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Sample records for affects surface temperature

  1. Analysing Thermal Response Test Data Affected by Groundwater Flow and Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Imitazione, Gianmario; Chiozzi, Paolo; Orsi, Marco; Armadillo, Egidio

    2014-05-01

    Tests that record the underground temperature variation due to a constant heat injected into a borehole (or extracted from it) by means of a carrier fluid are routinely performed to infer subsurface thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance, which are needed to size geothermal heat pump systems. The most popular model to analyse temperature-time curves obtained from these tests is the infinite line source (ILS). This model gives appropriate estimations of thermal parameters only if particular hydro-geological conditions are fulfilled. Several flaws can however affect data interpretation with ILS, which is based on strong assumptions like those of a purely conductive heat transfer regime in a homogeneous medium, no vertical heat flow and infinite length of the borehole. Other drawbacks can arise from the difficulty in the proper thermal insulation of the test equipment, and consequently with oscillations of the carrier fluid temperature due to surface temperature changes. In this paper, we focused on the treatment of thermal response test data when both advection and periodic changes of surface temperature occur. We used a moving line source model to simulate temperature-time signals under different hypothesis of Darcy velocity and thermal properties. A random noise was added to the signal in order to mimic high frequency disturbances, possibly caused by equipment operating conditions and/or geological variability. The subsurface thermal conductivity, the Darcy velocity and the borehole thermal resistance were inferred by minimising the root mean square error between the synthetic dataset and the theoretical model. The optimisation was carried out with the Nelder-Mead algorithm, and thermal and hydraulic properties were determined by iterative reprocessing according to a trial-and-error procedure. The inferred thermal and hydraulic parameters are well consistent with the 'a priory' values, and the presence of noise in the synthetic data does not produce

  2. Investigations on temperature distribution of satellite surfaces affected by solar absorptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Pan, X. X.; Li, G. H.; Liu, X.; Jiang, L. X.

    2010-09-01

    Based on the Monte Carlo ray-tracing method, the network coefficients of thermal network model describing the radiation heat transfer among satellite surfaces is solved by considering the surface material optical characters. It is superiority to the conventional Gebhart's method in view of the grey body and the diffuse reflection assumptions. The zone leveling method is used to discrete the governing equations and the solar absorpivity is separated and considered to be an important correction parameter. Effects of the solar incidence round angle, the zenith angle and the ratio of absorpivity to emissivity (RAE) on temperature distribution are numerically simulated and discussed in detail. The higher or the lower the RAE may be lead to the alternative heating and cooling tend with a larger heating or cooling velocity of main body surfaces than the solar array surfaces. Furthermore, maximum temperature of main body is almost larger than solar arrays. Under the same RAE, solar incidence angle make a great effect on the uniform character of temperature distribution.

  3. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  4. Factors affecting sorption of nitro explosives to biochar: pyrolysis temperature, surface treatment, competition, and dissolved metals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Seo, Yong-Deuk

    2015-05-01

    The application of rice straw-derived biochar for removing nitro explosives, including 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), from contaminated water was investigated through batch experiments. An increase in the pyrolysis temperature from 250 to 900°C in general led to higher pH, surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC), point of zero charge, and C:O ratio of biochar. The maximum sorption capacity estimated by a mixed sorption-partition model increased when pyrolysis temperatures were elevated from 250 to 900°C, indicating that C content and aromaticity of biochar were strongly related to the sorption of nitro explosives to biochar. Surface treatment with acid or oxidant increased the sorption capacity of biochar for the two strong π-acceptor compounds (DNT and TNT) but not for RDX. However, the enhancement of sorption capacity was not directly related to increased surface area and CEC. Compared with single-sorption systems, coexistence of explosives or cationic metals resulted in decreased sorption of each explosive to biochar, suggesting that sorption of nitro explosives and cationic metals to electron-rich portions in biochar was competitive. Our results suggest that π-π electron donor acceptor interactions are main sorption mechanisms and that changing various conditions can enhance or reduce the sorption of nitro explosives to biochar. PMID:26024263

  5. Sea surface temperature fronts affect distribution of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chen-Te; Sun, Chi-Lu; Belkin, Igor M.; Yeh, Su-Zan; Kuo, Chin-Lau; Liu, Don-Chung

    2014-09-01

    Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) is an important fisheries resource and commercial species of Taiwanese deep-sea saury stick-held dip net fishery in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. In this study, the logbook data of a 3-year (2006-2008) Taiwanese Pacific saury fishery and corresponding satellite-derived MODIS sea surface temperature (SST) data were analyzed to detect SST fronts and examine their influence on the spatio-temporal distribution of Pacific saury. The fronts were identified by the Cayula-Cornillon single-image edge detection algorithm. The results show that low frequency of SST fronts is associated with lower CPUEs during the early fishing season (June-August), while high frequency of SST fronts is associated with higher CPUEs during the peak fishing season. When fishing locations of Pacific saury are close to the SST fronts, higher CPUEs are observed. Results of this study provide a better understanding of how SST fronts influence distribution of Pacific saury and improve the basis of fishing ground forecasting.

  6. Regression analysis in modeling of air surface temperature and factors affecting its value in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; Jafri, Mohd. Zubir Mat; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-10-01

    This study encompasses air surface temperature (AST) modeling in the lower atmosphere. Data of four atmosphere pollutant gases (CO, O3, CH4, and H2O) dataset, retrieved from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), from 2003 to 2008 was employed to develop a model to predict AST value in the Malaysian peninsula using the multiple regression method. For the entire period, the pollutants were highly correlated (R=0.821) with predicted AST. Comparisons among five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the southwest monsoon (SWM) season, within 1.3 K, and for in situ data, within 1 to 2 K. The validation results of AST with AST from AIRS showed high correlation coefficient (R=0.845 to 0.918), indicating the model's efficiency and accuracy. Statistical analysis in terms of β showed that H2O (0.565 to 1.746) tended to contribute significantly to high AST values during the northeast monsoon season. Generally, these results clearly indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis study to investigate the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases on AST over the Malaysian peninsula. A model was developed that is capable of retrieving the Malaysian peninsulan AST in all weather conditions, with total uncertainties ranging between 1 and 2 K.

  7. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  8. Factors affecting the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil at high temperatures and its relation to cleanability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashokkumar, Saranya; Adler-Nissen, Jens; Møller, Per

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of the work was to investigate the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil (olive oil) over the temperature range of 25-200 °C to understand the differences in cleanability of different surfaces exposed to high temperatures in food processes. The different surface materials investigated include stainless steel (reference), PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), silicone, quasicrystalline (Al, Fe, Cr) and ceramic coatings: zirconium oxide (ZrO2), zirconium nitride (ZrN) and titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN). The ceramic coatings were deposited on stainless steel with two different levels of roughness. The cosine of the contact angle of olive oil on different surface materials rises linearly with increasing temperature. Among the materials analyzed, polymers (PTFE, silicone) gave the lowest cos θ values. Studies of the effect of roughness and surface flaws on wettability revealed that the cos θ values increases with increasing roughness and surface flaws. Correlation analysis indicates that the measured contact angle values gave useful information for grouping easy-clean polymer materials from the other materials; for the latter group, there is no direct relation between contact angle and cleanability. In addition to surface wettability with oil many other factors such as roughness and surface defects play an essential role in determining their cleanability.

  9. Snow cover and ground surface temperature on a talus slope affected by mass movements. Veleta cirque, Sierra Nevada, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; Salvador-Franch, F.

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses the thermal ground behaviour on an alpine talus slope located at the foot of the north wall of the glacial cirque on the Pico del Veleta (3398 m, 37°03'21''N, 3°21'57''W, MAAT: -0,4°C) in Sierra Nevada, SE Spain. There are frequent mass movements on this talus slope, particularly in its central section, caused by the abundant presence of fine-grained sediment and by the water from snowmelt and/or ice degradation in the ground or permafrost (Gómez et al., 2003). To determine the snowmelt pattern and ocurrence of permafrost, a continuous ground surface temperature was kept by installing 6 mini-loggers (HOBO Pendant) along the descending profile of the central talus, which is 170 m long with altitudes ranging from 3180 m at the higher end to 3085 m at the lower end. A thermal borehole was also installed at a depth of 2 m at the base of the slope on an active rock glacier. The results obtained for the period October 2008 - September 2009 show that, in contrast to alpine talus slopes (Luetschg et. al., 2004; Lambiel and Pieracci, 2008), the upper part of the slope is characterized by mean annual ground surface temperatures (MAGST) lower than at the base of the talus, possibly due to the effect of the shadow of the cirque wall. The MAGST oscillate between 0.592°C at the station near the slope apex (S2) and 1.836°C at the station near the base (S5). In winter-spring, when the talus slope is covered with snow, the GST are stabilized at all stations between mid-October and early November. The minimum GST, which express the BTS conditions, oscillate between 0.232 and 0.01°C, depending on the month, with lowest values recorded during the month of April. Only one station (S3, mid-slope) recorded negative values (max. value : - 0.549°C in December and - 0.211 in April ). In summer, the snow disappears fairly quickly between mid- and late July on the intermediate stretch of the talus slope (S3, S4, S6), where the majority of the flows detected occur

  10. Large-scale stress factors affecting coral reefs: open ocean sea surface temperature and surface seawater aragonite saturation over the next 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, K. J.; Lippmann, T.; Sen Gupta, A.

    2012-06-01

    One-third of the world's coral reefs have disappeared over the last 30 years, and a further third is under threat today from various stress factors. The main global stress factors on coral reefs have been identified as changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation (Ωarag). Here, we use a climate model of intermediate complexity, which includes an ocean general circulation model and a fully coupled carbon cycle, in conjunction with present-day observations of inter-annual SST variability to investigate three IPCC representative concentration pathways (RCP 3PD, RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5), and their impact on the environmental stressors of coral reefs related to open ocean SST and open ocean Ωarag over the next 400 years. Our simulations show that for the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, the threshold of 3.3 for zonal and annual mean Ωarag would be crossed in the first half of this century. By year 2030, 66-85% of the reef locations considered in this study would experience severe bleaching events at least once every 10 years. Regardless of the concentration pathway, virtually every reef considered in this study (>97%) would experience severe thermal stress by year 2050. In all our simulations, changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation lead changes in temperatures.

  11. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  12. Chilling temperatures affect flavor quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomatoes are harvested green in Florida and gassed with ethylene, then stored at chilling temperatures. These chilled temperatures of 12-13ºC can cause a decrease in aroma. Green fruit are more susceptible to chilling injury (CI) which manifests as a pitting of the peel through which decay organisms...

  13. Decoding the Surface Temperature Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhines, A. N.; Tingley, M.; McKinnon, K. A.; Huybers, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Historical temperature observations from surface stations have been recorded using a variety of units and levels of precision, with metadata that are often incomplete. As a result, the amount of rounding applied to these observations is generally unknown, posing a challenge to statistical methods that are sensitive to the use of discrete data. Methods used to infer distributional changes often assume that data are continuously distributed and can only be reliably applied when the specific discreteness of each sample is known. We present a new technique, termed `precision-decoding,' that identifies the original precision and units of time series data. Applying it to the GHCND database, we identify temporal and spatial patterns in the precision and units used by surface stations. We show that many archived values have been offset from the original observations due to double-rounding in the presence of conversion between Fahrenheit and Celsius, and provide additional metrics to identify stations in need of further quality control. While the discreteness of the data is unlikely to have influenced global mean temperature trends, we show that it can affect higher-order moments of the temperature distribution such as the variance or skewness, and that it can alter the apparent frequency of record-breaking events.

  14. Surface Temperature Assimilation in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Venkataraman

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the utilization of surface temperature as a variable to be assimilated in offline land surface hydrological models. Comparisons between the model computed and satellite observed surface temperatures have been carried out. The assimilation of surface temperature is carried out twice a day (corresponding to the AM and PM overpass of the NOAA10) over the Red-Arkansas basin in the Southwestern United States (31 degs 50 sec N - 36 degrees N, 94 degrees 30 seconds W - 104 degrees 3 seconds W) for a period of one year (August 1987 to July 1988). The effect of assimilation is to reduce the difference between the surface soil moisture computed for the precipitation and/or shortwave radiation perturbed case and the unperturbed case compared to no assimilation.

  15. Surface Temperature Assimilation in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Venkataraman

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the utilization of surface temperature as a variable to be assimilated in offline land surface hydrological models. Comparisons between the model computed and satellite observed surface temperatures have been carried out. The assimilation of surface temperature is carried out twice a day (corresponding to the AM and PM overpass of the NOAA10) over the Red- Arkansas basin in the Southwestern United States (31 deg 50 min N - 36 deg N, 94 deg 30 min W - 104 deg 30 min W) for a period of one year (August 1987 to July 1988). The effect of assimilation is to reduce the difference between the surface soil moisture computed for the precipitation and/or shortwave radiation perturbed case and the unperturbed case compared to no assimilation.

  16. Temperature Affects Fatty Acids In Methylococcus Capsulatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    According to report, temperature of growth of thermotolerant, methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) affects both proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and cis/trans ratio of these acids in cell membrane. Because suboptimum growth temperature is potential stress factor, it may be possible to use such cis/trans ratios as indices of stresses upon methane-oxidizing microbial communities. Research in microbiology of methanotrophs increasing because of possible commercial exploitation of these organisms as biocatalysts or as sources of useful polymers; knowledge of effect of temperature on ability of methanotrophs to utilize methane useful in optimization of conditions of growth.

  17. Brain temperature could affect neurochemical evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2014-01-01

    This article demonstrates the importance of natural brain temperature fluctuations as a critical factor affecting electrochemical detection of extracellular glutamate in awake rats and proposes a viable strategy to exclude this inescapable influence, thereby increasing the reliability of electrochemical measurements of glutamate in behaving animals.

  18. Temperature-dependent Luttinger surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Chainani, A; Haruna, T; Kanai, K; Yokoya, T; Shin, S; Kato, R

    2005-12-01

    The Luttinger surface of an organic metal (TTF-TCNQ), possessing charge order and spin-charge separated band dispersions, is investigated using temperature-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Luttinger surface topology, obtained from momentum distribution curves, changes from quasi-2D (dimensional) to quasi-1D with temperature. The high temperature quasi-2D surface exhibits 4kF charge-density-wave (CDW) superstructure in the TCNQ derived holon band, in the absence of 2kF order. Decreasing temperature results in quasi-1D nested 2kF CDW order in the TCNQ spinon band and in the TTF surface. The results establish the link in momentum space between charge order and spin-charge separation in a Luttinger liquid. PMID:16384402

  19. Urban aerosol effects on surface insolation and surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, M.; Burian, S. J.; Remer, L. A.; Shepherd, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Urban aerosol particulates may play a fundamental role in urban microclimates and city-generated mesoscale circulations via its effects on energy balance of the surface. Key questions that need to be addressed include: (1) How do these particles affect the amount of solar energy reaching the surface and resulting surface temperature? (2) Is the effect the same in all cities? and (3) How does it vary from city to city? Using NASA AERONET in-situ observations, a radiative transfer model, and a regional climate mode (MM5), we assess aerosol effects on surface insolation and surf ace temperature for dense urban-polluted regions. Two big cities, one in a developing country (Beijing, P.R. China) and another in developed country (New York City, USA), are selected for inter-comparison. The study reveals that aerosol effects on surface temperature depends largely on aerosols' optical and chemical properties as well as atmosphere and land surface conditions, such as humidity and land cover. Therefore, the actual magnitudes of aerosol effects differ from city to city. Aerosol measurements from AERONET show both average and extreme cases for aerosol impacts on surface insolation. In general, aerosols reduce surface insolation by 30Wm-2. Nevertheless, in extreme cases, such reduction can exceed 100 Wm-2. Consequently, this reduces surface skin temperature 2-10C in an urban environment.

  20. Therapeutic Magnets Do Not Affect Tissue Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Kathleen B.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Swez, John A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Manufacturers of commercially available “therapeutic” magnets claim that these magnets cause physiologic thermal effects that promote tissue healing. We conducted this study to determine if skin or intramuscular temperatures differed among magnet, sham, and control treatments during 60 minutes of application to the quadriceps muscle. Design and Setting: A 3 × 3 mixed-model, factorial design with repeated measures on both independent variables was used. The first independent variable, application duration, had 3 random levels (20, 40, and 60 minutes). The second independent variable, treatment, had 3 fixed levels (magnet, sham, and control). The dependent variable was tissue temperature (°C). Measurement depth served as a control variable, with 2 levels: skin and 1 cm below the fat layer. Data were collected in a thermoneutral laboratory setting and analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Subjects: The study included 13 healthy student volunteers (8 men, 5 women; age, 20.5 ± 0.9 years; height, 176.8 ± 10.4 cm; weight, 73.8 ± 11.8 kg; anterior thigh skinfold thickness, 16.9 ± 6.5 mm). Measurements: Temperatures were measured at 30-second intervals using surface and implantable thermocouples. Temperature data at 20, 40, and 60 minutes were used for analysis. Each subject received all 3 treatments on different days. Results: Neither skin nor intramuscular temperatures were different across the 3 treatments at any time. For both skin and intramuscular temperatures, a statistically significant but not clinically meaningful temperature increase (less than 1°C), was observed over time within treatments, but this increase was similar in all treatment groups. Conclusions: No meaningful thermal effect was observed with any treatment over time, and treatments did not differ from each other. We conclude that flexible therapeutic magnets were not effective for increasing skin or deep temperatures, contradicting one of the fundamental claims

  1. Method for measuring surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Gary A.; Baker, Sheila N.; McCleskey, T. Mark

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  2. Surface Temperature variability from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Dang, V. T.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    To address the existence and possible causes of the climate hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014for the day and night conditions. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We compare the satellite data with the new surface data produced by Karl et al. (2015) who denies the reality of the climate hiatus. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The day-night difference is an indicator of the anthropogenic trend. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Water Temperature Affects Susceptibility to Ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Brand, Mabre D; Hill, Rachel D; Brenes, Roberto; Chaney, Jordan C; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Grayfer, Leon; Miller, Debra L; Gray, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of emerging infectious diseases in wildlife populations is increasing, and changes in environmental conditions have been hypothesized as a potential driver. For example, warmer ambient temperatures might favor pathogens by providing more ideal conditions for propagation or by stressing hosts. Our objective was to determine if water temperature played a role in the pathogenicity of an emerging pathogen (ranavirus) that infects ectothermic vertebrate species. We exposed larvae of four amphibian species to a Frog Virus 3 (FV3)-like ranavirus at two temperatures (10 and 25°C). We found that FV3 copies in tissues and mortality due to ranaviral disease were greater at 25°C than at 10°C for all species. In a second experiment with wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus), we found that a 2°C change (10 vs. 12°C) affected ranaviral disease outcomes, with greater infection and mortality at 12°C. There was evidence that 10°C stressed Cope's gray tree frog (Hyla chrysoscelis) larvae, which is a species that breeds during summer-all individuals died at this temperature, but only 10% tested positive for FV3 infection. The greater pathogenicity of FV3 at 25°C might be related to faster viral replication, which in vitro studies have reported previously. Colder temperatures also may decrease systemic infection by reducing blood circulation and the proportion of phagocytes, which are known to disseminate FV3 through the body. Collectively, our results indicate that water temperature during larval development may play a role in the emergence of ranaviruses. PMID:27283058

  4. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  5. Effect of surface conditions affecting voltage breakdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flauta, Randolph; Aghazarian, Maro; Caughman, John; Ruzic, David

    2008-11-01

    The maximum power transferred by ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennas is dependent on the breakdown threshold when operated at high voltages. The voltage that these antennas can withstand is lowered and hence breakdowns occur due to many factors. The Surface Plasma Arcs by Radiofrequency - Control Study or SPARCS facility has a 0-15kV DC power supply to deliver power to flat cathode surface and semi-spherical anode made of Cu and Al under 10-8-10-6 torr vacuum conditions. The effects of different surface conditions on the breakdown threshold were then investigated. Also, as the ICRF antennas used for heating plasmas may come into contact with contaminants from the plasma, Li was also deposited on the cathode surface through in-situ evaporation coating and its effect on the breakdown threshold was investigated. Results on surface roughness showed no significant dependence of the breakdown threshold on macroscopic surface roughness in the cathode arithmetic roughness range of ˜77-1139nm. Microscopic surface features such as grain boundaries, impurities and imperfections may play a more visible role in affecting the vacuum breakdown.

  6. Global patterns in lake surface temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, C.; Sharma, S.; Gray, D.; Hampton, S. E.; Read, J. S.; Rowley, R.; McIntyre, P. B.; Lenters, J. D.; Schneider, P.; Hook, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature profoundly affects dynamics in the water bodieson which human societies depend worldwide. Even relatively small water temperature changes can alter lake thermal structure with implications for water level, nutrient cycling, ecosystem productivity, and food web dynamics. As air temperature increases with climate change and human land use transforms watersheds, rising water temperatures have been reported for individual lakes or regions, but a global synthesis is lacking; such a synthesis is foundational for understanding the state of freshwater resources. We investigated global patterns in lake surface water temperatures between 1985 and 2009 using in-situ and satellite data from 236 lakes. We demonstrate that lakes are warming significantly around the globe, at an average rate of 0.34 °C per decade. The breadth of lakes in this study allowed examination of the diversity of drivers across global lakes, and highlighted the importance of ice cover in determining the suite of morphological and climate drivers for lake temperature dynamics. These empirical results are consistent with modeled predictions of climate change, taking into account the extent to which water warming can be modulated by local environmental conditions and thus defy simple correlations with air temperature. The water temperature changes we report have fundamental importance for thermal structure and ecosystem functioning in global water resources; recognition of the extent to which lakes are currently in transition should have broad implications for regional and global models as well as for management.

  7. The international surface temperature initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, P. W.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Willett, K. M.; Allan, R.; Chandler, R. E.; Mhanda, A.; de Podesta, M.; Possolo, A.; Revadekar, J.; Rusticucci, M.; Stott, P. A.; Strouse, G. F.; Trewin, B.; Wang, X. L.; Yatagai, A.; Merchant, C.; Merlone, A.; Peterson, T. C.; Scott, E. M.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of International Surface Temperature Initiative is to create an end-to-end process for analysis of air temperature data taken over the land surface of the Earth. The foundation of any analysis is the source data. Land surface air temperature records have traditionally been stored in local, organizational, national and international holdings, some of which have been available digitally but many of which are available solely on paper or as imaged files. Further, economic and geopolitical realities have often precluded open sharing of these data. The necessary first step therefore is to collate readily available holdings and augment these over time either through gaining access to previously unavailable digital data or through data rescue and digitization activities. Next, it must be recognized that these historical measurements were made primarily in support of real-time weather applications where timeliness and coverage are key. At almost every long-term station it is virtually certain that changes in instrumentation, siting or observing practices have occurred. Because none of the historical measures were made in a metrologically traceable manner there is no unambiguous way to retrieve the true climate evolution from the heterogeneous raw data holdings. Therefore it is desirable for multiple independent groups to produce adjusted data sets (so-called homogenized data) to adequately understand the data characteristics and estimate uncertainties. Then it is necessary to benchmark the performance of the contributed algorithms (equivalent to metrological software validation) through development of realistic benchmark datasets. In support of this, a series of successive benchmarking and assessment cycles are envisaged, allowing continual improvement while avoiding over-tuning of algorithms. Finally, a portal is proposed giving access to related data-products, utilizing the assessment results to provide guidance to end-users on which product is the most suited to

  8. [Factors affecting the temperature of domestic refrigerators].

    PubMed

    Derens, E; Laguerre, O; Palagos, B

    2001-01-01

    A survey was carried out in France in 1999 in order to know the air temperature in domestic refrigerators and the factors which may effect this temperature. Temperatures were recorded at three levels (top, middle and bottom of the refrigerator compartment). A questionnaire was filled to acquire the following information: characteristic of family (number of family members, age, profession, income...), characteristic of refrigerator (trade, type, age, temperature setting, refrigerating type...) and the use condition (room temperature, near by heat source, built in, door opening frequency...). The average temperature of the 119 surveyed refrigerators was 6.6 degrees C. Descriptive analysis and multi dimensional analysis of factors effecting refrigerator temperature were carried out. The classification tree and the segmentation confirm the influence of the use condition (frequency of door opening, temperature setting, near by heat source and built in). There is no direct effect of one factor but the combination of all of them. PMID:11474586

  9. Temperature distribution along the surface of evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Luo, Jianbin; Guo, Dan

    2014-03-01

    The surface temperature can significantly affect the flow field of drying droplets. Most previous studies assumed a monotonic temperature variation along the droplet surface. However, the present analyses indicate that a nonmonotonic spatial distribution of the surface temperature should occur. Three different patterns of the surface temperature distribution may appear during the evaporation process of liquid droplets: (i) the surface temperature increases monotonically from the center to the edge of the droplet; (ii) the surface temperature exhibits a nonmonotonic spatial distribution along the droplet surface; (iii) the surface temperature decreases monotonically from the center to the edge of the droplet. These surface temperature distributions can be explained by combining the evaporative cooling at the droplet surface and the heat conduction across the substrate and the liquid. Furthermore, a "phase diagram" for the distribution of the surface temperature is introduced and the effect of the spatial temperature distribution along the droplet surface on the flow structure of the droplet is discussed. The results may provide a better understanding of the Marangoni effect of drying droplets and provide a potential way to control evaporation-driven deposition as well as the assembly of colloids and other materials. PMID:24730849

  10. Global modeling of fresh surface water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M. T.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature determines a range of water physical properties, the solubility of oxygen and other gases and acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing chemical reaction rates, phytoplankton and zooplankton composition and the presence or absence of pathogens. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism, tolerance to parasites, diseases and pollution and life history. Compared to statistical approaches, physically-based models of surface water temperature have the advantage that they are robust in light of changes in flow regime, river morphology, radiation balance and upstream hydrology. Such models are therefore better suited for projecting the effects of global change on water temperature. Till now, physically-based models have only been applied to well-defined fresh water bodies of limited size (e.g., lakes or stream segments), where the numerous parameters can be measured or otherwise established, whereas attempts to model water temperature over larger scales has thus far been limited to regression type of models. Here, we present a first attempt to apply a physically-based model of global fresh surface water temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modelled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by short and long-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice-formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We used the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global fresh surface water temperature at daily time steps on a 0.5x0.5 degree grid for the period 1970-2000. Meteorological forcing was obtained from the CRU data set, downscaled to daily values with ECMWF

  11. Temperature affects Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of temperature on several life history parameters of small hive beetles (SHB),Aethina tumida, were investigated under laboratory conditions. Our results showed that the development, body size and weight of SHB were dependent on temperature. Exposure of beetles to a lower (room) temperatu...

  12. Upscaling and Downscaling of Land Surface Fluxes with Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, W. P.; Anderson, M. C.; Hain, C.; Albertson, J. D.; Gao, F.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key surface boundary condition that is significantly correlated to surface flux partitioning between latent and sensible heat. The spatial and temporal variation in LST is driven by radiation, wind, vegetation cover and roughness as well as soil moisture status in the surface and root zone. Data from airborne and satellite-based platforms provide LST from ~10 km to sub meter resolutions. A land surface scheme called the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model has been incorporated into a multi-scale regional modeling system ALEXI (Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse) and a disaggregation scheme (DisALEXI) using higher resolution LST. Results with this modeling system indicates that it can be applied over heterogeneous land surfaces and estimate reliable surface fluxes with minimal in situ information. Consequently, this modeling system allows for scaling energy fluxes from subfield to regional scales in regions with little ground data. In addition, the TSEB scheme has been incorporated into a large Eddy Simulation (LES) model for investigating dynamic interactions between variations in the land surface state reflected in the spatial pattern in LST and the lower atmospheric air properties affecting energy exchange. An overview of research results on scaling of fluxes and interactions with the lower atmosphere from the subfield level to regional scales using the TSEB, ALEX/DisALEX and the LES-TSEB approaches will be presented. Some unresolved issues in the use of LST at different spatial resolutions for estimating surface energy balance and upscaling fluxes, particularly evapotranspiration, will be discussed.

  13. Factors affecting characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Three major factors affect the characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors in terms of their levitation properties during interaction with permanent magnets. First, the appropriate parameter for the permanent magnet is internal magnetization, not the value of the magnetic field measured at the magnet`s surface. Second, although levitation force grows with superconductor thickness and surface area, for a given permanent magnet size, comparison of levitation force between samples is meaningful when minimum values are assigned to the superconductor size parameters. Finally, the effect of force creep must be considered when time-averaging the force measurements. In addition to levitational force, the coefficient of friction of a levitated rotating permanent magnet may be used to characterize the superconductor.

  14. Stratospheric ozone affects mesospheric temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Since 1961, temperatures in the summer mesosphere have undergone a series of reversals. From 1961 to 1979 the atmospheric layer that stretches from roughly 50- to 100-kilometer altitude cooled by 0.5 K per decade. In the subsequent 2 decades the rate of cooling escalated to -3 to -5 K per decade, while the next 10 years saw a mild recovery. Though these temperature flips are seen in the observational record, they have never been reliably re-created in computer models of the middle atmosphere. Unlike the troposphere or stratosphere, for which there are extensive records, observations of mesospheric temperature are limited to point-source detections, making accurate modeling particularly important.

  15. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  16. Microclimatic Temperature Relationships over Different Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a study of temperature variations over different surfaces in an urban campus setting. Explains that researchers sampled temperatures over grass, bare soil, gravel, concrete, and blacktop. Reports that grassy areas registered the highest morning temperatures and lowest afternoon temperatures. (SG)

  17. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  18. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa. PMID:24977219

  19. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa. PMID:24977219

  20. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  1. How surface damage removal affects fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeelani, S.; Scott, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the removal of work hardened surface layers from specimens of 2024-T4 aluminum alloy and AISI-4130 steel on their fatigue lives has been investigated. Specimens were fatigued at selected stress levels for a given number of cycles, and the surface layer was removed followed by subsequent fatigue cycling. Results confirm that when a material is subjected to fatigue loading, damage accumulates in the surface layers in the form of work hardening. Removal of the surface layer brings the specimen back to its pre-fatigued condition.

  2. Radiometric surface temperature components for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature is a boundary condition often used in assessing soil moisture status and energy exchange from the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface. For row crops having incomplete canopy cover, the radiometric surface temperature is a composite of sunlit and shaded vegetation and substr...

  3. New satellite record of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-02-01

    Sea surface temperature is one of the key variables scientists track in studying climate changes; it is also important to meteorology and oceanography. Merchant et al. describe a new 20-year record of sea surface temperature. The record was created using infrared imagery from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) as part of the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) project.

  4. Assimilation of Surface Temperature in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Venkataraman

    1998-01-01

    Hydrological models have been calibrated and validated using catchment streamflows. However, using a point measurement does not guarantee correct spatial distribution of model computed heat fluxes, soil moisture and surface temperatures. With the advent of satellites in the late 70s, surface temperature is being measured two to four times a day from various satellite sensors and different platforms. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate use of satellite surface temperature in (a) validation of model computed surface temperatures and (b) assimilation of satellite surface temperatures into a hydrological model in order to improve the prediction accuracy of soil moistures and heat fluxes. The assimilation is carried out by comparing the satellite and the model produced surface temperatures and setting the "true"temperature midway between the two values. Based on this "true" surface temperature, the physical relationships of water and energy balance are used to reset the other variables. This is a case of nudging the water and energy balance variables so that they are consistent with each other and the true" surface temperature. The potential of this assimilation scheme is demonstrated in the form of various experiments that highlight the various aspects. This study is carried over the Red-Arkansas basin in the southern United States (a 5 deg X 10 deg area) over a time period of a year (August 1987 - July 1988). The land surface hydrological model is run on an hourly time step. The results show that satellite surface temperature assimilation improves the accuracy of the computed surface soil moisture remarkably.

  5. The Ocean? No Sweat! How the Oceans Affect Temperatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents an activity which helps students investigate how the ocean affects air temperature. Includes temperature data and a map for students to use in plotting and analyzing the temperature ranges of selected cities in Oregon. A supplementary laboratory activity is also offered. (ML)

  6. Titan Surface Temperatures from Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Flasar, F.M.; Kundle, V.G.; Samuelson, R.E.; Pearl, J.C.; Nixon, C.A.; Carlson, R.C.; Mamoutkine, A.A.; Brasunas, J.C.; Guandique, E.; Achterberg, R.K.; Bjoraker, M.H.; Romani, P.N.; Segura, M.E.; Albright, S.A.; Elliott, M.H.; Tingley, J.S.; Calcutt, S.; Coustenis, A.; Bezard, B.; Courtin, R.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal radiation from the surface of Titan reaches space through a spectral window at 19-microns wavelength. After removing the effects of the atmosphere, measurement of this radiance gives the brightness temperature of the surface. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has made such measurements during the Cassini prime mission. These observations cover a wide range of emission angles, thereby constraining the contributions from atmospheric radiance and opacity. With the more complete latitude coverage and much larger dataset, we have been able to improve upon the original results from Voyager IRIS. CIRS measures an equatorial surface brightness temperature, averaged over longitude, of 93.7 +/- 0.6 K. This agrees with the HASI temperature at the Huygens landing site. The latitude dependence of surface brightness temperature exhibits an approximately 2 K decrease toward the South Pole and 3 K decrease toward the North Pole. The lower surface temperatures seen at high latitudes are consistent with conditions expected for lake formation.

  7. Effect of surface temperature on microparticle-surface adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallabh, Chaitanya Krishna Prasad; Stephens, James D.; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of surface temperature on the adhesion properties of the bond between a substrate and a single micro-particle is investigated in a non-contact/non-invasive manner by monitoring the rolling/rocking motion dynamics of acoustically excited single microparticles. In the current work, a set of experiments were performed to observe the change in the rocking resonance frequency of the particles with the change of surface temperature. At various substrate surface temperature levels, the work-of-adhesion values of the surface-particle bond are evaluated from the resonance frequencies of the rocking motion of a set of microparticles driven by an orthogonal ultrasonic surface acoustic wave field. The dependence of adhesion bonds of a microparticle and the substrate on the surface temperature has been clearly demonstrated by the performed experiments. It was also observed and noted that the relative humidity plays a vital role in the rolling behavior of particles.

  8. Upscaling and downscaling of land surface fluxes with surface temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key surface boundary condition that is significantly correlated to surface flux partitioning between latent and sensible heat. The spatial and temporal variation in LST is driven by radiation, wind, vegetation cover and roughness as well as soil moisture status ...

  9. Examining an Affective Aggression Framework: Weapon and Temperature Effects on Aggressive Thoughts, Affect, and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Craig A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A general framework for studying affective aggression, integrating many insights from previous models, is presented. New research examining effects of extreme temperature and photos of guns on arousal, cognition, and affect is presented. Hostile cognition was assessed using automatic priming tasks (i.e., Stroop interference). Hostile affect was…

  10. Titan's Surface Temperatures Measured by Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Flasar, F. M.; Kundle, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Pearl, J. C.; Nixon, C. A.; Carlson, R. C.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Brasunas, J. C.; Guandique, E.; Arhterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Romani, P. N.; Segura, M. E.; Albright, S. A.; Elliott, M. H.; Tingley, J. S.; Calcutt, S.; Coustenis, A.; Bezard, B.; Courtin, R.

    2008-01-01

    A large fraction of 19-micron thermal radiation from the surface of Titan reaches space through a spectral window of low atmospheric opacity. The emergent radiance, after removing the effect of the atmosphere, gives the brightness temperature of the surface. This atmospheric window is covered by the far-infrared channel of the Composite Infrared spectrometer1 (CIRS) on Cassini. In mapping Titan surface temperatures, CIRS is able to improve upon results of Voyager IRIS, by taking advantage of improved latitude coverage and a much larger dataset. Observations are from a wide range of emission angles and thereby provide constraints on the atmospheric opacity and radiance that are used to derive the surface temperature. CIRS finds an average equatorial surface brightness temperature of 93.7+/-0.6 K, virtually identical to the HASI temperature at the Huygens landing site. Mapping in latitude shows that the surface temperature decreases toward the poles by about 2 K in the south and 3 K in the north. This surface temperature distribution is consistent with the formation of lakes seen at high latitudes on Titan.

  11. Surface roughness effects on equilibrium temperature.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houchens, A. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented for evaluation of equilibrium temperature distribution on radiatively adiabatic, adjoint planes which are uniformly irradiated by a collimated solar flux. The analysis employs a semigrey spectral model. Radiation properties for surface emitted radiation are obtained from the expressions of electromagnetic theory for smooth surfaces. Rough surface properties for solar radiation are given by the Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model. Numerical solutions to the governing equations yield equilibrium temperature distributions for a range of the influencing parameters. Surface roughness has little influence on equilibrium temperature for materials with high values for solar absorptance. However, for low or intermediate values of solar absorptance, roughness effects on the spatial distribution of reflected solar radiation can significantly alter equilibrium temperature particularly at surface elements where radiant interaction is small.

  12. Titan's Surface Temperatures from Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor A.

    2010-01-01

    The surface brightness temperature of Titan can be measured from Cassini through a spectral window at 19 microns where the atmosphere is low in opacity. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini observes this wavelength in its far-infrared channel. Because the Cassini tour has provided global coverage and a range of viewing geometries, CIRS has been able to go beyond the earlier flyby results of Voyager IRIS Near the equator, CIRS measures the zonally-averaged surface brightness temperature to be 917 K, very close to the temperature found at the surface by Huygens. Latitude maps show that Titan's surface temperatures drop off by about 2 K toward the south and by about 3 K toward the north. This temperature distribution is consistent with Titan's late northern winter when the data were taken. As the seasons progress, CIRS is continuing to search for corresponding changes in the temperatures of the surface and lower atmosphere. CIRS is also extending global mapping to both latitude and longitude to look for correlations between surface temperatures and geological features.

  13. Seasonal Changes in Surface Temperatures on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The surface brightness temperatures on Titan have been measured by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini during the period spanning late northern winter through vernal equinox. CIRS observes radiance from the surface through a spectral window at 19 microns where the atmosphere has an opacity minimum [I]. CIRS is now seeing a shift in the latitudinal distribution of temperatures froth a distinctly warmer south to a more symmetrical north -south pattern, similar to that found by Voyager IRIS [2,3] at the time of the previous vernal equinox. Near the equator the temperatures remain close to the 93.7 K value found at the surface by Huygens [4]. From the equator to the poles the temperature gradients are 2-3 K. When compared with predictions froth general circulation models [5] the measured temperatures and their seasonal changes constrain the possible types of surface material. As Cassini continues through Titan's northern spring CiRS will extend its, global coverage to took for correlations between surface temperatures and albedo and to search for diurnal temperature variations

  14. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  15. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  16. Medium-scale surface temperature mission: MUST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duthil, Philippe; Vidal, Alain; Dubet, Dominique

    1997-12-01

    The medium scale surface temperature (MUST) mission, studied in the frame of a European Commission (DG XII) contract, is a large swath (1200 Km), medium resolution (250 m) thermal infra-red imager mission devoted to retrieve the land surface temperature in order to serve various applications. These applications are firstly those concerned with the soil and vegetation water status (agriculture, irrigation and water resources management) as evapotranspiration and soil moisture can be inferred from surface temperature through relevant models. The other applications are either directly using the surface temperature (some frosts conditions assessment) or the air temperature that is itself derived from surface temperature extrapolation (urban heat island, some air frosts conditions). The project basically aimed to demonstrate the relevance and efficiency of the MUST mission products in the relevant application fields and to assess the economical benefits of the mission. Also in the course of the study the design of a medium resolution, large swath thermal imager, providing the appropriate performance required by the users while compact and affordable, was produced. Finally the operational implementation of the system and especially the ground segment was considered.

  17. Land and ocean surface temperature: data development and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Wang, A.; Brunke, M.

    2014-12-01

    Surface temperature (ST) plays a critical role in land-atmosphere-ocean interactions, and is one of the fundamental variables for Earth system research. ST includes surface air temperature (SAT), surface skin temperature (Ts), and subsurface water or soil temperature at a given depth [T(z)]. In this presentation, we will review our recent work on land and ocean ST. Over land, we have developed the first global 0.5 deg hourly SAT datasets from 1948-2009 by merging in situ CRU data with reanalysis data. Using these datasets, over high latitudes in winter the monthly averaged diurnal temperature range is found to be much larger than the range of monthly averaged hourly temperature diurnal cycle. The former primarily reflects the movement of synoptic weather systems, while the latter is primarily affected by the diurnal radiative forcing. We have also compared Ts from satellite remote sensing (MODIS) and land modeling (CLM) with in situ measurements. For instance, we have identified five factors contributing to the Ts differences between the model and MODIS. Over ocean, we have developed a prognostic Ts parameterization for modeling and data analysis. For instance, the inclusion of the Ts diurnal cycle affects atmospheric processes at diurnal, intraseasonal, and longer time scales. Furthermore, our parameterization provides the relationship between water temperature T(z) at different depths and Ts, and hence helps to merge temperature data from satellite infrared and microwave sensors and in situ buoy and ship measurements.

  18. GISS Analysis of Surface Temperature Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J.; Ruedy, R.; Glascoe, J.; Sato, M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the current GISS analysis of surface temperature change based primarily on meteorological station measurements. The global surface temperature in 1998 was the warmest in the period of instrumental data. The rate of temperature change is higher in the past 25 years than at any previous time in the period of instrumental data. The warmth of 1998 is too large and pervasive to be fully accounted for by the recent El Nino, suggesting that global temperature may have moved to a higher level, analogous to the increase that occurred in the late 1970s. The warming in the United States over the past 50 years is smaller than in most of the world, and over that period there is a slight cooling trend in the Eastern United States and the neighboring Atlantic ocean. The spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature change suggest that more than one mechanism is involved in this regional cooling.

  19. High temperature photoelectron emission and surface photovoltage in semiconducting diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. T.; Cooil, S. P.; Roberts, O. R.; Evans, S.; Langstaff, D. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2014-08-11

    A non-equilibrium photovoltage is generated in semiconducting diamond at above-ambient temperatures during x-ray and UV illumination that is sensitive to surface conductivity. The H-termination of a moderately doped p-type diamond (111) surface sustains a surface photovoltage up to 700 K, while the clean (2 × 1) reconstructed surface is not as severely affected. The flat-band C 1s binding energy is determined from 300 K measurement to be 283.87 eV. The true value for the H-terminated surface, determined from high temperature measurement, is (285.2 ± 0.1) eV, corresponding to a valence band maximum lying 1.6 eV below the Fermi level. This is similar to that of the reconstructed (2 × 1) surface, although this surface shows a wider spread of binding energy between 285.2 and 285.4 eV. Photovoltage quantification and correction are enabled by real-time photoelectron spectroscopy applied during annealing cycles between 300 K and 1200 K. A model is presented that accounts for the measured surface photovoltage in terms of a temperature-dependent resistance. A large, high-temperature photovoltage that is sensitive to surface conductivity and photon flux suggests a new way to use moderately B-doped diamond in voltage-based sensing devices.

  20. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S SURFACE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2011-08-10

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer measured surface radiances at 19 {mu}m in two time periods: one in late northern winter (LNW; L{sub s} = 335 deg.) and another centered on northern spring equinox (NSE; L{sub s} = 0 deg.). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between LNW and NSE a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of {approx}0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was at 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of {Delta}L{sub S} {approx} 9{sup 0} in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65{sup 0} S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  1. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennins, Donald E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) measured surface radiances at 19 micron in two time periods: one in late northern winter (Ls = 335d eg) and another centered on northern spring equinox (Ls = 0 deg). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between late northern winter and northern spring equinox a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of approximately 0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of delta Ls approximately 9 in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65 deg S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  2. Calibration of surface temperature on rocky exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap Jagadeesh, Madhu

    2016-07-01

    Study of exoplanets and the search for life elsewhere has been a very fascinating area in recent years. Presently, lots of efforts have been channelled in this direction in the form of space exploration and the ultimate search for the habitable planet. One of the parametric methods to analyse the data available from the missions such as Kepler, CoRoT, etc, is the Earth Similarity Index (ESI), defined as a number between zero (no similarity) and one (identical to Earth), introduced to assess the Earth likeness of exoplanets. A multi-parameter ESI scale depends on the radius, density, escape velocity and surface temperature of exoplanets. Our objective is to establish how exactly the individual parameters, entering the interior ESI and surface ESI, are contributing to the global ESI, using the graphical analysis. Presently, the surface temperature estimates are following a correction factor of 30 K, based on the Earth's green-house effect. The main objective of this work in calculations of the global ESI using the HabCat data is to introduce a new method to better estimate the surface temperature of exoplanets, from theoretical formula with fixed albedo factor and emissivity (Earth values). From the graphical analysis of the known data for the Solar System objects, we established the calibration relation between surface and equilibrium temperatures for the Solar System objects. Using extrapolation we found that the power function is the closest description of the trend to attain surface temperature. From this we conclude that the correction term becomes very effective way to calculate the accurate value of the surface temperature, for further analysis with our graphical methodology.

  3. Did surface temperatures constrain microbial evolution?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzman, D.; McMenamin, M.; Volk, T.

    1993-01-01

    The proposition that glaciation may not have occurred before the Cenozoic--albeit not yet a consensus position--nevertheless raises for reconsideration the surface temperature history of the earth. Glacial episodes, from the Huronian (2.3 billion years ago; BYA) through the late Paleozoic (320 to 250 million years ago; MYA) have been critical constraints on estimation of the upper bounds of temperature (Crowley 1983, Kasting and Toon 1989). Once removed, few if any constraints on the upper temperature limit other than life remain. Walker (1982) recognized that life provides an upper limit to temperature in the Precambrian. We propose a more radical concept: the upper temperature limit for viable growth of a given microbial group corresponds to the actual surface temperature at the time of the group's first appearance. In particular, we propose here that two major evolutionary developments--the emergence of cyanobacteria and aerobic eukaryotes--can be used to determine surface temperature in the Precambrian, and that only subsequent cooling mediated by higher plants and then angiosperms permitted what may possibly be the earth's first glaciation in the late Cenozoic.

  4. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Eikelboom, Tessa; van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through their tolerance to parasites and diseases. Models used to predict surface water temperature range between physically based deterministic models and statistical approaches. Here we present the initial results of a physically based deterministic model of global freshwater surface temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modeled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff, and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by shortwave and longwave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We use the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global freshwater surface temperature at daily time steps with a spatial resolution of 0.5° on a regular grid for the period 1976-2000. We opt to parameterize the model with globally available data and apply it without calibration in order to preserve its physical basis with the outlook of evaluating the effects of atmospheric warming on freshwater surface temperature. We validate our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), limited to the USA) and compare mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) data set. Results show that the model is able to capture the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations, while the interannual variability as derived from the USGS and NOAA data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for

  5. Twentieth-Century Sea Surface Temperature Trends

    PubMed

    Cane; Clement; Kaplan; Kushnir; Pozdnyakov; Seager; Zebiak; Murtugudde

    1997-02-14

    An analysis of historical sea surface temperatures provides evidence for global warming since 1900, in line with land-based analyses of global temperature trends, and also shows that over the same period, the eastern equatorial Pacific cooled and the zonal sea surface temperature gradient strengthened. Recent theoretical studies have predicted such a pattern as a response of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system to an exogenous heating of the tropical atmosphere. This pattern, however, is not reproduced by the complex ocean-atmosphere circulation models currently used to simulate the climatic response to increased greenhouse gases. Its presence is likely to lessen the mean 20th-century global temperature change in model simulations. PMID:9020074

  6. Surface temperature effect on subsonic stall.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, J. M.; Norton, D. J.; Young, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results of an analytical and experimental study of boundary layer flow over an aerodynamic surface rejecting heat to a cool environment. This occurs following reentry of a Space Shuttle vehicle. Analytical studies revealed that a surface to freestream temperature ratio, greater than unity tended to destabilize the boundary layer, hastening transition and separation. Therefore, heat transfer accentuated the effect of an adverse pressure gradient. Wind tunnel tests of a 0012-64 NACA airfoil showed that the stall angle was significantly reduced while drag tended to increase for freestream temperature ratios up to 2.2.

  7. Seasonal Surface Temperature Changes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor A.; Coustenis, Athena; Tokano, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini has been measuring surface brightness temperatures on Titan since 2004 (Jennings et al. 2011; Cottini et al. 2012; Tan et al. 2015). Radiation from the surface reaches space through a window of minimum opacity in Titan’s atmosphere near 19 microns wavelength. We mapped surface temperatures in five time periods, each about 2 years, centered on solar longitudes Ls = 313°, 335°, 0°, 28° and 53° degrees. Using zonally-averaged spectra binned in 10-degree latitude intervals, we clearly see the seasonal progression of the pole-to-pole temperature distribution. Whereas peak temperatures in the vicinity of the Equator have been close to 94 K throughout the Cassini mission, early in the mission temperatures at the North Pole were as low as 90 K and at the South Pole were 92 K. Late in the mission the pattern has reversed: 92 K in the north and 90 K in the south. Over 2005 to 2014 the peak temperature moved in latitude from about 15 S to 15 N. We estimate a seasonal lag of 0.2 Titan month. In 2010 the temperature distribution was approximately symmetric north and south, agreeing with Voyager 1 from one Titan year earlier. The surface temperatures follow closely the predictions of Tokano (2005). Our measurements may indicate a lower thermal inertia in the south than in the north.Jennings, D.E. et al., ApJ Lett. 737, L15 (2011)Cottini, V. et al., 2012. Planet. Space Sci. 60, 62 (2012)Tan, S. P. et al., Icarus 250, 64 (2015)Tokano, T., Icarus 204, 619 (2005)

  8. Chemical Sputtering of Deuterated Carbon Surfaces at Various Surface Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dadras, J.; Krstic, Predrag S

    2010-01-01

    The chemical sputtering of deuterated amorphous carbon (a-C:D) surfaces irradiated by 1 50 eV deuterium atoms at surface temperatures between 300 1000 K was studied using classical molecular dynamics. A quasi-stationary state was reached by cumulative bombardment for each energy and temperature. Results were compared with available experimental data and previous modeling results, and the applicability of molecular dynamics for thermally generated processes was discussed. An attempt is made to correct the absence of the thermally stimulated desorption/degassing form the MD simulations, which evolve at the longer time scales.

  9. Spacecraft ram glow and surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Llewellyn, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Space shuttle glow intensity measurements show large differences when the data from different missions are compared. In particular, on the 41-G mission the space shuttle ram glow was observed to display an unusually low intensity. Subsequent investigation of this measurement and earlier measurements suggest that there was a significant difference in temperature of the glow producing ram surfaces. The highly insulating properties coupled with the high emissivity of the shuttle tile results in surfaces that cool quickly when exposed to deep space on the night side of the orbit. The increased glow intensity is consistent with the hypothesis that the glow is emitted from excited NO2. The excited NO2 is likely formed through three body recombination (OI + NO + M = NO2*) where ramming of OI interacts with weakly surface bound NO. The NO is formed from atmospheric OI and NI which is scavenged by the spacecraft moving through the atmosphere. It is postulated that the colder surfaces retain a thicker layer of NO thereby increasing the probability of the reaction. It has been found from the glow intensity/temperature data that the bond energy of the surface bound precursor, leading to the chemical recombination producing the glow, is approximately 0.14 eV. A thermal analysis of material samples of STS-8 was made and the postulated temperature change of individual material samples prior to the time of glow measurements above respective samples are consistent with the thermal effect on glow found for the orbiter surface.

  10. Relationship between tree bark surface temperature and selected meteorological elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Středa, Tomáš; Litschmann, Tomáš; Středová, Hana

    2015-12-01

    The results were obtained by measurements in 2014 and 2015 in an apple orchard in Starý Lískovec and Těšetice (South Moravia, Czech Republic, Central Europe) into fertile planting of apple trees. The results show that the bark surface temperature during the year slightly differs from the surrounding air temperature. In addition, it is in average a few tenths of a °C higher in the period before the onset of the vegetation and several tenths of a degree lower during vegetation. Causes of these differences appear to be associated with the flow of sap as well as with foliage. Although it can be reasonably assumed that the temperature of the bark surface on the south side will be significantly affected by the global radiation, our measurements did not demonstrate this dependency. It appears that the wind speed had significantly larger influence on the temperature differences in the non-vegetation period as at speeds over 3.5 m s-1, the drop of temperature is so significant that the bark surface is colder than the surrounding air. Comparison of the development of sums of daily and hourly effective temperatures above 10 °C has shown that where daily values do not show significant differences, hourly values differed so prominently that the calculated date of emergence of adult codling moth in the bark surface was approximately one week earlier than with the use of data for air temperatures.

  11. GISS Analysis of Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J.; Ruedy, R.; Glascoe, J.; Sato, M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the current GISS analysis of surface temperature change for the period 1880-1999 based primarily on meteorological station measurements. The global surface temperature in 1998 was the warmest in the period of instrumental data. The rate of temperature change was higher in the past 25 years than at any previous time in the period of instrumental data. The warmth of 1998 was too large and pervasive to be fully accounted for by the recent El Nino. Despite cooling in the first half of 1999, we suggest that the mean global temperature, averaged over 2-3 years, has moved to a higher level, analogous to the increase that occurred in the late 1970s. Warming in the United States over the past 50 years has been smaller than in most of the world, and over that period there was a slight cooling trend in the Eastern United States and the neighboring Atlantic Ocean. The spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature change suggest that more than one mechanism was involved in this regional cooling. The cooling trend in the United States, which began after the 1930s and is associated with ocean temperature change patterns, began to reverse after 1979. We suggest that further warming in the United States to a level rivaling the 1930s is likely in the next decade, but reliable prediction requires better understanding of decadal oscillations of ocean temperature.

  12. Trends in Surface Temperature from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Aumann, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    To address possible causes of the current hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We find a monotonic positive trend for the land temperature but not for the ocean temperature. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The results are compared with the model studies. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  13. DISAGGREGATION OF GOES LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURES USING SURFACE EMISSIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate temporal and spatial estimation of land surface temperatures (LST) is important for modeling the hydrological cycle at field to global scales because LSTs can improve estimates of soil moisture and evapotranspiration. Using remote sensing satellites, accurate LSTs could be routine, but unfo...

  14. Produce Surface Characteristics Affect Product Quality and Safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface characteristics of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables vary largely among produce types, maturities and processing procedure. Studies have shown that the surface topography of produce significantly affected adherence, attachment, and biofilm formation of bacteria, as well as their removal a...

  15. Trends in Surface Temperature at High Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2012-01-01

    The earliest signal of a climate change is expected to be found in the polar regions where warming is expected to be amplified on account of ice-albedo feedbacks associated with the high reflectivity of snow and ice. Because of general inaccessibility, there is a general paucity of in situ data and hence the need to use satellite data to observe the large-scale variability and trends in surface temperature in the region. Among the most important sensors for monitoring surface temperature has been the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) which was first launched in 1978 and has provided continuous thermal infrared data since 1981. The top of the atmosphere data are converted to surface temperature data through various schemes that accounts for the unique atmospheric and surface conditions in the polar regions. Among the highest source of error in the data is cloud masking which is made more difficult in the polar region because of similar Signatures of clouds and snow lice covered areas. The availability of many more channels in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) launched on board Terra satellite in December 1999 and on board Aqua in May 2002 (e.g., 36 visible and infrared channels compared to 5 for AVHRR) made it possible to minimize the error. Further capabilities were introduced with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) which has the appropriate frequency channels for the retrieval of sea surface temperature (SST). The results of analysis of the data show an amplified warming in the Arctic region, compared with global warming. The spatial distribution of warming is, however, not uniform and during the last 3 decades, positive temperature anomalies have been most pronounced in North America, Greenland and the Arctic basin. Some regions of the Arctic such as Siberia and the Bering Sea surprisingly show moderate cooling but this may be because these regions were anomalously warm in the 1980s when the satellite record

  16. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Nixon, Conor A.; Cottini, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Cassini's extended mission has provided the opportunity to search for seasonal variations on Titan. In particular, surface temperatures are expected to have shifted significantly in latitude during the completed portion of the mission. Spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the nominal mission (2004-08) and the Equinox mission. (2008-10) have already shown changes in temperature. CIRS has detected a seasonal shift in the latitudinal distribution of surface brightness temperatures by comparing zonal averages from two time segments, one period in late northern winter centered on L(sub s) approximately 335 deg and a second period centered on the equinox (L(sub s) approximately 0 deg.). The earlier period had a meridional distribution similar to that previously reported: 93.5 K at the equator, 91.7 K at 85 S and 899 K at 85 N. The newly measured distribution near equinox shows a cooling in the south and a warming in the north, both by about 0.5 K. We estimate that. the centroid of the distribution moved from approximately 16 S to 7 S between the two periods. This gives a seasonal lag behind insolation of delta L(sub s) approximately 13 deg. The CIRS equinox results are consistent with those of Voyager IRIS, which encountered Titan in November 1980, just following the previous northern equinox (L(sub s) = 10 deg.). When compared with predictions from general circulation models, seasonal variations of surface temperature can help constrain the identification of surface materials. Our measurements most closely match the case of a porous ice regolith treated by Tokano, but with some apparent differences between the northern and southern hemispheres. CIRS will extend its study of seasonal variations in surface temperature on Titan as Cassini continues through northern spring.

  17. Temperature Grid Sensor for the Measurement of Spatial Temperature Distributions at Object Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Thomas; Schubert, Markus; Hampel, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of the development and application of a new temperature grid sensor based on the wire-mesh sensor principle. The grid sensor consists of a matrix of 256 Pt1000 platinum chip resistors and an associated electronics that measures the grid resistances with a multiplexing scheme at high speed. The individual sensor elements can be spatially distributed on an object surface and measure transient temperature distributions in real time. The advantage compared with other temperature field measurement approaches such as infrared cameras is that the object under investigation can be thermally insulated and the radiation properties of the surface do not affect the measurement accuracy. The sensor principle is therefore suited for various industrial monitoring applications. Its applicability for surface temperature monitoring has been demonstrated through heating and mixing experiments in a vessel. PMID:23353141

  18. Global Surface Temperatures of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. P.; Paige, D. A.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Sefton-Nash, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Diviner instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is providing the most comprehensive view of how regoliths on airless body store and exchange thermal energy with the space environment. Approximately a quarter trillion calibrated radiance measurements of the Moon, acquired over 5.5 years by Diviner, have been compiled into a 0.5° resolution global dataset with a 0.25 hour local time resolution. Maps generated with this dataset provide a global perspective of the surface energy balance of the Moon and reveal the complex and extreme nature of the lunar surface thermal environment. Daytime maximum temperatures are sensitive to the radiative properties of the surface and are ~387-397 K at the equator, dropping to ~95 K before sunrise. Asymmetry between the morning and afternoon temperatures is observed due to the thermal inertia of the regolith with the dusk terminator ~30 K warmer than the dawn terminator at the equator. An increase in albedo with incidence angle is required to explain the observed temperatures with latitude. At incidence angles >40° topography and surface roughness result in increasing anisothermality between spectral passbands and scatter in temperatures. Minimum temperatures reflect variations in thermophysical properties (Figure). Impact craters are found to modify regolith properties over large distances. The thermal signature of Tycho is asymmetric consistent with an oblique impact coming from the west. Some prominent crater rays are visible in the thermal data and require material with a higher thermal inertial than nominal regolith. The influence of the formation of the Orientale basin on the regolith properties is observable over a substantial portion of the western hemisphere despite its age (~3.8 Gyr), and may have contributed to mixing of highland and mare material on the southwest margin of Oceanus Procellarum where the gradient in radiative properties at the mare-highland contact are observed to be broad (~200 km).

  19. Surface temperature measurement of insulating glass units using infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Elmahdy, H.

    1996-12-31

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a process to produce, by means of an infrared scanner, thermal images of surfaces by detecting the radiation emitted from the surfaces. The application of IR thermography as a diagnostic tool in building science assists in determining existing anomalies in the building envelope and other building components. In this paper, IR thermography is used to compare the glass surface temperatures of insulating glass (IG) units made with two types of spacer bar (metal and silicone foam) and different gap widths. The results from this research are compared with data obtained from another research laboratory using a different IR scanner and also with data from finite-element computer modeling. All the tests and simulations were performed on identical IG units. Tests performed on seven IG units indicated that IR thermography could be used to assess the edge-of-glass temperature of IG units for the prediction of condensation resistance of the units. The image processing and analysis depend on the knowledge of accurate emissivity of the surfaces under investigation as well as other variables that affect the final thermal image (e.g., ambient temperature, relative humidity of air in the optical path, and the optical path length). The IR scanner records all the radiation (both direct and reflected) it sees either from the intended target or from any other radiative surfaces in its field of view (FOV). The vertical temperature profiles of all the tested units showed considerable reduction of temperature at the bottom section of the IG unit. The degree of temperature reduction is affected by the type of spacer bar material and the gap thickness.

  20. Correspondence of surface temperatures and terrain variables over a tallgrass prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedl, Mark A.; Davis, Frank W.; Michaelsen, Joel C.

    1991-01-01

    The time-dependent correspondence between maps of surface brightness temperature derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper data and mapped terrain variables over a tallgrass prairie in northeastern Kansas is examined. Individual terrain variables including burning treatment, vegetation cover type (agriculture, prairie, woody vegetation), hillslope position, and greenness exhibit varying degrees of association with surface temperature. Burning treatment is most strongly associated with mid-morning surface temperature. Examination of terrain strata based on combinations of terrain variables, notably burning treatment and hillslope position, suggest that terrain variables interact in affecting surface temperature. Interaction between hillslope position, burning treatment, and surface temperature is more important in August than in May.

  1. High temperature low friction surface coating

    DOEpatents

    Bhushan, Bharat

    1980-01-01

    A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

  2. How surface roughness affects chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness affects transport processes, e.g., runoff generation, infiltration, sediment detachment, etc., occurring on the surface. Nevertheless, how soil roughness affects chemical transport is less known. In this study, we partitioned roughness elements into mounds which diverge water ...

  3. Stratospheric Impact of Varying Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Waugh, Darryn; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM) has been run in 50 year simulations with the: 1) 1949-1999 Hadley Centre sea surface temperatures (SST), and 2) a fixed annual cycle of SSTs. In this presentation we first show that the 1949-1999 FVGCM simulation produces a very credible stratosphere in comparison to an NCEP/NCAR reanalysis climatology. In particular, the northern hemisphere has numerous major and minor stratospheric warming, while the southern hemisphere has only a few over the 50-year simulation. During the northern hemisphere winter, temperatures are both warmer in the lower stratosphere and the polar vortex is weaker than is found in the mid-winter southern hemisphere. Mean temperature differences in the lower stratosphere are shown to be small (less than 2 K), and planetary wave forcing is found to be very consistent with the climatology. We then will show the differences between our varying SST simulation and the fixed SST simulation in both the dynamics and in two parameterized trace gases (ozone and methane). In general, differences are found to be small, with subtle changes in planetary wave forcing that lead to reduced temperatures in the SH and increased temperatures in the NH.

  4. Factors affecting rectal temperature measurement using commonly available digital thermometers.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jonathan M; Streeter, Renee M; Torgerson, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Rectal temperature measurement is an essential part of physical examination of cattle and some physiological experiments. Modern digital thermometers are often used to measure rectal temperatures by students; this study describes their reliability and appropriate use. Students measured rectal temperature on 53 occasions using their personal digital thermometer and techniques gained from previous instruction, rectal temperature was also measured by an experienced person using a Cornell mercury thermometer completely inserted in the rectum. Cornell mercury thermometers values were 38.95±0.05°C (mean±1 SE, n=53). Student rectal temperature measurements using their initial technique were nearly 0.5°C lower, 38.46±0.07°C. After receiving instruction to insert the digital thermometer to the window, student obtained values were 38.77±0.06°C; these are significantly higher than with the student's initial technique and closer to those obtained with a Cornell thermometer. In a series of 53 water bath tests, student owned thermometers recorded similar mean values to those of a traceable (reference) digital thermometer, Cornell mercury thermometer readings were 0.2°C higher. 10 individual digital thermometers were repeatedly tested against a traceable thermometer in a water bath, one was inaccurate. In a separate experiment a trained clinician tested the effect of angle of insertion of a digital thermometer on temperature readings and the affect was <0.1°C. We conclude that accurate temperature measurements using digital thermometers are only likely if the thermometer is inserted to the beginning of the window and the thermometer's accuracy is checked periodically. PMID:21147490

  5. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  6. Is Air Temperature Enough to Predict Lake Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.; Majone, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lake surface water (LST) is a key factor that controls most of the physical and ecological processes occurring in lakes. Reliable estimates are especially important in the light of recent studies, which revealed that inland water bodies are highly sensitive to climate, and are rapidly warming throughout the world. However, an accurate estimation of LST usually requires a significant amount of information that is not always available. In this work, we present an application of air2water, a lumped model that simulates LST as a function of air temperature only. In addition, air2water allows for a qualitative evaluation of the depth of the epilimnion during the annual stratification cycle. The model consists in a simplification of the complete heat budget of the well-mixed surface layer, and has a few parameters (from 4 to 8 depending on the version) that summarize the role of the different heat flux components. Model calibration requires only air and water temperature data, possibly covering sufficiently long historical periods in order to capture inter-annual variability and long-term trends. During the calibration procedure, the information included in input data is retrieved to directly inform model parameters, which can be used to classify the thermal behavior of the lake. In order to investigate how thermal dynamics are related to morphological features, the model has been applied to 14 temperate lakes characterized by different morphological and hydrological conditions, by different sources of temperature data (buoys, satellite), and by variable frequency of acquisition. A good agreement between observed and simulated LST has been achieved, with a RMSE in the order of 1°C, which is fully comparable to the performances of more complex process-based models. This application allowed for a deeper understanding of the thermal response of lakes as a function of their morphology, as well as for specific analyses as for example the investigation of the exceptional

  7. Antarctic surface temperature and pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Limbert, D.W.S.; Boden, T.A. . Climatic Research Unit; British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-09-01

    This document presents monthly mean surface temperature and pressure data from 30 Antarctic stations. These data were assembled primarily from World Weather Records volumes for 1951--1960 and 1961--1979 and from Monthly Climatic Data for the World records since 1961. The periods of record vary by station. The earliest data are from 1903, and the most recent data are from 1988. All the assembled data were assessed for quality and for long-term homogeneity through the use of interstation comparison techniques. These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of this document and a magnetic tape containing machine-readable data files. This document provides tabular listings of the temperature and pressure data, describes how the data were processed, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, and provides reprints of pertinent literature. 25 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Sea surface temperature - Observations from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) on the geostationary GOES satellites were used to estimate sea surface temperatures (SST). A procedure was developed to screen VAS visible and infrared data for cloud-free regions for estimation of SST from the clear infrared radiances. A data set of matches between the VAS radiances and high quality buoy estimates of SST was produced. A linear regression analysis of these matches was performed to generate an empirical algorithm relating the VAS window channel brightness temperatures to the estimates of SST recorded by NOAA fixed environment buoys. Daily maps of SST during Hurricanes Alicia (1983) and Debbie (1982) demonstrated the ability of VAS to monitor air-sea interactions at high temporal and spatial scales.

  9. How does temperature affect the function of tissue macrophages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages create a major danger signal following injury or infection and upon activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn help to generate febrile conditions. Thus, like other cells of the body, tissue macrophages are often exposed to naturally occurring elevations in tissue temperature during inflammation and fever. However, whether macrophages sense and respond to temperature changes in a specific manner which modulates their function is still not clear. In this brief review, we highlight recent studies which have analyzed the effects of temperatures on macrophage function, and summarize the possible underlying molecular mechanisms which have been identified. Mild, physiological range hyperthermia has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and at the meeting presentation, we will show new data demonstrating that hyperthermia can indeed exert both positive and negative signals to macrophages. While some thermal effects are correlated with the induction of heat shock factors/heat shock proteins, overall it is not clear how mild hyperthermia can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We also summarize data which shows that hyperthermia can affect other macrophage effector functions, including the anti-tumor cytotoxicity. Overall, these studies may help us to better understand the immunological role of tissue temperature and may provide important information needed to maximize the application of heat in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

  10. Temperature Affects Human Sweet Taste via At Least Two Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nachtigal, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The reported effects of temperature on sweet taste in humans have generally been small and inconsistent. Here, we describe 3 experiments that follow up a recent finding that cooling from 37 to 21 °C does not reduce the initial sweetness of sucrose but increases sweet taste adaptation. In experiment 1, subjects rated the sweetness of sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions at 5–41 °C by dipping the tongue tip into the solutions after 0-, 3-, or 10-s pre-exposures to the same solutions or to H2O; experiment 2 compared the effects of temperature on the sweetness of 3 artificial sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, and saccharin); and experiment 3 employed a flow-controlled gustometer to rule out the possibility the effects of temperature in the preceding experiments were unique to dipping the tongue into a still taste solution. The results (i) confirmed that mild cooling does not attenuate sweetness but can increase sweet taste adaptation; (ii) demonstrated that cooling to 5–12 °C can directly reduce sweetness intensity; and (iii) showed that both effects vary across stimuli. These findings have implications for the TRPM5 hypothesis of thermal effects on sweet taste and raise the possibility that temperature also affects an earlier step in the T1R2–T1R3 transduction cascade. PMID:25963040

  11. Temperature Affects Human Sweet Taste via At Least Two Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Green, Barry G; Nachtigal, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    The reported effects of temperature on sweet taste in humans have generally been small and inconsistent. Here, we describe 3 experiments that follow up a recent finding that cooling from 37 to 21 °C does not reduce the initial sweetness of sucrose but increases sweet taste adaptation. In experiment 1, subjects rated the sweetness of sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions at 5-41 °C by dipping the tongue tip into the solutions after 0-, 3-, or 10-s pre-exposures to the same solutions or to H2O; experiment 2 compared the effects of temperature on the sweetness of 3 artificial sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, and saccharin); and experiment 3 employed a flow-controlled gustometer to rule out the possibility the effects of temperature in the preceding experiments were unique to dipping the tongue into a still taste solution. The results (i) confirmed that mild cooling does not attenuate sweetness but can increase sweet taste adaptation; (ii) demonstrated that cooling to 5-12 °C can directly reduce sweetness intensity; and (iii) showed that both effects vary across stimuli. These findings have implications for the TRPM5 hypothesis of thermal effects on sweet taste and raise the possibility that temperature also affects an earlier step in the T1R2-T1R3 transduction cascade. PMID:25963040

  12. Sea surface temperature variability: patterns and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deser, Clara; Alexander, Michael A; Xie, Shang-Ping; Phillips, Adam S

    2010-01-01

    Patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) variability on interannual and longer timescales result from a combination of atmospheric and oceanic processes. These SST anomaly patterns may be due to intrinsic modes of atmospheric circulation variability that imprint themselves upon the SST field mainly via surface energy fluxes. Examples include SST fluctuations in the Southern Ocean associated with the Southern Annular Mode, a tripolar pattern of SST anomalies in the North Atlantic associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and a pan-Pacific mode known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (with additional contributions from oceanic processes). They may also result from coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions, such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon in the tropical Indo-Pacific, the tropical Atlantic Niño, and the cross-equatorial meridional modes in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic. Finally, patterns of SST variability may arise from intrinsic oceanic modes, notably the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. PMID:21141660

  13. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values.

  14. High temperature surface protection. [10 gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    Alloys of the MCrAlX type are the basis for high temperature surface protection systems in gas turbines. M can be one or more of Ni, Co, or Fe and X denotes a reactive metal added to enhance oxide scale adherence. The selection and formation as well as the oxidation, hot corrosion and thermal fatigue performance of MCrAlX coatings are discussed. Coatings covered range from simple aluminides formed by pack cementation to the more advanced physical vapor deposition overlay coatings and developmental plasma spray deposited thermal barrier coatings.

  15. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, D.J.; Trenberth, K.E.; Reynolds, R.W. NOAA, Climate Analysis Center, Washington, DC )

    1992-09-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S. 22 refs.

  16. Eye surface temperature detects stress response in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Ikkatai, Yuko; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that stressors not only increase body core temperature but also body surface temperature in many animals. However, it remains unclear whether surface temperature could be used as an alternative to directly measure body core temperature, particularly in birds. We investigated whether surface temperature is perceived as a stress response in budgerigars. Budgerigars have been used as popular animal models to investigate various neural mechanisms such as visual perception, vocal learning, and imitation. Developing a new technique to understand the basic physiological mechanism would help neuroscience researchers. First, we found that cloacal temperature correlated with eye surface temperature. Second, eye surface temperature increased after handling stress. Our findings suggest that eye surface temperature is closely related to cloacal temperature and that the stress response can be measured by eye surface temperature in budgerigars. PMID:26103119

  17. Near-surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Díaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Muñoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle) that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air) and snow skin temperature (T-skin) helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  18. Modern average global sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    The data contained in this data set are derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature data (AVHRR MCSST), which are obtainable from the Distributed Active Archive Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. The JPL tapes contain weekly images of SST from October 1981 through December 1990 in nine regions of the world ocean: North Atlantic, Eastern North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Agulhas, Indian, Southeast Pacific, Southwest Pacific, Northeast Pacific, and Northwest Pacific. This data set represents the results of calculations carried out on the NOAA data and also contains the source code of the programs that made the calculations. The objective was to derive the average sea-surface temperature of each month and week throughout the whole 10-year series, meaning, for example, that data from January of each year would be averaged together. The result is 12 monthly and 52 weekly images for each of the oceanic regions. Averaging the images in this way tends to reduce the number of grid cells that lack valid data and to suppress interannual variability.

  19. Surface roughness change on sandstone induced by temperature increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlcko, J.; Kompanikova, Z.; Gomez-Heras, M.; Greif, V.; Durmekova, T.; Brcek, M.

    2012-04-01

    ratio of stable and less stable mineral phases is an important factor affecting the resistance of rocks to high temperatures and are reflected in optical surface roughness parameters, which increase with increasing temperature. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract No. APVV-0641-10 and No. APVV-0330-10 and by Geomateriales S2009/MAT-16.

  20. Temperature affects the silicate morphology in a diatom

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, N.; Dries, R.; Burson, A.; Stal, L. J.; Sloot, P. M. A.; Kaandorp, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Silica deposition by diatoms, a common component of the phytoplankton, has attracted considerable interest given the importance in ecology and materials science. There has recently been a great deal of research into the biological control of biosilicifcation, yet the in vivo physical and chemical effects have not been quantitatively investigated. We have grown the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in batch culture at three temperatures (14o, 18o, and 23 °C). We observed three distinct temperature-dependent growth phases. The morphology of silica was investigated using scanning electron microscopy followed by image analysis and supervised learning. The silica in the valves of the same species showed different structures: a mesh-like pattern in silicon-rich cultures and a tree-like pattern in silicon-limited cultures. Moreover, temperature affected this silica pattern, especially in silicon-limited cultures. We conclude that cells grown at 14 °C and 18 °C divide more successfully in Si-limited conditions by developing a tree-like pattern (lower silicification). PMID:26113515

  1. Surface Temperature Humidity Reference System Handbook - November 2005

    SciTech Connect

    MT Ritsche

    2005-11-30

    The Surface Temperature and Humidity Reference (SURTHREF) system is intended to provide accurate reference values of ambient temperature and relative humidity for comparison with radiosonde prelaunch values.

  2. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  3. Ground surface temperature simulation for different land covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herb, William R.; Janke, Ben; Mohseni, Omid; Stefan, Heinz G.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryA model for predicting temperature time series for dry and wet land surfaces is described, as part of a larger project to assess the impact of urban development on the temperature of surface runoff and coldwater streams. Surface heat transfer processes on impervious and pervious land surfaces were investigated for both dry and wet weather periods. The surface heat transfer equations were combined with a numerical approximation of the 1-D unsteady heat diffusion equation to calculate pavement and soil temperature profiles to a depth of 10 m. Equations to predict the magnitude of the radiative, convective, conductive and evaporative heat fluxes at a dry or wet surface, using standard climate data as input, were developed. A model for the effect of plant canopies on surface heat transfer was included for vegetated land surfaces. Given suitable climate data, the model can simulate the land surface and sub-surface temperatures continuously throughout a six month time period or for a single rainfall event. Land surface temperatures have been successfully simulated for pavements, bare soil, short and tall grass, a forest, and two agricultural crops (corn and soybeans). The simulations were run for three different locations in US, and different years as imposed by the availability of measured soil temperature and climate data. To clarify the effect of land use on surface temperatures, the calibrated coefficients for each land use and the same soil coefficients were used to simulate surface temperatures for a six year climate data set from Albertville, MN. Asphalt and concrete give the highest surface temperatures, as expected, while vegetated surfaces gave the lowest. Bare soil gives surface temperatures that lie between those for pavements and plant-covered surfaces. The soil temperature model predicts hourly surface temperatures of bare soil and pavement with root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of 1-2 °C, and hourly surface temperatures of vegetation-covered surfaces

  4. Global lake surface water temperatures from ATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCallum, Stuart; Merchant, Christopher J.; Layden, Aisling

    2013-04-01

    The ATSR Reprocessing for Climate - Lake (ARC-Lake) project applies optimal estimation (OE) retrievals and probabilistic cloud screening methods to provide lake surface water temperature (LSWT) estimates from the series of (Advanced) Along-Track Scanning Radiometers. This methodology is generic (i.e. applicable to all lakes) as variations in physical properties such as elevation, salinity, and atmospheric conditions are accounted for through the forward modelling of observed radiances. In the initial phases of ARC-Lake, LSWTs were obtained for 258 of Earth's largest lakes. In the final phase of the project, the dataset is extended by applying the OE methodology to smaller lakes, providing LSWT data from 1991 to 2012 for approximately 1000 lakes. In this presentation we will provide an overview of the ARC-Lake project, its publically available data products and some applications of these products.

  5. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Sea surface temperatures from VAS MSI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is developed for estimating sea surface temperatures from multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder on the geostationary GOES satellites. Theoretical regression equations for two and three infrared window channels are empirically tuned using clear field of view satellite radiances matched with reports of SST from NOAA fixed environmental buoys. The empirical regression equations are then used to produce daily regional analyses of SST. Monthly mean SST's for the western North Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific during March and July 1982 were produced for use in the SST Intercomparison Workshop Series. Workshop results showed VAS SST's have a scatter of 0.8-1.0 C and a slight warm bias with respect to the other measurements of SST. The VAS SST's show no discernible bias in the region of El Chichon volcanic aerosol cloud.

  7. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  8. Significant improvement in IR surface-temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Briles, S.D.; Bennett, G.A.; Larkin, T.H.; Worcester, P.

    1989-06-01

    Obtaining infrared (IR) surface-temperature measurements of miniature square targets on the order of 1.6 mm with a spatial resolution of 15 ..mu..m has recently become possible using the Barnes Engineering Computherm System, but the accuracy and precision of the measurements have been limited. The objective of this work is to provide a calibration procedure that will improve by a factor of 8 the accuracy and precision of the two-dimensional temperature measurement. The IR microscope detects energy emitted by the target and displays it as a radiance image. Heating the target to two known temperatures permits calculation of the target emissivity using the radiances at each pixel in the two-dimensional field. An error is induced in the emissivity calculation by substituting the thermal-well temperature for the known target surface temperature. At the same time, the radiance image is distorted by two functions that affect the measurement accuracy. The precision of the instrument is altered by a random noise field function. The noise functions were investigated to determine whether they were added to or multiplied by the radiance equation. A plot of image-radiance means shows the same trends as the added noise functions suggested by the prediction. Correction of the induced distortions improved the accuracy noticeably. Further improvement in the accuracy is accomplished by using a syringe thermocouple to measure the actual surface temperatures used for the emissivity calculations. Investigation of the random noise field shows that it is zero-mean and Gaussian in nature. We can therefore average images over time to improve the precision. 9 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Unexpected and Unexplained Surface Temperature Variations on Mimas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Pearl, J. C.; Hurford, T. A.; Segura, M.; Cassini Cirs Team

    2010-12-01

    could cause surface defects. For this process to also explain the observed temperature differences it would have to affect the surface’s thermal inertia to a depth comparable to the diurnal thermal skin-depth (~0.5 cm). However, whether the formation of the giant Herschel crater (which lies in the middle of the observed portion of the cold region) contributed to the observed temperature anomaly or if electron bombardment alone is able to explain the thermal anomaly is currently unknown. Future CIRS observations should be able to map the full spatial extent of the thermal anomaly and clarify whether it is centered on (and thus likely related to) Herschel, or is centered on the trailing hemisphere and thus likely to be related to the observed color anomaly.

  10. Towards Monitoring Satellite Land Surface Temperature Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, P.; Yu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is of fundamental importance to the net radiation budget at the Earth surface and to monitoring the state of crops and vegetation, as well as an important indicator of both the greenhouse effect and the energy flux between the atmosphere and the land. Since its launch on October 28, 2011, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite has been continuously providing data for LST production; intensive validation and calibration of the LST data have been conducted since then. To better monitor the performance of the S-NPP LST product and evaluate different retrieval algorithms for potential improvement, a near-real-time monitoring system has been developed and implemented. The system serves as a tool for both the routine monitoring and the deep-dive researches. It currently consists of two major components: the global cross-satellite LST comparisons between S-NPP/VIIRS and MODIS/AQUA, and the LST validation with respect to in-situ observations from SURFRAD network. Results about cross-satellite comparisons, satellite-in situ LST validation, and evaluation of different retrieval algorithms are routinely generated and published through an FTP server of the system ftp. The results indicate that LST from the S-NPP is comparable to that from MODIS. A few case studies using this tool will be analyzed and presented.

  11. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morice, C. P.; Rayner, N. A.; Auchmann, R.; Bessembinder, J.; Bronnimann, S.; Brugnara, Y.; Conway, E. A.; Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Herring, K.; Kennedy, J.; Lindgren, F.; Madsen, K. S.; Merchant, C. J.; van der Schrier, G.; Stephens, A.; Tonboe, R. T.; Waterfall, A. M.; Mitchelson, J.; Woolway, I.

    2015-12-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model.Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods.We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018), i.e.: • providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; • estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; • using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras.Information will also be given on how interested users can become

  12. EU Surface Temperature for All Corners of Earth - the EUSTACE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Nick; Auchmann, Renate; Bessembinder, Janette; Brönnimann, Stefan; Brugnara, Yuri; Carrea, Laura; Ghent, Darren; Good, Elizabeth; Herring, Katie; Høyer, Jacob; Kennedy, John; Klein Tank, Albert; Lindgren, Finn; Morice, Colin; Merchant, Chris; Remedios, John; Stephens, Ag; Tonboe, Rasmus

    2015-04-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model. Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work would need to include partnerships with statisticians and computer scientists to enable the development of new "Big Data" analysis methods. To achieve this, the EUSTACE project will: • provide new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in satellite retrievals of surface skin temperature; • identify inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from meteorological stations and correct for these over Europe; • estimate surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • use new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of the information in data-rich eras. EUSTACE will undertake this work

  13. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Appreciating when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is important for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To explore the shallow groundwater effect, we numerically exposed two soil profiles – one havi...

  14. Autosomal Mutations Affecting Adhesion between Wing Surfaces in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Prout, M.; Damania, Z.; Soong, J.; Fristrom, D.; Fristrom, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Integrins are evolutionarily conserved transmembrane α,β heterodimeric receptors involved in cell-to-matrix and cell-to-cell adhesions. In Drosophila the position-specific (PS) integrins mediate the formation and maintenance of junctions between muscle and epidermis and between the two epidermal wing surfaces. Besides integrins, other proteins are implicated in integrin-dependent adhesion. In Drosophila, somatic clones of mutations in PS integrin genes disrupt adhesion between wing surfaces to produce wing blisters. To identify other genes whose products function in adhesion between wing surfaces, we conducted a screen for autosomal mutations that produce blisters in somatic wing clones. We isolated 76 independent mutations in 25 complementation groups, 15 of which contain more than one allele. Chromosomal sites were determined by deficiency mapping, and genetic interactions with mutations in the β(PS) integrin gene myospheroid were investigated. Mutations in four known genes (blistered, Delta, dumpy and mastermind) were isolated. Mutations were isolated in three new genes (piopio, rhea and steamer duck) that affect myo-epidermal junctions or muscle function in embryos. Mutations in three other genes (kakapo, kiwi and moa) may also affect cell adhesion or muscle function at hatching. These new mutants provide valuable material for the study of integrin-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion. PMID:9136017

  15. Co adatoms on Cu surfaces: Ballistic conductance and Kondo temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruselli, P. P.; Requist, R.; Smogunov, A.; Fabrizio, M.; Tosatti, E.

    2015-07-01

    The Kondo zero-bias anomaly of Co adatoms probed by scanning tunneling microscopy is known to depend on the height of the tip above the surface, and this dependence is different on different low index Cu surfaces. On the (100) surface, the Kondo temperature first decreases then increases as the tip approaches the adatom, while on the (111) surface it is virtually unaffected. These trends are captured by combined density functional theory and numerical renormalization-group calculations. The adatoms are found to be described by an S =1 Anderson model on both surfaces, and ab initio calculations help identify the symmetry of the active d orbitals. We correctly reproduce the Fano line shape of the zero-bias anomaly for Co/Cu(100) in the tunneling regime but not in the contact regime, where it is probably dependent on the details of the tip and contact geometry. The line shape for Co/Cu(111) is presumably affected by the presence of surface states, which are not included in our method. We also discuss the role of symmetry, which is preserved in our model scattering geometry but most likely broken in experimental conditions.

  16. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Increased occurrence of more intense tropical storms intruding further poleward has been foreshadowed as one of the potential consequences of global warming. This scenario is based almost entirely on the general circulation model predictions of warmer sea surface temperature (SST) with increasing levels of atmospheric CO[sub 2] and some theories of tropical cyclone intensification that support the notion of more intense systems with warmer SST. Whether storms are able to achieve this theoretically determined more intense state depends on whether the temperature of the underlying water is the dominant factor in tropical cyclone intensification. An examination of the historical data record in a number of ocean basins is used to identify the relative importance of SST in the tropical cyclone intensification process. The results reveal that SST alone is an inadequate predictor of tropical cyclone intensity. Other factors known to affect tropical cyclone frequency and intensity are discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Nanocontact electrification: patterned surface charges affecting adhesion, transfer, and printing.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jesse J; Barry, Chad R; Knuesel, Robert J; Wang, Xinyu; Jacobs, Heiko O

    2011-06-01

    Contact electrification creates an invisible mark, overlooked and often undetected by conventional surface spectroscopic measurements. It impacts our daily lives macroscopically during electrostatic discharge and is equally relevant on the nanoscale in areas such as soft lithography, transfer, and printing. This report describes a new conceptual approach to studying and utilizing contact electrification beyond prior surface force apparatus and point-contact implementations. Instead of a single point contact, our process studies nanocontact electrification that occurs between multiple nanocontacts of different sizes and shapes that can be formed using flexible materials, in particular, surface-functionalized poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps and other common dielectrics (PMMA, SU-8, PS, PAA, and SiO(2)). Upon the formation of conformal contacts and forced delamination, contacted regions become charged, which is directly observed using Kelvin probe force microscopy revealing images of charge with sub-100-nm lateral resolution. The experiments reveal chemically driven interfacial proton exchange as the dominant charging mechanism for the materials that have been investigated so far. The recorded levels of uncompensated charges approach the theoretical limit that is set by the dielectric breakdown strength of the air gap that forms as the surfaces are delaminated. The macroscopic presence of the charges is recorded using force-distance curve measurements involving a balance and a micromanipulator to control the distance between the delaminated objects. Coulomb attraction between the delaminated surfaces reaches 150 N/m(2). At such a magnitude, the force finds many applications. We demonstrate the utility of printed charges in the fields of (i) nanoxerography and (ii) nanotransfer printing whereby the smallest objects are ∼10 nm in diameter and the largest objects are in the millimeter to centimeter range. The printed charges are also shown to affect the electronic

  18. Clouds, surface temperature, and the tropical and subtropical radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans L.; Kyle, H. Lee

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy drives both the Earth's climate and biosphere, but the absorbed energy is unevenly distributed over the Earth. The tropical regions receive excess energy which is then transported by atmospheric and ocean currents to the higher latitudes. All regions at a given latitude receive the same top of the atmosphere solar irradiance (insolation). However, the net radiation received from the Sun in the tropics and subtropics varies greatly from one region to another depending on local conditions. Over land, variations in surface albedo are important. Over both land and ocean, surface temperature, cloud amount, and cloud type are also important. The Nimbus-7 cloud and Earth radiation budget (ERB) data sets are used to examine the affect of these parameters.

  19. Amplification of surface temperature trends and variability in thetropical atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Santer, B.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.; Mears, C.; Wentz, F.J.; Klein,S.A.; Seidel, D.J.; Taylor, K.E.; Thorne, P.W.; Wehner, M.F.; Gleckler,P.J.; Boyle, J.S.; Collins, W.D.; Dixon, K.W.; Doutriaux, C.; Free, M.; Fu, Q.; Hansen, J.E.; Jones, G.S.; Ruedy, R.; Karl, T.R.; Lanzante, J.R.; Meehl, G.A.; Ramaswamy, V.; Russell, G.; Schmidt, G.A.

    2005-08-11

    The month-to-month variability of tropical temperatures is larger in the troposphere than at the Earth's surface. This amplification behavior is similar in a range of observations and climate model simulations, and is consistent with basic theory. On multi-decadal timescales, tropospheric amplification of surface warming is a robust feature of model simulations, but occurs in only one observational dataset. Other observations show weak or even negative amplification. These results suggest that either different physical mechanisms control amplification processes on monthly and decadal timescales, and models fail to capture such behavior, or (more plausibly) that residual errors in several observational datasets used here affect their representation of long-term trends.

  20. Flame attenuation effects on surface temperature measurements using IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jaap; Tabinowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Long-wave infrared (LWIR) cameras provide the unique ability to see through smoke and condensed water vapor. However, soot generated inside the flame does attenuate the LWIR signal. This work focuses on gas flame attenuation effects of LWIR signals originating from a blackbody. The experimental setup consists of time averaged, laboratory-scale turbulent diffusion flames with heat release rates set at 5 kW, 10 kW, and 15 kW. Propylene and ethylene were used as fuel, providing two different soot yields. A 30 cm by 30 cm blackbody was used with maximum surface temperatures set to 600°C. Both instantaneous and time-averaged blackbody temperature profiles through the flame were measured using a LWIR microbolometer camera (7.5-14 μm). Flame intermittency was quantified by color segmenting visible images. The experiments showed that low blackbody temperatures were significantly affected by the presence of the flame. At 600°C, the effect of flame absorption matches the emitted radiation from the flame itself. Using data obtained at various blackbody temperatures, the flame transmittance was obtained using a Generalized Reduced Gradient optimization method. The transmittance was lower for propylene flames compared to ethylene flames. Ethylene flames were shown to have higher temperatures. Using the values for flame radiance and transmissivity, the total averaged radiance of the flame plus the blackbody could be reproduced with 1% accuracy.

  1. Bead temperature effects on FCAW heat-affected zone hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Hardness limits for welding procedure qualification are often imposed to lessen the chances of delayed hydrogen cracking during production fabrication. Temper bead techniques have been used by fabricators during these qualifications to improve their chances of success. This practice involves using the heat of additional weld beads to soften the heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness in the base metal next to the weld where the hardness is the greatest. The technique works under controlled conditions, but the consistency for field use was questionable. This report describes an investigate of the effect of welding parameters, base metal chemical composition, and weld bead placement on HAZ softening. An empirical formula developed from base plate chemical composition, weld cooling time, and temper bead placement can be used to estimate the amount of HAZ tempering. Combined with an appropriate hardness prediction formula, it can help find the welding procedure needed to achieve a desired maximum HAZ hardness, or predict the HAZ hardness of existing welds. Based on the results of the study, bead temperature is not recommended for HAZ hardness control on large scale fabrications.

  2. Reevaluation of mid-Pliocene North Atlantic sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Marci M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lawrence, Kira T.

    2008-01-01

    Multiproxy temperature estimation requires careful attention to biological, chemical, physical, temporal, and calibration differences of each proxy and paleothermometry method. We evaluated mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) estimates from multiple proxies at Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes 552A, 609B, 607, and 606, transecting the North Atlantic Drift. SST estimates derived from faunal assemblages, foraminifer Mg/Ca, and alkenone unsaturation indices showed strong agreement at Holes 552A, 607, and 606 once differences in calibration, depth, and seasonality were addressed. Abundant extinct species and/or an unrecognized productivity signal in the faunal assemblage at Hole 609B resulted in exaggerated faunal-based SST estimates but did not affect alkenone-derived or Mg/Ca–derived estimates. Multiproxy mid-Pliocene North Atlantic SST estimates corroborate previous studies documenting high-latitude mid-Pliocene warmth and refine previous faunal-based estimates affected by environmental factors other than temperature. Multiproxy investigations will aid SST estimation in high-latitude areas sensitive to climate change and currently underrepresented in SST reconstructions.

  3. Surface Temperature Measurement Using Hematite Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring temperature via spectrophotometry principles are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on the temperature dependence of the reflection spectrum of hematite. Light reflected from these sensors can be measured to determine a temperature, based on changes in the reflection spectrum discussed herein.

  4. A multispectral method of determining sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A multispectral method for determining sea surface temperatures is discussed. The specifications of the equipment and the atmospheric conditions required for successful multispectral data acquisition are described. Examples of data obtained in the North Atlantic Ocean are presented. The differences between the actual sea surface temperatures and the equivalent blackbody temperatures as determined by a radiometer are plotted.

  5. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  6. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  7. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  8. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  9. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  10. Unabated global surface temperature warming: evaluating the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T. R.; Arguez, A.

    2015-12-01

    New insights related to time-dependent bias corrections in global surface temperatures have led to higher rates of warming over the past few decades than previously reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (2014). Record high global temperatures in the past few years have also contributed to larger trends. The combination of these factors and new analyses of the rate of temperature change show unabated global warming since at least the mid-Twentieth Century. New time-dependent bias corrections account for: (1) differences in temperatures measured from ships and drifting buoys; (2) improved corrections to ship measured temperatures; and (3) the larger rates of warming in polar regions (particularly the Arctic). Since 1951, the period over which IPCC (2014) attributes over half of the observed global warming to human causes, it is shown that there has been a remarkably robust and sustained warming, punctuated with inter-annual and decadal variability. This finding is confirmed through simple trend analysis and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Trend analysis however, especially for decadal trends, is sensitive to selection bias of beginning and ending dates. EMD has no selection bias. Additionally, it can highlight both short- and long-term processes affecting the global temperature times series since it addresses both non-linear and non-stationary processes. For the new NOAA global temperature data set, our analyses do not support the notion of a hiatus or slowing of long-term global warming. However, sub-decadal periods of little (or no warming) and rapid warming can also be found, clearly showing the impact of inter-annual and decadal variability that previously has been attributed to both natural and human-induced non-greenhouse forcings.

  11. Biochar pyrolyzed at two temperatures affects Escherichia coli transport through a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Carl H; Abit, Sergio M

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of biochar into soils has been proposed as a means to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. An added environmental benefit is that biochar has also been shown to increase soil retention of nutrients, heavy metals, and pesticides. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether biochar amendments affect the transport of Escherichia coli through a water-saturated soil. We looked at the transport of three E. coli isolates through 10-cm columns packed with a fine sandy soil amended with 2 or 10% (w/w) poultry litter biochar pyrolyzed at 350 or 700°C. For all three isolates, mixing the high-temperature biochar at a rate of 2% into the soil had no impact on transport behavior. When added at a rate of 10%, a reduction of five orders of magnitude in the amount of E. coli transported through the soil was observed for two of the isolates, and a 60% reduction was observed for the third isolate. Mixing the low-temperature biochar into the soil resulted in enhanced transport through the soil for two of the isolates, whereas no significant differences in transport behavior were observed between the low-temperature and high-temperature biochar amendments for one isolate. Our results show that the addition of biochar can affect the retention and transport behavior of E. coli and that biochar application rate, biochar pyrolysis temperature, and bacterial surface characteristics were important factors determining the transport of E. coli through our test soil. PMID:22218181

  12. Interactions between surface roughness and airflow turbulence affecting drying dynamics of rough porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Evaporative drying of porous surfaces interacting with turbulent airflows is common in various industrial and natural applications. The intrinsic relief and roughness of natural porous surfaces are likely to influence the structure of interacting turbulent airflow boundary layers, and thus affect rates and patterns of heat and vapor fluxes from the surface. These links have been formalized in new mechanistic models that consider intermittent and localized turbulence-induced boundary layers, resulting in rich surface evaporation and energy exchange dynamics. The models were evaluated experimentally by systematically varying surface roughness elements in drying experiments of wavy and bluff-body covered sand surfaces in a wind tunnel. Thermal infrared signatures of localized evaporative fluxes as well as mean evaporative mass losses were recorded. The resulting patterns were in good agreement with model predictions for local and surface averaged turbulent exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that evaporative water losses from wavy sand surfaces can be either enhanced or suppressed (relative to a flat surface), due to the complex interplay between the local boundary layer thickness and internal limitations on water flow to the evaporating surface. For sand surfaces covered by isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies), model predictions and measurements show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces compared to a flat surface under similar conditions. This enhancement is attributed to the formation of vortices that thin the boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. The implications of this study for interpreting and upscaling evapotranspiration rates from terrestrial surfaces will be discussed.

  13. Satellite Derived Land Surface Temperature for Model Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Ronnie J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    1999-01-01

    Studies have shown that land surface temperature (LST) tendencies are sensitive to the surface moisture availability which is a function of soil moisture and vegetation. The assimilation of satellite derived LST tendencies into the surface energy budget of mesoscale models has shown promise in improving the representation of the complex effects of both soil moisture and vegetation within the models for short term simulations. LST derived from geostationary satellites has the potential of providing the temporal and spatial resolution needed for an LST assimilation process. This paper presents an analysis comparing the LST derived from GOES-8 infrared measurements with LST calculated by the MM5 numerical model. The satellite derived LSTs are calculated using a physical split window approach using channels 4 and 5 of GOES-8. The differences in the LST data sets, especially the tendencies, are presented and examined. Quantifying the differences between the data sets provide insight of possible weaknesses in the model parameterizations affecting the surface energy budget calculations and an indication of the potential effectiveness o f assimilating LST into the models.

  14. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  15. Factors affecting survival of bacteriophage on tomato leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, F B; Balogh, B; Momol, M T; Smith, L M; Wilson, M; Jones, J B

    2007-03-01

    The ability of bacteriophage to persist in the phyllosphere for extended periods is limited by many factors, including sunlight irradiation, especially in the UV zone, temperature, desiccation, and exposure to copper bactericides. The effects of these factors on persistence of phage and formulated phage (phage mixed with skim milk) were evaluated. In field studies, copper caused significant phage reduction if applied on the day of phage application but not if applied 4 or 7 days in advance. Sunlight UV was evaluated for detrimental effects on phage survival on tomato foliage in the field. Phage was applied in the early morning, midmorning, early afternoon, and late evening, while UVA plus UVB irradiation and phage populations were monitored. The intensity of UV irradiation positively correlated with phage population decline. The protective formulation reduced the UV effect. In order to demonstrate direct effects of UV, phage suspensions were exposed to UV irradiation and assayed for effectiveness against bacterial spot of tomato. UV significantly reduced phage ability to control bacterial spot. Ambient temperature had a pronounced effect on nonformulated phage but not on formulated phages. The effects of desiccation and fluorescent light illumination on phage were investigated. Desiccation caused a significant but only slight reduction in phage populations after 60 days, whereas fluorescent light eliminated phages within 2 weeks. The protective formulation eliminated the reduction caused by both of these factors. Phage persistence was dramatically affected by UV, while the other factors had less pronounced effects. Formulated phage reduced deleterious effects of the studied environmental factors. PMID:17259361

  16. Inferring pathogen inactivation from the surface temperatures of compost heaps.

    PubMed

    Turner, Claire; Williams, Adrian; White, Rodger; Tillett, Robin

    2005-03-01

    A sufficiently high composting temperature should inactivate many common pathogens likely to be present in solid animal waste. Monitoring core temperatures inside compost heaps is not straightforward, which means that heaps are not generally monitored. An alternative is to monitor surface temperatures and use those data to infer core temperatures, and thus whether pathogen inactivation has occurred. This paper describes two methods (thermal imaging and thermocouples) for the measurement of surface temperature, and a modelling approach using time series analysis to predict the temperatures obtained in the core of aerated heaps of composting pig farmyard manure (FYM) from surface temperature data. The model was able to predict core temperatures in the heap quite closely for a period of time for well insulated parts of the heap, although predictions were further from observed values close to the surface of the heap and the aeration pipe. PMID:15501657

  17. Connecting the dots - III. Nightside cooling and surface friction affect climates of tidally locked terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, L.; Keppens, R.; Decin, L.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate how nightside cooling and surface friction affect surface temperatures and large-scale circulation for tidally locked Earth-like planets. For each scenario, we vary the orbital period between Prot = 1 and 100 d and capture changes in climate states. We find drastic changes in climate states for different surface friction scenarios. For very efficient surface friction (ts,fric = 0.1 d), the simulations for short rotation periods (Prot ≤ 10 d) show predominantly standing extratropical Rossby waves. These waves lead to climate states with two high-latitude westerly jets and unperturbed meridional direct circulation. In most other scenarios, simulations with short rotation periods exhibit instead dominance by standing tropical Rossby waves. Such climate states have a single equatorial westerly jet, which disrupts direct circulation. Experiments with weak surface friction (ts,fric = 10-100 d) show decoupling between surface temperatures and circulation, which leads to strong cooling of the nightside. The experiment with ts,fric = 100 d assumes climate states with easterly flow (retrograde rotation) for medium and slow planetary rotations Prot = 12-100 d. We show that an increase of nightside cooling efficiency by one order of magnitude compared to the nominal model leads to a cooling of the nightside surface temperatures by 80-100 K. The dayside surface temperatures only drop by 25 K at the same time. The increase in thermal forcing suppresses the formation of extratropical Rossby waves on small planets (RP = 1REarth) in the short rotation period regime (Prot ≤ 10 d).

  18. Exploration mode affects visuohaptic integration of surface orientation.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, Myrthe A; van Dam, Loes C J; Glowania, Catharina; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-01-01

    We experience the world mostly in a multisensory fashion using a combination of all of our senses. Depending on the modality we can select different exploration strategies for extracting perceptual information. For instance, using touch we can enclose an object in our hand to explore parts of the object in parallel. Alternatively, we can trace the object with a single finger to explore its parts in a serial fashion. In this study we investigated whether the exploration mode (parallel vs. serial) affects the way sensory signals are combined. To this end, participants visually and haptically explored surfaces that varied in roll angle and indicated which side of the surface was perceived as higher. In Experiment 1, the exploration mode was the same for both modalities (i.e., both parallel or both serial). In Experiment 2, we introduced a difference in exploration mode between the two modalities (visual exploration was parallel while haptic exploration was serial or vice versa). The results showed that visual and haptic signals were combined in a statistically optimal fashion only when the exploration modes were the same. In case of an asymmetry in the exploration modes across modalities, integration was suboptimal. This indicates that spatial-temporal discrepancies in the acquisition of information in the two senses (i.e., haptic and visual) can lead to the breakdown of sensory integration. PMID:25413627

  19. Global surface temperatures and the atmospheric electrical circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Colin

    1993-01-01

    To monitor future global temperature trends, it would be extremely useful if parameters nonlinearly related to surface temperature could be found, thereby amplifying any warming signal that may exist. Evidence that global thunderstorm activity is nonlinearly related to diurnal, seasonal and interannual temperature variations is presented. Since global thunderstorm activity is also well correlated with the earth's ionospheric potential, it appears that variations of ionospheric potential, that can be measured at a single location, may be able to supply valuable information regarding global surface temperature fluctuations. The observations presented enable a prediction that a 1 percent increase in global surface temperatures may result in a 20 percent increase in ionospheric potential.

  20. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  1. Modes of variability of global sea surface temperature, free atmosphere temperature and oceanic surface energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wenjie; Newell, R.E.; Wu, Zhong-Xiang

    1994-11-01

    Monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST), free air temperature from satellite microwave sounding units (MSU) and oceanic surface energy fluxes are subjected to empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis for a common decade to investigate the physical relationships involved. The first seasonal modes of surface solar energy flux and SST show similar inter-hemispheric patterns with an annual cycle. Solar flux appears to control this pattern of SST. The first seasonal mode of MSU is similar with, additionally, land-sea differences; MSU is apparently partly controlled by absorption of solar near-infrared radiation and partly by sensible heat from from the land surface. The second and third seasonal eigenvector of SST and solar flux exhibit semi-annual oscillations associated with a pattern of cloudiness in the subtropics accompanying the translation of the Hadley cell rising motion between the hemispheres. The second seasonal mode of MSU is dominated by an El Nino Signal. The first nonseasonal EOFs of SST and solar flux exhibit El Nino characteristics with solar pattern being governed by west-to-east translation of a Walker cell type pattern. The first non-seasonal EOF of MSU shows a tropical strip pattern for the El Nino mode, which is well correlated with the latent heat fluxes in the tropical east Pacific but not in the tropical west Pacific. Two possible explanations are: an increase in subsidence throughout the tropical strip driven by extra evaporation in the tropical east Pacific and consequent additional latent heat liberation; a decrease of meridional heat flux out of the tropics. 56 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Temperature sensitive surfaces and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Liang [Richland, WA; Rieke, Peter C [Pasco, WA; Alford, Kentin L [Pasco, WA

    2002-09-10

    Poly-n-isopropylacrylamide surface coatings demonstrate the useful property of being able to switch charateristics depending upon temperature. More specifically, these coatings switch from being hydrophilic at low temperature to hydrophobic at high temperature. Research has been conducted for many years to better characterize and control the properties of temperature sensitive coatings. The present invention provides novel temperature sensitive coatings on articles and novel methods of making temperature sensitive coatings that are disposed on the surfaces of various articles. These novel coatings contain the reaction products of n-isopropylacrylamide and are characterized by their properties such as advancing contact angles. Numerous other characteristics such as coating thickness, surface roughness, and hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic transition temperatures are also described. The present invention includes articles having temperature-sensitve coatings with improved properties as well as improved methods for forming temperature sensitive coatings.

  3. How strain affects the reactivity of surface metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Amakawa, Kazuhiko; Sun, Lili; Guo, Chunsheng; Hävecker, Michael; Kube, Pierre; Wachs, Israel E; Lwin, Soe; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Patlolla, Anitha; Hermann, Klaus; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2013-12-16

    Highly dispersed molybdenum oxide supported on mesoporous silica SBA-15 has been prepared by anion exchange resulting in a series of catalysts with changing Mo densities (0.2-2.5 Mo atoms nm(-2) ). X-ray absorption, UV/Vis, Raman, and IR spectroscopy indicate that doubly anchored tetrahedral dioxo MoO4 units are the major surface species at all loadings. Higher reducibility at loadings close to the monolayer measured by temperature-programmed reduction and a steep increase in the catalytic activity observed in metathesis of propene and oxidative dehydrogenation of propane at 8 % of Mo loading are attributed to frustration of Mo oxide surface species and lateral interactions. Based on DFT calculations, NEXAFS spectra at the O-K-edge at high Mo loadings are explained by distorted MoO4 complexes. Limited availability of anchor silanol groups at high loadings forces the MoO4 groups to form more strained configurations. The occurrence of strain is linked to the increase in reactivity. PMID:24259425

  4. Afforestation in China cools local land surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shu-Shi; Piao, Shilong; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Zhou, Liming; Li, Laurent Z X; Myneni, Ranga B; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2014-02-25

    China has the largest afforested area in the world (∼62 million hectares in 2008), and these forests are carbon sinks. The climatic effect of these new forests depends on how radiant and turbulent energy fluxes over these plantations modify surface temperature. For instance, a lower albedo may cause warming, which negates the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration. Here, we used satellite measurements of land surface temperature (LST) from planted forests and adjacent grasslands or croplands in China to understand how afforestation affects LST. Afforestation is found to decrease daytime LST by about 1.1 ± 0.5 °C (mean ± 1 SD) and to increase nighttime LST by about 0.2 ± 0.5 °C, on average. The observed daytime cooling is a result of increased evapotranspiration. The nighttime warming is found to increase with latitude and decrease with average rainfall. Afforestation in dry regions therefore leads to net warming, as daytime cooling is offset by nighttime warming. Thus, it is necessary to carefully consider where to plant trees to realize potential climatic benefits in future afforestation projects. PMID:24516135

  5. Afforestation in China cools local land surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-Shi; Piao, Shilong; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Zhou, Liming; Li, Laurent Z. X.; Myneni, Ranga B.; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    China has the largest afforested area in the world (∼62 million hectares in 2008), and these forests are carbon sinks. The climatic effect of these new forests depends on how radiant and turbulent energy fluxes over these plantations modify surface temperature. For instance, a lower albedo may cause warming, which negates the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration. Here, we used satellite measurements of land surface temperature (LST) from planted forests and adjacent grasslands or croplands in China to understand how afforestation affects LST. Afforestation is found to decrease daytime LST by about 1.1 ± 0.5 °C (mean ± 1 SD) and to increase nighttime LST by about 0.2 ± 0.5 °C, on average. The observed daytime cooling is a result of increased evapotranspiration. The nighttime warming is found to increase with latitude and decrease with average rainfall. Afforestation in dry regions therefore leads to net warming, as daytime cooling is offset by nighttime warming. Thus, it is necessary to carefully consider where to plant trees to realize potential climatic benefits in future afforestation projects. PMID:24516135

  6. Low-Temperature Biochar Affects an Eroded Calcareous Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research showed little benefit from using a high temperature, high pH biochar for improving the fertility of eroded calcareous soils. We thus explored the potential of an activated, low-temperature, low pH biochar to improve their fertility status. In a microcosm study conducted at 20 de...

  7. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms. PMID:20921371

  8. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature Over Central and Eastern Eurasia from MODIS Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    Surface air temperature (T(sub a)) is a critical variable in the energy and water cycle of the Earth.atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. This is a preliminary study to evaluate estimation of T(sub a) from satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature (T(sub s)) by using MODIS-Terra data over two Eurasia regions: northern China and fUSSR. High correlations are observed in both regions between station-measured T(sub a) and MODIS T(sub s). The relationships between the maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) depend significantly on land cover types, but the minimum T(sub a) and nighttime T(sub s) have little dependence on the land cover types. The largest difference between maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) appears over the barren and sparsely vegetated area during the summer time. Using a linear regression method, the daily maximum T(sub a) were estimated from 1 km resolution MODIS T(sub s) under clear-sky conditions with coefficients calculated based on land cover types, while the minimum T(sub a) were estimated without considering land cover types. The uncertainty, mean absolute error (MAE), of the estimated maximum T(sub a) varies from 2.4 C over closed shrublands to 3.2 C over grasslands, and the MAE of the estimated minimum Ta is about 3.0 C.

  9. Towards understanding how surface life can affect interior geological processes: a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, J. G.; Gans, F.; Kleidon, A.

    2011-06-01

    Life has significantly altered the Earth's atmosphere, oceans and crust. To what extent has it also affected interior geological processes? To address this question, three models of geological processes are formulated: mantle convection, continental crust uplift and erosion and oceanic crust recycling. These processes are characterised as non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems. Their states of disequilibrium are maintained by the power generated from the dissipation of energy from the interior of the Earth. Altering the thickness of continental crust via weathering and erosion affects the upper mantle temperature which leads to changes in rates of oceanic crust recycling and consequently rates of outgassing of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Estimates for the power generated by various elements in the Earth system are shown. This includes, inter alia, surface life generation of 264 TW of power, much greater than those of geological processes such as mantle convection at 12 TW. This high power results from life's ability to harvest energy directly from the sun. Life need only utilise a small fraction of the generated free chemical energy for geochemical transformations at the surface, such as affecting rates of weathering and erosion of continental rocks, in order to affect interior, geological processes. Consequently when assessing the effects of life on Earth, and potentially any planet with a significant biosphere, dynamical models may be required that better capture the coupled nature of biologically-mediated surface and interior processes.

  10. Canopy temperature view angle affects on the water deficit index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased water use efficiency for irrigated agricultural crop production requires solutions that improve irrigation scheduling and management. Several techniques exist that utilize canopy temperature measurements to assess the severity of plant water stress. The Water Deficit Index (WDI) was develo...

  11. Temperature can interact with landscape factors to affect songbird productivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Reidy, Jennifer L; Faaborg, John

    2013-04-01

    Increased temperatures and more extreme weather patterns associated with global climate change can interact with other factors that regulate animal populations, but many climate change studies do not incorporate other threats to wildlife in their analyses. We used 20 years of nest-monitoring data from study sites across a gradient of habitat fragmentation in Missouri, USA, to investigate the relative influence of weather variables (temperature and precipitation) and landscape factors (forest cover and edge density) on the number of young produced per nest attempt (i.e., productivity) for three species of songbirds. We detected a strong forest cover × temperature interaction for the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) on productivity. Greater forest cover resulted in greater productivity because of reduced brood parasitism and increased nest survival, whereas greater temperatures reduced productivity in highly forested landscapes because of increased nest predation but had no effect in less forested landscapes. The Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) exhibited a similar pattern, albeit with a marginal forest cover × temperature interaction. By contrast, productivity of the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) was not influenced by landscape effects or temperature. Our results highlight a potential difficulty of managing wildlife in response to global change such as habitat fragmentation and climate warming, as the habitat associated with the greatest productivity for flycatchers was also that most negatively influenced by high temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on nest predation (and therefore, nest predators) underscores the need to acknowledge the potential complexity of species' responses to climate change by incorporating a more thorough consideration of community ecology in the development of models of climate impacts on wildlife. PMID:23504884

  12. Influence of lunar topography on simulated surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiguo, Meng; Yi, Xu; Zhanchuan, Cai; Shengbo, Chen; Yi, Lian; Hang, Huang

    2014-11-01

    The surface temperature of the Moon is one of the essential parameters for the lunar exploration, especially to evaluate the Moon thermophysical features. The distribution of the temperature is heavily influenced by the Moon topography, which, however, is rarely studied in the state-of-art surface temperature models. Therefore, this paper takes the Moon topography into account to improve the surface temperature model, Racca model. The main parameters, such as slopes along the longitude and latitude directions, are estimated with the topography data from Chang'E-1 satellite and the Horn algorithm. Then the effective solar illumination model is then constructed with the slopes and the relative position to the subsolar point. Finally, the temperature distribution over the Moon surface is obtained with the effective illumination model and the improved Racca model. The results indicate that the distribution of the temperature is very sensitive to the fluctuation of the Moon surface. The change of the surface temperature is up to 150 K in some places compared to the result without considering the topography. In addition, the variation of the surface temperature increases with the distance from the subsolar point and the elevation, along both latitude and longitude directions. Furthermore, the simulated surface temperature coincides well with the brightness temperature in 37 GHz observed by the microwave sounder onboard Chang'E-2 satellite. The corresponded emissivity map not only eliminates the influence of the topography, but also hints the inherent properties of the lunar regolith just below the surface. Last but not the least, the distribution of the permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) in the lunar pole area is also evaluated with the simulated surface temperature result.

  13. Nanoscale topographic changes on sterilized glass surfaces affect cell adhesion and spreading.

    PubMed

    Wittenburg, Gretel; Lauer, Günter; Oswald, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk; Franz, Clemens M

    2014-08-01

    Producing sterile glass surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of laboratory and medical applications, including in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering. However, sterilization may change the surface properties of glass and thereby affect its use for medical applications, for instance as a substrate for culturing cells. To investigate potential effects of sterilization on glass surface topography, borosilicate glass coverslips were left untreated or subjected to several common sterilization procedures, including low-temperature plasma gas, gamma irradiation and steam. Imaging by atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the surface of untreated borosilicate coverslips features a complex landscape of microislands ranging from 1000 to 3000 nm in diameter and 1 to 3 nm in height. Steam treatment completely removes these microislands, producing a nanosmooth glass surface. In contrast, plasma treatment partially degrades the microisland structure, while gamma irradiation has no effect on microisland topography. To test for possible effects of the nanotopographic structures on cell adhesion, human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on untreated or sterilized glass surfaces. Analyzing fibroblast adhesion 3, 6, and 24 h after cell seeding revealed significant differences in cell attachment and spreading depending on the sterilization method applied. Furthermore, single-cell force spectroscopy revealed a connection between the nanotopographic landscape of glass and the formation of cellular adhesion forces, indicating that fibroblasts generally adhere weakly to nanosmooth but strongly to nanorough glass surfaces. Nanotopographic changes induced by different sterilization methods may therefore need to be considered when preparing sterile glass surfaces for cell culture or biomedical applications. PMID:24027204

  14. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    PubMed Central

    de CASTRO, Fabrício Luscino Alves; CAMPOS, Bruno Barbosa; BRUNO, Kely Firmino; REGES, Rogério Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8x2 mm) were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI). Three temperatures (10º C, 25º C and 60º C) and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s) were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1); B: 7 days after storage (M2); C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3). The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%). Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p<0.05). At 60º C, the composite sorption showed an inverse relationship with the curing time (p<0.05). The composite cured for 5 s showed higher sorption for the 40 s or 60 s curing times when compared with all temperatures (p<0.05). Curing times of 20 s and 40 s showed similar sorption data for all temperatures (p>0.05). The 60º C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10º C temperature (p<0.05). The same results were found when comparing 10º C and 25º C (p<0.05), except that the 20 s and 40 s curing times behaved similarly (p>0.05). Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05), but was higher at 10º C than at 60º C for all curing times (p<0.05). When the composite was cured at 25º C, similar solubility values were found when comparing the 5 s and 10 s or 20 s and 40 s curing times (p>0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and

  15. Degradation of soil fumigants as affected by initial concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q L; Gan, J; Papiernik, S K; Becker, J O; Yates, S R

    2001-01-01

    Soil fumigation using shank injection creates high fumigant concentration gradients in soil from the injection point to the soil surface. A temperature gradient also exists along the soil profile. We studied the degradation of methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in an Arlington sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed, thermic Haplic Durixeralf) at four temperatures and four initial concentrations. We then tested the applicability of first-order, half-order, and second-order kinetics, and the Michaelis-Menten model for describing fumigant degradation as affected by temperature and initial concentration. Overall, none of the models adequately described the degradation of MITC and 1,3-D isomers over the range of the initial concentrations. First-order and half-order kinetics adequately described the degradation of MITC and 1,3-D isomers at each initial concentration, with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.78 (r2> 0.78). However, the derived rate constant was dependent on the initial concentration. The first-order rate constants varied between 6 and 10x for MITC for the concentration range of 3 to 140 mg kg(-1), and between 1.5 and 4x for 1,3-D isomers for the concentration range of 0.6 to 60 mg kg(-1), depending on temperature. For the same initial concentration range, the variation in the half-order rate constants was between 1.4 and 1.7x for MITC and between 3.1 and 6.1x for 1,3-D isomers, depending on temperature. Second-order kinetics and the Michaelis-Menten model did not satisfactorily describe the degradation at all initial concentrations. The degradation of MITC and 1,3-D was primarily biodegradation, which was affected by temperature between 20 and 40 degrees C, following the Arrhenius equation (r2 > 0.74). PMID:11476506

  16. A Preliminary Study of Surface Temperature Cold Bias in COAMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H-N S; Leach, M J; Sugiyama, G A; Aluzzi, F J

    2001-04-27

    It is well recognized that the model predictability is more or less hampered by the imperfect representations of atmospheric state and model physics. Therefore, it is a common problem for any numerical models to exhibit some sorts of biases in the prediction. In this study, the emphasis is focused on the cold bias of surface temperature forecast in Naval Research Laboratory's three-dimensional mesoscale model, COAMPS (Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System). Based on the comparison with the ground station data, there were two types of ground temperature cold biases identified in LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) operational forecasts of COAMPS over the California and Nevada regions during the 1999 winter and the 2000 spring. The first type of cold bias appears at high elevation regions covered by snow, and its magnitude can be as large as 30 F - 40 F lower than observed. The second type of cold bias mainly exists in the snow-free clear-sky regions, where the surface temperature is above the freezing point, and its magnitude can be up to 5 F - 10 F lower than observed. These cold biases can affect the low-level stratification, and even the diurnal variation of winds in the mountain regions, and therefore impact the atmospheric dispersion forecast. The main objective of this study is to explore the causes of such cold bias, and to further the improvement of the forecast performance in COAMPS. A series of experiments are performed to gauge the sensitivity of the model forecast due to the physics changes and large-scale data with various horizontal and vertical resolutions.

  17. Martian Meteorites Record Surface Temperatures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2005-07-01

    Using published data for argon (Ar) released when Martian meteorites are heated, David Shuster (California Institute of Technology, now at Berkeley Geochronology Center, Berkeley, CA) and Benjamin Weiss (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) show that the nakhlite group of Martian meteorites and unique Martian meteorite ALH 84001 were probably not heated above about 0 degree C for most of their histories. This indicates that the surface of Mars has been cold for almost four billion years. If a warm, wet environment existed on Mars (inferred from previous studies of surface features and geochemical parameters), it occurred before four billion years ago.

  18. Modeling Tree Shade Effect on Urban Ground Surface Temperature.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marco; Massetti, Luciano; Brandani, Giada; Petralli, Martina; Orlandini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the role that urban forests can play as urban microclimate modifiers. Tree shade and evapotranspiration affect energy fluxes and mitigate microclimate conditions, with beneficial effects on human health and outdoor comfort. The aim of this study was to investigate surface temperature () variability under the shade of different tree species and to test the capability in predicting of a proposed heat transfer model. Surface temperature data on asphalt and grass under different shading conditions were collected in the Cascine park, Florence, Italy, and were used to test the performance of a one-dimensional heat transfer model integrated with a routine for estimating the effect of plant canopies on surface heat transfer. Shading effects of 10 tree species commonly used in Italian urban settings were determined by considering the infrared radiation and the tree canopy leaf area index (LAI). The results indicate that, on asphalt, was negatively related to the LAI of trees ( reduction ranging from 13.8 to 22.8°C). On grass, this relationship was weaker probably because of the combined effect of shade and grass evapotranspiration on ( reduction ranged from 6.9 to 9.4°C). A sensitivity analysis confirmed that other factors linked to soil water content play an important role in reduction of grassed areas. Our findings suggest that the energy balance model can be effectively used to estimate of the urban pavement under different shading conditions and can be applied to the analysis of microclimate conditions of urban green spaces. PMID:26828170

  19. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size.

    PubMed

    Woolway, R Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Maberly, Stephen C; French, Jon R; Livingstone, David M; Monteith, Donald T; Simpson, Gavin L; Thackeray, Stephen J; Andersen, Mikkel R; Battarbee, Richard W; DeGasperi, Curtis L; Evans, Christopher D; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C; Rusak, James A; Ryves, David B; Scott, Daniel R; Shilland, Ewan M; Smyth, Robyn L; Staehr, Peter A; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored. PMID:27023200

  20. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size

    PubMed Central

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D.; Maberly, Stephen C.; French, Jon R.; Livingstone, David M.; Monteith, Donald T.; Simpson, Gavin L.; Thackeray, Stephen J.; Andersen, Mikkel R.; Battarbee, Richard W.; DeGasperi, Curtis L.; Evans, Christopher D.; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P.; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C.; Rusak, James A.; Ryves, David B.; Scott, Daniel R.; Shilland, Ewan M.; Smyth, Robyn L.; Staehr, Peter A.; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored. PMID:27023200

  1. SCC Initiation in Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; DS Morton; RA Etien; GA Young; RB Bucinell

    2006-11-03

    Studies have shown that grain boundary chromium carbides improve the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel based alloys exposed to high temperature, high purity water. However, thermal cycles from welding can significantly alter the microstructure of the base material near the fusion line. In particular, the heat of welding can solutionize grain boundary carbides and produce locally high residual stresses and strains, reducing the SCC resistance of the Alloy 600 type material in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Testing has shown that the SCC growth rate in Alloy 600 heat affected zone samples can be {approx}30x faster than observed in the Alloy 600 base material under identical testing conditions due to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and increased plastic strain in the HAZ [1, 2]. Stress corrosion crack initiation tests were conducted on Alloy 600 HAZ samples at 360 C in hydrogenated, deaerated water to determine if these microstructural differences significantly affect the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to the Alloy 600 base material. Alloy 600 to EN82H to Alloy 600 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) specimens where fabricated from an Alloy 600 to Alloy 600 narrow groove weld with EN82H filler metal. The approximate middle third of the specimen gauge region was EN82H such that each specimen had two HAZ regions. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load, and a direct current electric potential drop was used for in-situ detection of SCC. Test results suggest that the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 and its weld metal follows the following order: EN82H > Alloy 600 HAZ > Alloy 600. The high SCC initiation resistance observed to date in Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to wrought Alloy 600 is unexpected based on the microstructure of HAZ versus wrought material and based on prior SCC growth rate studies. The observed behavior for the HAZ specimens is likely

  2. Temperature affects the morphology and calcification of Emiliania huxleyi strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Navarro, Anaid; Langer, Gerald; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The global warming debate has sparked an unprecedented interest in temperature effects on coccolithophores. The calcification response to temperature changes reported in the literature, however, is ambiguous. The two main sources of this ambiguity are putatively differences in experimental setup and strain specificity. In this study we therefore compare three strains isolated in the North Pacific under identical experimental conditions. Three strains of Emiliania huxleyi type A were grown under non-limiting nutrient and light conditions, at 10, 15, 20 and 25 °C. All three strains displayed similar growth rate versus temperature relationships, with an optimum at 20-25 °C. Elemental production (particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), particulate organic carbon (POC), total particulate nitrogen (TPN)), coccolith mass, coccolith size, and width of the tube element cycle were positively correlated with temperature over the sub-optimum to optimum temperature range. The correlation between PIC production and coccolith mass/size supports the notion that coccolith mass can be used as a proxy for PIC production in sediment samples. Increasing PIC production was significantly positively correlated with the percentage of incomplete coccoliths in one strain only. Generally, coccoliths were heavier when PIC production was higher. This shows that incompleteness of coccoliths is not due to time shortage at high PIC production. Sub-optimal growth temperatures lead to an increase in the percentage of malformed coccoliths in a strain-specific fashion. Since in total only six strains have been tested thus far, it is presently difficult to say whether sub-optimal temperature is an important factor causing malformations in the field. The most important parameter in biogeochemical terms, the PIC : POC ratio, shows a minimum at optimum growth temperature in all investigated strains. This clarifies the ambiguous picture featuring in the literature, i.e. discrepancies between PIC : POC-temperature

  3. Does temperature of charcoal creation affect subsequent mineralization of soil carbon and nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier-Bergeron, S.; Bradley, R.; Munson, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fire is the most common form of natural disturbance of boreal forest ecosystems and has primordial influence on successional processes. This may be due in part to the pre-disturbance vegetation development stage and species composition, but these successional pathways could also vary with differences in fire behavior and consequently in fire intensity, defined as the energy released during various phases of a fire. Fire intensity may also affect soil C and N cycling by affecting the quality of the charcoal that is produced. For example, the porosity of coal tends to increase with increasing temperature at which it is produced Higher porosity would logically increase the surface area to which dissolved soil molecules, such as tannins and other phenolics, may be adsorbed. We report on a microcosm study in which mineral and organic soils were jointly incubated for eight weeks with a full factorial array of treatments that included the addition of Kalmia tannins, protein, and wood charcoal produced at five different temperatures. A fourth experimental factor comprised the physical arrangement of the material (stratified vs. mixed), designed to simulate the effect of soil scarification after fire and salvage harvest. We examined the effects of these treatments on soil C and N mineralisation and soil microbial biomass. The furnace temperature at which the charcoal was produced had a significant effect on its physico-chemical properties; increasing furnace temperatures corresponded to a significant increase in % C (P<0.001), and a significant decrease in %O (P<0.001) and %H (P<0.001). Temperature also had significant impacts on microporosity (surface area and volume). Temperature of production had no effect (P=0.1355) on soil microbial biomass. We observed a linear decreasing trend (P<0.001) in qCO2 with increasing temperature of production, which was mainly reflected in a decline in basal respiration. Finally, we found a significant interaction (P=0.010) between

  4. Surface tension of low-temperature aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Horibe, A.; Fukusako, S.; Yamada, M.

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of the surface tension have been carried out to determine the effects of both temperature and concentration on the surface tension of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, propylene glycol, and ethylene glycol. A differential capillary-rise method was employed for the measurements. The results show that the surface tension of the ethylene glycol solution and the propylene glycol solution increases as the concentration of the solution decreases, while for the sodium chloride solution the surface tension increases monotonically as the concentration increases. The surface tension of the liquids was found to be an almost-linear function of temperature from 20{degrees}C to just above the freezing temperature. Equations for the surface tension of the three binary aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and concentration are presented.

  5. Temperature affects the timing of spawning and migration of North Sea mackerel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Teunis; Gislason, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Climate change accentuates the need for knowing how temperature impacts the life history and productivity of economically and ecologically important species of fish. We examine the influence of temperature on the timing of the spawning and migrations of North Sea Mackerel using data from larvae CPR surveys, egg surveys and commercial landings from Danish coastal fisheries in the North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat and inner Danish waters. The three independent sources of data all show that there is a significant relationship between the timing of spawning and sea surface temperature. Large mackerel are shown to arrive at the feeding areas before and leave later than small mackerel and the sequential appearance of mackerel in each of the feeding areas studied supports the anecdotal evidence for an eastward post-spawning migration. Occasional commercial catches taken in winter in the Sound N, Kattegat and Skagerrak together with catches in the first quarter IBTS survey furthermore indicate some overwintering here. Significant relationships between temperature and North Sea mackerel spawning and migration have not been documented before. The results have implications for mackerel resource management and monitoring. An increase in temperature is likely to affect the timing and magnitude of the growth, recruitment and migration of North Sea mackerel with subsequent impacts on its sustainable exploitation.

  6. Surface aerodynamic temperature modeling over rainfed cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) or latent heat flux (LE) can be spatially estimated as an energy balance (EB) residual for land surfaces using remote sensing inputs. The EB equation requires the estimation of net radiation (Rn), soil heat flux (G), and sensible heat flux (H). Rn and G can be estimated with ...

  7. Low temperature self-cleaning properties of superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fajun; Shen, Taohua; Li, Changquan; Li, Wen; Yan, Guilong

    2014-10-01

    Outdoor surfaces are usually dirty surfaces. Ice accretion on outdoor surfaces could lead to serious accidents. In the present work, the superhydrophobic surface based on 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-Perfluorodecanethiol (PFDT) modified Ag/PDMS composite was prepared to investigate the anti-icing property and self-cleaning property at temperatures below freezing point. The superhydrophobic surface was deliberately polluted with activated carbon before testing. It was observed that water droplet picked up dusts on the cold superhydrophobic surface and took it away without freezing at a measuring temperature of -10 °C. While on a smooth PFDT surface and a rough surface base on Ag/PDMS composite without PFDT modification, water droplets accumulated and then froze quickly at the same temperature. However, at even lower temperature of -12 °C, the superhydrophobic surface could not prevent the surface water from icing. In addition, it was observed that the frost layer condensed from the moisture pay an important role in determining the low temperature self-cleaning properties of a superhydrophobic surface.

  8. Possible rainfall reduction through reduced surface temperatures due to overgrazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Surface temperature reduction in terrain denuded of vegetation (as by overgrazing) is postulated to decrease air convection, reducing cloudiness and rainfall probability during weak meteorological disturbances. By reducing land-sea daytime temperature differences, the surface temperature reduction decreases daytime circulation of thermally driven local winds. The described desertification mechanism, even when limited to arid regions, high albedo soils, and weak meteorological disturbances, can be an effective rainfall reducing process in many areas including most of the Mediterranean lands.

  9. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  10. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  11. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  12. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  13. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101... temperature tests. The test for determination of exhaust gas cooling efficiency described in § 7.102 may be... the rated horsepower specified in § 7.97(a)(2). (ii) Install sufficient temperature measuring...

  14. Investigation of Radiation Affected High Temperature Superconductors - YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veterníková, J.; Chudý, M.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Degmová, J.; Snopek, J.

    In this paper, high temperature superconductors are studied in terms of radiation stability, which is necessary for application in fusion reactors. Perspective superconducting materials based on YBCO (Perkovskite structure) were measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Measurements were performed for samples prior to and after fast neutron irradiation in TRIGA MARK II reactor in Vienna. The samples demonstrated accumulation of Cu-O di-vacancies due to the irradiation. Nevertheless, the structure showed regeneration during thermal treatment by defects recombination. Positron spectroscopy results were complemented with values of critical temperature, which also showed changes of superconducting properties after the irradiation and the annealing.

  15. Phasic temperature change patterns affect growth and tuberization in potatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T.W. . Dept. of Horticulture)

    1994-07-01

    This study determined the response of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Norland) plants to various patterns of air temperature changes over different growth periods. In each of two experiments under controlled environments, eight treatments of temperature changes were carried out in two growth rooms maintained at 17 and 22 C and a constant vapor pressure deficit of 0.60 kPa and 14-hour photoperiod. Plants were grown for 63 days after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets in 20-liter pots containing peat-vermiculite mix. Temperature changes were imposed on days 21 and 42, which were essentially at the beginning of tuber initiation and tuber enlargement, respectively, for this cultivar. Plants were moved between two temperature rooms to obtain eight temperature change patterns: 17-17-17, 17-17-22, 17-22-17, 22-17-17, 17-22-22, 22-17-22, 22-22-17, and 22-22-22C over three 21-day growth periods. At harvest on day 63, total plant dry weight was higher for the treatments beginning with 22 C than for those beginning with 17C, with highest biomass obtained at 22-22-17 and 22-17-17C. Shoot dry weight increased with temperature increased from 17-17-17 to 22-22-22C during the three growth periods. Tuber dry weight was highest with 22-17-17C, and lowest with 17-17-22 and 17-22-22C. With 22-17-17C, both dry weights of stolons and roots were lowest. Total tuber number and number of small tubers were highest with 17-17-17 and 17-17-22C, and lowest with 17-22-22 and 22-22-22C, whereas number of medium tubers was highest with 22-17-22C, and number of large tubers was highest with 22-17-17C. This study indicates that tuber development of potatoes is optimized with a phasic pattern of high temperature during early growth and low temperature during later growth.

  16. Surface air temperature and its changes over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. D.; New, M.; Parker, D. E.; Martin, S.; Rigor, I. G.

    1999-05-01

    We review the surface air temperature record of the past 150 years, considering the homogeneity of the basic data and the standard errors of estimation of the average hemispheric and global estimates. We present global fields of surface temperature change over the two 20-year periods of greatest warming this century, 1925-1944 and 1978-1997. Over these periods, global temperatures rose by 0.37° and 0.32°C, respectively. The twentieth-century warming has been accompanied by a decrease in those areas of the world affected by exceptionally cool temperatures and to a lesser extent by increases in areas affected by exceptionally warm temperatures. In recent decades there have been much greater increases in night minimum temperatures than in day maximum temperatures, so that over 1950-1993 the diurnal temperature range has decreased by 0.08°C per decade. We discuss the recent divergence of surface and satellite temperature measurements of the lower troposphere and consider the last 150 years in the context of the last millennium. We then provide a globally complete absolute surface air temperature climatology on a 1° × 1° grid. This is primarily based on data for 1961-1990. Extensive interpolation had to be undertaken over both polar regions and in a few other regions where basic data are scarce, but we believe the climatology is the most consistent and reliable of absolute surface air temperature conditions over the world. The climatology indicates that the annual average surface temperature of the world is 14.0°C (14.6°C in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and 13.4°C for the Southern Hemisphere). The annual cycle of global mean temperatures follows that of the land-dominated NH, with a maximum in July of 15.9°C and a minimum in January of 12.2°C.

  17. A model of the diurnal variation in lake surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Jonathan L.

    Satellite measurements of water surface temperature can benefit several environmental applications such as predictions of lake evaporation, meteorological forecasts, and predictions of lake overturning events, among others. However, limitations on the temporal resolution of satellite measurements restrict these improvements. A model of the diurnal variation in lake surface temperature could potentially increase the effective temporal resolution of satellite measurements of surface temperature, thereby enhancing the utility of these measurements in the above applications. Herein, a one-dimensional transient thermal model of a lake is used in combination with surface temperature measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites, along with ambient atmospheric conditions from local weather stations, and bulk temperature measurements to calculate the diurnal surface temperature variation for the five major lakes in the Savannah River Basin in South Carolina: Lakes Jocassee, Keowee, Hartwell, Russell, and Thurmond. The calculated solutions are used to obtain a functional form for the diurnal surface temperature variation of these lakes. Differences in diurnal variation in surface temperature between each of these lakes are identified and potential explanations for these differences are presented.

  18. The role of subsurface soil temperature feedbacks in summer surface air temperature variability over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil temperature, an important component of land surface, can influence the climate through its effects on surface energy and water budgets and resulted changes in regional atmospheric circulation. However, the effects of soil temperature on climate variations have been less discussed. This study investigates the role of subsurface soil temperature feedbacks in influencing summer surface air temperature variability over East Asia by means of regional climate model (RCM) simulations. For this aim, two long-term simulations with and without subsurface soil temperature feedbacks are performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. From our investigation, it is evident that subsurface soil temperature feedbacks make a dominant contribution to amplifying summer surface air temperature variability over the arid/semi-arid regions. Further analysis reveals that subsurface soil temperature exhibits an asymmetric effect on summer daytime and nighttime surface air temperature variability, with a stronger effect on daily minimum temperature variability than that of daily maximum temperature variability. This study provides the first RCM-based demonstration that subsurface soil temperature feedbacks play an important role in influencing climate variability over East Asia, such as summer surface air temperature. In the meanwhile, the model bias should be recognized. The results achieved by this study thus need to be further confirmed in a multi-model framework to eliminate the model dependence.

  19. Temperature Contours and Ghost Surfaces for Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S. R.; Breslau, J.

    2008-03-07

    Steady state solutions for anisotropic heat transport in a chaotic magnetic field are determined numerically and compared to a set of 'ghost surfaces' -surfaces constructed via an action-gradient flow between the minimax and minimizing periodic orbits. The ghost surfaces are in remarkable agreement with the temperature contours.

  20. Offline land surface temperature assimilation in mumerical weather prediction output

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature plays an important role in land surface processes, and it is a key input to physically-based retrieval algorithms of important hydrological states and fluxes, such as soil moisture and evaporation. For this reason there are many independent estimates of land surface temperat...

  1. Temperature Contours and Ghost-Surfaces for Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson and J. Breslau

    2008-01-31

    Steady state solutions for anisotropic heat transport in a chaotic magnetic field are determined numerically and compared to a set of "ghost-surfaces", surfaces constructed via an action-gradient flow between the minimax and minimizing periodic orbits. The ghost-surfaces are in remarkable agreement with the temperature contours.

  2. PHYSICOCHEMICAL FACTORS AFFECTING TOXICITY IN FRESHWATER: HARDNESS, PH, AND TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A search of the literature for effects of hardness, pH, or temperature on the toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms suggested that the amount of reliable and useful data is limited. uch of the disparity among results reported in the literature was caused by improperly des...

  3. MATURITY AND TEMPERATURE AFFECTS THE GERMINATION OF STYRAX JAPONICUS SEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of seed maturity, warm (18oC) or cold (5.5oC) temperature, and gibberellic acid (GA3) on seed germination of Styrax japonicus Sieb. et. Zucc was investigated. Seed maturity and morphological changes were observed using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI). Fruits harvested on July 22,...

  4. Application of radiometric surface temperature for surface energy balance estimation: John Monteith's contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 25 years ago, Huband and Monteith paper’s investigating the radiative surface temperature and the surface energy balance of a wheat canopy, highlighted the key issues in computing fluxes with radiometric surface temperature. These included the relationship between radiometric and aerodynamic s...

  5. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  6. Planetary boundary layer response to surface temperature anomalies forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Xavier; Lapeyre, Guillaume; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies showed that strong sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, on the scale of the western boundary currents, strongly affect the planetary boundary layer (PBL) but also all the troposphere. This renewed the interest of air-sea interactions at oceanic meso-scales. Mainly two mechanisms are proposed in the literature, the first one (due to Wallace et al 1989) is based on the destabilization of the PBL above SST anomalies, the second one (Lindzen and Nigam 1987) is based on the pressure anomalies linked to the atmosphere temperature adjustment to the SST. These two mechanisms predict different responses of the PBL to the SST. We did numerical simulations with a meso-scale atmospheric model (WRF) with the same configuration as the one described in Lambert et al 2013. The model is forced by a SST anomaly which is first a zonally or meridionally constant field and secondly a field of meso-scale structures. Firstly we studied the influence of the initial wind strength on the PBL response for the two different types of SST anomalies. We showed that the dominant mechanism can change according to weak or strong wind and to the orientation of the SST anomaly. Secondly after considering a dry atmosphere we switched on the humidity in our configuration. We studied how it influences the PBL response and whether the mechanism driving the PBL response is still the same as in the dry case.

  7. Ocular surface temperature in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sodi, Andrea; Matteoli, Sara; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Finocchio, Lucia; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  8. Temperature affects microbial abundance, activity and interactions in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; Li, Jiabao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2016-06-01

    Temperature is a major factor determining the performance of the anaerobic digestion process. The microbial abundance, activity and interactional networks were investigated under a temperature gradient from 25°C to 55°C through amplicon sequencing, using 16S ribosomal RNA and 16S rRNA gene-based approaches. Comparative analysis of past accumulative elements presented by 16S rRNA gene-based analysis, and the in-situ conditions presented by 16S rRNA-based analysis, provided new insights concerning the identification of microbial functional roles and interactions. The daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. Increased methanogenesis and hydrolysis at 50°C were main factors causing higher methane production which was also closely related with more well-defined methanogenic and/or related modules with comprehensive interactions and increased functional orderliness referred to more microorganisms participating in interactions. This research demonstrated the importance of evaluating functional roles and interactions of microbial community. PMID:26970926

  9. Comparison of two methods for contactless surface temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Michalski, Dariusz; Strąk, Kinga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to determine the temperature filed of the heating surface on the basis of temperature measurements taken by liquid crystal thermography and infrared thermography applied in boiling heat transfer research during FC-72 flow in minichannels, and to compare them. The essential part of the experimental stand is the test section with two parallel rectangular minichannels, each 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. It is possible to observe the channel surfaces through panes: of the first minichannel allows observing foil temperature changes on the plain side due to liquid crystal thermography (LCT), which required treating the foil surface with thermochromic liquid crystals, of the other minichannel enables detecting outer glass or foil surface temperature changes due to infrared thermography (IRT). Comparison of the results of the measurements are presented in graphical form as thermographs and as heating surface temperature vs. minichannel length. The differences between two sets of measurement data concerning the temperature of the heating surface obtained with LCT and IRT, were analyzed using: Pearson linear correlation coefficient, determination coefficient, Experimental Method Error and Method Accuracy. The comparative data analysis shows that similar values and distributions of the surface temperature were obtained from both techniques.

  10. Titan Surface Temperatures as Measured by Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Flasar, F.M.; Kunde, V.G.; Nixon, C.A.; Romani, P.N.; Samuelson, R.E.; Coustenis, A.; Courtin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal radiation from the surface of Titan reaches space through a spectral window of low opacity at 19-microns wavelength. This radiance gives a measure of the brightness temperature of the surface. Composite Infrared Spectrometer' (CIRS) observations from Cassini during its first four years at Saturn have permitted latitude mapping of zonally averaged surface temperatures. The measurements are corrected for atmospheric opacity using the dependence of radiance on emission angle. With the more complete latitude coverage and much larger dataset of CIRS we have improved upon the original results from Voyager IRIS. CIRS measures the equatorial surface brightness temperature to be 93.7+/-0.6 K, the same as the temperature measured at the Huygens landing site. The surface brightness temperature decreases by 2 K toward the south pole and by 3 K toward the north pole. The drop in surface temperature between equator and north pole implies a 50% decrease in methane saturation vapor pressure and relative humidity; this may help explain the large northern lakes. The H2 mole fraction is derived as a by-product of our analysis and agrees with previous results. Evidence of seasonal variation in surface and atmospheric temperatures is emerging from CIRS measurements over the Cassini mission.

  11. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  12. Theoretical estimation of surface Debye temperature of nano structured material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Bijan Kumar; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The estimation of Debye temperature (TD) exploiting phonon is very important. In this work an attempt has been made to estimate TD for solids in a simple phenomenological approach. The ultimate goal is to estimate TD for nano structured material. The objective of this present work is to extend Debye model for nano-structured material and hence to extract the contribution to surface specific heat and surface Debye temperature. An empirical relation between TD and surface Debye temperature (TDS) is proposed. Lindemann melting criterion is also extended towards nano structure. The overall results obtained are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  13. Linking Surface Urban Heat Islands with Groundwater Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Benz, Susanne A; Bayer, Peter; Goettsche, Frank M; Olesen, Folke S; Blum, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Urban temperatures are typically, but not necessarily, elevated compared to their rural surroundings. This phenomenon of urban heat islands (UHI) exists both above and below the ground. These zones are coupled through conductive heat transport. However, the precise process is not sufficiently understood. Using satellite-derived land surface temperature and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements, we compare the spatial properties of both kinds of heat islands in four German cities and find correlations of up to 80%. The best correlation is found in older, mature cities such as Cologne and Berlin. However, in 95% of the analyzed areas, groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures due to additional subsurface heat sources such as buildings and their basements. Local groundwater hot spots under city centers and under industrial areas are not revealed by satellite-derived land surface temperatures. Hence, we propose an estimation method that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land-surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method, we are able to accurately estimate regional groundwater temperatures with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K. PMID:26595444

  14. How Temperature and Water levels affect Polar Mesospheric Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. L.; Randall, C. E.; Harvey, V.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument data, which is part of the Aeronomy in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission, we compare the albedo and ice water content measurements of CIPS with the Navy Operation Global Atmospheric Prediction System - Advanced Level Phyiscs and High Altitude (NOGAPS-ALPHA) temperature and water vapor data in order to derive a greater understanding of cloud formation and physics. We particularly focus on data from June 2007 and July 2007 in this case study because of particular cloud structures and formations during this time period for future studies.

  15. A high-resolution global sea surface temperature climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    In response to the development of a new higher-resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis at the National Meteorological Center (NMC), a new monthly 1{degrees} global sea surface temperature climatology was constructed from two intermediate climatologies: the 2{degrees} SST climatology used a 30-yr 1950-1979 base period between roughly 40{degrees}S and 60{degrees}N based on in situ (ship and buoy) SST data supplemented by four years (1982-1985) of satellite SST retrievals, and sea-ice coverage data over a 12-yr period (1982-1993). The final climatology was combined from these two products so that a 1{degrees} resolution was maintained and the base period was adjusted to the 1950-1979 period wherever possible (approximately between 40{degrees}S and 60{degrees}N). Compared to the 2{degrees} climatology, the 1{degrees} climatology resolves equatorial upwelling and fronts much better. This leads to a better matching of the scales of the new analysis and climatology. In addition, because the magnitudes of large-scale features are consistently maintained in both the older 2{degrees} and the new 1{degrees} climatologies, climate monitoring of large-scale anomalies will be minimally affected by the analysis change. The use of 12 years of satellite SST retrievals makes this new climatology useful for many additional purposes because its effective resolution actually approaches 1{degrees} everywhere over the global ocean and because the mean SST values are more accurate south of 40{degrees}S than climatologies without these data. 12 refs., 16 figs.

  16. Estimation of subsurface thermal structure using sea surface height and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yong Q. (Inventor); Jo, Young-Heon (Inventor); Yan, Xiao-Hai (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining a subsurface temperature in a body of water is disclosed. The method includes obtaining surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data of the body of water for a region of interest, and also obtaining subsurface temperature anomaly data for the region of interest at a plurality of depths. The method further includes regressing the obtained surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data for the region of interest with the obtained subsurface temperature anomaly data for the plurality of depths to generate regression coefficients, estimating a subsurface temperature at one or more other depths for the region of interest based on the generated regression coefficients and outputting the estimated subsurface temperature at the one or more other depths. Using the estimated subsurface temperature, signal propagation times and trajectories of marine life in the body of water are determined.

  17. Surface Temperatures on Titan; Changes During the Cassini Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor A.

    2010-01-01

    Surface brightness temperatures on Titan measured by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini span the period from late northern winter to early spring. The CIRS observations cover all latitudes and can be used to study meridional changes with season. CIRS previously reported surface temperatures from 2004-2008 which were 93.7 K at the equator with decreases of 2 K toward the south pole and 3 K toward the north pole'. From a comparison of the equinox period with the earlier data, CIRS can now detect a seasonal shift in the latitudinal distribution of temperatures. Around the time of the equinox the meridional distribution was more symmetric about the equator than had been found earlier in the mission. The equatorial surface temperatures remained close to 94 K, but in the south the temperatures had decreased by about 0.5 K and in the north had increased by about 0.5 K. The CIRS equinox results are similar to what was seen near the previous vernal equinox by Voyager IRIS Z. The observed surface temperatures can help constrain the type of surface material by comparison with predictions from general circulation models. Of the three cases treated by Tokano t , our measurements most closely match a porous-ice regolith. As Cassini continues through Titan's northern spring CIRS will extend its temporal and spatial coverage and will continue to search for seasonal variations in surface temperature.

  18. Mitigating errors in surface temperature forecasts using approximate radiation updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robin J.; Bozzo, Alessio

    2015-06-01

    Due to computational expense, the radiation schemes in many weather and climate models are called infrequently in time and/or on a reduced spatial grid. The former can lead to a lag in the diurnal cycle of surface temperature, while the latter can lead to large surface temperature errors at coastal land points due to surface fluxes computed over the ocean being used where the skin temperature and surface albedo are very different. This paper describes a computationally efficient solution to these problems, in which the surface longwave and shortwave fluxes are updated every time step and grid point according to the local skin temperature and albedo. In order that energy is conserved, it is necessary to compute the change to the net flux profile consistent with the changed surface fluxes. The longwave radiation scheme has been modified to compute also the rate of change of the profile of upwelling longwave flux with respect to the value at the surface. Then at each grid point and time step, the upwelling flux and heating-rate profiles are updated using the new value of skin temperature. The computational cost of performing approximate radiation updates in the ECMWF model is only 2% of the cost of the full radiation scheme, so increases the overall cost of the model by only of order 0.2%. Testing the new scheme by running daily 5 day forecasts over an 8 month period reveals significant improvement in 2 m temperature forecasts at coastal stations compared to observations.

  19. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  20. Effect of fast mold surface temperature evolution on iPP part morphology gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liparoti, Sara; Sorrentino, Andrea; Guzman, Gustavo; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that affects the sample surface morphology as well as the structural gradients (orientation crystal size, and type) as well as cooling stresses. The frozen layer thickness formed during the filling stage also has a very significant effect on the flow resistance and thus on the resulting pressure drop and flow length in thin wall parts. The possibility to have a hot mold during filling and a quick cooling soon afterward is a significant process enhancement particularly for specialized applications such as micro injection molding and for the reproduction of micro structured surfaces. Up to now, several methods (electromagnetic, infrared, hot vapor fleshing etc,) were tried to achieve fast temperature evolution of the mold. Unfortunately, all these methods require a complex balance between thermal and mechanical problems, equipment cost, energy consumption, safety, molding cycle time and part quality achievable. In this work, a thin electrical resistance was designed and used to generate a fast and confined temperature variation on mold surface (by joule effect). Since the whole temperature evolution can take place in a few seconds, one can couple the advantages of a high surface temperature during filling with the advantages of a low mold temperature, fast cooling and low heating dissipation. Some experiments were performed with a commercial iPP resin. The effects of the surface temperature and of the heating time (under constant electric power) on surface finishing and on the final morphology (thickness and structure of the different layers) are explored and discussed.

  1. Atmosphere-only GCM (ACCESS1.0) simulations with prescribed land surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerley, Duncan; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are valuable tools for understanding how the global ocean-atmosphere-land surface system interacts and are routinely evaluated relative to observational data sets. Conversely, observational data sets can also be used to constrain GCMs in order to identify systematic errors in their simulated climates. One such example is to prescribe sea surface temperatures (SSTs) such that 70 % of the Earth's surface temperature field is observationally constrained (known as an Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, AMIP, simulation). Nevertheless, in such simulations, land surface temperatures are typically allowed to vary freely, and therefore any errors that develop over the land may affect the global circulation. In this study therefore, a method for prescribing the land surface temperatures within a GCM (the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator, ACCESS) is presented. Simulations with this prescribed land surface temperature model produce a mean climate state that is comparable to a simulation with freely varying land temperatures; for example, the diurnal cycle of tropical convection is maintained. The model is then developed further to incorporate a selection of "proof of concept" sensitivity experiments where the land surface temperatures are changed globally and regionally. The resulting changes to the global circulation in these sensitivity experiments are found to be consistent with other idealized model experiments described in the wider scientific literature. Finally, a list of other potential applications is described at the end of the study to highlight the usefulness of such a model to the scientific community.

  2. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winer, W. O.; Sanborn, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The research in this report is divided into two categories: (1) lubricant rheological behavior, and (2) thermal behavior of a simulated elastohydrodynamic contact. The studies of the lubricant rheological behavior consists of high pressure, low shear rate viscosity measurements, viscoelastic transition measurements, by volume dilatometry, dielectric transitions at atmospheric pressure and light scattering transitions. Lubricant shear stress-strain behavior in the amorphous glassy state was measured on several fluids. It appears clear from these investigations that many lubricants undergo viscoplastic transitions in typical EHD contacts and that the lubricant has a limiting maximum shear stress it can support which in turn will determine the traction in the contact except in cases of very low slide-roll ratio. Surface temperature measurements were made for a naphthenic mineral oil and a polyphenyl ether. The maximum surface temperature in these experiments was approximately symmetrical about the zero slide-roll ration except for absolute values of slide-roll ratio greater than about 0.9. Additional surface temperature measurements were made in contacts with rough surfaces where the composite surface roughness was approximately equal to the EHD film thickness. A regression analysis was done to obtain a predictive equation for surface temperatures as a function of pressure, sliding speed, and surface roughness. A correction factor for surface roughness effects to the typical flash temperature analysis was found.

  3. Improving the Surface Roughness of Pickled Steel Strip by Control of Rolling Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Nan; Lin, Szu-Ning; Liou, Horng-Yih; Chang, Chu-Wei; Wu, Chia-Chan; Wang, Ying-Chun

    2013-01-01

    This investigation is to analyze the surface roughness problem of low carbon pickled steel strips from the view points of prior hot rolling conditions and the hot-rolled scales. The results showed that, compared with other parameters, the most important factor in hot rolling to affect the surface roughness was the rolling temperature. As the temperature was increased, the amount of the outer brittle α-Fe2O3 increased, leading to rough scale/substrate interface and rough surface after pickling. However, the effect of coiling temperature was almost negligible because no further rolling existed after that stage. Quantitative estimation showed that decrease in rolling temperature in this investigation reduced the surface roughness, Ra, from 1.06-1.78 μm to 0.88-1.10 μm after pickling in laboratory. Similar degree of improvement in roughness was also observed after pickling in mill.

  4. Factors affecting response of surface waters to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.; Johnson, D.W.; Elwood, J.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Clapp, R.B.; Reuss, J.O.

    1986-04-01

    Knowledge of watershed hydrology and of the biogeochemical reactions and elemental pools and fluxes occurring in watersheds can be used to classify the response of watersheds and surface waters to acidic deposition. A conceptual mosel is presented for classifying watersheds into those for which (1) surface water chemistry will change rapidly with deposition quality (direct response) (2) surface water chemistry will change only slowly over time (delayed response), and (3) surface water chemistry will not change significantly, even with continued acidic deposition (capacity-protected). Techniques and data available for classification of all watersheds in a region into these categories are discussed.

  5. Surface Tension Gradients Induced by Temperature: The Thermal Marangoni Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugliotti, Marcos; Baptisto, Mauricio S.; Politi, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    Surface tensions gradients were generated in a thin liquid film because of the local increase in temperature, for demonstration purposes. This is performed using a simple experiment and allows different alternatives for heat generation to be used.

  6. Sea Surface Temperature from EUMETSAT Including Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Bonekamp, Hans; Montagner, Francois; Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Tomazic, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of sea surface temperature (SST) activities at EUMETSAT including information on SST planned from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). Operational oceanography activities within the Marine Applications group at EUMETSAT continue with a focus on SST, sea surface winds, sea-ice products, radiative fluxes, significant wave height and sea surface topography. These are achieved through the mandatory, optional and third-party programmes, and for some products with the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF). Progress towards products from sea-ice surface temperature, ocean colour products, turbidity and aerosol optical depth over water continue. Information on oceanography products from EUMETSAT can be found through the product navigator (http://navigator.eumetsat.int). EUMETSAT have been collaborating with ESA for a number of years on the development of SST for SLSTR.

  7. Surface temperature transients from pulsed laser heating of UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagnik, S. K.; Olander, D. R.

    1988-07-01

    Surface heating of UO 2 by a pulsed laser was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Targets of solid uranium dioxide in vacuum were rapidly heated to peak temperatures of 3700 K, as measured by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The measured target surface temperatures were compared with a one-dimensional heat transport model that accounts for conduction and melting in the solid and ablation and radiation from the surface. Congruent vaporization of UO 2 was assumed. The measured temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam as well as temperature-dependent physical and thermodynamic properties of UO 2 are used as input to the calculations. Agreement of the theory with the measurements was further validated by post-irradiation microscopic examination of the target surface. Additional tests were performed to assess qualitatively the attenuation of laser light and thermal radiation from the surface by the vapor blow-off from the target. This effect was found to be insignificant.

  8. Evaluation of a surface/vegetation parameterization using satellite measurements of surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taconet, O.; Carlson, T.; Bernard, R.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1986-01-01

    Ground measurements of surface-sensible heat flux and soil moisture for a wheat-growing area of Beauce in France were compared with the values derived by inverting two boundary layer models with a surface/vegetation formulation using surface temperature measurements made from NOAA-AVHRR. The results indicated that the trends in the surface heat fluxes and soil moisture observed during the 5 days of the field experiment were effectively captured by the inversion method using the remotely measured radiative temperatures and either of the two boundary layer methods, both of which contain nearly identical vegetation parameterizations described by Taconet et al. (1986). The sensitivity of the results to errors in the initial sounding values or measured surface temperature was tested by varying the initial sounding temperature, dewpoint, and wind speed and the measured surface temperature by amounts corresponding to typical measurement error. In general, the vegetation component was more sensitive to error than the bare soil model.

  9. Surface Temperatures on Titan during Northern Winter and Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Romani, P. N.; Samuelson, R. E.; Mamoutkine, A.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2016-01-01

    Meridional brightness temperatures were measured on the surface of Titan during the 2004-2014 portion of the Cassini mission by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Temperatures mapped from pole to pole during five two-year periods show a marked seasonal dependence. The surface temperature near the south pole over this time decreased by 2 K from 91.7 ± 0.3 to 89.7 ± 0.5 K while at the north pole the temperature increased by 1 K from 90.7 ± 0.5 to 91.5 ± 0.2 K. The latitude of maximum temperature moved from 19 S to 16 N, tracking the sub-solar latitude. As the latitude changed, the maximum temperature remained constant at 93.65 ± 0.15 K. In 2010 our temperatures repeated the north-south symmetry seen by Voyager one Titan year earlier in 1980. Early in the mission, temperatures at all latitudes had agreed with GCM predictions, but by 2014 temperatures in the north were lower than modeled by 1 K. The temperature rise in the north may be delayed by cooling of sea surfaces and moist ground brought on by seasonal methane precipitation and evaporation.

  10. Surface Temperatures on Titan During Northern Winter and Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde ,V. G.; Romani, P. N.; Samuelson, R. E.; Mamoutkine, A.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2016-01-01

    Meridional brightness temperatures were measured on the surface of Titan during the 2004-2014 portion of the Cassini mission by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Temperatures mapped from pole to pole during five two year periods show a marked seasonal dependence. The surface temperature near the south pole over this time decreased by 2 K from 91.7 plus or minus 0.3 to 89.7 plus or minus 0.5 K while at the north pole the temperature increased by 1 K from 90.7 plus or minus 0.5 to 91.5 plus or minus 0.2 K. The latitude of maximum temperature moved from 19 S to 16 N, tracking the subsolar latitude. As the latitude changed, the maximum temperature remained constant at 93.65 plus or minus 0.15 K. In 2010 our temperatures repeated the north-south symmetry seen by Voyager one Titan year earlier in 1980. Early in the mission, temperatures at all latitudes had agreed with GCM predictions, but by 2014 temperatures in the north were lower than modeled by 1 K. The temperature rise in the north may be delayed by cooling of sea surfaces and moist ground brought on by seasonal methane precipitation and evaporation.

  11. Global Surface Temperature Change and Uncertainties Since 1861

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Samuel S. P.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this talk is to analyze the warming trend and its uncertainties of the global and hemi-spheric surface temperatures. By the method of statistical optimal averaging scheme, the land surface air temperature and sea surface temperature observational data are used to compute the spatial average annual mean surface air temperature. The optimal averaging method is derived from the minimization of the mean square error between the true and estimated averages and uses the empirical orthogonal functions. The method can accurately estimate the errors of the spatial average due to observational gaps and random measurement errors. In addition, quantified are three independent uncertainty factors: urbanization, change of the in situ observational practices and sea surface temperature data corrections. Based on these uncertainties, the best linear fit to annual global surface temperature gives an increase of 0.61 +/- 0.16 C between 1861 and 2000. This lecture will also touch the topics on the impact of global change on nature and environment. as well as the latest assessment methods for the attributions of global change.

  12. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I.; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.; Groot, Steven P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  13. How microphysical choices affect simulated infrared brightness temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberg, S.; Köhler, C.; Seifert, A.; Crewell, S.

    2015-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) today relies more and more on satellite data, both for assimilation and for evaluation. However, process-based analyses of the biases between observed and simulated satellite data, which go beyond a mere identification of the biases, are rare. The present study investigates a long-known bias (Böhme et al., 2011) between brightness temperatures (BTs) simulated from the regional NWP model COSMO-DE forecasts via RTTOV (Radiative Transfer for TOVS) and those observed by Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). The pivotal question is whether a novel two-moment cloud ice scheme, developed by Köhler (2013) primarily to improve the representation of ice nucleation processes, exhibits an improved performance with respect to this bias and, if that is so, to provide a process-based analysis which identifies the reasons for the improved behaviour. It is shown that the new two-moment cloud ice scheme reduces the BT bias distinctly and can therefore be considered an improvement in comparison to two standard schemes, the two-category ice scheme and the three-category ice scheme. The improvement in simulated BTs is due to a vertical redistribution of cloud ice to lower model levels. Sensitivity studies identify two of the introduced changes in the two-moment cloud ice scheme to be hand-in-hand responsible for most of the improved performance: the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation scheme and the consideration of cloud ice sedimentation. Including only cloud ice sedimentation without changing the heterogeneous ice nucleation scheme has no distinct effect on cloud ice. Further sensitivity studies with varying aerosol number densities reveal a comparably small sensitivity, indicating that the use of a physically reasonable heterogeneous ice nucleation scheme is far more important than the exact knowledge of the actual aerosol number densities.

  14. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H; Groot, Steven P C

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  15. SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF REMOTELY SENSED SURFACE TEMPERATURE AT FIELD SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bare soil surface temperatures (BST) and crop canopy temperatures (CCT) were collected from a 1-ha field in central Arizona using an infrared thermometer to determine whether they were spatially correlated. The measurements were taken from a two-dimensional random sampling patter...

  16. Surface Gravity and Hawking Temperature from Entropic Force Viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kietzman, B.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.

    We consider a freely falling holographic screen for the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black holes and evaluate the entropic force à la Verlinde. When the screen crosses the event horizon, the temperature of the screen agrees to the Hawking temperature and the entropic force gives rise to the surface gravity for both of the black holes.

  17. Hydromagnetic Steady Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface with Prescribed Surface Temperature and Prescribed Surface Heat Flux

    PubMed Central

    Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Alsaedi, Ahmad; Hayat, Tasawar

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady hydromagnetic three-dimensional boundary layer flow of Maxwell fluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. Both cases of prescribed surface temperature (PST) and prescribed surface heat flux (PHF) are considered. Computations are made for the velocities and temperatures. Results are plotted and analyzed for PST and PHF cases. Convergence analysis is presented for the velocities and temperatures. Comparison of PST and PHF cases is given and examined. PMID:23874523

  18. Correlation of noninvasive surface temperature measurement with rectal temperature in swine.

    PubMed

    Zinn, K R; Zinn, G M; Jesse, G W; Mayes, H F; Ellersieck, M R

    1985-06-01

    Skin and rectal temperature measurements were taken on 15 crossbred sows and gilts (225 kg) during the last 5 days of prepartum period and compared with those recorded in the first 8 days after parturition. The correlation of skin and rectal temperature values was not good during either period, although an increased correlation was noted in the postparturient period. The rectal temperature significantly (P less than 0.05) increased in the postparturient period, but the mean surface temperature was unchanged. This would indicate a decreased blood flow to the surface, since an equivalent blood flow to the surface after a rectal temperature increase would result in a concomitant mean surface temperature increase. The decreased flow to the surface of the animal was selective, since a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in surface temperature was noted at the tailhead, perineum, vulva, mammae-caudal, and eye, whereas the surface temperature of the mammae-cranial and mammae-middle was significantly (P less than 0.05) increased. PMID:4026016

  19. The Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils as Affected by Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HOCKER RAY W

    1933-01-01

    The effect on airfoil characteristics of surface roughness of varying degrees and types at different locations on an airfoil was investigated at high values of the Reynolds number in a variable density wind tunnel. Tests were made on a number of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 0012 airfoil models on which the nature of the surface was varied from a rough to a very smooth finish. The effect on the airfoil characteristics of varying the location of a rough area in the region of the leading edge was also investigated. Airfoils with surfaces simulating lap joints were also tested. Measurable adverse effects were found to be caused by small irregularities in airfoil surfaces which might ordinarily be overlooked. The flow is sensitive to small irregularities of approximately 0.0002c in depth near the leading edge. The tests made on the surfaces simulating lap joints indicated that such surfaces cause small adverse effects. Additional data from earlier tests of another symmetrical airfoil are also included to indicate the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with the Reynolds number for an airfoil with a polished surface and with a very rough one.

  20. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  1. The EUSTACE project: combining different components of the observing system to deliver global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways and are fundamental information for many climate services; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. Here we reflect on our experience so far within the Horizon 2020 project EUSTACE of using satellite skin temperature retrievals to help us to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types and developing new statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018): - providing new, consistent, multi-component estimation of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; - identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; - estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; - using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras. Information will also be given on how interested users can become involved.

  2. Ecoregional analysis of nearshore sea-surface temperature in the North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aim Sea surface temperature (SST) has been a parameter widely-identified to be useful to the investigation of marine species distribution, migration, and invasion, especially as SSTs are predicted to be affected by climate change. Here we use a remotely-sensed dataset to focus on...

  3. Comparison of Observed Surface Temperatures of 4 Vesta to the KRC Thermal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, T. N.; Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J. A.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-P.; McCord, T. B.; Li, J.-Y.; Russell, C. T.; Ryamond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Toplis, M.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we will compare ob-served temperatures of the surface of Vesta using data acquired by the Dawn [1] Visible and Infrared Map-ping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2] during the approach phase to model results from the KRC thermal model. High thermal inertia materials, such as bedrock, resist changes in temperature while temperatures of low thermal inertia material, such as dust, respond quickly to changes in solar insolation. The surface of Vesta is expected to have low to medium thermal inertia values, with the most commonly used value being extremely low at 15 TIU [4]. There are several parameters which affect observed temperatures in addition to thermal inertia: bond albedo, slope, and surface roughness. In addition to these parameters, real surfaces are rarely uniform monoliths that can be described by a single thermal inertia value. Real surfaces are often vertically layered or are mixtures of dust and rock. For Vesta's surface, with temperature extremes ranging from 50 K to 275 K and no atmosphere, even a uniform monolithic surface may have non-uniform thermal inertia due to temperature dependent thermal conductivity.

  4. Proteomic studies on soybean seed quality as affected by high temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term high temperature stresses can occur during soybean seed development through maturity and negatively impact seed quality. We investigated soybean seed quality as affected by high temperature using a proteomic approach. The effects of a prolonged high temperature treatment (37/30ºC day/nigh...

  5. Climatic change by cloudiness linked to the spatial variability of sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1975-01-01

    An active role in modifying the earth's climate is suggested for low cloudiness over the circumarctic oceans. Such cloudiness, linked to the spatial differences in ocean surface temperatures, was studied. The temporal variations from year to year of ocean temperature patterns can be pronounced and therefore, the low cloudiness over this region should also show strong temporal variations, affecting the albedo of the earth and therefore the climate. Photographs are included.

  6. Measurement of transient surface temperatures during rubbing using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tau; Yu, Jianwei; Yu, Xiaofen

    2013-10-01

    Infrared thermometer could provide IR radiance information to get the corresponding temperature as the machine is working. But the emissivity coefficient, which converts IR radiance to temperature, would vary with change of surface properties during rubbing, and this would bring dynamic error in measurement. In this study, we introduced a special tester, in the side of which compact IR thermometer are mounted. The thermometer enables us to measure contact surface temperature directly during tests of a rotating ring and a flat block which had a laser diode fixed under its contact surface. Based on Kirchhoff theory, the calculate model of the spectral emissivity is constructed. The normal emissivity at target region are measured through trigonometric ray consisted of InGaAsP laser source, PbSe detector and objective surface. So the temperature value from the IR thermometer could be corrected dynamically according to the real-time emissivity. The structure and the principle of the apparatus are described. The key technologies and the corresponding solution methods are briefly discussed. The error due to the rapid variations of emissivity value with change in contact conditions was shown, and it must be taken into consideration in radiometric temperature measurement in rubbing and could be especially useful in the verification of friction surface temperature predictions.

  7. Measuring the Surface Temperature of the Cryosphere using Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.

    2012-01-01

    A general description of the remote sensing of cryosphere surface temperatures from satellites will be provided. This will give historical information on surface-temperature measurements from space. There will also be a detailed description of measuring the surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet using Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data which will be the focus of the presentation. Enhanced melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has been documented in recent literature along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data since 1981. Using a recently-developed climate data record, trends in the clear-sky ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet have been studied using the MODIS IST product. Daily and monthly MODIS ISTs of the Greenland Ice Sheet beginning on 1 March 2000 and continuing through 31 December 2010 are now freely available to download at 6.25-km spatial resolution on a polar stereographic grid. Maps showing the maximum extent of melt for the entire ice sheet and for the six major drainage basins have been developed from the MODIS IST dataset. Twelve-year trends of the duration of the melt season on the ice sheet vary in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the course of the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The consistency of this IST record, with temperature and melt records from other sources will be discussed.

  8. Surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence from copper nanoparticles: Influence of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yeshchenko, Oleg A. Bondarchuk, Illya S.; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo Yu.

    2014-08-07

    Anomalous temperature dependence of surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence from copper nanoparticles embedded in a silica host matrix has been observed. The quantum yield of photoluminescence increases as the temperature increases. The key role of such an effect is the interplay between the surface plasmon resonance and the interband transitions in the copper nanoparticles occurring at change of the temperature. Namely, the increase of temperature leads to the red shift of the resonance. The shift leads to increase of the spectral overlap of the resonance with photoluminescence band of copper as well as to the decrease of plasmon damping caused by interband transitions. Such mechanisms lead to the increase of surface plasmon enhancement factor and, consequently, to increase of the quantum yield of the photoluminescence.

  9. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynek, Jaroslav Knobloch, Roman; Srb, Radek

    2015-11-30

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  10. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynek, Jaroslav; Knobloch, Roman; Srb, Radek

    2015-11-01

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  11. On estimating total daily evapotranspiration from remote surface temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Toby N.; Buffum, Martha J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for calculating daily evapotranspiration from the daily surface energy budget using remotely sensed surface temperature and several meteorological variables is presented. Vaules of the coefficients are determined from simulations with a one-dimensional boundary layer model with vegetation cover. Model constants are obtained for vegetation and bare soil at two air temperature and wind speed levels over a range of surface roughness and wind speeds. A different means of estimating the daily evapotranspiration based on the time rate of increase of surface temperature during the morning is also considered. Both the equations using our model-derived constants and field measurements are evaluated, and a discussion of sources of error in the use of the formulation is given.

  12. Symmetric scaling properties in global surface air temperature anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, Costas A.; Efstathiou, Maria N.

    2015-08-01

    We have recently suggested "long-term memory" or internal long-range correlation within the time-series of land-surface air temperature (LSAT) anomalies in both hemispheres. For example, an increasing trend in the LSAT anomalies is followed by another one at a different time in a power-law fashion. However, our previous research was mainly focused on the overall long-term persistence, while in the present study, the upward and downward scaling dynamics of the LSAT anomalies are analysed, separately. Our results show that no significant fluctuation differences were found between the increments and decrements in LSAT anomalies, over the whole Earth and over each hemisphere, individually. On the contrary, the combination of land-surface air and sea-surface water temperature anomalies seemed to cause a departure from symmetry and the increments in the land and sea surface temperature anomalies appear to be more persistent than the decrements.

  13. Venting temperature determines surface chemistry of magnetron sputtered TiN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Hultman, L.; Schneider, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface properties of refractory ceramic transition metal nitride thin films grown by magnetron sputtering are essential for resistance towards oxidation necessary in all modern applications. Here, typically neglected factors, including exposure to residual process gases following the growth and the venting temperature Tv, each affecting the surface chemistry, are addressed. It is demonstrated for the TiN model materials system that Tv has a substantial effect on the composition and thickness-evolution of the reacted surface layer and should therefore be reported. The phenomena are also shown to have impact on the reliable surface characterization by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. Stratospheric Pathways to Enhanced Persistence of European Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik W.; Sobolowski, Stefan P.; Scaife, Adam A.

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, severe weather anomalies in Europe have received considerable attention, mostly due to their detrimental impacts on human and natural systems, but also because of the apparent persistence of weather patterns over weeks and even months. The cold winter of 2009-2010 is a case in point. It is of great interest to improve our ability to forecast such events. Weather forecasts at mid-latitudes generally show low skill beyond 5-10 days ahead, but long-range forecast skill may increase during tropospheric blocking or sudden stratospheric warmings, which appear to affect midlatitude weather out to several weeks ahead. Here we use a simple approach to identify previously undocumented persistence in northern European summer and winter temperature anomalies in an ensemble of 18 pre-industrial climate model simulations, corroborated by actual observations. For instance, the probability of experiencing cold anomalies in February to April when the preceding months are anomalously cold and have a weak polar vortex is raised threefold compared to when the preceding months are not cold and the vortex is not weak. The persistence is observed irrespective of the data source or driving mechanisms, but is always enhanced when the stratospheric polar vortex or the NAO is also perturbed. Another interesting result is that an existing surface temperature anomaly is a necessary precondition; a weak vortex alone is a relatively poor predictor on the intraseasonal time scales considered here. Our results have a potential to conditionally improve the skill of long-range forecasts and to enhance recent advancements in dynamical seasonal prediction.

  15. Pretreatment of amphiphilic comb polymer surfaces dramatically affects protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanping; Ma, Hongwei; Hausner, Douglas B; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Beebe, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    New applications in regenerative biotechnology require the ability to understand and control protein-surface interactions on micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Evidence presented here shows that micropatterned amphiphilic comb polymer films exhibit a pretreatment-dependent behavior with respect to protein adsorption for the proteins fibronectin, laminin, and for serum. A micropatterned surface, consisting of protein-reactive regions, separated by comb polymer, was created and tested for protein adsorption using the surface-sensitive imaging tool TOF-SIMS. Immersion of micropatterned surfaces in solutions of fibronectin or laminin resulted in uniform protein coverage on both the comb polymer and protein-reactive regions. However, preimmersion of similarly patterned surfaces in water for 2 h prior to protein incubation was found to dramatically improve the protein-resistant properties of the comb polymer regions. These results are consistent with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chain reorientation and/or hydration and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone segregation away from the interface region. PMID:16283770

  16. Land Surface Temperature Measurements form EOS MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhengming

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a physics-based land-surface temperature (LST) algorithm for simultaneously retrieving surface band-averaged emissivities and temperatures from day/night pairs of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data in seven thermal infrared bands. The set of 14 nonlinear equations in the algorithm is solved with the statistical regression method and the least-squares fit method. This new LST algorithm was tested with simulated MODIS data for 80 sets of band-averaged emissivities calculated from published spectral data of terrestrial materials in wide ranges of atmospheric and surface temperature conditions. Comprehensive sensitivity and error analysis has been made to evaluate the performance of the new LST algorithm and its dependence on variations in surface emissivity and temperature, upon atmospheric conditions, as well as the noise-equivalent temperature difference (NE(Delta)T) and calibration accuracy specifications of the MODIS instrument. In cases with a systematic calibration error of 0.5%, the standard deviations of errors in retrieved surface daytime and nighttime temperatures fall between 0.4-0.5 K over a wide range of surface temperatures for mid-latitude summer conditions. The standard deviations of errors in retrieved emissivities in bands 31 and 32 (in the 10-12.5 micrometer IR spectral window region) are 0.009, and the maximum error in retrieved LST values falls between 2-3 K. Several issues related to the day/night LST algorithm (uncertainties in the day/night registration and in surface emissivity changes caused by dew occurrence, and the cloud cover) have been investigated. The LST algorithms have been validated with MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) dada and ground-based measurement data in two field campaigns conducted in Railroad Valley playa, NV in 1995 and 1996. The MODIS LST version 1 software has been delivered.

  17. Soil moisture from temperature measurements at the Earth's surface, update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Soil moisture budgets at the Earth's surface were investigated based on soil and atmospheric temperature variations. A number of data sets were plotted and statistically analyzed in order to accentuate the existence and the characteristics of mesoscale soil temperature extrema variations and their relations to other parameters. The correlations between diurnal temperature extrema for air and soil in drought and non-drought periods appear to follow different characteristic patterns, allowing an inference of soil moisture content from temperature data. The recovery of temperature extrema after a precipitation event also follows a characteristic power curve rise between two limiting values which is an indicator of evaporation rates. If these indicators are applied universally to regional temperature data, soil moisture content or drought conditions can be inferred directly from temperature measurements.

  18. Relationships between facial temperature changes, end-exercise affect and during-exercise changes in affect: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Fabien D; Bertucci, William M; Arfaoui, Ahlem

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed as an evaluation of the relationships between changes in facial temperature and self-reported pleasure-displeasure during an acute aerobic exercise bout. Ninety-two students performed a 10-minute long session of cycle ergometry at 80-85% of age-predicted maximal heart rate. Using infrared thermography and a single-item measure of pleasure-displeasure (the Feeling Scale, FS), facial temperature and the FS score were sampled at the beginning (Min1:00) and at the end of the exercise session (Min9:00). Statistical analyses revealed that cheek (but not forehead) temperature was higher at the end of the exercise bout compared to Min1:00 (it increased by about 5%). Change in cheek temperature was negatively related to end-exercise affect (β = -0.28, P < 0.001) and to during-exercise affective changes (β = -0.35, P < 0.001). No significant relationship with forehead temperature was found. Some of the possible reasons for this differential effect as well as theoretical and practical implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:25131146

  19. Factors Affecting Survival of Bacteriophage on Tomato Leaf Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of bacteriophage to persist in the phyllosphere for extended periods is limited by many factors, including sunlight irradiation, especially in the UV zone, temperature, desiccation, and exposure to copper bactericides. The effects of these factors on persistence of phage and formulated p...

  20. Factors Affecting Peptide Interactions with Surface-Bound Microgels.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Lina; Nordström, Randi; Bramhill, Jane; Saunders, Brian R; Álvarez-Asencio, Rubén; Rutland, Mark W; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Effects of electrostatics and peptide size on peptide interactions with surface-bound microgels were investigated with ellipsometry, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results show that binding of cationic poly-L-lysine (pLys) to anionic, covalently immobilized, poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methacrylic acid) microgels increased with increasing peptide net charge and microgel charge density. Furthermore, peptide release was facilitated by decreasing either microgel or peptide charge density. Analogously, increasing ionic strength facilitated peptide release for short peptides. As a result of peptide binding, the surface-bound microgels displayed pronounced deswelling and increased mechanical rigidity, the latter quantified by quantitative nanomechanical mapping. While short pLys was found to penetrate the entire microgel network and to result in almost complete charge neutralization, larger peptides were partially excluded from the microgel network, forming an outer peptide layer on the microgels. As a result of this difference, microgel flattening was more influenced by the lower Mw peptide than the higher. Peptide-induced deswelling was found to be lower for higher Mw pLys, the latter effect not observed for the corresponding microgels in the dispersed state. While the effects of electrostatics on peptide loading and release were similar to those observed for dispersed microgels, there were thus considerable effects of the underlying surface on peptide-induced microgel deswelling, which need to be considered in the design of surface-bound microgels as carriers of peptide loads, for example, in drug delivery or in functionalized biomaterials. PMID:26750986

  1. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  2. Simultaneous measurements of skin sea surface temperature and sea surface emissivity from a single thermal imagery.

    PubMed

    Yoshimori, Kyu; Tamba, Sumio; Yokoyama, Ryuzo

    2002-08-20

    A novel method, to our knowledge, to measure simultaneously the thermal emissivity and skin temperature of a sea surface has been developed. The proposed method uses an infrared image that includes a sea surface and a reference object located near the surface. By combining this image with sky radiation temperature, we retrieve both skin sea surface temperature and sea surface emissivity from the single infrared image. Because the method requires no knowledge of thermal radiative properties of actual sea surfaces, it can be used even for a contaminated sea surface whose emissivity is hard to determine theoretically, e.g., oil slicks or slicks produced by biological wastes. Experimental results demonstrate that the estimated emissivity agrees with the theoretical prediction and, also, the recovered temperature distribution of skin sea surface has no appreciable high-temperature area that is due to reflection of the reference object. The method allows the acquisition of match-up data of radiometric sea surface temperatures that precisely correspond to the satellite observable data. PMID:12206200

  3. Electromagnetic Probes of Metal and Ceramic Surfaces at Low Temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzchowski, Mark Steven

    1988-12-01

    This thesis presents, in three parts, topics dealing with the low temperature electro-magnetic surface properties of metals and ceramics. Part I discusses the development and operation of an apparatus to spatially resolve metallic surface potentials as a function of temperature between 2.8K and room temperature. This experiment operates under UHV conditions with a voltage resolution of 1 millivolt and a spatial resolution of 1200 microns. We use this equipment to search for temperature dependent changes in spatial fluctuations of the surface potential. A screening of these fluctuations by a surface conducting layer is suggested by the experiments of Lockhart, Witteborn, and Fairbank, who reported temperature dependent shielding of random electric fields inside a copper tube. Sharp changes with temperature in the microwave surface conductivity of copper and aluminum have also been reported. We have found some aluminum samples to be contaminated with sufficient tin to explain recent microwave results as superconducting impurity transitions. For copper, where both increased and decreased conductivities have been reported, we explain increasing conductivity results in the same way. The present experiment measures surface potential directly, but shows no evidence of temperature dependent shielding. Part II of this thesis presents a calculation of random fields outside a metal surface and their effect on TOF spectroscopy. We calculate the statistical properties of the fields in one-dimensional and cylindrical geometries, then use these results to investigate TOF effects. Calculated quantities include the autocovariance function of the potential, the rms electric field, corrections to the free particle time of flight, and the mean minimum energy required to transit the random potential. The results compare well with our numerical simulations, and with the available experimental data. In part III we investigate the 9.12 GHz complex surface impedance of bulk and thin film

  4. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  5. Surface temperatures of insulated glazing units: Infrared thermography laboratory measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.T.; Tuerler, D.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-12-01

    Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions corresponding to standard design conditions for winter heating. The temperatures conditions are 2 1.1{degrees}C (70{degrees}F) and -17.8{degrees}C (0{degrees}F) on the warm and cold sides, respectively. Film coefficients varied somewhat with average conditions of about 7.6 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (1.34 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the warm-side and 28.9 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (5.1 Btu/h{circ}ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the cold-side. Surface temperature data are plotted for the vertical distribution along the centerline of the IG and for the horizontal distribution along the centerline. This paper is part of larger collaborative effort that studied the same set of glazings.

  6. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference.

    PubMed

    Musin, Frédéric; Mégret, Patrice; Wuilpart, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible. PMID:27483271

  7. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  8. Comparison of MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature over the Continental USA Meteorological Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Thome, Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the surface-temperature-based urban heat island's (UHIS) signature on LST amplitude over the continental USA and to make comparisons to local air temperatures. Air-temperature-based UHIs (UHIA), calculated using the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily air temperatures, are compared with UHIS for urban areas in different biomes during different seasons. NLCD ISA is used to define urban and rural temperatures and to stratify the sampling for LST and air temperatures. We find that the MODIS LST agrees well with observed air temperature during the nighttime, but tends to overestimate it during the daytime, especially during summer and in nonforested areas. The minimum air temperature analyses show that UHIs in forests have an average UHIA of 1 C during the summer. The UHIS, calculated from nighttime LST, has similar magnitude of 1-2 C. By contrast, the LSTs show a midday summer UHIS of 3-4 C for cities in forests, whereas the average summer UHIA calculated from maximum air temperature is close to 0 C. In addition, the LSTs and air temperatures difference between 2006 and 2011 are in agreement, albeit with different magnitude.

  9. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  10. Measurements of surface air temperatures in Lombok with low cost miniature data loggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudiarta, I. W.; Yadnya, M. S.; Mardiana, L.; Kuripan, I. N.

    2014-09-01

    The global warming and climate change are two of our major problems in this decade. Local impacts of global warming need to be investigated since it depends on local conditions. Understanding variability of local weather especially surface air temperature requires many observations, not only periodic but also covers large area. In this paper, we report our progress in developing low cost miniature data loggers for temperature measurements. The data loggers are based on microcontrollers ATMega8L and 10 kΩ thermistors. Calibration results in laboratory and in field have indicated that the temperature obtained by data loggers shows good agreement with thermometer readings. It is found that errors of temperature measurements are less than 0.3 °C. We have performed preliminary temperature measurements in Lombok Island using twenty data loggers for about one week duration. Temperature variation in Lombok shows localized temperature distribution that is affected by position and topography.

  11. Environmental factors affecting the low temperature isomerization of homohopanes in acidic peat deposits, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianyu; Meyers, Philip A.; Xue, Jiantao; Gong, Linfeng; Wang, Xinxin; Xie, Shucheng

    2015-04-01

    Progressively more evidence reveals the abundant occurrence of the C31 homohopane with a 17α, 21β-configuration (C31 αβ) in immature peats. This compound is commonly considered to be an indicator of thermal maturity in petroleum source rocks, but in peats it has also been interpreted to reflect the oxidation and subsequent decarboxylation reactions of bacteriohopanepolyols with microbially mediated epimerization at C-17 that is catalyzed by the acidic peat conditions. To learn more about the environmental factors that affect the low-temperature isomerization of homohopanes, we investigated the distribution patterns of homohopanes in a well-studied peat core from the Dajiuhu peatland, central China, together with data from modern surface peat samples from Dajiuhu and three other locations. From comparison with paleotemperature and paleohydrologic records in the peat core, we hypothesize that the ratio of C31 αβ hopane relative to the ββ isomer (C31 αβ/ββ) is mainly influenced on a centennial to millennial timescale by ambient temperature with a secondary effect from redox conditions that are defined by peatland water levels. The surface peat samples revealed that relatively high C31 αβ/ββ values occurred under pH < 6. These results suggest that pH is indeed an important factor in the low-temperature isomerization of C31 homohopanes, although the magnitude of the pH effect may be less than those of ambient temperature and redox conditions. In both surface peat and peat horizons from the Dajiuhu peatland, the amount of the C31 αβ compound with R configuration relative to that with S configuration (C31 R/S) varied closely with C31 αβ/ββ, suggesting that the epimerization at both C-17 and C-22 may happen synchronously and at similar rates. This study reveals that the isomerization of homohopanes has the potential to reflect paleoenvironmental changes in acidic peat deposits. In addition, acidic peat samples investigated in this and previous studies

  12. Precipitation and temperature changes in the major Chinese river basins during 1957-2013 and links to sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qing; Prange, Matthias; Merkel, Ute

    2016-05-01

    The variation characteristics of precipitation and temperature in the three major Chinese river basins (Yellow River, Yangtze River and Pearl River) in the period of 1957-2013 were analyzed on an annual and seasonal basis, as well as their links to sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean on both interannual and decadal time scales. Annual mean temperature of the three river basins increased significantly overall since 1957, with an average warming rate of about 0.19 °C/10a, but the warming was characterized by a staircase form with steps around 1987 and 1998. The significant increase of annual mean temperature could mostly be attributed to the remarkable warming trend in spring, autumn and winter. Warming rates in the northern basins were generally much higher than in the southern basins. However, both the annual precipitation and seasonal mean precipitation of the three river basins showed little change in the study area average, but distinct interannual variations since 1957 and clear regional differences. An overall warming-wetting tendency was found in the northwestern and southeastern river basins in 1957-2013, while the central regions tended to become warmer and drier. Results from a Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) showed that the interannual variations of seasonal mean precipitation and surface air temperature over the three river basins were both associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) since 1957. ENSO SST patterns affected precipitation and surface air temperature variability throughout the year, but with very different response patterns in the different seasons. For instance, temperature in most of the river basins was positively correlated with central-eastern equatorial Pacific SST in winter and spring, but negatively correlated in summer and autumn. On the decadal time scale, the seasonal mean precipitation and surface air temperature variations were strongly associated with the Pacific

  13. Molecular contamination effects on the thermal emittance of highly reflective surfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chien W.

    2002-09-01

    For contamination effects on thermal control surfaces, changes in solar absorptance are the effect noted. Emittance of the surface is not normally affected. The SIRTF (Space InfraRed Telescope Facility) and NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) spacecraft will fly large low emissivity surfaces (e.g. aluminized Kapton shields and gold mirrors). During the orbital missions, these surfaces will not be exposed to the sun and will be at temperatures less than 150 K. Concern is that a thick molecular film, even water, will cause a change in emittance and results in affecting the thermal performance primarily controlled by emittance alone. Although an emphasis will be placed upon examining the effects on thermal performance for low emissivity surfaces, the effects on optical performance will also be examined because changes of the optical characteristics such as reflectance and scattering are of greater concern for the NGST mission.

  14. Surface wind observations affected by agricultural development over Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songjun; Tang, Qiuhong; Zhang, Xuezhen; Xu, Di; Kou, Lihang

    2016-05-01

    Meteorological stations in Northwest China are surrounded by large proportions of cultivated land. The relations between the change of surface wind speed and the cultivated land fractions (CF) within a 4 km radius at 135 meteorological stations over arid Northwest China are investigated. Stations with larger CF experienced larger declines in surface wind speed from 1960 to 2007. Compared with the wind speed variation in the Tibetan Plateau where agricultural development is negligible, stations with low CF show similar variation, whereas the wind speed at stations with large CF illustrates a sharp decrease in the 1970s–1980s, during which irrigated agriculture developed rapidly. The observed wind speed at the station surrounded by irrigated fields in the Jingtai Irrigation District, shows a rapid wind speed decrease during the same period when the irrigated area expanded. By contrast, rapid wind decrease is not observed at a nearby station with minimal influence of agricultural development.

  15. Applications of Thin Film Thermocouples for Surface Temperature Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Holanda, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples provide a minimally intrusive means of measuring surface temperature in hostile, high temperature environments. Unlike wire thermocouples, thin films do not necessitate any machining of the surface, therefore leaving intact its structural integrity. Thin films are many orders of magnitude thinner than wire, resulting in less disruption to the gas flow and thermal patterns that exist in the operating environment. Thin film thermocouples have been developed for surface temperature measurement on a variety of engine materials. The sensors are fabricated in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Thin Film Sensor Lab, which is a class 1000 clean room. The thermocouples are platinum-13 percent rhodium versus platinum and are fabricated by the sputtering process. Thin film-to-leadwire connections are made using the parallel-gap welding process. Thermocouples have been developed for use on superalloys, ceramics and ceramic composites, and intermetallics. Some applications of thin film thermocouples are: temperature measurement of space shuttle main engine turbine blade materials, temperature measurement in gas turbine engine testing of advanced materials, and temperature and heat flux measurements in a diesel engine. Fabrication of thin film thermocouples is described. Sensor durability, drift rate, and maximum temperature capabilities are addressed.

  16. The variability of California summertime marine stratus: Impacts on surface air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobellis, Sam F.; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    study investigates the variability of clouds, primarily marine stratus clouds, and how they are associated with surface temperature anomalies over California, especially along the coastal margin. We focus on the summer months of June to September when marine stratus are the dominant cloud type. Data used include satellite cloud reflectivity (cloud albedo) measurements, hourly surface observations of cloud cover and air temperature at coastal airports, and observed values of daily surface temperature at stations throughout California and Nevada. Much of the anomalous variability of summer clouds is organized over regional patterns that affect considerable portions of the coast, often extend hundreds of kilometers to the west and southwest over the North Pacific, and are bounded to the east by coastal mountains. The occurrence of marine stratus is positively correlated with both the strength and height of the thermal inversion that caps the marine boundary layer, with inversion base height being a key factor in determining their inland penetration. Cloud cover is strongly associated with surface temperature variations. In general, increased presence of cloud (higher cloud albedo) produces cooler daytime temperatures and warmer nighttime temperatures. Summer daytime temperature fluctuations associated with cloud cover variations typically exceed 1°C. The inversion-cloud albedo-temperature associations that occur at daily timescales are also found at seasonal timescales.

  17. The variability of California summertime marine stratus: impacts on surface air temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iacobellis, Sam F.; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the variability of clouds, primarily marine stratus clouds, and how they are associated with surface temperature anomalies over California, especially along the coastal margin. We focus on the summer months of June to September when marine stratus are the dominant cloud type. Data used include satellite cloud reflectivity (cloud albedo) measurements, hourly surface observations of cloud cover and air temperature at coastal airports, and observed values of daily surface temperature at stations throughout California and Nevada. Much of the anomalous variability of summer clouds is organized over regional patterns that affect considerable portions of the coast, often extend hundreds of kilometers to the west and southwest over the North Pacific, and are bounded to the east by coastal mountains. The occurrence of marine stratus is positively correlated with both the strength and height of the thermal inversion that caps the marine boundary layer, with inversion base height being a key factor in determining their inland penetration. Cloud cover is strongly associated with surface temperature variations. In general, increased presence of cloud (higher cloud albedo) produces cooler daytime temperatures and warmer nighttime temperatures. Summer daytime temperature fluctuations associated with cloud cover variations typically exceed 1°C. The inversion-cloud albedo-temperature associations that occur at daily timescales are also found at seasonal timescales.

  18. Free-surface stability criterion as affected by velocity distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng-Lung, Chen

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines how the velocity distribution of flow in open channels affects the kinematic and dynamic wave velocities, from which the various forms of the Vedernikov number V can be formulated. When V >1, disturbances created in open-channel flow will amplify in the form of roll waves; when V <1, some (though not all) disturbances will attenuate. A study of the Vedernikov stability criterion reveals that it can be readily deduced within the framework of the kinematic and dynamic wave theories by comparing the kinematic wave velocity to the corresponding dynamic wave velocity. -from Author

  19. Surface temperatures and temperature gradient features of the US Gulf Coast waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huh, O. K.; Rouse, L. J., Jr.; Smith, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared data on the Gulf of Mexico show that a seasonal cycle exists in the horizontal surface temperature structure. In the fall, the surface temperatures of both coastal and deep waters are nearly uniform. With the onset of winter, atmospheric cold fronts, which are accompanied by dry, low temperature air and strong winds, draw heat from the sea. A band of cooler water forming on the inner shelf expands, until a thermal front develops seaward along the shelf break between the cold shelf waters and the warmer deep waters of the Gulf. Digital analysis of the satellite data was carried out in an interactive mode using a minicomputer and software. A time series of temperature profiles illustrates the temporal and spatial changes in the sea-surface temperature field.

  20. The effect of water temperature and synoptic winds on the development of surface flows over narrow, elongated water bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Pielke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Simulations of the thermally induced breeze involved with a relatively narrow, elongated water body is presented in conjunction with evaluations of sensible heat fluxes in a stable marine atmospheric surface layer. The effect of the water surface temperature and of the large-scale synoptic winds on the development of surface flows over the water is examined. As implied by the sensible heat flux patterns, the simulation results reveal the following trends: (1) when the synoptic flow is absent or light, the induced surface breeze is not affected noticeably by a reduction of the water surface temperature; and (2) for stronger synoptic flow, the resultant surface flow may be significantly affected by the water surface temperature.

  1. Land surface temperature measurements from EOS MODIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhengming

    1994-01-01

    A generalized split-window method for retrieving land-surface temperature (LST) from AVHRR and MODIS data has been developed. Accurate radiative transfer simulations show that the coefficients in the split-window algorithm for LST must depend on the viewing angle, if we are to achieve a LST accuracy of about 1 K for the whole scan swath range (+/-55.4 deg and +/-55 deg from nadir for AVHRR and MODIS, respectively) and for the ranges of surface temperature and atmospheric conditions over land, which are much wider than those over oceans. We obtain these coefficients from regression analysis of radiative transfer simulations, and we analyze sensitivity and error by using results from systematic radiative transfer simulations over wide ranges of surface temperatures and emissivities, and atmospheric water vapor abundance and temperatures. Simulations indicated that as atmospheric column water vapor increases and viewing angle is larger than 45 deg it is necessary to optimize the split-window method by separating the ranges of the atmospheric column water vapor and lower boundary temperature, and the surface temperature into tractable sub-ranges. The atmospheric lower boundary temperature and (vertical) column water vapor values retrieved from HIRS/2 or MODIS atmospheric sounding channels can be used to determine the range where the optimum coefficients of the split-window method are given. This new LST algorithm not only retrieves LST more accurately but also is less sensitive than viewing-angle independent LST algorithms to the uncertainty in the band emissivities of the land-surface in the split-window and to the instrument noise.

  2. Analytical and experimental spur gear tooth temperature as affected by operating variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    A gear tooth temperature analysis was performed using a finite element method combined with a calculated heat input, calculated oil jet impingement depth, and estimated heat transfer coefficients. Experimental measurements of gear tooth average surface temperatures and instantaneous surface temperatures were made with a fast response infrared radiometric microscope. Increased oil jet pressure had a significant effect on both average and peak surface temperatures at both high load and speeds. Increasing the speed at constant load and increasing the load at constant speed causes a significant rise in average and peak surface temperatures of gear teeth. The oil jet pressure required for adequate cooling at high speed and load conditions must be high enough to get full depth penetration of the teeth. Calculated and experimental results were in good agreement with high oil jet penetration but showed poor agreement with low oil jet penetration depth.

  3. Analytical and experimental spur gear tooth temperature as affected by operating variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    A gear tooth temperature analysis was performed using a finite element method combined with a calculated heat input, calculated oil jet impingement depth, and estimated heat transfer coefficients. Experimental measurements of gear tooth average surface temperatures and instanteous surface temperatures were made with a fast response infrared radiometric microscope. Increased oil jet pressure had a significant effect on both average and peak surface temperatures at both high load and speeds. Increasing the speed at constant load and increasing the load at constant speed causes a significant rise in average and peak surface temperatures of gear teeth. The oil jet pressure required for adequate cooling at high speed and load conditions must be high enough to get full depth penetration of the teeth. Calculated and experimental results were in good agreement with high oil jet penetration but showed poor agreement with low oil jet penetration depth.

  4. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  5. Orientational order at finite temperature on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Carolina; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Dauchot, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    We study the effect of thermal fluctuations in the XY model on surfaces with unequal principal curvatures. Unlike Gaussian curvature that typically frustrates orientational order, the extrinsic curvature of the surface can act as a local field that promotes long-range order at low temperature. We find numerically that the transition from the high temperature isotropic phase to the true long-range ordered phase is characterized by critical exponents consistent with those of the flat space Ising model in two dimensions, up to finite size effects. Our results suggest a versatile strategy to achieve geometric control of liquid crystal order by suitable design of the underlying curvature of a substrate.

  6. Long-term changes in sea surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    Historical observations of sea surface temperature since 1856 have been improved by applying corrections to compensate for the predominant use of uninsulated or partly insulated buckets until the Second World War. There are large gaps in coverage in the late nineteenth century and around the two world wars, but a range of statistical techniques suggest that these gaps do not severely prejudice estimates of global and regional climatic change. Nonetheless, to improve the analysis on smaller scales, many unused historical data are to be digitized and incorporated. For recent years, satellite-based sea surface temperatures have improved the coverage, after adjustments for their biases relative to in situ data. An initial version of a nominally globally complete sea ice and interpolated sea surface temperature data set, beginning in 1871, has been created for use in numerical simulations of recent climate. Long time series of corrected regional, hemispheric, and global sea surface temperatures are mostly consistent with corresponding night marine air temperature series, and confirm the regionally specific climatic changes portrayed in the Scientific Assessments of the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The observations also show an El Nino-like oscillation on bidecadal and longer time scales.

  7. Japanese Whaling Ships' Sea Surface Temperatures 1946-84.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzejewska, Anna W.; Wu, Zhongxiang; Newell, Reginald E.; Miyashita, Tomio

    1997-03-01

    Japanese whaling ship data, a homogeneous dataset mainly covering the southern high-latitude oceans, may be used to fill in gaps in recent sea surface temperature datasets, contributing a fair number of additional observations in this area. The Japanese whaling ship data are treated separately here for the period 1946-84, and they show no significant temperature changes during this period in the main fishing region of 60°-70°S or in the west Pacific warm pool.

  8. Diurnal Variations of Titan's Surface Temperatures From Cassini -CIRS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor; Jennings, Don; Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert; Irwin, Patrick; Flasar, F. Michael

    The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, are providing us with the ability to detect the surface temperature of the planet by studying its outgoing radiance through a spectral window in the thermal infrared at 19 m (530 cm-1) characterized by low opacity. Since the first acquisitions of CIRS Titan data the in-strument has gathered a large amount of spectra covering a wide range of latitudes, longitudes and local times. We retrieve the surface temperature and the atmospheric temperature pro-file by modeling proper zonally averaged spectra of nadir observations with radiative transfer computations. Our forward model uses the correlated-k approximation for spectral opacity to calculate the emitted radiance, including contributions from collision induced pairs of CH4, N2 and H2, haze, and gaseous emission lines (Irwin et al. 2008). The retrieval method uses a non-linear least-squares optimal estimation technique to iteratively adjust the model parameters to achieve a spectral fit (Rodgers 2000). We show an accurate selection of the wide amount of data available in terms of footprint diameter on the planet and observational conditions, together with the retrieved results. Our results represent formal retrievals of surface brightness temperatures from the Cassini CIRS dataset using a full radiative transfer treatment, and we compare to the earlier findings of Jennings et al. (2009). The application of our methodology over wide areas has increased the planet coverage and accuracy of our knowledge of Titan's surface brightness temperature. In particular we had the chance to look for diurnal variations in surface temperature around the equator: a trend with slowly increasing temperature toward the late afternoon reveals that diurnal temperature changes are present on Titan surface. References: Irwin, P.G.J., et al.: "The NEMESIS planetary atmosphere radiative transfer and retrieval tool" (2008). JQSRT, Vol. 109, pp

  9. Temperature dependence of surface photovoltage of bulk semiconductors and the effect of surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shouvik; Gokhale, M. R.; Shah, A. P.; Arora, B. M.; Kumar, Shailendra

    2000-12-01

    Surface photovoltage (SPV) of n-GaAs decreases both above and below a certain transition temperature. We explain this phenomenon in terms of a Schottky contact based model and relative dominance of thermal and nonthermal parts of the dark current. This also explains the observed increase of SPV of p-GaAs below room temperature. Our analysis is further confirmed from the temperature dependence of the SPV measurements on p-InP and n-InP samples. Surface passivation is seen to lower the transition temperature of n-GaAs.

  10. An Analytic Function of Lunar Surface Temperature for Exospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, Dana M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Grava, Cesare; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Retherford, Kurt D.; Siegler, Matthew; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Paige, David

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytic expression to represent the lunar surface temperature as a function of Sun-state latitude and local time. The approximation represents neither topographical features nor compositional effects and therefore does not change as a function of selenographic latitude and longitude. The function reproduces the surface temperature measured by Diviner to within +/-10 K at 72% of grid points for dayside solar zenith angles of less than 80, and at 98% of grid points for nightside solar zenith angles greater than 100. The analytic function is least accurate at the terminator, where there is a strong gradient in the temperature, and the polar regions. Topographic features have a larger effect on the actual temperature near the terminator than at other solar zenith angles. For exospheric modeling the effects of topography on the thermal model can be approximated by using an effective longitude for determining the temperature. This effective longitude is randomly redistributed with 1 sigma of 4.5deg. The resulting ''roughened'' analytical model well represents the statistical dispersion in the Diviner data and is expected to be generally useful for future models of lunar surface temperature, especially those implemented within exospheric simulations that address questions of volatile transport.

  11. Daytime sensible heat flux estimation over heterogeneous surfaces using multitemporal land-surface temperature observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellví, F.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Rossi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Equations based on surface renewal (SR) analysis to estimate the sensible heat flux (H) require as input the mean ramp amplitude and period observed in the ramp-like pattern of the air temperature measured at high frequency. A SR-based method to estimate sensible heat flux (HSR-LST) requiring only low-frequency measurements of the air temperature, horizontal mean wind speed, and land-surface temperature as input was derived and tested under unstable conditions over a heterogeneous canopy (olive grove). HSR-LST assumes that the mean ramp amplitude can be inferred from the difference between land-surface temperature and mean air temperature through a linear relationship and that the ramp frequency is related to a wind shear scale characteristic of the canopy flow. The land-surface temperature was retrieved by integrating in situ sensing measures of thermal infrared energy emitted by the surface. The performance of HSR-LST was analyzed against flux tower measurements collected at two heights (close to and well above the canopy top). Crucial parameters involved in HSR-LST, which define the above mentioned linear relationship, were explained using the canopy height and the land surface temperature observed at sunrise and sunset. Although the olive grove can behave as either an isothermal or anisothermal surface, HSR-LST performed close to H measured using the eddy covariance and the Bowen ratio energy balance methods. Root mean square differences between HSR-LST and measured H were of about 55 W m-2. Thus, by using multitemporal thermal acquisitions, HSR-LST appears to bypass inconsistency between land surface temperature and the mean aerodynamic temperature. The one-source bulk transfer formulation for estimating H performed reliable after calibration against the eddy covariance method. After calibration, the latter performed similar to the proposed SR-LST method.

  12. ESTIMATING SUBPIXEL SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND ENERGY FLUXES FROM THE VEGETATION INDEX-RADIOMETRIC TEMPERATURE RELATIONSHIP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine (i.e., daily to weekly) monitoring of surface energy fluxes, particularly evapotranspiration (ET), using satellite observations of radiometric surface temperature has not been feasible at high pixel resolution because of the low frequency in satellite coverage over the region of interest (i...

  13. The Land Surface Temperature Impact to Land Cover Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, I.; Abu Samah, A.; Fauzi, R.; Noor, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover type is an important signature that is usually used to understand the interaction between the ground surfaces with the local temperature. Various land cover types such as high density built up areas, vegetation, bare land and water bodies are areas where heat signature are measured using remote sensing image. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of land surface temperature on land cover types. The objectives are 1) to analyse the mean temperature for each land cover types and 2) to analyse the relationship of temperature variation within land cover types: built up area, green area, forest, water bodies and bare land. The method used in this research was supervised classification for land cover map and mono window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) extraction. The statistical analysis of post hoc Tukey test was used on an image captured on five available images. A pixel-based change detection was applied to the temperature and land cover images. The result of post hoc Tukey test for the images showed that these land cover types: built up-green, built up-forest, built up-water bodies have caused significant difference in the temperature variation. However, built up-bare land did not show significant impact at p<0.05. These findings show that green areas appears to have a lower temperature difference, which is between 2° to 3° Celsius compared to urban areas. The findings also show that the average temperature and the built up percentage has a moderate correlation with R2 = 0.53. The environmental implications of these interactions can provide some insights for future land use planning in the region.

  14. Investigation about the effects of exterior surface paint color on temperature development in aboveground pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Farzaneh-Gord, Mahmood; Rasekh, Alireza; Nabati, Amin; Saadat, Morteza

    2010-12-15

    A practical analytical model for predicting temperature development of incompressible flow inside an aboveground pipeline has been constructed and presented in this research work. The outer surface of the pipeline is exposed to solar radiation and wind stream. The radiation heat exchange with ambient is also taken into account. The effects of exterior surface paint color represented by emissivity and absorptivity, have been studied. The model has been developed to study crude oil flow temperature development through a specific pipeline. The results obtained by the model show that the bulk temperature inclined to a limiting value in some distance which affected mainly by Reynolds numbers. It is found that emissivity and absorptivity of surface are predominant parameters in temperature development in an aboveground pipeline flow which can increase or decrease pipe surface and fluid temperature especially for low Reynolds number flow. Based on the results which indicated significantly of exterior surface paint color, one should choose the paint color by considering its effects on temperature development. (author)

  15. Quantitative evolution of volcanic surfaces affected by erosional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahitte, Pierre; Boillot-Airaksinen, Kim; Germa, Aurélie; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Variations through time of erosion dynamics, a key point to investigate correlation between climates and landform evolution, still remains poorly documented. One of the main issue in this type of study is the difficulty in determining for how long the erosion has operated. For this purpose, volcanic contexts are particularly suitable for defining the temporal dynamics governing erosion since the age of volcanic activity also constrains the age of emplacement of the surface today eroded, and thus the erosion duration. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of river profiles offers the opportunity to discriminate, among the wide variety of geological phenomena influencing erosion, their respective influence. Quantification of erosion processes and constrain of their signature on reliefs can be addressed by a morphometric approach of river profiles in volcanic environment through the analysis of digital topography (DEM). Break in slope zones, the so-called knickpoints, are usually related to a retreat of the point between the relict channel, upstream, and the adjusted channel, downstream. They are induced by either a lithological contrast, a change in the base level, uplift or eustatism, or a rejuvenation of the age of the volcanic surface. The stream long-profile and its watershed is also investigated by their concavity and hypsometric indexes to determine for how long the complexity and its heterogeneity along the valley incision remain visible. The present study focusses on the erosion of volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles, Reunion Island and Lombok Island (Indonesia). All located in tropical environments, these volcanoes offer a wide diversity of age (30 - 0 Ma) and lithology for investigating the respective influence of geological processes that have induced a large variety of shapes and volcanic history that we try to correlate to geometry of river profiles.

  16. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios. PMID:26028216

  17. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios. PMID:26028216

  18. Land surface temperature measurements for EOS MODIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhengming

    1994-01-01

    Work accomplished includes: Beta delivery 1 of the MODIS LST product; the first version of MODIS LST ATBD; update of the atmospheric radiative transfer code ATRAD; the development of a new approach look-up table method; and improvement of the TIR spectrometer. Preliminary feasibility analysis of the look-up table approach is presented in terms of showing the effects on the TIR radiance at the top of the atmosphere of the stratospheric and upper atmospheric temperature profiles, the surface emissivity and temperature, the lower atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, and the viewing angle.

  19. Global surface temperature changes since the 1850s

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Temperature data from land and marine areas form the basis for many studies of climatic variations on local, regional and hemispheric scales, and the global mean temperature is a fundamental measure of the state of the climate system. In this paper it is shown that the surface temperature of the globe has warmed by about 0.5{degrees}C since the mid-nineteenth century. This is an important part of the evidence in the {open_quote}global warming{close_quote} debate. How certain are we about the magnitude of the warming? Where has it been greatest? In this paper, these and related issues will be addressed.

  20. Procedure of rectal temperature measurement affects brain, muscle, skin and body temperatures and modulates the effects of intravenous cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, David D.; Brown, P. Leon; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2007-01-01

    Rectal probe thermometry is commonly used to measure body core temperature in rodents because of its ease of use. Although previous studies suggest that rectal measurement is stressful and results in long-lasting elevations in body temperatures, we evaluated how this procedure affects brain, muscle, skin and core temperatures measured with chronically implanted thermocouple electrodes in rats. Our data suggest that the procedure of rectal measurement results in powerful locomotor activation, rapid and strong increases in brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures, as well as a biphasic, down-up fluctuation in skin temperature, matching the response pattern observed during tail-pinch, a representative stressful procedure. This response, moreover, did not habituate after repeated day-to-day testing. Repeated rectal probe insertions also modified temperature responses induced by intravenous cocaine. Under quiet resting conditions, cocaine moderately increased brain, muscle and deep body temperatures. However, during repeated rectal measurements, which increased temperatures, cocaine induced both hyperthermic and hypothermic responses. Direct comparisons revealed that body temperatures measured by a rectal probe are typically lower (∼0.6°C) and more variable than body temperatures recorded by chronically implanted electrodes; the difference is smaller at low and greater at high basal temperatures. Because of this difference and temperature increases induced by the rectal probe per se, cocaine had no significant effect on rectal temperatures compared to control animals exposed to repeated rectal probes. Therefore, although rectal temperature measurements provide a decent correlation with directly measured deep body temperatures, the arousing influence of this procedure may drastically modulate the effects of other arousing stimuli and drugs. PMID:17466279

  1. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Boegh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne; Alfieri, Joseph G.; Kustas, William P.; Prueger, John H.; Niyogi, Dev; Das, Narendra; Drewry, Darren T.; Hoffmann, Lucien; Jarvis, Andrew J.

    2015-08-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combines TR data with standard energy balance closure models for deriving a hybrid scheme that does not require parameterization of the surface (or stomatal) and aerodynamic conductances (gS and gB). STIC is formed by the simultaneous solution of four state equations and it uses TR as an additional data source for retrieving the "near surface" moisture availability (M) and the Priestley-Taylor coefficient (α). The performance of STIC is tested using high-temporal resolution TR observations collected from different international surface energy flux experiments in conjunction with corresponding net radiation (RN), ground heat flux (G), air temperature (TA), and relative humidity (RH) measurements. A comparison of the STIC outputs with the eddy covariance measurements of λE and H revealed RMSDs of 7-16% and 40-74% in half-hourly λE and H estimates. These statistics were 5-13% and 10-44% in daily λE and H. The errors and uncertainties in both surface fluxes are comparable to the models that typically use land surface parameterizations for determining the unobserved components (gS and gB) of the surface energy balance models. However, the scheme is simpler, has the capabilities for generating spatially explicit surface energy fluxes and independent of submodels for boundary layer developments. This article was corrected on 27 AUG 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  2. Modeling Near-Surface Temperatures at Martian Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Bridges, N. T.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a process for deriving near-surface (approx. 1m) temperatures for potential landing sites, based on observational parameters from MGS TES, Odyssey THEMIS, and a boundary layer model developed by Murphy for fitting Pathfinder meteorological measurements. Minimum nighttime temperatures at the MER landing sites can limit power available, and thus mission lifetime. Temperatures are derived based on thermal inertia, albedo, and opacity estimated for the Hematite site in Sinus Meridiani, using predictions of 1-m air temperatures from a one-dimensional atmospheric model. The Hematite site shows 9 % probability of landing at a location with nighttime temperatures below the 97 C value considered to be a practical limit for operations.

  3. Surface heat flux parameterizations and tropical Pacific sea surface temperature simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, B.S. University Corp. for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO ); Cayan, D.R. )

    1993-04-15

    The authors report on a study of the problem of getting good model results for the sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific ocean. The tropical Pacific is particularly important because of its size, the large areas of warm surface temperature, its impact on global atmospheric circulation, and the fact that it serves as an indicator of climatic variations. To simulate sea surface temperature it is necessary to have an energy budget which fits into a general ocean circulation model. The main input, from solar flux, is not well known in the tropical Pacific. The authors use two different models to describe the latent flux and the radiative flux at the sea surface. Parameters of concern include the relative humidity, air-sea temperature difference, latent heat formulae, and radiative heat flux. They use these parameters in their models in different ways, and compare results with measurement sets from the Tropical Pacific.

  4. Temperature and strain-rate dependence of surface dislocation nucleation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ting; Li, Ju; Samanta, Amit; Leach, Austin; Gall, Ken

    2008-01-18

    Dislocation nucleation is essential to the plastic deformation of small-volume crystalline solids. The free surface may act as an effective source of dislocations to initiate and sustain plastic flow, in conjunction with bulk sources. Here, we develop an atomistic modeling framework to address the probabilistic nature of surface dislocation nucleation. We show the activation volume associated with surface dislocation nucleation is characteristically in the range of 1-10b3, where b is the Burgers vector. Such small activation volume leads to sensitive temperature and strain-rate dependence of the nucleation stress, providing an upper bound to the size-strength relation in nanopillar compression experiments. PMID:18232884

  5. Temperature-sensitive albino gene TCD5, encoding a monooxygenase, affects chloroplast development at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Jianhui; Shi, Xiaoliang; Peng, Yu; Li, Ping; Lin, Dongzhi; Dong, Yanjun; Teng, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Chloroplasts are essential for photosynthesis and play critical roles in plant development. In this study, we characterized the temperature-sensitive chlorophyll-deficient rice mutant tcd5, which develops albino leaves at low temperatures (20 °C) and normal green leaves at high temperatures (32 °C). The development of chloroplasts and etioplasts is impaired in tcd5 plants at 20 °C, and the temperature-sensitive period for the albino phenotype is the P4 stage of leaf development. The development of thylakoid membranes is arrested at the mid-P4 stage in tcd5 plants at 20 °C. We performed positional cloning of TCD5 and then complementation and knock-down experiments, and the results showed that the transcript LOC_Os05g34040.1 from the LOC_Os05g34040 gene corresponded to the tcd5 phenotype. TCD5 encodes a conserved plastid-targeted monooxygenase family protein which has not been previously reported associated with a temperature-sensitive albino phenotype in plants. TCD5 is abundantly expressed in young leaves and immature spikes, and low temperatures increased this expression. The transcription of some genes involved in plastid transcription/translation and photosynthesis varied in the tcd5 mutant. Although the phenotype and temperature dependence of the TCD5 orthologous mutant phenotype were different in rice and Arabidopsis, OsTCD5 could rescue the phenotype of the Arabidopsis mutant, suggesting that TCD5 function is conserved between monocots and dicots. PMID:27531886

  6. Temperature-sensitive albino gene TCD5, encoding a monooxygenase, affects chloroplast development at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Jianhui; Shi, Xiaoliang; Peng, Yu; Li, Ping; Lin, Dongzhi; Dong, Yanjun; Teng, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts are essential for photosynthesis and play critical roles in plant development. In this study, we characterized the temperature-sensitive chlorophyll-deficient rice mutant tcd5, which develops albino leaves at low temperatures (20 °C) and normal green leaves at high temperatures (32 °C). The development of chloroplasts and etioplasts is impaired in tcd5 plants at 20 °C, and the temperature-sensitive period for the albino phenotype is the P4 stage of leaf development. The development of thylakoid membranes is arrested at the mid-P4 stage in tcd5 plants at 20 °C. We performed positional cloning of TCD5 and then complementation and knock-down experiments, and the results showed that the transcript LOC_Os05g34040.1 from the LOC_Os05g34040 gene corresponded to the tcd5 phenotype. TCD5 encodes a conserved plastid-targeted monooxygenase family protein which has not been previously reported associated with a temperature-sensitive albino phenotype in plants. TCD5 is abundantly expressed in young leaves and immature spikes, and low temperatures increased this expression. The transcription of some genes involved in plastid transcription/translation and photosynthesis varied in the tcd5 mutant. Although the phenotype and temperature dependence of the TCD5 orthologous mutant phenotype were different in rice and Arabidopsis, OsTCD5 could rescue the phenotype of the Arabidopsis mutant, suggesting that TCD5 function is conserved between monocots and dicots. PMID:27531886

  7. Comparison of Near-Surface Air Temperatures and MODIS Ice-Surface Temperatures at Summit, Greenland (2008-2013)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Christopher A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Mefford, Thomas K.; Schnaubelt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the stability of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared-derived ice surface temperature (IST) data from Terra for use as a climate quality data record. The availability of climate quality air temperature data (TA) from a NOAA Global Monitoring Division observatory at Greenlands Summit station has enabled this high temporal resolution study of MODIS ISTs. During a 5 year period (July 2008 to August 2013), more than 2500 IST values were compared with 3-minute average TA values derived from the 1-minute data from NOAAs primary 2 m air temperature sensor. These data enabled an expected small offset between air and surface temperatures at this the ice sheet location to be investigated over multiple annual cycles.

  8. Modeling the Surface Temperature of Earth-like Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Silva, Laura; Murante, Giuseppe; Filippi, Luca; Provenzale, Antonello

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a novel Earth-like planet surface temperature model (ESTM) for habitability studies based on the spatial-temporal distribution of planetary surface temperatures. The ESTM adopts a surface energy balance model (EBM) complemented by: radiative-convective atmospheric column calculations, a set of physically based parameterizations of meridional transport, and descriptions of surface and cloud properties more refined than in standard EBMs. The parameterization is valid for rotating terrestrial planets with shallow atmospheres and moderate values of axis obliquity (ɛ ≲ 45{}^\\circ ). Comparison with a 3D model of atmospheric dynamics from the literature shows that the equator-to-pole temperature differences predicted by the two models agree within ≈ 5 K when the rotation rate, insolation, surface pressure and planet radius are varied in the intervals 0.5≲ {Ω }/{{{Ω }}\\oplus }≲ 2, 0.75≲ S/{{S}\\circ }≲ 1.25, 0.3≲ p/(1 bar)≲ 10, and 0.5≲ R/{{R}\\oplus }≲ 2, respectively. The ESTM has an extremely low computational cost and can be used when the planetary parameters are scarcely known (as for most exoplanets) and/or whenever many runs for different parameter configurations are needed. Model simulations of a test-case exoplanet (Kepler-62e) indicate that an uncertainty in surface pressure within the range expected for terrestrial planets may impact the mean temperature by ˜ 60 K. Within the limits of validity of the ESTM, the impact of surface pressure is larger than that predicted by uncertainties in rotation rate, axis obliquity, and ocean fractions. We discuss the possibility of performing a statistical ranking of planetary habitability taking advantage of the flexibility of the ESTM.

  9. Effect of Surface Energy on Freezing Temperature of Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Bekele, Selemon; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Previous studies have found that superhydrophobic surfaces are effective in delaying freezing of water droplets. However, the freezing process of water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces depends on factors such as droplet size, surface area, roughness, and cooling rate. The role of surface energy, independent of any other parameters, in delaying freezing of water is not understood. Here, we have used infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) to study the freezing of water next to solid substrates with water contact angles varying from 5° to 110°. We find that the freezing temperature of water decreases with increasing surface hydrophobicity only when the sample volume is small (∼10 μL). For a larger volume of water (∼300 μL), the freezing temperature is independent of surface energy. For water next to the surfaces with contact angle ≥54°, we observe a strong SFG peak associated with highly coordinated water. This research sheds new light on understanding the key factors in designing new anti-icing coatings. PMID:27314147

  10. Cell surface lectin array: parameters affecting cell glycan signature.

    PubMed

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Cancellieri, Perrine; Duverger, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Among the "omics", glycomics is one of the most complex fields and needs complementary strategies of analysis to decipher the "glycan dictionary". As an alternative method, which has developed since the beginning of the 21st century, lectin array technology could generate relevant information related to glycan motifs, accessibility and a number of other valuable insights from molecules (purified and non-purified) or cells. Based on a cell line model, this study deals with the key parameters that influence the whole cell surface glycan interaction with lectin arrays and the consequences on the interpretation and reliability of the results. The comparison between the adherent and suspension forms of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, showed respective glycan signatures, which could be inhibited specifically by neoglycoproteins. The modifications of the respective glycan signatures were also revealed according to the detachment modes and cell growth conditions. Finally the power of lectin array technology was highlighted by the possibility of selecting and characterizing a specific clone from the mother cell line, based on the slight difference determination in the respective glycan signatures. PMID:22899543

  11. Biofilm Formation by the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: Development and Parameters Affecting Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is a bacterial fish pathogen that affects many freshwater species worldwide. The natural reservoir of this pathogen is unknown, but its resilience in closed aquaculture systems posits biofilm as the source of contagion for farmed fish. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the dynamics of biofilm formation and morphology under static and flow conditions and (ii) to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, salinity, hardness, and carbohydrates on biofilm formation. Nineteen F. columnare strains, including representatives of all of the defined genetic groups (genomovars), were compared in this study. The structure of biofilm was characterized by light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. F. columnare was able to attach to and colonize inert surfaces by producing biofilm. Surface colonization started within 6 h postinoculation, and microcolonies were observed within 24 h. Extracellular polysaccharide substances and water channels were observed in mature biofilms (24 to 48 h). A similar time course was observed when F. columnare formed biofilm in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions. The virulence potential of biofilm was confirmed by cutaneous inoculation of channel catfish fingerlings with mature biofilm. Several physicochemical parameters modulate attachment to surfaces, with the largest influence being exerted by hardness, salinity, and the presence of mannose. Maintenance of hardness and salinity values within certain ranges could prevent biofilm formation by F. columnare in aquaculture systems. PMID:23851087

  12. High temperature growth of Pt on the Rh(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duisberg, M.; Dräger, M.; Wandelt, K.; Gruber, E. L. D.; Schmid, M.; Varga, P.

    1999-08-01

    The epitaxial growth of Pt on the Rh(111) surface at 700 K was studied with AES, UPS, ISS and STM. From AES and ISS measurements a 2D growth mode is concluded at this substrate temperature. The morphology of the surface is studied by photoemission spectra of adsorbed Xe (PAX) and STM. A disperse distribution of the Pt atoms is suggested by PAX and is consistent with an incorporation of these atoms into the first substrate layer. Atomically and chemically resolved STM measurements confirm these conclusions. The interaction of CO with the surface alloy is investigated by UPS. The CO-induced features in UP spectra show significant differences in the peak positions and shape between the clean substrate and the surface precovered with different amounts of Pt. The CO induced emissions are, thus, used for a quantitative titration of Pt on the Rh surface.

  13. Relating temperature dependence of atom scattering spectra to surface corrugation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, W W; Manson, J R

    2011-12-01

    It is suggested that a measurement of the temperature dependence of the most probable intensity of energy-resolved atom-surface scattering spectra can reveal the strength of the surface corrugation. To support this conjecture, a classical mechanical theory of atom scattering from a corrugated surface, valid in the weak corrugation limit, is developed. The general result for the scattering probability is expressed in terms of spatial integrals over the impact parameter within a surface unit cell. For the case of a one-dimensional corrugation, approximate expressions for the scattering probability are obtained in terms of analytic closed form expressions. As an indicator of its relation to experimental measurements, calculations using a one-dimensional corrugation model are compared with data for Ar scattering from a molten Ga surface and an approximate value of the corrugation height parameter is extracted. PMID:22085838

  14. Climate change signal analysis for Northeast Asian surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hyeong; Kim, Byungsoo; Sohn, Keon-Tae; Kown, Won-Tae; Min, Seung-Ki

    2005-03-01

    Climate change detection, attribution, and prediction were studied for the surface temperature in the Northeast Asian region using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and three coupled-model simulations from ECHAM4/OPYC3, HadCM3, and CCCma GCMs (Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis general circulation model). The Bayesian fingerprint approach was used to perform the detection and attribution test for the anthropogenic climate change signal associated with changes in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and sulfate aerosol (SO{4/2-}) concentrations for the Northeast Asian temperature. It was shown that there was a weak anthropogenic climate change signal in the Northeast Asian temperature change. The relative contribution of CO2 and SO{4/2-} effects to total temperature change in Northeast Asia was quantified from ECHAM4/OPYC3 and CCCma GCM simulations using analysis of variance. For the observed temperature change for the period of 1959 1998, the CO2 effect contributed 10% 21% of the total variance and the direct cooling effect of SO{4/2-} played a less important role (0% 7%) than the CO2 effect. The prediction of surface temperature change was estimated from the second CO2+SO{4/2-} scenario run of ECHAM4/OPYC3 which has the least error in the simulation of the present-day temperature field near the Korean Peninsula. The result shows that the area-mean surface temperature near the Korean Peninsula will increase by about 1.1° by the 2040s relative to the 1990s.

  15. Two Surface Temperature Retrieval Methods Compared Over Agricultural Lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Andrew N.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Jacob, Frederic; Ogawa, Kenta; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Accurate, spatially distributed surface temperatures are required for modeling evapotranspiration (ET) over agricultural fields under wide ranging conditions, including stressed and unstressed vegetation. Modeling approaches that use surface temperature observations, however, have the burden of estimating surface emissivities. Emissivity estimation, the subject of much recent research, is facilitated by observations in multiple thermal infrared bands. But it is nevertheless a difficult task. Using observations from a multiband thermal sensor, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), estimated surface emissivities and temperatures are retrieved in two different ways: the temperature emissivity separation approach (TES) and the normalized emissivity approach (NEM). Both rely upon empirical relationships, but the assumed relationships are different. TES relies upon a relationship between the minimum spectral emissivity and the range of observed emissivities. NEM relies upon an assumption that at least one thermal band has a pre-determined emissivity (close to 1.0). The benefits and consequences of each approach will be demonstrated for two different landscapes: one in central Oklahoma, USA and another in southern New Mexico.

  16. Fermi surfaces and energy gaps of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.X.; Dessau, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    In this short paper, the authors describe their recent experimental results from high-temperature superconductors. In the normal state, the data reveals interesting features of the Fermi surfaces and low energy excitations near the Fermi level. In the superconducting state, the data shows a very strong anisotropy in the superconducting gap.

  17. Applications of Land Surface Temperature from Microwave Observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key input for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes. Yet, it remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observation...

  18. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  19. Three-way partitioning of sea surface temperature measurement error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelton, D.

    1983-01-01

    Given any set of three 2 degree binned anomaly sea surface temperature (SST) data sets by three different sensors, estimates of the mean square error of each sensor estimate is made. The above formalism performed on every possible triplet of sensors. A separate table of error estimates is then constructed for each sensor.

  20. DISAGGREGATION OF GOES-LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURES USING MODIS OBSERVATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate temporal and spatial estimation of land surface temperatures (LST) is important for modeling the hydrological cycle at field to global scales because LSTs can improve estimates of soil moisture and evapotranspiration. Using remote sensing satellites, accurate LSTs could be routine, but unfo...

  1. Instrument accurately measures small temperature changes on test surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Miller, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Calorimeter apparatus accurately measures very small temperature rises on a test surface subjected to aerodynamic heating. A continuous thin sheet of a sensing material is attached to a base support plate through which a series of holes of known diameter have been drilled for attaching thermocouples to the material.

  2. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-01-01

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy–entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy–entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  3. Investigation of Aerodynamic and Aerodynamic and Radiometric Land Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crago, Richard D.; Friedl, Mark; Kustas, William; Wang, Ye-Qiao

    2003-01-01

    The overall goal of the project was to reconcile the difference between T(sub s,r) and T(sub aero), while maintaining consistency within models and with theory and data. The project involved collaboration between researchers at Bucknell University, Boston University, University of mode Island, and the USDNARS Hydrology Laboratory. This report focuses on the work done at Bucknell, which used an analytical continuous-source flux model developed by Crago (1998), based on work by Brutsaert and Sugita (1996) to generate fluxes at all levels of the canopy. Named ALARM [Analytical Land- Atmosphere-Radiometer Model] by Suleiman and Crago (2002), the model assumes the foliage has an exponential vertical temperature profile. The same profile is felt by the within-canopy turbulence and 'seen" by a radiometer viewing the surface from any zenith view angle. ALARM converts radiometric surface temperatures taken from any view angle into a clearly-defined version of Taero called the equivalent isothermal surface temperature T(sub s,j), and then calculates the sensible heat flux H using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. This allows remotely sensed Ts,r measurements to be used to produce high quality sensible and latent heat flux estimates, or to validate or update the surface temperature produced by SVATs in climate or mesoscale models.

  4. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRICALLY OPERATED TOYS OR OTHER ELECTRICALLY OPERATED ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations...

  5. Impacts of Short-Term Meteorological Fluctuations on Near-Surface Ground Temperatures in Spitsbergen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, S. M.; Christiansen, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    The state of permafrost in a given area is dependent on heat balance, which is largely controlled by major trends in climate. However, smaller-scale meteorological events can impact the thermal regime as well, depending on a number of ground surface factors. This project investigates the impact of short-term meteorological fluctuations on near-surface ground temperatures in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard, and identifies the depths at which these changes are perceptible. The Svalbard archipelago is subject to significant air temperature fluctuations due to its maritime climate; this can result in wintertime rain events. Even when snow is present, rain has the potential to notably affect near-surface ground temperatures. A few studies have examined Svalbard ground temperatures during specific wintertime warm periods, but no previous research has utilized the available long-term active layer and permafrost temperature data to compare distinct events. Though summer air temperatures on Svalbard are more stable, particularly warm intervals alter active layer thaw progression. By comparing high-resolution air temperature data with high-resolution ground temperature data, the temporal and spatial impact of short-term meteorological fluctuations is assessed and compared between sites from varying locations and lithology.

  6. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-01

    Physically-based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite observed brightness temperatures (TB) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are typically non-linear, such that inversions are ill-posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to better understand these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using brightness temperature weighting functions to quantify the percentage of the TB resulting from absorption/emission/reflection from the surface, absorption/emission/scattering by liquid and frozen hydrometeors in the cloud, the emission from atmospheric water vapor, and other contributors. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz and for several individual precipitation profiles as well as for three cloud resolving model simulations of falling snow. As expected, low frequency channels (<89 GHz) respond to liquid hydrometeors and the surface, while the higher frequency channels become increasingly sensitive to ice hydrometeors and the water vapor sounding channels react to water vapor in the atmosphere. Low emissivity surfaces (water and snow-covered land) permit energy downwelling from clouds to be reflected at the surface thereby increasing the percentage of the TB resulting from the hydrometeors. The slant path at a 53deg viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels and show sensitivity to surface polarization effects. The TB percentage information presented in this paper answers questions about the relative contributions to the brightness temperatures and provides a key piece of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  7. Effect of microorganism on Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, R.; Takeuchi, N.; Aoki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Greenland ice sheet holds approximately 10% of the fresh water on earth. If it melts all, sea level rises about 7.2meter. It is reported that mass of Greenland ice sheet is decreasing with temperature rising of climate change. Melting of the coastal area is particularly noticeable. It is established that 4 to 23% of the sea level rising from 1993 to 2005 is caused by the melting of Greenland ice sheet. In 2010, amount of melting per year became the largest than the past. However many climate models aren't able to simulate the recent melting of snow and ice in the Arctic including Greenland. One of the possible causes is albedo reduction of snow and ice surface by light absorbing snow impurities such as black carbon and dust and by glacial microorganisms. But there are few researches for effect of glacial microorganism in wide area. So it is important to clarify the impact of glacial microorganisms in wide area. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of microorganism on Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change using satellite images of visible, near infrared and thermal infrared wavelength range and observation carried out in northwestern Greenland. We use MODIS Land Surface Temperature Product as ice sheet surface temperature. It estimates land surface temperature based on split window method using thermal infrared bands. MODIS data is bound to cover the whole of Greenland, and calculated the ratio of the temperature change per year. Analysis period is from December 2002 to November 2010. Results of calculating Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change using the MODIS data, our analysis shows that it is upward trend in the whole region. We find a striking upward trend in northern and western part of Greenland. The rate is 0.33±0.03 degree Celsius per a year from 47.5°W to 49°W. While in the coastal area from 49°W to 50.7°W, the rate is 0.26±0.06 degree Celsius per a year. This large upward trend area is the same area as dark region

  8. Caterpillar biomass depends on temperature and precipitation, but does not affect bird reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eva Maria; Ohm, Judith; Hoffmann, Konstantin Frank; Hille, Sabine Marlene

    2016-07-01

    Complex changes in phenological events appear as temperatures are increasing: In deciduous forests bud burst, hatching of herbivorous caterpillars, egg laying and nestling time of birds when feeding chicks on caterpillars, may differentially shift into early season and alter synchronization. If timing of bird reproduction has to match with short periods of food availability, phenological mismatch could negatively affect reproductive success. Using a unique empirical approach along an altitudinal temperature gradient, we firstly asked whether besides temperature, also precipitation and leaf phenology interplay and affect caterpillar biomass, since impacts of rainfall on caterpillars have been largely neglected so far. Secondly, we asked whether abundance of caterpillars and thereby body mass of great tit nestlings, which are mainly fed with caterpillars, vary along the altitudinal temperature gradient. We demonstrated that next to temperature also precipitation and leaf phenology affected caterpillar biomass. In our beech forest, even along altitudes, caterpillars were available throughout the great tit breeding season but in highly variable amounts. Our findings revealed that although timing of leaf phenology and great tit breeding season were delayed with decreasing temperature, caterpillars occurred synchronously and were not delayed according to altitude. However, altitude negatively affected caterpillar biomass, but body mass of fledglings at high altitude sites was not affected by lower amounts of caterpillar biomass. This might be partially outweighed by larger territory sizes in great tits.

  9. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management. PMID:25350507

  10. Modeling Apple Surface Temperature Dynamics Based on Weather Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00–18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of “Fuji” apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management. PMID:25350507

  11. Temperature maps measurements on 3D surfaces with infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, Gennaro; Ianiro, Andrea; Dello Ioio, Gennaro; Passaro, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    The use of the infrared camera as a temperature transducer in wind tunnel applications is convenient and widespread. Nevertheless, the infrared data are available in the form of 2D images while the observed surfaces are often not planar and the reconstruction of temperature maps over them is a critical task. In this work, after recalling the principles of IR thermography, a methodology to rebuild temperature maps on the surfaces of 3D object is proposed. In particular, an optical calibration is applied to the IR camera by means of a novel target plate with control points. The proposed procedure takes also into account the directional emissivity by estimating the viewing angle. All the needed steps are described and analyzed. The advantages given by the proposed method are shown with an experiment in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  12. Environmental temperature affects the dynamics of ingestion in the nectivorous ant Camponotus mus.

    PubMed

    Falibene, Agustina; Josens, Roxana

    2014-12-01

    Environmental temperature influences physiology and behavior in animals in general and is particularly determinant in ectotherms. Not least because temperature defines metabolism and body temperature, muscle activity in insects also strongly depends on this factor. Here, we analyzed how environmental temperature influences the dynamics of ingestion due to its effect on the sucking pump muscles in the nectivorous ants Camponotus mus. Feeding behavior and sucking pump activity during sucrose solution ingestion were first recorded in a natural environment in an urban setting throughout the day and in different seasons. Then, controlled temperature experiments were performed in the laboratory. In both situations, feeding time decreased and pumping frequency increased with temperature. However, different pumping frequencies under a same temperature were also observed in different seasons. Besides, in the laboratory, the volume of solution ingested increased with temperature. Consequently, intake rate increased when temperature rose. This change was exclusively promoted by a variation in the pumping frequency while volume taken in per pump contraction was not affected by temperature. In summary, environmental temperature modified the dynamics of ingestion and feeding behavior by directly affecting pumping frequency. PMID:25285641

  13. Plasma temperature rise toward the plasma-facing surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R. P.; Seraydarian, R. P.; De Temmerman, G.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    Detailed measurements of axial electron temperature, Te, profiles in the presheath region were carried out using a Langmuir probe and the line intensity ratio technique for both He I (728.1 nm/706.5 nm) and Be II (467.3 nm/313.1 nm). The results show that Te increases toward the material surface, which contradicts the standard picture that Te is constant along the magnetic field in the sheath-limited regime. While no target bias voltage, Vb, dependence is seen, the Te rise becomes more prominent with decreasing neutral pressure. Similarly, the ion temperature, Ti, evaluated from Doppler broadening of a He II line emission at 468.6 nm is found to increase toward the surface, but also does not depend on Vb. Possible mechanisms of the Te and Ti rise as well as validity of the line intensity ratio technique near the material surface are discussed.

  14. A Titan atmosphere with a surface temperature of 200K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The brightness temperature of Titan at 3 mm wavelength is around 200 K according to Ulich, Conklin, and Dickel (1978). Although an earlier measurement by Briggs is much colder, 200 K as the surface temperature was used to build an atmospheric model with a surface pressure of 21 bars. CH4 clouds form between 100 and 120 km altitude. The visual limb is near 200 km. The methane mixing ratio is 0.25 percent above the clouds and 7 percent below; the dominant gas is assumed to be N2. The thermal opacity is due to pressure-induced absorption in N2 and a trace (0.5 percent) of H2, with some help from cloud particles; unit opacity is reached at 600 mbar, 110 km from the surface. The radius of the solid body in this model is 2700 km, in reasonable agreement with 2600 km obtained if the density is the same as that of Ganymede and Callisto.

  15. Finite element simulation of temperature dependent free surface flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelman, M. S.; Sani, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The method of Engelman and Sani (1984) for a finite-element simulation of incompressible surface flows with a free and/or moving fluid interface, such as encountered in crystal growth and coating and polymer technology, is extended to temperature-dependent flows, including the effect of temperature-dependent surface tension. The basic algorithm of Saito and Scriven (1981) and Ruschak (1980) has been generalized and implemented in a robust and versatile finite-element code that can be employed with relative ease for the simulation of free-surface problems in complex geometries. As a result, the costly dependence on the Newton-Raphson algorithm has been eliminated by replacing it with a quasi-Newton iterative method, which nearly retains the superior convergence properties of the Newton-Raphson method.

  16. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  17. Calcium pyroxenes at Mercurian surface temperatures: investigation of in-situ emissivity spectra and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Nestola, F.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Alvaro, M.; Domeneghetti, M.; Massironi, M.; Hiesinger, H.

    2013-12-01

    The European Space Agency and Japan Aerospace Agency mission to Mercury, named BepiColombo, will carry on board the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) that will be able to provide surface Thermal Infra-Red (TIR) emissivity spectra from 7 to 14 μm. This range of wavelengths is very useful to identify the fine-scale structural properties of several silicates. For mineral families as pyroxenes, the emissivity peak positions are good indicators of the composition. A complication in the interpretation of MERTIS data could arise from the extreme daily surface temperature range of Mercury (70 to 725 K) that significantly affects the crystal structure and density of minerals and consequently should affect the TIR spectral signature of each single mineral present on the surface of the planet. In preparation for the MERTIS data analysis, we are extensively investigating at high temperatures conditions several mineral phases potentially detectable on the surface of Mercury. Two C2/c augitic pyroxenes, with constant calcium content and very different magnesium to iron ratio, were studied by in situ high-temperature thermal infrared spectroscopy (up to 750 K) and in situ high-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction (up to 770 K). The emissivity spectra of the two samples show similar band center shifts of the main three bands toward lower wavenumbers with increasing temperature. Our results indicate that the center position of bands 1 and 2 is strictly dependent on temperature, whereas the center position of band 3 is a strong function of the composition regardless the temperature. These data suggest that MERTIS spectra will be able to provide indications of C2/c augitic pyroxene with different magnesium contents and will allow a correct interpretation independently on the spectra acquisition temperature.

  18. Estimation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Using Marine Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Satish Kumar; Dewangan, Pawan; Sain, Kalachand

    2016-04-01

    Not much attention is given to direct wave arrivals in marine seismic data that are acquired for petroleum exploration and prospecting. These direct arrivals are usually muted out in routine seismic data processing. In the present study, we process these direct arrivals to accurately estimate soundspeed in near-surface seawater and invert for sea surface temperature. The established empirical equation describing the relationships among temperature, salinity, pressure and soundspeed is used for the inversion. We also discuss processing techniques, such as first-break picking and cross-correlation for the estimation of soundspeed, that are well known among petroleum-industry geophysicists. The accuracy of the methods is directly linked to the data quality and signal processing. The novelty in our approach is in the data conditioning, which consists essentially of spectral balancing based on a wavelet transform that compensates for spherical spreading and increases the signal-to-noise ( S/ N) ratio. The 2D seismic data used in this paper are from the offshore Krishna-Godavari Basin east of India. We observe a significantly higher soundspeed of 1545 m/s for near-surface water than the commonly used value of ~1500 m/s. The estimated temperature (from velocity) is about 30 °C. Interestingly, the estimated temperature matches well with the temperature recorded in the CTD profile acquired in the study area during the month of May, the month corresponding to the acquisition of seismic data. Furthermore, the estimated temperatures during different times of data acquisition correlate well with the expected diurnal variation in temperature.

  19. Study of bacterial adhesion on biomimetic temperature responsive glycopolymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Kotsuchibashi, Yohei; Liu, Yang; Narain, Ravin

    2015-01-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for diseases such as bacteremia, chronic lung infection, and acute ulcerative keratitis. P. aeruginosa induced diseases can be fatal as the exotoxins and endotoxins released by the bacterium continue to damage host tissues even after the administration of antibiotics. As bacterial adhesion on cell surfaces is the first step in bacterial based pathogen infections, the control of bacteria-cell interactions is a worthwhile research target. In this work, thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [P(NIPAAm)] based biomimetic surfaces were developed to study the two major bacterial infection mechanisms, which is believed to be mediated by hydrophobic or lectin-carbohydrate interactions, using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. Although, a greater number of P. aeruginosa adhered to the NIPAAm homopolymer modified surfaces at temperatures higher than the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), the bacterium-substratum bond stiffness was stronger between P. aeruginosa and a galactose based P(NIPAAm) surface. The high bacterial adhesion bond stiffness observed on the galactose based thermally responsive surface at 37 °C might suggest that both hydrophobic and lectin-carbohydrate interactions contribute to bacterial adhesion on cell surfaces. Our investigation also suggests that the lectin-carbohydrate interaction play a significant role in bacterial infections. PMID:25548940

  20. Thoracic surface temperature rhythms as circadian biomarkers for cancer chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Véronique Pasquale; Mohamad-Djafari, Ali; Innominato, Pasquale Fabio; Karaboué, Abdoulaye; Gorbach, Alexander; Lévi, Francis Albert

    2014-01-01

    The disruption of the temperature circadian rhythm has been associated with cancer progression, while its amplification resulted in cancer inhibition in experimental tumor models. The current study investigated the relevance of skin surface temperature rhythms as biomarkers of the Circadian Timing System (CTS) in order to optimize chronotherapy timing in individual cancer patients. Baseline skin surface temperature at four sites and wrist accelerations were measured every minute for 4 days in 16 patients with metastatic gastro-intestinal cancer before chronotherapy administration. Temperature and rest-activity were recorded, respectively, with wireless skin surface temperature patches (Respironics, Phillips) and an actigraph (Ambulatory Monitoring). Both variables were further monitored in 10 of these patients during and after a 4-day course of a fixed chronotherapy protocol. Collected at baseline, during and after therapy longitudinal data sets were processed using Fast Fourier Transform Cosinor and Linear Discriminant Analyses methods. A circadian rhythm was statistically validated with a period of 24 h (p<0.05) for 49/61 temperature time series (80.3%), and 15/16 rest-activity patterns (93.7%) at baseline. However, individual circadian amplitudes varied from 0.04 °C to 2.86 °C for skin surface temperature (median, 0.72 °C), and from 16.6 to 146.1 acc/min for rest-activity (median, 88.9 acc/min). Thirty-nine pairs of baseline temperature and rest-activity time series (75%) were correlated (r>|0.7|; p<0.05). Individual circadian acrophases at baseline were scattered from 15:18 to 6:05 for skin surface temperature, and from 12:19 to 15:18 for rest-activity, with respective median values of 01:10 (25–75% quartiles, 22:35–3:07) and 14:12 (13:14–14:31). The circadian patterns in skin surface temperature and rest-activity persisted or were amplified during and after fixed chronotherapy delivery for 5/10 patients. In contrast, transient or sustained disruption

  1. Temperature-dependent surface-enrichment effects of imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Kolbeck, Claudia; Deyko, Alexey; Matsuda, Takashi; Kohler, Florian T U; Wasserscheid, Peter; Maier, Florian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-11

    We present the first systematic study of the influence of temperature on the degree of surface enrichment of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs). Using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the degree of surface enrichment strongly decreases with increasing temperature for all the studied ILs. For ILs with the same cation, but different anions, [C8 C1 Im]Br, [C8 C1 Im][TfO] and [C8 C1 Im][Tf2 N], no significant differences of the temperature-induced partial loss of surface enrichment are found. Measurements for [C4 C1 Im][TfO], [C8 C1 Im][TfO] and [C18 C1 Im][TfO] indicate a small effect of the chain length. For [C18 C1 Im][TfO], a continuous decrease of alkyl surface enrichment is found with increasing temperature, with no abrupt changes at the phase-transition temperature from the smectic A to the isotropic phase, indicating that the surface enrichment is not affected by this phase transition. PMID:24123477

  2. Effect of ambient temperature and attachment method on surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikuta, Agnes; Niedermann, Reto; Rossi, René M.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate measurement of skin surface temperature is essential in both thermo-physiological and clinical applications. However, a literature review of the last two decades of physiological or clinical research revealed an inconsistency or a lack of information on how temperature sensors were attached to the skin surface. The purpose of this study was to systematically compare and quantify the performance of different commercially available temperature sensors and their typical attachment methods, and, secondly, to provide a time-efficient and reliable method for testing any sensor-tape combination. In conclusion, both the sensor type and the attachment method influenced the results of temperature measurements (both its absolute and relative dimensions). The sensor shape and the contact of its sensing area to the surface, as well as the conductance of the tape were the most important parameters to minimise the influence of environmental conditions on surface temperature measurement. These results suggest that temperature sensors and attachment methods for human subject and manikin trials should be selected carefully, with a systematic evaluation of the sensor-tape system under conditions of use, and emphasise the need to report these parameters in publications.

  3. [Prediction of high temperature harm to rice in Jiangsu Province based on sea surface temperature].

    PubMed

    Pan, Ao-Da; Gao, Ping; Liu, Mei; Wang, Chun-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Based on the measurements of rice growth and the ordinary meteorological observations from eight main agro-meteorological stations in Jiangsu Province in 1986-2007, this paper analyzed the characteristics of generation circulation corresponding to the abnormal strong and southern subtropical high pressure in 2003 (the year with a typically high temperature), the relationships between the abnormalities of subtropical high pressure and previous sea surface temperature, and the physiological responses of rice to the abnormal high temperature during its crucial development stages. In the meantime, a field correlation analysis was made on the relationships between the harm index of high temperature in the northern (Huaibei), middle (Jianghuai), and southern (Sunan) areas of Jiangsu and the sea surface temperature (SST) of Western Pacific. The results showed that the harm index of high temperature in the three areas was highly correlated with the SST of Nino area, northern area, and warm pool area of Western Pacific, respectively, but the significance and temporal evolution of the correlations varied among the areas. The transformation of SST was conducted to optimize its correlation with the harm index of high temperature, and an increased reliability of SST acting as a predictor of high temperature harm was obtained. The simulation results of the established models in predicting high temperature harm to rice in Huaibei, Jianghuai and Sunan areas of Jiangsu Province were significant at 0.01 level. PMID:20387435

  4. Spatiotemporal temperature profiling of corneal surface during LTK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Maguen, Ezra I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2002-06-01

    Accurate prediction of LTK treatments requires refined thermal corneal models which necessitate precise input parameters. The overall objective of this study was to provide detailed information on the spatiotemporal temperature profile of the corneal surface, during in-vitro thermal keratoplasty. LTK was performed in-vitro on freshly harvested porcine eyes (N equals 16) with the Sunrise Technologies corneal shaping system (Model SUN 1000). Spatiotemporal thermal imaging of the irradiated corneas were obtained with a short wave Inframetrics thermal camera (Model PM290). Images were obtained at 8-bits resolution, with ~100 microns spatial and ~17 msec temporal resolution respectively. Treatment pattern consisted of eight spots at 6 mm zone, while lasing was conducted at settings of either 100 mJ and 15 pulses (N equals 8), or 260 mJ and 7 pulses (N equals 8). Temporal and spatial variation of the corneal surface temperatures were calculated at locations of importance to LTK. At the laser spot, temperature profiles consisted of transients coinciding approximately with the laser pulses. Maximum transient temperatures observed were 98.0+/- 4.6 degree(s)C for the high and 56.3+/- 2.6 degree(s)C for the low energy respectively. These temperature transients were superimposed on an envelope of lower-slowly varying temperatures. The maximum temperatures observed for this temperature envelope, were 51.8+/- 3.4 degree(s)C for the high and 35.4+/- 3.4 degree(s)C for the low energy respectively. The evolution of either the maximum temperature transients or the lower temperature envelope, followed exponential growth of the form: T equals A * exp(B*t). Maximum temperatures at locations 0.5 mm and 1 mm away from the laser spot, reached 25.7 degree(s)C and 23.3 degree(s)C for the low energy, and 34 degree(s)C and 25.6 degree(s)C for the high energy settings respectively. Temperature decay constants were approximately 2 to 3 sec, while the spatial temperature profile at the laser

  5. Sperm Affects Head Sensory Neuron in Temperature Tolerance of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Satoru; Ohta, Akane; Maruo, Ayana; Ujisawa, Tomoyo; Kuhara, Atsushi

    2016-06-28

    Tolerance to environmental temperature change is essential for the survival and proliferation of animals. The process is controlled by various body tissues, but the orchestration of activity within the tissue network has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we show that sperm affects the activity of temperature-sensing neurons (ASJ) that control cold tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic impairment of sperm caused abnormal cold tolerance, which was unexpectedly restored by impairment of temperature signaling in ASJ neurons. Calcium imaging revealed that ASJ neuronal activity in response to temperature was decreased in sperm mutant gsp-4 with impaired protein phosphatase 1 and rescued by expressing gsp-4 in sperm. Genetic analysis revealed a feedback network in which ASJ neuronal activity regulates the intestine through insulin and a steroid hormone, which then affects sperm and, in turn, controls ASJ neuronal activity. Thus, we propose that feedback between sperm and a sensory neuron mediating temperature tolerance. PMID:27320929

  6. Surface activation-based nanobonding and interconnection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, M. M. R.; Yamauchi, A.; Suga, T.

    2011-02-01

    Flip chip nanobonding and interconnect system (NBIS) equipment with high precision alignment has been developed based on the surface activated bonding method for high-density interconnection and MEMS packaging. The 3σ alignment accuracy in the IR transmission system was approximately ±0.2 µm. The performance of the NBIS has been preliminarily investigated through bonding between relatively rough surfaces of copper through silicon vias (Cu-TSVs) and gold-stud bumps (Au-SBs), and smooth surfaces of silicon wafers. The Cu-TSVs of 55 µm diameter and the Au-SBs of 35 µm diameter with ~6-10 nm surface roughness (RMS) were bonded at room temperature after surface activation using an argon fast atom beam (Ar-FAB) under 0.16 N per bump. Silicon wafers of 50 mm diameter with ~0.2 nm RMS surface roughness were bonded without heating after surface activation. Void-free interfaces both in Cu-TSV/Au-SB and silicon/silicon with bonding strength equivalent to bulk fracture of Au and silicon, respectively, were achieved. A few nm thick amorphous layers were observed across the silicon/silicon interface that was fabricated by the Ar-FAB. This study in the interconnection and bonding facilitates the required three-dimensional integration on the same surface for high-density electronic and biomedical systems.

  7. UV-B and temperature enhancement affect spring and autumn phenology in Populus tremula.

    PubMed

    Strømme, C B; Julkunen-Tiitto, R; Krishna, U; Lavola, A; Olsen, J E; Nybakken, L

    2015-05-01

    Perennial plants growing at high latitudes synchronize growth and dormancy to appropriate seasons by sensing environmental cues. Autumnal growth cessation, bud set and dormancy induction are commonly driven by the length of photoperiod and light quality, and the responses are modified by temperature. However, although ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation is well known to affect plant growth and development, information on the effects on bud phenology is scarce. We examined the separate and combined effects of enhanced temperature and UV-B on autumnal bud set and spring bud break in female and male clones of Populus tremula in an outdoor experiment in Joensuu, Eastern Finland. Enhancements of UV-B and temperature were modulated to +30% and +2 °C, respectively, from June to October 2012. Enhanced UV-B accelerated bud set, while increased temperature delayed it. For both UV-B and temperature, we found sex-related differences in responsiveness. Temperature increase had a stronger delaying effect on bud maturation in male compared with female clones. Also, male clones were more responsive to UV-B increase than female clones. Increasing autumnal temperature enhanced bud break in spring for both sexes, while UV-B enhanced bud break in male clones. In conclusion, we found that UV-B affected phenological shifts in P. tremula, and that temperature and UV-B affected genders differently. PMID:24689776

  8. Improved accuracy of the remote sensing of sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalu, G.; Prabhakara, C.; Lo, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for determining the water vapor content to within + or - 0.4 g/sq cm from remotely sensed radiances in three infrared channels, 11, 13, 18 microns. Using this method, it is possible to significantly improve the accuracy of sea surface temperature (SST) over what is obtainable with the two channel technique. A radiative computational scheme for the radiative transfer equation is used to study the manner in which the equivalent radiative temperature of the atmosphere changes as a function of wave number for different atmospheric conditions. Average climatological conditions are used to simulate the radiative response of the atmosphere. This radiative transfer simulation is used to compute brightness temperatures for radiosonde profiles obtained from oceanographic ships, which temperatures are in turn used to estimate the SST. Nimbus 4 IRIS spectral measurements corresponding to the profiles were used in the same way for purposes of comparison.

  9. Perturbation of ground surface temperature reconstructions by groundwater flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Beltrami, Hugo; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2006-07-01

    Subsurface temperatures have been shown to be a robust source of information on past climates. Most analyses neglect groundwater flow (GWF) and assume purely conductive heat flow. However, in many situations GWF has not been fully considered and to date there are no general GWF criteria for either accepting or rejecting a temperature profile for paleoclimate analysis. Here we examine the transition from conduction dominated environments to environments where advection has a significant effect on the subsurface temperature regime and thus ground surface temperature (GST) histories. We provide guidelines indicating when advection is important and conclude that it is unlikely that groundwater flow is a significant source of error in the global data set maintained by the International Heat Flow Commission.

  10. Designing high-temperature steels via surface science and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Cameron T.; Jiang, Zilin; Mathai, Allan; Chung, Yip-Wah

    2016-06-01

    Electricity in many countries such as the US and China is produced by burning fossil fuels in steam-turbine-driven power plants. The efficiency of these power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperature of the steam generator. In this work, we adopted a combined surface science and computational thermodynamics approach to the design of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant steels for this application. The result is a low-carbon ferritic steel with nanosized transition metal monocarbide precipitates that are thermally stable, as verified by atom probe tomography. High-temperature Vickers hardness measurements demonstrated that these steels maintain their strength for extended periods at 700 °C. We hypothesize that the improved strength of these steels is derived from the semi-coherent interfaces of these thermally stable, nanosized precipitates exerting drag forces on impinging dislocations, thus maintaining strength at elevated temperatures.

  11. Evidence of Lunar Phase Influence on Global Surface Air Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Ebby; Susskind, Joel

    2000-01-01

    Intraseasonal oscillations appearing in a newly available 20-year record of satellite-derived surface air temperature are composited with respect to the lunar phase. Polar regions exhibit strong lunar phase modulation with higher temperatures occurs near full moon and lower temperatures at new moon, in agreement with previous studies. The polar response to the apparent lunar forcing is shown to be most robust in the winter months when solar influence is minimum. In addition, the response appears to be influenced by ENSO events. The highest mean temperature range between full moon and new moon in the polar region between 60 deg and 90 deg latitude was recorded in 1983, 1986/87, and 1990/91. Although the largest lunar phase signal is in the polar regions, there is a tendency for meridional equatorward progression of anomalies in both hemispheres so that the warning in the tropics occurs at the time of the new moon.

  12. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the “gradient effect”. This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the “substrate effect”. This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an important role in the FBG

  13. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the "gradient effect". This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the "substrate effect". This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an important role in the FBG sensor

  14. Impervious surfaces and sewer pipe effects on stormwater runoff temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabouri, F.; Gharabaghi, B.; Mahboubi, A. A.; McBean, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    The warming effect of the impervious surfaces in urban catchment areas and the cooling effect of underground storm sewer pipes on stormwater runoff temperature are assessed. Four urban residential catchment areas in the Cities of Guelph and Kitchener, Ontario, Canada were evaluated using a combination of runoff monitoring and modelling. The stormwater level and water temperature were monitored at 10 min interval at the inlet of the stormwater management ponds for three summers 2009, 2010 and 2011. The warming effect of the ponds is also studied, however discussed in detail in a separate paper. An artificial neural network (ANN) model for stormwater temperature was trained and validated using monitoring data. Stormwater runoff temperature was most sensitive to event mean temperature of the rainfall (EMTR) with a normalized sensitivity coefficient (Sn) of 1.257. Subsequent levels of sensitivity corresponded to the longest sewer pipe length (LPL), maximum rainfall intensity (MI), percent impervious cover (IMP), rainfall depth (R), initial asphalt temperature (AspT), pipe network density (PND), and rainfall duration (D), respectively. Percent impervious cover of the catchment area (IMP) was the key parameter that represented the warming effect of the paved surfaces; sensitivity analysis showed IMP increase from 20% to 50% resulted in runoff temperature increase by 3 °C. The longest storm sewer pipe length (LPL) and the storm sewer pipe network density (PND) are the two key parameters that control the cooling effect of the underground sewer system; sensitivity analysis showed LPL increase from 345 to 966 m, resulted in runoff temperature drop by 2.5 °C.

  15. Surface emissivity and temperature retrieval for a hyperspectral sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.

    1998-12-01

    With the growing use of hyper-spectral imagers, e.g., AVIRIS in the visible and short-wave infrared there is hope of using such instruments in the mid-wave and thermal IR (TIR) some day. The author believes that this will enable him to get around using the present temperature-emissivity separation algorithms using methods which take advantage of the many channels available in hyper-spectral imagers. A simple fact used in coming up with a novel algorithm is that a typical surface emissivity spectrum are rather smooth compared to spectral features introduced by the atmosphere. Thus, a iterative solution technique can be devised which retrieves emissivity spectra based on spectral smoothness. To make the emissivities realistic, atmospheric parameters are varied using approximations, look-up tables derived from a radiative transfer code and spectral libraries. One such iterative algorithm solves the radiative transfer equation for the radiance at the sensor for the unknown emissivity and uses the blackbody temperature computed in an atmospheric window to get a guess for the unknown surface temperature. By varying the surface temperature over a small range a series of emissivity spectra are calculated. The one with the smoothest characteristic is chosen. The algorithm was tested on synthetic data using MODTRAN and the Salisbury emissivity database.

  16. Urban pavement surface temperature. Comparison of numerical and statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Mario; Khalifa, Abderrahmen; Bues, Michel; Bouilloud, Ludovic; Martin, Eric; Chancibaut, Katia

    2015-04-01

    The forecast of pavement surface temperature is very specific in the context of urban winter maintenance. to manage snow plowing and salting of roads. Such forecast mainly relies on numerical models based on a description of the energy balance between the atmosphere, the buildings and the pavement, with a canyon configuration. Nevertheless, there is a specific need in the physical description and the numerical implementation of the traffic in the energy flux balance. This traffic was originally considered as a constant. Many changes were performed in a numerical model to describe as accurately as possible the traffic effects on this urban energy balance, such as tires friction, pavement-air exchange coefficient, and infrared flux neat balance. Some experiments based on infrared thermography and radiometry were then conducted to quantify the effect fo traffic on urban pavement surface. Based on meteorological data, corresponding pavement temperature forecast were calculated and were compared with fiels measurements. Results indicated a good agreement between the forecast from the numerical model based on this energy balance approach. A complementary forecast approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-square regression (PLS) was also developed, with data from thermal mapping usng infrared radiometry. The forecast of pavement surface temperature with air temperature was obtained in the specific case of urban configurtation, and considering traffic into measurements used for the statistical analysis. A comparison between results from the numerical model based on energy balance, and PCA/PLS was then conducted, indicating the advantages and limits of each approach.

  17. Sea surface and remotely sensed temperatures off Cape Mendocino, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Arvesen, J. C.; Frydenlund, D.; Myers, J. S.; Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    During September 3 to 5, 1979, a multisensor oceanographic experiment was conducted off Cape Mendocino, California. The purpose of this experiment was to validate the use of remote sensing techniques over an area along the U.S. west coast where coasted upwelling is known to be intense. Remotely sensed mutlispectral data, including thermal infrared imagery, were collected above an upwelling feature off Cape Mendocino. Data were acquired from the TIRNOS-N and NOAA-6 polar orbiting satellites, the NASA Ames Research Center's high altitude U-2 aircraft, and a U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft. Supporting surface truth data over the same feature were collected aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, OCEANOGRAPHER. Atmospheric soundings were also taken aboard the ship. The results indicate that shipboard measurements of sea surface temperatures can be reproduction within 1 C or better through remote observation of absolute infrared radiance values (whether measured aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellite, the U-2 aircraft, or the Coast Guard aircraft) by using appropriate atmospheric corrections. Also, the patterns of sea surface temperature which were derived independently from the various remote platforms provide a consistent interpretation of the surface temperature field.

  18. Ultraviolet surface plasmon-mediated low temperature hydrazine decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Siying; Sheldon, Matthew T.; Atwater, Harry A.; Liu, Wei-Guang; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William Andrew

    2015-01-12

    Conventional methods require elevated temperatures in order to dissociate high-energy nitrogen bonds in precursor molecules such as ammonia or hydrazine used for nitride film growth. We report enhanced photodissociation of surface-absorbed hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) molecules at low temperature by using ultraviolet surface plasmons to concentrate the exciting radiation. Plasmonic nanostructured aluminum substrates were designed to provide resonant near field concentration at λ = 248 nm (5 eV), corresponding to the maximum optical cross section for hydrogen abstraction from N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. We employed nanoimprint lithography to fabricate 1 mm × 1 mm arrays of the resonant plasmonic structures, and ultraviolet reflectance spectroscopy confirmed resonant extinction at 248 nm. Hydrazine was cryogenically adsorbed to the plasmonic substrate in a low-pressure ambient, and 5 eV surface plasmons were resonantly excited using a pulsed KrF laser. Mass spectrometry was used to characterize the photodissociation products and indicated a 6.2× overall enhancement in photodissociation yield for hydrazine adsorbed on plasmonic substrates compared with control substrates. The ultraviolet surface plasmon enhanced photodissociation demonstrated here may provide a valuable method to generate reactive precursors for deposition of nitride thin film materials at low temperatures.

  19. Theoretical study of cathode surfaces and high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    The surface-dipole properties of model cathode surfaces have been investigated with relativistic scattered-wave cluster calculations. Work-function/coverage curves have been derived from these data by employing the depolarization model of interacting surface dipoles. Accurate values have been obtained for the minimum work functions of several low-work-function surfaces. In the series BaO on bcc W, hcp Os, and fcc Pt, BaO/Os shows a lower and BaO/Pt a higher work function than BaO/W, which is attributed to the different substrate crystal structures involved. Results are also presented on the electronic structure of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7, which has been investigated with fully relativistic calculations for the first time.

  20. The extent of temporal smearing in surface-temperature histories derived from borehole temperature measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of borehole temperature data to resolve past climatic events is investigated using Backus-Gilbert inversion methods. Two experimental approaches are considered: (1) the data consist of a single borehole temperature profile, and (2) the data consist of climatically-induced temperature transients measured within a borehole during a monitoring experiment. The sensitivity of the data's resolving power to the vertical distribution of the measurements, temperature measurement errors, the inclusion of a local meteorological record, and the duration of a monitoring experiment, are investigated. The results can be used to help interpret existing surface temperature histories derived from borehole temperature data and to optimize future experiments for the detection of climatic signals. ?? 1992.

  1. Interdecadal changes of surface temperature since the late nineteenth century

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.E.; Folland, C.K.; Bevan, A.; Jones, P.D.

    1994-07-20

    The authors present global fields of decadal annual surface temperature anomalies, referred to the period 1951-1980, for each decade from 1881-1890 to 1981-1990 and for 1984-1993. In addition, they show decadal calendar-seasonal anomaly fields for the warm decades 1936-1945 and 1981-1990. The fields are based on sea surface temperature (SST) and land surface air temperature data. The SSTs are corrected for the pre-World War II use of uninsulated sea temperature buckets and incorporate adjusted satellite-based SSTs from 1982 onward. These results extend those published in the 1990 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Scientific Assessment. Despite poor data coverage initially and around the two World Wars the generally cold end of the nineteenth century and start to the twentieth century are confirmed, together with the substantial warming between about 1920 and 1940. Slight cooling of the northern hemisphere took place between the 1950s and the mid-1970s, although slight warming continued south of the equator. Recent warmth has been most marked over the northern continents in winter and spring, but the 1980s were warm almost everywhere apart from Greenland, the northwestern Atlantic and the midlatitude North Pacific. Parts of the middle- to high-latitude southern ocean may also have been cool in the 1980s, but in this area the 1951-1980 climatology is unreliable. The impact of the satellite data is reduced because the record of blended satellite and in situ SST is still too short to yield a climatology from which to calculate representative anomalies reflecting climatic change in the southern ocean. However, the authors propose a method of using existing satellite data in a step toward this target. The maps are condensed into global and hemispheric decadal surface temperature anomalies. The authors show the sensitivity of these estimated anomalies to alternative methods of compositing the spatially incomplete fields. 58 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  3. Piglets’ Surface Temperature Change at Different Weights at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Caldara, Fabiana Ribeiro; dos Santos, Luan Sousa; Machado, Sivanilza Teixeira; Moi, Marta; de Alencar Nääs, Irenilza; Foppa, Luciana; Garcia, Rodrigo Garófallo; de Kássia Silva dos Santos, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out in order to verify the effects of piglets’ weight at birth on their surface temperature change (ST) after birth, and its relationship with ingestion time of colostrum. Piglets from four different sows were weighed at birth and divided into a totally randomized design with three treatments according to birth weight (PBW): T1 - less than 1.00 kg, T2 - 1.00 to 1.39 kg, and T3 - higher than or equal to 1.40 kg. The time spent for the first colostrum ingestion was recorded (TFS). Images of piglets’ surface by thermal imaging camera were recorded at birth (STB) and 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min after birth. The air temperature and relative humidity were recorded every 30 min and the indexes of temperature and humidity (THI) were calculated. A ST drop after 15 min from birth was observed, increasing again after sixty minutes. Positive correlations were found between the PBW and the ST at 30 and 45 min after birth. The PBW was negatively correlated with the TFS. The THI showed high negative correlations (−0.824 and −0.815) with STB and after 15 min from birth. The piglet’s surface temperature at birth was positively correlated with temperature thereof to 15 min, influencing therefore the temperatures in the interval of 45 to 120 min. The birth weight contributes significantly to postnatal hypothermia and consequently to the time it takes for piglets ingest colostrum, requiring special attention to those of low birth weight. PMID:25049971

  4. High Predictive Skill of Global Surface Temperature a Year Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folland, C. K.; Colman, A.; Kennedy, J. J.; Knight, J.; Parker, D. E.; Stott, P.; Smith, D. M.; Boucher, O.

    2011-12-01

    We discuss the high skill of real-time forecasts of global surface temperature a year ahead issued by the UK Met Office, and their scientific background. Although this is a forecasting and not a formal attribution study, we show that the main instrumental global annual surface temperature data sets since 1891 are structured consistently with a set of five physical forcing factors except during and just after the second World War. Reconstructions use a multiple application of cross validated linear regression to minimise artificial skill allowing time-varying uncertainties in the contribution of each forcing factor to global temperature to be assessed. Mean cross validated reconstructions for the data sets have total correlations in the range 0.93-0.95,interannual correlations in the range 0.72-0.75 and root mean squared errors near 0.06oC, consistent with observational uncertainties.Three transient runs of the HadCM3 coupled model for 1888-2002 demonstrate quite similar reconstruction skill from similar forcing factors defined appropriately for the model, showing that skilful use of our technique is not confined to observations. The observed reconstructions show that the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) likely contributed to the re-commencement of global warming between 1976 and 2010 and to global cooling observed immediately beforehand in 1965-1976. The slowing of global warming in the last decade is likely to be largely due to a phase-delayed response to the downturn in the solar cycle since 2001-2, with no net ENSO contribution. The much reduced trend in 2001-10 is similar in size to other weak decadal temperature trends observed since global warming resumed in the 1970s. The causes of variations in decadal trends can be mostly explained by variations in the strength of the forcing factors. Eleven real-time forecasts of global mean surface temperature for the year ahead for 2000-2010, based on broadly similar methods, provide an independent test of the

  5. Surface Fatigue Life of High Temperature Gear Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1994-01-01

    Three high temperature gear materials were evaluated using spur gear surface fatigue tests. These materials were, VASCO max 350, VASCO matrix 2, and nitralloy N and were evaluated for possible use in high temperature gear applications. The fatigue life of the three high temperature gear materials were compared with the life of the standard AISI 9310 aircraft gear material. Surface fatigue tests were conducted at a lubricant inlet temperature of 321 K (120 F), a lubricant outlet temperature of 350 K (170 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi), a speed of 10,000 rpm, and with a synthetic paraffinic lubricant. The life of the nitralloy N was approximately the same as the AISI 9310, the life of the VASCO max 350 was much less than the AISI 9310 while the life of the VASCO matrix 2 was several times the life of the AISI 9310. The VASCO max 350 also showed very low fracture toughness with approximately half of the gears failed by tooth fracture through the fatigue spall. The VASCO matrix 2 had approximately 10-percent fracture failure through the fatigue spalls indicating moderate to good fracture toughness.

  6. Observations of Near-Surface Heat-Flux and Temperature Profiles Through the Early Evening Transition over Contrasting Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Derek D.; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2016-06-01

    Near-surface turbulence data from the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program are used to study countergradient heat fluxes through the early evening transition. Two sites, subjected to similar large-scale forcing, but with vastly different surface and sub-surface characteristics, are considered. The Playa site is situated at the interior of a large dry lakebed desert with high sub-surface soil moisture, shallow water table, and devoid of vegetation. The Sagebrush site is located in a desert steppe region with sparse vegetation and little soil moisture. Countergradient sensible heat fluxes are observed during the transition at both sites. The transition process is both site and height dependent. At the Sagebrush site, the countergradient flux at 5 m and below occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux precedes the local temperature gradient sign change. For 10 m and above, the countergradient flux occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. At the Playa site, the countergradient flux at all tower levels occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. The phenomenon is explained in terms of the mean temperature and heat-flux evolution. The temperature gradient sign reversal is a top-down process while the flux reversal occurs nearly simultaneously at all heights. The differing countergradient behaviour is primarily due to the different subsurface thermal characteristics at the two sites. The combined high volumetric heat capacity and high thermal conductivity at the Playa site lead to small vertical temperature gradients that affect the relative magnitude of terms in the heat-flux tendency equation. A critical ratio of the gradient production to buoyant production of sensible heat flux is suggested so as to predict the countergradient behaviour.

  7. Investigating the Impacts of Surface Temperature Anomalies Due to Wildfires in Northern Sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbert, T.; Ichoku, C. M.; Matsui, T.; Capehart, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Sub-Saharan African region (NSSA) is an area of intense study due to the recent severe droughts that have dire consequences on the population, which relies mostly on rainfed agriculture for its food supply. This region's weather and hydrologic cycle are very complex and are dependent on the West African Monsoon. Different regional processes affect the West African Monsoon cycle and variability. One of the areas of current investigation is the water cycle response to the variability of land surface characteristics. Land surface characteristics are often altered in NSSA due to agricultural practices, grazing, and the fires that occur during the dry season. To better understand the effects of biomass burning on the hydrologic cycle of the sub-Saharan environment, an interdisciplinary team sponsored by NASA is analyzing potential feedback mechanisms due to the fires. As part of this research, this study focuses on the effects of land surface changes, particularly albedo and skin temperature, that are influenced by biomass burning. Surface temperature anomalies can influence the initiation of convective rainfall and surface albedo is linked to the absorption of solar radiation. To capture the effects of fire perturbations on the land surface, NASA's Unified Weather and Research Forecasting (NU-WRF) model coupled with NASA's Land Information System (LIS) is being used to simulate some of the fire-induced surface temperature anomalies and other environmental processes. In this presentation, we will report the strategy for these simulations, and show some preliminary results.

  8. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and chlorofluoromethanes - Combined effects on stratospheric ozone, temperature, and surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, L. B.; Natarajan, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of combined CO2 and CFCl3 and CF2Cl2 time-dependent scenarios on atmospheric O3 and temperature are described; the steady-state levels of O3 and surface temperature, to which the chlorofluoromethane scenario tends in the presence of twice and four time ambient CO2, are examined; and surface temperature changes, caused by the combined effects, are established. A description of the model and of the experiments is presented. Results indicate that (1) the total ozone time history is significantly different from that due to the chlorofluoromethane alone; (2) a local ozone minimum occurs in the upper stratosphere about 45 years from the present with a subsequent ozone increase, then decline; and (3) steady-state solutions indicate that tropospheric temperature and water vapor increases, associated with increased infrared opacity, cause significant changes in tropospheric ozone levels for 2 x CO2 and 4 x CO2, without the addition of chlorofluoromethanes.

  9. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Čaja; Marek, Patsch

    2015-05-01

    Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) elements by loop heat pipe (LHP). IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  10. The PRISM palaeoclimate reconstruction and Pliocene sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I present a summary of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, with emphasis on its historical development and range of boundary condition datasets. Sea-surface temperature (SST), sea level, sea ice, land cover (vegetation and ice) and topography are discussed as well as many of the assumptions required to create an integrated global-scale reconstruction. New multiproxy research shows good general agreement on the magnitude of mid-Pliocene SST warming. Future directions, including maximum and minimum SST analyses and deep ocean temperature estimates aimed at a full three-dimensional reconstruction, are presented. ?? The Micropalaeontological Society 2007.

  11. A study of surface temperatures, clouds and net radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans

    1994-01-01

    The study is continuing and it is focused on examining seasonal relationships between climate parameters such as the surface temperatures, the net radiation and cloud types and amount on a global basis for the period February 1985 to January 1987. The study consists of an analysis of the combined Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program (ISCCP) products. The main emphasis is on obtaining the information about the interactions and relationships of Earth Radiation Budget parameters, cloud and temperature information. The purpose is to gain additional qualitative and quantitative insight into the cloud climate relationship.

  12. Diurnal temperature variations affect development of a herbivorous arthropod pest and its predators.

    PubMed

    Vangansbeke, Dominiek; Audenaert, Joachim; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Verhoeven, Ruth; Gobin, Bruno; Tirry, Luc; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The impact of daily temperature variations on arthropod life history remains woefully understudied compared to the large body of research that has been carried out on the effects of constant temperatures. However, diurnal varying temperature regimes more commonly represent the environment in which most organisms thrive. Such varying temperature regimes have been demonstrated to substantially affect development and reproduction of ectothermic organisms, generally in accordance with Jensen's inequality. In the present study we evaluated the impact of temperature alternations at 4 amplitudes (DTR0, +5, +10 and +15°C) on the developmental rate of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and their natural prey, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). We have modelled their developmental rates as a function of temperature using both linear and nonlinear models. Diurnally alternating temperatures resulted in a faster development in the lower temperature range as compared to their corresponding mean constant temperatures, whereas the opposite was observed in the higher temperature range. Our results indicate that Jensen's inequality does not suffice to fully explain the differences in developmental rates at constant and alternating temperatures, suggesting additional physiological responses play a role. It is concluded that diurnal temperature range should not be ignored and should be incorporated in predictive models on the phenology of arthropod pests and their natural enemies and their performance in biological control programmes. PMID:25874697

  13. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15–300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system. PMID:27296771

  14. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15-300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system. PMID:27296771

  15. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperatures: A global reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.; Barron, J.; Poore, R.

    1996-01-01

    Identification and analyses of Pliocene marine microfossils from 64 globally distributed stratigraphic sequences have been used to produce a middle Pliocene sea surface temperature reconstruction of the Earth. This reconstruction shows little or no change from current conditions in low latitude regions and significant warming of the ocean surface at mid and higher latitudes of both hemispheres. This pattern of warming is consistent with terrestrial records and suggests a combination of enhanced meridional ocean heat transport and enhanced greenhouse effect were responsible for the middle Pliocene warmth.

  16. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal gradients in French coastal zones for the period of one year were mapped in order to enable a coherent study of certain oceanic features detectable by the variations in the sea surface temperature field and their evolution in time. The phenomena examined were mesoscale thermal features in the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean; thermal gradients generated by French estuary systems; and diurnal heating in the sea surface layer. The investigation was based on Heat Capacity Mapping Mission imagery.

  17. Biological control of surface temperature in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Gouveia, Albert D.; Shetye, Satish R.; Ravindran, P.; Platt, Trevor

    1991-01-01

    In the Arabian Sea, the southwest monsoon promotes seasonal upwelling of deep water, which supplies nutrients to the surface layer and leads to a marked increase in phytoplankton growth. Remotely sensed data on ocean color are used here to show that the resulting distribution of phytoplankton exerts a controlling influence on the seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature. This results in a corresponding modification of ocean-atmosphere heat exchange on regional and seasonal scales. It is shown that this biological mechanism may provide an important regulating influence on ocean-atmosphere interactions.

  18. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15–300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system.

  19. The effect of lattice temperature on surface damage in fused silica optics

    SciTech Connect

    Bude, J; Guss, G; Matthews, M; Spaeth, M L

    2007-10-31

    We examine the effect of lattice temperature on the probability of surface damage initiation for 355nm, 7ns laser pulses for surface temperatures below the melting point to temperatures well above the melting point of fused silica. At sufficiently high surface temperatures, damage thresholds are dramatically reduced. Our results indicate a temperature activated absorption and support the idea of a lattice temperature threshold of surface damage. From these measurements, we estimate the temperature dependent absorption coefficient for intrinsic silica.

  20. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  1. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  2. Potential vorticity intrusion index and climate variability of surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.

    2003-04-01

    This paper proposes a potential vorticity intrusion index (denoted as PVI) as an alternative diagnostic tool to study the observed climate variability/trend of the surface temperature. The PVI index is defined as the percentage area of upper lever PV intrusion in the extratropics at any given time. Abundance (shortage) of extreme cold surface air temperature episodes in high latitudes coincides with a high (low) PVI index. The interannual variability of the PVI index exhibits a strong QBO- like signal. The high (low) PVI index prevails when the equatorial zonal mean zonal wind at 50 hPa is easterly (westerly). The probability distribution map of PV intrusion activities shows a shift of the preferred regions of frontogenesis from the oceans to the continents when the PVI index is high. This explains directly why more extreme cold events are observed over the northern Eurasian and Northern America continents when the PVI index is high or the QBO is in the easterly phase.

  3. Potential vorticity intrusion index and climate variability of surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ming

    2003-02-01

    This paper proposes a potential vorticity intrusion index (denoted as PVI) as an alternative diagnostic tool to study the observed climate variability/trend of the surface temperature. The PVI index measures the percentage area of upper lever PV intrusion in the extratropics at any given time. More (fewer) outbreaks of extreme cold surface air temperature in high latitudes take place when the PVI index is high (low). The interannual variability of the PVI index exhibits a strong QBO- like signal. The high (low) PVI index prevails when the equatorial zonal mean zonal wind at 50 hPa is easterly (westerly). The probability distribution map of PV intrusion activities shows a shift of the preferred regions of frontogenesis from the oceans to the continents when the PVI index is high. This explains directly why more extreme cold events are observed over the northern Eurasian and Northern America continents when the PVI index is high, or the QBO is in the easterly phase.

  4. Global surface air temperature variations: 1851-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Raper, S.C.B.; Kelly, P.M.

    1986-11-01

    Many attempts have been made to combine station surface air temperature data into an average for the Northern Hemisphere. Fewer attempts have been made for the Southern Hemisphere because of the unavailability of data from the Antarctic mainland before the 1950s and the uncertainty of making a hemispheric estimate based solely on land-based analyses for a hemisphere that is 80% ocean. Past estimates have been based largely on data from the World Weather Records (Smithsonian Institution, 1927, 1935, 1947, and U.S. Weather Bureau, 1959-82) and have been made without considerable effort to detect and correct station inhomogeneities. Better estimates for the Southern Hemisphere are now possible because of the availability of 30 years of climatological data from Antarctica. The mean monthly surface air temperature anomalies presented in this package for the than those previously published because of the incorporation of data previously hidden away in archives and the analysis of station homogeneity before estimation.

  5. Infrared Low Temperature Turbine Vane Rough Surface Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Spuckler, C. M.; Lucci, B. L.; Camperchioli, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer distributions obtained using an infrared camera technique are described. Infrared thermography was used because noncontact surface temperature measurements were desired. Surface temperatures were 80 C or less. Tests were conducted in a three vane linear cascade, with inlet pressures between 0.14 and 1.02 atm., and exit Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.7, and 0.9, for turbulence intensities of approximately 1 and 10%. Measurements were taken on the vane suction side, and on the pressure side leading edge region. The designs for both the vane and test facility are discussed. The approach used to account for conduction within the vane is described. Midspan heat transfer distributions are given for the range of test conditions.

  6. Spatial correlations of interdecadal variation in global surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Michael E.; Park, Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed spatial correlation patterns of interdecadal global surface temperature variability from an empirical perspective. Using multitaper coherence estimates from 140-yr records, we find that correlations between hemispheres are significant at about 95 percent confidence for nonrandomness for most of the frequency band in the 0.06-0.24 cyc/yr range. Coherence estimates of pairs of 100-yr grid-point temperature data series near 5-yr period reveal teleconnection patterns consistent with known patterns of ENSO variability. Significant correlated variability is observed near 15 year period, with the dominant teleconnection pattern largely confined to the Northern Hemisphere. Peak-to-peak Delta-T is at about 0.5 deg, with simultaneous warming and cooling of discrete patches on the earth's surface. A global average of this pattern would largely cancel.

  7. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Global accuracies and error characteristics of presently orbiting satellite sensors are examined. The workshops are intended to lead to a better understanding of present capabilities for sea surface temperature measurement and to improve measurement concepts for the future. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVHRR and Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer is emphasized. Some data from the High Resolution Infrared Sounder HIRS and AVHRR are also examined. Comparisons of satellite data with ship and eXpendable BathyThermograph XBT measurement show standard deviations in the range 0.5 to 1.3 C with biases of less than 0.4 C, depending on the sensor, ocean region, and spatial/temporal averaging. The Sea Surface Temperature SST anomaly maps show good agreement in some cases, but a number of sensor related problems are identified.

  8. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are now possible using a variety of sensors. The present accuracies of these methods are in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 C. This makes them potentially useful for synoptic studies of ocean currents and for global monitoring of climatological anomalies. To improve confidence in the satellite data, objective evaluations of sensor accuracies are necessary, and the conditions under which these accuracies degrade need to be understood. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on the Nimbus-7 satellite was studied. Sea surface temperatures, derived from November 1979 SMMR data, were compared globally against ship measurements and climatology, using facilities of the JPL Pilot Ocean Data System. Methods for improved data analysis and plans for additional workshops to incorporate data from other sensors were discussed.

  9. The alkenone temperature signal in western North Atlantic surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, M. H.; Weber, J. C.; King, L. L.; Wakeham, S. G.

    2001-12-01

    Haptophyte algae-derived long-chain C 37-C 39 alkenones and alkyl alkenoates were analyzed in euphotic zone particulate matter collected over a 7 yr period at the Oceanic Flux Program/Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (OFP/BATS) site in the western Sargasso Sea. Surface water temperatures at the site range annually from 19 to 29°C. Alkenone concentrations ranged from < 0.1 ng L -1 in summer to > 100 ng L -1 following the passage of storms. Highest seasonal concentrations occurred during the late winter and spring. Under stratified conditions, alkenone concentrations in the surface mixed layer (0-20 m) were generally 2 to 4 times higher than in the deep fluorescent maximum (75-110 m), consistent with Emiliania huxleyi concentration profiles (Haidar and Thierstein, 2001) and indicated that alkenone production primarily occurs within the upper euphotic zone in this region. Alkenone compound distributions and the temperature calibrations of C 37 and C 38 methyl and ethyl alkenone unsaturation (U 37K', U 38MeK, and U 38EtK, respectively) were remarkably similar to that observed in an E. huxleyi strain previously isolated from the same area (Conte et al., 1998), providing strong evidence that E. huxleyi is the predominant alkenone synthesizer and that characteristics exhibited by randomly isolated clones in culture are, in many cases, consistent with those of populations in the region of origin. The Bermuda calibration of U 37K' vs. water temperature (U 37K' = -1.9835 + 0.2004T - 0.0034T 2, r 2 = 0.95, n = 91) is nonlinear and falls along the same trendline as euphotic zone particulates from warm (> 15°C) waters of the eastern North Atlantic (Conte and Eglinton, 1993) and Mediterranean (Ternois et al., 1997). The combined North Atlantic temperature calibration (U 37K' = - 1.1365 + 0.1257T - 0.0018T 2, r 2 = 0.963, n = 134) differs significantly from published coretop sediment calibrations (Rosell-Melé et al., 1995; Müller et al., 1998) based on sea surface temperature

  10. High-Temperature Sprayable Phosphor Coating Developed for Measuring Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    The use of phosphor thermography for noncontact temperature measurements in harsh environments has been proven over the last decade, but it has suffered from difficult application procedures such as vapor deposition or sputtering techniques. We have developed a high-temperature-sensitive paint that is easily applied with commercially available paint-spraying equipment and have successfully demonstrated it to temperatures up to 1500 C. Selected phosphors have also shown measurable signals to 1700 C, thus allowing a combination of phosphors to be used in high-temperature binders to make surface temperature measurements from ambient to over 1500 C. Phosphor thermography is an optical technique that measures the time response of fluorescence light, which is a function of the phosphor temperature. The phosphors are excited with short wavelength light (ultraviolet or blue), and they emit light at a longer wavelength. This technique has a benefit over other temperature measurements, such as thermocouples and infrared thermography, in difficult environments such as high blackbody backgrounds, vibration, flames, high electromagnetic noise, or where special windows may be needed. In addition, the sprayable phosphor paints easily cover large or complicated structures, providing full-surface information with a single measurement. Oak Ridge National Laboratories developed and tested the high-temperature binders and phosphors under the direction of the NASA Glenn Research Center. Refractory materials doped with rare earth metals were selected for their performance at high temperature. Survivability, adhesion, and material compatibility tests were conducted at high temperatures in a small furnace while the fluorescent response from the phosphors was being measured. A painted sample in a furnace with a clearly visible fluorescing dot excited by a pulsed laser is shown. Measuring the decay time of this fluorescence yields the surface temperature. One new paint was recently tested

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring surface contour on parts with elevated temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Horvath, Mark S.; Nance, Roy A.; Cohen, George H.; Fodor, George

    1991-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method and apparatus for measuring the surface contour of a test piece, such as the bow of a radioactive fuel rod, which is completely immersed in water. The invention utilizes ultrasonic technology and is capable of measuring surface contours of test pieces which are at a higher temperature than the surrounding water. The presence of a test piece at a higher temperature adversely affects the distance measurements by causing thermal variations in the water near the surface of the test piece. The contour measurements depend upon a constant temperature of the water in the path of the ultrasonic wave to provide a constant acoustical velocity (the measurement is made by the time of flight measurement for an ultrasonic wave). Therefore, any variations of water temperature near the surface will introduce errors degrading the measurement. The present invention overcomes these problems by assuring that the supply of water through which the ultrasonic waves travel is at a predetermined and constant temperature.

  12. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic and human losses. A main factor in the development of torrential rains is ocean-atmosphere exchange of heat and moisture that can destabilize air masses travelling over the sea. The study of air mass trajectories previous to the rain event permits the identification of sea areas that could probably contribute to the development or intensification of rainfall. From a Mediterranean sea surface temperature climatology, its spatio-temporal distribution patterns have been studied showing two main distribution modes in winter and summer and transitional regimes in spring and autumn. Hence, three heavy precipitation events, for such winter and summer sea temperature regimes and for fall transition, affecting the Valencia region have been selected to study the effect of sea surface temperature in torrential rains. Simulations with perturbed sea surface temperature in different areas along the air mass path were run to compare results with unperturbed simulation. The variation of sea surface temperature in certain areas caused significant changes in model accumulated values and its spatial distribution. Therefore, the existence of areas that at a greater extent favour air-sea interaction leading to the development of torrential rainfall in the Valencia region is shown. This methodology could be extended to other Mediterranean regions to look for such potential recharge areas. The identification of sea areas that contribute to the development or intensification of heavy rain events in the Mediterranean countries could be a useful prognosis and/or monitoring tool.

  13. Survival of salmonella on dried fruits and in aqueous dried fruit homogenates as affected by temperature.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, Larry R; Mann, David A

    2014-07-01

    A study was done to determine the ability of Salmonella to survive on dried cranberries, raisins, and strawberries and in date paste, as affected by storage temperature. Acid-adapted Salmonella, initially at 6.57 to 7.01 log CFU/g, was recovered from mist-inoculated cranberries (water activity [aw] 0.47) and raisins (aw 0.46) stored at 25°C for 21 days but not 42 days, strawberries (aw 0.21) for 42 days but not 84 days, and date paste (aw 0.69) for 84 days but not 126 days. In contrast, the pathogen was detected in strawberries stored at 4°C for 182 days (6 months) but not 242 days (8 months) and in cranberries, date paste, and raisins stored for 242 days. Surface-grown cells survived longer than broth-grown cells in date paste. The order of rate of inactivation at 4°C was cranberry > strawberry > raisin > date paste. Initially at 2.18 to 3.35 log CFU/g, inactivation of Salmonella on dry (sand)&ndash inoculated fruits followed trends similar to those for mist-inoculated fruits. Survival of Salmonella in aqueous homogenates of dried fruits as affected by fruit concentration and temperature was also studied. Growth was not observed in 10% (aw 0.995 to 0.999) and 50% (aw 0.955 to 0.962) homogenates of the four fruits held at 4°C, 50% homogenates at 25°C, and 10% cranberry and strawberry homogenates at 25°C. Growth of the pathogen in 10% date paste and raisin homogenates stored at 25°C was followed by rapid inactivation. Results of these studies suggest the need to subject dried fruits that may be contaminated with Salmonella to a lethal process and prevent postprocess contamination before they are eaten out-of-hand or used as ingredients in ready-to-eat foods. Observations showing that Salmonella can grow in aqueous homogenates of date paste and raisins emphasize the importance of minimizing contact of these fruits with high-moisture environments during handling and storage. PMID:24988015

  14. How Venus surface conditions evolution can be affected by large impacts at long timescales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, Cedric; Golabek, Gregor; Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate how the evolution of Venus' atmosphere and mantle is modified by large impacts, during Late Veneer and Late Heavy Bombardment. We propose a coupled model of mantle/atmosphere feedback. We also focus on volatile fluxes in and out of the atmosphere: atmospheric escape and degassing. The solid part of the planet is simulated using the StagYY code (Armann and Tackley, 2012) and releases volatiles into the atmosphere through degassing. Physical properties are depth-dependent. The assumed rheology is Newtonian diffusion creep plus plastic yielding. Atmospheric escape modeling involves two different aspects: hydrodynamic escape (0-500 Myr) and non-thermal escape mechanisms (dominant post 4 Ga). Hydrodynamic escape is the massive outflow of volatiles occurring when the solar energy input is strong. Post 4 Ga escape from non-thermal processes is comparatively low. The evolution of surface temperature is calculated from the greenhouse effect dependent on CO2 and water concentrations in the atmosphere, using a one-dimensional gray radiative-convective atmosphere model. It allows us to complete the coupling of the model: feedback of the atmosphere on the mantle is obtained by using surface temperature as a boundary condition for the convection. Large impacts are capable of contributing to (i) atmospheric escape, (ii) volatile replenishment and (iii) energy transfer to the mantle of the solid planet. We test a wide range of impactor parameters (size, velocity, timing) and different assumptions related to impact erosion (Shuvalov, 2010). For energy transfer, 2D distribution of the thermal anomaly created by the impact is used, leading to melting and subjected to transport by the mantle convection. Small (0-50 km) meteorites have a negligible effect on the global scale: they only affect the impact point and do not have lasting consequences on surface conditions. Medium ones (50-150 km) have strong short term influence through volatile

  15. High predictive skill of global surface temperature a year ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folland, Chris K.; Colman, Andrew W.; Smith, Doug M.; Boucher, Olivier; Parker, David E.; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2013-02-01

    We discuss 13 real-time forecasts of global annual-mean surface temperature issued by the United Kingdom Met Office for 1 year ahead for 2000-2012. These involve statistical, and since 2008, initialized dynamical forecasts using the Met Office DePreSys system. For the period when the statistical forecast system changed little, 2000-2010, issued forecasts had a high correlation of 0.74 with observations and a root mean square error of 0.07°C. However, the HadCRUT data sets against which issued forecasts were verified were biased slightly cold, especially from 2004, because of data gaps in the strongly warming Arctic. This observational cold bias was mainly responsible for a statistically significant warm bias in the 2000-2010 forecasts of 0.06°C. Climate forcing data sets used in the statistical method, and verification data, have recently been modified, increasing hindcast correlation skill to 0.80 with no significant bias. Dynamical hindcasts for 2000-2011 have a similar correlation skill of 0.78 and skillfully hindcast annual mean spatial global surface temperature patterns. Such skill indicates that we have a good understanding of the main factors influencing global mean surface temperature.

  16. Land surface temperature shaped by urban fractions in megacity region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Yonghong; Jia, Gensuo; Hou, Meiting; Fan, Yanguo; Sun, Zhongchang; Zhu, Yuxiang

    2015-11-01

    Large areas of cropland and natural vegetation have been replaced by impervious surfaces during the recent rapid urbanization in China, which has resulted in intensified urban heat island effects and modified local or regional warming trends. However, it is unclear how urban expansion contributes to local temperature change. In this study, we investigated the relationship between land surface temperature (LST) change and the increase of urban land signals. The megacity of Tianjin was chosen for the case study because it is representative of the urbanization process in northern China. A combined analysis of LST and urban land information was conducted based on an urban-rural transect derived from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and QuickBird images. The results indicated that the density of urban land signals has intensified within a 1-km2 grid in the urban center with an impervious land fraction >60 %. However, the construction on urban land is quite different with low-/mid-rise buildings outnumbering high-rise buildings in the urban-rural transect. Based on a statistical moving window analysis, positive correlation (R 2 > 0.9) is found between LST and urban land signals. Surface temperature change (ΔLST) increases by 0.062 °C, which was probably caused by the 1 % increase of urbanized land (ΔIF) in this case region.

  17. Joint variability of global runoff and global sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 1905-2002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly temperature and precipitation data to compute time series of annual gridded runoff for the analysis period. The annual runoff time series data are combined with gridded annual sea surface temperature data, and the combined dataset is subjected to a principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the primary modes of variability. The first three components from the PCA explain 29% of the total variability in the combined runoff/SST dataset. The first component explains 15% of the total variance and primarily represents long-term trends in the data. The long-term trends in SSTs are evident as warming in all of the oceans. The associated long-term trends in runoff suggest increasing flows for parts of North America, South America, Eurasia, and Australia; decreasing runoff is most notable in western Africa. The second principal component explains 9% of the total variance and reflects variability of the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its associated influence on global annual runoff patterns. The third component explains 5% of the total variance and indicates a response of global annual runoff to variability in North Aflantic SSTs. The association between runoff and North Atlantic SSTs may explain an apparent steplike change in runoff that occurred around 1970 for a number of continental regions.

  18. Ocean backscatter across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, S.V.; Li, F.K.

    1997-06-01

    Ocean backscatter was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the airborne NUSCAT K{sub u}-band scatterometer, across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991. Backscatter across the front between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration experimental coastal buoy A (44024) on the cold side and Discus C buoy (44023) on the warm side shows a difference of more than 5 dB for vertical polarization in many cases. This large frontal backscatter change is observed in all upwind, downwind, and crosswind directions. The sea surface temperature difference measured by the buoys was about 9{degrees}C. The corresponding difference in wind speed cannot account for the large backscatter change in view of geophysical model functions depending only on neutral wind velocity such as SASS. The measured backscatter also has larger upwind-downwind and upwind-crosswind ratios compared to the model results. Furthermore, NUSCAT data reveal that upwind backscatter on the cold side was smaller than or close to crosswind backscatter on the warm side for incidence angles between 30{degrees} to 50{degrees}. This suggests that the temperature front can be detected by the scatterometer at these incidence angles for different wind directions in the cold and warm sides.

  19. Experimental Investigation of High Temperature Superconducting Imaging Surface Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.N.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.

    1999-06-21

    The behavior of high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in the presence of high temperature superconducting surfaces has been investigated. When current sources are placed close to a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) an image current is produced due to the Meissner effect. When a SQUID magnetometer is placed near such a surface it will perform in a gradiometric fashion provided the SQUID and source distances to the SIS are much less than the size of the SIS. We present the first ever experimental verification of this effect for a high temperature SIS. Results are presented for two SQUID-SIS configurations, using a 100 mm diameter YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} disc as the SIS. These results indicate that when the current source and sensor coil (SQUID) are close to the SIS, the behavior is that of a first-order gradiometer. The results are compared to analytic solutions as well as the theoretical predictions of a finite element model.

  20. A hypothesis about factors that affect maximum stream temperatures across montane landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature is an important variable structuring lotic biotas, but little is known about how montane landscapes function to determine stream temperatures. We developed an a priori hypothesis that was used to predict how watershed elements would interact to affect stream temperatures. The hypothesis was tested in a series of path analyses using temperature data from 26 sites on second-order to fourth-order streams across a fifth-order Rocky Mountain watershed. Based on the performance of the first hypothesis, two revised versions of the hypothesis were developed and tested that proved to be more accurate than the original hypothesis. The most plausible of the revised hypotheses accounted for 82 percent of the variation in maximum stream temperature, had a predicted data structure that did not deviate from the empirical data structure, and was the most parsimonious. The final working hypothesis suggested that stream temperature maxima were directly controlled by a large negative effect from mean basin elevation (direct effect = -0.57, p < 0.01) and smaller effects from riparian tree abundance (direct effect = -0.28, p = 0.03), and cattle density (direct effect = 0.24, p = 0.05). Watershed slope, valley constraint, and the abundance of grass across a watershed also affected temperature maxima, but these effects were indirect and mediated through cattle density and riparian trees. Three variables included in the a priori hypothesis - watershed aspect, stream width, and watershed size - had negligible effects on maximum stream temperatures and were omitted from the final working hypothesis.

  1. Downscaling Thermal Infrared Radiance for Subpixel Land Surface Temperature Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Desheng; Pu, Ruiliang

    2008-01-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from satellite thermal sensors often consists of mixed temperature components. Retrieving subpixel LST is therefore needed in various environmental and ecological studies. In this paper, we developed two methods for downscaling coarse resolution thermal infrared (TIR) radiance for the purpose of subpixel temperature retrieval. The first method was developed on the basis of a scale-invariant physical model on TIR radiance. The second method was based on a statistical relationship between TIR radiance and land cover fraction at high spatial resolution. The two methods were applied to downscale simulated 990-m ASTER TIR data to 90-m resolution. When validated against the original 90-m ASTER TIR data, the results revealed that both downscaling methods were successful in capturing the general patterns of the original data and resolving considerable spatial details. Further quantitative assessments indicated a strong agreement between the true values and the estimated values by both methods.

  2. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  3. Surface Tensions and Their Variations with Temperature and Impurities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.; Fine, J.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tensions in this work were determined using the sessile drop technique. This method is based on a comparison of the profile of a liquid drop with the profile calculated by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The comparison can be made in several ways; the traditional Bashforth-Adams procedure was used in conjunction with recently calculated drop shape tables which virtually eliminate interpolation errors. Although previous study has found little difference in measurements with pure and oxygen doped silicon, there is other evidence suggesting that oxygen in dilute concentrations severely depresses the surface tension of silicon. The surface tension of liquid silicon in purified argon atmospheres was measured. A temperature coefficient near -0.28 mJ/square meters K was found. The experiments show a high sensitivity of the surface tension to what is believed are low concentrations of oxygen. Thus one cannot rule out some effect of low levels of oxygen in the results. However, the highest surface tension values obtained in conditions which minimized the residual oxygen pressure are in good agreement with a previous measurement in pure hydrogen. Therefore, depression of the surface tension by oxygen is insignificant in these measurements.

  4. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-01

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  5. Understanding the ECMWF winter surface temperature biases over Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Emanuel; Sandu, Irina; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Beljaars, Anton; Freville, Helene; Vignon, Etienne; Brun, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric reanalysis provide long-term estimates of the state of the atmosphere and surface. However, the reanalysis quality is dependent on the quality and quantity of observations used by the data assimilation systems and by the performance of the forecast model. Recent studies have found that the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis has a warm bias of surface temperature over Antarctica. We evaluate several factors that could explain this bias of surface temperature, and to some extent 2-meters temperature, in the ECMWF model and ERA-Interim reanalysis over Antarctica during winter. We focused on the Polar night where the solar radiation and latent heat fluxes can be neglected. Four main changes, derived from the surface energy balance, were tested including (i) reduction of the snow thermal inertia, (ii) full decoupling of the skin layer from the surface; (iii) reduced roughness lengths and (iv) different stability functions for the transfer coefficients calculations in the surface layer. Different configurations were tested within the ECMWF Integrated Forecasts System (IFS) in short-range forecasts and in stand-alone surface-only simulations at South Pole station. It was found that the model underestimates strong radiative cooling events and this can be mainly associated with a too strong land-atmosphere coupling over glaciers. The reduction of the snow thermally active depth had a positive effect allowing the model to better represent those radiative cooling effects. The reduction of the roughness lengths and the different stability functions also result in further cooling in stand-alone mode, but their impact was not so pronounced in the coupled forecasts. In general, averaged over the Antarctic continent, the reduction of the snow thermal active depth leads to a cooling of 1 K. The reduction of the roughness lengths resulted in an additional cooling of about 1 K. Our results indicate that the representation of a fast time scale to the thermal exchanges between

  6. High temperature adsorption of nitrogen on a polycrystalline nickel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughaba, S.; Auvert, G.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel tetracarbonyl [Ni(CO)4] molecules were used as a probe to investigate the coverage of a heated polycrystalline nickel surface with nitrogen adspecies. For this purpose, the deposition kinetics of nickel (Ni) microstructures from the thermal decomposition of nickel tetracarbonyl was investigated as a function of the partial pressure of nitrogen (N2), used as buffer gas. The laser-induced chemical vapor deposition technique was used to produce polycrystalline nickel lines in an atmosphere of pure Ni(CO)4 or a [Ni(CO)4+N2] mixture. The deposition process was performed on polysilicon/silicon dioxide/<100> monosilicon substrates. As a heat source, a cw argon-ion laser was used. The laser-induced surface temperature was varied in the range 500-850 °C. For Ni(CO)4 partial pressures typically below 0.3 mbar, the nickel deposition rate was found to decrease as the N2 partial pressure increases. For higher Ni(CO)4 partial pressures, the deposition rate was found to be independent of the N2 partial pressure. On the basis of these results, the high temperature adsorption of nitrogen on a polycrystalline nickel surface was investigated. A model which accounts for the dependence of the nickel deposition rate and surface coverage with nitrogen adspecies on the N2 partial pressure was elaborated.

  7. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  8. High frequency thermal emission from the lunar surface and near surface temperature of the Moon from Chang’E-2 microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tuo; Fa, Wenzhe

    2014-04-01

    Near surface temperature of the Moon and thermal behaviors of the lunar regolith can provide important information for constraining thermal and magmatic evolution models of the Moon and engineering constrains for in situ lunar exploration system. In this study, China’s Chang’E-2 (CE-2) microwave radiometer (MRM) data at high frequency channels are used to investigate near surface temperature of the Moon given the penetration ability of microwave into the desiccated and porous lunar regolith. Factors that affect high frequency brightness temperature (TB), such as surface slope, solar albedo and dielectric constant, are analyzed first using a revised Racca’s temperature model. Radiative transfer theory is then used to model thermal emission from a semi-infinite regolith medium, with considering dielectric constant and temperature profiles within the regolith layer. To decouple the effect of diurnal temperature variation in the uppermost lunar surface, diurnal averaged brightness temperatures at high frequency channels are used to invert mean diurnal surface and subsurface temperatures based on their bilinear profiles within the regolith layer. Our results show that, at the scale of the spatial resolution of CE-2 MRM, surface slope of crater wall varies typically from about 20° to 30°, and this causes a variation in TB about 10-15 K. Solar albedo can give rise to a TB difference of about 5-10 K between maria and highlands, whereas a ∼2-8 K difference can be compensated by the dielectric constant on the other hand. Inversion results indicate that latitude (ϕ) variations of the mean diurnal surface and subsurface temperatures follow simple rules as cos0.30ϕ and cos0.36ϕ, respectively. The inverted mean diurnal temperature profiles at the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites are also compared with the Apollo heat flow experiment data, showing an inversion uncertainty <4 K for surface temperature and <1 K for subsurface temperature.

  9. Nonlinear aspects of sea surface temperature in Monterey Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breaker, Laurence C.

    2006-04-01

    Nonlinear aspects of sea surface temperature (SST) in Monterey Bay are examined, based on an 85-year record of daily observations from Pacific Grove, California. Oceanic processes that affect the waters of Monterey Bay are described, processes that could contribute to nonlinearity in the record. Exploratory data analysis reveals that the record at Pacific Grove is non-Gaussian and, most likely, nonstationary. A more recent test for stationarity based on a power law approximation to the slope of the power spectrum indicates that the record is stationary for frequencies up to ∼8 cycles per year (∼45 days), but nonstationary at higher frequencies. To examine the record at Pacific Grove for nonlinear behavior, third-order statistics, including the skewness, statistical measures of asymmetry, the bicorrelation, and the bispectrum, were employed. The bicorrelation revealed maxima located approximately 365 days apart, reflecting a nonlinear contribution to the annual cycle. Based on a 365-day moving window, the running skewness is positive almost 80% of the time, reflecting the overall impact of warming influences. The asymmetry is positive approximately 75% of the time, consistent with the asymmetric shape of the mean annual cycle. Based on the skewness and asymmetry, nonlinearities in the record, when they occur, appear to be event-driven with time scales possibly as short as several days, to several years. In many cases, these events are related to warm water intrusions into the bay, and El Niño warming episodes. The power spectrum indicates that the annual cycle is a dominant source of variability in the record and that there is a relatively strong semiannual component as well. To determine whether or not the annual and semiannual cycles are harmonically related, the bispectrum and bicoherence were calculated. The bispectrum is nonzero, providing a strong indication of nonlinearity in the record. The bicoherence indicates that the annual cycle is a major source

  10. Long-Term Record of Arctic and Antarctic Sea and Ice Surface Temperatures from Thermal Infrared Satellite Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis, Cristina; Dybkjær, Gorm; Eastwood, Steinar; Tonboe, Rasmus; Høyer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 µm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  11. Upper ocean flow statistics estimated from superresolved sea-surface temperature images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Shane R.; Smith, K. Shafer

    2015-02-01

    Ocean turbulence on scales of 10-50 km plays a key role in biogeochemical processes, frontal dynamics, and tracer transport in the upper ocean, but our understanding of these scales is limited because they are too small to be resolved using extant satellite altimetry products. By contrast, microwave imagery of the sea-surface temperature field does resolve these scales and can be used to estimate the upper ocean flow field due to the strong correlation between the surface density field and the interior potential vorticity. However, because the surface density (or temperature) is a smoothed version of the geostrophic stream function, the resulting velocity field estimates are limited to scales of 100-300 km in the first few hundred meters of the water column. A method is proposed for generating superresolved sea-surface temperature images using direct low-resolution (microwave) temperature observations in combination with an empirical parameterization for the unresolved scales modeled on statistical information from high-resolution (infrared) imagery. Because the method relies only on the statistics of the small-scale field, it is insensitive to data outages due to cloud cover that affect infrared observations. The method enhances the effective resolution of the temperature images by exploiting the effect of spatial aliasing and generates an optimal estimate of the small-scale temperature field using standard Bayesian inference. The technique is tested in quasigeostrophic simulations driven by realistic climatological shear and stratification profiles for three contrasting regions at high, middle, and low latitudes. The resulting superresolved sea-surface temperature images are then used to estimate the three-dimensional velocity field in the upper ocean on scales of 10-50 km.

  12. Relationships between near-surface plankton concentrations, hydrography, and satellite-measured sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. C.; Emery, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) mapped by IR satellite images and in situ hydrographic measurements off the west coast of British Columbia for early-winter and midsummer periods were correlated with in situ measurements of surface chlorophyll and zooplankton concentration. Correlations between winter log(e) transformed zooplankton concentrations and SSTs demonstrated that IR satellite imagery could explain 49 percent of the sampled zooplankton concentration variance. A least-squares-fit nonlinear equation showed that satellite-measured SST patterns explained 72 percent of the log(e) transformed chlorophyll variance. However, summer zooplankton concentrations were not consistently related to satellite temperature patterns.

  13. Ground surface temperature and continental heat gain: uncertainties from underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature changes at the Earth's surface propagate and are recorded underground as perturbations to the equilibrium thermal regime associated with the heat flow from the Earth's interior. Borehole climatology is concerned with the analysis and interpretation of these downward propagating subsurface temperature anomalies in terms of surface climate. Proper determination of the steady-state geothermal regime is therefore crucial because it is the reference against which climate-induced subsurface temperature anomalies are estimated. Here, we examine the effects of data noise on the determination of the steady-state geothermal regime of the subsurface and the subsequent impact on estimates of ground surface temperature (GST) history and heat gain. We carry out a series of Monte Carlo experiments using 1000 Gaussian noise realizations and depth sections of 100 and 200 m as for steady-state estimates depth intervals, as well as a range of data sampling intervals from 10 m to 0.02 m. Results indicate that typical uncertainties for 50 year averages are on the order of ±0.02 K for the most recent 100 year period. These uncertainties grow with decreasing sampling intervals, reaching about ±0.1 K for a 10 m sampling interval under identical conditions and target period. Uncertainties increase for progressively older periods, reaching ±0.3 K at 500 years before present for a 10 m sampling interval. The uncertainties in reconstructed GST histories for the Northern Hemisphere for the most recent 50 year period can reach a maximum of +/- 0.5 K in some areas. We suggest that continuous logging should be the preferred approach when measuring geothermal data for climate reconstructions, and that for those using the International Heat Flow Commission database for borehole climatology, the steady-state thermal conditions should be estimated from boreholes as deep as possible and using a large fitting depth range (˜100 m).

  14. Ground surface temperature and continental heat gain: Uncertainties from underground.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2015-04-01

    Temperature changes at the Earth's surface propagate and are recorded underground as perturbations to the equilibrium thermal regime associated with heat flow from the Earth's interior. Interpretation of these downward propagating subsurface temperature anomalies in terms of surface climate is the central role of Borehole Climatology. Robust determination of the steady-state geothermal regime is nevertheless crucial for these efforts, because it is the reference against which climate induced subsurface temperature anomalies are estimated. Here we examine the effects of data noise on the determination of the subsurface steady-state geothermal regime and the subsequent impact on estimates of ground surface temperature (GST) history and heat gain. We perform sets of Monte Carlo experiments using 1000 Gaussian noise realizations and depth sections of 100 and 200 m as depth intervals for steady-state estimates, as well as a range of data sampling intervals from 10 m to 0.02 m. Results indicate that typical uncertainties for 50-year averages are on the order of +/- 0.02 K for the most recent 100-year period. These uncertainties grow with decreasing sampling interval reaching about +/- 0.1 K for a 10-m sampling interval under identical conditions and target period. Uncertainties increase for progressively older periods, reaching +/- 0.3 K at 500 years before present for a 10-m sampling interval. The uncertainties in reconstructed GST histories for the Northern Hemisphere for the most recent 50-yr period can reach a maximum of +/- 0.5 K in some areas. We suggest that continuous logging should be the preferred approach when measuring geothermal data for climate reconstructions, and that for those using the International Heat Flow Commission database for borehole climatology, the steady-state thermal conditions should be estimated from boreholes as deep as possible and using a large fitting depth range (~100 m).

  15. Contribution For Arc Temperature Affected By Current Increment Ratio At Peak Current In Pulsed Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Ryota; Mitubori, Hironori; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding is one of the high quality welding. However, parameters of the pulsed arc welding are many and complicated. if the welding parameters are not appropriate, the welding pool shape becomes wide and shallow.the convection of driving force contributes to the welding pool shape. However, in the case of changing current waveform as the pulse high frequency TIG welding, the arc temperature does not follow the change of the current. Other result of the calculation, in particular, the arc temperature at the reaching time of peak current is based on these considerations. Thus, the accurate measurement of the temperature at the time is required. Therefore, the objective of this research is the elucidation of contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc. It should obtain a detail knowledge of the welding model in pulsed arc. The temperature in the case of increment of the peak current from the base current is measured by using spectroscopy. As a result, when the arc current increases from 100 A to 150 A at 120 ms, the transient response of the temperature didn't occur during increasing current. Thus, during the current rise, it has been verified by measuring. Therefore, the contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc was elucidated in order to obtain more knowledge of welding model of pulsed arc.

  16. Study of the structure of synthetic opals affected by temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somenkov, V. A.; Agafonov, S. S.; Glazkov, V. P.; Kovalenko, E. S.; Shushunov, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated that synthetic opals, like most natural ones, have a cristobalite rather than quartz basis, change their color from white to blue after losing their water-containing component, and form superlattices. Being affected by temperature and pressure, they undergo partial or complete crystallization to the corresponding polymorphic modifications.

  17. Temperature stress affects the expression of immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata) is affected by a fungal disease called chalkbrood. In several species of bees, chalkbrood is more likely to occur in larvae kept at 25-30 C than at 35 C. We found that both high and low temperature stress increased the expression of immune response g...

  18. Do Changes in Tympanic Temperature Predict Changes in Affective Valence during High-Intensity Exercise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legrand, Fabien D.; Joly, Philippe M.; Bertucci, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Increased core (brain or body) temperature that accompanies exercise has been posited to play an influential role in affective responses to exercise. However, findings in support of this hypothesis have been equivocal, and most of the performed studies have been done in relation to anxiety. The aim of the present study was to investigate…

  19. Simulating soybean canopy temperature as affected by weather variables and soil water potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Hourly weather data for several clear sky days during summer at Phoenix and Baltimore which covered a wide range of variables were used with a plant atmosphere model to simulate soybean (Glycine max L.) leaf water potential, stomatal resistance and canopy temperature at various soil water potentials. The air and dew point temperatures were found to be the significant weather variables affecting the canopy temperatures. Under identical weather conditions, the model gives a lower canopy temperature for a soybean crop with a higher rooting density. A knowledge of crop rooting density, in addition to air and dew point temperatures is needed in interpreting infrared radiometric observations for soil water status. The observed dependence of stomatal resistance on the vapor pressure deficit and soil water potential is fairly well represented. Analysis of the simulated leaf water potentials indicates overestimation, possibly due to differences in the cultivars.

  20. Directional Emissivity Effects on Martian Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Wolff, M. J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Clancy, R. T.; Clayton, G. C.

    2001-11-01

    The angular dependence of thermal emission from the surface of Mars has not been well characterized. Although nadir sequences constitute most of the MGS/TES Martian surface observations [1,2], a significant number scans of Martian surfaces at multiple emission angles (emission phase function (EPF) sequences) also exist. Such data can provide insight into surface structures, thermal inertias, and non-isotropic corrections to thermal emission measurements [3]. The availability of abundant EPF data as well as the added utility of such observations for atmospheric characterization provide the impetus for examining the phenomenon of directional emissivity. We present examples of directional emissivity effects on brightness temperature spectra for a variety of typical Martian surfaces. We examine the theoretical development by Hapke (1993, 1996) [4,5] and compare his algorithm to that of Mishchenko et al. (1999) [6]. These results are then compared to relevant TES EPF data. This work is supported through NASA grant NAGS-9820 (MJW) and JPL contract no. 961471 (RTC). [1] Smith et al. (1998), AAS-DPS meeting # 30, # 11.P07. [2] Kieffer, Mullins, & Titus (1998), EOS, 79, 533. [3] Jakosky, Finiol, & Henderson (1990), JGR, 17, 985--988. [4] Hapke, B. (1993), Theory of Reflectance & Emittance Spectroscopy, Cambridge Univ. Press, NY. [5] Hapke, B. (1996), JGR, 101, E7, 16817--16831. [6] Mishchenko et al. (1999), JQSRT, 63, 409--432.

  1. When is groundwater flow an important consideration in ground surface temperature reconstructions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, G.; Woodbury, A. D.; Beltrami, H.

    2005-12-01

    The utility of subsurface temperatures in paleoclimate studies has become well established in recent years. However, there are many different factors that could cause questioning of the result of ground surface temperature (GST) reconstructions from temperature measured in boreholes. One of these factors is groundwater flow, particularly downward groundwater flow. In this case, the resulting curvature in the temperature profile is similar to that observed in many conductive environments where GST has increased over the past century. Simulations of heat flow with steady-state groundwater flow and constant GST indicate that groundwater flow will only significantly affect groundwater reconstructions when Peclet numbers are greater than 0.1 to 1.0. This generally occurs in areas with moderately high recharge rates. Here we show how meteorological records and information on permeability of the rocks and soils in the vicinity of a borehole can be used boreholes in areas where advection will have a minimal effect on GST reconstructions.

  2. Land Surface Temperature Measurements from EOD MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zheng-Ming

    1998-01-01

    We made more tests of the version 2.0 daily Level 2 and Level 3 Land-Surface Temperature (LST) code (PGE 16) jointly with the MODIS Science Data Support Team (SDST). After making minor changes a few times, the PGE16 code has been successfully integrated and tested by MODIS SDST, and recently has passed the inspection at the Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). We conducted a field campaign in the area of Mono Lake, California on March 10, 1998, in order to validate the MODIS LST algorithm in cold and dry conditions. Two MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) flights were completed during the field campaign, one before noon, and another around 10 pm PST. The weather condition for the daytime flight was perfect: clear sky, the column water vapor measured by radiosonde around 0.3 cm, and wind speed less than a half meter per second. The quality of MAS data is good for both day and night flights. We analyzed the noise equivalent temperature difference (NE(delta)T) and the calibration accuracy of the seven MAS thermal infrared (TIR) bands, that are used in the MODIS day/night LST algorithm, with daytime MAS data over four flat homogeneous study areas: two on Grant Lake (covered with ice and snow, respectively), one on Mono Lake, and another on the snow field site where we made field measurements. NE(delta)T ranges from 0.2 to 0.6 k for bands 42, 45, 46, and 48. It ranges from 0.8 to 1.1 K for bands 30-32. The day and night MAS data have been used to retrieve surface temperature and emissivities in these bands. A simple method to correct the effect of night thin cirrus has been incorporated into the day/night LST algorithm in dry atmospheric conditions. We compared the retrieved surface temperatures with those measured with TIR spectrometer, radiometers and thermistors in the snow test site, and the retrieved emissivity images with topographic map. The daytime LST values match well within 1 K. The night LST retrieved from MAS data is 3.3 K colder than those from

  3. Dominant factors affecting temperature rise in simulations of human thermoregulation during RF exposure.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2011-12-01

    Numerical models of the human thermoregulatory system can be used together with realistic voxel models of the human anatomy to simulate the body temperature increases caused by the power absorption from radio-frequency electromagnetic fields. In this paper, the Pennes bioheat equation with a thermoregulatory model is used for calculating local peak temperatures as well as the body-core-temperature elevation in a realistic human body model for grounded plane-wave exposures at frequencies 39, 800 and 2400 MHz. The electromagnetic power loss is solved by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the discretized bioheat equation is solved by the geometric multigrid method. Human thermoregulatory models contain numerous thermophysiological and computational parameters--some of which may be subject to considerable uncertainty--that affect the simulated core and local temperature elevations. The goal of this paper is to find how greatly the computed temperature is influenced by changes in various modelling parameters, such as the skin blood flow rate, models for vasodilation and sweating, and clothing and air movement. The results show that the peak temperature rises are most strongly affected by the modelling of tissue blood flow and its temperature dependence, and mostly unaffected by the central control mechanism for vasodilation and sweating. Almost the opposite is true for the body-core-temperature rise, which is however typically greatly lower than the peak temperature rise. It also seems that ignoring the thermoregulation and the blood temperature increase is a good approximation when the local 10 g averaged specific absorption rate is smaller than 10 W kg(-1). PMID:22080753

  4. Dominant factors affecting temperature rise in simulations of human thermoregulation during RF exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2011-12-01

    Numerical models of the human thermoregulatory system can be used together with realistic voxel models of the human anatomy to simulate the body temperature increases caused by the power absorption from radio-frequency electromagnetic fields. In this paper, the Pennes bioheat equation with a thermoregulatory model is used for calculating local peak temperatures as well as the body-core-temperature elevation in a realistic human body model for grounded plane-wave exposures at frequencies 39, 800 and 2400 MHz. The electromagnetic power loss is solved by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the discretized bioheat equation is solved by the geometric multigrid method. Human thermoregulatory models contain numerous thermophysiological and computational parameters—some of which may be subject to considerable uncertainty—that affect the simulated core and local temperature elevations. The goal of this paper is to find how greatly the computed temperature is influenced by changes in various modelling parameters, such as the skin blood flow rate, models for vasodilation and sweating, and clothing and air movement. The results show that the peak temperature rises are most strongly affected by the modelling of tissue blood flow and its temperature dependence, and mostly unaffected by the central control mechanism for vasodilation and sweating. Almost the opposite is true for the body-core-temperature rise, which is however typically greatly lower than the peak temperature rise. It also seems that ignoring the thermoregulation and the blood temperature increase is a good approximation when the local 10 g averaged specific absorption rate is smaller than 10 W kg-1.

  5. Fish pre-acclimation temperature only modestly affects cadmium toxicity in Atlantic salmon hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Søfteland, Liv; Hevrøy, Ernst M; Rasinger, Josef D; Waagbø, Rune

    2016-04-01

    An emerging focus in environmental toxicology is how climate change will alter bioavailability and uptake of contaminants in organisms. Ectothermic animals unable to adjust their temperature by local migration, such as farmed fish kept in net pens, may become more vulnerable to contaminants in warmer seas. The aim of this work was to study cadmium (Cd) toxicity in cells obtained from fish acclimated to sub-optimal growth temperature. Atlantic salmon hepatocytes, harvested from fish pre-acclimated either at 15°C (optimal growth temperature) or 20°C (heat-stressed), were exposed in vitro to two concentrations of Cd (control, 1 and 100µM Cd) for 48h. Cd-induced cytotoxicity, determined with the xCELLigence system, was more pronounced in cells from fish pre-acclimated to a high temperature than in cells from fish grown at optimal temperature. A feed spiked with antioxidants could not ameliorate the Cd-induced cytotoxicity in cells from temperature-stressed fish. At the transcriptional level, Cd exposure affected 11 out of 20 examined genes, of which most are linked to oxidative stress. The transcriptional levels of a majority of the altered genes were changed in cells harvested from fish grown at sub-optimal temperature. Interaction effects between Cd exposure and fish pre-acclimation temperature were seen for four transcripts, hmox1, mapk1, fth1 and mmp13. Overall, this study shows that cells from temperature-stressed fish are modestly more vulnerable to Cd stress, and indicate that mechanisms linked to oxidative stress may be differentially affected in temperature-stressed cells. PMID:27033036

  6. Emerita analoga recruit populations and correlations with sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettway, J.; Quan, H.; Juarez, F.; Vicencio, M.; Ng, N.; Careers in Science Intern Program

    2010-12-01

    The Careers in Science program at the California Academy of Sciences is a science internship for students from groups traditionally under-represented in the sciences. Starting in 2003, interns have participated in the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association's LiMPETS Sandy Beach Monitoring program, assessing populations of Emerita analoga, the Pacific mole crab. E. analoga, an inhabitant of intertidal swash zones along the coast from Alaska to Baja California, is an important species in the sandy beach intertidal food web. Weekly, during the months of June, July and August, a group of interns go to stairwell 18 of San Francisco’s Ocean Beach in Golden Gate National Recreational Area to systematically collect live E. analoga samples and data. Along a 50 meter sampling area, five transects with ten samples in the swash zone are taken and recorded. Collected E. analoga are sexed (male, female, female w/eggs, and recruit) and measured for carapace size. Newly settled E. analoga (recruit) populations have declined in recent years. However, beginning in 2009, recruit populations began to increase in number, particularly in 2010. Our group hypothesized that this increase in recruitment is correlated with increased sea surface temperature. It has been reported that some planktonic animals become more abundant in warmer waters after a major temperature shift. After examining the data, we did not find a correlation between sea surface temperature and recruit populations, leading us to further questions on the cause of this increase in E. analoga recruits.

  7. Hydration kinetics and physical properties of split chickpea as affected by soaking temperature and time.

    PubMed

    Johnny, Saeed; Razavi, Seyed M A; Khodaei, Diako

    2015-12-01

    In this study, some physical properties (principal dimensions, mean diameters, sphericity, area, density and electrical conductivity) of split chickpea were measured as function of soaking time (up to 360 min) and temperature (25-65 °C). Initially, the water absorption rate was high and then it showed a progressive decrease at all temperatures, whereas solid loss exhibited a power function of temperature (P < 0.05). The Peleg model was predicted well the kinetic of split chickpea soaking. No significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed in Peleg rate constant (K1) and Peleg capacity constant (K2) at all temperatures except for K1 at 25 °C. The discrepancy for K1 was in relation to permeability characteristics of split chickpea at temperature of 25 °C. As temperature increased from 25 to 65 °C, the K1 value decreased from 0.04620 to 0.00945 g h(-1), whereas the K2 value increased from 0.08597 to 0.11320 g(-1). Plot for K1 exhibited a slope changes around 45 °C corresponding to gelatinization temperature of split chickpeas. The effect of temperature and time on physical properties of split chickpea during soaking was monitored by regression equations. It was concluded that physical properties of split chickpea affected by its water absorption especially at higher temperatures. PMID:26604418

  8. Relationship Between the Surface Area to Volume Ratio and Temperature across Geologic Time in Ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Zaroff, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    In 1877 Joseph Allen proposed that endothermic terrestrial organisms would have lower surface area to volume ratios (SAVR) in colder climates and higher SAVRs in warmer climates. With a smaller surface area compared to volume, organisms can retain more heat in cold climates. We tested to see if this principle applied to ostracods, a type of ectothermic marine invertebrate. We hypothesised that Allen's rule applies to ostracods, as Allen's rule has been demonstrated in frogs (Alho 2011), which are also ectotherms . We used the linear dimensions of the three major carapace axes of ostracod holotypes to estimate the SAVR. We compared ostracod SAVRs with paleotemperatures from Royer et al. (2004). We found that there was a correlation between surface area and temperature; it is a small, but statistically significant correlation (adj. R2=0.0167). This means that as temperature increased, the SAVR also increased. We also found a negative correlation between ostracod SAVR to geologic time(adj. R2=0.0114), which shows us that as time has gone on, ostracod SAVR has decreased. We then plotted the correlation coefficient of SAVR to temperature over geologic time to explore trends in the strength of Allen's rule. For most of time there was no relationship but during the Devonian, Allen's Rule did explain the trend. In short, temperature does explain some of the correlation between the SAVR and temperature, but it is likely there were other environmental factors affecting this relationship.

  9. On the relationship between sea surface temperatures, circulation parameters and temperatures over west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Revadekar, J V; Varikoden, Hamza; Murumkar, P K; Ahmed, S A

    2016-05-01

    The oceans and the atmosphere are tightly linked and they together form the most dynamic component of the climate system. Topography and proximity to the surrounding seas of the region determine the temperature of the area. West Coast (WC) of India is a high elevated region surrounded by large oceanic area, therefore, an attempt is made in this study to examine the trends and variability in temperature over WC in relation to oceanic phenomena. Temperature over the WC shows considerable year-to-year variation with anomalous cool years in recent warm epoch. Therefore, sea surface temperature (SST) and associated winds have been analyzed to understand possible mechanism behind the variation in temperatures over the WC. During the winter, north-easterlies prevail over the WC which blows from land to ocean. Variations in SSTs alter the strength of these winds to cause anomalies in temperature over the WC. Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) appears to have a dominant role in climate of the WC, whereas SSTs over the equatorial Pacific do not show any impact on temperatures over the WC. Study indicates that the strengthening of north-easterlies due to negative phase of Indian Ocean Dipole causes cooling over the WC of India. PMID:26874773

  10. Surface Temperature of the Arctic: Comparison of TOVS Satellite Retrievals with Surface Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghua; Francis, Jennifer A.; Miller, James R.

    2002-12-01

    Surface temperature is a fundamental parameter for climate research. Over the Arctic Ocean and neighboring seas conventional temperature observations are often of uncertain quality, however, owing to logistical obstacles in making measurements over sea ice in harsh environmental conditions. Satellites offer an attractive alternative, but standard methods encounter difficulty in detecting clouds in the frequent surface-based temperature inversion and when solar radiation is absent. The Television and Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder Polar Pathfinder (TOVS Path-P) dataset provides nearly 20 yr (1979-98) of satellite-derived, gridded surface skin temperatures for the Arctic region north of 60°N. Another dataset based on surface observations has also recently become available. The International Arctic Buoy Program/Polar Exchange at the Sea Surface (IABP/POLES) project provides a gridded near-surface air temperature dataset based on optimally interpolated observations from Russian drifting ice stations, buoys, and land stations from 1979 to 1997.In this study these two datasets are compared and areas with large differences (4 to 6 K) are found in both winter and summer. Over the ice-covered Arctic Ocean in both seasons TOVS temperatures are substantially colder than POLES and over the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian (GIN) Seas TOVS is warmer. Using point measurements from manned ice stations and ships it is found that POLES is too warm (2 K on average) in January. The bias is larger (4 K) in regions where the primary source of data is buoys, which contain warm biases in winter owing to the insulation effect of snow covering the sensors. The difference between skin and 2-m temperatures accounts for approximately 1 K of the January discrepancy between POLES and TOVS. Over the GIN Seas in both seasons POLES is much too cold (7 K) where values are based primarily on analyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). In

  11. Correlations between altimetric sea surface height and radiometric sea surface temperature in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew S.; Allen, Myles; Guymer, Trevor; Saunders, Mark

    1998-04-01

    In the last decade, satellite altimetric measurements of sea surface height (SSH) and infrared radiometric measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) have provided a wealth of information about ocean circulation and atmosphere-ocean interactions. SSH is a depth-integrated quantity dependent upon the temperature and salinity structure of the water column and on the depth independent barotropic contribution. SST from infrared radiometers is a surface parameter representing the temperature of the top few microns of the ocean surface. Hence any relationship between SST and SSH provides dynamical information about the coupling between the ocean surface and subsurface. It also offers a promise of new techniques such as interpolating SSH data using SST and of improved calculations of eddy kinetic energy. We use SST data from the along-track scanning radiometer on ERS-I and SSH data from the TOPEX/POSEIDON instrument to examine the relationship between SST and SSH anomalies within the South Atlantic region for 1993 and 1994. We find that positive (≈0.2-0.6) spatial cross correlations between SST and SSH anomalies at zero lag are present throughout the region at large scales (wavelengths >1000 km). Small-scale correlations, however, are high (≈0.7) only in areas associated with fronts and mesoscale variability. These small-scale correlations are seasonal, being strongest in winter and weakest in summer. We discuss the application of these correlations to various techniques requiring the synergistic use of SSH and SST data.

  12. Proxy data constraints on Cretaceous sea surface temperature evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Charlotte L.; Robinson, Stuart A.; O'Connor, Lauren K.; Pancost, Richard D.

    2015-04-01

    It is well established that greenhouse conditions prevailed during the Cretaceous. However, constraining the exact nature of the greenhouse gas forcing, climatic warming and climate sensitivity remains an ongoing topic of research. Proxy temperature data provide valuable observational constraints on Cretaceous climate. In particular, much of our understanding of Cretaceous climate warmth comes from marine temperature proxy data reconstructions derived using planktic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ18O) palaeothermometry and, more recently, the TEX86 proxy, based on the distribution of marine isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs). Both of these proxies provide estimates of sea surface temperature (SST), however each technique is subject to a number of proxy-specific caveats. For example, δ18O values in planktic foraminifer may be compromised by preservation and/or diagenetic alteration, while the TEX86 proxy has undergone several temperature calibration re-evaluations and the exact mechanism that relates GDGT production to SST is not fully understood. Here we synthesise and reinterpret available TEX86- and δ18O-SST proxy data for the entire Cretaceous. For the TEX86 data, where possible we re-evaluate the fractional abundance of all individual GDGTs. By utilising fractional GDGT abundances we are also able to compute methane indices and branched and isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) indices, as well as apply both the TEX86H and TEX86L temperature calibrations. For each of the two SST proxy techniques, TEX86 and δ18O, we apply consistent temperature calibrations and place all data on a common timescale. Our new data-based SST synthesis allows us to examine long term temperature trends in the Cretaceous, including latitudinal temperature gradient variations, and evaluate global versus regional temperature patterns. Through considering both TEX86 and planktic foraminiferal δ18O data we critically compare the application of these two techniques

  13. Evidence that elevated water temperature affects the reproductive physiology of the European bullhead Cottus gobio.

    PubMed

    Dorts, Jennifer; Grenouillet, Gaël; Douxfils, Jessica; Mandiki, Syaghalirwa N M; Milla, Sylvain; Silvestre, Frédéric; Kestemont, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the average water temperature and alter the ecology and physiology of several organisms including fish species. To examine the effects of increased water temperature on freshwater fish reproduction, adult European bullhead Cottus gobio of both genders were maintained under three temperature regimes (T1: 6-10, T2: 10-14 and T3: 14-18°C) and assessed for gonad development (gonadosomatic index-GSI and gonad histology), sex steroids (testosterone-T, 17β-estradiol-E2 and 11-ketotestosterone-11-KT) and vitellogenin (alkali-labile phosphoprotein phosphorus-ALP) dynamics in December, January, February and March. The results indicate that a 8°C rise in water temperature (T3) deeply disrupted the gonadal maturation in both genders. This observation was associated with the absence of GSI peak from January to March, and low levels of plasma sex steroids compared with T1-exposed fish. Nevertheless, exposure to an increasing temperature of 4°C (T2) appeared to accelerate oogenesis with an early peak value in GSI and level of plasma T recorded in January relative to T1-exposed females. In males, the low GSI, reduced level of plasma 11-KT and the absence of GSI increase from January to March support the deleterious effects of increasing water temperature on spermatogenesis. The findings of the present study suggest that exposure to elevated temperatures within the context of climate warming might affect the reproductive success of C. gobio. Specifically, a 4°C rise in water temperature affects gametogenesis by advancing the spawning, and a complete reproductive failure is observed at an elevated temperature of 8°C. PMID:21638008

  14. Minimum relative entropy: Theory and application to surface temperature reconstruction from borehole temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Paula L.; Woodbury, Allan D.; Wang, Kelin

    2000-10-01

    In this paper we extend the minimum relative entropy (MRE) method to reconstruct ground surface temperature changes (GST) from borehole temperature measurements (BHT). The application of MRE to recovering GST is promising and provides an alternative to other inverse methods in geophysics. The relative entropy formulation provides the advantage of allowing for a prior bias in the estimated pdf and ‘hard’ bounds if desired. Test cases showed good recoveries of the GST. The method was utilized in recovering GST from two data sets in Canada. The Lac Dufault data gave very consistent results for different choices of a priori information and bounds. The Mariner results were not as good quality. This method has only recovered past ground surface temperatures, which does not directly provide information regarding climate change. However, results contained herein show fairly uniform temperatures until the past 100 to 500 years and in more recent times about a 4°C rise in temperature, consistent with previous published results.

  15. A data bank of Antarctic surface temperature and pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Limbert, D.W.S.

    1987-06-01

    A data bank of monthly-mean surface air temperature and sea-level or station-level pressures is presented for 29 stations over the Antarctic region south of 60/sup 0/S. Considerable attempts have been made to locate missing data in nationally published sources and in World Weather Records. By cross-checking neighboring station data, suspect values have been either verified or corrected. At four sites in the Antarctic Peninsula region, composite records were produced by amalgamating records from a number of short and longer length records at or near the key sites. The four sites were Bellingshausen, Faraday, Esperenza and Rothera. The mean Antarctic temperature series produced by Raper et al. (1984) is updated using the same method of calculation.

  16. Sea surface temperature contributes to marine crocodylomorph evolution.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeremy E; Amiot, Romain; Lécuyer, Christophe; Benton, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    During the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, four distinct crocodylomorph lineages colonized the marine environment. They were conspicuously absent from high latitudes, which in the Mesozoic were occupied by warm-blooded ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs. Despite a relatively well-constrained stratigraphic distribution, the varying diversities of marine crocodylomorphs are poorly understood, because their extinctions neither coincided with any major biological crises nor with the advent of potential competitors. Here we test the potential link between their evolutionary history in terms of taxic diversity and two abiotic factors, sea level variations and sea surface temperatures (SST). Excluding Metriorhynchoidea, which may have had a peculiar ecology, significant correlations obtained between generic diversity and estimated Tethyan SST suggest that water temperature was a driver of marine crocodylomorph diversity. Being most probably ectothermic reptiles, these lineages colonized the marine realm and diversified during warm periods, then declined or became extinct during cold intervals. PMID:25130564

  17. Assessing surface air temperature variability using quantile regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. A.; Sterin, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Many researches in climate change currently involve linear trends, based on measured variables. And many of them only consider trends in mean values, whereas it is clear, that not only means, but also whole shape of distribution changes over time and requires careful assessment. For example extreme values including outliers may get bigger, while median has zero slope.Quantile regression provides a convenient tool, that enables detailed analysis of changes in full range of distribution by producing a vector of quantile trends for any given set of quantiles.We have applied quantile regression to surface air temperature observations made at over 600 weather stations across Russian Federation during last four decades. The results demonstrate well pronounced regions with similar values of significant trends in different parts of temperature value distribution (left tail, middle part, right tail). The uncertainties of quantile trend estimations for several spatial patterns of trends over Russia are estimated and analyzed for each of four seasons.For temperature trend estimation over vast territories, quantile regression is an effort consuming approach, but is more informative than traditional instrument, to assess decadal evolution of temperature values, including evolution of extremes.Partial support of ERA NET RUS ACPCA joint project between EU and RBRF 12-05-91656-ЭРА-А is highly appreciated.

  18. Surface Figure Measurement of Silicon Carbide Mirrors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The surface figure of a developmental silicon carbide mirror, cooled to 87 K and then 20 K within a cryostat, was measured with unusually high precision at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The concave spherical mirror, with a radius of 600 mm and a clear aperture of 150 mm, was fabricated of sintered silicon carbide. The mirror was mounted to an interface plate representative of an optical bench, made of the material Cesic@, a composite of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide. The change in optical surface figure as the mirror and interface plate cooled from room temperature to 20 K was 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  19. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values. (MODIS Data Type: MODIS-PFM)

  20. A Study of Surface Temperatures, Clouds and Net Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans

    1996-01-01

    This study focused on the seasonal relationships and interactions of climate parameters such as the surface temperatures, net radiation, long wave flux, short wave flux, and clouds on a global basis. Five years of observations (December 1984 to November 1989) from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program (ISCCP) were used to study both seasonal variations and interannual variations by use of a basic radiation budget equation. In addition, the study was extended to include an analysis of the cloud forcing due El-Nino's impact on the ERBE parameters.

  1. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  2. The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

  3. Temperature-dependent intermolecular force measurement of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) grafted surface with protein.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Chul; Kim, Yong Deuk; Cho, Kilwon

    2005-06-15

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the intermolecular force between poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) grafted surface and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) using atomic force microscopy at the nanonewton scale. These observations show that the interaction force is nearly zero below the phase transition temperature of PNiPAM and that it increases steeply during the phase transition. Since the PNiPAM chains are grafted onto the aminosilane (gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane)-treated silicon wafer, we measured the force-distance curve of BSA-immobilized tips for the bare and the aminosilane-treated silicon wafer. These surfaces show no temperature dependence and their values are different from those of the PNiPAM-grafted surfaces at 30 degrees C. The results indicate that the measured adhesion force is between the PNiPAM-grafted surface and the BSA-immobilized tip. Our studies on the intermolecular force between other surfaces (CH(3)- and COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers) and the BSA-immobilized tip indicate that the variation in the intermolecular force between the PNiPAM surface and BSA with temperature can be attributed to the changes in the properties of the PNiPAM chains. From consideration of the PNiPAM phase transition mechanism, it is speculated that the intermolecular force between the PNiPAM-grafted surface and BSA would be affected by changes in the arrangement of the bound water molecules around the PNiPAM chain and by changes in the conformation (i.e., in the chain mobility) of the PNiPAM chain during the phase transition. PMID:15897061

  4. Improving the estimation of historical marine surface temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carella, Giulia; Kent, Elizabeth C.; Berry, David I.

    2015-04-01

    Global Surface Temperature (GST) is one of the main indicators of climate change and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forms its marine component. Historical SST observations extend back more than 150 years and are used for monitoring climate change and variability over the oceans, for validation of climate models and to provide boundary conditions for atmospheric models. SST observations from ships form our longest instrumental record of surface marine temperature change, but over the years different methods of measuring SST have been used, each of which potentially has different biases. Changes in technology and observational practice can be rapid and undocumented: generally, it is assumed that almost all SST data collected before the 1940s were derived from bucket samples although the measurement practice is almost never known in detail. Especially prior to the 1940s where buckets measurements prevailed, SST biases are expected to be large, namely comparable to the climatic increase in the GST over the past two centuries. Currently, SST datasets use bias models representing only large-scale effects, based on 5˚ area average monthly climatological environmental conditions or on large-scale variations in air-sea temperature difference, which is also uncertain. There are major differences between the bias adjustment fields used to date, which limits our confidence in global and regional estimates of historical SST as well as in long term trends, which are expected to be controlled by uncertainty in systematic biases. The main barrier to finer-scale adjustments of SST is that information about measurement methods and ambient environmental conditions is usually insufficient. As a result, many reports cannot be confidently assigned to a particular vessel and hence, cautiously, to the same measurement methodology. Here we present a new approach to the quantification of SST biases that can be applied on a ship-by-ship basis. These ship dependent adjustments are expected to

  5. Temperature dependent surface modification of silica spheres with methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Jo, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Sae-Han; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Do-gyun

    2014-09-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the C=O stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  6. INSECTICIDE PERSISTENCE IN NATURAL SEAWATER AS AFFECTED BY SALINITY, TEMPERATURE, AND STERILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of temperature, salinity, and sterility on the degradation of malathion, parathion, methyl parathion, diazinon, and methoxychlor in fresh and estuarine water has been determined under controlled laboratory conditions. Surface water samples of 1, 10, 20, and 28 ppt sali...

  7. Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by feedlot location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects within pen location, moisture, and temperature on odor emission from manure resulting from a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain with solubles. Pen surface material was collected from three locations. Material from each pen was consolidated for each specific...

  8. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  9. Global Distribution and Variability of Surface Skin and Surface Air Temperatures as Depicted in the AIRS Version-6 Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will briefly describe the significant improvements made in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm, especially as to how they affect retrieved surface skin and surface air temperatures. The global distribution of seasonal 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time 12 year climatologies of Ts,a will be presented for the first time. We will also present the spatial distribution of short term 12 year anomaly trends of Ts,a at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM, as well as the spatial distribution of temporal correlations of Ts,a with the El Nino Index. It will be shown that there are significant differences between the behavior of 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM Ts,a anomalies in some arid land areas.

  10. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-03-01

    It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular

  11. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-04-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  12. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  13. The effects of sea surface temperature gradients on surface turbulent fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, John

    A positive correlation between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress perturbation near strong SST gradients (DeltaSST) has been observed in different parts of the world ocean, such as the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic and the Kuroshio Extension east of Japan. These changes in winds and SSTs can modify near-surface stability, surface stress, and latent and sensible heat fluxes. In general, these small scale processes are poorly modeled in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and climate models. Failure to account for these air--sea interactions produces inaccurate values of turbulent fluxes, and therefore a misrepresentation of the energy, moisture, and momentum budgets. Our goal is to determine the change in these surface turbulent fluxes due to overlooking the correlated variability in winds, SSTs, and related variables. To model these air--sea interactions, a flux model was forced with and without SST--induced changes to the surface wind fields. The SST modification to the wind fields is based on a baroclinic argument as implemented by the University of Washington Planetary Boundary-Layer (UWPBL) model. Other input parameters include 2-m air temperature, 2-m dew point temperature, surface pressure (all from ERA--interim), and Reynolds Daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST). Flux model runs are performed every 6 hours starting in December 2002 and ending in November 2003. From these model outputs, seasonal, monthly, and daily means of the difference between DeltaSST and no DeltaSST effects on sensible heat flux (SHF), latent heat flux (LHF), and surface stress are calculated. Since the greatest impacts occur during the winter season, six additional December-January-February (DJF) seasons were analyzed for 1987--1990 and 1999--2002. The greatest differences in surface turbulent fluxes are concentrated near strong SST fronts associated with the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio Extension. On average, 2002---2003 DJF seasonal differences in SHF

  14. Characterizing the spatial dynamics of land surface temperature-impervious surface fraction relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiong; Qingming, Zhan; Guo, Huagui; Jin, Zhicheng

    2016-03-01

    The land surface temperature (LST) pattern is treated as one of the primary indications of environmental impacts of land cover change. Researchers continue to explore the potential contribution of land surface to temperature rising. The LST-land surface relationship is dynamic and varies spatially. Based upon the previous studies, this research assumes that such dynamics is manifested at two levels: (1) the phenomenon level, and (2) its formation mechanism level. The research presents a workflow of exploring such dynamics at both levels. The variogram of the phenomenon and multi-scale analysis of the LST-land surface relationship are mutually interpreted. In the case study of Wuhan, China, the variogram of the LST indicates that the operational scale of the phenomenon is 500-650 m. It suggests the optimal scale to inspect the LST and its cause in the study area. This finding is verified and further inspected through multi-scale analysis of the LST-Impervious Surface Fraction (ISF) relationship at the formation mechanism level. The research also employs the Spatial Autocorrelation model to show how the ISF impacts the LST through scales. A flexible autocorrelation weight matrix is proposed and implemented in the model. The parameters of the model exhibit the thermal sensitivity of land surface and again represent the scale features. The Ordinary Least Square regression is used as the benchmark. Several implications are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric depression-mediated water temperature changes affect the vertical movement of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Takashi; Hyodo, Susumu; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-08-01

    The Sanriku coastal area, Japan, is one of the southern-most natural spawning regions of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta. Here, we report their behavioral response to changes in ambient temperature after the passage of an atmospheric depression during the early spawning season. Before the passage, all electrically tagged fish moved vertically for several hours to depths below the shallow thermocline at >100 m. However, during the atmospheric depression, the salmon shortened the duration of their vertical movements and spent most time at the surface. The water column was homogenous at <150 m deep except for the surface. The descending behavior may have been discontinued because the cooler water below the thermocline was no longer in a thermally defined layer, due to strong vertical mixing by high wave action. Instead, they likely spent time within the cooler water temperatures at the surface of bays to minimize metabolic energy cost during migration. PMID:27236419

  16. Nutrient losses in runoff from feedlot surfaces as affected by unconsolidated surface materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated surface materials (USM) (loose manure pack) that accumulate within feedlot pens during a feeding cycle. The effects of varying amounts of USM on feedlot runoff water quality are not well defined. The objectives of this field investigation were to: a) compa...

  17. Surface temperatures in the polar regions from Nimbus 7 temperature humidity infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    1994-01-01

    Monthly surface temperatures in the Arctic and Antarctic regions have been derived from the 11.5 micrometer thermal infrared channel of the Nimbus 7 temperature humidity infrared radiometer (THIR) for a whole year in 1979 and for a winter and a summer month from 1980 through 1985. The data set shows interannual variability and provides spatial details that allow identification of temperature patterns over sea ice and ice sheet surfaces. For example, the coldest spot in the southern hemisphere is observed to be consistently in the Antarctic plateau in the southern hemisphere, while that in the northern hemisphere is usually located in Greenland, or one of three other general areas: Siberia, the central Arctic, or the Canadian Archipelago. Also, in the southern hemisphere, the amplitude of the seasonal fluctuation of ice sheet temperatures is about 3 times that of sea ice, while in the northern hemisphere, the corresponding fluctuations for the two surfaces are about the same. The main sources of error in the retrieval are cloud and other atmospheric effects. These were minimized by first choosing the highest radiance value from the set of measurements during the day taken within a 30 km by 30 km grid of each daily map. Then the difference of daily maps was taken and where the difference is greater than a certain threshold (which in this case is 12 C), the data element is deleted. Overall, the monthly maps derived from the resulting daily maps are spatially and temporally consistent, are coherent with the topograph y of the Antarctic continent and the location of the sea ice edge, and are in qualitative agreement with climatological data. Quantitatively, THIR data are in good agreement with Antarctic ice sheet surface air temperature station data with a correlation coefficient of 0.997 and a standard deviation of 2.0 C. The absolute values are not as good over the sea ice edges, but a comparison with Russian 2-m drift station temperatures shows very high correlation

  18. Ambient temperature: a factor affecting performance and physiological response of broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkoh, A.

    1989-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to elucidate the influence of four constant ambient temperatures (20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C) on the performance and physiological reactions of male commercial broiler chicks from 3 to 7 weeks of age. A 12 h light-dark cycle was operated, while relative humidity and air circulation were not controlled. Exposure of broiler chickens to the 20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C treatments showed highly significant ( P<0.0001) depression in growth rate, food intake and efficiency of food utilization, and a significant increase in water consumption for the 30° and 35°C groups. Mortality was, however, not affected by the temperature treatments. Changes in physiological status, such as increased rectal temperatures, decreased concentration of red blood cells, haemoglobin, haematocrit, and total plasma protein were observed in birds housed in the higher temperature (30° and 35°C) environments. Moreover, in these broiler chickens, there was an increased blood glucose concentration and a decreased thyroid gland weight. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to high ambient temperatures markedly affects their performance and physiological response.

  19. Theoretical study of cathode surfaces and high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the work functions of BaO on W, Os, Pt, and alloys of Re-W, Os-W, and Ir-W that are in excellent agreement with experiment. The observed emission enhancement for alloy relative to tungsten dispenser cathodes is attributed to properties of the substrate crystal structure and explained by the smaller depolarization of the surface dipole on hexagonal as compared to cubic substrates. For Ba and BaO on W(100), the geometry of the adsorbates has been determined by a comparison of inverse photoemission spectra with calculated densities of unoccupied states based on the fully relativistic embedded cluster approach. Results are also discussed for models of scandate cathodes and the electronic structure of oxygen on W(100) at room and elevated temperatures. A detailed comparison is made for the surface electronic structure of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 as obtained with non-, quasi-, and fully relativistic cluster calculations.

  20. Accessing Recent Trend of Land Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Romanov, P.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important element to measure the state of the terrestrial ecosystems and to study the surface energy budgets. In support of the land cover/land use change related international program MAIRS (Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study), we have collected the global monthly LST measured by MODIS since the beginning of the missions. The MODIS LST time series have ~11 years of data from Terra since 2000 and ~9 years of data from Aqua since 2002, which makes possible to study the recent climate, such as trend and variability. In this study, monthly climatology from two satellite platforms are calculated and compared. The spatial patterns of LST trends are accessed, focusing on the Asian Monsoon region. Furthermore, the MODIS LST trends are compared with the skin temperature trend from the NASA's atmospheric assimilation model, MERRA (MODERN ERA RETROSPECTIVE-ANALYSIS FOR RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS), which has longer data record since 1979. The calculated climatology and anomaly of MODIS LST will be integrated into the online visualization system, Giovanni, at NASA GES DISC for easy access and use by scientists and general public.

  1. Global interoperability in the oceanographic sea surface temperature community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Casey, K. S.; Vazquez, J.; Habermann, T.; Bingham, A.; Thompson, C. K.; Donlon, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Project is an international consortium of data providers coordinated across four continents providing sea surface temperature (SST) products from nearly every SST observing satellite in common data and metadata formats since 2005. It currently provides Level 2P data for 13 unique sensors with over 40 combined Level 2, 3 and 4 products. The entire project produces on the order of 35 Gbytes/day and distributes over 3 Tbytes/ month from a variety of access nodes. Although these combined data throughputs are modest by the standards of future NASA Decadal missions, GHRSST has achieved a large measure of success by implementing a regional/global task sharing framework built on self describing data formats, standardized metadata content and data access protocols early in its mission. We will present some of these implementation strategies, lessons learned and history with regard to standardizing products while reducing barriers to interoperability that the project undertook leading up to the present. We will also discuss recent revisions of data and metadata product specifications, and new tools and services that the project will implement in the near future to further reduce barriers, and improve discovery, metadata and access.

  2. Strengthening relationship between ENSO and western Russian summer surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cheng; Li, Jianping; Ding, Ruiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Western Russia (WR) experienced an extremely hot summer in 2010 that caused tremendous social and economic losses. The WR summer surface temperature (WRST) in the observational record is characterized by substantial interannual variability superimposed on the secular warming trend. Analysis of the 130 year observational record reveals that a strong and significant inverse relationship between WRST interannual variability and the tropical El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has emerged during the past three decades. The ENSO influence on the summer extratropical atmospheric circulation was weak before 1980 but became strong and significant afterward, showing a structure similar to the East Atlantic/WR teleconnection pattern. This pattern is associated with rising/falling upper level geopotential height over WR, which leads to the warming/cooling of surface and tropospheric air temperatures. Numerical simulations from a theoretical linear baroclinic model and Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project models further suggest that the enhancement of the ENSO teleconnection to WR may be attributable to a change in the ENSO-related tropical thermal forcing. A tripole-type rainfall anomaly pattern over tropical Pacific and Atlantic is found to be associated with ENSO in the past three decades. The tripole heating pattern can excite a Rossby wave that extends northwestward reaching WR and is necessary for the strong influence of ENSO on WR summer climate.

  3. Surface Temperature Reconstructions for the Last 1000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, G. R.

    2006-12-01

    This is a presentation of results from a recently released report written by a committee established by the National Research Council and chaired by the speaker. The report was titled the same as the title of this talk. It focused on the methods of reconstructing the large scales of such surface temperature fields, since there has been considerable discussion in the scientific literature, assessments such as the IPCC, the popular press, blogs and even Congressional Hearings. The so-called `hockey stick' curve indicating a gradual cooling from the beginning of the record at about 1000AD to roughly 150 years ago when the curve take a steep upward trend (the so-called global warming). The original publications by Mann, Bradley and Hughes were careful to present and emphasize error margins that have been ignored by many in the controversy. The Committee found that numerous subsequent publications have reported reconstructions that utilized different data and different statistical assumptions. These all fall within the error margins of the original studies. While the committee has some reservations about the period prior to the year 1600AD, it still concludes that it is plausible that surface temperatures averaged over the Northern Hemisphere over the last three decades are plausibly the warmest for any such comparable period in the last 1000 years.

  4. Three modes of interdecadal trends in sea surface temperature and sea surface height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.

    2013-12-01

    It might be thought that sea surface height and sea surface temperature would be tightly related. We show that this is not necessarily the case on a global scale. We analysed this relationship in a suite of coupled climate models run under 1860 forcing conditions. The models are low-resolution variants of the GFDL Earth System Model, reported in Galbraith et al. (J. Clim. 2011). 1. Correlated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode corresponds to opening and closing of convective chimneys in the Southern Ocean. As the Southern Ocean destratifies, sea ice formation is suppressed during the winter and more heat is taken up during the summer. This mode of variability is highly correlated with changes in the top of the atmosphere radiative budget and weakly correlated with changes in the deep ocean circulation. 2. Uncorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode of variability is associated with interdecadal variabliity in tropical winds. Changes in the advective flux of heat to the surface ocean play a critical role in driving these changes, which also result in significant local changes in sea level. Changes sea ice over the Southern Ocean still result in changes in solar absorption, but these are now largely cancelled by changes in outgoing longwave radiation. 3. Anticorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperatures. By varying the lateral diffusion coefficient in the ocean model, we are able to enhance and suppress convection in the Southern and Northern Pacific Oceans. Increasing the lateral diffusion coefficients shifts the balance sources of deep water away from the warm salty deep water of the North Atlantic and towards cold fresh deep water from the other two regions. As a result, even though the planet as a whole warms, the deep ocean cools and sea level falls, with changes of order 30 cm over 500 years. The increase in solar absorption

  5. Analyses of global sea surface temperature 1856-1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexey; Cane, Mark A.; Kushnir, Yochanan; Clement, Amy C.; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Rajagopalan, Balaji

    1998-08-01

    Global analyses of monthly sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies from 1856 to 1991 are produced using three statistically based methods: optimal smoothing (OS), the Kaiman filter (KF) and optimal interpolation (OI). Each of these is accompanied by estimates of the error covariance of the analyzed fields. The spatial covariance function these methods require is estimated from the available data; the timemarching model is a first-order autoregressive model again estimated from data. The data input for the analyses are monthly anomalies from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office historical sea surface temperature data set (MOHSST5) [Parker et al., 1994] of the Global Ocean Surface Temperature Atlas (GOSTA) [Bottomley et al., 1990]. These analyses are compared with each other, with GOSTA, and with an analysis generated by projection (P) onto a set of empirical orthogonal functions (as in Smith et al. [1996]). In theory, the quality of the analyses should rank in the order OS, KF, OI, P, and GOSTA. It is found that the first four give comparable results in the data-rich periods (1951-1991), but at times when data is sparse the first three differ significantly from P and GOSTA. At these times the latter two often have extreme and fluctuating values, prima facie evidence of error. The statistical schemes are also verified against data not used in any of the analyses (proxy records derived from corals and air temperature records from coastal and island stations). We also present evidence that the analysis error estimates are indeed indicative of the quality of the products. At most times the OS and KF products are close to the OI product, but at times of especially poor coverage their use of information from other times is advantageous. The methods appear to reconstruct the major features of the global SST field from very sparse data. Comparison with other indications of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle show that the analyses provide usable information on

  6. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (< 0.001 mm) and physical clay (< 0.01 mm) contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data. PMID:26090852

  7. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (< 0.001 mm) and physical clay (< 0.01 mm) contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data. PMID:26090852

  8. Spatiotemporal changes in extreme ground surface temperatures and the relationship with air temperatures in the Three-River Source Regions during 1980-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dongliang; Jin, Huijun; Lü, Lanzhi; Zhou, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Climate changes are affecting plant growth, ecosystem evolution, hydrological processes, and water resources in the Three-River Source Regions (TRSR). Daily ground surface temperature (GST) and air temperature (Ta) recordings from 12 meteorological stations illustrated trends and characteristics of extreme GST and Ta in the TRSR during 1980-2013. We used the Mann-Kendall test and Sen's slope estimate to analyze 12 temperature extreme indices as recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI). The mean annual ground surface temperatures (MAGST) are 2.4-4.3 °C higher than the mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) in the TRSR. The increasing trends of the MAGST are all higher than those of the MAAT. The multi-year average maximum GST (28.1 °C) is much higher than that of the Ta (7.6 °C), while the minimum GST (-8.7 °C) is similar to that of the minimum Ta (-6.9 °C). The minimum temperature trends are more significant than those of the maximum temperature and are consistent with temperature trends in other regions of China. Different spatiotemporal patterns of GST extremes compared to those of Ta may result from greater warming of the ground surface. Consequently, the difference between the GST and Ta increased. These findings have implications for variations of surface energy balance, sensible heat flux, ecology, hydrology, and permafrost.

  9. Maintenance of Coastal Surface Blooms by Surface Temperature Stratification and Wind Drift

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-de la Torre, Mary Carmen; Maske, Helmut; Ochoa, José; Almeda-Jauregui, César O.

    2013-01-01

    Algae blooms are an increasingly recurrent phenomenon of potentially socio-economic impact in coastal waters globally and in the coastal upwelling region off northern Baja California, Mexico. In coastal upwelling areas the diurnal wind pattern is directed towards the coast during the day. We regularly found positive Near Surface Temperature Stratification (NSTS), the resulting density stratification is expected to reduce the frictional coupling of the surface layer from deeper waters and allow for its more efficient wind transport. We propose that the net transport of the top layer of approximately 2.7 kilometers per day towards the coast helps maintain surface blooms of slow growing dinoflagellate such as Lingulodinium polyedrum. We measured: near surface stratification with a free-rising CTD profiler, trajectories of drifter buoys with attached thermographs, wind speed and direction, velocity profiles via an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, Chlorophyll and cell concentration from water samples and vertical migration using sediment traps. The ADCP and drifter data agree and show noticeable current shear within the first meters of the surface where temperature stratification and high cell densities of L. polyedrum were found during the day. Drifters with 1m depth drogue moved towards the shore, whereas drifters at 3 and 5 m depth showed trajectories parallel or away from shore. A small part of the surface population migrated down to the sea floor during night thus reducing horizontal dispersion. The persistent transport of the surface bloom population towards shore should help maintain the bloom in favorable environmental conditions with high nutrients, but also increasing the potential socioeconomic impact of the blooms. The coast wise transport is not limited to blooms but includes all dissolved and particulate constituents in surface waters. PMID:23593127

  10. Relating urban surface temperature to surface characteristics in Beijing area of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weidong; Lu, Liping; Ye, Caihua; Liu, Yonghong

    2009-10-01

    The surface environment and the thermal infrared information of remote sensing have been widely used to study urban climate. In this paper, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data acquired in 2008 were applied to study the relationship between urban surface temperature and surface characteristics within the Beijing 5th ring road area of China. The thermal band data of TM combined with classification-based surface emissivity were utilized to estimate land surface temperature (LST). Meanwhile, surface characteristics parameters, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Modified Normalized Difference Water Index (MNDWI), the Normalized Difference Building Index (NDBI) and the Normalized Difference Bareness Index (NDBaI) were calculated according to related arithmetic respectively. The quantitative relationship between LST and NDVI, MNDWI, NDBI and NDBaI were investigated according to urban main land use/cover types (water body, vegetation and built-up surfaces). The results showed there were negative correlations between LST and NDVI, MNDWI for vegetation and built-up land use/cover types, positive correlations between LST and NDBI, NDBaI for vegetation and built-up land use/cover types. In general, in the area 5th ring road of Beijing the distribution of NDVI, MNDWI and NDBI directly defined the distribution of LST. For built-up land use/cover type, the NDVI was small, However, NDBI and LST were high. While in the area with more water and vegetation, the NDVI and MNDWI were high and LST was small. There were obvious correlation between LST and urban surface characteristics.

  11. Impact of vegetation growth on urban surface temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyadi, S. N. A.; Mohd, W. M. N. W.; Misni, A.

    2014-02-01

    Earlier studies have indicated that, the temperature distribution in the urban area is significantly warmer than its surrounding suburban areas. The process of urbanization has created urban heat island (UHI). As a city expands, trees are cut down to accommodate commercial development, industrial areas, roads, and suburban growth. Trees or green areas normally play a vital role in mitigating the UHI effects especially in regulating high temperature in saturated urban areas. This study attempts to assess the effects of vegetation growth on land surface temperature (LST) distribution in urban areas. An area within the City of Shah Alam, Selangor has been selected as the study area. Land use/land cover and LST maps of two different dates are generated from Landsat 5 TM images of the year 1991 and 2009. Only five major land cover classes are considered in this study. Mono-window algorithm is used to generate the LST maps. Landsat 5 TM images are also used to generate the NDVI maps. Results from this study have shown that there are significant land use changes within the study area. Although the conversion of green areas into residential and commercial areas significantly increase the LST, matured trees will help to mitigate the effects of UHI.

  12. Land surface temperature measurements from EOS MODIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhengming

    1995-01-01

    A significant progress has been made in TIR instrumentation which is required to establish the spectral BRDF/emissivity knowledge base of land-surface materials and to validate the land-surface temperature (LST) algorithms. The SIBRE (spectral Infrared Bidirectional Reflectance and Emissivity) system and a TIR system for measuring spectral directional-hemispherical emissivity have been completed and tested successfully. Optical properties and performance features of key components (including spectrometer, and TIR source) of these systems have been characterized by integrated use of local standards (blackbody and reference plates). The stabilization of the spectrometer performance was improved by a custom designed and built liquid cooling system. Methods and procedures for measuring spectral TIR BRDF and directional-hemispheric emissivity with these two systems have been verified in sample measurements. These TIR instruments have been used in the laboratory and the field, giving very promising results. The measured spectral emissivities of water surface are very close to the calculated values based on well established water refractive index values in published papers. Preliminary results show that the TIR instruments can be used for validation of the MODIS LST algorithm in homogeneous test sites. The beta-3 version of the MODIS LST software is being prepared for its delivery scheduled in the early second half of this year.

  13. Temperature Affects the Tripartite Interactions between Bacteriophage WO, Wolbachia, and Cytoplasmic Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Bordenstein, Sarah R.; Bordenstein, Seth R.

    2011-01-01

    Wolbachia infections are a model for understanding intracellular, bacterial symbioses. While the symbiosis is often studied from a binary perspective of host and bacteria, it is increasingly apparent that additional trophic levels can influence the symbiosis. For example, Wolbachia in arthropods harbor a widespread temperate bacteriophage, termed WO, that forms virions and rampantly transfers between coinfections. Here we test the hypothesis that temperatures at the extreme edges of an insect's habitable range alter bacteriophage WO inducibility and in turn, Wolbachia densities and the penetrance of cytoplasmic incompatibility. We report four key findings using the model wasp, Nasonia vitripennis: First, both cold treatment at 18 C and heat treatment at 30 C reduce Wolbachia densities by as much as 74% relative to wasps reared at 25 C. Second, in all cases where Wolbachia densities decline due to temperature changes, phage WO densities increase and inversely associate with Wolbachia densities. Heat has a marked effect on phage WO, yielding phage densities that are 552% higher than the room temperature control. Third, there is a significant affect of insect family on phage WO and endoysmbiont densities. Fourth, at extreme temperatures, there was a temperature-mediated adjustment to the density threshold at which Wolbachia cause complete cytoplasmic incompatibility. Taken together, these results demonstrate that temperature simultaneously affects phage WO densities, endosymbiont densities, and the penetrance of cytoplasmic incompatibility. While temperature shock enhances bacteriophage inducibility and the ensuing bacterial mortality in a wide range of medically and industrially-important bacteria, this is the first investigation of the associations in an obligate intracellular bacteria. Implications to a SOS global sensing feedback mechanism in Wolbachia are discussed. PMID:22194999

  14. A Method for Calculating Transient Surface Temperatures and Surface Heating Rates for High-Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a method that can calculate transient aerodynamic heating and transient surface temperatures at supersonic and hypersonic speeds. This method can rapidly calculate temperature and heating rate time-histories for complete flight trajectories. Semi-empirical theories are used to calculate laminar and turbulent heat transfer coefficients and a procedure for estimating boundary-layer transition is included. Results from this method are compared with flight data from the X-15 research vehicle, YF-12 airplane, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. These comparisons show that the calculated values are in good agreement with the measured flight data.

  15. Air and Ground Surface Temperature Relations in a Mountainous Basin, Wolf Creek, Yukon Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roadhouse, Emily A.

    related to the winter air temperatures. The application of n-factor modeling techniques within the permafrost region, and the verification of these techniques for a range of natural surfaces, is essential to the determination of the thermal and physical response to potential climate warming in permafrost regions. The presence of temperature inversions presents a unique challenge to permafrost probability mapping in mountainous terrain. While elsewhere the existence of permafrost can be linearly related to elevation, the presence of frequent inversions challenges this assumption, affecting permafrost distribution in ways that the current modeling techniques cannot accurately predict. At sites across the Yukon, inversion-prone sites were predominantly situated in U-shaped valleys, although open slopes, mid-slope ridges and plains were also identified. Within the Wolf Creek basin and surrounding area, inversion episodes have a measurable effect on local air temperatures, occurring during the fall and winter seasons along the Mount Sima trail, and year-round in the palsa valley. Within the discontinuous permafrost zone, where average surface temperatures are often close to zero, even a relatively small change in temperature in the context of future climate change could have a widespread impact on permafrost distribution.

  16. Land Surface Temperature Variational Assimilation within the ORCHIDEE Continental Surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides-Pinjosovsky, H. S.; Ottle, C.; Thiria, S.; Badran, F.; Crepon, M. R.; Maugis, P.; Brajard, J.

    2013-12-01

    Variational data assimilation is applied to the energy and water budgets modules of the ORCHIDEE land surface model. This part of the model called SECHIBA, describes the exchanges of water and energy between the surface and the atmosphere. The adjoint semi-generator software called YAO is used as a framework to implement 4D-Var assimilation. First, sensitivity analysis was performed in order to validate the adjoint and to identify the most influential parameters. Following, the results of twin experiments using synthetic observations, are shown in order to demonstrate the robustness of the assimilation. In addition, assimilation were made using observational meteorology dataset from the Surface Monitoring Of Soil Reservoir EXperiment (SMOSREX). The results obtained when controlling the most sensitive parameters and the initial soil water content, show the flexibility of the assimilation scheme and the potential of land surface temperature variational data assimilation to improve model calibration and reduce prediction errors. Keywords: Sensibility Analysis, Data Assimilation, Model Calibration, Land Surface Temperature

  17. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field From Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    The primary focus of this project was on the estimation of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. This effort is directly related to an attempt to describe the mechanisms which give rise to observed SST and its variability on seasonal and inter-annual timescales, its relation to ocean-atmosphere interaction, and the dynamical coupling between the ocean mixed layer and the deep interior ocean. This is one of the fundamental climate related questions being pursued currently under the CLIVAR Program. Because of the strong turbulent mixing associated with atmospheric fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater through the sea surface, the ocean forms a shallow surface boundary layer, the mixed layer which is largely homogeneous in its constituents. The relation between the temperature of the remotely sensed "skin" and the bulk of the mixed layer is largely understood (Reynolds and Smith 1994; Emery et al., 1995). However, because the surface mixed layer is effectively decoupled from the underlying ocean dynamics, an interpretation of satellite SST observations in isolation and in direct use for dynamical studies is very difficult. As a result, the impact of SST data on the understanding of ocean variability.

  18. Satellite observations of surface temperature during the March 2015 total solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Good, Elizabeth

    2016-09-28

    The behaviour of remotely sensed land surface temperatures (LSTs) from the spinning-enhanced visible and infrared imager (SEVIRI) during the total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 is analysed over Europe. LST is found to drop by up to several degrees Celcius during the eclipse, with the minimum LST occurring just after the eclipse mid-point (median=+1.5 min). The drop in LST is typically larger than the drop in near-surface air temperatures reported elsewhere, and correlates with solar obscuration (r=-0.47; larger obscuration = larger LST drop), eclipse duration (r=-0.62; longer duration = larger LST drop) and time (r=+0.37; earlier eclipse = larger LST drop). Locally, the LST drop is also correlated with vegetation (up to r=+0.6), with smaller LST drops occurring over more vegetated surfaces. The LSTs at locations near the coast and at higher elevation are also less affected by the eclipse. This study covers the largest area and uses the most observations of eclipse-induced surface temperature drops to date, and is the first full characterization of satellite LST during an eclipse (known to the author). The methods described could be applied to Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) LST data over North America during the August 2017 total solar eclipse.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550764

  19. Martian Surface Temperature and Spectral Response from the MSL REMS Ground Temperature Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Torres, Javier; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Zorzano, María-Paz; Serrano, María; Mendaza, Teresa; Hamilton, Vicky; Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) offers the opportunity to explore the near surface atmospheric conditions and, in particular will shed new light into the heat budget of the Martian surface. This is important for studies of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), as the ground and air temperatures measured directly by REMS control the coupling of the atmosphere with the surface [Zurek et al., 1992]. This coupling is driven by solar insolation. The ABL plays an important role in the general circulation and the local atmospheric dynamics of Mars. One of the REMS sensors, the ground temperature sensor (GTS), provides the data needed to study the thermal inertia properties of the regolith and rocks beneath the MSL rover. The GTS includes thermopile detectors, with infrared bands of 8-14 µm and 16-20 µm [Gómez-Elvira et al., 2012]. These sensors are clustered in a single location on the MSL mast and the 8-14 µm thermopile sounds the surface temperature. The infrared radiation reaching the thermopile is proportional to the emissivity of the surface minerals across these thermal wavelengths. We have developed a radiative transfer retrieval method for the REMS GTS using a database of thermal infrared laboratory spectra of analogue minerals and their mixtures. [Martín Redondo et al. 2009, Martínez-Frías et al. 2012 - FRISER-IRMIX database]. This method will be used to assess the perfomance of the REMS GTS as well as determine, through the error analysis, the surface temperature and emissivity values where MSL is operating. Comparisons with orbiter data will be performed. References Gómez-Elvira et al. [2012], REMS: The Environmental Sensor Suite for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover, Space Science Reviews, Volume 170, Issue 1-4, pp. 583-640. Martín-Redondo et al. [2009] Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11:, pp. 1428-1432. Martínez-Frías et al. [2012] FRISER-IRMIX database http

  20. Validation of the MODIS Land-Surface Temperature Products with Temperature and Radiance-based Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2003-12-01

    A major field campaign was conducted in Railroad Valley, NV, in June 2003. Ground-based measurements were made in the clear-sky days from June 26 to 30. Sky radiance and surface-leaving TIR radiance in sunshine and shadow conditions were measured with a Bomem TIR spectroradiometer. Diurnal surface temperatures were measured with four TIR radiometers. Six radio sounding balloons were launched in the period of clear-sky days to measure the atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles. MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) data were acquired in a daytime flight and a nighttime flight on June 27. An excellent match between the measured spectral sky radiance and the radiance calculated with atmospheric radiative transfer code MODTRAN4.0 based on the measured atmospheric profiles provides a solid evidence of the good quality of both the TIR spectroradiometer and the radiative transfer code. The measured surface-leaving TIR radiance in sunshine and shadow conditions were used to retrieve playa surface spectral emissivity by a sun-shadow method. The band-averaged emissivities calculated from the retrieved spectral emissivity agree within 0.005 with those used in the MODIS split-window LST algorithm for the site. Terra and Aqua MODIS 1km LST products were validated with a temperature-based method using the LSTs measured by the TIR radiometers at nights. This method is limited by the spatial variation in LSTs, which is obviously shown in the day and night MAS images. The LST products were also validated in day and night conditions with a radiance-based method, which is based on the MODTRAN code, measured surface emissivity and atmospheric profiles. The LST accuracies are better than 1K in all seven Aqua cases where zenith viewing angles are up to 56\\deg, and in four of six Terra cases. The LST accuracy is better than 1.5K in the remaining two Terra cases with viewing angles at 54\\deg and 60\\deg. The accuracy of nighttime LSTs at viewing angles within 47\\deg is better than 0

  1. Assimilation of land surface temperature into the land surface model JULES with an ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, D.; Kaduk, J.; Remedios, J.; Ardö, J.; Balzter, H.

    2010-10-01

    Land surface models have uncertainties due to their approximation of physical processes and the heterogeneity of the land surface. These can be compounded when key variables are inadequately represented. Land surface temperature (LST) is critical as it forms an integral component in the surface energy budget, water stress evaluation, fuel moisture derivation, and soil moisture-climate feedbacks. A reduction in the uncertainty of surface energy fluxes, and moisture quantification, is assumed to be achievable by constraining simulations of LST with observation data. This technique is known as data assimilation and involves the adjustment of the model state at observation times with measurements of a predictable uncertainty. In this paper, the validity of LST simulations in a regionalized parameterization of the land surface model Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) for Africa is assessed by way of a multitemporal intercomparison study with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) thermal products, with a two-thirds reduction in model bias found when soil properties are reparameterized. A data assimilation experiment of SEVIRI LST into the JULES model via an ensemble Kalman filter shows an improvement in the modeled LST, soil moisture, and latent and sensible heat fluxes. This paper presents the first investigation into reducing the uncertainty in modeling energy and water fluxes with the United Kingdom's most important land surface model, JULES, by means of data assimilation of LST.

  2. Measuring surface temperature of isolated neutron stars and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, Marcus Alton

    New and exciting results for measuring neutron star surface temperatures began with the successful launch of the Chandra X-ray observatory. Among these results are new detections of neutron star surface temperatures which have made it possible to seriously test neutron star thermal evolution theories. The important new temperature determination of the Vela pulsar (Pavlov, et al., 2001a) requires a non-standard cooling scenario to explain it. Apart from this result, we have measured PSR B1055-52's surface temperature in this thesis, determining that it can be explained by standard cooling with heating. Our spectral fit of the combined data from ROSAT and Chandra have shown that a three component model, two thermal blackbodies and an non-thermal power-law, is required to explain the data. Furthermore, our phase resolved spectroscopy has begun to shed light on the geometry of the hot spot on PSR B1055-52's surface as well as the structure of the magnetospheric radiation. Also, there is strong evidence for a thermal distribution over its surface. Most importantly, the fact that PSR B1055-52 does not have a hydrogen atmosphere has been firmly established. To reconcile these two key observations, on the Vela pulsar and PSR B1055-52, we tested neutron star cooling with neutrino processes including the Cooper pair neutrino emission process. Overall, it has been found that a phase change associated with pions being present in the cores of more massive neutron stars explains all current of the data. A transition from neutron matter to pion condensates in the central stellar core explains the difference between standard and non-standard cooling scenarios, because the superfluid suppression of pion cooling will reduce the emissivity of the pion direct URCA process substantially. A neutron star with a mass of [Special characters omitted.] with a medium stiffness equation of state and a T72 type neutron superfluid models the standard cooling case well. A neutron star of [Special

  3. High-Temperature Modal Survey of a Hot-Structure Control Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Natalie D.

    2011-01-01

    Ground vibration tests are routinely conducted for supporting flutter analysis for subsonic and supersonic vehicles; however, for hypersonic vehicles, thermoelastic vibration testing techniques are neither well established nor routinely performed. New high-temperature material systems, fabrication technologies and high-temperature sensors expand the opportunities to develop advanced techniques for performing ground vibration tests at elevated temperatures. When high-temperature materials, which increase in stiffness when heated, are incorporated into a hot-structure that contains metallic components that decrease in stiffness when heated, the interaction between those materials can affect the hypersonic flutter analysis. A high-temperature modal survey will expand the research database for hypersonics and improve the understanding of this dual-material interaction. This report discusses the vibration testing of the carbon-silicon carbide Ruddervator Subcomponent Test Article, which is a truncated version of a full-scale hot-structure control surface. Two series of room-temperature modal test configurations were performed in order to define the modal characteristics of the test article during the elevated-temperature modal survey: one with the test article suspended from a bungee cord (free-free) and the second with it mounted on the strongback (fixed boundary). Testing was performed in the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Flight Loads Laboratory Large Nitrogen Test Chamber.

  4. Land Surface Temperature Measurements from EOS MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments made by the MODIS LST (Land-Surface Temperature) group at University of California, Santa Barbara, under NASA Contract. Version 1 of the MODIS Land-Surface Temperature Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) was reviewed in June 1994, version 2 reviewed in November 1994, version 3.1 in August 1996, and version 3.3 updated in April 1999. Based on the ATBD, two LST algorithms were developed, one is the generalized split-window algorithm and another is the physics-based day/night LST algorithm. These two LST algorithms were implemented into the production generation executive code (PGE 16) for the daily standard MODIS LST products at level-2 (MODII-L2) and level-3 (MODIIA1 at 1 km resolution and MODIIB1 at 5km resolution). PGE codes for 8-day 1 km LST product (MODIIA2) and the daily, 8-day and monthly LST products at 0.05 degree latitude/longitude climate model grids (CMG) were also delivered. Four to six field campaigns were conducted each year since 2000 to validate the daily LST products generated by PGE16 and the calibration accuracies of the MODIS TIR bands used for the LST/emissivity retrieval from versions 2-4 of Terra MODIS data and versions 3-4 of Aqua MODIS data. Validation results from temperature-based and radiance-based methods indicate that the MODIS LST accuracy is better than 1 C in most clear-sky cases in the range from -10 to 58 C. One of the major lessons learn from multi- year temporal analysis of the consistent V4 daily Terra MODIS LST products in 2000-2003 over some selected target areas including lakes, snow/ice fields, and semi-arid sites is that there are variable numbers of cloud-contaminated LSTs in the MODIS LST products depending on surface elevation, land cover types, and atmospheric conditions. A cloud-screen scheme with constraints on spatial and temporal variations in LSTs was developed to remove cloud-contaminated LSTs. The 5km LST product was indirectly validated through comparisons to

  5. Swimming performance of hatchling green turtles is affected by incubation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Elizabeth A.; Booth, David T.; Lanyon, Janet M.

    2006-08-01

    In an experiment repeated for two separate years, incubation temperature was found to affect the body size and swimming performance of hatchling green turtles ( Chelonia mydas). In the first year, hatchlings from eggs incubated at 26°C were larger in size than hatchlings from 28 and 30°C, whilst in the second year hatchlings from 25.5°C were similar in size to hatchings from 30°C. Clutch of origin influenced the size of hatchlings at all incubation temperatures even when differences in egg size were taken into account. In laboratory measurements of swimming performance, in seawater at 28°C, hatchlings from eggs incubated at 25.5 and 26°C had a lower stroke rate frequency and lower force output than hatchlings from 28 and 30°C. These differences appeared to be caused by the muscles of hatchlings from cooler temperatures fatiguing at a faster rate. Clutch of origin did not influence swimming performance. This finding that hatchling males incubated at lower temperature had reduced swimming ability may affect their survival whilst running the gauntlet of predators in shallow near-shore waters, prior to reaching the relative safety of the open sea.

  6. Elevated Ambient Temperature Differentially Affects Virus Resistance in Two Tobacco Species.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Huang, X; Yu, R; Jing, X L; Xu, J; Wu, C A; Zhu, C X; Liu, H M

    2016-01-01

    Antiviral defense of plants is usually enhanced by an elevated temperature under natural conditions. In order to better understand this phenomenon, we carried out temperature shift experiments with Nicotiana glutinosa plants that were infected with Potato virus X (PVX) or the necrotic strain of Potato virus Y (PVY(N)). The virus titer of the plants was found to be much lower when they were maintained at 30°C compared with 22°C, particularly in the upper leaves. PVX resistance at 30°C persisted for a short period even when temperature was shifted back to 22°C. In contrast, N. benthamiana lost the virus resistance immediately after the temperature dropped to 22°C. Expression analysis of two RNA-dependent RNA polymerases in N. glutinosa (NgRDR) showed that a 12-day treatment at 30°C increased the expression of NgRDR1, while NgRDR6 was not affected. In addition, the NgRDR6 mRNA level correlated with the PVX titer but was unaffected by PVY(N) infection. These observations indicate that PVX and PVY(N), although they are both RNA viruses, might trigger different defense responses at elevated temperatures. Our study provides valuable data for a better understanding of the temperature-regulated host virus interaction. PMID:26474332

  7. Local divergence of thermal reaction norms among amphibian populations is affected by pond temperature variation.

    PubMed

    Richter-Boix, Alex; Katzenberger, Marco; Duarte, Helder; Quintela, María; Tejedo, Miguel; Laurila, Anssi

    2015-08-01

    Although temperature variation is known to cause large-scale adaptive divergence, its potential role as a selective factor over microgeographic scales is less well-understood. Here, we investigated how variation in breeding pond temperature affects divergence in multiple physiological (thermal performance curve and critical thermal maximum [CTmax]) and life-history (thermal developmental reaction norms) traits in a network of Rana arvalis populations. The results supported adaptive responses to face two main constraints limiting the evolution of thermal adaptation. First, we found support for the faster-slower model, indicating an adaptive response to compensate for the thermodynamic constraint of low temperatures in colder environments. Second, we found evidence for the generalist-specialist trade-off with populations from colder and less thermally variable environments exhibiting a specialist phenotype performing at higher rates but over a narrower range of temperatures. By contrast, the local optimal temperature for locomotor performance and CTmax did not match either mean or maximum pond temperatures. These results highlight the complexity of the adaptive multiple-trait thermal responses in natural populations, and the role of local thermal variation as a selective force driving diversity in life-history and physiological traits in the presence of gene flow. PMID:26118477

  8. Observations of northern latitude ground-surface and surface-air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, Allan D.; Bhuiyan, A. K. M. H.; Hanesiak, John; Akinremi, O. O.

    2009-04-01

    Note that the magnitude of temperature increases reconstructed from borehole records seems to contrast with some proxy based reconstructions of surface air temperature (SAT) that indicate lower amounts of warming over the same period. We present data suggesting that ground and snow cover may bias climate reconstructions based on BT in portions of the Canadian northwest. Eight sites west of the Canadian cordillera, were examined for long-term SAT and GST changes. At seven of these sites precise borehole temperature profiles are used for the first time since the 1960s, thereby exploring the linkage between GST and SAT. New readings were made at four of these locations. All sites showed significant increasing SAT trends, in terms of annual mean minimum and maximum temperatures. Over a 54 year period, the minimum temperatures increased between 1.1°C and 1.5°C while the maximum increased between 0.8°C and 1.5°C, among those eight stations. Observations of GST at those sites, however, showed no obvious climate induced perturbations. Therefore, we believe that a trend in our area towards an increase in SAT temperatures only over the winter and spring is being masked by freeze thaw and latent energy effects. These results are important, particularly in northern locations where ground and snow cover may play an important role in creating a seasonal bias in GST reconstructions from borehole surveys.

  9. Vegetation, land surface brightness, and temperature dynamics after aspen forest die-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cho-ying; Anderegg, William R. L.

    2014-07-01

    Forest dynamics following drought-induced tree mortality can affect regional climate through biophysical surface properties. These dynamics have not been well quantified, particularly at the regional scale, and are a large uncertainty in ecosystem-climate feedback. We investigated regional biophysical characteristics through time (1995-2011) in drought-impacted (2001-2003), trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forests by utilizing Landsat time series green and brown vegetation cover, surface brightness (total shortwave albedo), and daytime land surface temperature. We quantified the temporal dynamics and postdrought recovery of these characteristics for aspen forests experiencing severe drought-induced mortality in the San Juan National Forest in southwestern Colorado, USA. We partitioned forests into three categories from healthy to severe mortality (Healthy, Intermediate, and Die-off) by referring to field observations of aspen canopy mortality and live aboveground biomass losses. The vegetation cover of die-off areas in 2011 (26.9% of the aspen forest) was significantly different compared to predrought conditions (decrease of 7.4% of the green vegetation cover and increase of 12.1% of the brown vegetation cover compared to 1999). The surface brightness of the study region 9 years after drought however was comparable to predrought estimates (12.7-13.7%). Postdrought brightness was potentially influenced by understory shrubs, since they became the top layer green canopies in disturbed sites from a satellite's point of view. Satellite evidence also showed that the differences of land surface temperature among the three groups increased substantially (≥45%) after drought, possibly due to the reduction of plant evapotranspiration in the Intermediate and Die-off sites. Our results suggest that the mortality-affected systems have not recovered in terms of the surface biophysical properties. We also find that the temporal dynamics of vegetation cover holds

  10. An Open and Transparent Databank of Global Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, J.; Thorne, P.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Gleason, B.; Menne, M. J.; Williams, C.

    2013-12-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) consists of an effort to create an end-to-end process for land surface air temperature analyses. The foundation of this process is the establishment of a global land surface databank. The databank builds upon the groundbreaking efforts of scientists who led efforts to construct global land surface datasets in the 1980's and 1990's. A primary aim of the databank is to improve aspects including data provenance, version control, temporal and spatial coverage, and improved methods for bringing dozens of source data together into an integrated dataset. The databank consists of multiple stages, with each successive stage providing a higher level of processing, quality and integration. Currently more than 50 sources of data have been added to the databank. An automated algorithm has been developed that merges these sources into one complete dataset by removing duplicate station records, identifying two or more station records that can be merged into a single record, and incorporating new and unique stations. The program runs iteratively through all the sources which are ordered based upon criteria established by the ISTI. The highest preferred source, known as the target, runs through all the candidate sources, calculating station comparisons that are acceptable for merging. The process is probabilistic in approach, and the final fate of a candidate station is based upon metadata matching and data equivalence criteria. If there is not enough information, the station is withheld for further investigation. The algorithm has been validated using a pseudo-source of stations with a known time of observation bias, and correct matches have been made nearly 95% of the time. The final product, endorsed and recommended by ISTI, contains over 30,000 stations, however slight changes in the algorithm can perturb results. Subjective decisions, such as the ordering of the sources, or changing metadata and data matching thresholds

  11. Regional ground surface temperature mapping from meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorelli, S.; Kohl, T.

    2004-02-01

    Evaluating ground surface temperature (GST) is common in applied and general geothermal research. Our main focus here is investigating GST for Switzerland because of its well-known impact on low-enthalpy resources, like borehole heat exchanger (BHE) utilization. Using mainly meteorological data, we determined the present-day GST distribution through different approaches. First, we analyzed the actual GST data from the last 20 years measured at the meteorological stations of the Swiss Meteorological Institute (SMI) by investigating recent climatic history and annual variation behavior. Recent climate change seems to have a higher impact on Alpine regions than on the Alpine Foreland. Next, we determined the GST altitude dependence in the range of 200-1800 m a.s.l., using nonlinear fitting approaches and investigated the relationship between GST and surface exposure. Contrary to previous publications, no universal correlation between GST and surface exposure was found, due to local and rapid changing meteorological conditions. Finally, we used a complete data set to consider meteorologically relevant data like soil moisture, wind speed, and vegetation cover and height. The measured GST was well reproduced for the case of low vegetation, except when covered by snow and for days of subzero surface air temperature (SAT). Other locations like urban areas could not be tested. Due to the complexity of physical interaction and the resulting assessment of large data sets, this approach is not suitable for determining regional GST distribution which we need as an input for BHE modeling. A relationship between GST and SAT was defined based on the data from the meteorological stations. By applying nonlinear approaches, we established three different altitude zones that require individual consideration. By further processing, an existing SAT map was converted into the first GST map of Switzerland. To verify this new map within the range of validity (up to altitudes of 1500 m a

  12. Si(111)-( 3× 3)-Ag surface at low temperatures: symmetry breaking and surface twin boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.

    1999-11-01

    In contrast to the honeycomb pattern observed at room temperature in empty-state scanning-tunneling-microscopy (STM) images corresponding to the generally accepted honeycomb-chained-triangle (HCT) structure, the Si(111)- ( 3× 3)-Ag surface at low temperatures (62 and 6 K) shows a hexagonal-lattice pattern. This is consistent with an 'inequivalent-triangle (IET) model' recently proposed as the most stable structure for the ( 3× 3)-Ag surface in which two Ag triangles in the unit cell are different in size. Because of the asymmetry of the IET structure, two types of domains whose structures are in the relation of twins to each other are created only at low temperatures, between which surface twin boundaries (TB) appear. The neighboring domains, separated by a conventional out-of-phase boundary (OPB), tend to have the IET structures of the opposite symmetry. The interaction between the OPB and TB is discussed. The TB is observed to fluctuate and to be pinned by some defects.

  13. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R2=0.946 and R2=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. PMID:22721687

  14. Daily Cycle of Air Temperature and Surface Temperature in Stone Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Yuan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization is one of the most profound human activities that impact on climate change. In cities, where are highly artificial areas, the conflict between human activity and natural climate is particularly prominent. Urban areas always have the larger area of impervious land, the higher consumption of greenhouse gases, more emissions of anthropogenic heat and air pollution, all contribute to the urban warming phenomena. Understanding the mechanisms causing a variety of phenomena involved in the urban warming is critical to distinguish the anthropogenic effect and natural variation in the climate change. However, the exact dynamics of urban warming were poorly understood, and effective control strategies are not available. Here we present a study of the daily cycle of air temperature and surface temperature in Stone Forest. The specific heat of the stones in the Stone Forest and concrete of the man-made structures within the cities are approximate. Besides, the height of the Stone Forest and the height of buildings within the city are also similar. As a scenic area, the Stone Forest is being preserved and only opened for sightseeing. There is no anthropogenic heat, as well air pollution within the Stone Forest. The thermal environment in Stone Forest can be considered to be a simulation of thermal environment in the city, which can reveal the effect of man-made structures on urban thermal environment. We conducted the field studies and numerical analysis in the Stone Forest for 4 typical urban morphology and environment scenarios, including high-rise compact cities, low-rise sparse cities, garden cities and isolated single stone. Air temperature and relative humidity were measured every half an hour in 15 different locations, which within different spatial distribution of stones and can represent the four urban scenarios respectively. At the same time, an infrared camera was used to take thermal images and get the hourly surface temperatures of stones and

  15. Temperatures and surface gravities of DB white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oke, J. B.; Weidemann, V.; Koester, D.

    1984-01-01

    Multichannel observations or reobservations of all DB white dwarfs accessible from Palomar Observatory, reduced and calibrated with the AB79 program of Oke and Gunn (1983), have been compared by least squares fitting procedures with energy distributions calculated from new model atmospheres with He:H = 100,000 and reduced metal content He:C = 1,000,000. The surface gravities and temperatures derived reveal for the first time a definitive cooling sequence for the DB stars, with a narrow mass distribution comparable to that of the DA white dwarfs. The mass range, 0.55 + or - 0.10 solar mass, almost coincides with the range derived for DA, DC, and C2 stars and therefore suggests that the progenitors for all these stars are the same. Spectroscopic distance determinations and comparison with cooling ages demonstrate that DB stars account for about one-tenth of the total white dwarf birthrate.

  16. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third of a series of three workshops, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, to investigate the state of the art in global sea surface temperature measurements from space. Three workshops were necessary to process and analyze sufficient data from which to draw conclusions on the accuracy and reliability of the satellite measurements. In this workshop, the final two (out of a total of four) months of satellite and in situ data chosen for study were processed and evaluated. Results from the AVHRR, HIRS, SMMR, and VAS sensors, in comparison with in situ data from ships, XBTs, and buoys, confirmed satellite rms accuracies in the 0.5 to 1.0 C range, but with variable biases. These accuracies may degrade under adverse conditions for specific sensors. A variety of color maps, plots, and statistical tables are provided for detailed study of the individual sensor SST measurements.

  17. Variability of surface temperature in agricultural fields of central California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Millard, J. P.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the relationship between hand-held infrared thermometers and aircraft thermal scanners in near-level terrain and to quantify the variability of surface temperatures within individual fields, ground-based and aircraft thermal sensor measurements were made along a 50-km transect on 3 May 1979 and a 20-km transect on 7 August 1980. These comparisons were made on fields near Davis, California. Agreement was within 1 C for fields covered with vegetation and 3.6 C for bare, dry fields. The variability within fields was larger for bare, dry fields than for vegetatively covered fields. In 1980, with improvements in the collection of ground truth data, the agreement was within 1 C for a variety of fields.

  18. Heat capacity mapping mission. [satellite for earth surface temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM), part of a series of Applications Explorers Missions, is designed to provide data on surface heating as a response to solar energy input. The data is obtained by a two channel scanning radiometer, with one channel covering the visible and near-IR band between 0.5 and 1.1 micrometers, and the other covering the thermal-IR between 10.5 and 12.5 micrometers. The temperature range covered lies between 260 and 340 K, in 0.3 deg steps, with an accuracy at 280 K of plus or minus 0.5 K. Nominal altitude is 620 km, with a ground swath 700 km wide.

  19. Tropical cyclone rainfall area controlled by relative sea surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanluan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclone rainfall rates have been projected to increase in a warmer climate. The area coverage of tropical cyclones influences their impact on human lives, yet little is known about how tropical cyclone rainfall area will change in the future. Here, using satellite data and global atmospheric model simulations, we show that tropical cyclone rainfall area is controlled primarily by its environmental sea surface temperature (SST) relative to the tropical mean SST (that is, the relative SST), while rainfall rate increases with increasing absolute SST. Our result is consistent with previous numerical simulations that indicated tight relationships between tropical cyclone size and mid-tropospheric relative humidity. Global statistics of tropical cyclone rainfall area are not expected to change markedly under a warmer climate provided that SST change is relatively uniform, implying that increases in total rainfall will be confined to similar size domains with higher rainfall rates. PMID:25761457

  20. Regional homogenization of surface temperature records using robust statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintar, A. L.; Possolo, A.; Zhang, N. F.

    2013-09-01

    An algorithm is described that is intended to estimate and remove spurious influences from the surface temperature record at a meteorological station, which may be due to changes in the location of the station or in its environment, or in the method used to make measurements, and which are unrelated to climate change, similarly to [1]. The estimate of these influences is based on a comparison of non-parametric decompositions of the target series with series measured at other stations in a neighborhood of the target series. The uncertainty of the estimated spurious artifacts is determined using a statistical bootstrap method that accounts for temporal correlation structure beyond what is expected from seasonal effects. Our computer-intensive bootstrap procedure lends itself readily to parallelization, which makes the algorithm practicable for large collections of stations. The role that the proposed procedure may play in practice is contingent on the results of large-scale testing, still under way, using historical data.

  1. Temperature-controlled surface plasmon resonance in VO (2) nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lopez, R; Haynes, T E; Boatner, L A; Feldman, L C; Haglund, R F

    2002-08-01

    The optical properties of VO(2) nanoparticles formed in an amorphous SiO(2) host by stoichiometric ion implantation of vanadium and oxygen and thermal annealing have been determined and correlated with the particle size and morphology. The results show that that the temperature-controlled semiconductor-to-metal phase transition of the VO(2) nanophase precipitates turns on the classical surface plasmon resonance, with specific features that depend on the size and aspect ratio of the VO(2) particles. This effect improves the optical contrast between the metallic and semiconducting states in the near-IR region of the spectrum as a result of dielectric confinement that is due to the SiO(2) host. A fiber-optic application is demonstrated, as is the ability to control the characteristics of the phase transition by using ion implantation to dope the VO(2) nanoparticles with tungsten or titanium ions. PMID:18026439

  2. Land surface phenology and land surface temperature changes along an urban-rural gradient in Yangtze River Delta, china.

    PubMed

    Han, Guifeng; Xu, Jianhua

    2013-07-01

    Using SPOT/VGT NDVI time series images (2002-2009) and MODIS/LST images (2002-2009) smoothed by a Savitzky-Golay filter, the land surface phenology (LSP) and land surface temperature (LST), respectively, are extracted for six cities in the Yangtze River Delta, China, including Shanghai, Hangzhou, Nanjing, Changzhou, Wuxi, and Suzhou. The trends of the averaged LSP and LST are analyzed, and the relationship between these values is revealed along the urban-rural gradient. The results show that urbanization advances the start of the growing season, postpones the end of the growing season, prolongs the growing season length (GSL), and reduces the difference between maximal NDVI and minimal NDVI in a year (NDVIamp). More obvious changes occur in surface vegetation phenology as the urbanized area is approached. The LST drops monotonously and logarithmically along the urban-rural gradient. Urbanization generally affects the LSP of the surrounding vegetation within 6 km to the urban edge. Except for GSL, the difference in the LSP between urban and rural areas has a significant logarithmic relationship with the distance to the urban edge. In addition, there is a very strong linear relationship between the LSP and the LST along the urban-rural gradient, especially within 6 km to the urban edge. The correlations between LSP and gross domestic product and population density reveal that human activities have considerable influence on the land surface vegetation growth. PMID:23740439

  3. Land Surface Temperature Variational Assimilation within the ORCHIDEE Continental Surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Hector Simon; Ottlé, Catherine; Thiria, Sylvie; Brajard, Julien; Bradan, Fouad; Maugis, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Variational data assimilation of FLUXNET soil surface temperature is applied to the energy and water budgets modules of the ORCHIDEE land surface model. This part of the model, called SECHIBA, describes the exchanges of water and energy between the surface and the atmosphere. The adjoint semi-generator software YAO is used as a framework to implement 4D-VAR assimilation. First, sensitivity analysis was performed in order to validate the adjoint and to identify the most influential parameters. Following, the results of twin experiments using synthetic observations demonstrate the robustness, consistency and flexibility of the process. Rendundant combinations of parameters and insensitive ones can then be detected, thus allowing to document the most efficient set of parameters to calibrate. However, optimal sets of parameter vary with time of day, season, site and initial state, thus suggesting a calibration strategy based on different time windows and sites to help constrain a larger set of parameter than on a single space-time window. Doing so on two FLUXNET sites and including initial soil water content as a parameter improves the model output. Although it proved difficult to characterize at the same time state variables and fluxes, this study puts forward the potential of land surface temperature variational data assimilation in model calibration and prediction errors reduction.

  4. Albatrosses as Ocean Samplers of Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, S. A.; Kappes, M.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D. P.; Weber, R.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2006-12-01

    Albatrosses are unique ocean voyagers because they range so widely and travel at speeds exceeding 90 km per hour. Because they can integrate vast areas of open-ocean, albatrosses are ideal ocean samplers. Between 2003 and 2005 breeding seasons, 21 Laysan and 15 black-footed albatrosses (body mass 2.5 to 3.5 kg) were equipped with 6 g leg-mounted geolocation archival data loggers at Tern Island, French Frigate Shoals, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The tags sampled environmental temperatures every 480 or 540 s and provided a single location per day for the duration of deployment. Whenever an albatross landed on the sea surface to feed or rest, the tag sampled sea surface temperature (SST). After nearly one year of deployment, 31 albatrosses were recaptured and 29 tags provided complete records. A total of 377,455 SST readings were obtained over 7,360 bird-days at sea. Given the location errors in the geolocation methodology (200 km) and the lack of temporal resolution (1 location per day), the SST measurements can only be used to characterize broad-scale correlates between albatross distribution and the ocean environment. However, in February 2006, we deployed 45 g GPS data loggers on 10 breeding albatrosses for 2-4 day deployments. The GPS loggers were attached to feathers on the albatrosses backs, they sampled every 10 s, and were accurate to within 10 m. One albatross was also equipped with the same leg-mounted archival tag that sampled SST every 8 s. This albatross collected 6,289 SST measurements with complementary GPS quality locations in 3 days at sea. These results highlight the efficacy of albatrosses as ocean samplers. Given that Laysan and black- footed albatrosses range throughout the North Pacific Ocean, it is conceivable that these seabirds could someday become sentinels of changing oceanic conditions. Moreover, these technologies provide exciting new information about the oceanic habitats of North Pacific albatrosses.

  5. Subseasonal variability of North American wintertime surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai

    2015-09-01

    Using observational pentad data of the recent 34 Northern Hemisphere extended winters, subseasonal variability of surface air temperature (SAT) over North America is analyzed. The four leading modes of subseasonal SAT variability, that are identified with an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, account for about 60% of the total variance. The first (EOF1) and second (EOF2) modes are independent of other modes, and thus are likely controlled by distinct processes. The third (EOF3) and fourth (EOF4) modes, however, tend to have a phase shift to each other in space and time, indicating that part of their variability is related to a common process and represent a propagating pattern over North America. Lagged regression analysis is conducted to identify the precursors of large-scale atmospheric circulation for each mode a few pentads in advance, and to understand the processes that influence the subseasonal SAT variability and the predictability signal sources. EOF1 is found to be closely related to the Pacific-North American (PNA) circulation pattern and at least part of its variability is preceded by the East Asian cold surge. The cold surge leads to low-level convergence and enhanced convection in the tropical central Pacific which in turn induces the PNA. EOF2 tends to oscillate at a period of about 70 days, and is influenced by the low-frequency component of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). On the other hand, EOF3 and EOF4 are connected to the high-frequency part of the MJO which has a period range of 30-50 days. These findings would help understanding the mechanisms of subseasonal surface air temperature variability in North America and improving weather predictions on a subseasonal time scale.

  6. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, F.; Valiente, J. A.; Estrela, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic losses and even human casualties. The Western Mediterranean is a deep and almost closed sea surrounded by high mountain ranges and with little exchange of water with the Atlantic ocean. A main factor in the development of