarimetric Retrievals of Surface and Cirrus Clouds Properties in the Region Affected by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, Matteo; Cairns, Brian; Chowdhary, Jacek; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Burton, Sharon; Hair, John; Obland, Michael D.; Rogers, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) performed several aerial surveys over the region affected by the oil spill caused by the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon offshore platform. The instrument was deployed on the NASA Langley B200 aircraft together with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), which provides information on the distribution of the aerosol layers beneath the aircraft, including an accurate estimate of aerosol optical depth. This work illustrates the merits of polarization measurements in detecting variations of ocean surface properties linked to the presence of an oil slick. In particular, we make use of the degree of linear polarization in the glint region, which is severely affected by variations in the refractive index but insensitive to the waviness of the water surface. Alterations in the surface optical properties are therefore expected to directly affect the polarization response of the RSP channel at 2264 nm, where both molecular and aerosol scattering are negligible and virtually all of the observed signal is generated via Fresnel reflection at the surface. The glint profile at this wavelength is fitted with a model which can optimally estimate refractive index, wind speed and direction, together with aircraft attitude variations affecting the viewing geometry. The retrieved refractive index markedly increases over oil-contaminated waters, while the apparent wind speed is significantly lower than in adjacent uncontaminated areas, suggesting that the slick dampens high-frequency components of the ocean wave spectrum. The constraint on surface reflectance provided by the short-wave infrared channels is a cornerstone of established procedures to retrieve atmospheric aerosol microphysical parameters based on the inversion of the RSP multispectral measurements. This retrieval, which benefits from the ancillary information provided by the HSRL, was in this specific case hampered by

  1. Surface variations affecting human dental enamel studied using nanomechanical and chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Michelle Emma

    The enamel surface is the interface between the tooth and its ever changing oral environment. Cavity (caries) formation and extrinsic tooth staining are due, respectively, to degradation of the enamel structure under low pH conditions and interactions between salivary pellicle and dietary elements. Both of these occur at the enamel surface and are caused by the local environment changing the chemistry of the surface. The results can be detrimental to the enamel's mechanical integrity and aesthetics. Incipient carious lesions are the precursor to caries and form due to demineralisation of enamel. These carious lesions are a reversible structure where ions (e.g. Ca2+, F -) can diffuse in (remineralisation) to preserve the tooth's structural integrity. This investigation used controlled in vitro demineralisation and remineralisation to study artificial carious lesion formation and repair. The carious lesions were cross-sectioned and characterised using nanoindentation, electron probe micro-analysis and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Mechanical and chemical maps showed the carious lesion had a significantly reduced hardness and elastic modulus, and the calcium and phosphate content was lower than in sound enamel. Fluoride based remineralisation treatments gave a new phase (possibly fluorohydroxyapatite) within the lesion with mechanical properties higher than sound enamel. The acquired salivary pellicle is a protein-rich film formed by the physisorption of organic molecules in saliva onto the enamel surface. Its functions include lubrication during mastication and chemical protection. However, pellicle proteins react with dietary elements such as polyphenols (tannins in tea) causing a brown stain. This study has used in vitro dynamic nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy to examine normal and stained pellicles formed in vivo. The effects of polyphenols on the pellicle's mechanical properties and morphology have been studied. It was found that the

  2. Detection of Extrasolar Planets by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Webster, Larry; Dunham, Edward; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Showen, Robert; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A knowledge of other planetary systems that includes information on the number, size, mass, and spacing of the planets around a variety of star types is needed to deepen our understanding of planetary system formation and processes that give rise to their final configurations. Recent discoveries show that many planetary systems are quite different from the solar system in that they often possess giant planets in short period orbits. The inferred evolution of these planets and their orbital characteristics imply the absence of Earth-like planets near the habitable zone. Information on the properties of the giant-inner planets is now being obtained by both the Doppler velocity and the transit photometry techniques. The combination of the two techniques provides the mass, size, and density of the planets. For the planet orbiting star HD209458, transit photometry provided the first independent confirmation and measurement of the diameter of an extrasolar planet. The observations indicate a planet 1.27 the diameter of Jupiter with 0.63 of its mass (Charbonneau et al. 1999). The results are in excellent agreement with the theory of planetary atmospheres for a planet of the indicated mass and distance from a solar-like star. The observation of the November 23, 1999 transit of that planet made by the Ames Vulcan photometer at Lick Observatory is presented. In the future, the combination of the two techniques will greatly increase the number of discoveries and the richness of the science yield. Small rocky planets at orbital distances from 0.9 to 1.2 AU are more likely to harbor life than the gas giant planets that are now being discovered. However, new technology is needed to find smaller, Earth-like planets, which are about three hundred times less massive than Jupiter-like planets. The Kepler project is a space craft mission designed to discover hundreds of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone around a wide variety of stars. To demonstrate that the

  3. HST Photometry of Uranus 1994-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2016-10-01

    Images of Uranus by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provide a useful tool in studying seasonal and other physical changes on Uranus. HST gives spatial resolution on the disk of Uranus, wide spectral coverage, temporal coverage over more than 20 years, and stable photometric properties. We selected 1368 images in 81 filters of four cameras between 240 and 1130 nm wavelength taken between August 1994 and October 2015.We started with analyzing the photometry of the whole disk of Uranus. We divided the total light of Uranus into the light from "quiet" Uranus and the light from active storms, which can contribute as much as 2.3 % to the total light, although their median contribution is only 0.14 %. The statistical analysis of the light from storms as function of wavelength and time gives clues about their temporal distribution and altitude distribution since different filters probe different altitudes.The photometry of quiet Uranus shows three main variations: a smooth seasonal variation, a small deviation from this on time scales of 1-2 years, and a small variation with phase angle. The latter variation is 0.15 % for each degree of phase angle between 0 and 3 degrees. This may be the first such measurement for Uranus. The deviations from the smooth curve are about 0.2 %, which is significant since most data otherwise fit to the 0.1 % level.The seasonal variation has the same shape at all wavelengths, except that the amplitude differs. The shape is roughly a parabola with a minimum brightness in 2009, two years after the equinox of Uranus. The amplitude is negligible at wavelengths probing high altitudes but goes up to a factor of 2.1 in wavelengths probing the 1-2 bar level. The seasonal variation is a combined effect of physical change in the atmosphere and the geometric change due to variable sub-solar and sub-Earth latitudes. The physical change is further divided into darkening of high southern latitudes and brightening of high northern latitudes. The

  4. WIYN Open Cluster Study: UBVRI Photometry of NGC 2158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverne, Luke T.; Steinhauer, Aaron J.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-01-01

    We present WIYN 0.9m HDI UBVRI photometry of NGC 2158, a very rich, intermediate-aged, open cluster located near the galactic anti-center. We report derived values for the cluster age, distance, reddening.

  5. Cell surface alpha 2,6 sialylation affects adhesion of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoqiang; Kemmner, Wolfgang; Grigull, Sabine; Schlag, Peter M

    2002-05-15

    Tumor-associated alterations of cell surface glycosylation play a crucial role in the adhesion and metastasis of carcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alpha 2,6-sialylation on the adhesion properties of breast carcinoma cells. To this end mammary carcinoma cells, MDA-MB-435, were sense-transfected with sialyltransferase ST6Gal-I cDNA or antisense-transfected with a part of the ST6Gal-I sequence. Sense transfectants showed an enhanced ST6Gal-I mRNA expression and enzyme activity and an increased binding of the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), specific for alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid. Transfection with ST6Gal-I in the antisense direction resulted in less enzyme activity and SNA reactivity. A sense-transfected clone carrying increased amounts of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid adhered preferentially to collagen IV and showed reduced cell-cell adhesion and enhanced invasion capacity. In contrast, antisense transfection led to less collagen IV adhesion but enhanced homotypic cell-cell adhesion. In another approach, inhibition of ST6Gal-I enzyme activity by application of soluble antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. Antisense treatment resulted in reduced ST6 mRNA expression and cell surface 2,6-sialylation and significantly decreased collagen IV adhesion. Our results suggest that cell surface alpha 2,6-sialylation contributes to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion of tumor cells. Inhibition of sialytransferase ST6Gal-I by antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides might be a way to reduce the metastatic capacity of carcinoma cells.

  6. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  7. TFIT: Mixed-resolution data set photometry package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidler, Victoria G.; Papovich, Casey; Grogin, Norman A.; Idzi, Rafal; Dickinson, Mark; Ferguson, Henry C.; Hilbert, Bryan; Clubb, Kelsey; Ravindranath, Swara

    2015-05-01

    TFIT measures galaxy photometry using prior knowledge of sources in a deep, high-resolution image (HRI) to improve photometric measurements of objects in a corresponding low-resolution image (LRI) of the same field, usually at a different wavelength. For background-limited data, this technique produces optimally weighted photometry that maximizes signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). For objects not significantly detected in the low-resolution image, it provides useful and quantitative information for setting upper limits.

  8. BINARY STAR SYNTHETIC PHOTOMETRY AND DISTANCE DETERMINATION USING BINSYN

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan E-mail: pdestefa@uw.edu

    2013-09-15

    This paper extends synthetic photometry to components of binary star systems. The paper demonstrates accurate recovery of single star photometric properties for four photometric standards, Vega, Sirius, GD153, and HD209458, ranging over the HR diagram, when their model synthetic spectra are placed in fictitious binary systems and subjected to synthetic photometry processing. Techniques for photometric distance determination have been validated for all four photometric standards.

  9. Essentials of photometry for clinical electrophysiology of vision.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Daphne L; Hamilton, Ruth

    2010-08-01

    Electrophysiological testing of the visual system requires familiarity with photometry. This technical note outlines the concepts of photometry with a focus on information relevant to clinical ERG and VEP testing. Topics include photometric quantities, consideration of pupil size, specification of brief extended flash stimuli, and the influence of the spectral composition of visual stimuli. Standard units and terms are explained in the context of the ISCEV standards and guidelines for clinical electrophysiology of vision.

  10. Factors Affecting P Loads to Surface Waters: Comparing the Roles of Precipitation and Land Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motew, M.; Booth, E.; Carpenter, S. R.; Kucharik, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface water quality is a major concern in the Yahara watershed (YW) of southern Wisconsin, home to a thriving dairy industry, the city of Madison, and five highly valued lakes that are eutrophic. Despite management interventions to mitigate runoff, there has been no significant trend in P loading to the lakes since 1975. Increases in manure production and heavy rainfall events over this time period may have offset any effects of management. We developed a comprehensive, integrated modeling framework that can simulate the effects of multiple drivers on ecosystem services, including surface water quality. The framework includes process-based representation of terrestrial ecosystems (Agro-IBIS) and groundwater flow (MODFLOW), hydrologic routing of water and nutrients across the landscape (THMB), and assessment of lake water quality (YWQM). Biogeochemical cycling and hydrologic transport of P have been added to the framework to enable detailed simulation of P dynamics within the watershed, including interactions with climate and management. The P module features in-soil cycling of organic, inorganic, and labile forms of P; manure application, decomposition, and subsequent loss of dissolved P in runoff; loss of particulate-bound P with erosion; and transport of dissolved and particulate P within waterways. Model results will compare the effects of increased heavy rainfall events, increased manure production, and implementation of best management practices on P loads to the Yahara lakes.

  11. A new capture fraction method to map how pumpage affects surface water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, S.A.; Reeves, H.W.; Dickinson, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    All groundwater pumped is balanced by removal of water somewhere, initially from storage in the aquifer and later from capture in the form of increase in recharge and decrease in discharge. Capture that results in a loss of water in streams, rivers, and wetlands now is a concern in many parts of the United States. Hydrologists commonly use analytical and numerical approaches to study temporal variations in sources of water to wells for select points of interest. Much can be learned about coupled surface/groundwater systems, however, by looking at the spatial distribution of theoretical capture for select times of interest. Development of maps of capture requires (1) a reasonably well-constructed transient or steady state model of an aquifer with head-dependent flow boundaries representing surface water features or evapotranspiration and (2) an automated procedure to run the model repeatedly and extract results, each time with a well in a different location. This paper presents new methods for simulating and mapping capture using three-dimensional groundwater flow models and presents examples from Arizona, Oregon, and Michigan. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  12. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces.

  13. Recent Advances in Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Meachem, Terry; Cooke, William J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most common (and obvious) problems with video meteor data involves the saturation of the output signal produced by bright meteors, resulting in the elimination of such meteors from photometric determinations. It is important to realize that a "bright" meteor recorded by intensified meteor camera is not what would be considered "bright" by a visual observer - indeed, many Generation II or III camera systems are saturated by meteors with a visual magnitude of 3, barely even noticeable to the untrained eye. As the relatively small fields of view (approx.30 ) of the camera systems captures at best modest numbers of meteors, even during storm peaks, the loss of meteors brighter than +3 renders the determination of shower population indices from video observations even more difficult. Considerable effort has been devoted by the authors to the study of the meteor camera systems employed during the Marshall Space Flight Center s Leonid ground-based campaigns, and a calibration scheme has been devised which can extend the useful dynamic range of such systems by approximately 4 magnitudes. The calibration setup involves only simple equipment, available to amateur and professional, and it is hoped that use of this technique will make for better meteor photometry, and move video meteor analysis beyond the realm of simple counts.

  14. Microlensing for extrasolar planets : improving the photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajek, David J.

    2013-08-01

    Gravitational Microlensing, as a technique for detecting Extrasolar Planets, is recognised for its potential in discovering small-mass planets similar to Earth, at a distance of a few Astronomical Units from their host stars. However, analysing the data from microlensing events (which statistically rarely reveal planets) is complex and requires continued and intensive use of various networks of telescopes working together in order to observe the phenomenon. As such the techniques are constantly being developed and refined; this project outlines some steps of the careful analysis required to model an event and ensure the best quality data is used in the fitting. A quantitative investigation into increasing the quality of the original photometric data available from any microlensing event demonstrates that 'lucky imaging' can lead to a marked improvement in the signal to noise ratio of images over standard imaging techniques, which could result in more accurate models and thus the calculation of more accurate planetary parameters. In addition, a simulation illustrating the effects of atmospheric turbulence on exposures was created, and expanded upon to give an approximation of the lucky imaging technique. This further demonstrated the advantages of lucky images which are shown to potentially approach the quality of those expected from diffraction limited photometry. The simulation may be further developed for potential future use as a 'theoretical lucky imager' in our research group, capable of producing and analysing synthetic exposures through customisable conditions.

  15. Macular pigment assessment by motion photometry.

    PubMed

    Moreland, J D

    2004-10-15

    A Moreland anomaloscope was modified to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) profiles by motion photometry. A grating (spatial frequency 0.38 c deg(-1)), whose alternate bars were filled, respectively, with 460 nm (maximum MP absorption) and 580 nm (zero MP absorption) lights, drifted steadily at 37 degrees s(-1). The subject adjusted the 580 nm radiance to minimise perceived motion (equiluminance between 460 and 580 nm). Five or more settings were made for two foveal fields (0.9 degrees and 2.2 degrees diameter) and 11 extrafoveal annular fields (0.8 degrees -7.5 degrees eccentricity). Twenty subjects made measurements for both eyes: some with replications. MPOD profiles varied in scale (0.18-0.75 for the 0.9 degrees foveal field) and in shape. A mean profile was derived. Foveal data were optimally aligned with annular data in that profile when plotted at 0.71 of the foveal field radius. Factors that limit precision were identified, such as fixation errors foveally and Troxler's effect parafoveally.

  16. BVI CCD photometry of 47 Tucanae

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-08-01

    CCD BVI main-sequence photometry of 47 Tuc is presented, matched to the recent BVI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). The main-sequence turnoffs are found to be at V = 17.60 + or - 0.1, B-V = 0.56 + or - 0.02; V-I = 0.68 + or - 0.02, and B-I = 1.24 + or - 0.02. The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is 3.55 + or - 0.15 for all three color indices. A consistent age for 47 Tuc of 17 Gyr and a consistent distance modulus of (m-M)v = 13.2 are obtained for all three indices, and an absolute magnitude of Mv = 0.85 is determined for the horizontal branch stars. The results also favor the adoption of (Fe/H) near -0.5 as the best abundance value for 47 Tuc. 38 references.

  17. NEW UBVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 234 M33 STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2013-04-15

    This is the second paper of our series. In this paper, we present UBVRI photometry for 234 star clusters in the field of M33. For most of these star clusters, there is photometry in only two bands in previous studies. The photometry of these star clusters is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements, and in particular that our photometry is in good agreement with that of Zloczewski and Kaluzny. Combined with star cluster photometry in previous studies, we present some results: none of the M33 youngest clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, and comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages for M33 star clusters and some as old as the Galactic globular clusters.

  18. FIXING THE U-BAND PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Bastola, Deepak; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Espinoza, Juan; Gonzalez, David; Gonzalez, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hamuy, Mario E-mail: suntzeff@physics.tamu.edu E-mail: hsiao@lco.cl E-mail: mmp@lco.cl

    2013-01-01

    We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9 m, 1.3 m, and Las Campanas 1 m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest-frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift {approx}0.3-0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest-frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high-redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.

  19. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri photometry of Rave stars. I. Data, effective temperatures, and reddenings

    SciTech Connect

    Munari, U.; Siviero, A.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Bienaymé, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; and others

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ{sup 2} fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T {sub eff} and E {sub B–V}, computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for E{sub B−V}{sup poles} = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| ≥ 25°.

  20. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri Photometry of RAVE Stars. I. Data, Effective Temperatures, and Reddenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Smith, T. C.; Steinmetz, M.; Templeton, M.; Terrell, D.; Welch, D. L.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ2 fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T eff and E B - V , computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for EpolesB-V = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| >= 25°.

  1. Plasma of Argon Affects the Earliest Biological Response of Different Implant Surfaces: An In Vitro Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Canullo, L; Genova, T; Tallarico, M; Gautier, G; Mussano, F; Botticelli, D

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the early cell response and protein adsorption elicited by the argon plasma treatment of different commercially available titanium surfaces via a chair-side device. Sterile disks made of grade 4 titanium (n= 450, 4-mm diameter) with 3 surface topographies (machined, plasma sprayed, and zirconia blasted and acid etched) were allocated to receive 4 testing treatments (2% and 10% protein adsorption and cell adhesion with MC3T3-E1 and MG-63). Furthermore, the specimens were divided to undergo 1) argon plasma treatment (10 W, 1 bar for 12 min) in a plasma reactor, 2) ultraviolet (UV) light treatment for 2 h (positive control group), or 3) no treatment (control group). Pretreatment surface analyses based on a scanning electron microscope and profilometer images were also performed. Profilometric analysis demonstrated that the evaluated specimens perfectly suit the standard parameters. The use of argon plasma was capable of affecting the quantity of proteins adsorbed on the different surfaces, notwithstanding their roughness or topographic features at a low fetal bovine serum concentration (2%). UV light treatment for 2 h attained similar results. Moreover, both the plasma of argon and the UV light demonstrated a significant increase in the number of osteoblasts adherent at 10 min in all tested surfaces. Within its limitations, this in vitro study highlights the potential biological benefits of treating implant surfaces with plasma of argon or UV, irrespective of the roughness of the titanium surface. However, in vivo experiments are needed to confirm these preliminary data and settle the rationale of a treatment that might be clinically relevant in case of bone-reparative deficiencies.

  2. Spitzer/IRAC Photometry Of The Four Largest Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard; Emery, J.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.

    2012-10-01

    The surfaces of the four largest Uranian satellites are dominated by water ice and a spectrally neutral constituent that is likely carbonaceous in composition. CO2 ice has been detected on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania, with no detection on the furthest regular Uranian satellite, Oberon (Grundy et al., 2003, 2006). Whether CO2 ice is primordial or is actively produced in the Uranian system is unclear; however, it seems unlikely that primordial CO2 ice would remain exposed on an icy satellite surface over the age of the Solar System. One possible mechanism for producing CO2 ice is bombardment of water ice and carbonaceous material by charged particles caught in Uranus’ magnetic field. Unlike the other large Uranian satellites, Oberon spends part of its orbit outside the confines of Uranus’ magnetic field, which might help explain why CO2 ice has yet to be detected on Oberon. We are using photometric data gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), in order to search for the signature of CO2 ice on Oberon, and confirm its presence on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania at longer wavelengths than previous studies. IRAC collects data in four different channels, which are centered roughly at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 µm. Additionally, we are gathering spectroscopic data using SpeX on IRTF, at similar longitudes to the IRAC observations, in order to characterize the distribution of CO2 ice on these icy satellites over a wide range of near-infrared wavelengths. Our preliminary photometry results for Oberon indicate that there is a steep reduction in reflected solar flux from channel 1 to channel 2, suggesting that surface materials are absorbing photons at wavelengths within the bandpass of channel 2. We will present the results of our photometric analysis of the four largest Uranian moons.

  3. Dynamitin affects cell-surface expression of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Chatin, Benoît; Colombier, Pauline; Gamblin, Anne Laure; Allouis, Marie; Le Bouffant, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    The major cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 associates with proteins that regulate its biosynthesis, localization, activity and degradation. Identification of partner proteins is crucial for a better understanding of the channel regulation. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified dynamitin as a Nav1.5-interacting protein. Dynamitin is part of the microtubule-binding multiprotein complex dynactin. When overexpressed it is a potent inhibitor of dynein/kinesin-mediated transport along the microtubules by disrupting the dynactin complex and dissociating cargoes from microtubules. The use of deletion constructs showed that the C-terminal domain of dynamitin is essential for binding to the first intracellular interdomain of Nav1.5. Co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association between Nav1.5 and dynamitin in mouse heart extracts. Immunostaining experiments showed that dynamitin and Nav1.5 co-localize at intercalated discs of mouse cardiomyocytes. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was applied to test the functional link between Nav1.5 and dynamitin. Dynamitin overexpression in HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells expressing Nav1.5 resulted in a decrease in sodium current density in the membrane with no modification of the channel-gating properties. Biotinylation experiments produced similar information with a reduction in Nav1.5 at the cell surface when dynactin-dependent transport was inhibited. The present study strongly suggests that dynamitin is involved in the regulation of Nav1.5 cell-surface density.

  4. Robust automatic photometry of local galaxies from SDSS. Dissecting the color magnitude relation with color profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fumagalli, Michele; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    We present an automatic procedure to perform reliable photometry of galaxies on SDSS images. We selected a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Virgo superclusters. For each galaxy, we derive Petrosian g and i magnitudes, surface brightness and color profiles. Unlike the SDSS pipeline, our procedure is not affected by the well known shredding problem and efficiently extracts Petrosian magnitudes for all galaxies. Hence we derived magnitudes even from the population of galaxies missed by the SDSS which represents ~25% of all local supercluster galaxies and ~95% of galaxies with g < 11 mag. After correcting the g and i magnitudes for Galactic and internal extinction, the blue and red sequences in the color magnitude diagram are well separated, with similar slopes. In addition, we study (i) the color-magnitude diagrams in different galaxy regions, the inner (r ≤ 1 kpc), intermediate (0.2RPet ≤ r ≤ 0.3RPet) and outer, disk-dominated (r ≥ 0.35RPet)) zone; and (ii), we compute template color profiles, discussing the dependences of the templates on the galaxy masses and on their morphological type. The two analyses consistently lead to a picture where elliptical galaxies show no color gradients, irrespective of their masses. Spirals, instead, display a steeper gradient in their color profiles with increasing mass, which is consistent with the growing relevance of a bulge and/or a bar component above 1010 M⊙. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A38

  5. The RSA survey of dwarf galaxies, 1: Optical photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vader, J. Patricia; Chaboyer, Brian

    1994-01-01

    We present detailed surface photometry, based on broad B-band charge coupled device (CCD) images, of about 80 dwarf galaxies. Our sample represents approximately 10% of all dwarf galaxies identified in the vicinity of Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxies on high resolution blue photographic plates, referred to as the RSA survey of dwarf galaxies. We derive global properties and radial surface brightness profiles, and examine the morphologies. The radial surface brightness profiles of dwarf galaxies, whether early or late type, display the same varieties in shape and complexity as those of classical giant galaxies. Only a few are well described by a pure r(exp 1/4) law. Exponential profiles prevail. Features typical of giant disk galaxies, such as exponential profiles with a central depression, lenses, and even, in one case (IC 2041), a relatively prominent bulge are also found in dwarf galaxies. Our data suggest that the central region evolves from being bulge-like, with an r(exp 1/4) law profile, in bright galaxies to a lens-like structure in dwarf galaxies. We prove detailed surface photometry to be a helpful if not always sufficient tool in investigating the structure of dwarf galaxies. In many cases kinematic information is needed to complete the picture. We find the shapes of the surface brightness profiles to be loosely associated with morphological type. Our sample contains several new galaxies with properties intermediate between those of giant and dwarf ellipticals (but no M32-like objects). This shows that such intermediate galaxies exist so that at least a fraction of early-type dwarf ellipticals is structurally related to early-type giants instead of belonging to a totally unrelated, disjunct family. This supports an origin of early-type dwarf galaxies as originally more massive systems that acquired their current morphology as a result of substantial, presumable supernova-driven, mass loss. On the other hand, several early-type dwarfs in our sample are

  6. Proliferation of Purple Sulphur Bacteria at the Sediment Surface Affects Intertidal Mat Diversity and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Hubas, Cédric; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Paterson, David M.; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative absence of studies dealing with mats of purple sulphur bacteria in the intertidal zone. These bacteria display an array of metabolic pathways that allow them to disperse and develop under a wide variety of conditions, making these mats important in terms of ecosystem processes and functions. Mass blooms of purple sulphur bacteria develop during summer on sediments in the intertidal zone especially on macroalgal deposits. The microbial composition of different types of mats differentially affected by the development of purple sulphur bacteria was examined, at low tide, using a set of biochemical markers (fatty acids, pigments) and composition was assessed against their influence on ecosystem functions (sediment cohesiveness, CO2 fixation). We demonstrated that proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria has a major impact on intertidal mats diversity and functions. Indeed, assemblages dominated by purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were efficient exopolymer producers and their biostabilisation potential was significant. In addition, the massive growth of purple sulphur bacteria resulted in a net CO2 degassing whereas diatom dominated biofilms represented a net CO2 sink. PMID:24340018

  7. Proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria at the sediment surface affects intertidal mat diversity and functionality.

    PubMed

    Hubas, Cédric; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Paterson, David M; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative absence of studies dealing with mats of purple sulphur bacteria in the intertidal zone. These bacteria display an array of metabolic pathways that allow them to disperse and develop under a wide variety of conditions, making these mats important in terms of ecosystem processes and functions. Mass blooms of purple sulphur bacteria develop during summer on sediments in the intertidal zone especially on macroalgal deposits. The microbial composition of different types of mats differentially affected by the development of purple sulphur bacteria was examined, at low tide, using a set of biochemical markers (fatty acids, pigments) and composition was assessed against their influence on ecosystem functions (sediment cohesiveness, CO2 fixation). We demonstrated that proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria has a major impact on intertidal mats diversity and functions. Indeed, assemblages dominated by purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were efficient exopolymer producers and their biostabilisation potential was significant. In addition, the massive growth of purple sulphur bacteria resulted in a net CO2 degassing whereas diatom dominated biofilms represented a net CO2 sink.

  8. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  9. Regression analysis in modeling of air surface temperature and factors affecting its value in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; Jafri, Mohd. Zubir Mat; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-10-01

    This study encompasses air surface temperature (AST) modeling in the lower atmosphere. Data of four atmosphere pollutant gases (CO, O3, CH4, and H2O) dataset, retrieved from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), from 2003 to 2008 was employed to develop a model to predict AST value in the Malaysian peninsula using the multiple regression method. For the entire period, the pollutants were highly correlated (R=0.821) with predicted AST. Comparisons among five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the southwest monsoon (SWM) season, within 1.3 K, and for in situ data, within 1 to 2 K. The validation results of AST with AST from AIRS showed high correlation coefficient (R=0.845 to 0.918), indicating the model's efficiency and accuracy. Statistical analysis in terms of β showed that H2O (0.565 to 1.746) tended to contribute significantly to high AST values during the northeast monsoon season. Generally, these results clearly indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis study to investigate the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases on AST over the Malaysian peninsula. A model was developed that is capable of retrieving the Malaysian peninsulan AST in all weather conditions, with total uncertainties ranging between 1 and 2 K.

  10. Experiences with Opto-Mechanical Systems that Affect Optical Surfaces at the Sub-Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Taylor, J S

    2008-04-03

    Projection optical systems built for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) demonstrated the ability to produce, support and position reflective optical surfaces for achieving transmitted wavefront errors of 1 nm or less. Principal challenges included optical interferometry, optical manufacturing processes, multi-layer coating technology and opto mechanics. Our group was responsible for designing, building and aligning two different projection optical systems: a full-field, 0.1 NA, four-mirror system for 70 nm features and a small-field, 0.3 NA, two-mirror system for 30 nm features. Other than physical size and configuration, the two systems were very similar in the way they were designed, built and aligned. A key difference exists in the optic mounts, driven primarily by constraints from the metrology equipment used by different optics manufacturers. As mechanical stability and deterministic position control of optics will continue to play an essential role in future systems, we focus our discussion on opto-mechanics and primarily the optic mounts.

  11. Manufacturing lot affects polyethylene tibial insert volume, thickness, and surface geometry.

    PubMed

    Teeter, Matthew G; Milner, Jaques S; MacDonald, Steven J; Naudie, Douglas D R

    2013-08-01

    To perform wear measurements on retrieved joint replacement implants, a reference geometry of the implant's original state is required. Since implants are rarely individually scanned before implantation, a different, new implant of the same kind and size is frequently used. However, due to manufacturing variability, errors may be introduced into these measurements, as the dimensions between the retrieved and reference components may not be exactly the same. The hypothesis of this study was that new polyethylene tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots would demonstrate greater variability than those from the same lot. In total, 12 new tibial inserts of the same model and size were obtained, 5 from the same lot and the remainder from different lots. The geometry of each tibial insert was obtained using microcomputed tomography. Measurements of tibial insert volume, thickness, and three-dimensional surface deviations were obtained and compared between tibial inserts from the same and different manufacturing lots. Greater variability was found for the tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots for all types of measurements, including a fourfold difference in volume variability (p < 0.001) and a maximum of 0.21 mm difference in thickness (p < 0.001). Investigators should be aware of this potential confounding error and take steps to minimize it, such as by averaging together the geometries of multiple new components from different manufacturing lots for use as the reference geometry.

  12. Water chemistry of surface waters affected by the Fourmile Canyon wildfire, Colorado, 2010-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the Fourmile Canyon fire burned about 23 percent of the Fourmile Creek watershed in Boulder County, Colo. Water-quality sampling of Fourmile Creek began within a month after the wildfire to assess its effects on surface-water chemistry. Water samples were collected from five sites along Fourmile Creek (above, within, and below the burned area) monthly during base flow, twice weekly during snowmelt runoff, and at higher frequencies during storm events. Stream discharge was also monitored. Water-quality samples were collected less frequently from an additional 6 sites on Fourmile Creek, from 11 tributaries or other inputs, and from 3 sites along Boulder Creek. The pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, specific ultraviolet absorbance, total suspended solids, and concentrations (dissolved and total) of major cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium), anions (chloride, sulfate, alkalinity, fluoride, and bromide), nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and phosphorus), trace metals (aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, mercury, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, rubidium, antimony, selenium, strontium, vanadium, and zinc), and dissolved organic carbon are here reported for 436 samples collected during 2010 and 2011.

  13. Surface functionality affects the biodistribution and microglia-targeting of intra-amniotically delivered dendrimers☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Nance, Elizabeth; Zhang, Zhi; Jasty, Venkatasai; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Burd, Irina; Romero, Roberto; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a chronic childhood disorder with limited therapeutic options. Maternal intrauterine inflammation/infection is a major risk factor in the pathogenesis of CP. In pre-clinical models, dendrimer-based therapies are viable in postnatal period, attenuating inflammation and improving motor function in vivo. However, treatment to the mother, in the prenatal period, may provide the possibility of preventing/resolving inflammation at early stages. Towards this goal, we used a maternal intrauterine inflammation-induced rabbit model of CP to study fetal-maternal transport and neuroinflammation targeting of intra-amniotically administrated dendrimers with neutral/anionic surface functionality. Our study suggested both hydroxyl-terminated ‘neutral’ (D-OH) and carboxyl-terminated ‘anionic’ (D-COOH) Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were absorbed by fetuses and demonstrated bi-directional transport between fetuses and mother. D-OH was more effective in crossing the fetal blood-brain barrier, and targeting activated microglia. The cell-specific targeting was associated with the extent of microglia activation. This study demonstrated intra-amniotically administered hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimers could be an effective drug delivery vehicle for targeting fetal inflammation and preventing subsequent neurologic injury associated with chorioamnionitis. PMID:27378700

  14. Evaluation of factors affecting the accuracy of impressions using quantitative surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, I K; DeLong, R; Pintado, M R; Malik, R

    1995-01-01

    Impression material goes from a plastic to an elastic state during setting. Movement of the impression and excessive seating pressure during this transition can cause distortion in the impressions. The purpose of this study is to determine if the impression distortion is related to movement during setting or to distortion of the putty phase in the two-step impressioning technique. A master model of a maxillary quadrant of teeth was impressed using four different procedures: 1) one-step technique without movement (1S-NM); 2) one-step technique with movement (1S-M); 3) two-step technique without movement (2S-NM); and 4) two-step technique with movement (2S-M). An artificial oral environment and surface analysis technique of the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics were used to produce the impressions and measure their accuracy. A digitized image of the first premolar of the master model was aligned with a digitized image of the first premolar of each epoxy model using AnSur. The root mean squared difference (RMS) between the aligned images is a measure of the distortion. The corresponding RMS values for the different methods were: 1S-NM = 23.7 +/- 9.21; 1S-M = 20.4 +/- 3.9; 2S-NM = 20.5 +/- 7.7; 2S-M = 21.3 +/- 4.4. Statistical analysis using a two-way analysis of variance showed no difference at the 0.05 level of significance. Pairwise comparison using the Tukey method showed that neither technique (one-step vs two-step) nor movement is a significant factor. These results showed that low seating pressure will not cause any greater distortions in the two-step impression technique than in the one-step technique, and minor movement during the setting of the impression material will no cause distortion.

  15. Erosive cola-based drinks affect the bonding to enamel surface: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    CASAS-APAYCO, Leslie Caroll; DREIBI, Vanessa Manzini; HIPÓLITO, Ana Carolina; GRAEFF, Márcia Sirlene Zardin; RIOS, Daniela; MAGALHÃES, Ana Carolina; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; WANG, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of in vitro erosion provoked by different cola-based drinks (Coke types), associated or not with toothbrushing, to bonding to enamel. Material and Methods Fifty-six bovine enamel specimens were prepared and randomly assigned into seven groups (N=8): C- Control (neither eroded nor abraded), ERO-RC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Regular Coke (RC), ERO-LC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Light Coke (LC), ERO-ZC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Zero Coke (ZC) and three other eroded groups, subsequently abraded for 1-minute toothbrushing (EROAB-RC, EROAB-LC and EROAB-ZC, respectively). After challenges, they were stored overnight in artificial saliva for a total of 24 hours and restored with Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350. Buildup coronal surfaces were cut in 1 mm2 -specimens and subjected to a microtensile test. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy (X40). The interface of the restorations were observed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Results All tested cola-based drinks significantly reduced the bond strength, which was also observed in the analyses of interfaces. Toothbrushing did not have any impact on the bond strength. CLSM showed that except for Zero Coke, all eroded specimens resulted in irregular hybrid layer formation. Conclusions All cola-based drinks reduced the bond strength. Different patterns of hybrid layers were obtained revealing their impact, except for ZC. PMID:24918663

  16. The IRAF/STSDAS Synthetic Photometry Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; Simon, B.

    The Space Telescope Science Data Analysis System (STSDAS) Synthetic Photometry (Synphot) package is an IRAF-based suite of tasks designed to simulate photometric data and spectra as observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Tasks in the Synphot package can be used to make plots of HST instrument sensitivity curves and calibration target spectra, to predict count rates for observations in any available mode of the HST science instruments, and to examine photometric transformation relationships among the various HST observing modes as well as conventional photometric systems such as Johnson UBV and Stromgren uvby. The availability of on-line spectral atlases also provides for the capability of simulating HST observations of real astrophysical targets. Synphot is available to assist Guest Observers in preparing observing proposals and has proven useful in planning and optimizing HST observing programs due to its cross-instrument simulation capability. Passbands for all of the HST instrument components, as well as those of other conventional photometric systems, are stored in data tables and are referenced via a master component graph table. The component graph table essentially provides a map of all of the HST instruments and describes all allowed combinations of the various instrument components. The Synphot passband calculator utilizes user-supplied keywords to trace a path through the component graph table and multiply together the individual component throughputs to return the composite passband. A powerful spectrum calculator is used to create complicated composite spectra from various parameterized spectrum models, grids of model atmosphere spectra, and atlases of stellar spectrophotometry. Because the Synphot tasks are completely data driven, instrument observing modes can be changed and even entirely new instruments added without any modifications to the software. Therefore Synphot can be applied to any other telescopes and instruments simply by

  17. Mesopic luminance assessed with minimum motion photometry.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Sabine; MacLeod, Donald I A

    2011-08-25

    We measured the relative contribution of rods and cones to luminance across a range of photopic, mesopic, and scotopic adaptation levels and at various retinal eccentricities. We isolated the luminance channel by setting motion-based luminance nulls (minimum motion photometry) using annular stimuli. Luminance nulls between differently colored stimuli require equality in a weighted sum of rod and cone excitations. The relative cone weight increases smoothly from the scotopic range, where rods dominate, to photopic levels, where rod influence becomes negligible. The change from rod to cone vision does not occur uniformly over the visual field. The more peripheral the stimulus location, the higher is the light level required for cones to participate strongly. The relative cone contribution can be described by a sigmoid function of intensity, with two parameters that each depend on the eccentricity and spatial frequency of the stimulus. One parameter determines the "meso-mesopic" luminance--the center of the mesopic range, at which rod and cone contributions are balanced. This increases with eccentricity, reflecting an increase in the meso-mesopic luminance from 0.04 scotopic cd/m(2) at 2° eccentricity to 0.44 scotopic cd/m(2) at 18°. The second parameter represents the slope of the log-log threshold-versus-intensity curve (TVI curve) for rod vision. This parameter inversely scales the width of the mesopic range and increases only slightly with eccentricity (from 0.73 at 2° to 0.78 for vision at 18° off-axis).

  18. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; Kim, Alex G

    2011-02-22

    The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends on the point-spread function (PSF), detector pixelization, and observing strategy. The PSF and pixel response describe the spatial blurring of the source, the pixel scale describes the spatial sampling of a single exposure, and the observing strategy determines the set of dithered exposures with pointing offsets from which the source flux is inferred. In a wide-field imaging survey, sources of interest are randomly distributed within the field of view and hence are centered randomly within a pixel. A given hardware configuration and observing strategy therefore have a distribution of photometric uncertainty for sources of fixed flux that fall in the field. In this article we explore the ensemble behavior of photometric and position accuracies for different PSFs, pixel scales, and dithering patterns. We find that the average uncertainty in the flux determination depends slightly on dither strategy, whereas the position determination can be strongly dependent on the dithering. For cases with pixels much larger than the PSF, the uncertainty distributions can be non-Gaussian, with rms values that are particularly sensitive to the dither strategy. We also find that for these configurations with large pixels, pointings dithered by a fractional pixel amount do not always give minimal average uncertainties; this is in contrast to image reconstruction for which fractional dithers are optimal. When fractional pixel dithering is favored, a pointing accuracy of better than {approx}0.15 {approx}0.15 pixel width is required to maintain half the advantage over random dithers.

  19. Laser flare-cell photometry: methodology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ladas, John G; Wheeler, Noel C; Morhun, Patrick J; Rimmer, Steven O; Holland, Gary N

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of intraocular inflammation involves the assessment of cells and protein levels ("flare") in the aqueous humor. These factors are difficult to quantify precisely on clinical examination alone. Laser flare-cell photometry provides an automated technique to quantify these factors objectively, and it has been used in a variety of research and clinical situations to assess anterior segment inflammation. Any new technique requires evaluation to determine accuracy and reproducibility of measured values, and initial applications require critical appraisal to assess the value of the technique. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of laser flare-cell photometry have been performed to determine its validity and utility as a research and clinical tool. This article reviews published studies that describe the technique of laser flare-cell photometry; it provides new in vitro data that supplements information on the capabilities of this technique and factors that influence photometry results, and it reviews representative publications that have used laser flare-cell photometry for study of specific disease entities. This information can help clinicians and researchers to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of laser flare-cell photometry, to identify appropriate future uses for this technique, and to use it and interpret its results appropriately. Laser flare-cell photometry offers an opportunity to improve upon current techniques of inflammation assessment and should not be considered simply an objective surrogate for clinical grading of cells and flare at the slit-lamp biomicroscope. Its research applications and utility for monitoring patients with uveitis have not yet been fully explored.

  20. A local attenuation filter for accurate photometry of near-infrared bright stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Takahiro

    2016-07-01

    I have developed a special ND filter (Local Attenuation Filter) for observing bright near-infrared stars. This filter is a 60mm diameter with a 4mm thickness, on which an attenuation (0.02% transparency) patch with an 8mm diameter is coated. This filter is expected to be installed near the focal plane of telescope, and the flux through this patch is attenuated. Using this filter, we can observe the attenuated bright star together with not affected field stars as reference for relative photometry. This filter has been installed to the IRSF 1.4m telescope and used for the monitoring of NIR bright stars, for example, η Car.

  1. Different Organization of Type I Collagen Immobilized on Silanized and Nonsilanized Titanium Surfaces Affects Fibroblast Adhesion and Fibronectin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Marín-Pareja, Nathalia; Cantini, Marco; González-García, Cristina; Salvagni, Emiliano; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2015-09-23

    Silanization has emerged in recent years as a way to obtain a stronger and more stable attachment of biomolecules to metallic substrates. However, its impact on protein conformation, a key aspect that influences cell response, has hardly been studied. In this work, we analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the distribution and conformation of type I collagen on plasma-treated surfaces before and after silanization. Subsequently, we investigated the effect of the different collagen conformations on fibroblasts adhesion and fibronectin secretion by immunofluorescence analyses. Two different organosilanes were used on plasma-treated titanium surfaces, either 3-chloropropyl-triethoxy-silane (CPTES) or 3-glycidyloxypropyl-triethoxy-silane (GPTES). The properties and amount of the adsorbed collagen were assessed by contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, and AFM. AFM studies revealed different conformations of type I collagen depending on the silane employed. Collagen was organized in fibrillar networks over very hydrophilic (plasma treated titanium) or hydrophobic (silanized with CPTES) surfaces, the latter forming little globules with a beads-on-a-string appearance, whereas over surfaces presenting an intermediate hydrophobic character (silanized with GPTES), collagen was organized into clusters with a size increasing at higher protein concentration in solution. Cell response was strongly affected by collagen conformation, especially at low collagen density. The samples exhibiting collagen organized in globular clusters (GPTES-functionalized samples) favored a faster and better fibroblast adhesion as well as better cell spreading, focal adhesions formation, and more pronounced fibronectin fibrillogenesis. In contrast, when a certain protein concentration was reached at the material surface, the effect of collagen conformation was masked, and similar fibroblast response was observed in all samples.

  2. Enteric YaiW Is a Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane Lipoprotein That Affects Sensitivity to an Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Markus F. F.; Caro-Hernandez, Paola; Tan, Karen; Runti, Giulia; Wehmeier, Silvia; Scocchi, Marco; Doerrler, William T.; Ferguson, Gail P.

    2014-01-01

    yaiW is a previously uncharacterized gene found in enteric bacteria that is of particular interest because it is located adjacent to the sbmA gene, whose bacA ortholog is required for Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis and Brucella abortus pathogenesis. We show that yaiW is cotranscribed with sbmA in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Typhimurium strains. We present evidence that the YaiW is a palmitate-modified surface exposed outer membrane lipoprotein. Since BacA function affects the very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) modification of S. meliloti and B. abortus lipid A, we tested whether SbmA function might affect either the fatty acid modification of the YaiW lipoprotein or the fatty acid modification of enteric lipid A but found that it did not. Interestingly, we did observe that E. coli SbmA suppresses deficiencies in the VLCFA modification of the lipopolysaccharide of an S. meliloti bacA mutant despite the absence of VLCFA in E. coli. Finally, we found that both YaiW and SbmA positively affect the uptake of proline-rich Bac7 peptides, suggesting a possible connection between their cellular functions. PMID:24214946

  3. Surface Features Analysis in Salt-Affected Area Using Hyperspectral Data: A Case Study in the Zone of Chotts, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Moncef; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Bouaziz, Samir; Gloaguen, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions are most affected by Salinity. Chotts regions in southern Tunisia are such an area, where the excessive content of salt in the soil is a hard faced problem. Soil salinity in this area enforces several environmental problems such as limiting plant growth, reducing crop productivity, degrading soil quality and leads to accelerated rates rill and gully erosion . Remote sensing analysis by the mean of spectral analysis, geomorphologic aspect from digital elevation models and distribution of rainfall intensity from satellite data are used in this study to discern features and patterns of areas affected by salt. Correlation between these remote sensing indicators is made in order to assess the contribution of each indicator to identify the salt-affected area. The approach followed in this study was applied on Hyperspectral data from EO-1 Mission. Hyperion data are promoted due to their very high spectral resolution and wide enhanced spatial information. The present study highlighted the high correlation between the flat surfaces and the high content of salt in the soil (from soil salinity indices) on one hand and a low correlation between the high intensity of rainfall distribution and indicators of low salt content in the soil on the other hand.

  4. The highly unusual outgassing of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 from narrowband photometry and imaging of the coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.

    2013-02-01

    We report on photometry and imaging of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 obtained at Lowell Observatory from 1991 through 2011. We acquired photoelectric photometry on two nights in 1991, four nights in 1997/1998, and 13 nights in 2010/2011. We observed a strong secular decrease in water and all other observed species production in 2010/2011 from the 1991 and 1997/1998 levels. We see evidence for a strong asymmetry with respect to perihelion in the production rates of our usual bandpasses, with peak production occurring ˜10 days post-perihelion and production rates considerably higher post-perihelion. The composition was "typical," in agreement with the findings of other investigators. We obtained imaging on 39 nights from 2010 July until 2011 January. We find that, after accounting for their varying parentage and lifetimes, the C2 and C3 coma morphology resemble the CN morphology we reported previously. These species exhibited an hourglass shape in October and November, and the morphology changed with rotation and evolved over time. The OH and NH coma morphology showed hints of an hourglass shape near the nucleus, but was also enhanced in the anti-sunward hemisphere. This tailward brightness enhancement did not vary significantly with rotation and evolved with the viewing geometry. We conclude that all five gas species likely originate from the same source regions on the nucleus, but that OH and NH were derived from small grains of water and ammonia ice that survived long enough to be affected by radiation pressure and driven in the anti-sunward direction. We detected the faint, sunward facing dust jet reported by other authors, and did not detect a corresponding gas feature. This jet varied little during a night but exhibited some variations from night to night, suggesting it is located near the total angular momentum vector. Overall, our imaging results support the conclusions of other authors that Hartley 2's "hyperactivity" is caused by icy particles of various sizes that

  5. The miscibility of milk sphingomyelin and cholesterol is affected by temperature and surface pressure in mixed Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ken; Ropers, Marie-Hélène; Lopez, Christelle

    2017-06-01

    The miscibility of milk sphingomyelin (milk-SM) and cholesterol was investigated in this study. The effect of different physical states of milk-SM on its interactions with cholesterol was determined by the recording of isotherms of compression of Langmuir films for temperatures above and below the gel to Lα phase transition of milk-SM (Tm∼34°C). For T=15°Csurface pressures of 10-15mN/m. For T=43°C>Tm, the milk-SM molecules were in a LE phase regardless of the surface pressure applied. A phase diagram pressure - milk-SM/cholesterol composition was established. This study demonstrated that both temperature and surface pressure affected the miscibility between the milk-SM and cholesterol. The strongest attractive forces (i.e. condensing effect) were identified for 30mol% cholesterol when the milk-SM was in the LE phase state.

  6. Uranian Satellites and Triton: JHK Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesten, P. R.; Davies, J. K.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.

    1998-09-01

    We report photometric measurements of Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania (10.4 Aug. 1995), and Neptune's satellite Triton (21.2 Sept. 1995) with the infrared camera (IRCAM) and standard J (1.13-1.42 mu m), H (1.53-1.81 mu m), and K (2.00-2.41 mu m) filters at the 3.8-m UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea. The individual image frames are 256 x 256 pixels with an image scale of 0.286 arcsec/pixel, resulting in a 1.22 arcmin field of view. The standard star used for airmass correction and flux calibration was UKIRT FS 34 (EG141). The photometric information for the Uranian satellites was derived from 5-image mosaics created after dark frame and flat-field corrections; a circular aperture approximation based on DAOPHOT/aper-irtf (P. B. Stetson, PASP 99, 191, 1987) was used except in the case of Miranda, in which a linear fit to the strong background light gradient from the nearby image of Uranus was applied. The center of Uranus was 9.7 arcsec (measured on the images) from Miranda. Triton data were extracted from individual images (not mosaics) with an 8-arcsec aperture and a sky anulus 10-15 arcsec. The phase angle of the Uranian satellites was alpha =1.0(o) , and that of Triton was alpha =1.7(o) . The resulting magnitudes are as follows: Miranda J = 15.30 +/-.05, H = 15.14 +/-.05, K = 15.40 +/-.06; Ariel J = 12.96 +/-.04, H = 12.86 +/-.04, K = 13.04 +/-.04; Umbriel J = 13.60 +/-.04, H = 13.37 +/-.04, K = 13.44 +/-.04; Titania J = 12.58 +/-.04, H = 12.44 +/-.04, K = 12.60 +/-.04; Triton J = 12.26 +/-.04, H = 12.14 +/-.04, K = 12.31 +/-.04. Other reports of Uranian satellite photometry are: P. D. Nicholson and T. J. Jones (Icarus 42, 54, 1980), D. P. Cruikshank (Icarus 41, 246, 1980), and K. H. Baines et al. (Icarus 132, 266, 1998).

  7. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  8. Division B Commission 25: Astronomical Photometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Alistair; Adelman, Saul; Milone, Eugene; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Bastien, Pierre; Chen, Wen Ping; Howell, Steve; Knude, Jens; Kurtz, Donald; Magalhães, Antonio Mario; Menzies, John; Smith, Allyn; Volk, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 25 (C25) deals with the techniques and issues involved with the measurement of optical and infrared radiation intensities and polarization from astronomical sources. As such, in recent years attention has focused on photometric standard stars, atmospheric extinction, photometric passbands, transformation between systems, nomenclature, and observing and reduction techniques. At the start of the trimester C25 changed its name from Stellar Photometry and Polarization to Astronomical Photometry and Polarization so as to explicitly include in its mandate particular issues arising from the measurement of resolved sources, given the importance of photometric redshifts of distant galaxies for many of the large photometric surveys now underway. We begin by summarizing commission activities over the 2012-2014 period, follow with a report on Polarimetry, continue with Photometry topics that have been of interest to C25 members, and conclude with a Vision for the Future.

  9. Photometry Of The Semi-regular Variable Tx Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Katherine; Spear, G.; McLin, K.; Cominsky, L.; Mankiewicz, L.; Reichart, D.; Ivarsen, K.

    2009-12-01

    We report V-band and I-band photometry for the SRA type variable TX Tau. Photometry was obtained using the robotic telescope GORT at the Hume Observatory (NASA funded through Sonoma State University) and the PROMPT robotic telescopes at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (NSF and NASA funded through the University of North Carolina). Photometry was also obtained using the PI of the Sky optical transient search system at Las Campanas Observatory developed by a consortium of institutions in Poland. Modern periods are determined, the V-band and I-band light curves are compared, and V-I colors are derived. It is possible that the classification for this variable should be reconsidered.

  10. Monitoring of brain potassium with rubidium flame photometry and MRI.

    PubMed

    Yushmanov, Victor E; Kharlamov, Alexander; Boada, Fernando E; Jones, Stephen C

    2007-03-01

    An animal model was developed to monitor [K(+)] in the brain using partial K(+) replacement with Rb(+) and (87)Rb MRI. Fifty-one rats were given 0-80 mM of RbCl in the drinking water for up to 90 days. Focal cerebral ischemia was produced in 15 of the animals. Na, K, and Rb content in precision-guided submilligram samples of cortical brain were determined by emission flame photometry. Multinuclear (87)Rb/(23)Na/(1)H MRI was performed on phantoms and rats at 3T using a twisted projection imaging (TPI) scheme for (87)Rb/(23)Na, and custom-built surface or parallel cosine transmit/receive coils. Brain [Rb(+)] was safely brought up to 17-25 mEq/kg within 2-3 weeks of feeding. The characteristic patterns of [K(+)] decrease (with a sharp drop at 3-4 hr of ischemia) and [Na(+)] increase (at a rate of 31%/hr) observed previously in animals without Rb/K substitution were reproduced in ischemic cortex. The Rb/(Rb+K) ratio increased over time in ischemic areas (R = 0.91, P < 0.001), suggesting an additional index of ischemia progression. Preliminary (87)Rb MRI gave an estimate of 20-25 mEq Rb/kg brain weight (N = 2). In conclusion, brain Rb(+) is detectable by (87)Rb MRI and does not significantly interfere with ion dynamics in ischemic brain, which enables (87)Rb MRI studies of K(+) in ischemia.

  11. How the knowledge of genetic "makeup" and cellular data can affect the analysis of repolarization in surface electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Wataru

    2010-01-01

    This review article sought to describe patterns of repolarization on the surface electrocardiogram in inherited cardiac arrhythmias and to discuss how the knowledge of genetic makeup and cellular data can affect the analysis based on the data derived from the experimental studies using arterially perfused canine ventricular wedge preparations. Molecular genetic studies have established a link between a number of inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndromes and mutations in genes encoding cardiac ion channels or membrane components during the past 2 decades. Twelve forms of congenital long QT syndrome have been so far identified, and genotype-phenotype correlations have been investigated especially in the 3 major genotypes-LQT1, LQT2, and LQT3. Abnormal T waves are reported in the LQT1, LQT2, and LQT3, and the differences in the time course of repolarization of the epicardial, midmyocardial, and endocardial cells give rise to voltage gradients responsible for the manifestation of phenotypic appearance of abnormal T waves. Brugada syndrome is characterized by ST-segment elevation in leads V1 to V3 and an episode of ventricular fibrillation, in which 7 genotypes have been reported. An intrinsically prominent transient outward current (I(to))-mediated action potential notch and a subsequent loss of action potential dome in the epicardium, but not in the endocardium of the right ventricular outflow tract, give rise to a transmural voltage gradient, resulting in ST-segment elevation, and a subsequent phase 2 reentry-induced ventricular fibrillation. In conclusion, transmural electrical heterogeneity of repolarization across the ventricular wall profoundly affects the phenotypic manifestation of repolarization patterns on the surface electrocardiogram in inherited cardiac arrhythmias.

  12. TGF-beta and TNF-a affect cell surface proteoglycan and sialic acid expression on vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Amber L; Kirkpatrick, Allison P; Rinker, Kristina D

    2004-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the formation of plaques in the arterial wall brought about by numerous events including the accumulation of oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL), stimulation of inflammatory responses, the release of cytokines, and the attachment of monocytes to the arterial wall. Proteoglycans are implicated in many aspects of atherosclerosis including the metabolism of lipoproteins, regulation of cytokine activity, cell adhesion, and modification of the extracellular matrix. Due to their complex role in molecular recognition and cellular adhesion, the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains attached to the proteoglycan core and sialic acids on the terminal ends of the glycan chains are of interest. This study investigated the effects of exposure to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) on the expression of cell surface GAGs and sialic acids on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Initial results show that TGF-beta 1 affected GAG expression compared to a control condition. Results also show that the combination of TGF-beta 1 and TNF-a affected GAG expression differently than does TGF-beta 1 alone. Additionally, TNF-a decreased the number of sialic acid residues per cell and TGF-beta 1 slightly upregulated sialic acid expression as compared to the control. The combination of the two cytokines showed a larger upward trend in this value. These data indicate that TNF-a and TGF-beta 1 play a role in the expression of GAG chains and sialic acids on the cell surface. Further study may clarify the implications of these findings for atherosclerosis.

  13. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Photometry of the Globular Cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Richer, Harvey B.; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Bolte, Michael; Bond, Howard E.; Hesser, James E.; Pryor, Carlton; Stetson, Peter B.

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of the acquisition and processing of a large body of imaging data for three fields in the globular cluster M4 taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Analysis with the ALLFRAME package yielded the deepest photometry yet obtained for this cluster. The resulting data set for 4708 stars (positions and calibrated photometry in V, I, and, in two fields, U) spanning approximately six cluster core radii is presented. The scientific analysis is deferred to three companion papers, which investigate the significant white dwarf population discovered and the main-sequence population.

  14. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  15. Digicon photometry of an intergalactic bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, E. A.; Harms, R. J.; Tifft, W. G.; Sargent, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    Surface brightness and color data are derived for two points in the bridge and tail structure of Arp 295. The best observed point has a surface brightness in V of 25.9 magnitudes per square arc second and (B-V) = +1.00 m. A point on the tail is brighter with the same color.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity and photometry for GJ3470 (Bonfils+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfils, X.; Gillon, M.; Udry, S.; Armstrong, D.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Fumel, A.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; McCormac, J.; Neves, V.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Pollaco, D.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-11-01

    The tables contain radial-velocity and photometry time series of GJ3470. Radial velocities were obtained with he HARPS spectrograph. Photometry was obtained with TRAPPIST, EulerCam and NITES telescopes. (5 data files).

  17. Infrared space observatory photometry of circumstellar dust in Vega-type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.; Thakur, N.

    1998-01-01

    The ISOPHOT (Infrared Space Observatory Photometry) instrument onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was used to obtain 3.6-90 micron photometry of Vega-type systems. Photometric data were calibrated with the ISOPHOT fine calibration source 1 (FCS1). Linear regression was used to derive transformations to make comparisons to ground-based and IRAS photometry systems possible. These transformations were applied to the photometry of 14 main-sequence stars. Details of these results are reported on.

  18. Processes affecting the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum and other persistent pathogens in surface- and ground-waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.; Lau, B. L.; Harter, T.; Atwill, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    Waterborne diseases are transmitted through numerous environmental pathways, and their migration is strongly mediated by interaction with a wide variety of sediments and other natural materials during transport. Here we provide an overview of factors that affect the fate of persistent water-borne pathogens, focusing particularly on the zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum as an example. While individual microbial cells are both small and have low specific gravity, suggesting that they should be highly mobile and remain suspended for long periods of time, attachment to a variety of background materials can substantially reduce pathogen mobility. Cryptosporidium oocysts readily associate with both inorganic and organic particles, resulting in the formation of aggregates. This process tends to increase the effective settling velocity of C. parvum in surface waters. Similarly, pathogens readily become associated with the solid matrix during transport in groundwater, resulting in removal by filtration. However, this process is reversible with C. parvum, resulting in a slow long-term release following the initial deposition. Pathogens also become associated with biofilms, which are surface-attached communities of microorganisms in a gelatinous matrix. The presence of biofilms increases the immobilization and retention of Cryptosporidium on solid surfaces. All of these processes influence pathogen transmission in surface waters such as rivers and water-supply canals. In these environments, pathogens can be immobilized by deposition into stable sediment beds by a combination of gravitational sedimentation and advection into pore waters followed by subsurface filtration. Association with background suspended matter tends to increase pathogen deposition by sedimentation, and the presence of benthic (sedimentary) biofilms also tends to increase pathogen retention. For pathogens that remain viable for long periods of time in natural aquatic systems, as is the case with

  19. JCMT COADD: UKT14 continuum and photometry data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David; Oliveira, Firmin J.; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Jenness, Tim

    2014-11-01

    COADD was used to reduce photometry and continuum data from the UKT14 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in the 1990s. The software can co-add multiple observations and perform sigma clipping and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Additional information on the software is available in the JCMT Spring 1993 newsletter (large PDF).

  20. UBV photometry of Cyg X-1 from 1996 to 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshina, I. B.; Lyuty, V.

    2004-07-01

    The preliminary results of analysis of $UBV$-photometry of the black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in primary minimum are presented. These observations were carried out with the main goal of studying in detail the variability that was detected by Lyuty in 1985 in the optical light curve of this system near orbital phase 0.00.

  1. Iontophoresis and Flame Photometry: A Hybrid Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Duncan; Cottam, Linzi; Bradley, Sarah; Brannigan, Jeanie; Davis, James

    2010-01-01

    The combination of reverse iontophoresis and flame photometry provides an engaging analytical experiment that gives first-year undergraduate students a flavor of modern drug delivery and analyte extraction techniques while reinforcing core analytical concepts. The experiment provides a highly visual demonstration of the iontophoresis technique and…

  2. TNO Photometry and Spectroscopy at ESO and Calar Alto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnhardt, H.; Sekiguchi, T.; Vair, M.; Hainaut, O.; Delahodde, C.; West, R. M.; Tozzi, G. P.; Barrera, L.; Birkle, K.; Watanabe, J.; Meech, K.

    New photometry and spectroscopy of Transneptunian objects (TNO) has been obtained at ESO (VLT+FORS1, NTT+SOFI) and the Calar Alto (3.5m+MOSCA) observatory. BVRI photometry of more than 10 objects confirms the general colour-colour distribution of TNOs found previously. Quasi-simultaneous spectroscopy in the visible wavelength range of 5 TNOs did not reveal any spectral signature apart from the spetral gradients which are in agreement with the broadband colours. JHK filter photometry of 3 objects indicates that the reddening may only occur in the near-IR at least in some cases. Using new observations from the ESO VLT the lightcurve, colours and spectrum of 1996TO66 are investigated: the rotation period of 6.25h is confirmed, also the change in the lightcurve between 1997 and 1998 which indicates an exceptional behaviour in this object (temporary cometary activity ?). The 1999 photometry and spectroscopy in the visible revealed solar colours, no reddening and no spectral features. V-R colour changes over the rotation phase are not found. This works is done in colaboration with:

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GMASS photometry (Kurk+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurk, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Mignoli, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Dickinson, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Zamorani, G.; Cassata, P.; Rodighiero, G.; Franceschini, A.; Renzini, A.; Rosati, P.; Halliday, C.; Berta, S.

    2012-10-01

    Properties of objects observed in the GMASS masks, including the GMASS identification number, coordinates, photometry in four bands, redshifts determined from spectroscopy, average S/N per pixel in spectrum, photometric normalisation factor to obtain imaging flux, sample of which the target is part and mask(s) in which the target was observed. (2 data files).

  4. Multiband photometry of PSNJ14102342-4318437 with OAUNI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Cori, W.; Ricra, J.; Zevallos, M.; Tello, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report multiband photometry of Type Ib SN PSNJ14102342-4318437 (ATel #8415, ATel #8434, ATel #8437, ATel #8504) on 2016-01-10 (UT) gathered with the OAUNI 51cm telescope (Pereyra et al. 2015; arXiv:1512.03104) at Huancayo Observatory, Peru.

  5. Photoelectric photometry of J V. [Jupiter satellite Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    UBV photometry of J V (Amalthea) near greatest western elongation shows this satellite to be about one magnitude fainter than previously believed. It is observed to be very red, having a B-V color index near + 1.5 mag. Unlike the Galilean satellites, J V appears to be a low-albedo object.

  6. Characterization of Transiting Exoplanets by Way of Differential Photometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Michael; Hughes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simple activity for plotting and characterizing the light curve from an exoplanet transit event by way of differential photometry analysis. Using free digital imaging software, participants analyse a series of telescope images with the goal of calculating various exoplanet parameters, including size, orbital radius and…

  7. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  8. BVRI Photometry of the Supernova Candidate Gaia16ath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Feher, T.; Gyurita, A.; Redli, M.; Sukolova, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report confirmation and photometry of the recently discovered Gaia Science Alerts transient Gaia16ath. CCD frames were taken with the 60/90 cm Schmidt telescope through Bessell B,V,R,I filters at Konkoly Observatory, Piszkesteto, Hungary on July 11.01 UT. The transient was detected with high significance (S/N > 20) in all bands.

  9. The affected gene underlying the class K glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) surface protein defect codes for the GPI transamidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianliang; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Knez, Jansen J.; Udenfriend, Sidney; Chen, Rui; Medof, M. Edward

    1997-01-01

    The final step in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of cell surface proteins consists of a transamidation reaction in which preassembled GPI donors are substituted for C-terminal signal sequences in nascent polypeptides. In previous studies we described a human K562 cell mutant, termed class K, that accumulates fully assembled GPI units but is unable to transfer them to N-terminally processed proproteins. In further work we showed that, unlike wild-type microsomes, microsomes from these cells are unable to support C-terminal interaction of proproteins with the small nucleophiles hydrazine or hydroxylamine, and that the cells thus are defective in transamidation. In this study, using a modified recombinant vaccinia transient transfection system in conjunction with a composite cDNA prepared by 5′ extension of an existing GenBank sequence, we found that the genetic element affected in these cells corresponds to the human homolog of yGPI8, a gene affected in a yeast mutant strain exhibiting similar accumulation of GPI donors without transfer. hGPI8 gives rise to mRNAs of 1.6 and 1.9 kb, both encoding a protein of 395 amino acids that varies in cells with their ability to couple GPIs to proteins. The gene spans ≈25 kb of DNA on chromosome 1. Reconstitution of class K cells with hGPI8 abolishes their accumulation of GPI precursors and restores C-terminal processing of GPI-anchored proteins. Also, hGPI8 restores the ability of microsomes from the mutant cells to yield an active carbonyl in the presence of a proprotein which is considered to be an intermediate in catalysis by a transamidase. PMID:9356492

  10. Uranium in Surface Waters and Sediments Affected by Historical Mining in the Denver West 1:100,000 Quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, Robert A.; Otton, James K.; Schumann, R. Randall; Wirt, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical sampling of 82 stream waters and 87 stream sediments within mountainous areas immediately west of Denver, Colorado, was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in October 1994. The primary purpose was to evaluate regionally the effects of geology and past mining on the concentration and distribution of uranium. The study area contains uranium- and thorium-rich bedrock, numerous noneconomic occurrences of uranium minerals, and several uranium deposits of variable size and production history. During the sampling period, local streams had low discharge and were more susceptible to uranium-bearing acid drainage originating from historical mines of base- and precious-metal sulfides. Results indicated that the spatial distribution of Precambrian granites and metamorphic rocks strongly influences the concentration of uranium in stream sediments. Within-stream transport increases the dispersion of uranium- and thorium rich mineral grains derived primarily from granitic source rocks. Dissolved uranium occurs predominantly as uranyl carbonate complexes, and concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 65 micrograms per liter. Most values were less than 5 micrograms per liter, which is less than the current drinking water standard of 30 micrograms per liter and much less than locally applied aquatic-life toxicity standards of several hundred micrograms per liter. In local streams that are affected by uranium-bearing acid mine drainage, dissolved uranium is moderated by dilution and sorptive uptake by stream sediments. Sorbents include mineral alteration products and chemical precipitates of iron- and aluminum-oxyhydroxides, which form where acid drainage enters streams and is neutralized. Suspended uranium is relatively abundant in some stream segments affected by nearby acid drainage, which likely represents mobilization of these chemical precipitates. The 234U/238U activity ratio of acid drainage (0.95-1.0) is distinct from that of local surface waters (more than 1

  11. Fibrous shape underlies the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of nanosilver while surface chemistry affects the biosafety of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gábelová, Alena; El Yamani, Naouale; Alonso, Tamara Iglesias; Buliaková, Barbora; Srančíková, Annamária; Bábelová, Andrea; Pran, Elise Runden; Fjellsbø, Lise Marie; Elje, Elisabeth; Yazdani, Mazyar; Silva, Maria João; Dušinská, Mária

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly used in a wide range of commercial products and biomedical applications. Despite this, the knowledge of human potential health risk as well as comprehensive biological and toxicological information is still limited. We have investigated the capacity of two frequently used metallic ENMs, nanosilver and magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs), to induce thymidine kinase (Tk (+/-)) mutations in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells and transformed foci in Bhas 42 cells. Two types of nanosilver, spherical nanoparticles (AgNM300) and fibrous (AgNM302) nanorods/wires, and MNPs differing in surface modifications [MNPs coated with sodium oleate (SO-MNPs), MNPs coated with SO + polyethylene glycol (SO-PEG-MNPs) and MNPs coated with SO + PEG + poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) SO-PEG-PLGA-MNPs] were included in this study. Spherical AgNM300 showed neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic potential. In contrast, silver nanorods/wires (AgNM302) increased significantly the number of both gene mutations and transformed foci compared with the control (untreated) cells. Under the same treatment conditions, neither SO-MNPs nor SO-PEG-PLGA-MNPs increased the mutant frequency compared with control cells though an equivocal mutagenic effect was estimated for SO-PEG-MNPs. Although SO-MNPs and SO-PEG-MNPs did not show any carcinogenic potential, SO-PEG-PLGA-MNPs increased concentration dependently the number of transformed foci in Bhas 42 cells compared with the control cells. Our results revealed that fibrous shape underlies the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of nanosilver while surface chemistry affects the biosafety of MNPs. Considering that both nanosilver and MNPs are prospective ENMs for biomedical applications, further toxicological evaluations are warranted to assess comprehensively the biosafety of these nanomaterials.

  12. International Studies of Hazardous Groundwater/Surface Water Exchange in the Volcanic Eruption and Tsunami Affected Areas of Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Gusiakov, V. K.; Izbekov, P. E.; Gordeev, E.; Titov, V. V.; Verstraeten, I. M.; Pinegina, T. K.; Tsadikovsky, E. I.; Heilweil, V. M.; Gingerich, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    During the US-Russia Geohazards Workshop held July 17-19, 2012 in Moscow, Russia the international research effort was asked to identify cooperative actions for disaster risk reduction, focusing on extreme geophysical events. As a part of this recommendation the PIRE project was developed to understand, quantify, forecast and protect the coastal zone aquifers and inland water resources of Kamchatka (Russia) and its ecosystems affected by the November 4, 1952 Kamchatka tsunami (Khalatyrka Beach near Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy) and the January 2, 1996 Karymskiy volcano eruption and the lake tsunami. This project brings together teams from U.S. universities and research institutions located in Russia. The research consortium was briefed on recent technical developments and will utilize samples secured via major international volcanic and tsunami programs for the purpose of advancing the study of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in the volcanic eruption and tsunami affected coastal areas and inland lakes of Kamchatka. We plan to accomplish this project by developing and applying the next generation of field sampling, remote sensing, laboratory techniques and mathematical tools to study groundwater-surface water interaction processes and SGD. We will develop a field and modeling approach to define SGD environment, key controls, and influence of volcano eruption and tsunami, which will provide a framework for making recommendations to combat contamination. This is valuable for politicians, water resource managers and decision-makers and for the volcano eruption and tsunami affected region water supply and water quality of Kamchatka. Data mining and results of our field work will be compiled for spatial modeling by Geo-Information System (GIS) using 3-D Earth Systems Visualization Lab. The field and model results will be communicated to interested stakeholders via an interactive web site. This will allow computation of SGD spatial patterns. In addition, thanks to the

  13. Lunar Photometry and Composition of Ejecta Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Pugacheva, S. G.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.; Daydou, Y.

    One scientific goal of the AMIE experiment to fly onboard the SMART-1 mission is to investigate, at low polar orbit, the South Pole regions of the Moon. The AMIE camera will observe the surface in nadir direction within a large phase angle interval, thus providing photometric investigation of selected regions, in particular the South Pole- Aitken basin. The view is taken here that information retrieved from the local surface photometric behaviour of the Moon could be used for guiding the remote sensing anal- yses of specific geological targets. In a preliminary investigation, we have compared the Lunar Prospector thorium contents for some regions of the lunar near side with surface roughness estimated by means of the local photometric function. The aver- age structure of the lunar surface consists in a porous upper layer with various small fragments. Reflecting properties of this layer gives the uniform shape of photometric function. The average integrated lunar indicatrix was used as a background photomet- ric model. Taken as a reference, it permits to intercompare in a uniform system the shape of the phase function of different areas located at different longitude and lati- tude on the Moon. If the observed surface is represented by significant fields of ejecta materials, with many fragments of rocks, a shadow-hiding mechanism is involved, showing up at low phase angles. Thus, the fast decrease of the brightness in the phase function curve should reveal the presence of fragments on the surface. The Saari and Shorthill catalog data were used as observed phase functions. Both kinds of photo- metric functions were converted to symmetric form. Then, the difference between the modeled and observed phase functions for phase angle about 18 degree was used as a photometric parameter of the surface roughness. In the areas under study, this pa- rameter (which can vary between 0 and 1) varies from 0.05 (smooth mare surface) to 0.25 (crater Tycho and its ejecta

  14. Crowded Field Photometry in the CLASH Clusters: Measuring the Red Sequence of Cluster Galaxies with Robust Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John; Kelson, Daniel; Coe, Dan A.; Postman, Marc; CLASH Team

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program investigating 25 massive clusters of galaxies with X-ray gas Tx > 5 keV, spanning ~5 to ~30 x 10^14 solar masses, and a redshift range of 0.15 < z < 0.9. With 500 orbits of HST time and 16-filter, ultraviolet to infrared photometry of each cluster, this survey offers an unprecedented dataset for cluster galaxy photometry across a span of age and mass, but obtaining robust photometry for the cluster members has been hampered by the crowded field. We have developed a new technique to detect and define objects despite the presence of overlapping light profiles and to measure photometry of galaxies overlapping the extended haloes of massive galaxies. Utilizing spectral energy distribution fitting, we infer the properties of the detected galaxies, including their abundances and the time since their first star formation. Here we will discuss our technique and results, including the role metallicity and age play in shaping the red sequence of cluster galaxies.

  15. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  16. Does the temperature of beverages affect the surface roughness, hardness, and color stability of a composite resin?

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Karaman, Emel; Firat, Esra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of beverages’ temperature on the surface roughness, hardness, and color stability of a composite resin. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of the Filtek Z250 composite (3M ESPE, Dental Products, St.Paul, MN, USA) were prepared and initial roughness, microhardness, and color were measured. Then the specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 10 specimens each: Coffee at 70°C, coffee at 37°C, cola at 10°C, cola at 37°C, and artificial saliva (control). After the samples were subjected to 15 min × 3 cycles per day of exposure to the solutions for 30 days, the final measurements were recorded. Results: After immersion in beverages, the artificial saliva group showed hardness values higher than those of the other groups (P < 0.001) and the microhardness values were significantly different from the initial values in all groups except for the control group. Both cola groups showed roughness values higher than the baseline values (P < 0.05), while the other groups showed values similar to the baseline measurements. When ΔE measurements were examined, the 70°C coffee group showed the highest color change among all the groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: High-temperature solutions caused alterations in certain properties of composites, such as increased color change, although they did not affect the hardness or roughness of the composite resin material tested. PMID:24883021

  17. HIGH-PRECISION PHOTOMETRY OF EXTREME KBO 2003 EL{sub 61}

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David; Peixinho, Nuno

    2008-05-15

    We present high-precision, time-resolved, visible and near-infrared photometry of the large (diameter {approx} 2500 km) Kuiper belt object (136108) 2003 EL{sub 61}. The new data confirm rapid rotation at period P = 3.9155 {+-} 0.0001 h with a peak-to-peak photometric range of {delta}m{sub R} = 0.29 {+-} 0.02 mag and further show subtle but reproducible color variations with rotation. Rotational deformation of 2003 EL{sub 61} alone would give rise to a symmetric light curve free of color variations. The observed photometric deviations from the best-fit equilibrium model show the existence of a large surface region with an albedo and color different from the mean surface of 2003 EL{sub 61}. We explore constraints on the nature of this anomalous region set by the existing data.

  18. Isotopic assessment of sources and processes affecting sulfate and nitrate in surface water and groundwater of Luxembourg.

    PubMed

    Rock, L; Mayer, B

    2002-12-01

    Surface water and deep and shallow groundwater samples were taken from selected parts of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg to determine the isotopic composition of nitrate and sulfate, in order to identify sources and/or processes affecting these solutes. Deep groundwater had sulfate concentrations between 20 and 40 mg/L, delta34S(sulfate) values between -3.0 and -20.0 per thousand, and delta18O(sulfate) values between +1.5 and +5.0 per thousand; nitrate was characterized by concentrations varying between < 0.5 and 10 mg/L, delta15N(nitrate) values of approximately -0.5 per thousand, and delta18O(nitrate) values approximately +3.0 per thousand. In the shallow groundwater, sulfate concentrations ranged from 25 to 30 mg/L, delta34S(sulfate) values from -20.0 to +4.5 per thousand, and delta18O(sulfate) values from approximately +0.5 to +4.5 per thousand; nitrate concentrations varied between approximately 10 and 75 mg/L, delta15N(nitrate) values between +2.5 and +10.0 per thousand, and delta18O(nitrate) values between +1.0 and +3.0 per thousand. In surface water, sulfate concentrations ranged from 10 to 210 mg/L, delta34S(sulfate) values varied between -9.3 and +10.9 per thousand, and delta18O(sulfate) values between +3.0 and +10.7 per thousand were observed. Nitrate concentrations ranged from 10 to 40 mg/L, delta15N(nitrate) values from +6.5 to +12.0 per thousand, and delta18O(nitrate) values from -0.4 to +4.0 per thousand. Based on these data, three sulfate sources were identified controlling the riverine sulfate load. These are soil sulfate, dissolution of evaporites, and oxidation of reduced S minerals in the bedrock. Both groundwater types were predominantly influenced by sulfate from the two latter lithogenic S sources. The deep groundwater and a couple shallow groundwater samples had nitrate derived mainly from soil nitrification. All other sampling sites were influenced by nitrate originating from sewage and/or manure. A decrease in nitrate concentration observed

  19. CCD photometry of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Gibson, James; Mosher, Joel A.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband V and R CCD observations of the Uranian satellite system have been obtained over the full range of solar phase angles observable from earth. These first visual observations of the phase curves of Miranda, Ariel, and Umbriel show that Ariel and Miranda exhibit the large opposition surges previously seen on the two outer Uranian Satellites. Umbriel, however, lacks an appreciable opposition surge; its surface is either extremely compact or consists of small particles which lack a backscattered component. The tenuous structure of the other satellites is most likely due to the effects of eons of meteoritic gardening.

  20. High Precision Differential Photometry with CCDs: A Brief History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.

    I present a brief history of the hunt for high photometric precision using CCDs in astronomy. CCDs were invented in 1969 and only 7 years later they started to appear at the major observatories of the time. The next 10 years constituted a steep learning curve for astronomers as they developed an understanding of CCDs as instruments and analysis techniques for use with digital images. In 1985, differential photometry with CCDs began producing light curves with precisions near 0.01 magnitude. By 2008, ground-based telescopes armed with CCDs and using differential techniques consistently can provide photometric precisions of 1 millimagnitude or better. The challenge now is to continue to improve the photometry using new types of CCD detectors and other advanced digital imagers.

  1. Optical Photometry of V404 Cyg (=GS2023+338)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. M.; Shrader, C. R.; Starrfield, S. G.

    2000-03-01

    In response to the request by Hjellming et al. in ATEL #54, Rose Finn (Steward Observatory/U. Arizona) obtained for us two R-band CCD images of V404 Cyg (=GS2023+338) on 2000 Mar 3.52 UT with the Steward Observatory Bok 2.3-m telescope and direct CCD (scale = 0.3 arcsec/pixel, airmass = 1.8, seeing = 1.7 arcsec FWHM). Photometry of V404 Cyg was obtained with respect to the comparison stars C1, C4, and C5 of Udalski and Kaluzny (1991, PASP, 103, 198), Casares et al. (1993, MNRAS, 265, 834), and our own photometry of C1 (R = 12.39).

  2. The Spitzer Local Volume Legacy (LVL) global optical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Janice C.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Calzetti, Daniela; Staudaher, Shawn M.; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2014-11-01

    We present the global optical photometry of 246 galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey. The full volume-limited sample consists of 258 nearby (D < 11 Mpc) galaxies whose absolute B-band magnitude span a range of -9.6 < MB < -20.7 mag. A composite optical (UBVR) data set is constructed from observed UBVR and Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz imaging, where the ugriz magnitudes are transformed into UBVR. We present photometry within three galaxy apertures defined at UV, optical, and IR wavelengths. Flux comparisons between these apertures reveal that the traditional optical R25 galaxy apertures do not fully encompass extended sources. Using the larger IR apertures, we find colour-colour relationships where later type spiral and irregular galaxies tend to be bluer than earlier type galaxies. These data provide the missing optical emission from which future LVL studies can construct the full panchromatic (UV-optical-IR) spectral energy distributions.

  3. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Fringes' impacts to astrometry and photometry of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. J.; Peng, Q. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Fringes often appear in a CCD frame, especially when a thin CCD chip and an R or I filter is used. 88 CCD frames of the two open clusters NGC 2324 and NGC 1664 with a Johnson I filter taken from the 2.4-m telescope at Yunnan Observatory are used to study the fringes' impacts to the astrometry and photometry of stars. A novel technique proposed by Snodgrass and Carry is applied to remove the fringes in each CCD frame. And an appraisal of this technique is performed to estimate fringes' effects on astrometry and photometry of stars. Our results show that the astrometric and photometric precisions of stars can be improved effectively after the removal of fringes, especially for faint stars.

  5. An Aperture Photometry Pipeline for K2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek L.; Carboneau, Lindsey; Lezcano, Andy; Vydra, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research program with undergraduate students at Florida Gulf Coast University, we have constructed an aperture photometry pipeline for K2 data. The pipeline performs dynamic automated aperture mask definition for all targets in the K2 fields, followed by aperture photometry and detrending. Our pipeline is currently used to support a number of projects, including studies of stellar rotation and activity, red giant asteroseismology, gyrochronology, and exoplanet searches. In addition, output is used to support an undergraduate class on exoplanets aimed at a student audience of both majors and non-majors. The pipeline is designed for both batch and single-target use, and is easily extensible to data from other missions, and pipeline output is available to the community. This paper will describe our pipeline and its capabilities and illustrate the quality of the results, drawing on all of the applications for which it is currently used.

  6. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...

  7. CCD photometry using a wide-field Newtonian telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menako, C. R.; Henson, G. D.; Castelaz, M. A.; Powell, H. D.

    1996-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the utility of a CCD electronic-imaging camera at the focus of a wide-field Newtonian telescope as an efficient system for astronomical photometry. The CCD camera coupled to the wide-field telescope images one square degree of the sky, allowing for simultaneous light flux measurement of multiple stars without instrument repositioning. Photometric data acquired from the variable star W UMa using this system is compared to published values.

  8. Physical Properties of White Dwarfs from Multi-Band Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddi, R.

    2017-03-01

    We describe a hierarchical Bayesian model to measure the physical parameters (mass, cooling age, distance, interstellar extinction) of single white dwarfs using only multi-band UV to IR photometry. We test our model on a set of known white dwarfs with well-assessed atmospheric parameters, determined via optical spectroscopy. Looking forward to the results of the ESA Gaia mission, we derive the posterior distributions of white dwarf parameters in two different scenarios with known or unknown parallaxes.

  9. Luminosities and temperatures of M dwarf stars from infrared photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Bolometric magnitudes for a large number of M type dwarf stars, obtained by broadband infrared photometry at 1.65, 2.2, and 3.5 microns, are reviewed. The data obtained indicate that one parameter is sufficient to describe the blanketing in all of the UBVRI bands for all types of M dwarfs. In general, late M dwarfs seem to have lower effective temperatures than are predicted by theoretical models.

  10. High Speed Optical Photometry of LMXBs and CVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Robinson, Edward L.; Gomez, Sebastian; Gonzalez, Emmanuel; Lopez, Isaac D.; Monroy, Lorena; Price, Alex

    2013-02-01

    High speed photometry of several accreting binaries was obtained using the McDonald Observatory 2.1m telescope and ARGOS CCD photometer. A broad-band filter (BVR) was used in order to maximize flux and maintain a short (1-10s) integration time on faint targets. Such observations obtained over several years allow for variability study over time scales covering many orders of magnitude. Observations and analysis for several binaries are summarized.

  11. M2K Planet Search: Spectroscopic Screening and Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Gaidos, E.; Fischer, D.; Lepine, S.

    2010-10-01

    The M2K project is a search for planets orbiting nearby early M and late K dwarf drawn from the SUPERBLINK catalog. M and K dwarfs are highly attractive targets for finding low-mass and habitable planets because (1) close-in planets are more likely to orbit within their habitable zone, (2) planets orbiting them induce a larger Doppler signal and have deeper transits than similar planets around F, G, and early K type stars, (3) planet formation models predict they hold an abundance of super-Earth sized planets, and (4) they represent the vast majority of the stars close enough for direct imaging techniques. In spite of this, only 10% of late K and early M dwarfs are being monitored by current Doppler surveys. As part of the M2K project we have obtained low-resolution spectra for more than 2000 of our sample of 10,000 M and K dwarfs. We vet our sample by screening these stars for high metallicity and low chromospheric activity. We search for transits on targets showing high RMS Doppler signal and photometry candidates provided by SuperWASP project. By using "snapshot” photometry have been able to achieve sub-millimag photometry on numerous transit targets in the same night. With further follow-up observations we will be able to detect planets smaller than 10 Earth masses.

  12. High speed low noise multiplexed three color absorbance photometry.

    PubMed

    Dadesh, Khaled M; Kurup, G K; Basu, Amar S

    2011-01-01

    Multispectral photometry is often required to distinguish samples in flow injection analysis and flow cytometry; however, the cost of multiple light detectors, filters, and optical paths contribute to the high cost of multicolor and spectral detection systems. This paper describes frequency division multiplexing (FDM), a simple approach for performing multi-wavelength absorbance photometry with a single light detector and a single interrogation window. In previous efforts, modulation frequencies were <10 KHz, resulting in a detector bandwidth of <20 Hz. This paper presents a high frequency FDM circuit which can increase the oscillation frequencies to several 100 KHz, improving the detection bandwidth by a factor of 10 while still maintaining low cost. Light from 3 different LED sources are encoded into unique frequency channels, passed through the detection cell, and later demodulated using phase-sensitive electronics. Electronic multiplexing couples all light sources into a single optical train without spectral filters. Theory and high frequency considerations are demonstrated. Simultaneous three color absorbance detection is demonstrated in solutions and in flowing droplet microreactors. This technique can potentially reduce the cost of multicolor photometry by replacing expensive optical components with low-cost electronics.

  13. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals.

  14. Antimicrobial surfaces containing cationic nanoparticles: how immobilized, clustered, and protruding cationic charge presentation affects killing activity and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bing; Jiang, Ying; Nüsslein, Klaus; Rotello, Vincent M; Santore, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    This work examines how the antimicrobial (killing) activity of net-negative surfaces depends on the presentation of antimicrobial cationic functionality: distributed versus clustered, and flat clusters versus raised clusters. Specifically, the ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus by sparsely distributed 10 nm cationic nanoparticles, immobilized on a negative surface and backfilled with a PEG (polyethylene glycol) brush, was compared with that for a dense layer of the same immobilized nanoparticles. Additionally, sparsely distributed 10 nm poly-L-lysine (PLL) coils, adsorbed to a surface to produce flat cationic "patches" and backfilled with a PEG brush were compared to a saturated adsorbed layer of PLL. The latter resembled classical uniformly cationic antimicrobial surfaces. The protrusion of the cationic clusters substantially influenced killing but the surface concentration of the clusters had minor impact, as long as bacteria adhered. When surfaces were functionalized at the minimum nanoparticle and patch densities needed for bacterial adhesion, killing activity was substantial within 30 min and nearly complete within 2 h. Essentially identical killing was observed on more densely functionalized surfaces. Surfaces containing protruding (by about 8 nm) nanoparticles accomplished rapid killing (at 30 min) compared with surfaces containing similarly cationic but flat features (PLL patches). Importantly, the overall surface density of cationic functionality within the clusters was lower than reported thresholds for antimicrobial action. Also surprising, the nanoparticles were far more deadly when surface-immobilized compared with free in solution. These findings support a killing mechanism involving interfacial stress.

  15. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2011 January - March

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, Petr; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2011-01-01

    For background on the program details for each of the opportunity lists, refer to previous issues, e.g., Minor Planet Bulletin 36, 188. As always, we urge observations of asteroids even if they have well-established lightcurve parameters, especially if they do not yet have good spin axis or shape models. Every lightcurve of sufficient quality provides valuable information in support of such efforts, which are needed to resolve a number of questions about the evolution of individual asteroids and the general population. Furthermore, data over many apparitions can help determine if an asteroid's rotation rate is being affected by the YORP effect, a thermal effect that can cause a smaller, irregularly-shaped asteroid to speed up or slow down. See Lowry et al. (2007) Science 316, 272- 274 and Kaasalainen et al. (2007) Nature 446, 420-422. Lightcurves, new or repeats, of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are also important for solving spin axis models, specifically the orientation of the asteroid's axis of rotation. Pole directions are known for only about 30 NEAs out of a population of 6800. This is hardly sufficient to begin analyses of pole alignments, including whether or not YORP is forcing pole orientations into a limited number of preferred directions (see La Spina et al., 2004, Nature 428, 400-401).

  16. Asteroid photometry: Phase-angle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belskaya, I.; Shevchenko, V.

    2014-07-01

    We review available observational data on magnitude phase-angle dependencies of asteroids. The number of asteroids, for which good quality phase curves were measured, increases very slowly. At present, the data-set on magnitude-phase dependencies with a good phase-angle coverage and small scatter includes less than one hundred asteroids. Most part of these data is related to the ground-based observations of main-belt asteroids and covered the phase-angle range from 0.3--0.5 deg to 20--25 deg. The phase curves in the wider phase-angle range up to 120--140 deg were measured for ten asteroids observed by space missions and for several near-Earth asteroids. Ground-based and space-based observations are generally mutually consistent. For most of the observed phase-angle ranges, asteroid magnitude phase curves are found to be linear with a noticeable deviation at phase angles smaller than 5--7 deg due to the opposition effect and at phase angles larger than 70-80 deg due to the influence of large-scale surface features. The differences in the phase curves at large phase angles and their influence on the phase integral have not yet been thoroughly investigated. The measured linear phase coefficients of asteroids are in the range of 0.02--0.05 mag/deg. The opposition-effect amplitudes determined relatively to the extrapolation of the linear part of the phase curve do not exceeds 0.4 mag. Relatively small variations of asteroid phase curve parameters require accurate photometric observations and thorough account for lightcurve amplitude to distinguish phase-angle effects. The measured magnitude phase dependencies revealed essential differences in magnitude phase-angle behavior for asteroids of different surface composition both in the linear part and in the opposition effect range (Harris et al. 1989, Belskaya and Shevchenko 2000, Shevchenko et al. 2012). Maximal amplitude of the opposition effect occurs for moderate-albedo S- and M-type asteroids. Low-albedo asteroids

  17. Galileo photometry of Apollo landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Head, James W.; Pieters, C.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Klaasen, K.; Neukum, G.; Hoffmann, H.; Jaumann, R.

    1993-01-01

    As of December 1992, the Galileo spacecraft performed its second and final flyby (EM2), of the Earth-Moon system, during which it acquired Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera images of the lunar surface suitable for photometric analysis using Hapke's, photometric model. These images, together with those from the first flyby (EM1) in December 1989, provide observations of all of the Apollo landing sites over a wide range of photometric geometries and at eight broadband filter wavelengths ranging from 0.41 micron to 0.99 micron. We have completed a preliminary photometric analysis of Apollo landing sites visible in EM1 images and developed a new strategy for a more complete analysis of the combined EM1 and EM2 data sets in conjunction with telescopic observations and spectrogoniometric measurements of returned lunar samples. No existing single data set, whether from spacecraft flyby, telescopic observation, or laboratory analysis of returned samples, describes completely the light scattering behavior of a particular location on the Moon at all angles of incidence (i), emission (e), and phase angles (a). Earthbased telescopic observations of particular lunar sites provide good coverage of incidence nad phase angles, but their range in emission angle is limited to only a few degrees because of the Moon's synchronous rotation. Spacecraft flyby observations from Galileo are now available for specific lunar features at many photometric geometries unobtainable from Earth; however, this data set lacks coverage at very small phase angles (a less than 13 deg) important for distinguishing the well-known 'opposition effect'. Spectrogoniometric measurements from returned lunar samples can provide photometric coverage at almost any geometry; however, mechanical properties of prepared particulate laboratory samples, such as particle compaction and macroscopic roughness, likely differ from those on the lunar surface. In this study, we have developed methods for the simultaneous

  18. Galileo photometry of asteroid 243 Ida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Fanale, F.; Granahan, J.; McEwen, A.S.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.

    1996-01-01

    Galileo imaging observations over phase angles 19.5?? to 109.8?? are combined with near-opposition Earth-based data to derive the photometric properties of Ida. To first order these properties are uniform over the surface and well modeled at ?? = 0.55 ??m by Hapke parameters ????0 = 0.22, h = 0.020, B0 = 1.5, g = -0.33, and ?? = 18?? with corresponding geometric albedo p = 0.21??0.030.01 and Bond albedo AB = 0.081??0.0170.008. Ida's photometric properties are more similar to those of "average S-asteroids" (P. Helfenstein and J. Veverka 1989, Asteroids II, Univ. of Arizona Press, Tucson) than are those of 951 Gaspra. Two primary color units are identified on Ida: Terrain A exhibits a spectrum with relatively shallower 1-??m absorption and a relatively steeper red spectral slope than average Ida, while Terrain B has a deeper 1-??m absorption and a less steep red slope. The average photometric properties of Ida and Terrain A are similar while those of Terrain B differ mostly in having a slightly higher value of ????0 (0.22 versus 0.21), suggesting that Terrain B consists of slightly brighter, more transparent regolith particles. Galileo observations of Ida's satellite Dactyl over phase angles 19.5?? to 47.6?? suggest photometric characteristics similar to those of Ida, the major difference being Dactyl's slightly lower albedo (0.20 compared to 0.21). ?? 1990 Academic Press, Inc.

  19. High-Quality Broadband BVRI Photometry of Benchmark Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.

    Photometric techniques are often used to observe stars and it can be demonstrated that fundamental stellar properties can be observationally determined using calibrated sets of photometric data. Many of the most powerful techniques utilized to calibrate stellar photometry employ the use of stars in clusters since the individual stars are believed to have many common properties such as age, composition, and approximate distance. Broadband photometric Johnson/Cousins BVRI observations are presented for several nearby open clusters. The new photometry has been tested for consistency relative to archival work and shown to be both accurate and precise. The careful use of a regular routine when making photometric observations, along with the monitoring of instrumental systems and the use of various quality control techniques when making observations or performing data reductions, will enhance an observer's ability to produce high-quality photometric measurements. This work contains a condensed review of the history of photometry, along with a brief description of several popular photometric systems that are often utilized in the field of stellar astrophysics. Publications written by Taylor or produced during the early Taylor and Joner collaboration are deemed especially relevant to the current work. A synopsis of seven archival publications is offered, along with a review of notable reports of VRI photometric observations for the nearby Hyades open star cluster. The body of this present work consists of four publications that appeared between the years 2005 and 2008, along with a soon to be submitted manuscript for a fifth publication. Each of these papers deals specifically with high-quality broadband photometry of open clusters with new data being presented for the Hyades, Coma, NGC 752, Praesepe, and M67. It is concluded that the VRI photometry produced during the Taylor and Joner collaborative investigations forms a high-quality data set that has been: (1) stable for

  20. Chemical Composition, but Not Specific Surface Area, Affects Calcium Retention of Nanostructured Calcium Compounds in Growing Rats.

    PubMed

    Posavec, Lidija; Hilty, Florentine M; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Buntting, Hylton; Hilbe, Monika; Kruger, Marlena; Krumeich, Frank; Grobler, Anne F; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    Background: Low dietary calcium intake and bioavailability may adversely affect bone health. Reducing the size of calcium compounds increases their specific surface area (SSA, expressed as m(2)/g) and may increase calcium dissolution and bioavailability.Objective: We investigated the influence of SSA and chemical composition on the bioavailability of calcium and compared in vitro calcium dissolution with in vivo absorption.Methods: Calcium dissolution was measured in 0.1 M phosphoric acid, whereas color and pH changes of foods were assessed as indicators for potential sensory performance. Calcium absorption, retention, and fractional retention were measured over a 5-d balance study in growing Sprague-Dawley male rats after 21 d of feeding. Femoral and vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and extensive tissue histology were assessed at study end. The influence of SSA on calcium bioavailability was assessed by comparing the groups fed pure calcium carbonate (CaCO3) with increasing SSAs of 3, 36, and 64 m(2)/g (CaCO3_3, CaCO3_36 and CaCO3_64), whereas chemical composition was assessed by comparing the smallest CaCO3_64, a 50:50 wt:wt percent solution mixture of CaCO3 and hydroxyapatite_94, and pure hydroxyapatite_100.Results: In vivo, fractional calcium retention from hydroxyapatite_100 (mean ± SEM: 54.86% ± 0.95%/5 d) was significantly greater than from CaCO3_64 (49.66% ± 1.15%/5 d) (P = 0.044). Increasing SSA of the pure CaCO3 did not significantly improve calcium retention. Across all 5 groups, there were no significant differences in BMD or tissue calcification by histology. In vitro calcium dissolution did not correlate with SSA or calcium absorption. In selected food matrixes, hydroxyapatite_100 caused less color change and/or smaller pH increase than did the other calcium compounds.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that chemical composition rather than SSA is a predictor of nanostructured calcium bioavailability and that in vitro dissolution of

  1. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats (hence ``Constellation'') from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes (3 cm aperture) and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats (funded by Austria) are UniBRITE, designed and built by UTIAS-SFL (University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies-Space Flight Laboratory) and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz (TUG) with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency, under contract to the Canadian Space Agency. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~ 24 degrees), so up to 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously in 32 × 32 sub-rasters. Photometry (with reduced precision but thorough time sampling) of additional fainter targets will be possible through on-board data processing. A critical technical element of the BRITE mission is the three-axis attitude control system to stabilize a nanosat with very low inertia. The pointing stability is better than 1.5 arcminutes rms, a significant advance by UTIAS-SFL over any previous nanosatellite. BRITE-Constellation will primarily measure p- and g-mode pulsations to probe the interiors and ages of stars through asteroseismology. The BRITE sample of many of the brightest stars in the night sky is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all evolutionary stages, and evolved medium-mass stars at the very end of their nuclear burning phases (cool giants and AGB stars). The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for stars brighter than mag V=4 from which the BRITE-Constellation sample

  2. Photometry from Voyager 2 - Initial results from the Uranian atmosphere, satellites, and rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. L.; West, R. A.; Nelson, R. M.; Wallis, B. D.; Buratti, B. J.; Horn, L. J.; Hord, C. W.; Esposito, L. W.; Simmons, K. E.; Graps, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of Voyager 2 photopolarimetry (PPS) surveys of Uranus, the ring system, occultation experiments and observations of the Uranian moons are reported. Dual-channel photometry and polarimetry data obtained of the atmosphere at various emission and phase angles are delineated and compared with characteristics of the Saturn and Jupiter atmospheres. The results of temperature, UV absorption and density profile calculations are also discussed. Extensive ring dimensional data, based on two occultation experiments, are provided in tabular form noting that the rings contain no dust. Finally, the geometric albedos of the five major moons and the phase curve of the moon Titania are presented. The latter data indicate that Titanian surface features are not the result of recent events such as volcanism or ice slurry outflows.

  3. Starspots and active regions on IN Com: UBVRI photometry and linear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I. Yu.; Kozlova, O. V.

    2014-06-01

    The activity of the variable star IN Com is considered using the latest multicolor UBVRI photometry and linear polarimetric observations carried out during a decade. The photometric variability of the star is fully described using the zonal spottedness model developed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO). Spotted regions cover up to 22% of the total stellar surface, with the difference in temperatures between the quiet photosphere and the spot umbra being 600 K. The spots are located at middle and low latitudes (40°-55°). The intrinsic broad-band linear polarization of IN Com and its rotational modulation in the U band due to local magnetic fields at the most spotted (active) stellar longitudes were detected for the first time.

  4. Barred Galaxy Photometry: Comparing results from the Cananea sample with N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.; Gadotti, D. A.; Carrasco, L.; Bosma, A.; de Souza, R. E.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We compare the results of the photometrical analysis of barred galaxies with those of a similar analysis from N-body simulations. The photometry is for a sample of nine barred galaxies observed in the J and K[s] bands with the CANICA near infrared (NIR) camera at the 2.1 m telescope of the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro (OAGH) in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. The comparison includes radial ellipticity profiles and surface brightness (density for the N-body galaxies) profiles along the bar major and minor axes. We find very good agreement, arguing that the exchange of angular momentum within the galaxy plays a determinant role in the evolution of barred galaxies.

  5. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Stellar population of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are analyzed. UBVRI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The brightness and color distributions in the galaxies are analyzed. Extinction in dust lanes in three spiral galaxies is estimated. The contributions of the radiation of the spherical and disk components in different photometric bands are estimated. Two-color diagrams are used to estimate the composition of the stellar populations in various galaxy components. The variations of the color characteristics in the S0 galaxies is due mostly to radial metallicity gradients.

  6. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Structure of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are reported. U BV RI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The overall structure of the galaxies is analyzed and the galaxy images decomposed into bulge and disk components. The parameters of the galaxy components—rings, bars, spiral arms, and dust lanes—are determined. The bulge/disk decompositions based on averaged one-dimensional photometric profiles yield incorrect parameters for the bulges of the S0-Sa galaxies with bars and/or rings, whose inner regions are dominated by the radiation of the bulge.

  7. Cell sheet detachment affects the extracellular matrix: a surface science study comparing thermal liftoff, enzymatic, and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Heather E; Cheng, Xuanhong; Graham, Daniel J; Ratner, Buddy D; Castner, David G

    2005-10-01

    This work compares the removal of bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) monolayers via 1) low-temperature liftoff from a "smart polymer," plasma polymerized poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (ppNIPAM), 2) enzymatic digestion, and 3) mechanical dissociation from ppNIPAM surfaces. We examine the surfaces after cell removal by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), immunostaining, and cell adhesion assay. Immunoassay results indicate that low-temperature liftoff nondestructively harvests the cell sheet and most of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas enzymatic digestion and mechanical dissociation are damaging to both the cells and ECM. XPS results indicate that amide and alcohol groups attributed to proteins in the ECM are present on postliftoff surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) of ToF-SIMS data indicates that molecular ion fragments of amino acids are present on postliftoff surfaces. Finally, a cell adhesion assay seeding new cells on surfaces from which an initial layer of cells was removed via each of the three methods indicates that liftoff and mechanical dissociation leave behind surfaces that better promote cell adhesion. We conclude that the removal of BAEC cells via low-temperature liftoff from ppNIPAM-treated surfaces is less damaging to the ECM proteins remaining at the surface than the other methods.

  8. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  9. Retention and rainfastness of mancozeb as affected by physicochemical characteristics of adaxial apple leaf surface after enhanced UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Bringe, Katja; Hunsche, Mauricio; Schmitz-Eiberger, Michaela; Noga, Georg

    2007-02-01

    It is not clear so far whether alteration of leaf micromorphology and surface wax chemistry due to the impact of environmental factors, such as UV-B radiation, affects retention and rainfastness of applied pesticide solutions. In this study; UV-B treated and untreated adaxial leaf surfaces of apple seedlings (Malus domestica Borkh.) were characterized in terms of chemical composition, micromorphological fine structure, hydrophobicity, and wettability. Furthermore, the retention and rainfastness of applied fungicide mancozeb were studied. The samples were examined 0, 24 and 48 h after ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation (0.022 kW m(-2) for 150 min) The total wax mass, recovered from the adaxial leaf surface, amounted from 0.38 microg cm(-2) (control) up to 0.49 microg cm(-2) (24 h). Chemical composition of surface wax altered, whereas the contact angle of applied water droplets on leaf surface of UV-B treated plants did not change significantly compared to the control. The alteration of surface wax quantity and quality significantly affected retention of a.i.; it increased at a sampling time of 24 h after UV-B irradiation, whereas rainfastness of the fungicide spray solution was not significantly influenced.

  10. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  11. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES: ULTRAVIOLET AND H{alpha} PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-12-20

    We present an analysis of ultradeep UV and H{alpha} imaging of five nearby spiral galaxies to study the recent star formation in the outer disk. Using azimuthally averaged ellipse photometry as well as aperture photometry of individual young stellar complexes, we measure how star formation rates (SFRs) and UV and H{alpha} colors vary with radius. We detect azimuthally averaged UV flux to {approx}1.2-1.4 R{sub 25} in most galaxies; at the edge of the detected UV disk, the surface brightnesses are 28-29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, corresponding to SFR surface densities of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Additionally, we detect between 120 and 410 young stellar complexes per galaxy, with a significant number of detections out to {approx}1.5 R{sub 25}. We measure radial FUV-NUV profiles, and find that the dispersion in the UV colors of individual young stellar complexes increases with radius. We investigate how radial variations in the frequency of star formation episodes can create color gradients and increasing dispersion in the UV colors of star-forming regions, like those observed in our study. Specifically, we use recently published, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of {Sigma}{sub SFR} throughout the disk of M33 to estimate the frequency of star formation episodes throughout the disk of a typical spiral galaxy. We use stellar synthesis models of these star formation histories (SFHs) to measure the variations in UV colors and find that we can replicate large dispersions in UV colors based on episodic SFHs.

  12. High-precision photometry for K2 Campaign 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Domsa, I.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2015-12-01

    The two reaction wheel K2 mission promises and has delivered new discoveries in the stellar and exoplanet fields. However, due to the loss of accurate pointing, it also brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. In this paper, we describe a new reduction pipeline for extracting high-precision photometry from the K2 data set, and present public light curves for the K2 Campaign 1 target pixel data set. Key to our reduction is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps, from which accurate centroids are passed on for high-precision photometry extraction. We extract target light curves for sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue - this includes not only primary targets of the K2 campaign 1, but also any other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. We provide the raw light curves, and the products of various detrending processes aimed at removing different types of systematics. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ˜0.127 arcsec. For bright stars, our best 6.5 h precision for raw light curves is ˜20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 h precision achieved is ˜15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. Example light curves of transiting planets and a Cepheid variable candidate, are also presented. We make all light curves public, including the raw and detrended photometry, at http://k2.hatsurveys.org.

  13. Photometry and spectroscopy in the open cluster alpha Persei, 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.

    1994-01-01

    Results from a combination of new spectroscopic and photometric observations in the lower main sequence and pre-main sequence of the open cluster alpha Persei are presented. New echelle spectroscopy has provided radial and rotational velocity information for thirteen candidate members, three of which are nonmembers based on radial velocity, absence of a Li 6707 A feature, and absence of H alpha emission. A set of revised rotational velocity estimates for several slowly rotating candidates identified earlier is given, yielding rotational velocities as low as 7 km/s for two apparent cluster members. VI photometry for several pre-main-sequence members is given; the new (V, V-I(sub K) photometry yields a more clearly defined pre-main sequence. A list of approximately 30 new faint candidate members based on the (V, V-I(sub K)), charge coupled device (CCD) photometry is presented in an effort to identify additional cluster members at very low masses. Low-dispersion spectra obtained for several of these candidates provide in some cases supporting evidence for cluster membership. The single brown dwarf candidate in this cluster is for the first time placed in a color-magnitude diagram with other cluster members, providing a better means for establishing its true status. Stars from among the list of new photometric candidates may provide the means for establishing a sequence of cluster members down to very faint magnitudes (V approximately 21) and consequently very low masses. New coordinate determinations for previous candidate members and finding charts for the new photometric candidates are provided in Appendices.

  14. Photometry and spectroscopy in the open cluster Alpha Persei, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.

    1993-01-01

    Results from a combination of new spectroscopic and photometric observations in the lower main-sequence and pre-main sequence of the open cluster alpha Persei are presented. New echelle spectroscopy has provided radial and rotational velocity information for thirteen candidate members, three of which are nonmembers based on radial velocity, absence of a Li 6707A feature, and absence of H-alpha emission. A set of revised rotational velocity estimates for several slowly rotating candidates identified earlier is given, yielding rotational velocities as low as 7 km/s for two apparent cluster members. VRI photometry for several pre-main sequence members is given; the new (V,V-I(sub K)) photometry yields a more clearly defined pre-main sequence. A list of approximately 43 new faint candidate members based on the (V,V-I(sub K)) CCD photometry is presented in an effort to identify additional cluster members at very low masses. Low-dispersion spectra obtained for several of these candidates provide in some cases supporting evidence for cluster membership. The single brown dwarf candidate in this cluster is for the first time placed in a color-magnitude diagram with other cluster members, providing a better means for establishing its true status. Stars from among the list of new photometric candidates may provide the means for establishing a sequence of cluster members down to very faint magnitudes (V approximately 21) and consequently very low masses. New coordinate determinations for previous candidate members and finding charts for the new photometric candidates are provided in appendices.

  15. EUVE photometry of SS Cygni: Dwarf nova outbursts and oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1995-05-15

    The authors present EUVE Deep Survey photometry and AAVSO optical measurements of the 1993 August and 1994 June/July outbursts of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The EUV and optical light curves are used to illustrate the different response of the accretion disk to outbursts which begin at the inner edge and propagate outward, and those which begin at the outer edge and propagate inward. Furthermore, the authors describe the properties of the quasi-coherent 7--9 s sinusoidal oscillations in the EUV flux detected during the rise and plateau stages of these outbursts.

  16. MYRaf: An Easy Aperture Photometry GUI for IRAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaei, M. S.; KiliÇ, Y.; Özeren, F. F.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the design and development of MYRaf, a GUI (Graphical User Interface) that aims to be completely open-source under General Public License (GPL). MYRaf is an easy to use, reliable, and a fast IRAF aperture photometry GUI tool for those who are conversant with text-based software and command-line procedures in GNU/Linux OSs. MYRaf uses IRAF, PyRAF, matplotlib, ginga, alipy, and SExtractor with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python, and uses the Qt framework.

  17. CCD-photometry of comets at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Beatrice E. A.

    1992-01-01

    CCD imaging and time series photometry are used to determine the state of activity, nuclear properties and eventually the rotational motion of cometary nuclei. Cometary activity at large heliocentric distances and mantle evolution are not yet fully understood. Results of observations carried out at the 2.1 telescope on Kitt Peak April 10-12 and May 15-16, 1991 are discussed. Color values and color-color diagrams are presented for several comets and asteroids. Estimations of nuclear radii and shapes are given.

  18. Io hot spots - Infrared photometry of satellite occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, J. D.; Matson, D. L.; Sinton, W. M.; Howell, R. R.; Dyck, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Io's active hot spots, which are presently mapped on the basis of IR photometry of this moon's occultation by other Gallilean satellites, are obtained with greatest spatial resolution near the sub-earth point. A model is developed for the occultation lightcurves, and its fitting to the data defines the apparent path of the occulting satellite relative to Io; the mean error in apparent relative position of occulting satellites is of the order of 178 km. A heretofore unknown, 20-km diameter hot spot is noted on Io's leading hemisphere.

  19. Using DA White Dwarfs to Calibrate Synthetic Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holberg, J. B.

    2007-04-01

    Four widely used photometric systems, namely the Johnson-Kron-Cousins UBVRI, the Strömgren uvby, the 2MASS JHKs and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz systems have been directly compared with the HST absolute photometric scale of Bohlin & Gilliland (2004). These comparisons are subsequently used to construct a large grid of accurate synthetic magnitudes for DA white dwarfs. This grid is, in turn, critically evaluated with respect to the observed photometry from substantial samples of actual white dwarfs. The advantages of DA white dwarfs as photometric stars are emphasized, and the prospects for extending the use of these stars into the near infrared are highlighted.

  20. Refined flicker photometry technique to measure ocular lens density.

    PubMed

    Teikari, Petteri; Najjar, Raymond P; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Dumortier, Dominique; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M; Gronfier, Claude

    2012-11-01

    Many physiological and pathological conditions are associated with a change in the crystalline lens transmittance. Estimates of lens opacification, however, generally rely on subjective rather than objective measures in clinical practice. The goal of our study was to develop an improved psychophysical heterochromatic flicker photometry technique combined with existing mathematical models to evaluate the spectral transmittance of the human ocular media noninvasively. Our results show that it is possible to accurately estimate ocular media density in vivo in humans. Potential applications of our approach include basic research and clinical settings on visual and nonimage-forming visual systems.

  1. Spectroscopy and photometry for low-mass stars in Praesepe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Scott D.; Stauffer, John R.; Prosser, Charles F.; Herter, Terry

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained spectral types, H alpha equivalent widths, and optical photometry for a small sample of late K and M dwarf candidate members of the Praesepe open cluster. At least for the small sample of stars we have observed, all of the Paesepe members later than M2 have H alpha in emission. The chromospheric activity of the Praesepe satrs is essentially the same as that for Hyades members of the same mass, as expected since the two clusters are thought to be the same age.

  2. Photometry and polarimetry. [optical properties of Titan atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.

    1974-01-01

    A review of available information on the photometry, polarimetry, and narrow band spectrophotometry of Titan discusses five major categories: (1) brightness and color as a function of orbital position; (2) brightness and color as a function of solar phase angle; (3) geometric and bond albedo; (4) reflectance as a function of wavelength; and (5) polarization as a function of solar phase angle. It is concluded that a Saturn-like cloud model may be required to explain the sum of polarimetric and photometric observations.

  3. Classification of Asteroid 9983 Rickfienberg using Spectral Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatge, Coty; Arion, D.; Fienberg, R.

    2012-01-01

    Asteroid 9983 has not yet been previously classified. The asteroid was classified using spectral photometry. Images were obtained using the 0.9-meter WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak Observatory, the S2KB camera, and U, B, V, R, and I Harris filters. Landolt reference stars were used to calibrate the imaging system. These observations were conducted in parallel with observations being made at Andover Academy to determine a rotational lightcurve. These observations were well timed to occur during the recent opposition of 9983 Rickfienberg. This work was supported in part by the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium and a private bequest from Ms. Linda Staubitz.

  4. uvby photometry in McCormick proper motion fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Danish 50 cm telescope at the European Southern Observatory was used to obtain high-precision uvby photometry for 50 F2 to G2 stars, with V values in the 9.4-12.3 mag range, which were selected in the southern galactic polar regions of the McCormick proper motion fields and measured on six different nights. The brighter stars are found to systematically exhibit smaller m(1) indices, of about 0.02 mag, upon comparison with the earlier data of Blaauw et al (1976). Single measurements are given for 98 stars in eight McCormick fields at intermediate southern galactic latitudes.

  5. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T.; Ilkiewicz, K.; Swierczynski, E.; Belcheva, M.; Dimitrov, D.

    2013-08-01

    We report optical BV photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013, carried out between August 14.88 UT and August 15.08 UT. Using a 60 cm Cassegrain telescope at the Nicolaus Copernicus University Observatory (Torun, Poland) we estimated the V brightness of the Nova to be 6.31+/-0.02 mag and 6.18+/-0.03 mag on Aug. 14.94 UT and Aug. 15.02 UT respectively. HD 194113 (F2, V=8.00 mag) was used as a comparison star.

  6. Coordinates and RI photometry of Large Magellanic Cloud carbon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, E. )

    1990-07-01

    Coordinates and photoelectric RI magnitudes are given for 86 carbon stars discovered by Blanco et al. in four selected 0.12 deg sq areas of the LMC. A comparison with the photometry of Blanco et al. for carbon stars in three different fields of the LMC suggests that the luminosity distribution of the carbon stars may change from center to center in the LMC. This possibility is supported by the differences in the mean I magnitude of the carbon stars detected between the four areas studied. 16 refs.

  7. LEMON: an (almost) completely automated differential-photometry pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrón, V.; Fernández, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present LEMON, the CCD differential-photometry pipeline, written in Python, developed at the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia (CSIC) and originally designed for its use at the 1.23 m CAHA telescope for automated variable stars detection and analysis. The aim of our tool is to make it possible to completely reduce thousands of images of time series in a matter of hours and with minimal user interaction, if not none at all, automatically detecting variable stars and presenting the results to the astronomer.

  8. Extinctions and Distances of Dark Clouds from Ugrijhk Photometry of Red Clump Giants: the North America and Pelican Nebulae Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straižys, V.; Laugalys, V.

    A possibility of applying 2MASS J, H, Ks, IPHAS r, i and MegaCam u, g photometry of red giants for determining distances to dark clouds is investigated. Red clump giants with a small admixture of G5--K1 and M2--M3 stars of the giant branch can be isolated and used in determining distances to separate clouds or spiral arms. Interstellar extinctions of background red giants can be also used for mapping dust surface density in the cloud.

  9. Time-Series Spectroscopy and Photometry of the Helium Atmosphere Pulsating White Dwarf EC 20058–5234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    We summarise both photometric and spectroscopic observations of the southern DBV white dwarf EC 20058–5234 (QU Tel) obtained primarily using a Magellan 6.5 m telescope. With the aim of identifying pulsation-induced spectral variations, the time-resolved 30 sMagellan spectra are phased using 54 h of contiguous time-series photometry obtained using the Mt John (NZ) 1.0 m telescope. A comparison of the DFTs obtained from a 1997 nine day multisite WET run and the two day single site Magellan observations is made. The difficulty of establishing a reliable surface temperatures for DBVs is mentioned.

  10. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  11. Accurate PSF-matched photometry for the J-PAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Teja, Yolanda; Benitez, Txitxo; Dupke, Renato a.

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-PAU Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is expected to map 8,600 squared-degrees of the sky using 54 narrow and 5 broad band filters. Carried out by a Spanish-Brazilian consortium, the main goal of this survey is to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) with photometric redshifts. The expectation is measuring these photometric redshifts with a precision of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.003 for 100 million galaxies and a few millions of quasars, and reaching an accuracy of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.01 for other 300 million galaxies. With these numbers, it will be possible to determine w in the Dark Energy (DE) equation of state with an accuracy of < 4%. To achieve such precision and measure the radial BAOs, not only an advanced technical setup but also special data processing tools are required. These tools must be accurate as well as suitable to be implemented in fully automated and computationally efficient algorithms.The factor that most influences the photometric redshift precision is the quality of the photometry. For that reason we have developed a new technique based on the Chebyshev-Fourier bases (CHEFs, Jiménez-Teja & Benítez 2012, ApJ, 745, 150) to obtain a highly precise multicolor photometry without PSF consideration, thus saving a considerable amount of time and circumventing severe problems such as the PSF variability across the images. The CHEFs are a set of mathematical orthonormal bases with different scale and resolution levels, originally designed to fit the surface light distribution of galaxies. They have proved to be able to model any kind of morphology, including spirals, highly elliptical, or irregular galaxies, including isophotal twists and fine substructure. They also fit high signal-to-noise images, lensing arcs and stars with great accuracy. We can calculate optimal, unbiased, total magnitudes directly through these CHEFs models and, thus, colors without needing the PSF.We compare our photometry with widely-used codes such as SExtractor (Bertin

  12. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  13. The cytoplasmic tail of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF negatively affects transport to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Oeffner, F; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1999-02-01

    The surface glycoprotein, HEF, of influenza C virus (C/Johannesburg/1/66) has been shown to undergo a post-translation conformational change that is evident in a dramatic change of electrophoretic mobility. If the corresponding gene is expressed in the absence of other viral proteins, this folding process does not occur at all or only very inefficiently. A chimaeric protein, HEF-HA(Tail), in which the short cytoplasmic tail (Arg-Thr-Lys) of HEF was replaced by the cytoplasmic tail of the haemagglutinin of an influenza A virus (fowl plague virus) was constructed. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the chimaeric protein was detected on the cell surface. No further improvement of the surface expression was observed when both the transmembrane domain and the cytoplasmic tail were replaced by the corresponding domains of either the influenza A haemagglutinin or gp40, an endogenous protein of MDCK cells. For the HEF-HA(Tail) construct this study shows that a substantial amount of the protein is converted to the 100 kDa mature form that is observed in virus-infected cells. The HEF-HA expressed on the cell surface reacted positively in esterase and haemadsorption assays, indicating that it was present in a biologically active form. The results show that the short cytoplasmic tail of HEF has a negative effect on the folding and surface transport of this protein. How this effect may be prevented during a virus infection is discussed.

  14. Surface pressure affects B-hordein network formation at the air-water interface in relation to gastric digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingqi; Huang, Jun; Zeng, Hongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    Protein interfacial network formation under mechanical pressure and its influence on degradation was investigated at molecular level using Langmuir-Blodgett B-hordein monolayer as a 2D model. Surface properties, such as surface pressure, dilatational and shear rheology and the surface pressure--area (π-A) isotherm, of B-hordein at air-water interface were analyzed by tensiometer, rheometer and a Langmuir-Blodgett trough respectively. B-Hordein conformation and orientation under different surface pressures were determined by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The interfacial network morphology was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). B-Hordein could reduce the air-water surface tension rapidly to ∼ 45 mN/m and form a solid-like network with high rheological elasticity and compressibility at interface, which could be a result of interactions developed by intermolecular β-sheets. The results also revealed that B-hordein interfacial network switched from an expanded liquid phase to a solid-like film with increasing compression pressure. The orientation of B-hordein was parallel to the surface when in expended liquid phase, whereas upon compression, the hydrophobic repetitive region tilted away from water phase. When compressed to 30 mN/m, a strong elastic network was formed at the interface, and it was resistant to a harsh gastric-like environment of low pH and pepsin. This work generated fundamental knowledge, which suggested the potential to design B-hordein stabilized emulsions and encapsulations with controllable digestibility for small intestine targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.

  15. PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lingzhi; Macri, Lucas M.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V.; Cui Xiangqun; Gong Xuefei; Yuan Xiangyan; Feng Longlong; Yang Ji; Zhu Zhenxi; Liu Qiang; Zhou Xu; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Shang Zhaohui; Yang Huigen; York, Donald G.

    2011-11-15

    Dome A on the Antarctic plateau is likely one of the best observing sites on Earth thanks to the excellent atmospheric conditions present at the site during the long polar winter night. We present high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 10,000 stars with i < 14.5 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. The photometry was obtained with one of the CSTAR telescopes during 128 days of the 2008 Antarctic winter. We used this photometric data set to derive site statistics for Dome A and to search for variable stars. Thanks to the nearly uninterrupted synoptic coverage, we found six times as many variables as previous surveys with similar magnitude limits. We detected 157 variable stars, of which 55% were unclassified, 27% were likely binaries, and 17% were likely pulsating stars. The latter category includes {delta} Scuti, {gamma} Doradus, and RR Lyrae variables. One variable may be a transiting exoplanet.

  16. High Precision Photometry for the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Soares-Furtado, Melinda; Penev, Kaloyan; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar; Bhatti, Waqas; Domsa, Istvan; de Val-Borro, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    The two reaction wheel K2 mission brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. We developed a reduction pipeline for extracting high precision photometry from the K2 dataset and we use this pipeline to generate light curves for the K2 Campaign 0 super-stamps and K2 Campaign 1 target pixel dataset. Key to our reduction technique is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps from which accurate centroids are passed on for high precision photometry extraction. We also implemented the image subtraction method to reduce the K2 Campaign 0 super-stamps containing open clusters M35 and NGC2158. We extract target light curvesfor sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue -- this includes not only primary targets of the K2 Mission, but also other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ~0.127". For bright stars, our best 6.5 hour precision for raw light curves is ~20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 hour precision achieved is ~15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. We highlight the measurements of rotation curves using the K2 light curves of stars within open cluster M35 and NGC2158.

  17. Optical Photometry of the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, D. A.; van Zee, L.; Johnson, B. D.; Lee, J. C.; Cales, S.; LVL Team

    2014-01-01

    We present new optical (UBVR) imaging of 258 nearby (D < 11 Mpc) galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey. The volume limited sample is dominated by dwarf galaxies, however, the sample as a whole probes many global galaxy environments. This photometry completes the panchromatic data set which spans a wide wavelength range (1500 Å - 160 μm). This study focuses on GALEX (FUV & NUV), optical (UBVR), 2MASS (JHK), and Spitzer (3.6 μm, 4.5 μm, 5 um, 8 μm, & 24 μm) data. Photometry was performed with three separate apertures (defined from the FUV, 3.6 μm, and optical) to allow direct photometric comparisons between galaxies with consistent apertures. The wide wavelength coverage with uniform apertures across many environments will facilitate studying the effect of secular galaxy evolution and environment on galaxy-wide properties. Furthermore, the proximity of these galaxies will yield a wealth information on sub-kpc scales since individual star-forming regions can be identified and studied with the same wide wavelength coverage. We present the basic optical properties and SEDs of these galaxies and their relationships to the full panchromatic data set to evince underlying physical processes.

  18. A new look at photometry of the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goguen, J.D.; Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; Buratti, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    We use ROLO photometry (Kieffer, H.H., Stone, T.C. [2005]. Astron. J. 129, 2887-2901) to characterize the before and after full Moon radiance variation for a typical highlands site and a typical mare site. Focusing on the phase angle range 45??. ) to calculate the scattering matrix and solve the radiative transfer equation for I/. F. The mean single scattering albedo is ??=0.808, the asymmetry parameter is ???cos. ?????=0.77 and the phase function is very strongly peaked in both the forward and backward scattering directions. The fit to the observations for the highland site is excellent and multiply scattered photons contribute 80% of I/. F. We conclude that either model, roughness or multiple scattering, can match the observations, but that the strongly anisotropic phase functions of realistic particles require rigorous calculation of many orders of scattering or spurious photometric roughness estimates are guaranteed. Our multiple scattering calculation is the first to combine: (1) a regolith model matched to the measured particle size distribution and index of refraction of the lunar soil, (2) a rigorous calculation of the particle phase function and solution of the radiative transfer equation, and (3) application to lunar photometry with absolute radiance calibration. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  19. The MOST Asteroseismology Mission: Ultraprecise Photometry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon; Matthews, Jaymie; Kuschnig, Rainer; Johnson, Ron; Rucinski, Slavek; Pazder, John; Burley, Gregory; Walker, Andrew; Skaret, Kristina; Zee, Robert; Grocott, Simon; Carroll, Kieran; Sinclair, Peter; Sturgeon, Don; Harron, John

    2003-09-01

    The Microvariablity and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) mission is a low-cost microsatellite designed to detect low-degree acoustic oscillations (periods of minutes) with micromagnitude precision in solar-type stars and metal-poor subdwarfs. There are also plans to detect light reflected from giant, short-period, extrasolar planets and the oscillations of roAp stars and the turbulent variability in the dense winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. This paper describes the experiment and how we met the challenge of ultraprecise photometry despite severe constraints on the mass, volume, and power available for the instrument. A side-viewing, 150 mm aperture Rumak-Maksutov telescope feeds two frame-transfer CCDs, one for tracking and the other for science. There is a single 300 nm wide filter centered at 525 nm. Microlenses project Fabry images of the brighter (V<=10) target stars onto the science CCD. Fainter target stars will be focused directly elsewhere on the CCD. MOST was launched on 2003 June 30 into a low-Earth, Sun-synchronous, polar orbit allowing stars between -19° and +36° declination to be viewed continuously for up to 60 days. Attitude is controlled by reaction wheels and magnetotorquers. A solar safety shutter over the telescope diagonal is the only other moving part. Accumulated photometry will be used to calibrate response across the target field stop, and data will be compressed and downloaded to three dedicated ground stations.

  20. Stellar photometry and astrometry with discrete point spread functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2005-08-01

    The key features of the MATPHOT algorithm for precise and accurate stellar photometry and astrometry using discrete point spread functions (PSFs) are described. A discrete PSF is a sampled version of a continuous PSF, which describes the two-dimensional probability distribution of photons from a point source (star) just above the detector. The shape information about the photon scattering pattern of a discrete PSF is typically encoded using a numerical table (matrix) or an FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) image file. Discrete PSFs are shifted within an observational model using a 21-pixel-wide damped sinc function, and position-partial derivatives are computed using a five-point numerical differentiation formula. Precise and accurate stellar photometry and astrometry are achieved with undersampled CCD (charge-coupled device) observations by using supersampled discrete PSFs that are sampled two, three or more times more finely than the observational data. The precision and accuracy of the MATPHOT algorithm is demonstrated by using the C-language MPD code to analyse simulated CCD stellar observations; measured performance is compared with a theoretical performance model. Detailed analysis of simulated Next Generation Space Telescope observations demonstrate that millipixel relative astrometry and mmag photometric precision is achievable with complicated space-based discrete PSFs.

  1. A Search for Transits of Proxima b in MOST Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of a potentially rocky planet in the habitable-zone of our nearest star presents exciting prospects for future detailed characterization of another world. If Proxima b transits its star, the road to characterization would be considerably eased. In 2014 and 2015, we monitored Proxima Centauri with the Canadian space telescope MOST for a total of 43 days. As expected, the star presents considerable photometric variability due to flares, which greatly complicate our analysis. Using Gaussian process regression and Bayesian model selection with informative priors for the time of transit of Proxima b, we do find evidence for a transit of the expected depth. However, relaxing the prior on the transit time to an uninformative one returns a distinct solution highlighting the high false-positive rate induced by flaring. Using ground-based photometry from HATSouth, we show that our candidate transit is unlikely to be genuine although a conclusive answer will likely require infrared photometry, such as that from Spitzer, where flaring should be suppressed.

  2. Optimal addition of images for detection and photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Philippe; Kochanski, Greg P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe weighting techniques used for the optimal coaddition of charge coupled devices (CCD) frames with differing characteristics. Optimal means maximum signal to noise (S/N) for stellar objects. We derive formulas for four applications: (1) object detection via matched filter, (2) object detection identical to DAOFIND, (3) aperture photometry, and (4) ALLSTAR profile-fitting photometry. We have included examples involving 21 frames for which either the sky brightness or image resolution varied by a factor of 3. The gains in S/N were modest for most of the examples, except for DAOFIND detection with varying image resolution which exhibited a substantial S/N increase. Even though the only consideration was maximizing S/N, the image resolution was seen to improve for most of the variable resolution examples. Also discussed are empirical fits for the weighting and the availability of the program, WEIGHT, used to generate the weighting for the individual frames. Finally, we include appendices describing the effects of clipping algorithms and a scheme for star/galaxy and cosmic-ray/star discrimination. scheme for star/galaxy and cosmic-ray/star discrimination.

  3. Spin period and attitude of satellites and space debris measured by using photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, Leonid; Koshkin, Nikolay; Korobeynikova, Elena; Strakhova, Svetlana; Melikyants, Seda; Ryabov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Photometry is an essential method for studying of the properties of the proper rotation of satellites and space debris. The observation method with high time resolution is used in the Odessa astronomical observatory for observations of artificial satellites. This method provides the measuring of the orbital motion and the proper rotation of satellites. Worth note, that the time resolution of the light curve and the accuracy of positioning in time of the details in the light curve are more important for the interpretation of the brightness variations than the precise measuring of the brightness. The rapid photometry allows not only registering of the flashes caused by mirror surfaces of structure satellite elements but also determining the indicatrix of the corresponding structure satellite element. This principal change of the photometric quality allows significant improving the interpretation of the satellites' light curves. We obtained a large amount of the photometric observations sequences of the satellites with time resolution 0.02 sec on the 50 cm telescope during last 11 years. We used this data for determination of the rotational parameters of several space objects. We present the method and results of the data analysis for the inactive satellites such as Envisat, Cbers-2B, Topex and other. Each of them changes its rotational parameters in its own way. For some satellites, the rotation period increases, for other it decreases. The rotation axis also change their orientation in space. The obtained information about rotation characteristics can be used for the precise numerical models of the satellite orbital motion and for the future Active Debris Removal missions.

  4. Prediction of the Properties of Heat-Affected Zone of Welded Joints of Sheets from Aluminum Alloys with Structured Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    Welded joints of light structured sheets from aluminum alloy EN AW-6181-T4 (DIN EN 515) of the Al - Si - Mg system are studied. The welding is performed in an argon environment with a short arc by the method of cold metal transfer (CMT®). The results of the study are used in an amended Leblond model for describing the variation of the properties of the heat-affected zone of welded joints of structured sheets.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CU Vir Stroemgren differential photometry (Pyper+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyper, D. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Adelman, S. J.

    2014-06-01

    Our data are from two sources: Stroemgren differential uvby photometry obtained using the Four College Automated Photometric Telescope (FCAPT) originally on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and later at Fairborn Observatory, Washington Camp, AZ, and photometry from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI). (1 data file).

  6. Potential Environmental Factors Affecting Oil-Degrading Bacterial Populations in Deep and Surface Waters of the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiqing; Bacosa, Hernando P.; Liu, Zhanfei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding bacterial community dynamics as a result of an oil spill is important for predicting the fate of oil released to the environment and developing bioremediation strategies in the Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the roles of temperature, water chemistry (nutrients), and initial bacterial community in selecting oil degraders through a series of incubation experiments. Surface (2 m) and bottom (1537 m) waters, collected near the Deepwater Horizon site, were amended with 200 ppm light Louisiana sweet crude oil and bacterial inoculums from surface or bottom water, and incubated at 4 or 24°C for 50 days. Bacterial community and residual oil were analyzed by pyrosequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results showed that temperature played a key role in selecting oil-degrading bacteria. Incubation at 4°C favored the development of Cycloclasticus, Pseudoalteromonas, Sulfitobacter, and Reinekea, while 24°C incubations enhanced Oleibacter, Thalassobius, Phaeobacter, and Roseobacter. Water chemistry and the initial community also had potential roles in the development of hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities. Pseudoalteromonas, Oleibacter, and Winogradskyella developed well in the nutrient-enriched bottom water, while Reinekea and Thalassobius were favored by low-nutrient surface water. We revealed that the combination of 4°C, crude oil and bottom inoculum was a key factor for the growth of Cycloclasticus, while the combination of surface inoculum and bottom water chemistry was important for the growth of Pseudoalteromonas. Moreover, regardless of the source of inoculum, bottom water at 24°C was a favorable condition for Oleibacter. Redundancy analysis further showed that temperature and initial community explained 57 and 19% of the variation observed, while oil and water chemistry contributed 14 and 10%, respectively. Overall, this study revealed the relative roles of temperature, water

  7. Potential Environmental Factors Affecting Oil-Degrading Bacterial Populations in Deep and Surface Waters of the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiqing; Bacosa, Hernando P; Liu, Zhanfei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial community dynamics as a result of an oil spill is important for predicting the fate of oil released to the environment and developing bioremediation strategies in the Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the roles of temperature, water chemistry (nutrients), and initial bacterial community in selecting oil degraders through a series of incubation experiments. Surface (2 m) and bottom (1537 m) waters, collected near the Deepwater Horizon site, were amended with 200 ppm light Louisiana sweet crude oil and bacterial inoculums from surface or bottom water, and incubated at 4 or 24°C for 50 days. Bacterial community and residual oil were analyzed by pyrosequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results showed that temperature played a key role in selecting oil-degrading bacteria. Incubation at 4°C favored the development of Cycloclasticus, Pseudoalteromonas, Sulfitobacter, and Reinekea, while 24°C incubations enhanced Oleibacter, Thalassobius, Phaeobacter, and Roseobacter. Water chemistry and the initial community also had potential roles in the development of hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities. Pseudoalteromonas, Oleibacter, and Winogradskyella developed well in the nutrient-enriched bottom water, while Reinekea and Thalassobius were favored by low-nutrient surface water. We revealed that the combination of 4°C, crude oil and bottom inoculum was a key factor for the growth of Cycloclasticus, while the combination of surface inoculum and bottom water chemistry was important for the growth of Pseudoalteromonas. Moreover, regardless of the source of inoculum, bottom water at 24°C was a favorable condition for Oleibacter. Redundancy analysis further showed that temperature and initial community explained 57 and 19% of the variation observed, while oil and water chemistry contributed 14 and 10%, respectively. Overall, this study revealed the relative roles of temperature, water

  8. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Non-surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Mayra G; Cantu, Myrna G; Wilson, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize the findings of studies that have evaluated non-surgical approaches for detoxification of implant body surfaces in vitro and in vivo, and to evaluate clinical trials on the use of these methodologies for treating peri-implant disease. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (Pubmed) from 1966 to 2013. In vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on non-surgical therapy were evaluated. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment levels, bleeding on probing; radiographic bone fill and histological re-osseointegration. Results: From 134 articles found 35 were analyzed. The findings, advantages and disadvantages of using lasers as well as mechanical and chemical methods are discussed. Most of the in vivo and human studies used combination therapies which makes determining the efficacy of one specific method difficult. Most human studies are case series with short term longitudinal analysis without survival or failure reports. Conclusion: Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve using these approaches. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Re-osseointegration may be difficult to achieve if not impossible without surgical access to ensure thorough debridement of the defect and detoxification of the implant surface. Combination protocols for non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical results but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:24894571

  9. Occurrence of near-surface ozone depletion in the Arctic spring strongly affected by Northern-Hemispheric climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, T.; Deng, Y.; Oltmans, S. J.; Solberg, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the Arctic spring, near-surface ozone can decrease to extremely low levels due to chemical removal catalyzed by halogen radicals. These ozone depletion events (ODEs) are usually accompanied by greatly enhanced surface deposition of reactive gaseous mercury. Here we show the effects of regional climate variability on Arctic ODE frequencies by analyzing surface ozone measurements at three monitoring sites (Barrow, Alert, and Zeppelinfjellet) in the past 30 years. Among the various climate variability indices, the Western Pacific (WP) index has the most significant impact. In years with high ODE frequencies at Barrow and Alert in April, the WP teleconnection pattern tends to be in its negative phase with a weakened storm track from the western Pacific to the Arctic and a strengthened subtropical jet across the Pacific, reducing transport of ozone-rich air masses from mid-latitudes to the Arctic. Analysis of the observations at Zeppelinfjellet indicates a much stronger influence of WP pattern in the 2000s than 1990s. Consequently, the WP index may be used as a proxy to assess ODE frequencies and subsequent environmental impacts in future climate projections.

  10. Near-Infrared Photometry and Spectroscopy of L and T Dwarfs: The Effects of Temperature, Clouds, and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Leggett, S. K.; Fan, X.; Marley, M. S.; Geballe, T. R.; Golimowski, D. A.; Finkbeiner, D.; Gunn, J. E.; Hennawi, J.; Ivezić, Z.; Lupton, R. H.; Schlegel, D. J.; Strauss, M. A.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Chiu, K.; Hoversten, E. A.; Glazebrook, K.; Zheng, W.; Hendrickson, M.; Williams, C. C.; Uomoto, A.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Luginbuhl, C. B.; Guetter, H. H.; Munn, J. A.; Canzian, B.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, J.

    2004-06-01

    We present new JHK photometry on the MKO-NIR system and JHK spectroscopy for a large sample of L and T dwarfs. Photometry has been obtained for 71 dwarfs, and spectroscopy for 56. The sample comprises newly identified very red objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and known dwarfs from the SDSS and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Spectral classification has been carried out using four previously defined indices from Geballe et al. that measure the strengths of the near infrared water and methane bands. We identify nine new L8-9.5 dwarfs and 14 new T dwarfs from SDSS, including the latest yet found by SDSS, the T7 dwarf SDSS J175805.46+463311.9. We classify 2MASS J04151954-0935066 as T9, the latest and coolest dwarf found to date. We combine the new results with our previously published data to produce a sample of 59 L dwarfs and 42 T dwarfs with imaging data on a single photometric system and with uniform spectroscopic classification. We compare the near-infrared colors and absolute magnitudes of brown dwarfs near the L-T transition with predictions made by models of the distribution and evolution of photospheric condensates. There is some scatter in the Geballe et al. spectral indices for L dwarfs, suggesting that these indices are probing different levels of the atmosphere and are affected by the location of the condensate cloud layer. The near-infrared colors of the L dwarfs also show scatter within a given spectral type, which is likely due to variations in the altitudes, spatial distributions, and thicknesses of the clouds. We have identified a small group of late-L dwarfs that are relatively blue for their spectral type and that have enhanced FeH, H2O, and K I absorption, possibly due to an unusually small amount of condensates. The scatter seen in the H-K color for late-T dwarfs can be reproduced by models with a range in surface gravity. The variation is probably due to the effect on the K-band flux of pressure-induced H2 opacity. The

  11. Constraints on the Bulk Composition of Uranus from Herschel PACS and ISO LWS Photometry, SOFIA FORCAST Photometry and Spectroscopy, and Ground-Based Photometry of its Thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn; Mueller, Thomas; Burgdorf, Martin; Fletcher, Leigh; de Pater, Imke; Atreya, Sushil; Adams, Joseph; Herter, Terry; Keller, Luke; Sidher, Sunil; Sinclair, James; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    We present thermal infrared observations of the disk of Uranus at 17-200 μm to deduce its global thermal structure and bulk composition. We combine 17-200 μm filtered photometric measurements by the Herschel PACS and ISO LWS instruments and 19-35 μm filtered photometry and spectroscopy by the SOFIA FORCAST instrument, supplemented by 17-25 μm ground-based photometric filtered imaging of Uranus. Previous analysis of infrared spectroscopic measurements of the disk of Uranus made by the Spitzer IRS instrument yielded a model for the disk-averaged temperature profile and stratospheric composition (Orton et al. 2014a Icarus 243,494; 2014b Icarus 243, 471) that were consistent with submillimeter spectroscopy by the Herschel SPIRE instrument (Swinyard et al. 2014, MNRAS 440, 3658). Our motivation to observe the 17-35 μm spectrum was to place more stringent constraints on the global para-H2 / ortho-H2 ratio in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the ISO SWS results of Fouchet et al. (2003, Icarus 161, 127), who examined H2 quadrupole lines. We will discuss the consistency of these observations with a higher para-H2 fraction than implied by local thermal equilibrium, which would resolve a discrepancy between the Spitzer-based model and observations of HD lines by the Herschel PACS experiment (Feuchtgruber et al. 2013 Astron. & Astrophys. 551, A126). Constraints on the global para-H2 fraction allow for more precise analysis of the far-infrared spectrum, which is sensitive to the He:H2 ratio, a quantity that was not constrained by the Spitzer IRS spectra. The derived model, which assumed the ratio derived by the Voyager-2 IRIS/radio-science occultation experiment (Conrath et al. 1987 J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15003), is inconsistent with 70-200 μm PACS photometry (Mueller et al. 2016 Astron. & Astrophys. submittted) and ISO LWS photometric measurements. However, the model can be made consistent with the observations if the fraction of He relative to H2 were

  12. Seasonal dynamics of the land surface energy balance of a boreal forest-peatland landscape affected by degrading permafrost in the Taiga Plains, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, M.; Wischnewski, K.; Chasmer, L.; Quinton, W. L.; Kljun, N.; Detto, M.; Sonnentag, O.

    2014-12-01

    Northern boreal ecosystems along the southern limit of permafrost comprise a mosaic of forests with permafrost, and permafrost-free peatland and lake ecosystems. The proportion of permafrost-free areas has rapidly increased over the last decades due to increasingly warmer air temperatures. This change in land cover causes changes in vegetation composition and structure affecting land surface characteristics such as albedo and surface roughness with important implications for the land surface energy balance and thus regional climate. For example, a decrease in sensible heat flux potentially cools the atmosphere and thus constitutes a negative feedback to the climate system. Changes in latent heat fluxes alter regional water vapour dynamics and thus may affect precipitation patterns. To better understand the land surface energy balance under the influence of degrading permafrost, we measured sensible and latent heat fluxes with two eddy covariance systems, one at 15 m and one at 2 m above the ground surface, along with net radiation and soil heat flux at Scotty Creek, a watershed in the discontinuous permafrost zone in the southern part of the Northwest Territories, Canada. The flux footprint of the 15 m-eddy covariance system covers an area equally covered by black spruce forests and permafrost-free, treeless peatlands whereas the flux footprint of the adjacent 2 m-eddy covariance system covers a single bog within the footprint of the 15 m system. Peak sensible heat fluxes at the bog were up to 200 W m-2 smaller than the landscape-scale fluxes between April and July 2014. During the snow free period, peak latent heat fluxes at the wet bog were about 50 W m-2 higher than the landscape-scale fluxes. Albedo of the forest was generally smaller compared to the bog except for the immediate post-melt period when the bog was affected by widespread surface flooding. This difference in albedo leads to higher net radiation at the forest site, particularly during the snow cover

  13. Energy absorption during impact on the proximal femur is affected by body mass index and flooring surface.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Shivam; Levine, Iris C; Laing, Andrew C

    2014-07-18

    Impact mechanics theory suggests that peak loads should decrease with increase in system energy absorption. In light of the reduced hip fracture risk for persons with high body mass index (BMI) and for falls on soft surfaces, the purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of participant BMI, gender, and flooring surface on system energy absorption during lateral falls on the hip with human volunteers. Twenty university-aged participants completed the study with five men and five women in both low BMI (<22.5 kg/m(2)) and high BMI (>27.5 kg/m(2)) groups. Participants underwent lateral pelvis release experiments from a height of 5 cm onto two common floors and four safety floors mounted on a force plate. A motion-capture system measured pelvic deflection. The energy absorbed during the initial compressive phase of impact was calculated as the area under the force-deflection curve. System energy absorption was (on average) 3-fold greater for high compared to low BMI participants, but no effects of gender were observed. Even after normalizing for body mass, high BMI participants absorbed 1.8-fold more energy per unit mass. Additionally, three of four safety floors demonstrated significantly increased energy absorption compared to a baseline resilient-rolled-sheeting system (% increases ranging from 20.7 to 28.3). Peak system deflection was larger for high BMI persons and for impacts on several safety floors. This study indicates that energy absorption may be a common mechanism underlying the reduced risk of hip fracture for persons with high BMI and for those who fall on soft surfaces.

  14. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  15. Application of an environmental decision support system to a water quality trading program affected by surface water diversions.

    PubMed

    Obropta, Christopher C; Niazi, Mehran; Kardos, Josef S

    2008-12-01

    Environmental decision support systems (EDSSs) are an emerging tool used to integrate the evaluation of highly complex and interrelated physicochemical, biological, hydrological, social, and economic aspects of environmental problems. An EDSS approach is developed to address hot-spot concerns for a water quality trading program intended to implement the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for phosphorus in the Non-Tidal Passaic River Basin of New Jersey. Twenty-two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) spread throughout the watershed are considered the major sources of phosphorus loading to the river system. Periodic surface water diversions to a major reservoir from the confluence of two key tributaries alter the natural hydrology of the watershed and must be considered in the development of a trading framework that ensures protection of water quality. An EDSS is applied that enables the selection of a water quality trading framework that protects the watershed from phosphorus-induced hot spots. The EDSS employs Simon's (1960) three stages of the decision-making process: intelligence, design, and choice. The identification of two potential hot spots and three diversion scenarios enables the delineation of three management areas for buying and selling of phosphorus credits among WWTPs. The result shows that the most conservative option entails consideration of two possible diversion scenarios, and trading between management areas is restricted accordingly. The method described here is believed to be the first application of an EDSS to a water quality trading program that explicitly accounts for surface water diversions.

  16. CO2 leakage from carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems affects organic matter cycling in surface marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Amaro, Teresa; Greco, Silvestro; Lo Martire, Marco; Carugati, Laura; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), involving the injection of CO2 into the sub-seabed, is being promoted worldwide as a feasible option for reducing the anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, the effects on the marine ecosystems of potential CO2 leakages originating from these storage sites have only recently received scientific attention, and little information is available on the possible impacts of the resulting CO2-enriched seawater plumes on the surrounding benthic ecosystem. In the present study, we conducted a 20-weeks mesocosm experiment exposing coastal sediments to CO2-enriched seawater (at 5000 or 20,000 ppm), to test the effects on the microbial enzymatic activities responsible for the decomposition and turnover of the sedimentary organic matter in surface sediments down to 15 cm depth. Our results indicate that the exposure to high-CO2 concentrations reduced significantly the enzymatic activities in the top 5 cm of sediments, but had no effects on subsurface sediment horizons (from 5 to 15 cm depth). In the surface sediments, both 5000 and 20,000 ppm CO2 treatments determined a progressive decrease over time in the protein degradation (up to 80%). Conversely, the degradation rates of carbohydrates and organic phosphorous remained unaltered in the first 2 weeks, but decreased significantly (up to 50%) in the longer term when exposed at 20,000 ppm of CO2. Such effects were associated with a significant change in the composition of the biopolymeric carbon (due to the accumulation of proteins over time in sediments exposed to high-pCO2 treatments), and a significant decrease (∼20-50% at 5000 and 20,000 ppm respectively) in nitrogen regeneration. We conclude that in areas immediately surrounding an active and long-lasting leak of CO2 from CCS reservoirs, organic matter cycling would be significantly impacted in the surface sediment layers. The evidence of negligible impacts on the deeper sediments should be considered with

  17. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cements

  18. Estimating environmental conditions affecting protozoal pathogen removal in surface water wetland systems using a multi-scale, model-based approach.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Miles E; Hogan, Jennifer; Smith, Woutrina A; Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A; Hardin, Dane; Shapiro, Karen; Los Huertos, Marc; Conrad, Patricia A; Dominik, Clare; Watson, Fred G R

    2014-09-15

    Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii are waterborne protozoal pathogens distributed worldwide and empirical evidence suggests that wetlands reduce the concentrations of these pathogens under certain environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate how protozoal removal in surface water is affected by the water temperature, turbidity, salinity, and vegetation cover of wetlands in the Monterey Bay region of California. To examine how protozoal removal was affected by these environmental factors, we conducted observational experiments at three primary spatial scales: settling columns, recirculating wetland mesocosm tanks, and an experimental research wetland (Molera Wetland). Simultaneously, we developed a protozoal transport model for surface water to simulate the settling columns, the mesocosm tanks, and the Molera Wetland. With a high degree of uncertainty expected in the model predictions and field observations, we developed the model within a Bayesian statistical framework. We found protozoal removal increased when water flowed through vegetation, and with higher levels of turbidity, salinity, and temperature. Protozoal removal in surface water was maximized (~0.1 hour(-1)) when flowing through emergent vegetation at 2% cover, and with a vegetation contact time of ~30 minutes compared to the effects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity. Our studies revealed that an increase in vegetated wetland area, with water moving through vegetation, would likely improve regional water quality through the reduction of fecal protozoal pathogen loads.

  19. Dissolved organic matter dynamics in surface waters affected by oil spill pollution: Results from the Serious Game exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnelli, M.; Galletti, Y.; Marchetti, E.; Mercadante, L.; Retelletti Brogi, S.; Ribotti, A.; Sorgente, R.; Vestri, S.; Santinelli, C.

    2016-11-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM, respectively) surface distribution was studied during the Serious Game exercise carried out in the Eastern Ligurian Sea, where an oil spill was localized by using satellite images and models. This paper reports the first DOC, CDOM and FDOM data for this area together with an evaluation of fluorescence as a fast and inexpensive tool for early oil spill detection in marine waters. The samples collected in the oil spill showed a fluorescence intensity markedly higher ( 5 fold) than all the other samples. The excitation-emission matrixes, coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), allowed for the identification in the FDOM pool of a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, humic-like and protein-like fluorophores.

  20. Spectral properties of near-Earth and Mars-crossing asteroids using Sloan photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carry, B.; Solano, E.; Eggl, S.; DeMeo, F. E.

    2016-04-01

    The nature and origin of the asteroids orbiting in near-Earth space, including those on a potentially hazardous trajectory, is of both scientific interest and practical importance. We aim here at determining the taxonomy of a large sample of near-Earth and Mars-crosser asteroids and analyze the distribution of these classes with orbit. We use this distribution to identify the source regions of near-Earth objects and to study the strength of planetary encounters to refresh asteroid surfaces. We measure the photometry of these asteroids over four filters at visible wavelengths on images taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These colors are used to classify the asteroids into a taxonomy consistent with the widely used Bus-DeMeo taxonomy (DeMeo et al. [2009]. Icarus 202, 160-180) based on visible and near-infrared spectroscopy. We report here on the taxonomic classification of 206 near-Earth and 776 Mars-crosser asteroids determined from SDSS photometry, representing an increase of 40% and 663% of known taxonomy classifications in these populations. Using the source region mapper by Greenstreet et al. (Greenstreet, S., Ngo, H., Gladman, B. [2012]. Icarus, 217, 355-366), we compare for the first time the taxonomic distribution among near-Earth and main-belt asteroids of similar diameters. Both distributions agree at the few percent level for the inner part of the main belt and we confirm this region as a main source of near-Earth objects. The effect of planetary encounters on asteroid surfaces are also studied by developing a simple model of forces acting on a surface grain during planetary encounter, which provides the minimum distance at which a close approach should occur to trigger resurfacing events. By integrating numerically the orbit of the 519 S-type and 46 Q-type asteroids in our sample back in time for 500,000 years and monitoring their encounter distance with Venus, Earth, Mars, and Jupiter, we seek to understand the conditions for resurfacing

  1. ColorPro: PSF-corrected aperture-matched photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan; Benitez, Narciso

    2015-08-01

    ColorPro automatically obtains robust colors across images of varied PSF. To correct for the flux lost in images with poorer PSF, the "detection image" is blurred to match the PSF of these other images, allowing observation of how much flux is lost. All photometry is performed in the highest resolution frame (images being aligned given WCS information in the FITS headers), and identical apertures are used in every image. Usually isophotal apertures are used, as determined by SExtractor (ascl:1010.064). Using SExSeg (ascl:1508.006), object aperture definitions can be pre-defined and object detections from different image filters can be combined automatically into a single comprehensive "segmentation map." After producing the final photometric catalog, ColorPro can automatically run BPZ (ascl:1108.011) to obtain Bayesian Photometric Redshifts.

  2. SIT Vidicon photometry for four old Magellanic Cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. E.; Hesser, J. E.; Atwood, B.

    1983-12-01

    SIT Vidicon photometry in B and V from the CTIO 4-m telescope is presented for NGC 1466, NGC 2203, NGC 2210, and NGC 2257 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The deepest data are for NGC 2257, where the main sequence turnoff is reached at V = 22.4, confirming Stryker's (1983) inference from photographic data that the cluster has an age comparable to those of the Galactic globular clusters. NGC 2203 is found to be an intermediate-age cluster with a C-M diagram similar to that of NGC 7789 in the Galaxy. For NGC 1466 and NGC 2210 the present data are compatible with previous studies that have found these to be genuinely old clusters in the Galactic globular cluster sense.

  3. CCD photometry of the sparse halo cluster E3

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclure, R.D.; Hesser, J.E.; Stetson, P.B.; Stryker, L.L.

    1985-08-01

    New photometry in B and V for the sparse halo cluster E3 has been obtained with the prime-focus CCD camera at the CTIO 4-m telescope. The principal sequences are better defined than in the previous color-magnitude (C-M) diagrams, but the large scatter of evolved stars above the turnoff remains. The C-M morphology, inferred old age, and position in the halo definitely indicate that E3 is a globular cluster. Evidence for possible main-sequence binaries appears in the C-M diagram in the form of a sequence parallel to the cluster main sequence and three-quarters of a magnitude above it. The luminosity function drops off sharply, about 2.5 mag below the turnoff, supporting the suggestion by van den Bergh, Demers, and Kunkel (1980), that the cluster is severely truncated by tidal forces. 34 references.

  4. Asteroid models from photometry and complementary data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2016-05-01

    I discuss inversion methods for asteroid shape and spin reconstruction with photometry (lightcurves) and complementary data sources such as adaptive optics or other images, occultation timings, interferometry, and range-Doppler radar data. These are essentially different sampling modes (generalized projections) of plane-of-sky images. An important concept in this approach is the optimal weighting of the various data modes. The maximum compatibility estimate, a multi-modal generalization of the maximum likelihood estimate, can be used for this purpose. I discuss the fundamental properties of lightcurve inversion by examining the two-dimensional case that, though not usable in our three-dimensional world, is simple to analyze, and it shares essentially the same uniqueness and stability properties as the 3-D case. After this, I review the main aspects of 3-D shape representations, lightcurve inversion, and the inclusion of complementary data.

  5. Results of the 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Navarro-Meza, Samuel; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Olguin, Lorenzo L.; Saucedo, Julio C.; Loera-Gonzalez, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    The 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign was organized at the 2nd National Planetary Astrophysics Workshop held in 2015 March at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, México. Three asteroids were selected for coordinated observations from several Mexican observatories. We report full lightcurves for the main-belt asteroid 1084 Tamariwa (P = 6.195 ± 0.001 h) and near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 4055 Magellan (P = 7.479 ± 0.001 h). Asteroid 1466 Mundleria was also observed on eight nights but no lightcurve was obtained because of its faintness, a crowded field-of-view, and low amplitude (<0.03 mag).

  6. The symbiosis of photometry and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP mission is optimized to detect the inner planets of a planetary system. According to the current paradigm of planet formation, these planets will probably be small Earth-sized objects. Ground-based radial-velocity programs now have the sensitivity to detect Jovian-mass planets in orbit around bright solar-type stars. We expect the more massive planets to form in the outer regions of a proto-stellar nebula. These two types of measurements will very nicely complement each other, as they have highest detection probability for very different types of planets. The combination of FRESIP photometry and ground-based spectra will provide independent confirmation of the existence of planetary systems in orbit around other stars. Such detection of both terrestrial and Jovian planets in orbit around the same star is essential to test our understanding of planet formation.

  7. Macular pigment and the edge hypothesis of flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Bone, Richard A; Landrum, John T; Gibert, Jorge C

    2004-12-01

    Heterochromatic flicker photometry is commonly used to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in the human retina. It has been proposed, and accepted by many, that the MPOD so measured represents the value at a retinal location corresponding to the edge of the flickering, circular stimulus. We have investigated this proposal by using a series of annular stimuli to determine the MPOD distribution in the central 1.5 degrees of the retina for both eyes of 10 subjects. The MPOD obtained using a 1.5 degrees circular stimulus matched the MPOD distribution at a retinal eccentricity that was always less than the stimulus radius, and averaged, for the 10 subjects, 51% of the stimulus radius. Similar results were obtained using a 1 degrees stimulus. Thus the edge hypothesis is inconsistent with our data. We suggest that involuntary eye movements may be responsible for an apparent edge effect.

  8. SPITZER IRAC PHOTOMETRY FOR TIME SERIES IN CROWDED FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Novati, S. Calchi; Beichman, C.; Gould, A.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Pogge, R. W.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W.; Poleski, R.; Yee, J. C.; Bryden, G.; Henderson, C. B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Carey, S.; Udalski, A.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Collaboration: Spitzer team; OGLE group; and others

    2015-12-01

    We develop a new photometry algorithm that is optimized for the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spitzer time series in crowded fields and that is particularly adapted to faint or heavily blended targets. We apply this to the 170 targets from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign and present the results of three variants of this algorithm in an online catalog. We present detailed accounts of the application of this algorithm to two difficult cases, one very faint and the other very crowded. Several of Spitzer's instrumental characteristics that drive the specific features of this algorithm are shared by Kepler and WFIRST, implying that these features may prove to be a useful starting point for algorithms designed for microlensing campaigns by these other missions.

  9. An Adaptive Homomorphic Aperture Photometry Algorithm for Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. C.; Hwang, C. Y.

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel automatic adaptive aperture photometry algorithm for measuring the total magnitudes of merging galaxies with irregular shapes. First, we use a morphological pattern recognition routine for identifying the shape of an irregular source in a background-subtracted image. Then, we extend the shape of the source by using the Dilation image operation to obtain an aperture that is quasi-homomorphic to the shape of the irregular source. The magnitude measured from the homomorphic aperture would thus have minimal contamination from the nearby background. As a test of our algorithm, we applied our technique to the merging galaxies observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope. Our results suggest that the adaptive homomorphic aperture algorithm can be very useful for investigating extended sources with irregular shapes and sources in crowded regions.

  10. USING PHOTOMETRY TO PROBE THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT OF {delta} SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. E.; Wiegert, P. A.; Cyr, R. P.; Halonen, R. J.; Tycner, C.; Henry, G. W.; Muterspaugh, M. W.

    2013-05-15

    We acquired Johnson BV photometry of the binary Be disk system {delta} Scorpii during its 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons and used it to probe the innermost regions of the disk. We found that several disk building events have occurred during this time, resulting in an overall brightening in the V band and reddening of the system. In addition to these long-term trends, we found cyclical variability in each observing season on timescales between 60 and 100 days. We were able to reproduce the changes in the magnitude and color of {delta} Sco using our theoretical models and found that variable mass-loss rates in the range 2.5-7.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} over {approx}35 days can reproduce the observed increase in brightness.

  11. Photometry and Spectroscopy of V2455 Cygni (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) We present photometry and spectroscopy of the high amplitude delta Scuti variable star V2455 Cygni. Analysis is presented of the BVRI light curves secured over several years on the 0.9-meter and 0.3-meter telescopes at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory as well as the Orson Pratt Observatory located on the BYU Provo campus. In addition, we present radial velocity measurements and spectrophotometric H-alpha and H-beta measurements secured at the 1.2-meter telescope of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Saanich, British Columbia. These data are used to determine the fundamental properties of this pulsating variable star. We acknowledge the Department of Physics and Astronomy at BYU for continued support of the research work being done at the West Mountain Observatory.

  12. Towards photometry pipeline of the Indonesian space surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, Rhorom; Religia, Bahar; Rachman, Abdul; Dani, Tiar

    2015-09-01

    Optical observation through sub-meter telescope equipped with CCD camera becomes alternative method for increasing orbital debris detection and surveillance. This observational mode is expected to eye medium-sized objects in higher orbits (e.g. MEO, GTO, GSO & GEO), beyond the reach of usual radar system. However, such observation of fast moving objects demands special treatment and analysis technique. In this study, we performed photometric analysis of the satellite track images photographed using rehabilitated Schmidt Bima Sakti telescope in Bosscha Observatory. The Hough transformation was implemented to automatically detect linear streak from the images. From this analysis and comparison to USSPACECOM catalog, two satellites were identified and associated with inactive Thuraya-3 satellite and Satcom-3 debris which are located at geostationary orbit. Further aperture photometry analysis revealed the periodicity of tumbling Satcom-3 debris. In the near future, it is not impossible to apply similar scheme to establish an analysis pipeline for optical space surveillance system hosted in Indonesia.

  13. Infrared photometry of comet Wilson (1986l) at two epochs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, Martha S.; Newburn, Ray L.

    1989-01-01

    1-20 micron filter photometry of comet Wilson (1986l) was obtained on May 29 - June 2, 1987 (r = 1.36 AU) and January 11 -14, 1988 (r = 3.75 AU) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. The thermal emission at 1.36 AU has been fit with a model for a size distribution of small absorbing grains; the size and the optical properties of the dust (color, albedo, and thermal emission spectrum) appear typical of short period comets at similar r. No 10 micron silicate feature was evident. The dust-production rate on June 1 was about 5 x 10 to the 5th g/s. The geometric albedo of comet Wilson at r = 3.75 AU appears to be higher than that of comets measured at smaller r, after phase effects have been accounted for. Such albedos seem typical of comets at larger heliocentric distances.

  14. The Optical Afterglow of GRB 971214: R and J Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diercks, A. H.; Deutsch, E. W.; Castander, F. J.; Corson, C.; Gilmore, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Tanvir, N.; Turner, E. L.; Wyse, R.

    1998-08-01

    We present an R- and J-band photometry of an optical transient that is likely to be associated with the gamma-ray burst event GRB 971214. Our first measurement took place 13 hr after the gamma-ray event. The brightness decayed with a power-law exponent α=-1.20+/-0.02, which is similar to those of GRB 970228 andGRB 970508, which had exponents of α=-1.10+/-0.04 and α=-1.141+/-0.014, respectively. The transient decayed monotonically during the first 4 days following the gamma-ray event in contrast with the optical transient associated with GRB 970508, which increased in brightness, peaking 2 days after the burst, before settling to a power-law decay.

  15. Photometry of stars in the Cas OB5 Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanriver, Mehmet; Keskin, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    OB associations are a grouping of very young associations, contain 10-100 very hot massive stars, spectral types O and B. Also, the OB associations contain low and intermediate mass stars, too. Association members are believed to form within the same small volume inside a giant molecular cloud. Once the surrounding dust and gas is blown away, the remaining stars become not tied up and begin to drift separately. It is believed that the majority of all stars in the Milky Way were formed in OB associations. O type stars are short-lived, and will be at an end as supernovae after roundly a million years. OB associations are generally only a few million years in age or less. In this study, the photometry of UU Cas and field star which been Cas OB5 association member was carried out. Light curves and color diagrams are given in the study.

  16. Gaia, an all-sky survey for standard photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Weiler, M.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.

    2017-03-01

    Gaia ESA's space mission (launched in 2013) includes two low resolution spectroscopic instruments (one in the blue, BP, and another in the red, RP, wavelength domains) to classify and derive the astrophysical parameters of the observed sources. As it is well known, Gaia is a full-sky unbiased survey down to about 20th magnitude. The scanning law yields a rather uniform coverage of the sky over the full extent (a minimum of 5 years) of the mission. Gaia data reduction is a global one over the full mission. Both sky coverage and data reduction strategy ensure an unprecedented all-sky homogeneous spectrophotometric survey. Certainly, that survey is of interest for current and future on-ground and space projects, like LSST, PLATO, EUCLID and J-PAS/J-PLUS among others. These projects will benefit from the large amount (more than one billion) and wide variety of objects observed by Gaia with good quality spectrophotometry. Synthetic photometry derived from Gaia spectrophotometry for any passband can be used to expand the set of standard sources for these new instruments to come. In the current Gaia data release scenario, BP/RP spectrophotometric data will be available in the third release (in 2018, TBC). Current preliminary results allow us to estimate the precision of synthetic photometry derived from the Gaia data. This already allows the preparation of the on-going and future surveys and space missions. We discuss here the exploitation of the Gaia spectrophotometry as standard reference due to its full-sky coverage and its expected photometric uncertainties derived from the low resolution Gaia spectra.

  17. Far-ultraviolet photometry of the globular cluster omega Cen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Jonathan H.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Rood, Robert T.; Dorman, Ben; Landsman, Wayne B.; Cheng, K.-P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.

    1994-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet images of the globular cluster omega Centauri obtained with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during the 1990 December Astro-1 mission. A total of 1957 sources are detected at 1620 A to a limiting ultraviolet (UV) magnitude of 16.4 in the central 24 min diameter region of the field and a limit of 15.6 over the remainder of the 40 min diameter field. Over 1400 of these sources are matched with stars on a Stroemgren u band charge coupled devices (CCD) frame obtained with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9 m telescope to produce a (far-UV, u) color-magnitude diagram (CMD). Completeness of the sample and error estimates are determined by photometry of artificial stars added to the images. The horizontal branch (HB) of the CMD is heavily populated hotter than 9000 K. A large number of 'extreme HB' stars are found hotter than a conspicuous break in the HB at T(sub e) approximately 16000 K. There is also a significant population of stars above the HB, the brightest of which is 4 mag brighter than the HB. Most of the hotter of these appear to be 'AGB-manque' or 'Post-Early Asymptotic Giant Branch' stars. We compare the observations to recent theoretical evolutionary tracks for the zero-age HB and subsequent phases. The tracks match the data well, with the exception of the hotter HB stars, many of which fall below the zero-age horizontal branch. It is unclear as yet whether these are a special population or an artifact of errors in the models or photometry. We identify 33 stars with T(sub e) greater than or approximately = 50000 K, which are hotter than zero-age HB stars with envelope masses of 0.003 solar mass.

  18. Exoplanet Photometry and Spectroscopy with HII/L2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.

    2000-12-01

    With the recent discovery of extrasolar planets (exoplanets) around nearby stars by indirect methods, one of the next goals of the exoplanet study is to directly detect the giant exoplanets and to make photometry and spectroscopy. The next decade will be the time to move from discovery to characterization of exoplanet systems. This, however, requires all of high sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and high dynamic range observations at infrared wavelengths, which will be difficult to achieve from the ground. In this paper, we describe a coronagraphic camera and spectrometer for the HII/L2 mission for mid- and far-infrared astronomy and show the photometry and spectroscopy of exoplanets to be one of the most important scientific aims for this mission. The proposed HII/L2 coronagraph will cover the wavelength between 4 and 27 micron, optimized at 5 micron. The plate scale is about 0.06 arcsec, covering a field-of-view of about 1 arcmin by 1 arcmin with a 1024x1024 array detector. Occulting masks of diameter greater than 0.72 arcsec will be available, which enables the observations of exoplanets beyond ~2 AU around nearby (d~5 pc) stars. The coronagraph greatly takes advantage of the single (non-segmented) mirror of the HII/L2 telescope design. A high-efficiency Ge or CdTe grism with a resolution of a few hundreds will be installed for the coronagraphic spectroscopy of the exoplanet atmosphere. Rich spectral features at mid-infrared wavelengths enable us to study various atmospheric components and to make a comparative study of the exoplanets and our solar system planets.

  19. Reduced oxide sites and surface corrugation affecting the reactivity, thermal stability, and selectivity of supported Au-Pd bimetallic clusters on SiO2/Si(100).

    PubMed

    Gross, Elad; Sorek, Elishama; Murugadoss, Arumugam; Asscher, Micha

    2013-05-21

    The morphology and surface elemental composition of Au-Pd bimetallic nanoclusters are reported to be sensitive to and affected by reduced silicon defect sites and structural corrugation on SiO2/Si(100), generated by argon ion sputtering under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Metastable structures of the bimetallic clusters, where Au atoms are depleted from the top surface upon annealing, are stabilized by the interaction with the reduced silica sites, as indicated from CO temperature programmed desorption (TPD) titration measurements. Acetylene conversion to ethylene and benzene has been studied as a probe reaction, revealing the modification of selectivity and reactivity enhancement in addition to improved thermal stability on substrates rich in reduced-silica sites. These observations suggest that these unique sites play an important role in anchoring thermodynamically metastable conformations of supported Au-Pd bimetallic catalysts and dictate their high-temperature activity.

  20. A hybrid two-component system of Tannerella forsythia affects autoaggregation and post-translational modification of surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe closely associated with both periodontal and periapical diseases. The ORF TF0022 of strain ATCC 43037 encodes a hybrid two-component system consisting of an N-terminal histidine kinase and a C-terminal response regulator. Disruption of the TF0022 locus enhanced autoaggregation of the broth-cultured cells. Comparative proteome analyses revealed that two S-layer proteins in the TF0022 mutant exhibited decreased apparent masses by denaturing gel electrophoresis, suggesting a deficiency in post-translational modification. Furthermore, the mutant decreased the production of a glycosyltransferase encoded by TF1061 that is located in a putative glycosylation-related gene cluster. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed reduced transcription of TF1061 and the associated genes in the TF0022 mutant. These results indicate that TF0022 upregulates the expression of the glycosylation-related genes and suggest modulation of the autoaggregation of T. forsythia cells by a possible post-translational modification of cell-surface components.

  1. Iron oxide nanoparticles surface coating and cell uptake affect biocompatibility and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells and macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Antonina; Colombo, Miriam; Prosperi, Davide; Gregori, Maria; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Masserini, Massimo; Cazzaniga, Emanuela

    2015-09-01

    Engineered iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) offer the possibility of a wide range of medical uses, from clinical imaging to magnetically based hyperthermia for tumor treatment. These applications require their systemic administration in vivo. An important property of nanoparticles is their stability in biological media. For this purpose, a multicomponent nanoconstruct combining high colloidal stability and improved physical properties was synthesized and characterized. IONP were coated with an amphiphilic polymer (PMA), which confers colloidal stability, and were pegylated in order to obtain the nanoconstruct PEG-IONP-PMA. The aim of this study was to utilize cultured human endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine macrophages, taken as model of cells exposed to NP after systemic administration, to assess the biocompatibility of PEG-IONP-PMA (23.1 ± 1.4 nm) or IONP-PMA (15.6 ± 3.4 nm). PEG-IONP-PMA, tested at different concentrations as high as 20 μg mL-1, exhibited no cytotoxicity or inflammatory responses. By contrast, IONP-PMA showed a concentration-dependent increase of cytotoxicity and of TNF-α production by macrophages and NO production by HUVECs. Cell uptake analysis suggested that after PEGylation, IONP were less internalized either by macrophages or by HUVEC. These results suggest that the choice of the polymer and the chemistry of surface functionalization are a crucial feature to confer to IONP biocompatibility.

  2. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  3. pH gradients and a micro-pore filter at the luminal surface affect fluxes of propionic acid across guinea pig large intestine.

    PubMed

    Busche, Roger; von Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    A neutral pH microclimate had been shown at the luminal surface of the large intestine. The aim was to estimate to what extent fluxes of propionic acid/propionate are affected by changes of the luminal pH when this microclimate is present, largely reduced or absent. Fluxes of propionic acid/propionate (J(Pr)) across epithelia from the caecum, the proximal and the distal colon of guinea pigs were measured in Ussing chambers with and without a filter at the luminal surface. With bicarbonate and with a neutral or an acid pH of mucosal solutions (pH 7.4 or 6.4), mucosal-to-serosal fluxes (J(ms)(Pr) ) were 1.5 to 1.9-fold higher at the lower pH, in bicarbonate-free solutions and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition 2.1 to 2.6-fold. With a filter at the mucosal surface and with bicarbonate containing solutions, J (ms) (Pr) was not or only little elevated at the lower pH. Without bicarbonate J(ms)(Pr) was clearly higher. We conclude that the higher J(ms)(Pr) after luminal acidification is due to vigorous mixing in Ussing chambers resulting in a markedly reduced unstirred layer. Therefore, an effective pH microclimate at the epithelial surface is missing. J(ms)(Pr) is not or is little affected by lowering of pH because in the presence of bicarbonate the filter maintains the pH microclimate. However, in bicarbonate-free solutions J(ms)(Pr) was higher at pH 6.4 because a pH microclimate does not develop. Findings confirm that 30-60% of J(ms)(Pr) results from non-ionic diffusion.

  4. UBVRI Photometry of Stellar Structures throughout the Disk of the Barred Galaxy NGC 3367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Barreto, J. Antonio; Hernández-Toledo, Héctor; Moreno-Díaz, Edmundo; Bernal-Marín, Tula; Villarreal-Castillo, A. Lucía

    2007-07-01

    We report new detailed surface U, B, V, R, and I photometry of 81 stellar structures in the disk of the barred galaxy NGC 3367. The images show many different structures, indicating that star formation is going on in most parts of the disk. NGC 3367 is known to have a very high concentration of molecular gas distribution in the central regions of the galaxy and bipolar synchrotron emission from the nucleus, with two lobes (at 6 kpc) forming a triple structure similar to a radio galaxy. We have determined the U, B, V, R, and I magnitudes and U-B, B-V, U-V, and V-I colors for the central region (nucleus), a region which includes supernova 2003 AA, and 79 star associations throughout NGC 3367. The estimation of ages of star associations is very difficult due to several factors, among them the filling factor, metallicity, spatial distribution of each structure, and the fact that we estimated the magnitudes with a circular aperture of 16 pixels in diameter, equivalent to 6.8''~1.4 kpc. However, even though the colors derived for NGC 3367 were similar to the colors expected of star clusters with theoretical evolutionary star tracks developed for the LMC and had a similar metallicity, NGC 3367 shows 56% of the observed structures with age type SWB I (a few tens of megayears), with seven sources outside the high surface brightness visible disk.

  5. Time series photometry of the helium atmosphere pulsating white dwarf EC 04207-4748

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chote, P.; Sullivan, D. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Provencal, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    We present the analysis of 71 h of high-quality time series CCD photometry of the helium atmosphere pulsating white dwarf (DBV) EC 04207-4748 obtained using the facilities at Mt John University Observatory in New Zealand. The photometric data set consists of four week-long observing sessions covering the period 2011 March to November. A Fourier analysis of the light curves yielded clear evidence of four independent eigenmodes in the star with the dominant mode having a period of 447 s. The light-curve variations exhibit distinct non-sinusoidal shapes, which result in significant harmonics of the dominant frequency appearing in the Fourier transforms. These observed variations are interpreted in terms of non-linear contributions from the energy flux transmission through the sub-surface convection zone in the star. Our modelling of this mechanism, using the methods first introduced by Montgomery, yields a time-averaged convective response time of τ0 ˜ 150 s for the star, and this is shown to be broadly consistent with an MLT/α parameter value between 0.8 and 1.2. It is argued that for the DBV pulsators the measured value of τ0 is a better estimate of the relative stellar surface temperatures than those obtained via spectroscopic techniques.

  6. Distribution and factors affecting adsorption of sterols in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Yao, Xiaorui; Lu, Jianjiang; Qiao, Xiuwen; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanman

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the concentrations and distribution of eight sterol compounds in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang, China. The ratios of sterols as diagnostic indices were used to identify pollution sources. The sediment of the two lakes was selected as an adsorbent to investigate the adsorption behaviour of sterols. Results showed that the sterols were widely distributed in the sediments of the lakes in the study areas. The total concentrations of the detected sterols in Bosten Lake and in Manas Lake were 1.584-27.897 and 2.048-18.373 μg g(-1)∙dw, respectively. In all of the sampling sites, the amount of faecal sterols was less than that of plant sterols. β-sitosterol was the dominant plant sterol with a mean concentration of 2.378 ± 2.234 μg g(-1)∙dw; cholesterol was the most abundant faecal sterol with a mean concentration of 1.060 ± 1.402 μg g(-1)∙dw. The pollution level was higher in Bosten Lake than in Manas Lake. Majority of the ratios clearly demonstrated that the contamination by human faecal sources was occurring at stations which are adjacent to residential areas and water inlets. The adsorption behaviour of sterols to sediment suggested that the sterol adsorption coefficients were reduced as temperature increased. As salinity increased, the adsorption quantity also increased. As pH increased, the sediment adsorption of sterol slightly increased because the strong alkaline solution is not conducive to the adsorption of sterols. The ratios between sterols did not change largely with the change in external factors.

  7. DOE-EMSP Final Report: Characterization of Changes in Colloid and DNAPL Affecting Surface Chemistry and Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Susan E. Powers; Stefan J. Grimberg; Miles Denham

    2007-02-07

    The waste disposal to the M-area basin and A-14 outfall at the Savannah River Department of Energy facility in Aiken SC (USA) included a wide variety of inorganic aqueous flows and organic solvents in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The DNAPL has migrated through the subsurface resulting in widespread groundwater contamination. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify processes that could have affected the migration and remediation of the DNAPL in the subsurface. It was hypothesized that the variety of waste disposed at this site could have altered the mineral, microbial and DNAPL properties at this site relative to other DNAPL sites. The DNAPL was determined to have a very low interfacial tension and is suspected to be distributed in fine grained media, thereby reducing the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation efforts. Although the DNAPL is primarily comprised of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethane, it also contains organic acids and several heavy metals. Experimental results suggest that iron from the aqueous and DNAPL phases undergoes precipitation and dechlorination reactions at the DNAPL-water interface, contributing to the low interfacial tension and acidity of the DNAPL. Biological activity in the contaminated region can also contribute to the low interfacial tension. PCE degrading bacteria produce biosurfactants and adhere to the DNAPL-water interface when stressed by high tetrachloroethene or low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The presence of iron can reduce the interfacial tension by nearly an order of magnitude, while the PCE degraders reduced the interfacial tension by nearly 50%. Abiotic changes in the mineral characteristics were not found to be substantially different between contaminated and background samples. The research completed here begins to shed some insight into the complexities of DNAPL fate and migration at sites where co-disposal of many different waste products occurred. Quantifying

  8. The rotation period of Epsilon Eri from photometry of its starspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Gary J.; Hall, Douglas S.; Mattingly, Phil; Robb, Steve; Wood, Jim; Zeigler, Kenneth; Grim, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    BV photometry at six observatories in 1988/1989 and 1989/1990 shows variability resulting from five starspots which lived 1 or 2 months each, had rotation periods in the range P between 10.0d and 12.3d, and had amplitudes in the range 0.01 m - 0.03 m. From the range in P it was possible to estimate k greater than 0.20 +/- 0.05 for the differential rotation coefficient. Ca II K-line photometry, polarimetry, and earlier photometry reported in the literature has also shown variability with periodicities in the same 10 d -12 d range.

  9. The AAVSO Photoelectric Photometry Program in Its Scientific and Socio-Historic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, I review the work of the AAVSO in the area of photoelectric photometry (PEP). This work was influenced by several trends: in science, in technology, and in the sociology of amateur astronomy. Through the 1980s, the AAVSO photoelectric photometry program competed with other such programs and, in recent years, has been overshadowed by CCD photometry programs. Nevertheless, the AAVSO PEP program has, through careful organization, motivation, and feedback, produced extensive scientific results, and can continue to do so. In the case of my own research, AAVSO PEP observations have also contributed significantly to the education of my students.

  10. Optical Photometry of BY Cam Modeled Using a Multipolar Magnetic Field Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, John; Mason, P. A.; Zhilkin, A.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Robinson, E. L.

    2014-01-01

    We present new high-speed broad-band optical photometry of the asynchronous polar (magnetic cataclysmic variable) BY Cam. Observations were obtained at the 2.1-m Otto Struve Telescope of McDonald observatory with 3s integration times. In an attempt to understand the complex changes in accretion flow geometry, we performed full 3D MHD simulations assuming a variety of white dwarf magnetic field structures including both aligned and non-aligned dipole plus quadrupole field components. We compare model predictions with photometry and various phases of the beat cycle and find that synthetic light curves derived from a multipolar field structure are consistent with the optical photometry.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Vilnius photometry in North Ecliptic Pole (Zdanavicius+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanavicius, K.; Straizys, V.; Zdanavicius, J.; Chmieliauskaite, R.; Kazlauskas, A.

    2012-06-01

    Table 2 contains the results of photometry of 948 stars down to V=16.2mag in the Vilnius seven-color system at the North Ecliptic Pole. Photometric data are used to classify about 500 stars in spectral and luminosity classes. For the remaining stars one-dimensional spectral classes are given. The results of photometry and classification can be used to supplement the catalog of Gaia standard stars near the Ecliptic poles. To facilitate this, Table 3 presents the magnitudes of the SDSS and Gaia systems transformed from the Vilnius seven-color photometry. (3 data files).

  12. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  13. A new look at photometry of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Stone, Thomas C.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2010-08-01

    We use ROLO photometry (Kieffer, H.H., Stone, T.C. [2005]. Astron. J. 129, 2887-2901) to characterize the before and after full Moon radiance variation for a typical highlands site and a typical mare site. Focusing on the phase angle range 45° < α < 50°, we test two different physical models, macroscopic roughness and multiple scattering between regolith particles, for their ability to quantitatively reproduce the measured radiance difference. Our method for estimating the rms slope angle is unique and model-independent in the sense that the measured radiance factor I/ F at small incidence angles (high Sun) is used as an estimate of I/ F for zero roughness regolith. The roughness is determined from the change in I/ F at larger incidence angles. We determine the roughness for 23 wavelengths from 350 to 939 nm. There is no significant wavelength dependence. The average rms slope angle is 22.2° ± 1.3° for the mare site and 34.1° ± 2.6° for the highland site. These large slopes, which are similar to previous "photometric roughness" estimates, require that sub-mm scale "micro-topography" dominates roughness measurements based on photometry, consistent with the conclusions of Helfenstein and Shepard (Helfenstein, P., Shepard, M.K. [1999]. Icarus 141, 107-131). We then tested an alternative and very different model for the before and after full Moon I/ F variation: multiple scattering within a flat layer of realistic regolith particles. This model consists of a log normal size distribution of spheres that match the measured distribution of particles in a typical mature lunar soil 72141,1 (McKay, D.S., Fruland, R.M., Heiken, G.H. [1974]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 5, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1 (5), 887-906). The model particles have a complex index of refraction 1.65-0.003 i, where 1.65 is typical of impact-generated lunar glasses. Of the four model parameters, three were fixed at values determined from Apollo lunar soils: the mean radius and width of the log normal

  14. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-12-19

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  15. Photometry and Spectroscopy of BD+35 1111 in M38

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Sami, Mona; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian

    2014-06-01

    BD+35 1111 is a ~10.5-magnitude star in the field of M38, an open cluster that has been a target of our ongoing study of Hα emission variability in massive stars via narrowband CCD photometry (e.g. Souza, Davis, and Teich 2013, BAAS. 45, PM354.22). BD+35 1111 has no MKK classification in the literature, and is not listed as variable in GCVS, VSX, or NSVS. It is included, with no further characterization, in both the Vatican and Kohoutek catalogs of emission line stars. Using inhomogeneous ensemble photometry (e.g. Bhatti, Richmond, Ford, and Petro 2010, ApJ Supp., 186, 233), we find it to be an irregular variable with a range of ~0.15 mag. To further understand this star we obtained a medium-resolution spectrum using the DIS spectrograph on the ARC 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We classify BD+35 1111 as B2Ve, the only confirmed Be star in the field of M38. This raises the question of membership, since the age of M38 is likely 250 Ma or greater (Pandey et al. 2007, Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 59, 547). From published B and V magnitudes we find a nominal distance to BD+35 1111 of 1.6 kpc, but with a range of 1.3 to 2.0 kpc, marginally consistent with distance estimates for M38 ranging from 1.0 to 1.4 kpc. If a member, BD+35 1111 is a candidate blue straggler. If not, it may have escaped from a nearby younger cluster, possibly Kronberger 1 (Kronberger et al. 2006, A&A 447, 921), which has the right heliocentric distance and age. The notion that BD+35 1111 is behind M38 is supported by its reddening of EB-V ~ 0.5, significantly higher than for M38 itself 0.24). We gratefully acknowledge support for student research from NSF grant AST-1005024 to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium, Williams College, and NASA via an American Astronomical Society Small Research Grant.

  16. Infrared photometry and polarimetry of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Gehrz, Robert D.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Molnar, Lawrence A.; Howard, Eric M.

    1994-01-01

    We present photometry and linear polarimetry of Cygnus X-3 at K (2.2 micrometers) obtained over a 5 yr period. Photometry and polarimetry at J, H, and K of nearby field stars is also presented. From an analysis of these data we find: (1) Using the x-ray ephemeris of Kitamoto et al. (ApJ, 384, 263 (1992), including the first and second derivatives of the period, the leading edge of the decline to minimum in the quiescent K light curve has not changed in phase since 1974. The duration of the minimum in the light curve has changed significantly between different epochs, becoming much broader in 1993 than it was previously. (2) In addition to an interstellar polarization component, it is likely Cyg X-3 has an intrinsic polarization component that is variable. The variations in the polarization do not show any diagnostic pattern with orbital phase. A crude analysis of the polarization suggests the intrinsic polarization of Cyg X-3 has a mean position angle of approximately 12 deg, nearly the same as the direction of the expanding radio lobes. This is consistent with circumstellar electrons scattering in an equatorial disk that is perpendicular to the lobe axis. (3) The mean position angle for the interstellar polarization in the direction of Cyg X-3 is 150 deg. This is nearly perpendicular to the axis of interstellar radio scattering seen in the extended (Very Long Baseline Inteferometry (VLBI) images. Since the position angle of interstellar polarization is the same as the projected magnetic field direction, this suggests the interstellar (not circumstellar) scattering must be taking place perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field lines. (4) Cyg X-3 was observed at K during a flare on 1992 September 30 with a temporal resolution of 6 s. The flaring had rise and fall times of approximately 50 s with peak intensities up to 80 mJy. The flux between individual flare events never dropped to quiescent levels for the duration of our observations (approximately 2000 s).

  17. Optical and near infrared photometry of Butcher-Oemler clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shier, Lisa M.; Rieke, Marcia J.

    1993-01-01

    Rich clusters of galaxies at moderate redshifts (z approx. .3) have a larger proportion of optically blue galaxies than their low redshift counterparts. Spectroscopic examination of the blue galaxies by various authors has shown that the blue galaxies are generally Seyferts, show evidence for recent star formation, or are foreground objects. Unfortunately, spectroscopy is too time consuming to be used on large samples. Thus, we have looked for a way to separate Seyferts, starbursts, ellipticals and nonmembers using photometry alone. Five moderate redshift clusters, Abell numbers 777, 963, 1758, 1961 and 2218, have been observed in the V, R and K bands. We model the spectral energy distributions of various kinds of galaxies found in clusters and derive observed colors. We have modeled the spectral energy distributions (SED) of several kinds of galaxies and compute their colors as a function of redshift. We expect to see ellipticals, spirals, starbursts, post-starburst and Seyfert galaxies. The SED of elliptical and Sbc galaxies was observed by Rieke and Rieke. The SEDs for the starburst galaxies was created by adding a reddened 10(exp 8) year old burst to a spiral galaxy SED. The post-starburst (E+A) galaxy SEDs are composed of a slightly reddened 10(exp 9) year old burst and elliptical galaxy SED. SEDs for the Seyferts were created by adding a v(exp -1.1) power law, and a hot dust thermal spectrum to the Sbc. From the SEDs the colors of galaxies at various redshifts with assorted filters were computed. Lilly & Gunn (1985) have optical and infrared photometry for a sample of galaxies in CL0024+1654 observed spectroscopically by Dressler, Gunn and Schneider (1985). We have used this data to choose the most appropriate SEDs for our starburst and post-starburst models. The most likely explanation for the optically blue colors in most cluster galaxies is star formation. Very few galaxies lie in the Seyfert locus. Abel 1758 has more Seyfert candidates than the other

  18. [Determination of lithium content in human biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry].

    PubMed

    Luzanova, I S; Voznesenskaia, T V; Menitskaia, V I; Pushchinskaia, E V

    2007-01-01

    The authors give a method of determination of the content of lithium in biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry. It is possible to use this method in forensic medicine in cases of acute intoxication.

  19. Stellar photometry with the Wide Field/Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, J.A. )

    1990-07-01

    Simulations of Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) images are analyzed in order to discover the most effective techniques for stellar photometry and to evaluate the accuracy and limitations of these techniques. The capabilities and operation of the WF/PC and the simulations employed in the study are described. The basic techniques of stellar photometry and methods to improve these techniques for the WF/PC are discussed. The correct parameters for star detection, aperture photometry, and point-spread function (PSF) fitting with the DAOPHOT software of Stetson (1987) are determined. Consideration is given to undersampling of the stellar images by the detector; variations in the PSF; and the crowding of the stellar images. It is noted that, with some changes DAOPHOT, is able to generate photometry almost to the level of photon statistics. 10 refs.

  20. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT. A DISTANCE DETERMINATION TO THE LOCAL GROUP SPIRAL M33 FROM NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF CEPHEID VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Dariusz E-mail: pietrzyn@hubble.cfm.udec.cl; and others

    2013-08-10

    Motivated by an amazing range of reported distances to the nearby Local Group spiral galaxy M33, we have obtained deep near-infrared photometry for 26 long-period Cepheids in this galaxy with the ESO Very Large Telescope. From the data, we constructed period-luminosity relations in the J and K bands which together with previous optical VI photometry for the Cepheids by Macri et al. were used to determine the true distance modulus of M33, and the mean reddening affecting the Cepheid sample with the multiwavelength fit method developed in the Araucaria Project. We find a true distance modulus of 24.62 for M33, with a total uncertainty of {+-}0.07 mag which is dominated by the uncertainty on the photometric zero points in our photometry. The reddening is determined as E(B - V) = 0.19 {+-} 0.02, in agreement with the value used by the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project of Freedman et al. but in some discrepancy with other recent determinations based on blue supergiant spectroscopy and an O-type eclipsing binary which yielded lower reddening values. Our derived M33 distance modulus is extremely insensitive to the adopted reddening law. We show that the possible effects of metallicity and crowding on our present distance determination are both at the 1%-2% level and therefore minor contributors to the total uncertainty of our distance result for M33.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBVR photometry of the open cluster King 2 (Aparicio+ 1990)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; Bertelli, G.; Chiosi, C.; Garcia-Pelayo, J. M.

    2003-06-01

    In this paper we present the Johnson-Cousins UBVR CCD photometry of the stars in King 2, an old open cluster towards the galactic anticenter. We have obtained the colour-magnitude diagram, the colour excess, the reddening, an estimate of the metallicity, and the distance modulus. The comparison of the observational colour-magnitude diagram with the theoretical simulations based on stellar models with convective overshoot shows that a major revision of the model structure is required. To this aim, we explore the possibility that the formulation of convective overshoot for stars in the mass range 1 to 2M{sun} ought to be different from the one currently in use. The point of major uncertainty that we see to affect the stars in this domain is whether or not convective overshoot may erode the gradient in molecular weight in the regions surrounding the convective core. We find that models, in which this is not allowed to occur, better fit the overall morphology of the colour-magnitude diagram of King 2. In addition to this, analyzing the width of the main sequence band we suggest that a significant fraction of the stars are members of binary systems, and evaluate the range spanned by their mass ratios. Finally, we derive the luminosity function and the mass function for the main sequence stars of the cluster. (1 data file).

  2. Southern Milky Way carbon stars - New candidates, JHK photometry, and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, V.M.; Cook, K.H.; Schechter, P.L.; Aaronson, M.; Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ; Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-07-01

    Data are presented for low-latitude southern Milky Way carbon stars. Coordinates and cross identifications are given for carbon stars (67 of which are confirmed new discoveries) in seven fields deemed to be unusually transparent. JHK photometry is presented for 520 stars. Velocities are presented for 393 stars. Improved coordinates are presented for selected stars in Westerlund's catalog. Averaged photometry and velocities are presented for a sample of 336 stars. 26 refs.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-104b and WASP-106b photometry (Smith+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Armstrong, D. J.; Barros, S. C. C.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier, Cameron A.; Delrez, L.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hebrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Louden, T. M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Montagnier, G.; Neveu-Vanmalle, M.; Osborn, H. P.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Rostron, J. W.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Udry, S.; Walker, S. R.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2014-09-01

    The stars WASP-104 and WASP-106 were observed by SuperWASP-N from 2008 to 2011, and by WASP-South from 2009 to 2010. This differential survey photometry has been de-reddened and normalised. Further photometry was obtained using the TRAPPIST, Euler, Liverpool and Isaac Newton telescopes in 2013 and 2014. All these data are plotted in Figures 1 and 2. (1 data file).

  4. The CCD photometry of the globular cluster Palomar 1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissova, J.; Spassova, N.

    1995-04-01

    A CCD photometry of the halo cluster Palomar 1 is presented in the Thuan-Gunn photometric system. The principal sequences of the color-magnitude diagrams are delineated in different spectral bands. The color-magnitude diagrams of the cluster show a well defined red horizontal branch, a subgiant branch and a main-sequence down to about two magnitudes below the main sequence turnoff. The giant branch is absent and the brightest stars are the horizontal branch stars. The age of the cluster determined by comparison with the isochrones of Bell & Vanden Berg (1987) is consistent with an age in the interval 12-14Gyr. A distance modulus of (m-M)_g0_=15.38+/-0.15 magnitude and E(g-r)=0.16 has been derived. An estimate of the cluster structural parameters such as core radius and concentration parameter gives r_c_=1.5pc and c=1.46. A mass estimate of 1.1 10^3^Msun_ and a mass-to-light ratio of 1.79 have been obtained using King's (1966) method. The morphology of color-magnitude diagrams allows Pal 1 to be interpreted as probably a globular cluster rather than an old open one.

  5. Color-magnitude diagram of Palomar 4 - CCD photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, C. A.; Heasley, J. N.

    1986-04-01

    Photometry of the globular cluster Pal 4 was obtained with the RCA CCD camera on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea. The color-magnitude diagram of the cluster shows a well-defined red horizontal branch, typical of outer halo systems, and an asymptotic giant branch well separated from the giant branch. The population of Pal 4 has been sampled to the main-sequence turnoff region (V = 25), allowing a detailed comparison of this distant object with theoretical models. The cluster parameters consistent with the CCD data are (m - M)0 = 20.1 + or - 0.1 mag, E(B - V) = 0.02 + or - 0.02, and Fe/H forbidden line = -1.7 + or - 0.1 with Y =0.2. The age of the cluster, determined by comparison with the isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985) is consistent with an age of 15 + or - 1 Gyr, similar to inner halo globular clusters with ages determined in the same way.

  6. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. II

    SciTech Connect

    Szkody, P.; Howell, S.B.; Mateo, M.; Kreidl, T.J. Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ )

    1989-10-01

    Time-resolved optical broad-band light curves obtained from differential photometry on sequential CCD frames of the known or suspected cataclysmic variable FO And, EH Aqr, WX Cet, XX Cet, AL Com, V503 Cyg, AH Eri, CP Eri, IR Gem, RW UMi, PG0134+070, and US 3215 are presented. The analysis of the light curves with coverage of greater than 2 hrs shows repeatable periodicity in five objects. PG0134+070 exhibits eclipses of 1.3-1.8 mag depth with a period of 313 min. V503 Cyg has a 0.7-1.0 mag peak-to-peak modulation with a period of 109 min. IR Gem shows a large modulation at the orbital period of 99 min, and comparison with previous data indicates that this modulation may have an amplitude dependent on outburst phase. AH Eri reveals a 0.1-0.3 mag modulation, at a period of 42 min. Better time-resolved data on AL Com confirm the 0.4-mag variation reported by Howell and Szkody (1988) at a period of 42 min. These latter two short periods likely indicate magnetic systems. There is also some evidence of periodicity in RW UMi and WX Cet which must be confirmed with further data. 25 refs.

  7. Photometry and Astrometry of the Jovian satellites Amalthea and Thebe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saquet, Eléonore; Emelyanov, Nicolai; Colas, François; Robert, Vincent; Arlot, Jean-Eudes

    2016-10-01

    During the 2014-2015 campaign of mutual events, we realized ground-based observations of Amalthea (JV) and Thebe (JXIV). We recorded two eclipses of Amalthea and, for the first time, one of Thebe by the Galilean moons. We used the 1-m telescope at Pic du Midi Observatory with an IR filter and a mask placed over the planetary image to reduce the light intensity of Jupiter. A third observation of Amalthea was taken at Saint-Sulpice Observatory with a 60-cm telescope using a methane filter (890 nm) and a deep absorption band to decrease the contrast between the planet and the satellites. We provide astrometric results derived from the photometry with an overall accuracy of 34 mas, or 100 km at Jupiter.In the same time, we realized 45 astrometric observations of Amalthea and 41 of Thebe to compare the photometric technique with direct astrometry, using the UCAC4 reference star catalog. We provide astrometric results with an overall accuracy of 100 mas for Amalthea, or 300 km at Jupiter, and 90 mas for Thebe, or 270 km at Jupiter. These results are better than those from previous ground-based and old reduced space measurements.

  8. High Precision Photometry of Bright Transiting Exoplanet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Eastman, Jason; Johnson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the successful search for exoplanets and the characterization of their physical properties have shown the immense progress that has been made towards finding planets with characteristics similar to Earth. For most exoplanets with a radius about the size of Earth, evaluating their physical properties, such as the mass, radius and equilibrium temperature, cannot be determined with satisfactory precision. The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) was recently built to obtain spectroscopic and photometric measurements to find, confirm, and characterize Earth-like exoplanets. MINERVA's spectroscopic survey targets the brightest, nearby stars which are well-suited to the array's capabilities, while its primary photometric goal is to search for transits around these bright targets. Typically, it is difficult to find satisfactory comparison stars within a telescope's field of view when the primary target is very bright. This issue is resolved by using one of MINERVA's telescopes to observe the primary bright star while the other telescopes observe a distinct field of view that contains satisfactory bright comparison stars. We describe the code used to identify nearby comparison stars, schedule the four telescopes, produce differential photometry from multiple telescopes, and show the first results from this effort.This work has been funded by the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program, the ERAU Honors Program, the ERAU Undergraduate Research Spark Fund, and the Banneker Institute at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

  9. Worldwide photometry of the January 1989 Tau Persei eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Douglas S.; Curott, David R.; Barksdale, William S.; Diethelm-Sutter, Roger; Ells, Jack

    1991-01-01

    New UBV photoelectric photometry of Tau Persei obtained at 19 different observatories during its recent January 1989 eclipse is presented. Mideclipse occurred at JD 2 447 542.31 + or - 0.01. The resulting light curve, though not complete at all phases, is solved for the elements with the help of two quantities derived from spectroscopy: the eclipse is 84 percent total at mideclipse, and the ratio of the radii is 0.135 + or - 0.01. Radii relative to the semimajor axis are 0.0236 for the G5 giant and 0.0032 for the A2 star. With a reasonable total mass assumed, the absolute radii say the A2 star could be luminosity class V or somewhat evolved and the G5 star is between III and II but could be closer to II. The G5 giant is brighter than the A2 star by 1.72 mag in V and the color excess in B - V is 0.06 mag, both quantities consistent (within uncertainties) with earlier estimates of Ake (1986). The eclipse duration, from first to fourth contact, is 2.09 day. The orbital inclination is 88.74 deg, consistent with what McAlister derived from speckle interferometry. Because of the large (e = 0.73) eccentricity, there is no secondary eclipse at all.

  10. High Speed Photometry and Spectroscopy of Novae at Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. M.; Woudt, P. A.; Warner, B.; Williams, R. E.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present spectroscopy of Nova Velorum 1999 (V382 Vel) and Nova Sagittarii 1936c (V630 Sgr) obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope in May and July 2012 as part of our ongoing observing campaign of old novae. The SALT spectrum of V382 Vel is dominated by broad Hα emission associated with the nova shell. The other Balmer lines in the spectrum are narrower and single-peaked, with Hβ at similar line strength as He II 4686Å. The SALT spectrum of V630 Sgr is dominated by He II 4686Å, emission lines are double-peaked (except the lines of the He II Pickering series) and show clear variations in multiple spectra obtained over one-quarter of the binary orbit. Additional high speed photometry of V382 Vel has been obtained in 2012 using the new SHOC photometer of the South African Astronomical Observatory. It shows the emergence of large amplitude quasi-periodic variability with periodicities around ˜ 30 minutes, not seen previously.

  11. NEOWISE STUDIES OF ASTEROIDS WITH SLOAN PHOTOMETRY: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Hand, E.; Grav, T.; Mo, W.; Tholen, D. J.; McMillan, R. S.; Maleszewski, C.; Wright, E.; Watkins, J.; Spahr, T.; Cutri, R. M.; Walker, R.

    2012-01-20

    We have combined the NEOWISE and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data to study the albedos of 24,353 asteroids with candidate taxonomic classifications derived using Sloan photometry. We find a wide range of moderate to high albedos for candidate S-type asteroids that are analogous to the S complex defined by previous spectrophotometrically based taxonomic systems. The candidate C-type asteroids, while generally very dark, have a tail of higher albedos that overlaps the S types. The albedo distribution for asteroids with a photometrically derived Q classification is extremely similar to those of the S types. Asteroids with similar colors to (4) Vesta have higher albedos than the S types, and most have orbital elements similar to known Vesta family members. Finally, we show that the relative reflectance at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m is higher for D-type asteroids and suggest that their red visible and near-infrared spectral slope extends out to these wavelengths. Understanding the relationship between size, albedo, and taxonomic classification is complicated by the fact that the objects with classifications were selected from the visible/near-infrared Sloan Moving Object Catalog, which is biased against fainter asteroids, including those with lower albedos.

  12. Infrared photometry of the black hole candidate Sagittarius A*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Close, Laird M.; Mccarthy, Donald W. JR.; Melia, Fulvio

    1995-01-01

    An infrared source has been imaged within 0.2 +/- 0.3 arcseconds of the unique Galactic center radio source Sgr A* High angular resolution (averaged value of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) approximately 0.55 arcseconds) was achieved by rapid (approximately 50 Hz) real-time images motion compensation. The source's near-infrared magnitudes (K = 12.1 +/- 0.3, H = 13.7 +/- 0.3, and J = 16.6 +/- 0.4) are consistent with a hot object reddened by the local extinction A(sub v) approximately 27). At the 3 sigma level of confidence, a time series of 80 images limits the source variability to less than 50% on timescales from 3 to 30 minutes. The photometry is consistent with the emission from a simple accretion disk model for a approximately 1 x 10(exp 6) solar mass black hole. However, the fluxes are also consistent with a hot luminous (L approximately 10(exp 3.5) to 10(exp 4-6) solar luminosity) central cluster star positionally coincident with Sgr A*.

  13. Counterphase modulation flicker photometry: phenotypic and genotypic associations.

    PubMed

    Lawrance-Owen, A J; Bosten, J M; Hogg, R E; Bargary, G; Goodbourn, P T; Mollon, J D

    2014-04-01

    The OSCAR test, a clinical device that uses counterphase flicker photometry, is believed to be sensitive to the relative numbers of long-wavelength and middle-wavelength cones in the retina, as well as to individual variations in the spectral positions of the photopigments. As part of a population study of individual variations in perception, we obtained OSCAR settings from 1058 participants. We report the distribution characteristics for this cohort. A randomly selected subset of participants was tested twice at an interval of at least one week: the test-retest reliability (Spearman's rho) was 0.80. In a whole-genome association analysis we found a provisional association with a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs16844995). This marker is close to the gene RXRG, which encodes a nuclear receptor, retinoid X receptor γ. This nuclear receptor is already known to have a role in the differentiation of cones during the development of the eye, and we suggest that polymorphisms in or close to RXRG influence the relative probability with which long-wave and middle-wave opsin genes are expressed in human cones.

  14. Controversies in ocular inflammation and immunology laser flare photometry.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Denis; Herbort, Carl P; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Zierhut, Manfred

    2010-10-01

    Laser flare photometry (LFP) is a method used to detect flare in the anterior chamber (AC). Until now several laser flare photometers have been developed and are in use. LFP is not yet used in all major uveitis centres and, in order to understand this reluctance and know whether use of LFP is justified and should be recommended, an expert meeting was deemed necessary leading to this publication. Besides others results included the following: There is variation between users with regard to how many readings are necessary varying from 3 to 10. It appears appropriate to use at least 6-10 readings. LFP is most useful in patients with anterior uveitis. In patients with posterior and intermediate uveitis, at least 15 photons in the anterior chamber is considered the necessary threshold to be reliable to monitor evolution of inflammation. Factors influencing the measurement of LFP are cataract, corneal opacity, pupil size, intraocular lens and shallow anterior chamber but this is mostly irrelevant in pathological situation. LFP can be used to adjust the management of patients with uveitis, but not necessarily influence treatment. Exceptions may be patients with JIA and Behcet's Disease. LFP results should always be interpreted in conjunction with the usually clinical observations. There is some evidence that worsening of the flare on two consecutive visits is predictive of a relapse, especially in patients with Behcet's disease. LFP maybe also useful for predicting rejection of corneal transplant when the cornea is not thickened.

  15. GASPS Photometry of the Tucana-Horologium Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Donaldson J.; Roberge, Aki

    2010-01-01

    The GASPS Open Time Key Programme on Herschel represents a new opportunity to sensitively probe protoplanetary and debris disks at far-IR wavelengths. We present preliminary PACS 70 and 160 micron photometry of eighteen stars in the 30 Myr-old Tucana-Horologium association. Of these eighteen, eight were detected in the 70 micron band. Four of these eight were also detected in the 160 micron band. We constructed SEDs for these systems using optical data from Hipparcos (B and V), near-IR data from 2MASS (J, H, and K), mid-IR data from IRAS and Spitzer MIPS (12 and 24 microns, respectively), and the new far-IR data from PACS. For the stars showing IR excess emission, we fit simple single-temperature blackbody curves to the IR excess in order to determine the rough dust abundances and temperatures. Dust observations at these wavelengths will also be important for comparison with upcoming Herschel PACS spectra that will search for gas in the disks. Our goal is to determine or limit the ever-allusive gas-to-dust ratio for these disk systems.

  16. photPARTY: Python automated square-aperture photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Teresa A.; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.

    2017-01-01

    As CCD’s have drastically increased the amount of information recorded per frame, so too have they increased the time and effort needed to sift through the data. For observations of a single star, information from millions of pixels needs to be distilled into one number: the magnitude. Various computer systems have been used to streamline this process over the years. The CCDPhot photometer, in use at the Kitt Peak 0.9-m telescope in the 1990’s, allowed for user settings and provided real time magnitudes during observation of single stars. It is this level of speed and convenience that inspired the development of the Python-based software analysis system photPARTY, which can quickly and efficiently produce magnitudes for a set of single-star or un-crowded field CCD frames. Seeking to remove the need for manual interaction after initial settings for a group of images, photPARTY automatically locates stars, subtracts the background, and performs square-aperture photometry. Rather than being a package of available functions, it is essentially a self-contained, one-click analysis system, with the capability to process several hundred frames in just a couple of minutes. Results of comparisons against present systems such as IRAF will be presented. The support of the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1211621 is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Photometry of some neglected bright cataclysmic variables and candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Albert

    2017-04-01

    As part of an effort to better characterize bright cataclysmic variables (CVs) which have received little attention in the past light curves of four confirmed systems (CZ Aql, BO Cet, V380 Oph and EF Tuc) and one candidate (Lib 3) are analyzed. For none of these stars time resolved photometry has been published previously. While no variability was found in the case of Lib 3, which thus cannot be confirmed as a CV, the light curves of all other targets are dominated by strong flickering. Modulations on hourly time scales superimposed on the flickering can probably be related to orbital variations in BO Cet and V380 Oph, but not in CZ Aql and EF Tuc. Variations on the time scale of 10 min in CZ Aql, while not yet constituting convincing evidence, together with previous suspicions of a magnetically channeled accretion flow may point at an intermediate polar nature of this star. Some properties of the flickering are quantified in an effort to enlarge the data base for future comparative flickering studies in CVs and to refine the classification of the target stars.

  18. Isochrone Fitting of Hubble Photometry in UV-Vis Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Hallie; Paust, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of isochrone fitting of color-magnitude diagrams from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) photometry of the globular clusters M13 and M80 in five bands from the ultraviolet to near infrared. Fits from both the Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program (DSEP) and the PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolution Code (PARSEC) are examined. Ages, extinctions, and distances are found from the isochrone fitting, and metallicities are confirmed. We conduct careful qualitative analysis on the inconsistencies of the fits across all of the color combinations possible with the five observed bands, and find that the (F606W-F814W) color generally produces very good fits, but that there are large discrepancies when the data is fit using colors including UV bands for both models. Finally, we directly compare the two models by performing isochrone-isochrone fitting, and find that the age in PARSEC is on average 1.5 Gyr younger than DSEP for similar-appearing models at the same metallicity, and that the two models become less discrepant at lower metallicities.

  19. High Cadence Time-Series Photometry of V1647 Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, K. G.; Weintraub, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    We present high cadence time-series photometry of the 2003-2004 and 2008-2009 FUor/EXor outbursts of V1647 Orionis, the star illuminating McNeil's Nebula. The first dataset was taken as the object was most steeply increasing in brightness while the second was presumably taken after its luminosity had plateaued. We detect two significant periods in our 2003 lightcurve superimposed on a flicker-noise spectrum, while the power spectrum of our 2009 lightcurve is devoid of significant structure. We find that neither of these periods can be attributed to the star's rotation. The dominant period is 4.3d, and we find that it may be akin to the dwarf-nova oscillations observed around cataclysmic variable stars. This 4.3d period would suggest that the inner edge of the star's Keplerian accretion disk was located 2.5 stellar radii away from the star before its luminosity had reached its peak and that, considered together with the flickering, the stellar magnetosphere was interacting with the disk during this phase of the outburst. The second period of 0.13d is consistent with the star's theoretical radial pulsation timescale, and, given that this period is not detected in 2009, we propose that the very high accretion rate at the time of our 2003 observations induced short-term radial pulsations in the star.

  20. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  1. SYNMAG PHOTOMETRY: A FAST TOOL FOR CATALOG-LEVEL MATCHED COLORS OF EXTENDED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Yasuda, Naoki; Hogg, David W.; Higgs, Tim D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Masters, Karen L.; Lang, Dustin; Wake, David A.

    2012-12-01

    Obtaining reliable, matched photometry for galaxies imaged by different observatories represents a key challenge in the era of wide-field surveys spanning more than several hundred square degrees. Methods such as flux fitting, profile fitting, and PSF homogenization followed by matched-aperture photometry are all computationally expensive. We present an alternative solution called 'synthetic aperture photometry' that exploits galaxy profile fits in one band to efficiently model the observed, point-spread-function-convolved light profile in other bands and predict the flux in arbitrarily sized apertures. Because aperture magnitudes are the most widely tabulated flux measurements in survey catalogs, producing synthetic aperture magnitudes (SYNMAGs) enables very fast matched photometry at the catalog level, without reprocessing imaging data. We make our code public and apply it to obtain matched photometry between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz and UKIDSS YJHK imaging, recovering red-sequence colors and photometric redshifts with a scatter and accuracy as good as if not better than FWHM-homogenized photometry from the GAMA Survey. Finally, we list some specific measurements that upcoming surveys could make available to facilitate and ease the use of SYNMAGs.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JKH photometry in LDN 1688 (Wilking+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilking, B. A.; Gagne, M.; Allen, L. E.

    2008-11-01

    A review of star formation in the Rho Ophiuchi molecular complex is presented, with particular emphasis on studies of the main cloud, L1688, since 1991. Recent photometric and parallax measurements of stars in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Sco-Cen OB association suggest a distance for the cloud between 120 and 140 parsecs. Star formation is ongoing in the dense cores of L1688 with a median age for young stellar objects of 0.3Myr. The surface population appears to have a median age of 2-5Myr and merges with low mass stars in the Upper Scorpius subgroup. Making use of the most recent X-ray and infrared photometric surveys and spectroscopic surveys of L1688, we compile a list of over 300 association members with counterparts in the 2MASS catalog. Membership criteria, such as lithium absorption, X-ray emission, and infrared excess, cover the full range of evolutionary states for young stellar objects. Spectral energy distributions are classified for many association members using infrared photometry obtained from the Spitzer Space Telescope. (2 data files).

  3. Photometry from voyager 2: initial results from the uranian atmosphere, satellites, and rings.

    PubMed

    Lane, A L; Hord, C W; West, R A; Esposito, L W; Simmons, K E; Nelson, R M; Wallis, B D; Buratti, B J; Horn, L J; Graps, A L; Pryor, W R

    1986-07-04

    The Voyager 2 photopolarimeter successfully completed the Uranus encounter, acquiring new data on the planet's atmosphere, its principal satellites, and its ring system. Spatially resolved photometry of the atmosphere at 0.27 micrometer shows no enhancement in absorption toward the pole, unlike the case for Jupiter and Saturn. Stellar occultation measurements indicate the temperature at the 1-millibar level over the north pole is near 90 kelvins. The geometric albedos of the five large satellites of Uranus were measured at 0.27 and 0.75 micrometer and indicate the presence of low albedo, spetrally flat absorbing material. Titania seems to have a fluffy surface, as indicated by its phase curve. The nine ground-based rings were detected, and their internal structure, optical depths, and positions were determined. The sharp edges of the in ring made it possible to measure its edge thickness (less than 150 meters) and particle sizes (less than 30 meters); little or no dust was detcted. New narrow rings and partial rings (arcs) were measured, and the narrow component of the eta ring was found to be discontinuous.

  4. Deep Photometry of Galaxies in the VEGAS Survey: The Case of NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spavone, M.

    The VST-VEGAS project is aimed at observing and studying a rich sample of nearby early-type galaxies in order to systematically characterize their properties over a wide baseline of sizes and out to the faint outskirts where data are rather scarce so far. The external regions of galaxies more easily retain signatures about the formation and evolution mechanisms which shaped them, as their relaxation time are longer, and they are more weakly influenced by processes such as mergers, secular evolution, central black hole activity, and supernova feedback on the ISM, which tend to level age and metallicity gradients. The collection of a wide photometric dataset of a large number of galaxies in various environmental conditions, may help to shed light on these questions. To this end VEGAS exploits the potential of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) which provides high quality images of 1 deg2 field of view in order to satisfy both the requirement of high resolution data and the need of studying nearby, and thus large, objects. We present a detailed study of the surface photometry of the elliptical galaxy NGC4472 and of smaller ETGs in its field, performed by using new g and i bands images to constrain the formation history of this nearby giant galaxy, and to investigate the presence of very faint substructures in its surroundings.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CCD UBV photometry of stars in Sex A (Aparicio+, 1987)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; Garcia-Pelayo, J. M.; Moles, M.; Melnick, J.

    2000-07-01

    CCD UBV photometry of 2279 stars in Sextans A is presented. Differences with the photometric scales of Sandage and Carlson (1985AJ.....90.1019S) and Hoessel et al. (1983ApJ...274..577H) are discussed; recalibration of the Sandage and Carlson data for Cepheids in Sextans A results in a smaller value for the distance modulus, μ=25.6. A similar value for the distance modulus is obtained from the colour-colour diagram. Colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams for the whole galaxy and for different parts are presented indicating a general star formation activity all over Sextans A. The contribution of stars brighter than Mpg=-3 to the total blue light of the galaxy amounts to 25%, a much higher value than what is found for other dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Group. The integrated birthrate per unit mass of massive stars for the galaxy is found to be much higher than in the Magellanic Clouds, suggesting that the rate in Sextans A was probably smaller in the past. Different slopes for high mass and low mass IMF parts are needed to account for its low surface brightness. The formation of massive stars seems to be favoured for systems of decreasing mass or, given the relation between total mass and metal content, for galaxies of decreasing metallicity. (1 data file).

  6. Photometry of the SW Sextantis-type nova-like BH Lyncis in high state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanishev, V.; Kraicheva, Z.; Genkov, V.

    2006-08-01

    Aims.We present a photometric study of the deeply eclipsing SW Sex-type nova-like cataclysmic variable star BH Lyn. Methods: .Time-resolved V-band CCD photometry was obtained for seven nights between 1999 and 2004. Results: .We determined 11 new eclipse timings of BH Lyn and derived a refined orbital ephemeris with an orbital period of 0.155875577(14) °. During the observations, BH Lyn was in high-state with V≃15.5 mag. The star presents ~1.5 mag deep eclipses with mean full-width at half-flux of 0.0683(±0.0054)P_orb. The eclipse shape is highly variable, even changing form cycle to cycle. This is most likely due to accretion disc surface brightness distribution variations, most probably caused by strong flickering. Time-dependent accretion disc self-occultation or variations of the hot spot(s) intensity are also possible explanations. Negative superhumps with period of ˜0.145 ° are detected in two long runs in 2000. A possible connection between SW Sex and negative superhump phenomena through the presence of tilted accretion disc is discussed, and a way to observationally test this is suggested.

  7. New Horizons approach photometry of Pluto and Charon: light curves and Solar phase curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, A. M.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Verbiscer, A.; Howett, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    While the most captivating images of Pluto and Charon were shot by NASA's New Horizons probe on July 14, 2015, the spacecraft also imaged Pluto with its LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager ("LORRI") during its Annual Checkouts and Approach Phases, with campaigns in July 2013, July 2014, January 2015, March 2015, April 2015, May 2015 and June 2015. All but the first campaign provided full coverage of Pluto's 6.4 day rotation. Even though many of these images were taken when surface features on Pluto and Charon were unresolved, these data provide a unique opportunity to study Pluto over a timescale of several months. Earth-based data from an entire apparition must be combined to create a single light curve, as Pluto is never otherwise continuously available for observing due to daylight, weather and scheduling. From the spacecraft, Pluto's sub-observer latitude remained constant to within 0.05 degrees of 43.15 degrees, comparable to a week's worth of change as seen from Earth near opposition. During the July 2013 to June 2015 period, Pluto's solar phase curve increased from 11 degrees to 15 degrees, a small range, but large compared to Earth's 2 degree limit. The slope of the solar phase curve hints at properties such as surface roughness. Using PSF photometry that takes into account the ever-increasing sizes of Pluto and Charon as seen from New Horizons, as well as surface features discovered at closest approach, we present rotational light curves and solar phase curves of Pluto and Charon. We will connect these observations to previous measurements of the system from Earth.

  8. Surface Orientation Affects the Direction of Cone Growth by Leptolyngbya sp. Strain C1, a Likely Architect of Coniform Structures Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park)

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Kristina; Gonzalez, Nicolas I.; Stewart, Joshua; Ospino, Frank; Nguyen, Dickie; Cho, David T.; Ghahremani, Nahal; Spear, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Laminated, microbially produced stromatolites within the rock record provide some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. The chemical, physical, and biological factors that lead to the initiation of these organosedimentary structures and shape their morphology are unclear. Modern coniform structures with morphological features similar to stromatolites are found on the surface of cyanobacterial/microbial mats. They display a vertical element of growth, can have lamination, can be lithified, and observably grow with time. To begin to understand the microbial processes and interactions required for cone formation, we determined the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community of a coniform structure from a cyanobacterial mat at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and reconstituted coniform structures in vitro. The 16S rRNA clone library from the coniform structure was dominated by Leptolyngbya sp. Other cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were present in much lower abundance. The same Leptolyngbya sp. identified in the clone library was also enriched in the laboratory and could produce cones in vitro. When coniform structures were cultivated in the laboratory, the initial incubation conditions were found to influence coniform morphology. In addition, both the angle of illumination and the orientation of the surface affected the angle of cone formation demonstrating how external factors can influence coniform, and likely, stromatolite morphology. PMID:23241986

  9. Surface orientation affects the direction of cone growth by Leptolyngbya sp. strain C1, a likely architect of coniform structures Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Kristina; Gonzalez, Nicolas I; Stewart, Joshua; Ospino, Frank; Nguyen, Dickie; Cho, David T; Ghahremani, Nahal; Spear, John R; Johnson, Hope A

    2013-02-01

    Laminated, microbially produced stromatolites within the rock record provide some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. The chemical, physical, and biological factors that lead to the initiation of these organosedimentary structures and shape their morphology are unclear. Modern coniform structures with morphological features similar to stromatolites are found on the surface of cyanobacterial/microbial mats. They display a vertical element of growth, can have lamination, can be lithified, and observably grow with time. To begin to understand the microbial processes and interactions required for cone formation, we determined the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community of a coniform structure from a cyanobacterial mat at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and reconstituted coniform structures in vitro. The 16S rRNA clone library from the coniform structure was dominated by Leptolyngbya sp. Other cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were present in much lower abundance. The same Leptolyngbya sp. identified in the clone library was also enriched in the laboratory and could produce cones in vitro. When coniform structures were cultivated in the laboratory, the initial incubation conditions were found to influence coniform morphology. In addition, both the angle of illumination and the orientation of the surface affected the angle of cone formation demonstrating how external factors can influence coniform, and likely, stromatolite morphology.

  10. Odd Harmonics in Exoplanet Photometry: Weather or Artifact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Chayes, Victoria; Bouffard, Élie; Meynig, Max; Haggard, Hal M.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to the transits of a planet in front of its star and the eclipses of the planet by its star, researchers have reported flux variations at the orbital frequency and its harmonics: planetary reflection and/or emission and Doppler beaming of starlight produce one peak per orbit, while ellipsoidal variations of a tidally distorted star and/or planet produce two maxima per orbit. Researchers have also reported significant photometric variability at three times the orbital frequency, as yet unexplained. Reflected phase variations of homogeneous planets only contain power at the orbital frequency and its even harmonics. We show that odd harmonics can, however, be produced by an edge-on planet with a time-variable map, or an inclined planet with a North-South (N-S) asymmetric map. For tidally-locked planets with thick atmospheres, either of these scenarios entail weather: planets with zero obliquity experience N-S symmetric stellar forcing. North-South asymmetry would therefore suggest stochastic localized features, i.e., weather. However, we find that previous claims of large-amplitude odd modes in Kepler photometry are artifacts of removing planetary transits rather than modeling them. The only reliable claims of odd harmonics remain HAT-P-7b and Kepler-13Ab, for which the third mode amplitude is 6-8% of the planetary flux. Although time-variable albedo maps could in principle explain these odd harmonics, upper-limits on the infrared variability of other hot Jupiters make this scenario unlikely. We recommend further studying the tidal effects of close-in planets on their host stars, as this remains the only plausible hypothesis.

  11. Precision Photometry to Study the Nature of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Schubnell, Michael

    2011-01-30

    Over the past decade scientists have collected convincing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, leading to the conclusion that the content of our universe is dominated by a mysterious 'dark energy'. The fact that present theory cannot account for the dark energy has made the determination of the nature of dark energy central to the field of high energy physics. It is expected that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics is required to fully understand the accelerating universe. Discovering the nature of dark energy is a very difficult task, and requires experiments that employ a combination of different observational techniques, such as type-Ia supernovae, gravitational weak lensing surveys, galaxy and galaxy cluster surveys, and baryon acoustic oscillations. A critical component of any approach to understanding the nature of dark energy is precision photometry. This report addresses just that. Most dark energy missions will require photometric calibration over a wide range of intensities using standardized stars and internal reference sources. All of the techniques proposed for these missions rely on a complete understanding of the linearity of the detectors. The technical report focuses on the investigation and characterization of 'reciprocity failure', a newly discovered count-rate dependent nonlinearity in the NICMOS cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. In order to quantify reciprocity failure for modern astronomical detectors, we built a dedicated reciprocity test setup that produced a known amount of light on a detector, and to measured its response as a function of light intensity and wavelength.

  12. A Remotely Operated Observatory for Minor Planet Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditteon, Richard

    2008-05-01

    In October of 2007 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana began operating the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory (E09) located near Siding Spring Observatory in New South Wales, Australia. The observatory houses a 0.5-m, f/8.4 Ritchey-Chretien telescope mounted on a Paramount ME, German equatorial mount. Attached to the telescope is an STL-1001E CCD camera which has 1024 by 1024, 24 µm pixels, a two-stage thermoelectric cooler, and built in color filter wheel with BVRI and clear filters. Image scale is 1.2 arcseconds per pixel. A cloud sensor is used to monitor sky conditions. The observatory has a roll-off roof with limit switches to detect when the roof is fully open and fully closed. In addition, a switch has been added to the mount to detect when the telescope is parked and that it is safe to open or close the roof. All of the hardware is controlled by a custom program which reads a simple text file containing the sequence of images and targets to be collected each night. The text file is loaded onto the control computer once each day, then the software waits until sunset to determine if the sky is clear. When conditions are favorable, power is turned on, the roof opens, twilight flats, dark and bias frames are recorded, and when it is fully dark data frames are recorded. Images are transferred via the Internet back to Rose-Hulman by another program running in the background. The observatory closes itself before dawn or if it gets cloudy. Currently we are using the observatory for photometry of minor planets. Students are responsible for selecting targets, processing the returned images, determining the period and light curve of each minor planet and writing a paper for publication. Recent results will be presented.

  13. Just the Photometry: Constraining exoplanet orbits by measuring stellar densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliski, David; Kipping, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    One unique trick in toolkit of astronomers studying transiting exoplanets, is that the mean stellar density may be determined using the shape of the light curve, under various idealized assumptions such as a circular orbit and the target star is unblended. “Asterodensity profiling” seeks to exploit this trick by comparing the light curve derived stellar density to that from some independent measurement. Any difference between the two measures indicates that one or more of the idealized assumptions are invalid. Therefore, the major challenge with single-planet systems (so-called “single-body asterodensity profiling” or SAP) is distinguishing whether the difference is due to a blend, orbital eccentricity or some combination. By careful consideration of the input priors, utilizing constraints from secondary eclipses and a Bayesian analysis of the system in question, the problem is tractable though, offering the chance to determine the underlying eccentricity distribution of exoplanets and even aid in validating planet candidates through blend analysis. In this talk, I will discuss single-body asterodensity profiling (SAP) for targets with asteroseismologically determined stellar densities, which is generally considered a gold-standard measure. We have investigated several targets with the largest apparent discrepancies between the transit-derived stellar density and that from asteroseismology. By independently detrending and fitting the transit light curves, we have calculated a revised value of this crucial ratio, with various priors tried. I will present the current results our work and discuss implications for the eccentricity and blend validation of these studied systems. I will finish by exploring the exciting potential of this technique in the TESS-era, where the fact our technique requires bright-star photometry alone, opens the door to constraints for hundreds/thousands of objects.

  14. Strengthening the open cluster distance scale via VVV photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaess, D.; Turner, D.; Moni Bidin, C.; Geisler, D.; Borissova, J.; Minniti, D.; Bonatto, C.; Gieren, W.; Carraro, G.; Kurtev, R.; Mauro, F.; Chené, A.-N.; Forbes, D.; Lucas, P.; Dékány, I.; Saito, R. K.; Soto, M.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 14% of known Galactic open clusters possess absolute errors ≤ 20% as evaluated from n ≥ 3 independent distance estimates, and the statistics for age estimates are markedly worse. That impedes such diverse efforts as calibrating standard candles and constraining masses for substellar companions. New data from the VVV survey may be employed to establish precise cluster distances with comparatively reduced uncertainties ( ≤ 10%). This is illustrated by deriving parameters for Pismis 19 and NGC 4349, two pertinent open clusters which hitherto feature sizable uncertainties (60%). Fundamental parameters determined for Pismis 19 from new VVV JHKs photometry are d = 2.40 ± 0.15 kpc, ⟨EJ - H⟩ = 0.34 ± 0.04, and log τ = 9.05 ± 0.10, whereas for NGC 4349 the analysis yielded d = 1.63 ± 0.13 kpc, EJ - H = 0.09 ± 0.02, log τ = 8.55 ± 0.10. The results exhibit a significant ( ≥ 5 × ) reduction in uncertainties, and indicate that: i) existing parameters for the substellar object NGC 4349 127b require revision, in part because the new cluster parameters imply that the host is 20% less-massive (ℳ∗/ℳ⊙ ~ 3.1); ii) R Cru is not a member of NGC 4349 and should be excluded from period-Wesenheit calibrations that anchor the distance scale; iii) and results for Pismis 19 underscore the advantages gleaned from employing deep VVV JHKs data to examine obscured (AV ~ 4) and differentially reddened intermediate-age clusters. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002.

  15. SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF WASP-4b WITH WARM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Beerer, Ingrid M.; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Langton, Jonathan; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.

    2011-01-20

    We present photometry of the giant extrasolar planet WASP-4b at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m taken with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of Spitzer's extended warm mission. We find secondary eclipse depths of 0.319% {+-} 0.031% and 0.343% {+-} 0.027% for the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, respectively, and show model emission spectra and pressure-temperature profiles for the planetary atmosphere. These eclipse depths are well fit by model emission spectra with water and other molecules in absorption, similar to those used for TrES-3 and HD 189733b. Depending on our choice of model, these results indicate that this planet has either a weak dayside temperature inversion or no inversion at all. The absence of a strong thermal inversion on this highly irradiated planet is contrary to the idea that highly irradiated planets are expected to have inversions, perhaps due the presence of an unknown absorber in the upper atmosphere. This result might be explained by the modestly enhanced activity level of WASP-4b's G7V host star, which could increase the amount of UV flux received by the planet, therefore reducing the abundance of the unknown stratospheric absorber in the planetary atmosphere as suggested in Knutson et al. We also find no evidence for an offset in the timing of the secondary eclipse and place a 2{sigma} upper limit on |ecos {omega}| of 0.0024, which constrains the range of tidal heating models that could explain this planet's inflated radius.

  16. Near-Infrared Absolute Photometry of the Saturnian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, T. W.; Baines, K. H.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Golisch, W.; Kaminski, C.

    1998-09-01

    We report absolutely-calibrated photometry of the Saturnian satellites in canonical near-infrared filters, including the first such spectrum of the leading side of Enceladus. The satellites were observed during Ring Plane Crossing in August and September of 1995 with the NSFCAM instrument at the NASA/IRTF. These observations were also simultaneous with those of the Uranian system, taken with the same instrument and filters, and analyzed by Baines et al. (Icarus 132, 266-284, 1998). Results are reported for J, H, and K filters near 1.27, 1.62, and 2.20 mu m, and two 0.1 mu m-wide filters centered at 1.73 and 2.27 mu m. We find that Enceladus has a peak brightness at 1.27 mu m with a geometric albedo of 0.898 +/- 0.063, in contrast to the Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Titania, which are relatively dim at this wavelength (albedos of roughly 0.3). The J-H band depth of Enceladus is about 30%, characteristic of spectra of Rhea, Tethys, and the trailing side of Iapetus, taken from Clark et al. (Icarus 58, 265-281, 1984) and convolved with our filters. By contrast, the darker Uranian satellites display a J-H band depth of less than 10%. From H to 1.73 mu m, the full-disk albedo of Enceladus increases by 27%, similar to the Uranian satellites. The dip in the Enceladus spectrum from J to H, as well as the subsequent rise from H to 1.73 mu m, are an expected signature of water ice. Finally, preliminary results for the albedos of Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Mimas, as well as Enceladus, at 2.27 mu m compare favorably with the visible albedos of Buratti and Veverka (Icarus, 58, 254-264, 1984).

  17. Seven-Color Photometry and Classification of Stars in the Direction of Open Cluster M29 (NGC 6913) in Cygnus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    UZsakyrno Nr. 2775, tiraZas 100 vnt. Baltic Astronomy, val. 22, 181-221, 2013 ()(). 3 SEVEN-COLOR PHOTOMETRY AND CLASSIFICATION OF STARS IN THE...photometric data are used to classify about 70% of stars in spectral and luminosity classes unci peculiarity types. Key words: stars: photometry ...the cluster area either by spectroscopy (the I’viK system) or by multicolor photometry applying interstellar reddening-free photomet-ric paramet-ers

  18. Groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium in Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, 2012–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L. Rick; Ortiz, Roderick F.; Brown, Christopher R.; Watts, Kenneth R.

    2016-11-28

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arkansas River Basin Regional Resource Planning Group, initiated a study of groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and loading of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium to Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, to improve understanding of sources and processes affecting loading of these constituents to streams in the Arkansas River Basin. Fourteen monitoring wells were installed in a series of three transects across Fountain Creek near Pueblo, and temporary streamgages were established at each transect to facilitate data collection for the study. Groundwater and surface-water interaction was characterized by using hydrogeologic mapping, groundwater and stream-surface levels, groundwater and stream temperatures, vertical hydraulic-head gradients and ratios of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in the hyporheic zone, and streamflow mass-balance measurements. Water quality was characterized by collecting periodic samples from groundwater, surface water, and the hyporheic zone for analysis of dissolved solids, selenium, uranium, and other selected constituents and by evaluating the oxidation-reduction condition for each groundwater sample under different hydrologic conditions throughout the study period. Groundwater loads to Fountain Creek and in-stream loads were computed for the study area, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium were evaluated on the basis of geology, geochemical conditions, land and water use, and evapoconcentration.During the study period, the groundwater-flow system generally contributed flow to Fountain Creek and its hyporheic zone (as a single system) except for the reach between the north and middle transects. However, the direction of flow between the stream, the hyporheic zone, and the near-stream aquifer was variable in response to streamflow and stage. During periods of low streamflow, Fountain Creek generally gained flow from

  19. Is Handwriting Performance Affected by the Writing Surface? Comparing Preschoolers', Second Graders', and Adults' Writing Performance on a Tablet vs. Paper

    PubMed Central

    Gerth, Sabrina; Klassert, Annegret; Dolk, Thomas; Fliesser, Michael; Fischer, Martin H.; Nottbusch, Guido; Festman, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Due to their multifunctionality, tablets offer tremendous advantages for research on handwriting dynamics or for interactive use of learning apps in schools. Further, the widespread use of tablet computers has had a great impact on handwriting in the current generation. But, is it advisable to teach how to write and to assess handwriting in pre- and primary schoolchildren on tablets rather than on paper? Since handwriting is not automatized before the age of 10 years, children's handwriting movements require graphomotor and visual feedback as well as permanent control of movement execution during handwriting. Modifications in writing conditions, for instance the smoother writing surface of a tablet, might influence handwriting performance in general and in particular those of non-automatized beginning writers. In order to investigate how handwriting performance is affected by a difference in friction of the writing surface, we recruited three groups with varying levels of handwriting automaticity: 25 preschoolers, 27 second graders, and 25 adults. We administered three tasks measuring graphomotor abilities, visuomotor abilities, and handwriting performance (only second graders and adults). We evaluated two aspects of handwriting performance: the handwriting quality with a visual score and the handwriting dynamics using online handwriting measures [e.g., writing duration, writing velocity, strokes and number of inversions in velocity (NIV)]. In particular, NIVs which describe the number of velocity peaks during handwriting are directly related to the level of handwriting automaticity. In general, we found differences between writing on paper compared to the tablet. These differences were partly task-dependent. The comparison between tablet and paper revealed a faster writing velocity for all groups and all tasks on the tablet which indicates that all participants—even the experienced writers—were influenced by the lower friction of the tablet surface. Our

  20. Does Land-Surface Heterogeneity Affect the Evolution of Hurricanes after their Landfall in the Eastern US - A Numerical Study with the Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Model (OLAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avissar, R.; Walko, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    simulate weather events such as hurricanes, which require a high- resolution grid in the region of the hurricane to properly simulate the eye of the storm but also need to interact with the large-scale dynamics, which they significantly affect and are affected by through complex interactions. Here, we investigate with OLAM the impact of land-surface heterogeneity on the evolution of hurricanes after their landfall in the eastern US. We use Hurricane Frances as a case study.

  1. Laser flare photometry: a noninvasive, objective, and quantitative method to measure intraocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Herbort, Carl P

    2010-10-01

    Aqueous flare and cells are the two inflammatory parameters of anterior chamber inflammation resulting from disruption of the blood-ocular barriers. When examined with the slit lamp, measurement of intraocular inflammation remains subjective with considerable intra- and interobserver variations. Laser flare cell photometry is an objective quantitative method that enables accurate measurement of these parameters with very high reproducibility. Laser flare photometry allows detection of subclinical alterations in the blood-ocular barriers, identifying subtle pathological changes that could not have been recorded otherwise. With the use of this method, it has been possible to compare the effect of different surgical techniques, surgical adjuncts, and anti-inflammatory medications on intraocular inflammation. Clinical studies of uveitis patients have shown that flare measurements by laser flare photometry allowed precise monitoring of well-defined uveitic entities and prediction of disease relapse. Relationships of laser flare photometry values with complications of uveitis and visual loss further indicate that flare measurement by laser flare photometry should be included in the routine follow-up of patients with uveitis.

  2. Absolute parameters for AI Phoenicis using WASP photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby-Kent, J. A.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Serenelli, A. M.; Turner, O. D.; Evans, D. F.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; West, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. AI Phe is a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary, in which a K-type sub-giant star totally eclipses its main-sequence companion every 24.6 days. This configuration makes AI Phe ideal for testing stellar evolutionary models. Difficulties in obtaining a complete lightcurve mean the precision of existing radii measurements could be improved. Aims: Our aim is to improve the precision of the radius measurements for the stars in AI Phe using high-precision photometry from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP), and use these improved radius measurements together with estimates of the masses, temperatures and composition of the stars to place constraints on the mixing length, helium abundance and age of the system. Methods: A best-fit ebop model is used to obtain lightcurve parameters, with their standard errors calculated using a prayer-bead algorithm. These were combined with previously published spectroscopic orbit results, to obtain masses and radii. A Bayesian method is used to estimate the age of the system for model grids with different mixing lengths and helium abundances. Results: The radii are found to be R1 = 1.835 ± 0.014 R⊙, R2 = 2.912 ± 0.014 R⊙ and the masses M1 = 1.1973 ± 0.0037 M⊙, M2 = 1.2473 ± 0.0039 M⊙. From the best-fit stellar models we infer a mixing length of 1.78, a helium abundance of YAI = 0.26 +0.02-0.01 and an age of 4.39 ± 0.32 Gyr. Times of primary minimum show the period of AI Phe is not constant. Currently, there are insufficient data to determine the cause of this variation. Conclusions: Improved precision in the masses and radii have improved the age estimate, and allowed the mixing length and helium abundance to be constrained. The eccentricity is now the largest source of uncertainty in calculating the masses. Further work is needed to characterise the orbit of AI Phe. Obtaining more binaries with parameters measured to a similar level of precision would allow us to test for relationships between helium

  3. Near-Infrared Absolute Photometry of the Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, T. W.; Baines, K. H.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Golisch, W.

    1996-09-01

    We report the first absolutely-calibrated photometry of the Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Titania, in canonical near-infrared filters. These satellites were observed in July, August, and September of 1995, with the NSFCAM instrument at the NASA/IRTF. Results are reported for J, H, and K filters near 1.26, 1.62, and 2.21 mu m, and two special ~ 0.15-mu m-wide filters placed at 1.73 and 2.27 mu m. We measure an opposition surge for Miranda in the near-infrared of at least 0.48 mag/deg between phase angles of 1.0deg and 0.6deg , compared to a much shallower 0.015 +/- 0.006 mag/deg surge reported by Buratti et al. (Icarus 84, 203-214, 1990) for the visible. Miranda, which is brighter than Titania throughout the visible (Karkoschka et al., Icarus submitted), becomes the darker of the two satellites in the near- infrared, being some 20.5% dimmer than Titania in H, 8.8% dimmer in 1.73 mu m, and 9.1% dimmer in K. All three satellites are brightest at 1.73 mu m, with Ariel being fully 1/3 brighter than Miranda or Titania, whereas the three satellites are evenly spaced in albedo at 0.7 mu m, in the visible (Ariel being 15% brighter than Miranda, which is in turn 15% brighter than Titania). Specifically, Ariel reaches a peak full disk albedo of 0.4161 +/- 0.0125 for 1.0deg phase at 1.73 mu m. By comparison, the peak albedos of Miranda and Titania are only 0.2730 +/- 0.0082 and 0.2969 +/- 0.0089, respectively, at this wavelength (though these latter observations were at 2.4deg phase). Continuing the trend seen in the visible, Ariel is the brightest of the Uranian satellites throughout the near-infrared. Finally, all three satellites show a distinct increase in full-disk albedo between H and 1.73 mu m filters, on the order of 20%, which is the expected signature of water ice, in agreement with spectra taken by Brown and Cruikshank (Icarus 55, 83-92, 1983).

  4. Near-nucleus photometry of comets using archived NEAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Michael D.; Bambery, Raymond J.; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Kollipara, Priya

    2007-06-01

    Though optimized to discover and track fast moving Near-Earth Objects (NEOs), the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) survey dataset can be mined to obtain information on the comet population observed serendipitously during the asteroid survey. We have completed analysis of over 400 CCD images of comets obtained during the autonomous operations of two 1.2-m telescopes: the first on the summit of Haleakala on the Hawaiian island of Maui and the second on Palomar Mountain in southern California. Photometric calibrations of each frame were derived using background catalog stars and the near-nucleus comet photometry measured. We measured dust production and normalized magnitudes for the coma and nucleus in order to explore cometary activity and comet size-frequency distributions. Our data over an approximately two-year time frame (2001 August-2003 February) include 52 comets: 12 periodic, 19 numbered, and 21 non-periodic, obtained over a wide range of viewing geometries and helio/geocentric distances. Nuclear magnitudes were estimated for a subset of comets observed. We found that for low-activity comets ( Afρ<100 cm) our model gave reasonable estimates for nuclear size and magnitude. The slope of the cumulative luminosity function of our sample of low-activity comets was 0.33 ± 0.04, consistent with the slope we measured for the Jupiter-family cometary nuclei collected by Fernández et al. [Fernández, J.A., Tancredi, G., Rickman, H., Licandro, J., 1999. Astron. Astrophys. 392, 327-340] of 0.38 ± 0.02. Our slopes of the cumulative size distribution α=1.50±0.08 agree well with the slopes measured by Whitman et al. [Whitman, K., Morbidelli, A., Jedicke, R., 2006. Icarus 183, 101-114], Meech et al. [Meech, K.J., Hainaut, O.R., Marsden, B.G., 2004. Icarus 170, 463-491], Lowry et al. [Lowry, S.C., Fitzsimmons, A., Collander-Brown, S., 2003. Astron. Astrophys. 397, 329-343], and Weissman and Lowry [Weissman, P.R., Lowry, S.C., 2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34. Abstract 34].

  5. Results of CCD Transit Photometry Testing for the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Witteborn, F.; Dunham, E.; Jenkins, J.; Borucki, W.; Webster, L.

    1999-12-01

    Transit signals produced by Earth-size planets in orbit around solar-like stars are of the order of 8e-5 and have durations from 4 to 16 hours for planets in or near the habitable zone. A mission to search for habitable planets has been proposed (Koch, et al., 1998). At the heart of the mission is an array of CCDs used to continuously measure the relative brightness variations of 100,000 dwarf stars for transits. A testbed facility has been constructed to determine the effects of various induced noise sources on the capability of a CCD photometer to maintain an instrument relative precision of better than 1e-5. The photometry facility includes: a simulated star field with an approximate solar spectrum, fast optics to simulate the space borne telescope, a thinned back-illuminated CCD similar to those to be used on the spacecraft operating at 1 Mpix/sec read rate, and shutterless operation. The test facility is thermally and mechanically isolated. Each source of noise is introduced in a controlled fashion and evaluated. Pointing noise or changing thermal conditions in the spacecraft can cause star-image motion at the milli-pixel level. These motions are imposed by piezo-electric devices that move the photometer relative to the star field. Transit signals as small as Earth-size transits of solar-like stars are generated and measured. This is accomplished by electrical self-heating and expansion of fine wires placed across many of the star apertures. The small decrease in stellar brightness is used to demonstrate that Earth-size planets can be detected under realistic noise conditions and at the shot-noise-limited level. The effects of imposing several noise sources are shown and the resulting detectability of planets is presented. This work is supported in part by the NASA Discovery program and NASA Ames. Koch, D., Borucki, W., Webster, L., Dunham, E., Jenkins, J., Marriott, J. and Reitsema, H. SPIE Conf. on Space Telescopes and Instruments V, 3356, 599-607 (1998)

  6. High-precision ground-based photometry of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2013-04-01

    High-precision photometry of transiting exoplanet systems has contributed significantly to our understanding of the properties of their atmospheres. The best targets are the bright exoplanet systems, for which the high number of photons allow very high signal-to-noise ratios. Most of the current instruments are not optimised for these high-precision measurements, either they have a large read-out overhead to reduce the readnoise and/or their field-of-view is limited, preventing simultaneous observations of both the target and a reference star. Recently we have proposed a new wide-field imager for the Observatoir de Mont-Megantic optimised for these bright systems (PI: Jayawardhana). The instruments has a dual beam design and a field-of-view of 17' by 17'. The cameras have a read-out time of 2 seconds, significantly reducing read-out overheads. Over the past years we have obtained significant experience with how to reach the high precision required for the characterisation of exoplanet atmospheres. Based on our experience we provide the following advice: Get the best calibrations possible. In the case of bad weather, characterise the instrument (e.g. non-linearity, dome flats, bias level), this is vital for better understanding of the science data. Observe the target for as long as possible, the out-of-transit baseline is as important as the transit/eclipse itself. A short baseline can lead to improperly corrected systematic and mis-estimation of the red-noise. Keep everything (e.g. position on detector, exposure time) as stable as possible. Take care that the defocus is not too strong. For a large defocus, the contribution of the total flux from the sky-background in the aperture could well exceed that of the target, resulting in very strict requirements on the precision at which the background is measured.

  7. Flight Investigation on a Fighter-type Airplane of Factors which Affect the Loads and Load Distributions on the Vertical Tail Surfaces During Rudder Kicks and Fishtails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boshar, John

    1947-01-01

    Results are presented of a flight investigation conducted on a fighter-type airplane to determine the factors which affect the loads and load distributions on the vertical tail surfaces in maneuvers. An analysis is made of the data obtained in steady flight, rudder kicks, and fishtail maneuvers. For the rudder kicks, the significant loads were the "deflection load" resulting from an abrupt control deflection and the "dynamic load" consisting of a load corresponding to the new static equilibrium condition for the rudder deflected plus a load due to a transient overshoot. The minimum time to reach the maximum control deflection attainable by the pilot in any flight condition was found to be a constant. In the fishtail maneuvers, it was found that the pilot tends to deflect the rudder in phase with the natural frequency of the airplane. The maximum loads measured in fishtails were of the same order of magnitude as those from a rudder kick in which the rudder is returned to zero at the time of maximum sideslip.

  8. CCD photometry of distant comets. III. Ensemble properties of Jupiter-family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, S. C.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Collander-Brown, S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the results of a ground-based observational ``snapshot'' study of Jupiter-family comets in the heliocentric range 2.29 AU <= Rh <= 5.72 AU. Results are presented based on observations from the 1m JKT on the island of La Palma. A total of 25 comets were targeted with 15 being positively detected. Broad-band VRI photometry was performed to determine dimensions, colour indices, and dust production rates in terms of the ``Afrho '' formalism. The results for selected comets are compared with previous investigations. Ensemble properties of the Jupiter-family population have been investigated by combining the results presented here with those of Lowry et al. (\\cite{Lowry1999}), and Lowry & Fitzsimmons (\\cite{Lowry2001}). We find that the cumulative size distribution of the Jupiter-family comets can be described by a power law of the form; Sigma (> r)~ r-1.6 +/- 0.1. This size distribution is considerably shallower than that found for the observed Edgeworth-Kuiper belt objects, which may reflect either an intrinsic difference at small km-sizes in the belt, or the various processes affecting the nuclei of comets as their orbits evolve from the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt to the inner Solar system. Also, there would appear to be no correlation between nuclear absolute magnitude and perihelion distance. Finally, for the sample of active comets, there is a distinct correlation between absolute R band magnitude and perihelion distance, which can be explained by either a discovery bias towards brighter comets or in terms of ``rubble'' mantle formation.

  9. Photoelectric photometry of Comet P/Halley from Mauna Kea Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscitelli, J. R.; Tholen, D. J.; Hammel, H. B.; Lark, N.

    1986-12-01

    A systematic program of photoelectric photometry of comet Halley from Mauna Kea Observatory has yielded approximately 60 nights of usable photometry. The uncertainty in the photometry in all filters except OH is generally better than 2%. Throughout the apparition, the comet was brightest in the four filters that isolated the neutral gas emission features of OH, CN, C2, and C3. The fluxes in the two filters that isolated the ionic emission features of CO+ and H2O+ were comparable to the continuum when centered upon the optocenter, thereby making the ionic emission weak to undetectable above the continuum. The continuum colors do not appear to be a function of phase angle; therefore, the colors are probably indicative of dust grain composition and are not dominated by scattering geometry effects.

  10. Optical BVRI photometry of common proper motion F/G/K+M wide separation binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Williams, Patrick; Chavez, Joy; Lépine, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    We present optical (BVRI) photometric measurements of a sample of 76 common proper motion wide separation main-sequence binary pairs. The pairs are composed of a F-, G-, or K-type primary star and an M-type secondary. The sample is selected from the revised NLTT catalog and the LSPM catalog. The photometry is generally precise to 0.03 mag in all bands. We separate our sample into two groups, dwarf candidates and subdwarf candidates, using the reduced proper motion diagram constructed with our improved photometry. The M subdwarf candidates in general have larger V – R colors than the M dwarf candidates at a given V – I color. This is consistent with an average metallicity difference between the two groups, as predicted by the PHOENIX/BT-Settl models. The improved photometry will be used as input into a technique to determine the metallicities of the M-type stars.

  11. Photoelectric photometry of Comet P/Halley from Mauna Kea Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piscitelli, J. R.; Tholen, D. J.; Hammel, H. B.; Lark, N.

    1986-01-01

    A program of photoelectric photometry of comet Halley yielded 60 nights of usable photometry. The uncertainty in the photometry in all filters except OH is better than 2%. Throughout the apparition, the comet is brightest in the filters that isolated the neutral gas emission features of OH, CN, C2, and C3. The fluxes in the filters that isolated the ionic emission features of CO(+) and H2O(+) are comparable to the continuum when centered upon the optocenter, thereby making the ionic emission weak to undetectable above the continuum. The continuum colors do not appear to be a function of phase angle; therefore, the colors are probably indicative of dust grain composition and are not dominated by scattering geometry effects.

  12. Near-infrared photometry of WISE J085510.74-071442.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Lodieu, N.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Martín, E. L.; Ivanov, V. D.; Bayo, A.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Mužić, K.; Minniti, D.; Beamín, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim at obtaining near-infrared photometry and deriving the mass, age, temperature, and surface gravity of WISE J085510.74-071442.5 (J0855-0714), which is the coolest object beyond the solar system currently known. Methods: We used publicly available data from the archives of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to determine the emission of this source at 1.153 μm (F110W) and 1.575 μm (CH4-off). J0855-0714 was detected at both wavelengths with a signal-to-noise ratio of ≈10 (F110W) and ≈4 (CH4-off) at the peak of the corresponding point-spread-functions. Results: This is the first detection of J0855-0714 in the H-band wavelengths. We measured 26.31 ± 0.10 and 23.22 ± 0.35 mag in F110W and CH4-off (Vega system). J0855-0714 remains unresolved in the HST images that have a spatial resolution of 0.22''. Companions at separations of 0.5 AU (similar mass and brightness) and at ~1 AU (≈1 mag fainter in the F110W filter) are discarded. By combining the new data with published photometry, including non-detections, we build the spectral energy distribution of J0855-0714 from 0.89 through 22.09 μm, and contrast it against current solar-metallicity models of planetary atmospheres. We determine that the best spectral fit yields a temperature of 225-250 K, a bolometric luminosity of log L/L⊙ = -8.57, and a high surface gravity of log g = 5.0 (cm s-2), which suggests an old age although a gravity this high is not fully compatible with evolutionary models. After comparing our data with the cooling theory for brown dwarfs and planets, we infer a mass in the interval 2-10 MJup for ages of 1-12 Gyr and high atmospheric gravities of log g ⪆ 3.5 (cm s-2). If it had the age of the Sun, J0855-0714 would be a ≈5-MJup free-floating planetary-mass object. Conclusions: J0855-0714 meets the mass values previously determined for free-floating planetary-mass objects discovered in star-forming regions and young stellar clusters. Based on

  13. STAR CLUSTERS IN M33: UPDATED UBVRI PHOTOMETRY, AGES, METALLICITIES, AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhou; De Grijs, Richard E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The photometric characterization of M33 star clusters is far from complete. In this paper, we present homogeneous UBVRI photometry of 708 star clusters and cluster candidates in M33 based on archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the galaxy's major axis. Our photometry includes 387, 563, 616, 580, and 478 objects in the UBVRI bands, respectively, of which 276, 405, 430, 457, and 363 do not have previously published UBVRI photometry. Our photometry is consistent with previous measurements (where available) in all filters. We adopted Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry for complementary purposes, as well as Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHK photometry where available. We fitted the spectral-energy distributions of 671 star clusters and candidates to derive their ages, metallicities, and masses based on the updated PARSEC simple stellar populations synthesis models. The results of our χ{sup 2} minimization routines show that only 205 of the 671 clusters (31%) are older than 2 Gyr, which represents a much smaller fraction of the cluster population than that in M31 (56%), suggesting that M33 is dominated by young star clusters (<1 Gyr). We investigate the mass distributions of the star clusters—both open and globular clusters—in M33, M31, the Milky Way, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Their mean values are log (M {sub cl}/M {sub ☉}) = 4.25, 5.43, 2.72, and 4.18, respectively. The fraction of open to globular clusters is highest in the Milky Way and lowest in M31. Our comparisons of the cluster ages, masses, and metallicities show that our results are basically in agreement with previous studies (where objects in common are available); differences can be traced back to differences in the models adopted, the fitting methods used, and stochastic sampling effects.

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: accurate panchromatic photometry from optical priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Clarke, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high-resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalization, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric data set from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the data sets. None the less, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR data set. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  15. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey: Herschel Image Atlas and Aperture Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jason K.; Sanders, D. B.; Larson, K. L.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Howell, J. H.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Xu, K. C.; Paladini, R.; Schulz, B.; Shupe, D.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Billot, N.; Chan, B. H. P.; Evans, A. S.; Fadda, D.; Frayer, D. T.; Haan, S.; Ishida, C. M.; Iwasawa, K.; Kim, D.-C.; Lord, S.; Murphy, E.; Petric, A.; Privon, G. C.; Surace, J. A.; Treister, E.

    2017-04-01

    Far-infrared images and photometry are presented for 201 Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies [LIRGs: log ({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )=11.00{--}11.99, ULIRGs: log ({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )=12.00{--}12.99], in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), based on observations with the Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instruments. The image atlas displays each GOALS target in the three PACS bands (70, 100, and 160 μm) and the three SPIRE bands (250, 350, and 500 μm), optimized to reveal structures at both high and low surface brightness levels, with images scaled to simplify comparison of structures in the same physical areas of ∼100 × 100 kpc2. Flux densities of companion galaxies in merging systems are provided where possible, depending on their angular separation and the spatial resolution in each passband, along with integrated system fluxes (sum of components). This data set constitutes the imaging and photometric component of the GOALS Herschel OT1 observing program, and is complementary to atlases presented for the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory. Collectively, these data will enable a wide range of detailed studies of active galactic nucleus and starburst activity within the most luminous infrared galaxies in the local universe. Based on Herschel Space Observatory observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by the European-led Principal Investigator consortia, and important participation from NASA.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and photometry of VV Puppis during a high accretion state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Szkody, Paula; Sion, Edward M.; Long, Knox S.

    1995-01-01

    We determine the physical properties of the accretion region of the AM Her-type binary VV Puppis using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) medium-resolution spectroscopy and photometry obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) observatory. The EUV continuum from VV Pup was detected in the wavelength range from 75 to 135 A and was simultaneously recorded with the Deep Survey/Spectrometer (DS/S) imaging telescope, allowing for the extraction of an accurate light curve. VV Pup appeared to have entered a high-accretion state just prior to the pointed EUVE observations. We use the EUV light curve to infer the diameter of the accretion region (d = 220 km) assuming a hemispherical geometry and a radius of 9000 km for the white dwarf. We perform a model atmosphere analysis and, based on the light curve properties and assuming a distance of 145 pc, we derive an effective temperature of the accretion region in the range 270,000 is less than T(sub eff) is less than 360,000 K and a neutral hydrogen column density in the local interstellar medium of n(sub H) = 1.9 - 3.7 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm. The total EUV/soft X-ray energy radiated by the accretion region is approximately 3.5 x 10(exp 32) ergs/s. Our results provide a first verification of past suggestions that deep heating of the white dwarf surface produces the soft X-ray flux from the polars. We present a possible detection of O VI absortion features, and we suggest that extensive EUVE observations targeting high-accretion events may result in oxygen and heavier element abundance determination in the accretion region.

  17. TIME-SERIES BVI PHOTOMETRY FOR THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6981 {sup ,} {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Amigo, P.; Catelan, M.; Zoccali, M.; Stetson, P. B.; Smith, H. A. E-mail: mzoccali@astro.puc.cl E-mail: Peter.Stetson@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2013-11-01

    We present new BVI photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6981, based mostly on ground-based CCD archival images. We present a new color-magnitude diagram (CMD) that reaches almost four magnitudes below the turn-off level. We performed new derivations of metallicity and morphological parameters of the evolved sequences, in good agreement with the results of previous authors, and obtain a value of [Fe/H] ≅ –1.50 in the new UVES scale. We also identify the cluster's blue straggler population. Comparing the radial distribution of these stars with the red giant branch population, we find that the blue stragglers are more centrally concentrated, as found in previous studies of blue stragglers in globular clusters. Taking advantage of the large field of view covered by our study, we analyzed the surface density profile of the cluster, and find extratidal main sequence stars out to r ≈ 14.'1, or about twice the tidal radius. We speculate that the presence of these stars may be due to tidal disruption in the course of NGC 6981's orbit, in which case tidal tails associated with the cluster may exist. We also take a fresh look at the variable stars in the cluster, recovering all previously known variables, including three SX Phoenicis stars. We also add three previously unknown RR Lyrae (one c-type and two ab-type) to the total census. Finally, comparing our CMD with unpublished data for M3 (NGC 5272), a cluster with a similar metallicity and horizontal branch morphology, we found that both objects are essentially coeval.

  18. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Survey of Clusters in Nearby Galaxies. I. Detection and Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed photometric techniques that can be applied to images with highly variable backgrounds, as well as to slightly extended objects (object size comparable to or smaller than point-spread function [PSF] size). We have shown that ordinary stellar PSF-fitting photometry can be applied to slightly extended objects provided that one applies a systematic correction to the photometry that is a function primarily of the observed sharpness. Applying these techniques to the Cepheid target NGC 3627, we find that we are successfully able to photometer the stars and clusters, as well as discriminate the cluster population with a negligible number of false detections.

  19. Stellar Astrophysics Using Ultra-High Precision CCD Time Series Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S.; Everett, M.; Huber, M.; Ciardi, D.; van Belle, G.

    2001-05-01

    Using time-series CCD photometry and a wide-field imager, we have extended the techniques of differential photometry to provide robust photometric precisions for each star over the entire field of view. Reaching photometric precisions of 2 milli-magnitudes, we produced high cadence light curves for over 12,000 stars at mid- and high galactic latitude. The fraction of stars seen to be variable is higher than the canonical wisdom, being 10-14 will present the details of our techniques, sample light curves, methods to access the data, and a summary of astrophysical uses of such high precision data.

  20. A 3D dust map from Pan-STARRS 1 photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Gregory M.

    We have constructed a three-dimensional map of dust in the Milky Way, tracing reddening on ˜ 7' scales out to a distance of several kiloparsecs. We trace reddening using stars embedded in the dust, by simultaneously inferring stellar distance, stellar type, and the reddening along the line of sight. We use 5-band grizy Pan-STARRS 1 photometry of 800 million stars, augmented by 3-band 2MASS JHKs photometry when available. The full map is available at http://argonaut.skymaps.info. An online version of this talk is available at http://http://greg.ory.gr/present/ewass2015.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBV(RI)c photometry of Stock 16 (Vazquez+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, R. A.; Baume, G. L.; Feinstein, C.; Nunez, J. A.; Vergne, M. M.

    2005-02-01

    CCD UBV(RI)c imaging photometry was carried out in the field of Stock 16 along two observational runs at the University of Toronto Southern Observatory, Las Campanas, Chile, using the Hellen Sawyer Hogg 60-cm telescope: on the nights of 1994 April 13, 14 and 16, we obtained UBVRI photometry for four frames with the nitrogen-cooled detector PM METHACROME UV coated (0.45"/pix) covering 4' on a side; three more frames were exposed on the nights of 1996 February 25 and 26 in the UBV(I)c bands (this time, the detector was glycol-refrigerated). (1 data file).

  2. BV RI CCD photometry of 361,281 objects in the field of M 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.; Jain, A.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1992-01-01

    Deep BV RI CCD photometry was performed on a 1 sq deg region of M 31. A catalog of photometry and astrometry of a total of 361,281 stars is presented, with typical completion limits of BV RI = (22.3, 22.2, 22.2, 20.9). Photometric accuracy is about 2 percent at V = 19. This catalog allows detailed studies of stellar populations and reddening. The data are currently being used to assist in finding the optical counterparts of Einstein and ROSAT X-ray sources.

  3. Project MINERVA's Follow-up on Wide-Field, Small Telescope Photometry to Identify Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, Audrey; Henderson, Morgan; Johnson, Samson; Sergi, Anthony; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; McCrady, Nate

    2017-01-01

    MINERVA is an array of four 0.7-m telescopes equipped for high precision photometry and spectroscopy dedicated to exoplanet observations. During the first 18 months of science operations, MINERVA engaged in a program of photometric follow-up of potential transiting exoplanet targets identified by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). Robotically-obtained observations are passed through our data reduction pipeline and we extract light curves via differential photometry. We seek transit signals via a Markov chain Monte Carlo fit using BATMAN. We discuss results for over 100 target stars analyzed to date.

  4. Low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry in cluster 2158+0351 at z=0.45 (Molinari+ 1990)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Chincarini, G.

    1993-03-01

    Results of detailed 3-colour photometry of the distant cluster 2158+0351 (z=0.445) are presented. The photometry was produced using the INVENTORY package. The Gunn g, r, i magnitudes were measureed, down to r = 23.5, with a typical error of 0.1mag. (1 data file).

  6. Is increasing industrialization affecting remote ecosystem health in the South Americas? Insights from ocean surface water measurements of As, Sb and Pb from a GEOTRACES transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Salaun, Pascal; Van den Berg, Stan; Bi, Zaoshun

    2014-05-01

    Continued industrial development of the South Americas with increasing atmospheric emission of toxic trace metals has lead to a growing concern about possible effects on pristine ecosystem health. Concentration measurements of trace metals in ocean surface waters in the North Atlantic have successfully revealed the global extent of atmospheric pollution in the Northern Hemisphere during economical growth in the USA and Europe, suggesting a similar approach can be applied to the Southern Hemisphere. To this end, we determined concentrations of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) using voltammetry in surface water samples of the South Atlantic Ocean collected during the third leg of the GEOTRACES West Atlantic Cruise. These elements are volatile and therefore most likely suitable tracer elements of industrial emissions from South America. The samples were not filtered and the solutions were acidified and UV digested. Total concentrations of Pb were detected. Detected As levels correspond to the sum of inorganic species (AsIII + AsV) plus the mono methyl arsenic acid (MMA) while the dimethyl arsenic acid (DMA) is not detected in such conditions. For Sb, detected levels correspond at least to the sum of inorganic fractions (SbIII + SbV). The measured concentrations for Pb varied from 6 to 23 pM. Concentrations were highest at -35° latitude and lowest at -40° and -50° latitude. We found a decreasing trend from about -35° latitude southwards. The average concentrations of As was 20 nM and of Sb 1.2 nM. Arsenic showed a more significant north to south trend than Sb. Arsenic concentration was highest at -23 ° latitude (21 nM) and the lowest at -43 ° latitude (17.7 nM). Antimony concentration was highest at -31 ° latitude (1.5 nM) and lowest at -35 ° latitude (1.0 nM). Our preliminary data suggests that the major industrial centres in Brazil (i.e., Sao Paolo, Rio de Janeiro) and Argentina (i.e., Buenos Aires) affect atmospheric metal fluxes to remote

  7. Characterizing extrasolar planets with multi-color photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Knicole Dawn

    Over the past twenty years, nearly 800 planets have been discovered orbiting stars other than the Sun. The discovery of these extrasolar planets (or simply, exoplanets) has led to a renewed interest in planet formation and evolution, as many exoplanets have properties that are nothing like those of the planets found in the Solar System. A subset of exoplanets are known to transit, or pass in front of, their host star, which provides a unique opportunity to measure how their radius changes with wavelength. Such measurements can be used to study the atmospheres of exoplanets, since changes in the measured radius can indicate absorption of stellar photons by the exoplanet atmosphere. Finding a significant change in the radius with wavelength can also indicate that a planet candidate is not a planet at all, but is instead an eclipsing binary star composed of two stars with different temperatures and therefore colors. With over 200 confirmed transiting exoplanets and NASA's Kepler mission's recent discovery of over 2000 transiting exoplanet candidates, detailed investigations into the properties of exoplanetary atmospheres and false positive rates for planet search surveys can now be conducted. To aid these investigations, I developed a novel technique of using the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) installed on the 10.4 meter Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) to acquire near-simultaneous, multi-color, narrow-band photometry of exoplanet transits. I first used this technique to observe the transits of the hot-Jupiters TrES-2b and TrES-3b, from which I reached some of the best photometric precisions (0.343-0.470 mmag) achieved to date using a ground-based telescope. I subsequently used this technique to measure a ˜ 4.2% change in the apparent planetary radius of the giant exoplanet HD 80606b during transit between wavelengths that probe potassium. I hypothesize that the excess absorption is due to potassium in a high-speed wind

  8. How surface fire in Siberian Scots pine forests affects soil organic carbon in the forest floor: Stocks, molecular structure, and conversion to black carbon (charcoal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, Claudia I.; Preston, Caroline M.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2003-03-01

    In boreal forests, fire is a frequent disturbance and converts soil organic carbon (OC) to more degradation-resistant aromatic carbon, i.e., black carbon (BC) which might act as a long-term atmospheric-carbon sink. Little is known on the effects of fires on boreal soil OC stocks and molecular composition. We studied how a surface fire affected the composition of the forest floor of Siberian Scots pine forests by comparing the bulk elemental composition, molecular structure (13C-MAS NMR), and the aromatic carbon fraction (BC and potentially interfering constituents like tannins) of unburned and burned forest floor. Fire reduced the mass of the forest floor by 60%, stocks of inorganic elements (Si, Al, Fe, K, Ca, Na, Mg, Mn) by 30-50%, and of OC, nitrogen, and sulfur by 40-50%. In contrast to typical findings from temperate forests, unburned OC consisted mainly of (di-)O-alkyl (polysaccharides) and few aromatic structures, probably due to dominant input of lichen biomass. Fire converted OC into alkyl and aromatic structures, the latter consisting of heterocyclic macromolecules and small clusters of condensed carbon. The small cluster size explained the small BC concentrations determined using a degradative molecular marker method. Fire increased BC stocks (16 g kg-1 OC) by 40% which translates into a net-conversion rate of 0.7% (0.35% of net primary production) unburned OC to BC. Here, however, BC was not a major fraction of soil OC pool in unburned or burned forest floor, either due to rapid in situ degradation or relocation.

  9. Comparative evaluation of microshear bond strength of the caries-affected dentinal surface treated with conventional method and chemomechanical method (papain)

    PubMed Central

    Chittem, Jyothi; Sajjan, Girija S.; Varma, Kanumuri Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a growing interest in chemomechanical excavation (papain) in permanent molar teeth. There are several studies dealing with primary molar teeth. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of conventional method and Carie-care (chemomechanical method) on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) and the type of failure of an adhesive system to caries-affected dentin of permanent molar teeth. Materials and Methods: Twenty permanent molar teeth with carious lesions extending into the dentin were selected. Through the center of the carious lesion, teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and divided into two groups based on the method of caries excavation (conventional and chemomechanical method). The time required for the completion of excavation procedure was noted. Samples were again divided into two subgroups in each according to the method of restoration (Ketac N100 and Filtek Z350 composite). The bonded interface was subjected to μSBS testing in a universal testing machine. Fractured surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope, and representative specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope for the type of failure. Statistical Analysis: It was achieved with unpaired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis H-test at 5% level of significance. Results: The μSBS values of Carie-care groups were similar to that of the conventional method. The μSBSs of resin composite were significantly (P < 0.001) more than that of resin glass ionomer bonded irrespective of the method of caries excavation. Conclusion: A papain-based chemomechanical agent can be used safely as a method for caries removal when employing conventional adhesive systems. PMID:26430299

  10. Results of near-Earth-asteroid photometry in the frame of the ASPIN programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugly, Y.; Molotov, I.; Inasaridze, R.; Kvaratskhelia, O.; Aivazyan, V.; Rumyantsev, V.; Belskaya, I.; Golubaev, A.; Sergeev, A.; Shevchenko, V.; Slyusarev, I.; Burkhonov, O.; Ehgamberdiev, S.; Elenin, L.; Voropaev, V.; Koupianov, V.; Gaftonyuk, N.; Baransky, A.; Irsmambetova, T.; Litvinenko, E.; Aliev, A.; Namkhai, T.

    2014-07-01

    Regular photometric observations aimed for obtaining physical properties of near-Earth asteroids (NEA) are carried out within the Asteroid Search and Photometry Initiative (ASPIN) of the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON). At present, ISON project joins 35 observation facilities in 15 countries with 80 telescopes of different class. Photometric observations of NEAs are carried out at the telescopes with apertures from 20 cm up to 2.6 m equipped with CCD cameras. The obtained lightcurves in the Johnson-Cousins photometric system or in exceptional cases in the integral light (unfiltered photometry) have typical photometric accuracy of 0.01-0.03 mag. The main targets of these observations are near-Earth asteroids as hazardous objects pose a threat for the Earth civilization. The main purpose of the observations is to study characteristics of asteroids such as rotation period, size, and shape of the body, and surface composition. The observations are aimed toward searching binary asteroids, supporting the asteroid radar observations and investigation of the YORP effect. In 2013, we have observed 40 near-Earth asteroids in more than 200 nights. The rotation periods have been determined for 14 NEAs for the first time and, for 6 NEAs, rotation periods were defined more precisely. New rotation periods have been obtained for objects from Aten group: (137805) 1999 YK_5, (329437) 2002 OA_{22}, (367943) Duende (2012 DA_{14}); Apollo: (17188) 1999 WC_2, (137126) 1999 CF_9, (163249) 2002 GT, (251346) 2007 SJ, 2013 TV_{135}; Amor: (9950) ESA, (24445) 2000 PM_8, (137199) 1999 KX_4, (285263) 1998 QE_2, (361071) 2006 AO_4, 2010 XZ_{67}, and refined for (1943) Anteros, (3361) Orpheus, (3752) Camillo, (7888) 1993 UC, (53435) 1999 VM_{40}, (68216) 2001 CV_{26}. NEAs (7888) 1993 UC and (68216) 2001 CV_{26} were found to show signs of a binary nature. To detect possible binary asteroids, we observe the object during several consecutive nights and at several observatories

  11. Interpretation of whole-disk photometry of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K. D.; Rhoads, J. W.; Hanover, G. A.; Lumme, K.; Bowell, E.

    1983-01-01

    Small scale surface features of the moons Deimos and Phobos were studied using star tracker observations made by the Mariner 9 and Viking orbiters. The whole-disk brightness/solar phase angle phase curves were developed out to a phase angle of 125 deg. An analysis was undertaken according to Lumme-Bowell theory to obtain accurate phase integrals zero-phase geometric albedos, and Bond albedos. The microstructural and particulate surface properties of the two moons were found to be very similar, as were the whole-body densities and the microphysical makeup, thereby suggesting a common origin. However, the presence of streamers on Deimos and the relatively smooth surfaces of both moons indicates a long-term influence of Mars producing surface morphologies different from what would occur with asteroids.

  12. The Araucaria Project. A Distance Determination to the Local Group Spiral M33 from Near-infrared Photometry of Cepheid Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieren, Wolfgang; Górski, Marek; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Konorski, Piotr; Suchomska, Ksenia; Graczyk, Dariusz; Pilecki, Bogumil; Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Storm, Jesper; Karczmarek, Paulina; Gallenne, Alexandre; Calderón, Paula; Geisler, Doug

    2013-08-01

    Motivated by an amazing range of reported distances to the nearby Local Group spiral galaxy M33, we have obtained deep near-infrared photometry for 26 long-period Cepheids in this galaxy with the ESO Very Large Telescope. From the data, we constructed period-luminosity relations in the J and K bands which together with previous optical VI photometry for the Cepheids by Macri et al. were used to determine the true distance modulus of M33, and the mean reddening affecting the Cepheid sample with the multiwavelength fit method developed in the Araucaria Project. We find a true distance modulus of 24.62 for M33, with a total uncertainty of ±0.07 mag which is dominated by the uncertainty on the photometric zero points in our photometry. The reddening is determined as E(B - V) = 0.19 ± 0.02, in agreement with the value used by the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project of Freedman et al. but in some discrepancy with other recent determinations based on blue supergiant spectroscopy and an O-type eclipsing binary which yielded lower reddening values. Our derived M33 distance modulus is extremely insensitive to the adopted reddening law. We show that the possible effects of metallicity and crowding on our present distance determination are both at the 1%-2% level and therefore minor contributors to the total uncertainty of our distance result for M33. Based on observations obtained with the ESO VLT for program 382.D-0469(A).

  13. Thermal Emission Photometry of Deep Impact Flyby Target (163249) 2002 GT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Moskovitz, N. A.; Licandro, J.; Emery, J. P.; Reddy, V.; Vilas, F.; 2002 GT Observing Team

    2013-10-01

    Near-Earth asteroid (163249) 2002 GT is now the target of a Deep Impact spacecraft flyby in Jan. 2020 (see Pittichova et al., this volume, for details of the flyby and observing campaign). Thermal emission photometry of 2002 GT was obtained from NIRI on Gemini-North in the L' and M' filters, which are centered at 3.76 and 4.68 microns respectively. J- and K-band reflectance photometry was also acquired in support of the thermal observations. The full JKL'M' set was acquired on UT 2013-Jun-13 at a solar phase angle of 53 degrees. A further set of photometry in J, K, and L' only was carried out on 2013-Jun-19 at a phase angle of 65 degrees. High water vapor conditions at Mauna Kea during this period unfortunately prevented acquisition of a second set of M' measurements. In addition, N-band photometry of 2002 GT was conducted on 2013-Jun-10 from CanariCam at the 10-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias using a beta version of the moving object guiding system. Data were acquired in three filters between 8.7 and 12.5 microns, although the limitations of the guiding are complicating the analysis. (We note that N-band observing was not offered by either Gemini or IRTF during this apparition.) Data analysis is ongoing and results will be discussed. We appreciate the efforts of the Gemini and GTC staff in support of these observing programs.

  14. Photoelectric Photometry of Asteroids 184 Dejopeja, 498 Tokio and 690 Wratislavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.

    1995-04-01

    Photoelectric photometry of asteroids 184, 498 and 690 are herein presented. The observations were made during 1992 at Estación Astronómica "Dr.Carlos Ulrrico Cesco" of Félix Aguilar Observatory, San Juan, Argentina. For minor planet 184 a reliable rotation period has been obtained, while for 498 and 690 approximate estimates are given.

  15. CANDELS Multi-wavelength Catalogs: Source Identification and Photometry in the CANDELS COSMOS Survey Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, H.; Hemmati, S.; Mobasher, B.; Ferguson, H. C.; Cooray, A.; Barro, G.; Faber, S. M.; Dickinson, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Peth, M.; Salvato, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Darvish, B.; Donley, J.; Durbin, M.; Finkelstein, S.; Fontana, A.; Grogin, N. A.; Gruetzbauch, R.; Huang, K.; Khostovan, A. A.; Kocevski, D.; Kodra, D.; Lee, B.; Newman, J.; Pacifici, C.; Pforr, J.; Stefanon, M.; Wiklind, T.; Willner, S. P.; Wuyts, S.; Castellano, M.; Conselice, C.; Dolch, T.; Dunlop, J. S.; Galametz, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Lucas, R. A.; Yan, H.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the COSMOS field as part of the observations by the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. The catalog is based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of the COSMOS field (centered at R.A.: {10}{{h}}{00}{{m}}{28}{{s}}, Decl.: +02^\\circ 12\\prime {21}\\prime\\prime ). The final catalog has 38671 sources with photometric data in 42 bands from UV to the infrared (∼ 0.3{--}8 μ {{m}}). This includes broadband photometry from HST, CFHT, Subaru, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy, and Spitzer Space Telescope in the visible, near-infrared, and infrared bands along with intermediate- and narrowband photometry from Subaru and medium-band data from Mayall NEWFIRM. Source detection was conducted in the WFC3 F160W band (at 1.6 μm) and photometry is generated using the Template FITting algorithm. We further present a catalog of the physical properties of sources as identified in the HST F160W band and measured from the multi-band photometry by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions of sources against templates.

  16. AN UPDATED CATALOG OF M33 CLUSTERS AND CANDIDATES: UBVRI PHOTOMETRY AND SOME STATISTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2012-08-15

    We present UBVRI photometry for 392 star clusters and candidates in the field of M33, which are selected from the most recent star cluster catalog. In this catalog, the authors listed star clusters' parameters such as cluster positions, magnitudes, colors in the UBVRIJHK{sub s} filters, and so on. However, a large fraction of objects in this catalog do not have previously published photometry. Photometry is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. Positions (right ascension and declination) for some clusters are corrected here. Combined with previous literature, ours constitute a large sample of M33 star clusters. Based on this cluster sample, we present some statistical results: none of the youngest M33 clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} ; roughly half the star clusters are consistent with the 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} mass models; the continuous distribution of star clusters along the model line indicates that M33 star clusters have been formed continuously from the epoch of the first star cluster formation until recent times; and there are {approx}50 star clusters which are overlapped with the Galactic globular clusters on the color-color diagram, and these clusters are old globular cluster candidates in M33.

  17. Photoelectric Photometry of Faint M-Type Stars in the Direction of the South Galactic Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, P.

    1982-04-01

    Photoelectric V (Johnson-Morgan UBV system) and (V I) (Kron-Mayall PVI system) photometry is presented for 54 faint M-type stars from Pesch and Sanduleak's catalog of probable dwarf stars of type M3 and later in the direction of the south galactic pole. The observations were made in November 1978 with the 1.5-m CTIO reflector.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multiband surface photometry of 21 BCGs (Micheva+ 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheva, G.; Ostlin, G.; Zackrisson, E.; Bergvall, N.; Marquart, T.; Masegosa, J.; Marquez, I.; Cumming, R. J.; Durret, F.

    2013-07-01

    The data consist of optical and NIR broadband imaging (UBVRIHKs), obtained during the period 2003-2007 with ALFOSC (at the Nordic Optical Telescope, NOT, La Palma), MOSCA (NOT), and EMMI (at the European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, ESO NTT, La Silla) in the optical, and with NOTCAM (NOT) and SOFI (ESO NTT) in the NIR. Very deep observations are of a volume-limited sample of 21 Blue Compact Galaxies (Emission line galaxies). The images are reduced (bias correction, flatfielding, normalized, aligned, skysubtracted). Calibration to the Vega photometric system in the optical based on Landolt standard stars; in the NIR on 2MASS field stars found in each frame. Total exposure time (seconds) in each filter and galaxy is included in each FITS header as TOTALTIM. Cosmic rays have not been removed. (4 data files).

  19. Spitzer Photometry of WISE-Selected Brown Dwarf and Hyper-Lumninous Infrared Galaxy Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Bridge, Carrie R.; Cohen, Martin; Cutri, Roc M.; Donoso, Emilio; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lonsdale, Carol; Mace, Gregory; Mainzer, A.; Marsh, Ken; Padgett, Deborah; Petty, Sara; Ressler, Michael E.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stanford, Spencer A.; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wright, Edward L.; Wu, Jingwen

    2012-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micrometer photometry and positions for a sample of 1510 brown dwarf candidates identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. Of these, 166 have been spectroscopically classified as objects with spectral types M(1), L(7), T(146), and Y(12). Sixteen other objects are non-(sub)stellar in nature. The remainder are most likely distant L and T dwarfs lacking spectroscopic verification, other Y dwarf candidates still awaiting follow-up, and assorted other objects whose Spitzer photometry reveals them to be background sources. We present a catalog of Spitzer photometry for all astrophysical sources identified in these fields and use this catalog to identify seven fainter (4.5 m to approximately 17.0 mag) brown dwarf candidates, which are possibly wide-field companions to the original WISE sources. To test this hypothesis, we use a sample of 919 Spitzer observations around WISE-selected high-redshift hyper-luminous infrared galaxy candidates. For this control sample, we find another six brown dwarf candidates, suggesting that the seven companion candidates are not physically associated. In fact, only one of these seven Spitzer brown dwarf candidates has a photometric distance estimate consistent with being a companion to the WISE brown dwarf candidate. Other than this, there is no evidence for any widely separated (greater than 20 AU) ultra-cool binaries. As an adjunct to this paper, we make available a source catalog of 7.33 x 10(exp 5) objects detected in all of these Spitzer follow-up fields for use by the astronomical community. The complete catalog includes the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 m photometry, along with positionally matched B and R photometry from USNO-B; J, H, and Ks photometry from Two Micron All-Sky Survey; and W1, W2, W3, and W4 photometry from the WISE all-sky catalog.

  20. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel J. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2015-10-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealized conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line of sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star formation), median-likelihood SFHs generated by marginalizing over the default MAGPHYS libraries produce robust estimates of the smoothly varying isolated disc simulation SFHs. This preference for the median-likelihood SFH is quantitatively underlined by our estimates of χ ^2_SFH (analogous to the χ2 goodness-of-fit estimator) and Δ M / M (the integrated absolute mass discrepancy between the model and true SFH) that strongly prefer the median-likelihood SFHs over those that best fit the UV-to-far-IR photometry. In contrast, we are unable to derive a good estimate of the SFH for the merger simulations (either best fit or median likelihood) despite being able to obtain a reasonable fit to the simulated photometry, likely because the analytic SFHs with bursts superposed in the standard MAGPHYS library are insufficiently general/realistic.

  1. A New Look at Factors Affecting Microbial Silicification: Effects of Microbe to Solution Ratio, Al and Fe on Silica Accumulation on B. subtilis Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenesch, A. C.; Hinman, N. W.; Blank, C. E.

    2006-12-01

    In this investigation, we aim to constrain the geochemical conditions that favor siliceous microfossil formation. This work will provide a framework for assessing the biogenic origin of putative microfossils in siliceous hydrothermal deposits on early Earth, and potentially, on Mars. Previous work on silicification of microbial cells has been done under unnatural conditions or when cells were physiological stressed. Here, we attempt to reduce the amount reduce the amount of physiological stress on the organisms and to better emulate the natural environment. Silicification experiments involving the gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, have been conducted under different experimental conditions to provide insight into the processes that affect silicification of microorganisms. Experiments were conducted with silica stock solution at an initial pH of 8, and with and without added Al and Fe, in two different experimental designs. The first experimental design represented a silica-limited environment in which the ratio of exponentially growing culture (O.D.600 = 0.2) to silica-rich stock solution was very high (1:1 v/v). Silica concentrations declined likely due to nucleation and precipitation mediated by microbial surfaces, and the pH dropped from 8.0 to 6.5. The presence of Fe and Al resulted in lower dissolved silica concentrations, suggesting additional effects of these ions on nucleation and precipitation. The second experimental design used a lower ratio of exponentially growing culture (O.D.600 = .2) to silica-rich stock solution (0.004:1 v/v) resulting in a stable concentration of silica, which was also accompanied by a slight decline in pH. This latter design is more similar to the cell:silica ratios found in natural environments. B. subtilis cells were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) accompanied by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Cells exhibited silica crystallites under SEM and yet continued to undergo cell division in an

  2. Carcass orientation and drip time affect potential surface water carryover for broiler carcasses subjected to a post-chill water dip or spray1.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, D V; Wilson, K M; Bartenfeld, L N; Harris, C E; Howard, A K; Ingram, K D; Hinton, A; Adams, E S; Berrang, M E; Feldner, P W; Gamble, G R; Frye, J G; Jackson, C R; Johnston, J J; Buhr, R J

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the potential for residual antimicrobial solution carryover, surface water accumulation and loss was measured on post-chill carcasses that were either dipped or sprayed with water. For all experiments, broilers were slaughtered, soft or hard scalded, defeathered, and eviscerated. Carcasses were immersion chilled, allowed to drip, and post-chill carcass weight (CW) recorded. For water dip treatment, carcasses were dipped for 0.5 min in water and hung by a wing (n = 33) or a leg (n = 30) and CW recorded at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 min post-dip. For water spray treatment, individual carcasses were hung by either the wings (n = 35) or legs (n = 34) from a shackle suspended from a scale. Water was sprayed at 80 psi and post-spray CW recorded. Initial water accumulation (0 min) for dipped carcasses was not significantly different (P > 0.05) for carcasses hung by the leg (101.0 g) or wing (108.8 g). Following the 5 min drip time, 31 g of water remained on the carcasses hung by the leg and only 10 g on carcasses hung by the wing (P < 0.05). When carcasses were sprayed with water, initial water accumulation (0 min) was 62 g for carcasses hung by the legs and 60 g for carcasses hung by the wings (P > 0.05). Following the 5 min drip time, 1 g or no water remained on the sprayed carcasses (P > 0.05). Carcasses that were dipped and hung by a leg for 5 min retained significantly more water (31 g) than carcasses that were dipped and hung by a wing (10 g) or sprayed carcasses hung either way (0.3 g) (P < 0.05). Post-chill water dip resulted in significantly higher initial carcass water accumulation than spraying (105 g vs. 61 g, P < 0.05). Carcass orientation during dripping only affected the amount of retained water for dipped carcasses. Dipped carcasses hung by a leg have the highest potential for residual carcass antimicrobial solution carryover and sprayed carcasses hung by either orientation have the lowest potential for residual antimicrobial

  3. Synthetic photometry for carbon-rich giants. IV. An extensive grid of dynamic atmosphere and wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, K.; Nowotny, W.; Höfner, S.; Aringer, B.; Wachter, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The evolution and spectral properties of stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are significantly affected by mass loss through dusty stellar winds. Dynamic atmosphere and wind models are an essential tool for studying these evolved stars, both individually and as members of stellar populations, to understand their contribution to the integrated light and chemical evolution of galaxies. Aims: This paper is part of a series with the purpose of testing state-of-the-art atmosphere and wind models of C-type AGB stars against observations, and making them available to the community for use in various theoretical and observational studies. Methods: We have computed low-resolution spectra and photometry (in the wavelength range 0.35-25 μm) for a grid of 540 dynamic models with stellar parameters typical of solar-metallicity C-rich AGB stars and with a range of pulsation amplitudes. The models cover the dynamic atmosphere and dusty outflow (if present), assuming spherical symmetry, and taking opacities of gas-phase species and dust grains consistently into account. To characterize the time-dependent dynamic and photometric behaviour of the models in a concise way we defined a number of classes for models with and without winds. Results: Comparisons with observed data in general show a quite satisfactory agreement for example regarding mass-loss rates vs. (J - K) colours or K magnitudes vs. (J - K) colours. Some exceptions from the good overall agreement, however, are found and attributed to the range of input parameters (e.g. relatively high carbon excesses) or intrinsic model assumptions (e.g. small particle limit for grain opacities). Conclusions: While current results indicate that some changes in model assumptions and parameter ranges should be made in the future to bring certain synthetic observables into better agreement with observations, it seems unlikely that these pending improvements will significantly affect the mass-loss rates of the models

  4. Adhesion of Streptococcus mitis and Actinomyces oris in co-culture to machined and anodized titanium surfaces as affected by atmosphere and pH

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the rising demand for osseointegrated titanium implants for replacing missing teeth, often in patients with a history of periodontitis, implant-related infections have become an issue of growing concern. Novel methods for treating and preventing implant-associated infections are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate if different pH, atmosphere and surface properties could restrict bacterial adhesion to titanium surfaces used in dental implants. Methods Titanium discs with machined or anodized (TiUnite™) surface were incubated with a co-culture of Streptococcus mitis and Actinomyces oris (early colonizers of oral surfaces) at pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 at aerobic or anaerobic atmosphere. The adhesion was analysed by counting colony forming (CFU) units on agar and by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results The CFU analysis showed that a pH of 5.0 was found to significantly decrease the adhesion of S. mitis, and an aerobic atmosphere, the adhesion of A. oris. S. mitis was found in significantly less amounts on the anodized surface than the machined surface, while A. oris was found in equal amounts on both surfaces. The CLSM analysis confirmed the results from the CFU count and provided additional information on how the two oral commensal species adhered to the surfaces: mainly in dispersed clusters oriented with the groves of the machined surface and the pores of the anodized surface. Conclusions Bacterial adhesion by S. mitis and A. oris can be restricted by acidic pH and aerobic atmosphere. The anodized surface reduced the adhesion of S. mitis compared to the machined surface; while A. oris adhered equally well to the pores of the anodized surface and to the grooves of the machined surface. It is difficult to transfer these results directly into a clinical situation. However, it is worth further investigating these findings from an in vitro perspective, as well as clinically, to gain more knowledge of the effects acid pH and

  5. Estimates of L:M cone ratio from ERG flicker photometry and genetics.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Joseph; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2002-01-01

    Estimates of L:M cone ratio for males with normal color vision were derived using the flicker-photometric electroretinogram (ERG). These were obtained by best fitting ERG spectral sensitivity functions to a weighted sum of long (L)- and middle (M)-wavelength-sensitive cone spectral absorption curves. Using the ERG, measurements can be made with extremely high precision, which leaves variation in the wavelength of maximal sensitivity (lambda(max)) of the cone photopigments as the major remaining source of inaccuracy in determining the ratio of cone contributions. Here that source of inaccuracy was largely eliminated through the use of individualized L-cone spectral absorption curves deduced from L-pigment gene sequences. The method was used on 62 normal males as part of an effort to obtain a true picture of how normal variations in L:M cone ratio are distributed. The percentage of L cones in the average eye was 65%L [where %L = 100 X L / (L+M)]. There were huge individual differences ranging from 28%-93%L, corresponding to more than a 30-fold range in L:M ratio (0.4-13). However, the most extreme values were relatively rare; 80% of the subjects fell within +/-15 %L of the mean, corresponding to a 4-fold range in L:M ratio (1-4). The method remedies major weaknesses inherent in earlier applications of flicker photometry to estimate cone ratio; however, it continues to depend on the assumption that the average L cone produces a response with an identical amplitude to that of the average M cone. A comparison of the ERG results with the distribution of cone ratios estimated from cone pigment messenger RNA in cadaver eyes indicates that the assumption generally holds true. However, there may be a small number of exceptions in which individuals have normally occurring (but relatively rare) amino acid substitutions in one of their pigments that significantly affect the physiology of the cone class containing that pigment, so as to reduce the amplitude of its contribution

  6. Visible Color and Photometry of Bright Materials on Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroder, S. E.; Li, J. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Keller, H. U.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) collected images of the surface of Vesta at a pixel scale of 70 m in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase through its clear and seven color filters spanning from 430 nm to 980 nm. The surface of Vesta displays a large diversity in its brightness and colors, evidently related to the diverse geology [1] and mineralogy [2]. Here we report a detailed investigation of the visible colors and photometric properties of the apparently bright materials on Vesta in order to study their origin. The global distribution and the spectroscopy of bright materials are discussed in companion papers [3, 4], and the synthesis results about the origin of Vestan bright materials are reported in [5].

  7. Oberon - Color photometry from Voyager and its geological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Hillier, John; Weitz, Catherine; Veverka, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The surface of the Uranian satellite Oberon is characterized on the basis of ground-based and Voyager photometric observations. Disk-integrated phase-curve and disk-resolved data are presented in extensive tables, graphs, maps, and black-and-white and false-color images and discussed in terms of fits to the Hapke (1986) parameters, local variations in albedo and color, and their possible geological significance. It is found that most of the leading hemisphere is covered with dark materials like those in the crater floors, while the trailing hemisphere has patches of the dark material on a surface with a higher proportion of icy materials which are spectrally neutral.

  8. Near Infrared Absolute Photometry of Saturn's Satellites at Ring Plane Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, T. W.; Baines, K. H.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Buratti, B. J.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    1999-09-01

    Absolutely-calibrated multispectral photometry of nine Saturnian satellites, including the leading side of Enceladus, are presented for canonical near-infrared filters. The satellites were observed during Ring Plane Crossing in August/September 1995 with the NSFCAM instrument at the NASA/IRTF. Observations were contemporaneous with those of the Uranian system, acquired by Baines et al. (Icarus 132, 266-284, 1998), using the same instrument and filters. Results are reported for J, H, and K filters near 1.27, 1.62, and 2.20 microns, and two filters centerd at 1.73 and 2.27 microns. We find that the spectrum and absolute brightness of Enceladus is consistent with fresh water ice, relatively uncontaminated by the kinds of low albedo, spectrally neutral materials found in the Uranian system. The satellite's peak brightness is at 1.27 microns with a geometric albedo of 0.904 +/- 0.063, in contrast to the Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Titania, which are one third as bright at this wavelength. The J-H band depth of Enceladus is about 30% contrasting with the darker Uranian satellites' J-H band depth of less than 10%. Enceladus shows a large near-infrared opposition surge of 0.0817 mag /degree between 3.51 deg and 0.39 deg solar phase, perhaps consistent with a surface coated with highly backscattering fresh water-ice frost. Dione, Janus, and Epimetheus have brighter leading sides than trailing. The opposite is true for Enceladus, consistent with 0.89 micron measurements of Buratti et al. (Icarus, 136, 223-231, 1998) and with the suggestion by Showalter et al. (Icarus, 94, 451-473, 1991) that negatively charged E-ring particles would preferentially impact Enceladus' trailing side. Finally, our 2.27 micron albedos for Prometheus, Janus, Epimetheus, Mimas, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Hyperion, as well as Enceladus, are comparable to the visible albedos reported by Buratti and Veverka (Icarus, 58, 254-264, 1984).

  9. Space borne photometry perturbations from solar light scatterd by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, Jean-Claude; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Vuillemin, André

    2001-10-01

    We study the possible impairment of the solar light scattered by small debris, measured by high photometric quality instrument, during space borne observations. We compute the contribution of the fragments released on orbit by the host satellite and of the debris already present in the background. Preliminary results show that these spurious fluxes can reach the level of the collected Zodiacal Light: there are the main components of the noise level which affect the scientific signal. On the future, threats on high sensitivity photometric missions should rise with the increasing launches of satellite constellations if no legislation controls the design of satellites.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multiwavelength photometry of 34 galaxies (Rowlands+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Maddox, S.; da Cunha, E.; Smith, D. J. B.; Bourne, N.; Eales, S.; Gomez, H. L.; Smail, I.; Alpaslan, M.; Clark, C. J. R.; Driver, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Robotham, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2014-03-01

    Photometry for 34 submillimetre galaxies (including 5 galaxies with poor quality SED fits rejected from the final sample) utilised in the paper from the compilation in Magnelli et al (2012A&A...539A.155M, hereafter M12), which were taken from blank field (sub)millimetre surveys (850-1200um) which have robust counterparts identified with deep radio, interferometric submillimetre and/or mid-infrared imaging. In GOODS-N all photometry shortwards of 3um is described in Berta et al. (2010A&A...518L..30B, 2011A&A...532A..49B) and includes PSF-matched photometry from HST ACS bviz (version 1.0), FLAMINGOS JHK, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0um was obtained with the ConvPhot code and spectroscopic redshifts and U-band magnitudes from Barger et al. (2008, Cat. J/ApJ/689/687). Deep CFHT WirCAM K_s band photometry was taken from Wang et al. (2010, Cat. J/ApJS/187/251). We refer the reader to http://www2011.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php?lang=en for details, but briefly, magnitudes with value +99.99 are non-detections. ConvPhot-derived magnitudes are negative if they are fainter than the 1-sigma noise level. In this case the absolute value of the magnitude (with a small correction to galactic extinction) corresponds to half their flux and their magnitude uncertainty is equal to 0.7526mag. The U-band magnitudes from Barger et al. (2008, Cat. J/ApJ/689/687) are -99.99 if a source was not matched. In some cases magnitudes are negative and not -99.99, see Barger et al (2008, Cat. J/ApJ/689/687) for details. WIRCam Ks magnitudes are -99.99 if an object was not matched. The 70um MIPS data in GOODS-N are from Magnelli et al. (2011, Cat. J/A+A/528/A35), negative flux values indicate an upper limit, with the absolute flux value equal to the 5σ upper limit computed from the 70um residual map. We list the uncertainties from both the residual map and Monte-Carlo simulations which includes an additional statistical contribution from confusion noise, see Magnelli et al. (2011

  11. K2 and Herschel/PACS photometry of irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Andras; Kiss, Csaba; Molnar, Laszlo; Mueller, Thomas G.; Sarneczky, Krisztian; Szabo, Robert; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Szabo, Gyula M.

    2016-10-01

    The combination of optical and far-infrared photometric measurements yields an unambiguous method for characterizing the basic physical and surface properties of minor bodies in the Solar System. In principle, an object with a certain visible brightness can either be an object with a small but bright or a large but dim surface. To resolve this issue, conducting thermal emission measurements can also be acquired since both larger and dimmer objects have higher infrared radiations. In addition, the precise modelling of thermal emission should certainly take into account the rotation period of these bodies - otherwise the presence of surface thermal inertia can result in inaccurate conclusions regarding to the physical size and albedo.Since early 2014, Kepler Space Telescope surveys fields close to the Ecliptic in a framework of quarterly campaigns of the K2 initiative. This program makes possible to continuously observe Solar System bodies during this period of 80-90 days and hence provide an uninterrupted photometric series of moving Solar System objects down to the magnitude range of R = 23.5. This instrument hence an ideal observatory now for Solar System studies. Due to the fact that the expected rotational periods of these objects are commensurable to the diurnal characteristics of ground-based observations, such uninterrupted light curves are rather valuable for the accurate determination of rotational characteristics - including the physical rotation period, the amplitude and the confirmation of the presence of double- or multiple peaked features.In this presentation we summarize our results of current K2 and legacy Herschel/PACS observations regarding to some of the irregular satellites of Uranus and Neptune, namely Caliban, Sycorax, Prospero, Setebos and Nereid. By comparing these results with similar kind of observations for trans-Neptunian objects (see Kiss et al., this DPS meeting), one can conclude how the formation and evolution of the outer Solar

  12. Photometry of particulate mixtures: What controls the phase curve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Fernando, J.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Douté, S.

    2015-04-01

    The amplitude and angular distribution of the light scattered by planetary surfaces give essential information about their physical and compositional properties. In particular, the angular variation of the bidirectional reflectance, characterized through the phase curve, is directly related to the grain size, shape and internal structure. We use a new radiative transfer model that allows specifying the photometric parameters of each grain individually to study the evolution of the phase curve for various kinds of mixtures (spatial, intimate and layered), mimicking different situations encountered for natural surfaces. Results show that the phase curve evolution is driven by the most abundant/brightest/highly anisotropic scattering grains within the mixture. Both spatial and intimate mixtures show similar trends in the phase curves when varying the photometric parameters of the grains. Simple laws have been produced to quantify the evolution of these variations. Layered mixtures have also been investigated and are generally very sensitive to the photometric properties of the top monolayer. Implications for the interpretation of photometric data and their link with the phases identified by spectroscopy are examined. The photometric properties of a few planetary bodies are also discussed over a couple of examples. These different results constitute a new support for the interpretation of orbital/in situ photometric datasets.

  13. Laboratory photometry of regolith analogues: Effect of porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, A.; Sen, A. K.; Gupta, R.

    2016-10-01

    New Laboratory phase curves are presented, to examine the effect of porosity on reflectance as a function of phase angle for grain size having dimension about half, twice and those larger than the illuminating wavelength. The experimental setup used for generating reflectance data is a goniometric device developed at the Department of Physics, Assam University, Silchar, India. Some of the well-documented samples having different sizes were chosen; alumina, olivine, basalt, rutile, chromite and iron. The sample surfaces were prepared with different porosities, in order to simulate natural regolith surface as much as possible. The wavelength of observation is 632.8 nm. A model based on the Radiative Transfer Equation is presented here to analyze and model the laboratory data. In the present modelling work, the empirical relation of Hapke, Mie theory and Henyey-Greenstein phase function are used. For particles having dimension about half, twice to the wavelength, Mie theory is used to calculate single scattering albedo. Although the Mie theory is insufficient for describing the scattering properties of particles larger than the wavelength, for such large particle single scattering albedo (SSA) is estimated through method of best fit. It has been found that, the porosity has a distinguishable effect on reflectance. Also the contribution of multiple scattering function for different porosity is examined. Further the results presented in the current work, demonstrates the light scattering properties of a diverse collections of regolith like samples.

  14. Stellar photometry including saturated images: Results on M67 with WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1994-01-01

    The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is providing unsurpassed imaging capabilities and supporting accurate stellar photometry over large fields of view at high angular resolution. I discuss a feature of the WFPC2 CCD systems that nominally limits the dynamic range attainable with single exposures: a 12 bit analog to digital converter that does not allow sampling of the CCD full-well depth even at the low gain (14e(sup -)/DN) setting. I demonstrate that accurate stellar photometry can be performed on stellar images that are strongly saturated. Two 40 s exposures in V and I bands on the old open cluster M67 are analyzed to demonstrate photometric capabilities with a dynamic range of over 12 mag from single exposures. New photometric results for both bright and faint objects in M67 are derived from the WFPC2 data.

  15. Combining Photometry from Kepler and TESS to Improve Short-Period Exoplanet Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Planets emit thermal radiation and reflect incident light that they receive from their host stars. As a planet orbits its host star the photometric variations associated with these two effects produce very similar phase curves. If observed through only a single bandpass, this leads to a degeneracy between certain planetary parameters that hinder the precise characterization of such planets. However, observing the same planet through two different bandpasses gives much more information about the planet. Here we develop a Bayesian methodology for combining photometry from both Kepler and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. In addition, we demonstrate via simulations that one can disentangle the reflected and thermally emitted light from the atmosphere of a hot-Jupiter as well as more precisely constrain both the geometric albedo and day-side temperature of the planet. This methodology can further be employed using various combinations of photometry from the James Webb Space Telescope, the Characterizing ExOplanet Satellite, or the PLATO mission.

  16. Theoretical interpretation of the ground-based photometry of Saturn's B ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumme, K.; Irvine, W. M.; Esposito, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    Small tilt angle photographic photometry obtained during 1979 and 1981 apparitions is combined with previous data to derive physical parameters for the Saturn B ring in red and blue colors. The value of the volume density is 0.020 + or - 0.004, with no indication of dependence on either the color or the tilt for values between 6 and 26 deg. For the geometric albedo of a single particle, the derived values of 0.61 + or - 0.04 in the red and 0.41 + or - 0.03 in the blue are superior to earlier estimates lacking the most recent data. The present results indicate that the ground-based photometry is fully consistent with the classical, many-particle-thick ring model.

  17. Combining Photometry from Kepler and TESS to Improve Short-period Exoplanet Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Planets emit thermal radiation and reflect incident light that they receive from their host stars. As a planet orbits its host star the photometric variations associated with these two effects produce very similar phase curves. If observed through only a single bandpass, this leads to a degeneracy between certain planetary parameters that hinder the precise characterization of such planets. However, observing the same planet through two different bandpasses gives much more information about the planet. Here we develop a Bayesian methodology for combining photometry from both Kepler and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. In addition, we demonstrate via simulations that one can disentangle the reflected and thermally emitted light from the atmosphere of a hot-Jupiter as well as more precisely constrain both the geometric albedo and day-side temperature of the planet. This methodology can further be employed using various combinations of photometry from the James Webb Space Telescope, the Characterizing ExOplanet Satellite, or the PLATO mission.

  18. HST/WFC3 IR Detector Updates: Photometry, Grisms, and a New SPARS Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosmeyer, Catherine M.; Baggett, Sylvia; Bajaj, Varun; Bourque, Matthew; Brammer, Gabriel; Durbin, Meredith; MacKenty, John W.; McCullough, Peter R.; Pirzkal, Nor; Ryan, Russell E.

    2015-08-01

    We discuss new developments to the characterization and monitoring of the IR channel on the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, WFC3 is a fourth-generation imaging instrument, comprising a UVIS channel and an IR channel. The IR detector is composed of a low-noise, high-QE 1024×1024 pixel HgCdTe chip and remains stable after 5 years on-orbit. We present new measurements of the detector's photometric stability and the high precision photometry that can be achieved through spatial scanning. We give an update on the status and calibrations of the IR grisms. We also report on the IR “blobs” and their effect on photometry, and the evolution and properties of IR "snowballs." Finally, we introduce a new SPARS sequence that is planned for release this fall.

  19. Optimal Stellar Photometry for Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics Systems Using Science-based Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turri, P.; McConnachie, A. W.; Stetson, P. B.; Fiorentino, G.; Andersen, D. R.; Bono, G.; Massari, D.; Véran, J.-P.

    2017-04-01

    We present a detailed discussion of how to obtain precise stellar photometry in crowded fields using images from multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, with the intent of informing the scientific development of this key technology for the Extremely Large Telescopes. We use deep J and K s exposures of NGC 1851 taken with the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) on Gemini South to quantify the performance of the instrument and to develop an optimal strategy for stellar photometry using point-spread function (PSF)-fitting techniques. We judge the success of the various methods we employ by using science-based metrics, particularly the width of the main sequence turnoff region. We also compare the GeMS photometry with the exquisite HST data in the visible of the same target. We show that the PSF produced by GeMS possesses significant spatial and temporal variability that must be accounted for during the analysis. We show that the majority of the variation of the PSF occurs within the “control radius” of the MCAO system and that the best photometry is obtained when the PSF radius is chosen to closely match this spatial scale. We identify photometric calibration as a critical issue for next-generation MCAO systems such as those on the Thirty Meter Telescope and European Extremely Large Telescope. Our final CMDs reach K s ∼ 22—below the main sequence knee—making it one of the deepest for a globular cluster available from the ground. Theoretical isochrones are in remarkable agreement with the stellar locus in our data from below the main sequence knee to the upper red giant branch.

  20. The March 1995 superoutburst of the SU Ursae Majoris star AK Cancri: photometry and superhumps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennickent, R. E.; Nogami, D.; Kato, T.; Worraker, W.

    1996-11-01

    We present differential photometry of AK Cnc obtained during its March 1995 superoutburst. Superhumps with amplitude of 0.2mag appeared within 4 days after maximum with a period of 0.06749(1)d. This result is used to estimate a likely orbital period of 0.065(2)d and a mass ratio (M_2_/M_1_) of 0.21. Photometric maxima and timings of 26 recorded outbursts imply an average cycle length of 47 days.