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Sample records for afferent electrical stimulation

  1. Improved bladder emptying in urinary retention by electrical stimulation of pudendal afferents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Cheng, Chen-Li; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-06-01

    Urinary retention is the inability to empty the bladder completely, and may result from bladder hypocontractility, increases in outlet resistance or both. Chronic urinary retention can lead to several urological complications and is often refractory to pharmacologic, behavioral and surgical treatments. We sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of sensory fibers in the pudendal nerve could engage an augmenting reflex and thereby improve bladder emptying in an animal model of urinary retention. We measured the efficiency of bladder emptying with and without concomitant electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents in urethane-anesthetized rats. Voiding efficiency (VE = voided volume/initial volume) was reduced from 72 ± 7% to 29 ± 7% following unilateral transection of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve (UST) and from 70 ± 5% to 18 ± 4% following bilateral transection (BST). Unilateral electrical stimulation of the proximal transected sensory pudendal nerve during distention-evoked voiding contractions significantly improved VE. Low-intensity stimulation at frequencies of 1-50 Hz increased VE to 40-51% following UST and to 39-49% following BST, while high-intensity stimulation was ineffective at increasing VE. The increase in VE was mediated by increases in the duration of distention-evoked voiding bladder contractions, rather than increases in contraction amplitude. These results are consistent with an essential role for pudendal sensory feedback in efficient bladder emptying, and raise the possibility that electrical activation of pudendal nerve afferents may provide a new approach to restore efficient bladder emptying in persons with urinary retention.

  2. Cardiovascular effects of afferent renal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stella, A; Weaver, L; Golin, R; Genovesi, S; Zanchetti, A

    1987-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves elicits an increase in arterial pressure and heart rate. The hypertensive response is presumably due to the widespread activation of the sympathetic nervous system leading to peripheral vasoconstriction. Interestingly, the kidney does not appear involved in this reflex excitatory response to afferent renal nerve stimulation since changes in vascular conductances and excretory functions are equal in both the innervated and denervated kidney, and secondary to changes in renal perfusion pressure. In addition, no changes in renin release from either kidneys are observed during afferent renal nerve stimulation. It is likely that the electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves activates other reflexes exerting an inhibitory influence on efferent renal nerve activity. Indeed, neural renorenal reflexes which tonically inhibit renal functions have clearly been demonstrated. Furthermore, preferential inhibition of efferent renal nerve activity by cardiopulmonary and sinoaortic receptors has recently been shown during activation of other visceral afferents.

  3. Towards determining the afferent sites of perception feedback on residual arms of amputees with transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Fang, Peng; Tian, Lan; Zheng, Yue; Zhou, Hui; Li, Guanglin; Zhang, Xiufeng

    2015-01-01

    The coordination and combination of motion and sensation are critical to realize a natural and precise control of prosthetic hands. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) is one of possible methods to develop an intuitive perception feedback for limb amputees. However, the perception afferent sites would be a critical issue that is still unexplored in depth. This paper reports a preliminary study on using somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to determine the proper afferent sites of perceptions on residual arms of transradial amputees. In this study, two transradial amputees with phantom finger perception (PFP) were recruited and SEP for the stimulation of median nerves and ulnar nerves were recorded and analyzed. PFP distribution maps on subjects' stumps were obtained by mechanical stimulations performed manually. Electrical stimulation was then applied to some selected sites on the stumps of their residual arms with surface electrodes to evoke SEP. In the experiments, SEP were successfully recorded, which means that the proposed method might be a suitable approach for localizing the afferent sites of perceptions, and could provide technique support for possible intuitive neural feedback for limb amputees in future work.

  4. Vestibular implantation and longitudinal electrical stimulation of the semicircular canal afferents in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Phillips, James O; Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Jameyson, Elyse; Phillips, Christopher M; Nowack, Amy L; Golub, Justin S; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2015-06-01

    Animal experiments and limited data in humans suggest that electrical stimulation of the vestibular end organs could be used to treat loss of vestibular function. In this paper we demonstrate that canal-specific two-dimensionally (2D) measured eye velocities are elicited from intermittent brief 2 s biphasic pulse electrical stimulation in four human subjects implanted with a vestibular prosthesis. The 2D measured direction of the slow phase eye movements changed with the canal stimulated. Increasing pulse current over a 0-400 μA range typically produced a monotonic increase in slow phase eye velocity. The responses decremented or in some cases fluctuated over time in most implanted canals but could be partially restored by changing the return path of the stimulation current. Implantation of the device in Meniere's patients produced hearing and vestibular loss in the implanted ear. Electrical stimulation was well tolerated, producing no sensation of pain, nausea, or auditory percept with stimulation that elicited robust eye movements. There were changes in slow phase eye velocity with current and over time, and changes in electrically evoked compound action potentials produced by stimulation and recorded with the implanted device. Perceived rotation in subjects was consistent with the slow phase eye movements in direction and scaled with stimulation current in magnitude. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the vestibular end organ in human subjects provided controlled vestibular inputs over time, but in Meniere's patients this apparently came at the cost of hearing and vestibular function in the implanted ear.

  5. Vestibular implantation and longitudinal electrical stimulation of the semicircular canal afferents in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Jameyson, Elyse; Phillips, Christopher M.; Nowack, Amy L.; Golub, Justin S.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments and limited data in humans suggest that electrical stimulation of the vestibular end organs could be used to treat loss of vestibular function. In this paper we demonstrate that canal-specific two-dimensionally (2D) measured eye velocities are elicited from intermittent brief 2 s biphasic pulse electrical stimulation in four human subjects implanted with a vestibular prosthesis. The 2D measured direction of the slow phase eye movements changed with the canal stimulated. Increasing pulse current over a 0–400 μA range typically produced a monotonic increase in slow phase eye velocity. The responses decremented or in some cases fluctuated over time in most implanted canals but could be partially restored by changing the return path of the stimulation current. Implantation of the device in Meniere's patients produced hearing and vestibular loss in the implanted ear. Electrical stimulation was well tolerated, producing no sensation of pain, nausea, or auditory percept with stimulation that elicited robust eye movements. There were changes in slow phase eye velocity with current and over time, and changes in electrically evoked compound action potentials produced by stimulation and recorded with the implanted device. Perceived rotation in subjects was consistent with the slow phase eye movements in direction and scaled with stimulation current in magnitude. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the vestibular end organ in human subjects provided controlled vestibular inputs over time, but in Meniere's patients this apparently came at the cost of hearing and vestibular function in the implanted ear. PMID:25652917

  6. Electrical stimulation of low-threshold afferent fibers induces a prolonged synaptic depression in lamina II dorsal horn neurons to high-threshold afferent inputs in mice.

    PubMed

    Sdrulla, Andrei D; Xu, Qian; He, Shao-Qiu; Tiwari, Vinod; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Chen; Shu, Bin; Shechter, Ronen; Raja, Srinivasa N; Wang, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Guan, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of low-threshold Aβ-fibers (Aβ-ES) is used clinically to treat neuropathic pain conditions that are refractory to pharmacotherapy. However, it is unclear how Aβ-ES modulates synaptic responses to high-threshold afferent inputs (C-, Aδ-fibers) in superficial dorsal horn. Substantia gelatinosa (SG) (lamina II) neurons are important for relaying and modulating converging spinal nociceptive inputs. We recorded C-fiber-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in spinal cord slices in response to paired-pulse test stimulation (500 μA, 0.1 millisecond, 400 milliseconds apart). We showed that 50-Hz and 1000-Hz, but not 4-Hz, Aβ-ES (10 μA, 0.1 millisecond, 5 minutes) induced prolonged inhibition of C-fiber eEPSCs in SG neurons in naive mice. Furthermore, 50-Hz Aβ-ES inhibited both monosynaptic and polysynaptic forms of C-fiber eEPSC in naive mice and mice that had undergone spinal nerve ligation (SNL). The paired-pulse ratio (amplitude second eEPSC/first eEPSC) increased only in naive mice after 50-Hz Aβ-ES, suggesting that Aβ-ES may inhibit SG neurons by different mechanisms under naive and nerve-injured conditions. Finally, 50-Hz Aβ-ES inhibited both glutamatergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, which were identified by fluorescence in vGlut2-Td and glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice after SNL. These findings show that activities in Aβ-fibers lead to frequency-dependent depression of synaptic transmission in SG neurons in response to peripheral noxious inputs. However, 50-Hz Aβ-ES failed to induce cell-type-selective inhibition in SG neurons. The physiologic implication of this novel form of synaptic depression for pain modulation by Aβ-ES warrants further investigation. PMID:25974163

  7. Nanomolar oxytocin synergizes with weak electrical afferent stimulation to activate the locomotor CpG of the rat spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dose, Francesco; Zanon, Patrizia; Coslovich, Tamara; Taccola, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Synergizing the effect of afferent fibre stimulation with pharmacological interventions is a desirable goal to trigger spinal locomotor activity, especially after injury. Thus, to better understand the mechanisms to optimize this process, we studied the role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (previously shown to stimulate locomotor networks) on network and motoneuron properties using the isolated neonatal rat spinal cord. On motoneurons oxytocin (1 nM-1 μM) generated sporadic bursts with superimposed firing and dose-dependent depolarization. No desensitization was observed despite repeated applications. Tetrodotoxin completely blocked the effects of oxytocin, demonstrating the network origin of the responses. Recording motoneuron pool activity from lumbar ventral roots showed oxytocin mediated depolarization with synchronous bursts, and depression of reflex responses in a stimulus and peptide-concentration dependent fashion. Disinhibited bursting caused by strychnine and bicuculline was accelerated by oxytocin whose action was blocked by the oxytocin antagonist atosiban. Fictive locomotion appeared when subthreshold concentrations of NMDA plus 5HT were coapplied with oxytocin, an effect prevented after 24 h incubation with the inhibitor of 5HT synthesis, PCPA. When fictive locomotion was fully manifested, oxytocin did not change periodicity, although cycle amplitude became smaller. A novel protocol of electrical stimulation based on noisy waveforms and applied to one dorsal root evoked stereotypic fictive locomotion. Whenever the stimulus intensity was subthreshold, low doses of oxytocin triggered fictive locomotion although oxytocin per se did not affect primary afferent depolarization evoked by dorsal root pulses. Among the several functional targets for the action of oxytocin at lumbar spinal cord level, the present results highlight how small concentrations of this peptide could bring spinal networks to threshold for fictive locomotion in combination with other

  8. Modeling the spinal pudendo-vesical reflex for bladder control by pudendal afferent stimulation.

    PubMed

    McGee, Meredith J; Grill, Warren M

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is a promising approach to restore continence and micturition following bladder dysfunction resulting from neurological disease or injury. Although the pudendo-vesical reflex and its physiological properties are well established, there is limited understanding of the specific neural mechanisms that mediate this reflex. We sought to develop a computational model of the spinal neural network that governs the reflex bladder response to PN stimulation. We implemented and validated a neural network architecture based on previous neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies. Using synaptically-connected integrate and fire model neurons, we created a network model with realistic spiking behavior. The model produced expected sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN) neuron firing rates from prescribed neural inputs and predicted bladder activation and inhibition with different frequencies of pudendal afferent stimulation. In addition, the model matched experimental results from previous studies of temporal patterns of pudendal afferent stimulation and selective pharmacological blockade of inhibitory neurons. The frequency- and pattern-dependent effects of pudendal afferent stimulation were determined by changes in firing rate of spinal interneurons, suggesting that neural network interactions at the lumbosacral level can mediate the bladder response to different frequencies or temporal patterns of pudendal afferent stimulation. Further, the anatomical structure of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the network model was necessary and sufficient to reproduce the critical features of the pudendo-vesical reflex, and this model may prove useful to guide development of novel, more effective electrical stimulation techniques for bladder control. PMID:26968615

  9. Laryngeal and tracheal afferent nerve stimulation evokes swallowing in anaesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Udemgba, Chioma; Inoue, Makoto; Canning, Brendan J

    2013-09-15

      We describe swallowing reflexes evoked by laryngeal and tracheal vagal afferent nerve stimulation in anaesthetized guinea pigs. The swallowing reflexes evoked by laryngeal citric acid challenges were abolished by recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) transection and mimicked by electrical stimulation of the central cut ends of an RLN. By contrast, the number of swallows evoked by upper airway/pharyngeal distensions was not significantly reduced by RLN transection but they were virtually abolished by superior laryngeal nerve transection. Laryngeal citric acid-evoked swallowing was mimicked by laryngeal capsaicin challenges, implicating transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-expressing laryngeal afferent nerves arising from the jugular ganglia. The swallowing evoked by citric acid and capsaicin and evoked by electrical stimulation of either the tracheal or the laryngeal mucosa occurred at stimulation intensities that were typically subthreshold for evoking cough in these animals. Swallowing evoked by airway afferent nerve stimulation also desensitized at a much slower rate than cough. We speculate that swallowing is an essential component of airway protection from aspiration associated with laryngeal and tracheal afferent nerve activation. PMID:23858010

  10. Cerebral, subcortical, and cerebellar activation evoked by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, Daniel L.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Colebatch, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We compared the brain areas that showed significant flow changes induced by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents using fMRI BOLD imaging. Afferents arising from the right hand were studied in eight volunteers with electrical stimulation of the digital nerve of the index finger and over the motor point of the FDI muscle. Both methods evoked areas of significant activation cortically, subcortically, and in the cerebellum. Selective muscle afferent stimulation caused significant activation in motor‐related areas. It also caused significantly greater activation within the contralateral precentral gyrus, insula, and within the ipsilateral cerebellum as well as greater areas of reduced blood flow when compared to the cutaneous stimuli. We demonstrated separate precentral and postcentral foci of excitation with muscle afferent stimulation. We conclude, contrary to the findings with evoked potentials, that muscle afferents evoke more widespread cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar activation than do cutaneous afferents. This emphasizes the importance, for studies of movement, of matching the kinematic aspects in order to avoid the results being confounded by alterations in muscle afferent activation. The findings are consistent with clinical observations of the movement consequences of sensory loss and may also be the basis for the contribution of disturbed sensorimotor processing to disorders of movement. PMID:24771687

  11. Hydrogen sulfide determines HNO-induced stimulation of trigeminal afferents.

    PubMed

    Wild, Vanessa; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J M

    2015-08-18

    Endogenous NO and hydrogen sulfide form HNO, which causes CGRP release via TRPA1 channel activation in sensory nerves. In the present study, stimulation of intact trigeminal afferent neuron preparations with NO donors, Na2S or both was analyzed by measuring CGRP release as an index of mass activation. Combined stimulation was able to activate all parts of the trigeminal system and acted synergistic compared to stimulation with both substances alone. To investigate the contribution of both substances, we varied their ratio and tracked intracellular calcium in isolated neurons. Our results demonstrate that hydrogen sulfide is the rate-limiting factor for HNO formation. CGRP has a key role in migraine pathophysiology and HNO formation at all sites of the trigeminal system should be considered for this novel means of activation.

  12. Loss of Afferent Vestibular Input Produces Central Adaptation and Increased Gain of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Shepherd, Sarah J; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Kaneko, Chris R S; Rubinstein, Jay T; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2016-02-01

    Implanted vestibular neurostimulators are effective in driving slow phase eye movements in monkeys and humans. Furthermore, increases in slow phase velocity and electrically evoked compound action potential (vECAP) amplitudes occur with increasing current amplitude of electrical stimulation. In intact monkeys, protracted intermittent stimulation continues to produce robust behavioral responses and preserved vECAPs. In lesioned monkeys, shorter duration studies show preserved but with somewhat lower or higher velocity behavioral responses. It has been proposed that such changes are due to central adaptive changes in the electrically elicited vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). It is equally possible that these differences are due to changes in the vestibular periphery in response to activation of the vestibular efferent system. In order to investigate the site of adaptive change in response to electrical stimulation, we performed transtympanic gentamicin perfusions to induce rapid changes in vestibular input in monkeys with long-standing stably functioning vestibular neurostimulators, disambiguating the effects of implantation from the effects of ototoxic lesion. Gentamicin injection was effective in producing a large reduction in natural VOR only when it was performed in the non-implanted ear, suggesting that the implanted ear contributed little to the natural rotational response before injection. Injection of the implanted ear produced a reduction in the vECAP responses in that ear, suggesting that the intact hair cells in the non-functional ipsilateral ear were successfully lesioned by gentamicin, reducing the efficacy of stimulation in that ear. Despite this, injection of both ears produced central plastic changes that resulted in a dramatically increased slow phase velocity nystagmus elicited by electrical stimulation. These results suggest that loss of vestibular afferent activity, and a concurrent loss of electrically elicited vestibular input, produces an

  13. Loss of Afferent Vestibular Input Produces Central Adaptation and Increased Gain of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Shepherd, Sarah J; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Kaneko, Chris R S; Rubinstein, Jay T; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2016-02-01

    Implanted vestibular neurostimulators are effective in driving slow phase eye movements in monkeys and humans. Furthermore, increases in slow phase velocity and electrically evoked compound action potential (vECAP) amplitudes occur with increasing current amplitude of electrical stimulation. In intact monkeys, protracted intermittent stimulation continues to produce robust behavioral responses and preserved vECAPs. In lesioned monkeys, shorter duration studies show preserved but with somewhat lower or higher velocity behavioral responses. It has been proposed that such changes are due to central adaptive changes in the electrically elicited vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). It is equally possible that these differences are due to changes in the vestibular periphery in response to activation of the vestibular efferent system. In order to investigate the site of adaptive change in response to electrical stimulation, we performed transtympanic gentamicin perfusions to induce rapid changes in vestibular input in monkeys with long-standing stably functioning vestibular neurostimulators, disambiguating the effects of implantation from the effects of ototoxic lesion. Gentamicin injection was effective in producing a large reduction in natural VOR only when it was performed in the non-implanted ear, suggesting that the implanted ear contributed little to the natural rotational response before injection. Injection of the implanted ear produced a reduction in the vECAP responses in that ear, suggesting that the intact hair cells in the non-functional ipsilateral ear were successfully lesioned by gentamicin, reducing the efficacy of stimulation in that ear. Despite this, injection of both ears produced central plastic changes that resulted in a dramatically increased slow phase velocity nystagmus elicited by electrical stimulation. These results suggest that loss of vestibular afferent activity, and a concurrent loss of electrically elicited vestibular input, produces an

  14. Integrated phrenic responses to carotid afferent stimulation in adult rats following perinatal hyperoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, L; Olson, E B; Vidruk, E H; Mitchell, G S

    1997-01-01

    1. Hypoxic ventilatory responses are greatly attenuated in adult rats exposed to moderate hyperoxia (60% O2) during the first month of life (perinatal treated rats). The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that perinatal hyperoxia impairs central integration of carotid chemoreceptor afferent inputs, thereby diminishing the hypoxic ventilatory response. 2. Time-dependent phrenic nerve responses to electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN) and steady-state relationships between CSN stimulation frequency and phrenic nerve output were compared in control and perinatal treated rats. The rats were urethane anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed and artificially ventilated. End-tidal CO2 was monitored and maintained at isocapnic levels; arterial blood gases were determined. 3. Two stimulation protocols were used: (1) three 2 min episodes of CSN stimulation (20 Hz, 0.2 ms duration, 3 x threshold), separated by 5 min intervals; and (2) nine 45 s episodes of CSN stimulation with stimulus frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 20 Hz (0.2 ms duration, 3 x threshold), separated by 4 min intervals. 4. The mean threshold currents to elicit phrenic responses were similar between groups. Burst frequency (f, burst min-1), peak amplitude of integrated phrenic activity (integral of Phr), and minute phrenic activity (integral of Phr x f) during and after CSN stimulation were not distinguishable between groups in either protocol at any time or at any stimulus intensity (P > 0.05). 5. Perinatal hyperoxia does not alter temporal or steady-state phrenic responses to CSN stimulation, suggesting that the central integration of carotid chemoreceptor afferent inputs is not impaired in perinatal treated rats. It is speculated that carotid chemoreceptors per se are impaired in perinatal treated rats. PMID:9161991

  15. Spinal inhibition of phrenic motoneurones by stimulation of afferents from leg muscle in the cat: blockade by strychnine.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Waldrop, T

    1987-08-01

    1. Phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of calf muscle receptors or their afferents were studied in paralysed high (C1) spinal cats whose phrenic nerve activity was evoked by activation of the intercostal-to-phrenic reflex. End-tidal PCO2 was maintained at a constant level by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. 2. Physical stimulation of calf muscles or electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve uniformly caused inhibition of phrenic activity evoked by facilitatory conditioning stimuli. The degree of inhibition gradually decreased as muscle stimulation continued, and there was a post-stimulus augmentation of phrenic activity. 3. Pre-treatment with subconvulsive doses of strychnine, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter glycine, partially or completely blocked the inhibitory effects on phrenic activity of muscle-afferent stimulation. The blockade was reversible with time. 4. Pre-treatment with a subconvulsive dose of bicuculline, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), had no effect on the inhibitory mechanism. 5. We conclude that glycine is an important transmitter of the inhibition of phrenic motoneurones induced by muscle-afferent stimulation, but that GABA is not involved in this inhibitory mechanism. PMID:3681723

  16. Effect of stimulation of afferent renal nerves on plasma levels of vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Caverson, M.M.; Ciriello, J.

    1987-04-01

    Experiments were done in ..cap alpha..-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats with vagus, cervical sympathetic, aortic depressor, and carotid sinus nerves cut bilaterally to investigate the effect of afferent renal nerve (ARN) stimulation on circulating levels of vasopressin (AVP). Electrical stimulation of ARN elicited a pressor response that had two components, a primary (1/sup 0/) component locked in time with the stimulus and a secondary (2/sup 0/) component that had a long onset latency and that outlasted the stimulation period. The 1/sup 0/ and 2/sup 0/ components of the pressor response were largest at stimulation frequencies of 30 and 40 Hz, respectively. Autonomic blockage with hexamethonium bromide and atropine methylbromide abolished the 1/sup 0/ component. Administration of the vasopressin V/sub 1/-vascular receptor antagonist d(CH/sub 2/)/sub 5/ VAVP during autonomic blockade abolished the 2/sup 0/C component. Plasma concentrations of AVP measured by radioimmunoassay increased from control levels of 5.2 +/- 0.9 to 53.6 +/- 18.6 pg/ml during a 5-min period of stimulation of ARN. Plasma AVP levels measured 20-40 min after simulation were not significantly different from control values. These data demonstrate that sensory information originating in the kidney alters the release of vasopressin from the neurohypophysis and suggest that ARN are an important component of the neural circuitry involved in homeostatic mechanisms controlling arterial pressure.

  17. [Effects of afferent vagal stimulation and distention of the upper digestive tract on the micturition reflex and activity of the pontine micturition center in dogs].

    PubMed

    Moda, Y

    1992-12-01

    (1) The study was performed to elucidate the effects of afferent vagal stimulation and distension of the digestive tract on the micturition reflex in 21 acute decerebrate dogs immobilized with gallamine. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve with high voltage (17.5-25 V) and moderate frequency (10-50 Hz) elicited in most cases inhibition of the periodic bladder contractions and of outflows of the pelvic vesical branch which were induced by a sustained intravesical pressure of 10-15 cmH2O. Distension of the thoracic esophagus, the stomach, and the duodenum also induced inhibition of the bladder contractions and of the pelvic outflow to the bladder. Such inhibitions were abolished after bilateral cervical vagotomies except a few cases of distension of the duodenum. (2) Another series of experiments were undertaken to clear the effect of afferent vagal stimulation on the electrical activity of the pontine micturition center in 10 acute decerebrate dogs. By means of an extracellular glass microelectrode method, unitary discharges synchronized with the grouping discharges in the pelvic vesical branch with a rhythm of 2.2-2.5 Hz were recorded from the pontine micturition center in the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum. Such a type of discharges was detected in 6 of 59 units which discharged by afferent stimulation of the pelvic vesical branch. This type of discharges was inhibited by afferent vagal stimulation at the supradiaphragmatic level. From these results, it may be concluded that the afferent pathway of the bladder relaxation reflex induced by distension of the upper digestive tract is mainly involved in the vagal nerves, but in some cases of the strong distension of the duodenum, the pathway is in splanchnic nerves, and that inhibition of the bladder contraction after stimulation of vagal nerve is induced by suppression of the pontine micturition centers.

  18. Afferent and motoneuron activity in response to single neuromast stimulation in the posterior lateral line of larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Haehnel-Taguchi, Melanie; Akanyeti, Otar; Liao, James C

    2014-09-15

    The lateral line system of fishes contains mechanosensory receptors along the body surface called neuromasts, which can detect water motion relative to the body. The ability to sense flow informs many behaviors, such as schooling, predator avoidance, and rheotaxis. Here, we developed a new approach to stimulate individual neuromasts while either recording primary sensory afferent neuron activity or swimming motoneuron activity in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). Our results allowed us to characterize the transfer functions between a controlled lateral line stimulus, its representation by primary sensory neurons, and its subsequent behavioral output. When we deflected the cupula of a neuromast with a ramp command, we found that the connected afferent neuron exhibited an adapting response which was proportional in strength to deflection velocity. The maximum spike rate of afferent neurons increased sigmoidally with deflection velocity, with a linear range between 0.1 and 1.0 μm/ms. However, spike rate did not change when the cupula was deflected below 8 μm, regardless of deflection velocity. Our findings also reveal an unexpected sensitivity in the larval lateral line system: stimulation of a single neuromast could elicit a swimming response which increased in reliability with increasing deflection velocities. At high deflection velocities, we observed that lateral line evoked swimming has intermediate values of burst frequency and duty cycle that fall between electrically evoked and spontaneous swimming. An understanding of the sensory capabilities of a single neuromast will help to build a better picture of how stimuli are encoded at the systems level and ultimately translated into behavior.

  19. Afferent and motoneuron activity in response to single neuromast stimulation in the posterior lateral line of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Haehnel-Taguchi, Melanie; Akanyeti, Otar

    2014-01-01

    The lateral line system of fishes contains mechanosensory receptors along the body surface called neuromasts, which can detect water motion relative to the body. The ability to sense flow informs many behaviors, such as schooling, predator avoidance, and rheotaxis. Here, we developed a new approach to stimulate individual neuromasts while either recording primary sensory afferent neuron activity or swimming motoneuron activity in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). Our results allowed us to characterize the transfer functions between a controlled lateral line stimulus, its representation by primary sensory neurons, and its subsequent behavioral output. When we deflected the cupula of a neuromast with a ramp command, we found that the connected afferent neuron exhibited an adapting response which was proportional in strength to deflection velocity. The maximum spike rate of afferent neurons increased sigmoidally with deflection velocity, with a linear range between 0.1 and 1.0 μm/ms. However, spike rate did not change when the cupula was deflected below 8 μm, regardless of deflection velocity. Our findings also reveal an unexpected sensitivity in the larval lateral line system: stimulation of a single neuromast could elicit a swimming response which increased in reliability with increasing deflection velocities. At high deflection velocities, we observed that lateral line evoked swimming has intermediate values of burst frequency and duty cycle that fall between electrically evoked and spontaneous swimming. An understanding of the sensory capabilities of a single neuromast will help to build a better picture of how stimuli are encoded at the systems level and ultimately translated into behavior. PMID:24966296

  20. [Postsynaptic reactions of cerebral cortex neurons, activated by nociceptive afferents during stimulation of the Raphe nuclei].

    PubMed

    Labakhua, T Sh; Dzhanashiia, T K; Gedevanishvili, G I; Dzhokhadze, L D; Tkemaladze, T T; Abzianidze, I V

    2012-01-01

    On cats, we studied the influence of stimulation of the Raphe nuclei (RN) on postsynaptic processes evoked in neurons of the somatosensory cortex by stimulation of nociceptive (intensive stimulation of the tooth pulp) and non-nociceptive (moderate stimulation of the ventroposteromedial--VPN--nucleus of the thalamus) afferent inputs. 6 cells, selectively excited by stimulation of nocciceptors and 9 cells, activated by both the above nociceptive and non-nociceptive influences (nociceptive and convergent neurons, respectively) were recorded intracellular. In neurons of both groups, responses to nociceptive stimulation (of sufficient intensity) looked like an EPSP-spike-IPSP (the letter of significant duration, up to 200-300 ms) compleх. Conditioning stimulation of the RN which preceded test stimulus applied to the tooth pulp or VPM nucleus by 100 to 800 ms, induced 40-60 % decrease of the IPSP amplitude only, while maхimal effect of influence, in both cases, was noted within intervals of 300-800 ms between conditioning and test stimulus. During stimulation of the RN, serotonin released via receptor and second messengers, provides postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic system, decreasing the IPSP amplitude which occurs after stimulation of both the tooth pulp and VPM thalamic nucleus. This process may be realized trough either pre- or postsynaptic mechanisms.

  1. Electrical stimulation: a societal perspective.

    PubMed

    Gater, D R; McDowell, S M; Abbas, J J

    2000-01-01

    Societal perspective on functional electrical stimulation is colored by media influence, popular thought, and political climate as much as by the science that supports it. The purpose of this article is to examine how these influences facilitate or inhibit the application of electrical stimulation in today's world and to describe the challenges facing the use of electrical stimulation in the future. Emphasis will be placed on perceived need, cost, and available resources and how these factors must be addressed to utilize functional electrical stimulation successfully in society.

  2. Electrical stimulation in exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has a long history of use in medicine dating back to 46 A.D. when the Roman physician Largus found the electrical discharge of torpedo fishes useful in the treatment of pain produced by headache and gout. A rival Greek physician, Dioscorides, discounted the value of the torpedo fish for headache relief but did recommend its use in the treatment of hemorrhoids. In 1745, the Leyden jar and various sized electrostatic generators were used to treat angina pectoris, epilepsy, hemiplegia, kidney stones, and sciatica. Benjamin Franklin used an electrical device to treat successfully a young woman suffering from convulsive fits. In the late 1800's battery powered hydroelectric baths were used to treat chronic inflammation of the uterus while electrified athletic supporters were advertised for the treatment of male problems. Fortunately, such an amusing early history of the simple beginnings of electrical stimulation did not prevent eventual development of a variety of useful therapeutic and rehabilitative applications of electrical stimulation. Over the centuries electrical stimulation has survived as a modality in the treatment of various medical disorders with its primary application being in the rehabilitation area. Recently, a surge of new interest in electrical stimulation has been kindled by the work of a Russian sport scientist who reported remarkable muscle strength and endurance improvements in elite athletes. Yakov Kots reported his research on electric stimulation and strength improvements in 1977 at a Canadian-Soviet Exchange Symposium held at Concordia University in Montreal. Since then an explosion of new studies has been seen in both sport science and in medicine. Based upon the reported works of Kots and the present surge of new investigations, one could be misled as to the origin of electrical stimulation as a technique to increase muscle strength. As a matter of fact, electric stimulation has been used as a technique to improve

  3. Effects of stimulation of vesical afferents on colonic motility in cats.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, M; Grimaud, J C; Abysique, A

    1990-05-01

    The effects of distension and isovolumetric contraction of urinary bladder on colonic motility were studied in anesthetized cats. Distension and contraction of the urinary bladder induced an inhibition of spontaneous colonic electromyographic activity and a decrease in the amplitudes of the excitatory junction potentials evoked in the colon by stimulation of the distal end of the parasympathetic nerve fibers. This inhibition was blocked by guanethidine and phentolamine. Reversely, vesical emptying resulted in an increase in colonic motility, abolished by atropine, and an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory junction potentials. Both excitatory and inhibitory reflexes disappeared after hexamethonium. The inhibitory effects of bladder distension were abolished by bilateral section of the lumbar ventral or dorsal spinal roots and after bilateral section of the lumbar colonic or hypogastric nerves. These results indicate (a) that the vesical afferents responsible for the inhibitory and excitatory reflexes run in the hypogastric and pelvic nerves respectively and (b) that the inhibitory and excitatory effects are caused by the activation of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent nerve fibers, respectively. The supraspinal nervous structures were not implicated in these reflexes because they persisted in spinal cats.

  4. Afferent vagal nerve stimulation resets baroreflex neural arc and inhibits sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Saku, Keita; Kishi, Takuya; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Murayama, Yoshinori; Kakino, Takamori; Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It has been established that vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) benefits patients and/or animals with heart failure. However, the impact of VNS on sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated how vagal afferent stimulation (AVNS) impacts baroreflex control of SNA. In 12 anesthetized Sprague–Dawley rats, we controlled the pressure in isolated bilateral carotid sinuses (CSP), and measured splanchnic SNA and arterial pressure (AP). Under a constant CSP, increasing the voltage of AVNS dose dependently decreased SNA and AP. The averaged maximal inhibition of SNA was ‐28.0 ± 10.3%. To evaluate the dynamic impacts of AVNS on SNA, we performed random AVNS using binary white noise sequences, and identified the transfer function from AVNS to SNA and that from SNA to AP. We also identified transfer functions of the native baroreflex from CSP to SNA (neural arc) and from SNA to AP (peripheral arc). The transfer function from AVNS to SNA strikingly resembled the baroreflex neural arc and the transfer functions of SNA to AP were indistinguishable whether we perturbed ANVS or CSP, indicating that they likely share common central and peripheral neural mechanisms. To examine the impact of AVNS on baroreflex, we changed CSP stepwise and measured SNA and AP responses with or without AVNS. AVNS resets the sigmoidal neural arc downward, but did not affect the linear peripheral arc. In conclusion, AVNS resets the baroreflex neural arc and induces sympathoinhibition in the same manner as the control of SNA and AP by the native baroreflex. PMID:25194023

  5. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES) are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications. Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES) are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favor of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG) signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm. PMID:27471448

  6. The facilitation of motor actions by acoustic and electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Welber; Milford, Magdalene; Carroll, Timothy; Riek, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    The presentation of a loud acoustic stimulus during the preparation of motor actions can both speed movement initiation and increase response vigor. Several recent studies have explored this phenomenon as a means to investigate the mechanisms and neural correlates of movement preparation. Here, we sought to determine the generality of this effect across sensory modalities, and in particular whether unexpected somatosensory stimulation can facilitate movements in a manner similar to loud sounds. We show that electric and acoustic stimuli can be similarly effective in inducing the early release of motor actions, in both reaction time and anticipatory timing tasks. Consistent with recent response activation models of motor preparation, we also demonstrate that increasing the intensity of electric stimuli induces both progressive decreases in reaction time and increases in response vigor. Additionally, we show that the early release of motor actions can be induced by electric stimuli targeting predominantly either muscle afferents or skin afferents. Finally, we show that simultaneous acoustic and electric stimulation leads to earlier releases of anticipatory actions than either unimodal stimulus. These findings may lead to new avenues for experimental and clinical exploitation of the effects of accessory sensory information on movement preparation and initiation. PMID:26338375

  7. Electrical stimulation of mechanoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echenique, A. M.; Graffigna, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Within the field of Rehabilitation Engineering, this work is aimed at identifying the optimal parameters of electric current stimulus which activate the nervous axons of mecanoreceptors found in the fingertip, allowing, this way, to resemble tactile senses. These sensorial feelings can be used by aiding technological means, namely, the sensorial substitution technology, in an attempt to render information to blind people through the tactile sense. The physical pressure on sensorial areas (fingertips) used for reading activities through the Braille System is the main effect that is imitated and studied in this research work. An experimental aiding prototype for Braille reading research has been developed and tested with blinds and reduced vision people, with highly satisfactory results.

  8. Myelinated Afferents Are Involved in Pathology of the Spontaneous Electrical Activity and Mechanical Hyperalgesia of Myofascial Trigger Spots in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are common causes for chronic pain. Myelinated afferents were considered to be related with muscular pain, and our clinical researches indicated they might participate in the pathology of MTrPs. Here, we applied myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs, equal to MTrPs in human) of rats to further investigate role of myelinated afferents. Modified pyridine-silver staining revealed more nerve endings at MTrSs than non-MTrSs (P < 0.01), and immunohistochemistry with Neurofilament 200 indicated more myelinated afferents existed in MTrSs (P < 0.01). Spontaneous electrical activity (SEA) recordings at MTrSs showed that specific block of myelinated afferents in sciatic nerve with tetrodotoxin (TTX) led to significantly decreased SEA (P < 0.05). Behavioral assessment showed that mechanical pain thresholds (MPTs) of MTrSs were lower than those of non-MTrSs (P < 0.01). Block of myelinated afferents by intramuscular TTX injection increased MPTs of MTrSs significantly (P < 0.01), while MPTs of non-MTrSs first decreased (P < 0.05) and then increased (P > 0.05). 30 min after the injection, MPTs at MTrSs were significantly lower than those of non-MTrSs (P < 0.01). Therefore, we concluded that proliferated myelinated afferents existed at MTrSs, which were closely related to pathology of SEA and mechanical hyperalgesia of MTrSs. PMID:26064165

  9. The Electrical Stimulation Modifies the Cerebral Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luisa Lilia; López-Meraz, María Leonor; Cuéllar-Herrera, Manola; Neri-Bazán., Leticia

    2002-08-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for therapeuthic purposes. In this review, we present the clinical and scientific bases for using electrical stimulation as a treatment for pharmacological refractory epilepsy. We also describe results in receptors of inhibitory neurotransmitters obtained in rat brain with or without epilepsy, undergoing brain stimulation. Brain electrical stimulation may improve our understanding of brain function and neuroplasticity.

  10. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  11. Substance P release in the cat spinal cord upon afferent C-fibre stimulation is not attenuated by clonidine at analgesic doses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Lacey, Gary; Hendry, Ian A; Morton, Cecil R

    2004-05-01

    In anaesthetized cats, antibody microprobes were used to measure the release of immunoreactive substance P (irSP) in the lumbar dorsal horn during electrical stimulation of primary afferent fibres at intensities suprathreshold for unmyelinated fibres. Release of irSP was detected in the region of the superficial dorsal horn. This evoked release was not reduced by clonidine hydrochloride, administered intravenously or by superfusion of the dorsal cord surface. Microprobes inserted during cord superfusion with lignocaine hydrochloride detected less irSP along their entire length, including in the region of evoked release. The results suggest that the analgesic action of clonidine does not involve reduced release of SP from the central terminals of nociceptors in the spinal cord.

  12. A computational model for estimating recruitment of primary afferent fibers by intraneural stimulation in the dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, D. J.; Hokanson, J. A.; Rubin, J. E.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Primary afferent microstimulation has been proposed as a method for activating cutaneous and muscle afferent fibers to restore tactile and proprioceptive feedback after limb loss or peripheral neuropathy. Large populations of primary afferent fibers can be accessed directly by implanting microelectrode arrays in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which provide a compact and stable target for stimulating a diverse group of sensory fibers. To gain insight into factors affecting the number and types of primary afferents activated, we developed a computational model that simulates the recruitment of fibers in the feline L7 DRG. The model comprises two parts. The first part is a single-fiber model used to describe the current-distance relation and was based on the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill model for excitability. The second part uses the results of the singe-fiber model and published data on fiber size distributions to predict the probability of recruiting a given number of fibers as a function of stimulus intensity. The range of intensities over which exactly one fiber was recruited was approximately 0.5-5 µA (0.1-1 nC per phase); the stimulus intensity at which the probability of recruiting exactly one fiber was maximized was 2.3 µA. However, at 2.3 µA, it was also possible to recruit up to three fibers, albeit with a lower probability. Stimulation amplitudes up to 6 µA were tested with the population model, which showed that as the amplitude increased, the number of fibers recruited increased exponentially. The distribution of threshold amplitudes predicted by the model was similar to that previously reported by in vivo experimentation. Finally, the model suggested that medium diameter fibers (7.3-11.5 µm) may be recruited with much greater probability than large diameter fibers (12.8-16 µm). This model may be used to efficiently test a range of stimulation parameters and nerve morphologies to complement results from electrophysiology experiments and to aid in the

  13. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Barbara M.; Lam, Amy; Griffin, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Lack of neural innervation due to neurological damage renders muscle unable to produce force. Use of electrical stimulation is a medium in which investigators have tried to find a way to restore movement and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Different methods of applying electrical current to modify neuromuscular activity are electrical stimulation (ES), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and functional electrical stimulation (FES). This review covers the aspects of electrical stimulation used for rehabilitation and functional purposes. Discussed are the various parameters of electrical stimulation, including frequency, pulse width/duration, duty cycle, intensity/amplitude, ramp time, pulse pattern, program duration, program frequency, and muscle group activated, and how they affect fatigue in the stimulated muscle. PMID:22737049

  14. Electrical potentials from the eye and optic nerve of Strombus: effects of electrical stimulation of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Gillary, H L

    1977-02-01

    1. Photic stimulation of the mature eye of Strombus can evoke in the optic nerve 'on' activity in numerous small afferent fibres and repetitive 'off' bursts of afferent impulses in a smaller number of larger fibres. 2. Synchronous invasion of the eye by electrically evoked impulses in small optic nerve fibres (apparently the 'on' afferents, antidromically activated) can evoke a burst of impulses in the larger 'off' fibres which propagate away from the eye. Invasion of the eye via one branch of optic nerve can evoke an answering burst in another branch. 3. Such electrically evoked bursts are similar to light-evoked 'off' bursts with respect to their impulse composition, their ability to be inhibited by illumination of the eye, and their susceptibility to MgCl2 anaesthesia. 4. Invasion of the eye by a train of repetitive electrically evoked impulses in the absence of photic stimulation can give rise to repetitive 'off' bursts as well as concomitant oscillatory potentials in the eye which are similar to those normally evoked by cessation of a photic stimulus. 5. The electrically evoked 'off' bursts appear to be caused by an excitatory rebound following the cessation of inhibitory synaptic input from photoreceptors which can be antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve. 6. The experimental results suggest that the rhythmic discharge of the 'off' fibres evoked by the cessation of a photic stimulus is mediated by the abrupt decrease of inhibitory synaptic input from the receptors. PMID:192827

  15. Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens reveals local modulation of presynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Melchior, James R; Ferris, Mark J; Stuber, Garret D; Riddle, David R; Jones, Sara R

    2015-09-01

    The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse local microenvironments. Dopamine (DA) neuron terminals similarly express a heterogeneous collection of terminal receptors that modulate DA signaling. Cyclic voltammetry is often used to probe DA terminal dynamics in brain slice preparations; however, this method traditionally requires electrical stimulation to induce DA release. Electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially introducing simultaneous, multi-synaptic modulation of DA terminal release. We used optogenetics to selectively stimulate DA terminals and used voltammetry to compare DA responses from electrical and optical stimulation of the same area of tissue around a recording electrode. We found that with multiple pulse stimulation trains, optically stimulated DA release increasingly exceeded that of electrical stimulation. Furthermore, electrical stimulation produced inhibition of DA release across longer duration stimulations. The GABAB antagonist, CGP 55845, increased electrically stimulated DA release significantly more than light stimulated release. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide, inhibited single pulse electrically stimulated DA release while having no effect on optically stimulated DA release. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation introduces local multi-synaptic modulation of DA release that is absent with optogenetically targeted stimulation. The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse microenvironments. Local electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially modulating the dopamine signal - measured using cyclic voltammetry. Optogenetically targeting light stimulation to dopamine

  16. Stability of long term facilitation and expression of zif268 and Arc in the spinal cord dorsal horn is modulated by conditioning stimulation within the physiological frequency range of primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Haugan, F; Wibrand, K; Fiskå, A; Bramham, C R; Tjølsen, A

    2008-07-17

    Long term facilitation (LTF) of C-fiber-evoked firing of wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal dorsal horn in response to conditioning stimulation (CS) of afferent fibers is a widely studied cellular model of spinal nociceptive sensitization. Although 100 Hz CS of primary afferent fibers is commonly used to induce spinal cord LTF, this frequency exceeds the physiological firing range. Here, we examined the effects of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve within the physiological frequency range on the magnitude and stability of the C-fiber-evoked responses of wide dynamic range neurons and the expression of immediate early genes (c-fos, zif268, and Arc) in anesthetized rats. Stimulation frequencies of 3, 30 and 100 Hz all induced facilitation of similar magnitude as recorded at 1 h post-CS. Strikingly, however, 3 Hz-induced potentiation of the C-fiber responses was decremental, whereas both 30 and 100 Hz stimulation resulted in stable, non-decremental facilitation over 3 h of recording. The number of dorsal horn neurons expressing c-fos, but not zif268 or Arc, was significantly elevated after 3 Hz CS and increased proportionally with stimulation rate. In contrast, a stable LTF of C-fiber responses was obtained at 30 and 100 Hz CS, and at these frequencies there was a sharp increase in zif268 expression and appearance of Arc-positive neurons. The results show that response facilitation can be induced by stimulation frequencies in the physiological range (3 and 30 Hz). Three hertz stimulation induced the early phase of LTF, but the responses were decremental. Arc and zif268, two genes previously coupled to LTP of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, are upregulated at the same frequencies that give stable LTF (30 and 100 Hz). This frequency-dependence is important for understanding how the afferent firing pattern affects neuronal plasticity and nociception in the spinal dorsal horn.

  17. [The stimulating effects of contralateral glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal afferent fibers on the glossopharyngeo-hypoglossal reflex activities in the frog].

    PubMed

    Murayama, N

    1991-01-01

    American Bullfrogs, Rana catesbiana, immobilized with suxamethonium chloride (20 mg/kg b. w., i. p.), were used. By stimulating the glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve, reflex activities, composed of early (10-20 ms in latency) and late (greater than 20 ms) components, were evoked in both protoractor branch (P. br.) and retractor branch (R. br.) of the ipsilateral hypoglossal (XII) nerve. Contralateral IXth nerve stimulation increased the reflex activities of both components in the P. br. elicited ipsilaterally by the homonymous nerve. Whereas, it increased the reflex activities of the early component in the R. br. but, decreased that of the late component. On the other hand, stimulation of P. br. in the contralateral XIIth nerve increased the activities of both components in the P. br. and those of the late component in the R. br., but did not affect the activities of the early component in the R. br. The time course of these effects was similar to that by contralateral IXth nerve stimulation. The present findings strongly suggest the existence of afferent fibers in the XIIth nerve. PMID:1770456

  18. Sympathetic skin response following thermal, electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation in familial dysautonomia patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Azelrod, F B; Schweibold, G; Kolodny, E H

    1999-08-01

    To determine whether sympathetic skin response (SSR) testing evaluates afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction, we studied SSR in patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) in whom both afferent small and efferent sympathetic fibers are largely reduced. We analyzed whether the response pattern to a combination of stimuli specific for large or small fiber activation allows differentiation between afferent and efferent small fiber dysfunction. In 52 volunteers and 13 FD patients, SSR was studied at palms and soles after warm, cold and heat as well as electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation. In addition, thermal thresholds were assessed at four body sites using a Thermotest device (Somedic; Stockholm, Sweden). In volunteers, any stimulus induced reproducible SSRs. Only cold failed to evoke SSR in two volunteers. In all FD patients, electrical SSR was present, but amplitudes were reduced. Five patients had no acoustic SSR, four had no inspiratory SSR. Thermal SSR was absent in 10 patients with abnormal thermal perception and present in one patient with preserved thermal sensation. In two patients, thermal SSR was present only when skin areas with preserved temperature perception were stimulated. In patients with FD, preserved electrical SSR demonstrated the overall integrity of the SSR reflex but amplitude reduction suggested impaired sudomotor activation. SSR responses were dependent on the perception of the stimulus. In the presence of preserved electrical SSR, absent thermal SSR reflects afferent small fiber dysfunction. A combination of SSR stimulus types allows differentiation between afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction. PMID:10574280

  19. Braille line using electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puertas, A.; Purés, P.; Echenique, A. M.; Ensinck, J. P. Graffigna y. G.

    2007-11-01

    Conceived within the field of Rehabilitation Technologies for visually impaired persons, the present work aims at enabling the blind user to read written material by means of a tactile display. Once he is familiarized to operate this system, the user will be able to achieve greater performance in study, academic and job activities, thus achieving a rapid and easier social inclusion. The devise accepts any kind of text that is computer-loadable (documents, books, Internet information, and the like) which, through digital means, can be read as Braille text on the pad. This tactile display is composed of an electrodes platform that simulate, through stimulation the writing/reading Braille characters. In order to perceive said characters in similar way to the tactile feeling from paper material, the skin receptor of fingers are stimulated electrically so as to simulate the same pressure and depressions as those of the paper-based counterpart information. Once designed and developed, the display was tested with blind subjects, with relatively satisfactory results. As a continuing project, this prototype is currently being improved as regards.

  20. [ELECTRIC STIMULATION OF VAGUS NERVE MODULATES A PROPAGATION OF OXYGEN EPILEPSY IN RABBITS].

    PubMed

    Zhilyaev, S Yu; Moskvin, A N; Platonova, T F; Demchenko, I T

    2015-11-01

    The activation of autonomic afferents (achieved through the vagus nerve (VN) electrical stimulation) on CNS O2 toxicity and cardiovascular function was investigated. In conscious rabbits at 5 ATA 02, prodromal signs of CNS O2 toxicity and convulsion latency were determined with and without vagus nerve (VN) stimulation. EEG, ECG and respiration were also recorded. In rabbits at 5 ATA, sympathetic overdrive and specific patterns on the EEG (synchronization of slow-waves), ECG (tachycardia) and respiration (respiratory minute volume increase) preceded motor convulsions. Vagus nerve stimulation increased parasympathetic component of autonomic drive and significantly delayed prodromal signs of oxygen toxicity and convulsion latency. Autonomic afferent input to the brain is a novel target for preventing CNS toxicity in HBO2. PMID:26995956

  1. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation: chances and challenges in the management of treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Jordan, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is associated with excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Electrical carotid sinus stimulators engaging baroreflex afferent activity have been developed for such patients. Indeed, baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term blood pressure control by governing efferent sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. The first-generation carotid sinus stimulator applying bilateral bipolar stimulation reduced blood pressure in a controlled clinical trial but nevertheless failed to meet the primary efficacy endpoint. The second-generation device utilizes smaller unilateral unipolar electrodes, thus decreasing invasiveness of the implantation while saving battery. An uncontrolled clinical study suggested improvement in blood pressure with the second-generation device. We hope that these findings as well as preliminary observations suggesting cardiovascular and renal organ protection with electrical carotid sinus stimulation will be confirmed in properly controlled clinical trials. Meanwhile, we should find ways to better identify patients who are most likely to benefit from electrical carotid sinus stimulation.

  2. Similar nociceptive afferents mediate psychophysical and electrophysiological responses to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Iannetti, G D; Zambreanu, L; Tracey, I

    2006-01-01

    The ability to perceive and withdraw rapidly from noxious environmental stimuli is crucial for survival. When heat stimuli are applied to primate hairy skin, first pain sensation is mediated by type-II A-fibre nociceptors (II-AMHs). In contrast, the reported absence of first pain and II-AMH microneurographical responses when heat stimuli are applied to the hand palm has led to the notion that II-AMHs are lacking in this primate glabrous skin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of hairy and glabrous skin stimulation on neural transmission of nociceptive inputs elicited by different kinds of thermal heating. We recorded psychophysical and EEG brain responses to radiant (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs) and contact heat stimuli (contact heat-evoked potentials, CHEPs) delivered to the dorsum and the palm of the hand in normal volunteers. Brain responses were analysed at a single-trial level, using an automated approach based on multiple linear regression. Laser stimulation of hairy and glabrous skin at the same energy elicited remarkably similar psychophysical ratings and LEPs. This finding provides strong evidence that first pain to heat does exist in glabrous skin, and suggests that similar nociceptive afferents, with the physiological properties of II-AMHs, mediate first pain to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans. In contrast, when contact heat stimuli were employed, a significantly higher nominal temperature had to be applied to glabrous skin in order to achieve psychophysical ratings similar to those obtained following hairy skin stimulation, and CHEPs following glabrous skin stimulation had significantly longer latencies (N2 wave, +25%; P2 wave, +24%) and smaller amplitudes (N2 wave, −40%; P2 wave, −44%) than CHEPs following hairy skin stimulation. Irrespective of the stimulated territory, CHEPs always had significantly longer latencies (hairy skin N2 wave, +75%; P2 wave, +56%) and smaller amplitudes (hairy skin N2 wave, −42%; P

  3. Force-sensitive afferents recruited during stance encode sensory depression in the contralateral swinging limb during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Shawn; Hayes, Heather Brant; Speigel, Iris; Chang, Young-Hui

    2013-03-01

    Afferent feedback alters muscle activity during locomotion and must be tightly controlled. As primary afferent depolarization-induced presynaptic inhibition (PAD-PSI) regulates afferent signaling, we investigated hindlimb PAD-PSI during locomotion in an in vitro rat spinal cord-hindlimb preparation. We compared the relation of PAD-PSI, measured as dorsal root potentials (DRPs), to observed ipsilateral and contralateral limb endpoint forces. Afferents activated during stance-phase force strongly and proportionately influenced DRP magnitude in the swinging limb. Responses increased with locomotor frequency. Electrical stimulation of contralateral afferents also preferentially evoked DRPs in the opposite limb during swing (flexion). Nerve lesioning, in conjunction with kinematic results, support a prominent contribution from toe Golgi tendon organ afferents. Thus, force-dependent afferent feedback during stance binds interlimb sensorimotor state to a proportional PAD-PSI in the swinging limb, presumably to optimize interlimb coordination. These results complement known actions of ipsilateral afferents on PAD-PSI during locomotion.

  4. Search for a cardiac nociceptor: stimulation by bradykinin of sympathetic afferent nerve endings in the heart of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D G; Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Nerdrum, T

    1980-01-01

    1. We have examined the effect of bradykinin on impulse traffic in sympathetic afferent fibres from the heart, great vessels and pleura, and have attempted to identify cardiac nociceptors that on the basis of their functional characteristics might have a role in the initiation of cardiac pain. 2. In anaesthetized cats, we recorded afferent impulses from 'single-fibre' slips of the left 2nd--5th thoracic rami communicantes and associated chain, and selected fibres arising from endings in the heart, great vessels, pericardium and pleura. We applied bradykinin solution (0 . 1--1 . 0 microgram/ml.) locally to the site of the ending; we also injected bradykinin (0 . 3--1 . 0 microgram/kg) into the left atrium. 3. Afferent endings excited by bradykinin (159 of 191 tested) were of two types. The larger group (140) were primarily mechanoreceptors with A delta of C fibres (mean conduction velocity, 7 . 5 +/- 0 . 6 m/sec). They were very sensitive to light touch. Those located in the heart, great vessels or overlying pleura had a cardiac rhythm of discharge and were stimulated by an increase in blood pressure or cardiac volume. 4. Bradykinin increased mechanoreceptor firing from 0 . 7 +/- to 5 . 0 +/- 0 . 3 (mean +/- S.E. of mean) impulses/sec. Some endings appeared to be stimulated directly by bradykinin, others sensitized by it so that they responded more vigorously to the pulsatile mechanical stimulation associated with the cardiac cycle. 5. The smaller group of eighteen endings, of which ten were in the left ventricle, were primarily chemosensitive. Most had C fibres, a few had A delta fibres (mean conduction velocity, 2 . 3 +/- 0 . 7 m/sec). They were insensitive to light touch. With one exception they never fired with a cardiac rhythm, and even large increases in aortic or left ventricular pressure had little effect on impulse frequency. 6. Chemosensitive endings were stimulated by bradykinin, impulse activity increasing from 0 . 6 to 15 . 6 +/- 1 . 3 impulses/sec and

  5. [Ultrastructure of afferent synapses on the ventral dendrite of mauthner neurons after goldfish adaptation to optokinetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Mikheeva, I B; Shtanchaev, R Sh; Kokanova, N A; Mikhaĭlova, G Z; Bezgina, E N; Tiras, N P; Moshkov, D A

    2013-01-01

    Using the morphometric techniques, the ultrastructural changes of the afferent synapses on the ventral dendrite of the Mauthner neurons (MNs) were studied after the adaptation of goldfish to long-term fatiguing sensory (visual) stimulation, characterized by the growth of MN resistance. It was shown that after the adaptation, the length of active zones (AZs) in the synapses located on the MN ventral dendrite was significantly reduced by 23%. At the same time, the length the AZs of the excitatory visual synapses was reduced by 29% in comparison with the control, while the length of desmosome-like contacts (DLCs) bordering AZs was increased by 71%. It was also found that the length of AZs in the inhibitory synapses was decreased by 19% after the adaptation, which is consistent with the important role of inhibitory processes in the sensory pathways during the memory formation. Taking into account the actin nature of the DLCs, the basis of the adaptation to the visual stimulation is suggested to be in the presynaptic mechanism of neurotransmitter secretion regulation by actin.

  6. Vomiting Center reanalyzed: An electrical stimulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brainstem of 15 decerebrate cats produced stimulus-bound vomiting in only 4 animals. Vomiting was reproducible in only one cat. Effective stimulating sites were located in the solitary tract and reticular formation. Restricted localization of a vomiting center, stimulation of which evoked readily reproducible results, could not be obtained.

  7. Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lise A.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that can restore some degree of motor function in individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury or stroke. One way to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of muscle stimulation needed to elicit complex upper limb movements is to use electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from able-bodied subjects as a template for electrical stimulation. However, this requires a transfer function to convert the recorded (or predicted) EMG signals into an appropriate pattern of electrical stimulation. Here we develop a generalized transfer function that maps EMG activity into a stimulation pattern that modulates muscle output by varying both the pulse frequency and the pulse amplitude. We show that the stimulation patterns produced by this transfer function mimic the active state measured by EMG insofar as they reproduce with good fidelity the complex patterns of joint torque and joint displacement.

  8. Advances in functional electrical stimulation (FES).

    PubMed

    Popović, Dejan B

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the advancements that are needed to enhance the effects of electrical stimulation for restoring or assisting movement in humans with an injury/disease of the central nervous system. A complex model of the effects of electrical stimulation of peripheral systems is presented. The model indicates that both the motor and sensory systems are activated by electrical stimulation. We propose that a hierarchical hybrid controller may be suitable for functional electrical stimulation (FES) because this type of controller acts as a structural mimetic of its biological counterpart. Specific attention is given to the neural systems at the periphery with respect to the required electrodes and stimulators. Furthermore, we note that FES with surface electrodes is preferred for the therapy, although there is a definite advantage associated with implantable technology for life-long use. The last section of the review discusses the potential need to combine FES and robotic systems to provide assistance in some cases. PMID:25287528

  9. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats.

  10. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats. PMID:27071004

  11. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats. PMID:27071004

  12. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  13. Electrical Cerebral Stimulation Modifies Inhibitory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuéllar-Herrera, M.; Rocha, L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrical stimulation of the nervous tissue has been proposed as a method to treat some neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. Epileptic seizures result from excessive, synchronous, abnormal firing patterns of neurons that are located predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Many people with epilepsy continue presenting seizures even though they are under regimens of antiepileptic medications. An alternative therapy for treatment resistant epilepsy is cerebral electrical stimulation. The present study is focused to review the effects of different types of electrical stimulation and specifically changes in amino acids.

  14. Cholinergic afferent stimulation induces axonal function plasticity in adult hippocampal granule cells.

    PubMed

    Martinello, Katiuscia; Huang, Zhuo; Lujan, Rafael; Tran, Baouyen; Watanabe, Masahiko; Cooper, Edward C; Brown, David A; Shah, Mala M

    2015-01-21

    Acetylcholine critically influences hippocampal-dependent learning. Cholinergic fibers innervate hippocampal neuron axons, dendrites, and somata. The effects of acetylcholine on axonal information processing, though, remain unknown. By stimulating cholinergic fibers and making electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells, we show that synaptically released acetylcholine preferentially lowered the action potential threshold, enhancing intrinsic excitability and synaptic potential-spike coupling. These effects persisted for at least 30 min after the stimulation paradigm and were due to muscarinic receptor activation. This caused sustained elevation of axonal intracellular Ca(2+) via T-type Ca(2+) channels, as indicated by two-photon imaging. The enhanced Ca(2+) levels inhibited an axonal KV7/M current, decreasing the spike threshold. In support, immunohistochemistry revealed muscarinic M1 receptor, CaV3.2, and KV7.2/7.3 subunit localization in granule cell axons. Since alterations in axonal signaling affect neuronal firing patterns and neurotransmitter release, this is an unreported cellular mechanism by which acetylcholine might, at least partly, enhance cognitive processing. PMID:25578363

  15. Implantable neurotechnologies: electrical stimulation and applications.

    PubMed

    Nag, Sudip; Thakor, Nitish V

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation using injected electrical charge is widely used both in functional therapies and as an experimental tool for neuroscience applications. Electrical pulses can induce excitation of targeted neural pathways that aid in the treatment of neural disorders or dysfunction of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we summarize the recent trends in the field of electrical stimulation for therapeutic interventions of nervous system disorders, such as for the restoration of brain, eye, ear, spinal cord, nerve and muscle function. Neural prosthetic applications are discussed, and functional electrical stimulation parameters for treating such disorders are reviewed. Important considerations for implantable packaging and enhancing device reliability are also discussed. Neural stimulators are expected to play a profound role in implantable neural devices that treat disorders and help restore functions in injured or disabled nervous system. PMID:26753775

  16. Increased skin temperature during transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Abram, S E; Asiddao, C B; Reynolds, A C

    1980-01-01

    Conflicting reports have appeared in the literature concerning the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on skin temperature. This report studied 33 patients with chronic pain involving one extremity (13 upper, 20 lower) to determine whether changes in sympathetic tone, as reflected in skin temperature, occurred in response to electrical stimulation of painful areas. Stimulation was carried out for 20 to 45 minutes. Skin temperatures were measured from the thumbs or great toes of stimulated and contralateral extremities before and during stimulation. Skin temperature rose 2.5 +/- 0.7 (mean +/- SEM) in both the ipsilateral and contralateral extremity in patients who experienced relief of pain during stimulation. There was no significant change in skin temperature in patients who experienced no relief.

  17. Do electrically stimulated sensory inputs and movements lead to long-term plasticity and rehabilitation gains?

    PubMed

    Dobkin, Bruce H

    2003-12-01

    Peripheral and cortical magnetic and electrical stimulation may find a therapeutic niche as augmentative rehabilitation interventions for lessening impairments and disabilities after brain and spinal cord injury. The momentum for these approaches arose from recent physiological studies that examined the effects of paradigms of stimulation on synaptic and biological adaptations within the cortex and lumbar cord. A case report about improvements made by Christopher Reeve is driving requests by patients with profound spinal cord injury for interventions that include resistance pedaling facilitated by electrical neuromuscular stimulation. Although the evidence for this particular approach is less than convincing, reorganization-inducing cortical and peripheral afferent stimulation protocols offer insights into the steps needed for scientific designs of these potential rehabilitation interventions. PMID:14624077

  18. Effect of Paired-Pulse Electrical Stimulation on the Activity of Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kei; Onishi, Hideaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the transient effect of short-duration paired-pulse electrical stimulation (ppES) on corticospinal excitability and the after-effect of long-duration ppES on excitability, short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), and afferent facilitation (AF). Methods: A total of 28 healthy subjects participated in two different experiments. In Experiment 1, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles before and immediately after short-duration ppES (5 s) at various inter-pulse intervals (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 30 ms). In Experiment 2, MEPs, SAI, and AF were measured before, immediately, and 20 and 40 min after long-duration ppES (20 min, inter-pulse interval of 5 and 15 ms) and peripheral electrical stimulation (20 min, 10 and 20 Hz). Results: Short-duration ppES with inter-pulse intervals of 5 and 20 ms significantly increased MEP measured in APB but not in ADM. Long-duration ppES with an inter-pulse interval of 5 ms significantly decreased SAI but not MEPs in APB. In contrast, long-duration ppES did not affect ADM. Conclusion: The afferent inputs induced by ppES-5 ms were effective for transiently increasing MEP and sustaining SAI reduction. PMID:26733847

  19. Gait phase detection from sciatic nerve recordings in functional electrical stimulation systems for foot drop correction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun-Uk; Song, Kang-Il; Han, Sungmin; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kang, Ji Yoon; Hwang, Dosik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Choi, Kuiwon; Youn, Inchan

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous afferent activities recorded by a nerve cuff electrode have been used to detect the stance phase in a functional electrical stimulation system for foot drop correction. However, the implantation procedure was difficult, as the cuff electrode had to be located on the distal branches of a multi-fascicular nerve to exclude muscle afferent and efferent activities. This paper proposes a new gait phase detection scheme that can be applied to a proximal nerve root that includes cutaneous afferent fibers as well as muscle afferent and efferent fibers. To test the feasibility of this scheme, electroneurogram (ENG) signals were measured from the rat sciatic nerve during treadmill walking at several speeds, and the signal properties of the sciatic nerve were analyzed for a comparison with kinematic data from the ankle joint. On the basis of these experiments, a wavelet packet transform was tested to define a feature vector from the sciatic ENG signals according to the gait phases. We also propose a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) classifier and investigate whether it could be used successfully to discriminate feature vectors into the stance and swing phases. In spite of no significant differences in the rectified bin-integrated values between the stance and swing phases, the sciatic ENG signals could be reliably classified using the proposed wavelet packet transform and GMM classification methods.

  20. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  1. Bipolar spinal cord stimulation attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity at an intensity that activates a small portion of A-fiber afferents in spinal nerve-injured rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Carteret, A F; Wacnik, P W; Chung, C-Y; Xing, L; Dong, X; Meyer, R A; Raja, S N; Guan, Y

    2011-12-29

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is used clinically to treat neuropathic pain states, but the precise mechanism by which it attenuates neuropathic pain remains to be established. The profile of afferent fiber activation during SCS and how it may correlate with the efficacy of SCS-induced analgesia are unclear. After subjecting rats to an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), we implanted a miniature quadripolar electrode similar to that used clinically. Our goal was to determine the population and number of afferent fibers retrogradely activated by SCS in SNL rats by recording the antidromic compound action potential (AP) at the sciatic nerve after examining the ability of bipolar epidural SCS to alleviate mechanical hypersensitivity in this model. Notably, we compared the profiles of afferent fiber activation to SCS between SNL rats that exhibited good SCS-induced analgesia (responders) and those that did not (nonresponders). Additionally, we examined how different contact configurations affect the motor threshold (MoT) and compound AP threshold. Results showed that three consecutive days of SCS treatment (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 30 min, 80-90% of MoT), but not sham stimulation, gradually alleviated mechanical hypersensitivity in SNL rats. The MoT obtained in the animal behavioral study was significantly less than the Aα/β-threshold of the compound AP determined during electrophysiological recording, suggesting that SCS could attenuate mechanical hypersensitivity with a stimulus intensity that recruits only a small fraction of the A-fiber population in SNL rats. Although both the MoT and compound AP threshold were similar between responders and nonresponders, the size of the compound AP waveform at higher stimulation intensities was larger in the responders, indicating a more efficient activation of the dorsal column structure in responders. PMID:22001681

  2. Binaural hearing with electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Alan; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming a standard of care in many clinics. While much benefit has been shown through bilateral implantation, patients who have bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) still do not perform as well as normal hearing listeners in sound localization and understanding speech in noisy environments. This difference in performance can arise from a number of different factors, including the areas of hardware and engineering, surgical precision and pathology of the auditory system in deaf persons. While surgical precision and individual pathology are factors that are beyond careful control, improvements can be made in the areas of clinical practice and the engineering of binaural speech processors. These improvements should be grounded in a good understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to the acoustic binaural cues that are important to normal hearing listeners for sound localization and speech in noise understanding. To this end, we review the current state-of-the-art in the understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to binaural cues in electric hearing, and highlight the important issues and challenges as they relate to clinical practice and the development of new binaural processing strategies. PMID:25193553

  3. Binaural hearing with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kan, Alan; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming a standard of care in many clinics. While much benefit has been shown through bilateral implantation, patients who have bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) still do not perform as well as normal hearing listeners in sound localization and understanding speech in noisy environments. This difference in performance can arise from a number of different factors, including the areas of hardware and engineering, surgical precision and pathology of the auditory system in deaf persons. While surgical precision and individual pathology are factors that are beyond careful control, improvements can be made in the areas of clinical practice and the engineering of binaural speech processors. These improvements should be grounded in a good understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to the acoustic binaural cues that are important to normal hearing listeners for sound localization and speech in noise understanding. To this end, we review the current state-of-the-art in the understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to binaural cues in electric hearing, and highlight the important issues and challenges as they relate to clinical practice and the development of new binaural processing strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  4. Transcutaneous electrical spinal-cord stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Sayenko, Dimitry; Gad, Parag; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2016-01-01

    Locomotor behavior is controlled by specific neural circuits called central pattern generators primarily located at the lumbosacral spinal cord. These locomotor-related neuronal circuits have a high level of automaticity; that is, they can produce a “stepping” movement pattern also seen on electromyography (EMG) in the absence of supraspinal and/or peripheral afferent inputs. These circuits can be modulated by epidural spinal-cord stimulation and/or pharmacological intervention. Such interventions have been used to neuromodulate the neuronal circuits in patients with motor-complete spinal-cord injury (SCI) to facilitate postural and locomotor adjustments and to regain voluntary motor control. Here, we describe a novel non-invasive stimulation strategy of painless transcutaneous electrical enabling motor control (pcEmc) to neuromodulate the physiological state of the spinal cord. The technique can facilitate a stepping performance in non-injured subjects with legs placed in a gravity-neutral position. The stepping movements were induced more effectively with multi-site than single-site spinal-cord stimulation. From these results, a multielectrode surface array technology was developed. Our preliminary data indicate that use of the multielectrode surface array can fine-tune the control of the locomotor behavior. As well, the pcEmc strategy combined with exoskeleton technology is effective for improving motor function in paralyzed patients with SCI. The potential impact of using pcEmc to neuromodulate the spinal circuitry has significant implications for furthering our understanding of the mechanisms controlling locomotion and for rehabilitating sensorimotor function even after severe SCI. PMID:26205686

  5. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Florene Carnicelli

    Currently, research is being performed in the area of nonsurgical and nonchemical means for influencing the body's threshold for pain. Today, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is being widely used for this purpose. Application of this treatment can be confusing, however, because determining such things as selection of the proper…

  6. Changes in the frequency of swallowing during electrical stimulation of superior laryngeal nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kojun; Tsujimura, Takanori; Magara, Jin; Sakai, Shogo; Nakamura, Yuki; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the adaptation of the swallowing reflex in terms of reduced swallowing reflex initiation following continuous superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Forty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized with urethane. To identify swallowing, electromyographic activity of the left mylohyoid and thyrohyoid muscles was recorded. To evoke the swallowing response, the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), recurrent laryngeal nerve, or cortical swallowing area was electrically stimulated. Repetitive swallowing evoked by continuous SLN stimulation was gradually reduced, and this reduction was dependent on the resting time duration between stimulations. Prior SLN stimulation also suppressed subsequent swallowing initiation. The reduction in evoked swallows induced by recurrent laryngeal nerve or cortical swallowing area stimulation was less than that following superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Decerebration had no effect on the reduction in evoked swallows. Prior subthreshold stimulation reduced subsequent initiation of swallowing, suggesting that there was no relationship between swallowing movement evoked by prior stimulation and the subsequent reduction in swallowing initiation. Overall, these data suggest that reduced sensory afferent nerve firing and/or trans-synaptic responses, as well as part of the brainstem central pattern generator, are involved in adaptation of the swallowing reflex following continuous stimulation of swallow-inducing peripheral nerves and cortical areas.

  7. Long-term sensitization of mechanosensitive and -insensitive afferents in mice with persistent colorectal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-ho; Schwartz, Erica S.; Tanaka, Takahiro; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Afferent input contributes significantly to the pain and colorectal hypersensitivity that characterize irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we investigated the contributions of mechanically sensitive and mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; or silent afferents) to colorectal hypersensitivity. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD; 15–60 mmHg) was recorded in mice before and for weeks after intracolonic treatment with zymosan or saline. After CRD tests, the distal colorectum with the pelvic nerve attached was removed for single-fiber electrophysiological recordings. Colorectal afferent endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. Intracolonic zymosan produced persistent colorectal hypersensitivity (>24 days) associated with brief colorectal inflammation. Pelvic nerve muscular-mucosal but not muscular mechanosensitive afferents recorded from mice with colorectal hypersensitivity exhibited persistent sensitization. In addition, the proportion of MIAs (relative to control) was significantly reduced from 27% to 13%, whereas the proportion of serosal afferents was significantly increased from 34% to 53%, suggesting that MIAs acquired mechanosensitivity. PGP9.5 immunostaining revealed no significant loss of colorectal nerve fiber density, suggesting that the reduction in MIAs is not due to peripheral fiber loss after intracolonic zymosan. These results indicate that colorectal MIAs and sensitized muscular-mucosal afferents that respond to stretch contribute significantly to the afferent input that sustains hypersensitivity to CRD, suggesting that targeted management of colorectal afferent input could significantly reduce patients' complaints of pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:22268098

  8. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring...

  10. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring...

  12. Metallic taste from electrical and chemical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Harry T; Stevens, David A; Chapman, Kathryn W; Kurtz, Anne

    2005-03-01

    A series of three experiments investigated the nature of metallic taste reports after stimulation with solutions of metal salts and after stimulation with metals and electric currents. To stimulate with electricity, a device was fabricated consisting of a small battery affixed to a plastic handle with the anode side exposed for placement on the tongue or oral tissues. Intensity of taste from metals and batteries was dependent upon the voltage and was more robust in areas dense in fungiform papillae. Metallic taste was reported from stimulation with ferrous sulfate solutions, from metals and from electric stimuli. However, reports of metallic taste were more frequent when the word 'metallic' was presented embedded in a list of choices, as opposed to simple free-choice labeling. Intensity decreased for ferrous sulfate when the nose was occluded, consistent with a decrease in retronasal smell, as previously reported. Intensity of taste evoked by copper metal, bimetallic stimuli (zinc/copper) or small batteries (1.5-3 V) was not affected by nasal occlusion. This difference suggests two distinct mechanisms for evocation of metallic taste reports, one dependent upon retronasal smell and a second mediated by oral chemoreceptors. PMID:15741603

  13. Electrical stimulation for epilepsy: stimulation of hippocampal foci.

    PubMed

    Velasco, F; Velasco, M; Velasco, A L; Menez, D; Rocha, L

    2001-01-01

    Subacute and chronic continuous electrical stimulation at the epileptic focus in the hippocampus or parahippocampal cortex at 130 Hz, 0.21-1.0 ms, 2.5-3.5 V (about 200-300 microA) induces a decrease in focal EEG epileptic interictal activity and also in the occurrence of clinical seizures. This may represent an alternative for the treatment of temporal lobe seizures originated in bilateral independent temporal lobe foci or occurring in patients where one is uncertain whether memory deficit might result from ablative procedures.

  14. Species differences in the reflex effects of lingual afferent nerve stimulation on lip blood flow and arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Koeda, S; Yasuda, M; Izumi, H

    2003-11-01

    We evoked changes in lower lip blood flow and systemic arterial blood pressure by electrically stimulating the central cut end of the lingual nerve in artificially ventilated, urethane-anesthetized, cervically vago-sympathectomized cats, rats, rabbits, and guinea pig. The systemic arterial blood pressure changes were species-dependent: increases in rat, consistent decreases in rabbit and guinea pig, and variable among individuals in cat. In cat and rabbit, lip blood flow increases, which occurred only ipsilaterally to the stimulated nerve and showed no statistically significant correlation with the systemic arterial blood pressure changes. In rat, the ipsilateral lip blood flow increase was markedly greater than the contralateral one, and although there was a significant correlation between each of them and the systemic arterial blood pressure changes, the ipsilateral increase presumably included an active vasodilatation. In guinea pig, lip blood flow decreased on both sides in proportion to the systemic arterial blood pressure reductions. Thus, species variability exists in the sympathetic-mediated systemic arterial blood pressure changes and parasympathetic-mediated lip blood flow responses themselves, and in the relationship between them. PMID:12920546

  15. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ludwig, Kip A.; Welle, Cristin G.; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach. In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results. For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance. It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device

  16. Electrical stimulation for the relief of pain.

    PubMed

    Miles, J

    1984-03-01

    Electrical stimulation can relieve some severe and otherwise persisting pains. At its best it can be associated with either a gradual reduction in the pain or an increased ability by the patient to control his suffering. It seems particularly appropriate for use in the field of benign persistent pain. Equipment design and materials, particularly for implantable circuits, are not perfect. Movement towards percutaneous implantation, obviating the need for open operation, seems progressively more popular. Any unit or group using this form of treatment, must be prepared to provide major technical facilities, both in the form of people and equipment in order to cater for the many purely technical problems that occur. A great deal of knowledge both neurophysiological and neurochemical seems to be accruing from the clinical use of electrical stimulation. We would do well to take advantage of this opportunity, in the hope that it might lead us to a better understanding of the functioning of the nervous system. This consideration remarkably parallels an observation made by John Hunter in his presentation to the Royal Society in 1773 (13) which anticipated the realisation of the part played by electricity in the function of nerves. Following his description of the extraordinary innervation of the electric organs of the Torpedo fish, he wrote: 'How far this may be connected with the power of the nerves in general, or how far it may lead to an explanation of their operations, time and future discoveries alone can fully determine.' PMID:6608312

  17. A microprocessor-based multichannel subsensory stochastic resonance electrical stimulator.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gwo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic resonance electrical stimulation is a novel intervention which provides potential benefits for improving postural control ability in the elderly, those with diabetic neuropathy, and stroke patients. In this paper, a microprocessor-based subsensory white noise electrical stimulator for the applications of stochastic resonance stimulation is developed. The proposed stimulator provides four independent programmable stimulation channels with constant-current output, possesses linear voltage-to-current relationship, and has two types of stimulation modes, pulse amplitude and width modulation.

  18. Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

  19. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures. PMID:19180087

  20. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures.

  1. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about functional electrical stimulation in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is defined as the electrical stimulation of muscles that have impaired motor control, in order to produce a contraction to obtain functionally useful movement. It was first proposed in…

  2. In vitro Functional Characterization of Mouse Colorectal Afferent Endings

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    This video demonstrates in detail an in vitro single-fiber electrophysiological recording protocol using a mouse colorectum-nerve preparation. The approach allows unbiased identification and functional characterization of individual colorectal afferents. Extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials (APs) that originate from one or a few afferent (i.e., single-fiber) receptive fields (RFs) in the colorectum are made from teased nerve fiber fascicles. The colorectum is removed with either the pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached and opened longitudinally. The tissue is placed in a recording chamber, pinned flat and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Focal electrical stimulation is used to locate the colorectal afferent endings, which are further tested by three distinct mechanical stimuli (blunt probing, mucosal stroking and circumferential stretch) to functionally categorize the afferents into five mechanosensitive classes. Endings responding to none of these mechanical stimuli are categorized as mechanically-insensitive afferents (MIAs). Both mechanosensitive and MIAs can be assessed for sensitization (i.e., enhanced response, reduced threshold, and/or acquisition of mechanosensitivity) by localized exposure of RFs to chemicals (e.g., inflammatory soup (IS), capsaicin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)). We describe the equipment and colorectum–nerve recording preparation, harvest of colorectum with attached PN or LSN, identification of RFs in the colorectum, single-fiber recording from nerve fascicles, and localized application of chemicals to the RF. In addition, challenges of the preparation and application of standardized mechanical stimulation are also discussed. PMID:25651300

  3. Auricular electrical stimulation and dental pain threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, M. S.; Oleson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A modified double-blind evaluation of naloxone reversibility of dental analgesia produced by auricular electrical stimulation (AES) was examined in 40 subjects assigned randomly to one of four groups: AES followed by saline (AS), AES followed by naloxone (AN), placebo AES followed by saline (PS), and placebo AES followed by naloxone (PN). Dental pain threshold was tested using a hand-held dental pulp tester. A second investigator administered the true or placebo AES using an electrical stimulator. A third investigator injected intravenously saline or naloxone. The subjects and investigators 1 and 3 were blind to all treatment conditions. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference among the four groups. The AES groups exhibited a statistically significant 18% elevation of pain threshold, whereas the two placebo stimulation groups (PS and PN) remained essentially unchanged. The mean pain threshold increased to more than 23% for group AS, but fell to less than 12% for the subjects in group AN, who were given naloxone. These findings indicate a small but significant elevation of pain threshold by AES, an effect partially blocked by naloxone, suggesting an endogenous opioid system as one mechanism for AES analgesia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8185085

  4. Methods of gastric electrical stimulation and pacing: a review of their benefits and mechanisms of action in gastroparesis and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hasler, W L

    2009-03-01

    Development of gastric electrical stimulation techniques for treatment of gastric dysmotility syndromes and obesity has been a long-standing goal of investigators and clinicians. Depending on stimulus parameters and sites of stimulation, such methods have a range of theoretical benefits including entrainment of intrinsic gastric electrical activity, eliciting propagating contractions and reducing symptomatology in patients with gastroparesis and reducing appetite and food intake in individuals with morbid obesity. Additionally, gastric stimulation parameters have extragastrointestinal effects including alteration of systemic hormonal and autonomic neural activity and modulation of afferent nerve pathways projecting to the central nervous system that may represent important mechanisms of action. Numerous case series and smaller numbers of controlled trials suggest clinical benefits in these two conditions, however better controlled trials are mandated to confirm their efficacy. Current research is focusing on novel stimulation methods to better control symptoms in gastroparesis and promote weight reduction in morbid obesity. PMID:19254353

  5. Thrombin induces long-term potentiation of reactivity to afferent stimulation and facilitates epileptic seizures in rat hippocampal slices: toward understanding the functional consequences of cerebrovascular insults.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Nicola; Shavit, Efrat; Chapman, Joab; Segal, Menahem

    2008-01-16

    The effects of thrombin, a blood coagulation serine protease, were studied in rat hippocampal slices, in an attempt to comprehend its devastating effects when released into the brain after stroke and head trauma. Thrombin acting through its receptor, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), produced a long-lasting enhancement of the reactivity of CA1 neurons to afferent stimulation, an effect that saturated the ability of the tissue to undergo tetanus-induced long-term potentiation. This effect was mediated by activation of a PAR1 receptor, because it was shared by a PAR1 agonist, and was blocked by its selective antagonist. An independent effect of thrombin involved the lowering of the threshold for generating epileptic seizures in CA3 region of the hippocampus. Thus, the experiments in a slice mimicked epileptic and cognitive dysfunction induced by thrombin in the brain, and suggest that these effects are mediated by activation of the PAR1 receptor. PMID:18199772

  6. Electrical Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, A; Bowen, JM

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and children. Data Sources A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 2007 until December 2012. Review Methods Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies (in the absence of RCTs) of adults or children were included. DBS studies were included if they specified that the anterior nucleus of thalamus was the area of the brain stimulated. Outcomes of interest were seizure frequency, health resource utilization, and safety. A cost analysis was also performed. Results The search identified 6 studies that assessed changes in seizure frequency after electrical stimulation: 1 RCT on DBS in adults, 4 RCTs on VNS in adults, and 1 RCT on VNS in children. The studies of DBS and VNS in adults found significantly improved rates of seizure frequency, but the study of VNS in children did not find a significant difference in seizure frequency between the high and low stimulation groups. Significant reductions in hospitalizations and emergency department visits were found for adults and children who received VNS. No studies addressed the use of health resources for patients undergoing DBS. Five studies reported on adverse events, which ranged from serious to transient for both procedures in adults and were mostly transient in the 1 study of VNS in children. Limitations We found no evidence on DBS in children or on health care use related to DBS. The measurement of seizure frequency is self-reported and is therefore subject to bias and issues of compliance. Conclusions Based on evidence of low to moderate quality, both DBS and VNS seemed to reduce seizure frequency in adults. In children, VNS did not appear to be as

  7. Functional electrical stimulation bicycle ergometry: patient perceptions.

    PubMed

    Sipski, M L; Delisa, J A; Schweer, S

    1989-06-01

    Forty-seven patients who had participated in a clinical electrical stimulation ergometry program were administered a questionnaire to determine their perceptions of the therapy. Improved endurance was reported by 62% of paraplegics and 65% of quadriplegics. Sixty-two percent of paraplegics and 56% of quadriplegics reported improved self-image, while 54% of paraplegics and 77% of quadriplegics perceived their appearance was better. Thirty-nine percent of paraplegics and 24% of quadriplegics noted decreased lower extremity edema with training. Six out of nine patients with a previous history of neurogenic pain noted an increase in pain, which caused them to leave the program.

  8. Functional electrical stimulation and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Triolo, Ronald J; Elias, Anastasia L; Kilgore, Kevin L; DiMarco, Anthony F; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H; Audu, Musa L; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R; Chan, K Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Brose, Steven W; Gustafson, Kenneth J; Kiss, Zelma H T; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, resulting in loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can use these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options to allow functional restoration and to manage medical complications following SCI. The use of FES for the restoration of muscular and organ functions may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many FES devices are commercially available and should be considered as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible persons with SCI.

  9. Functional electrical stimulation and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Triolo, Ronald J; Elias, Anastasia L; Kilgore, Kevin L; DiMarco, Anthony F; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H; Audu, Musa L; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R; Chan, K Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Brose, Steven W; Gustafson, Kenneth J; Kiss, Zelma H T; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, resulting in loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can use these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options to allow functional restoration and to manage medical complications following SCI. The use of FES for the restoration of muscular and organ functions may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many FES devices are commercially available and should be considered as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible persons with SCI. PMID:25064792

  10. Cutaneous afferent input does not modulate motor intracortical inhibition in ageing men.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ashleigh E; Ridding, Michael C; Higgins, Ryan D; Wittert, Gary A; Pitcher, Julia B

    2011-11-01

    Afferent input has been shown to be a powerful modulator of cortical inhibition. Such modulation is likely to be important for the control of ongoing movement, but may also play a role in facilitating neuroplastic reorganisation. Human motor control and neuroplasticity both decline with ageing, whereas the efficacy of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) appears not to. We examined if ageing alters the efficacy of afferent modulation of SICI. Previously, electrical cutaneous stimulation of a finger has been shown to reduce SICI in the motor cortices of young adults. Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess SICI in the cortical representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle. SICI was assessed separately under two conditions: with and without prior afferent input from electrical cutaneous stimulation of the index finger. Fifteen 'young' (20.1 ± 2.1 years) and 15 'old' male humans (65.5 ± 3.9 years) were studied. SICI did not differ when young and old males were compared. However, when preceded by electrical cutaneous finger stimulation, SICI was reduced in young men but not old men. Reflex testing indicated preservation of the afferent volley to the cortex. These findings suggest that a contributing factor in the decline of motor function, and possibly neuroplasticity, with ageing is loss of SICI modulation, probably due to altered cortical sensorimotor integration of afferent input.

  11. Electrical stimulation for the relief of pain.

    PubMed Central

    Miles, J.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical stimulation can relieve some severe and otherwise persisting pains. At its best it can be associated with either a gradual reduction in the pain or an increased ability by the patient to control his suffering. It seems particularly appropriate for use in the field of benign persistent pain. Equipment design and materials, particularly for implantable circuits, are not perfect. Movement towards percutaneous implantation, obviating the need for open operation, seems progressively more popular. Any unit or group using this form of treatment, must be prepared to provide major technical facilities, both in the form of people and equipment in order to cater for the many purely technical problems that occur. A great deal of knowledge both neurophysiological and neurochemical seems to be accruing from the clinical use of electrical stimulation. We would do well to take advantage of this opportunity, in the hope that it might lead us to a better understanding of the functioning of the nervous system. This consideration remarkably parallels an observation made by John Hunter in his presentation to the Royal Society in 1773 (13) which anticipated the realisation of the part played by electricity in the function of nerves. Following his description of the extraordinary innervation of the electric organs of the Torpedo fish, he wrote: 'How far this may be connected with the power of the nerves in general, or how far it may lead to an explanation of their operations, time and future discoveries alone can fully determine.' Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6608312

  12. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD. PMID:24595534

  13. High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increases c-fos immunoreactivity in the dorsal raphe nucleus and afferent brain regions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sonny K H; Janssen, Marcus L F; Jahanshahi, Ali; Chouliaras, Leonidas; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Lim, Lee Wei; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Sharp, Trevor; Temel, Yasin

    2011-10-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is the neurosurgical therapy of choice for the management of motor deficits in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease, but this treatment can elicit disabling mood changes. Our recent experiments show that in rats, HFS of the STN both inhibits the firing of 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine; serotonin) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and elicits 5-HT-dependent behavioral effects. The neural circuitry underpinning these effects is unknown. Here we investigated in the dopamine-denervated rat the effect of bilateral HFS of the STN on markers of neuronal activity in the DRN as well as DRN input regions. Controls were sham-stimulated rats. HFS of the STN elicited changes in two 5-HT-sensitive behavioral tests. Specifically, HFS increased immobility in the forced swim test and increased interaction in a social interaction task. HFS of the STN at the same stimulation parameters, increased c-fos immunoreactivity in the DRN, and decreased cytochrome C oxidase activity in this region. The increase in c-fos immunoreactivity occurred in DRN neurons immunopositive for the GABA marker parvalbumin. HFS of the STN also increased the number of c-fos immunoreactive cells in the lateral habenula nucleus, medial prefrontal cortex but not significantly in the substantia nigra. Collectively, these findings support a role for circuitry involving DRN GABA neurons, as well as DRN afferents from the lateral habenula nucleus and medial prefrontal cortex, in the mood effects of HFS of the STN.

  14. Deep Brain Electrical Stimulation in Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luisa L.

    2008-11-01

    The deep brain electrical stimulation has been used for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, depression and epilepsy. Studies carried out in human brain indicate that the application of high frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) at 130 Hz in limbic structures of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy abolished clinical seizures and significantly decreased the number of interictal spikes at focus. The anticonvulsant effects of HFS seem to be more effective in patients with less severe epilepsy, an effect associated with a high GABA tissue content and a low rate of cell loss. In addition, experiments using models of epilepsy indicate that HFS (pulses of 60 μs width at 130 Hz at subthreshold current intensity) of specific brain areas avoids the acquisition of generalized seizures and enhances the postictal seizure suppression. HFS is also able to modify the status epilepticus. It is concluded that the effects of HFS may be a good strategy to reduce or avoid the epileptic activity.

  15. A continuum model of retinal electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joarder, Saiful A.; Abramian, Miganoosh; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2011-10-01

    A continuum mathematical model of retinal electrical stimulation is described. The model is represented by a passive vitreous domain, a thin layer of active retinal ganglion cell (RGC) tissue adjacent to deeper passive neural layers of the retina, the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid thus ending at the sclera. To validate the model, in vitro epiretinal responses to stimuli from 50 µm disk electrodes, arranged in a hexagonal mosaic, were recorded from rabbit retinas. 100 µs/phase anodic-first biphasic current pulses were delivered to the retinal surface in both the mathematical model and experiments. RGC responses were simulated and recorded using extracellular microelectrodes. The model's epiretinal thresholds compared favorably with the in vitro data. In addition, simulations showed that single-return bipolar electrodes recruited a larger area of the retina than twin-return or six-return electrodes arranged in a hexagonal layout in which a central stimulating electrode is surrounded by six, eqi-spaced returns. Simulations were also undertaken to investigate the patterns of RGC activation in an anatomically-accurate model of the retina, as well as RGC activation patterns for subretinal and suprachoroidal bipolar stimulation. This paper was originally submitted for the special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip.

  16. Electrochemical corrosion of STS304 acupuncture needles by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Yang, Eun Jin; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Myeong Soo; Choi, Sun-Mi

    2010-06-01

    We present the first investigation of electrical corrosion in acupuncture needles after electrical stimulation. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed the occurrence of electrochemical corrosion on the surface of stainless steel 304 acupuncture needles after electrical stimulation in the tibial muscles of rats. Biphasic pulse electrical stimuli with 10-Hz frequency, 1-mA intensity and 1-ms pulse width were applied to the needles. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method labels fragmented DNA. Positive staining using this test indicates apoptotic cells in electrically stimulated tissues. The risk of electrical corrosion was found to be less in bipolar, short-duration, low-current or voltage and short-period stimulation than in monopolar, long-duration, high-current or voltage and long-period stimulation. Evaluation with a scanning electron microscope revealed that electrical stimulation can increase the electrical corrosion of stainless steel 304 acupuncture needles. In biocompatibility studies of stainless steel 304 acupuncture needles for electrical stimulation, TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the tibial muscle within 5 days after electrical stimulation. The results of this study demonstrate that the corrosion products of stainless steel 304 acupuncture needles might affect the post-electrical stimulation tissue response. PMID:20633521

  17. Functional Electrical Stimulation and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chester H.; Triolo, Ronald J.; Elias, Anastasia L.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; DiMarco, Anthony F.; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H.; Audu, Musa; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R.; Chan, K. Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J.; Brose, Steven W.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Kiss, Zelma; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, leading to a loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. The use of electrical stimulation (ES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can take advantage of these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options, to allow functional restoration, and even to manage or prevent many medical complications following SCI. The use of ES for the restoration of upper extremity, lower extremity and truncal functions can make many activities of daily living a potential reality for individuals with SCI. Restoring bladder and respiratory functions and preventing pressure ulcers may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many of the ES devices are already commercially available and should be considered by all SCI clinicians routinely as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible individuals with SCI. PMID:25064792

  18. Facilitation of the swallowing reflex with bilateral afferent input from the superior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kojiro; Shingai, Tomio; Saito, Isao; Yamamura, Kensuke; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2014-03-01

    To determine the cooperative effect of laryngeal afferent signals on the swallowing reflex, we examined whether afferent signals originating from the left and right superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) modulates elicitation of the swallowing reflex in urethane-anesthetized rats. Mylohyoid electromyographic activity was recorded to quantify the swallowing reflex. The onset latency of the swallowing reflex and the time intervals between successive swallows were used to quantify and compare the effects of unilateral and bilateral electrical stimulations of the SLN. The mean latency of the first swallow and the mean time interval between swallows evoked with low frequency stimulation were both significantly different between unilateral and bilateral stimulations of the SLN. These findings suggest that facilitatory effect of afferent signals originating from the SLN bilaterally increase the motoneuronal activity in the medullary swallowing center and enhance the swallowing reflex.

  19. The relationship between the size of a muscle afferent volley and the cerebral potential it produces.

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, S; Burke, D; McKeon, B

    1982-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the size of an afferent neural input produced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle and the size of the early components of the evoked cerebral potential. For five of six subjects the first peak of the afferent neural volley recorded in the popliteal fossa was uncontaminated by either motor efferents or cutaneous afferents. This was established by measuring the conduction times of motor fibres in the posterior tibial nerve and cutaneous fibres in the sural and posterior tibial nerves over the ankle to popliteal fossa segment. It is likely therefore that the first peak of the afferent volley contained predominantly, if not exclusively, activity in rapidly conducting afferents from the small muscles of the foot. The size of the two earliest components of the cerebral potential did not increase in direct proportion to the size of the afferent volley which produced it. The early components of the cerebral potential reached a maximum when the responsible muscle afferent volley was less than 50% of its maximum. PMID:6290605

  20. [Stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by phenylephrine potentiates anticonvulsive and eliminates sedative action of sodium valproate in the pentylenetetrazol kindling model in rats].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, S E; Gmiro, V E; Veselkina, O S

    2014-01-01

    Sodium valproate after chronic intragastric administration in the high dose of 100-200 mg/kg eliminates generalized clonic-tonic pentylenetetrazol seizures in 100 % of rats, but only in 33-57 % of rats it prevents local clonic kindling seizures. Strong sedation is induced by the specified doses of sodium valproate. The combined oral chronic administration of phenylephrine in threshold, noneffective alone dose of 0.2 mg/kg and sodium valproate in high doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg potentiates anticonvulsive action of sodium valproate, because prevents both clonic-tonic kindling. seizures in 100 % of rats and clonic kindling seizures in 86-100 % of rats, and also it increases in 1.7-1.9 times anticonvulsive activity of valproate. The specified combinations of sodium valproate with phenylephrine do not produce the sedative side effect. The basis of the mechanism of potentiation of anticonvulsive action and elimination of sedative action of sodium valproate in high doses is the stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by phenylephrine.

  1. Imaging Electrical Stimulation of the Human Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Sonya; Suh, Minah; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2004-03-01

    The intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is a change in light reflectance from neural tissue that correlates spatially with electrophysiological activity. Depending on the wavelength of incident light, the IOS reveals different physiological changes in the tissue. In order for the IOS to be applicable to problems such as the intraoperative brain mapping, it is critical to determine which wavelengths of incident light provide optimal information about the time course and spatial localization of the underlying activity. We performed intraoperative imaging of the human cortex during direct electrical stimulation, with illumination at 546 nm (corresponding mainly to blood flow) and 605 nm (corresponding to the oxy/deoxy ratio of hemoglobin). Incident light at 546 nm showed a much larger reflectance change than orange light; at 605 nm an initial reflectance change was observed which may correspond to the ``initial dip'' observed in BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI imaging, followed by a large inverse reflectance signal which may correlate closely with the BOLD fMRI signal itself.

  2. Differential effects of plantar cutaneous afferent excitation on soleus stretch and H-reflex.

    PubMed

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Vette, Albert H; Obata, Hiroki; Alekhina, Maria I; Akai, Masami; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that plantar cutaneous afferents can adjust motoneuron excitability, which may contribute significantly to the control of human posture and locomotion. However, the role of plantar cutaneous afferents in modulating the excitability of stretch and H-reflex with respect to the location of their excitation remains unclear. In the present study, it was hypothesized that electrical stimulation delivered to the sole of the foot might be followed by modulation of spinal excitability that depends on: (1) the stimulation location and (2) the reflex studied. In these experiments, conditioned and unconditioned stretch and H-reflexes were evoked in 16 healthy subjects in a seated position. Both reflexes were conditioned by non-noxious electrical plantar cutaneous afferent stimulation at two different sites, the heel and metatarsal regions, at four different conditioning-test (CT) intervals. The conditioning stimulation delivered to the heel caused a significant facilitation of the soleus stretch reflex for all CT intervals, whereas the soleus H-reflex had significant facilitation only at CT interval of 50 ms and significant inhibition at longer CT intervals. Stimulation delivered to the metatarsal region, however, resulted mainly in reduced stretch and H-reflex sizes. This study extends the reported findings on the contribution of plantar cutaneous afferents within spinal interneuron reflex circuits as a function of their location and the reflex studied. PMID:19260052

  3. Frequency dependence of behavioral modulation by hippocampal electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    La Corte, Giorgio; Wei, Yina; Chernyy, Nick; Gluckman, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation offers the potential to develop novel strategies for the treatment of refractory medial temporal lobe epilepsy. In particular, direct electrical stimulation of the hippocampus presents the opportunity to modulate pathological dynamics at the ictal focus, although the neuroanatomical substrate of this region renders it susceptible to altering cognition and affective processing as a side effect. We investigated the effects of three electrical stimulation paradigms on separate groups of freely moving rats (sham, 8-Hz and 40-Hz sine-wave stimulation of the ventral/intermediate hippocampus, where 8- and 40-Hz stimulation were chosen to mimic naturally occurring hippocampal oscillations). Animals exhibited attenuated locomotor and exploratory activity upon stimulation at 40 Hz, but not at sham or 8-Hz stimulation. Such behavioral modifications were characterized by a significant reduction in rearing frequency, together with increased freezing behavior. Logistic regression analysis linked the observed changes in animal locomotion to 40-Hz electrical stimulation independently of time-related variables occurring during testing. Spectral analysis, conducted to monitor the electrophysiological profile in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus, showed a significant reduction in peak theta frequency, together with reduced theta power in the 40-Hz vs. the sham stimulation animal group, independent of locomotion speed (theta range: 4–12 Hz). These findings contribute to the development of novel and safe medical protocols by indicating a strategy to constrain or optimize parameters in direct hippocampal electrical stimulation. PMID:24198322

  4. Muscle damage induced by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Kazunori; Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; Chen, Trevor C

    2011-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) induces muscle damage that is characterised by histological alterations of muscle fibres and connective tissue, increases in circulating creatine kinase (CK) activity, decreases in muscle strength and development of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Muscle damage is induced not only by eccentric contractions with ES but also by isometric contractions evoked by ES. Muscle damage profile following 40 isometric contractions of the knee extensors is similar between pulsed current (75 Hz, 400 μs) and alternating current (2.5 kHz delivered at 75 Hz, 400 μs) ES for similar force output. When comparing maximal voluntary and ES-evoked (75 Hz, 200 μs) 50 isometric contractions of the elbow flexors, ES results in greater decreases in maximal voluntary contraction strength, increases in plasma CK activity and DOMS. It appears that the magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES-evoked isometric contractions is comparable to that induced by maximal voluntary eccentric contractions, although the volume of affected muscles in ES is not as large as that of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. It seems likely that the muscle damage in ES is associated with high mechanical stress on the activated muscle fibres due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment (i.e., non-selective, synchronous and spatially fixed manner). The magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES is significantly reduced when the second ES bout is performed 2-4 weeks later. It is possible to attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage by "pre-conditioning" muscles, so that muscle damage should not limit the use of ES in training and rehabilitation. PMID:21811767

  5. Toward rational design of electrical stimulation strategies for epilepsy control

    PubMed Central

    Sunderam, Sridhar; Gluckman, Bruce; Reato, Davide; Bikson, Marom

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is emerging as a viable alternative for epilepsy patients whose seizures are not alleviated by drugs or surgery. Its attractions are temporal and spatial specificity of action, flexibility of waveform parameters and timing, and the perception that its effects are reversible unlike resective surgery. However, despite significant advances in our understanding of mechanisms of neural electrical stimulation, clinical electrotherapy for seizures relies heavily on empirical tuning of parameters and protocols. We highlight concurrent treatment goals with potentially conflicting design constraints that must be resolved when formulating rational strategies for epilepsy electrotherapy: namely seizure reduction versus cognitive impairment, stimulation efficacy versus tissue safety, and mechanistic insight versus clinical pragmatism. First, treatment markers, objectives, and metrics relevant to electrical stimulation for epilepsy are discussed from a clinical perspective. Then the experimental perspective is presented, with the biophysical mechanisms and modalities of open-loop electrical stimulation, and the potential benefits of closed-loop control for epilepsy. PMID:19926525

  6. Pharmacologically Distinct Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Drive Efferent-Mediated Excitation in Calyx-Bearing Vestibular Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Kewin, Kevin; Jordan, Paivi M.; Cameron, Peter; Klapczynski, Marcin; McIntosh, J. Michael; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Lysakowski, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of vestibular efferent neurons rapidly excites the resting discharge of calyx/dimorphic (CD) afferents. In turtle, this excitation arises when acetylcholine (ACh), released from efferent terminals, directly depolarizes calyceal endings by activating nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs). Although molecular biological data from the peripheral vestibular system implicate most of the known nAChR subunits, specific information about those contributing to efferent-mediated excitation of CD afferents is lacking. We sought to identify the nAChR subunits that underlie the rapid excitation of CD afferents and whether they differ from α9α10 nAChRs on type II hair cells that drive efferent-mediated inhibition in adjacent bouton afferents. We recorded from CD and bouton afferents innervating the turtle posterior crista during electrical stimulation of vestibular efferents while applying several subtype-selective nAChR agonists and antagonists. The α9α10 nAChR antagonists, α-bungarotoxin and α-conotoxin RgIA, blocked efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents while leaving efferent-mediated excitation in CD units largely intact. Conversely, 5-iodo-A-85380, sazetidine-A, varenicline, α-conotoxin MII, and bPiDDB (N,N-dodecane-1,12-diyl-bis-3-picolinium dibromide) blocked efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents without affecting efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents. This pharmacological profile suggested that calyceal nAChRs contain α6 and β2, but not α9, nAChR subunits. Selective blockade of efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents distinguished dimorphic from calyx afferents by revealing type II hair cell input. Dimorphic afferents differed in having higher mean discharge rates and a mean efferent-mediated excitation that was smaller in amplitude yet longer in duration. Molecular biological data demonstrated the expression of α9 in turtle hair cells and α4 and β2 in associated vestibular ganglia. PMID:25716861

  7. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral...

  8. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral...

  9. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral...

  10. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral...

  11. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral...

  12. Design of electrical stimulation bioreactors for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, N; Marsano, A; Cannizzaro, C; Voldman, J; Vunjak-Novakovic, G

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering.

  13. Design of Electrical Stimulation Bioreactors for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, N.; Marsano, A.; Cannizzaro, C.; Voldman, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:19163486

  14. Vascular effects of free radicals generated by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, F.S.; Webb, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Electrical field stimulation (9 V, 1.0 ms, 4 Hz) of isolated segments of rat tail arteries and dog coronary arteries inhibits contractile response to exogenous norephinephrine and elevated potassium concentration. This inhibitory effect of electrical stimulation is blocked by various agents that alter oxygen metabolism: superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, ascorbate, and dimethyl sulfoxide. The observations suggest that the inhibitory effect is due to an action of oxygen free radical metabolites that are generated by the electrical stimulation of the oxygen-rich buffer. These free radical metabolites have two actions: 1) they oxidize drugs in the experimental system, and 2) they exert a direct inhbitory action on vascular smooth muscle.

  15. Role of Chemoreceptor Activation in Hemodynamic Responses to Electrical Stimulation of the Carotid Sinus in Conscious Rats.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Pedro L; Castania, Jaci A; Dias, Daniel P M; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2015-09-01

    Electric carotid baroreflex activation has been used to treat patients with resistant hypertension. It is hypothesized that, in conscious rats, combined activation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors afferences attenuates the reflex hypotension. Rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, with unilateral denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors; (2) chemoreceptor denervation group, with bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery; (3) baroreceptor denervation group, with unilateral denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and right carotid chemoreceptors; and (4) carotid bifurcation denervation group, with denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors, plus denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors. Animals were subjected to 4 rounds of electric stimulation (5 V, 1 ms), with 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz applied randomly for 20 s. Electric stimulation caused greater hypotensive responses in the chemoreceptor denervation group than in the control group, at 60 Hz (-37 versus -19 mm Hg) and 90 Hz (-33 versus -19 mm Hg). The baroreceptor denervation group showed hypertensive responses at all frequencies of stimulation. In contrast, the carotid sinus denervation group showed no hemodynamic responses. The control group presented no changes in heart rate, whereas the chemoreceptor denervation group and the baroreceptor denervation group showed bradycardic responses. These data demonstrate that carotid chemoreceptor activation attenuates the reflex hypotension caused by combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve in conscious rats. These findings may provide useful insight for clinical studies using baroreflex activation therapy in resistant hypertension and heart failure.

  16. Selective Activation of Neuronal Targets With Sinusoidal Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Eddington, Donald K.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the CNS is being evaluated as a treatment modality for a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and sensory disorders. Despite considerable success in some applications, existing stimulation techniques offer little control over which cell types or neuronal substructures are activated by stimulation. The ability to more precisely control neuronal activation would likely improve the clinical outcomes associated with these applications. Here, we show that specific frequencies of sinusoidal stimulation can be used to preferentially activate certain retinal cell types: photoreceptors are activated at 5 Hz, bipolar cells at 25 Hz, and ganglion cells at 100 Hz. In addition, low-frequency stimulation (≤25 Hz) did not activate passing axons but still elicited robust synaptically mediated responses in ganglion cells; therefore, elicited neural activity is confined to within a focal region around the stimulating electrode. Our results suggest that sinusoidal stimulation provides significantly improved control over elicited neural activity relative to conventional pulsatile stimulation. PMID:20810683

  17. Optimization of Electrical Stimulation Parameters for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile cardiac tissue constrcuts. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation, to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, and were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Cardiac tissues stimulated at 3V/cm amplitude and 3Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43, and the best developed contractile behavior. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21604379

  18. Optimization of electrical stimulation parameters for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-06-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile engineered cardiac tissues. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Engineered cardiac tissues stimulated at 3 V/cm amplitude and 3 Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43 and the best-developed contractile behaviour. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering.

  19. A CONTINUED INVESTIGATION OF ELECTRICALLY STIMULATED FABRIC FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes three experiments performed by Southern Research Institute under a cooperative agreement with EPA. First was a demonstration of electrostatically stimulated fabric filtration (ESFF) used to collect particulate matter (PM) from fossil fuel electrical power pl...

  20. Electrical stimulation therapies for spinal fusions: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jean C; Glazer, Paul A

    2006-09-01

    Electrical stimulation therapies have been used for more than 30 years to enhance spinal fusions. Although their positive effects on spinal fusions have been widely reported, the mechanisms of action of the technologies were only recently identified. Three types of technologies are available clinically: direct current, capacitive coupling, and inductive coupling. The latter is the basis of pulsed electromagnetic fields and combined magnetic fields. This review summarizes the current concepts on the mechanisms of action, animal and clinical studies, and cost justification for the use of electrical stimulation for spinal fusions. Scientific studies support the validity of electrical stimulation treatments. The mechanisms of action of each of the three electrical stimulation therapies are different. New data demonstrates that the upregulation of several growth factors may be responsible for the clinical success seen with the use of such technologies.

  1. Induction of Long-term Depression-like Plasticity by Pairings of Motor Imagination and Peripheral Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jochumsen, Mads; Signal, Nada; Nedergaard, Rasmus W.; Taylor, Denise; Haavik, Heidi; Niazi, Imran K.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity are models of synaptic plasticity which have been associated with memory and learning. The induction of LTD and LTP-like plasticity, using different stimulation protocols, has been proposed as a means of addressing abnormalities in cortical excitability associated with conditions such as focal hand dystonia and stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the excitability of the cortical projections to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle could be decreased when dorsiflexion of the ankle joint was imagined and paired with peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) of the nerve supplying the antagonist soleus muscle. The effect of stimulus timing was evaluated by comparing paired stimulation timed to reach the cortex before, at and after the onset of imagined movement. Fourteen healthy subjects participated in six experimental sessions held on non-consecutive days. The timing of stimulation delivery was determined offline based on the contingent negative variation (CNV) of electroencephalography brain data obtained during imagined dorsiflexion. Afferent stimulation was provided via a single pulse ES to the peripheral nerve paired, based on the CNV, with motor imagination of ankle dorsiflexion. A significant decrease (P = 0.001) in the excitability of the cortical projection of TA was observed when the afferent volley from the ES of the tibial nerve (TN) reached the cortex at the onset of motor imagination based on the CNV. When TN stimulation was delivered before (P = 0.62), or after (P = 0.23) imagined movement onset there was no significant effect. Nor was a significant effect found when ES of the TN was applied independent of imagined movement (P = 0.45). Therefore, the excitability of the cortical projection to a muscle can be inhibited when ES of the nerve supplying the antagonist muscle is precisely paired with the onset of imagined movement. PMID:26648859

  2. The effect of electrical stimulation on obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, C; Powell, N; Bowman, B; Stoohs, R

    1995-01-01

    Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea polygraphically documented underwent electrical stimulation treatment trials. Submental and intraoral stimulations were applied during waking and during nocturnal sleep. The stimulation was applied using a custom-designed neuromuscular electrical stimulator (EdenTec Corp) providing symmetric biphasic constant voltage pulses. Pulse duration of each phase was set to 80 microseconds based on a subjective evaluation of pulse durations from 80 to 300 microseconds to minimize sensation while generating equivalent motor responses. Pulse repetition rate was set to 50 pulses per second. Cephalometric radiographs and endoscopies were obtained with and without stimulations during waking. Most commonly, stimulations induced alpha EEG arousals. Submental subcutaneous stimulation induced good contractions of platysmal muscles but had no impact on the upper airway. Intraoral stimulation induced clear tongue muscle movements but with change of shape of the upper airway and posterior movements of the tongue. Each time a breakage of apnea was noted, it was associated with a time-linked alpha EEG arousal. The results obtained by us and others do not, at this time, give convincing support for the use of electrical stimulation using submental surface or intraoral electrodes as a viable approach for effective control of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome symptoms.

  3. Pulsed laser versus electrical energy for peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter; Kao, Chris; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Transient optical neural stimulation has previously been shown to elicit highly controlled, artifact-free potentials within the nervous system in a non-contact fashion without resulting in damage to tissue. This paper presents the physiologic validity of elicited nerve and muscle potentials from pulsed laser induced stimulation of the peripheral nerve in a comparative study with the standard method of electrically evoked potentials. Herein, the fundamental physical properties underlying the two techniques are contrasted. Key laser parameters for efficient optical stimulation of the peripheral nerve are detailed. Strength response curves are shown to be linear for each stimulation modality, although fewer axons can be recruited with optically evoked potentials. Results compare the relative transient energy requirements for stimulation using each technique and demonstrate that optical methods can selectively excite functional nerve stimulation. Adjacent stimulation and recording of compound nerve potentials in their entirety from optical and electrical stimulation are presented, with optical responses shown to be free of any stimulation artifact. Thus, use of a pulsed laser exhibits some advantages when compared to standard electrical means for excitation of muscle potentials in the peripheral nerve in the research domain and possibly for clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:17537515

  4. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes. PMID:26193273

  5. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-07-16

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes.

  6. Effects of somatosensory electrical stimulation on neuronal injury after global hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Manuel M; Luft, Andreas R; Thakor, Nitish V; Blue, Mary E; Hanley, Daniel F

    2004-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) is used after cardiac arrest (CA) for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The effects of ES on brain damage induced by hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI) has not been investigated. Stimulation of afferent pathways by ES may increase neural injury by releasing excitatory neurotransmitters (glutamate) and thereby exacerbating excitotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, ES was applied to the median nerve (2 h) of adult male Wistar rats after 5 min of asphyxic CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Control animals received no ES. Assessment of neuronal damage in five regions of interest was performed in survivors (ESn=15, Control n=10, Sham n=3) after 48 h using H&E, Cresyl-Violet, and TUNEL stains, and Caspase-3 and activated ERK 1/2 immunohistochemistry. Ratios of injured to normal cells were calculated. Most injury was found in hippocampus and cerebellum. ES animals showed significantly lower injury ratios in bilateral hippocampus as compared with controls (F=20.8, p<0.00001). TUNEL staining, caspase-3 and activated ERK 1/2 showed no differences between groups. It is concluded that ES during the acute phase of HI does not amplify neuronal damage at 48 h, but may have a protective effect that requires further investigation. PMID:15146305

  7. Electrical stimulation of a small brain area reversibly disrupts consciousness.

    PubMed

    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Picard, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    The neural mechanisms that underlie consciousness are not fully understood. We describe a region in the human brain where electrical stimulation reproducibly disrupted consciousness. A 54-year-old woman with intractable epilepsy underwent depth electrode implantation and electrical stimulation mapping. The electrode whose stimulation disrupted consciousness was between the left claustrum and anterior-dorsal insula. Stimulation of electrodes within 5mm did not affect consciousness. We studied the interdependencies among depth recording signals as a function of time by nonlinear regression analysis (h(2) coefficient) during stimulations that altered consciousness and stimulations of the same electrode at lower current intensities that were asymptomatic. Stimulation of the claustral electrode reproducibly resulted in a complete arrest of volitional behavior, unresponsiveness, and amnesia without negative motor symptoms or mere aphasia. The disruption of consciousness did not outlast the stimulation and occurred without any epileptiform discharges. We found a significant increase in correlation for interactions affecting medial parietal and posterior frontal channels during stimulations that disrupted consciousness compared with those that did not. Our findings suggest that the left claustrum/anterior insula is an important part of a network that subserves consciousness and that disruption of consciousness is related to increased EEG signal synchrony within frontal-parietal networks.

  8. Electrical stimulation of a small brain area reversibly disrupts consciousness.

    PubMed

    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Picard, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    The neural mechanisms that underlie consciousness are not fully understood. We describe a region in the human brain where electrical stimulation reproducibly disrupted consciousness. A 54-year-old woman with intractable epilepsy underwent depth electrode implantation and electrical stimulation mapping. The electrode whose stimulation disrupted consciousness was between the left claustrum and anterior-dorsal insula. Stimulation of electrodes within 5mm did not affect consciousness. We studied the interdependencies among depth recording signals as a function of time by nonlinear regression analysis (h(2) coefficient) during stimulations that altered consciousness and stimulations of the same electrode at lower current intensities that were asymptomatic. Stimulation of the claustral electrode reproducibly resulted in a complete arrest of volitional behavior, unresponsiveness, and amnesia without negative motor symptoms or mere aphasia. The disruption of consciousness did not outlast the stimulation and occurred without any epileptiform discharges. We found a significant increase in correlation for interactions affecting medial parietal and posterior frontal channels during stimulations that disrupted consciousness compared with those that did not. Our findings suggest that the left claustrum/anterior insula is an important part of a network that subserves consciousness and that disruption of consciousness is related to increased EEG signal synchrony within frontal-parietal networks. PMID:24967698

  9. Long-lasting modulation of human motor cortex following prolonged transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of forearm muscles: evidence of reciprocal inhibition and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Tinazzi, Michele; Zarattini, Stefano; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romito, Silvia; Farina, Simona; Moretto, Giuseppe; Smania, Nicola; Fiaschi, Antonio; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2005-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that motor cortex excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent inputs, like peripheral electrical stimulation. Most studies in humans mainly dealt with the effects of prolonged low-frequency peripheral nerve stimulation on motor cortical excitability, despite its being known from animal studies that high-frequency stimulation can also result in changes of the cortical excitability. To investigate the possible effects of high-frequency peripheral stimulation on motor cortical excitability we recorded motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left motor cortex from the right flexor carpi radialis (FCR), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) in normal subjects, before and after transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of 30 min duration applied over the FCR. The amplitude of MEPs from the FRC was significantly reduced from 10 to 35 min after TENS while the amplitude of MEPs from ECR was increased. No effects were observed in the FDI muscle. Indices of peripheral nerve (M-wave) and spinal cord excitability (H waves) did not change throughout the experiment. Electrical stimulation of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve has no significant effect on motor cortex excitability. These findings suggest that TENS of forearm muscles can induce transient reciprocal inhibitory and facilitatory changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability of forearm flexor and extensor muscles lasting several minutes. These changes probably may occur at cortical site and seem to be mainly dependent on stimulation of muscle afferents. These findings might eventually lead to practical applications in rehabilitation, especially in those syndromes in which the excitatory and inhibitory balance between agonist and antagonist is severely impaired, such as spasticity and dystonia.

  10. Electric field stimulated growth of Zn whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, D.; McCulloch, J.; Warrell, G. R.; Irving, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the impact of strong (˜104 V/cm) electric fields on the development of Zn whiskers. The original samples, with considerable whisker infestation were cut from Zn-coated steel floors and then exposed to electric fields stresses for 10-20 hours at room temperature. We used various electric field sources, from charges accumulated in samples irradiated by: (1) the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), (2) the electron beam of a medical linear accelerator, and (3) the ion beam of a linear accelerator; we also used (4) the electric field produced by a Van der Graaf generator. In all cases, the exposed samples exhibited a considerable (tens of percent) increase in whiskers concentration compared to the control sample. The acceleration factor defined as the ratio of the measured whisker growth rate over that in zero field, was estimated to approach several hundred. The statistics of lengths of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution known previously for metal whiskers. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  11. Why intra-epidermal electrical stimulation achieves stimulation of small fibres selectively: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Jun; Sugiyama, Yukiya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Inui, Koji; Tamura, Manabu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    The in situ electric field in the peripheral nerve of the skin is investigated to discuss the selective stimulation of nerve fibres. Coaxial planar electrodes with and without intra-epidermal needle tip were considered as electrodes of a stimulator. From electromagnetic analysis, the tip depth of the intra-epidermal electrode should be larger than the thickness of the stratum corneum, the electrical conductivity of which is much lower than the remaining tissue. The effect of different radii of the outer ring electrode on the in situ electric field is marginal. The minimum threshold in situ electric field (rheobase) for free nerve endings is estimated to be 6.3 kV m-1. The possible volume for electrostimulation, which can be obtained from the in situ electric field distribution, becomes deeper and narrower with increasing needle depth, suggesting that possible stimulation sites may be controlled by changing the needle depth. The injection current amplitude should be adjusted when changing the needle depth because the peak field strength also changes. This study shows that intra-epidermal electrical stimulation can achieve stimulation of small fibres selectively, because Aβ-, Aδ-, and C-fibre terminals are located at different depths in the skin.

  12. Role of the heart and peripheral resistance in the reflex effect of group I afferent fibers on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Orani, G P; Decandia, M

    1994-03-01

    Experiments were done on anesthetized and curarized cats to see whether the increase in blood pressure caused by electrical stimulation of group I afferent fibers is related to a direct reflex effect on the heart. The reflex effect of electrical stimulation of group I afferent fibers from the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles on the arterial pressure, the left ventricular pressure, the inotropic state of the left ventricle (dP50/dt) and the heart rate were compared before and after beta-blockade with propranolol (0.1 mg/kg intravenously) to reduce a possible direct effect on the heart. The same comparison was made before and after alpha-blockade with phentolamine (2.5 mg/kg intravenously) to keep the peripheral resistance constant. Electrical stimulation of group I afferent fibers caused an increase in the blood pressure, the left ventricular pressure and, to some extent, the inotropic state of the left ventricle and the heart rate. The beta-blockade had no significant effect on these increases, while the alpha-blockade abolished the increase in blood pressure. It is concluded that the effect of stimulation of group I afferent fibers on the blood pressure is not dependent on a direct reflex effect on the heart, but can be better explained by a reflex increase in the peripheral resistance. PMID:8204793

  13. Safe neuromuscular electrical stimulator designed for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Matthias; Haller, Michael; Bijak, Manfred; Unger, Ewald; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    A stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) was designed, especially suiting the requirements of elderly people with reduced cognitive abilities and diminished fine motor skills. The aging of skeletal muscle is characterized by a progressive decline in muscle mass, force, and condition. Muscle training with NMES reduces the degradation process. The discussed system is intended for evoked muscle training of the anterior and posterior thigh. The core of the stimulator is based on a microcontroller with two modular output stages. The system has two charge-balanced biphasic voltage-controlled stimulation channels. Additionally, the evoked myoelectric signal (M-wave) and the myokinematic signal (surface acceleration) are measured. A central controller unit allows using the stimulator as a stand-alone device. To set up the training sequences and to evaluate the compliance data, a personal computer is connected to the stimulator via a universal serial bus. To help elderly people handle the stimulator by themselves, the user interface is kept very simple. For safety reasons, the electrode impedance is monitored during stimulation. A comprehensive compliance management with included measurements of muscle activity and stimulation intensity enables a scientific use of the stimulator in clinical trials.

  14. Bladder emptying by intermittent electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Joseph W.; Wenzel, Brian J.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2006-03-01

    Persons with a suprasacral spinal cord injury cannot empty their bladder voluntarily. Bladder emptying can be restored by intermittent electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots (SR) to cause bladder contraction. However, this therapy requires sensory nerve transection to prevent dyssynergic contraction of the external urethral sphincter (EUS). Stimulation of the compound pudendal nerve trunk (PN) activates spinal micturition circuitry, leading to a reflex bladder contraction without a reflex EUS contraction. The present study determined if PN stimulation could produce bladder emptying without nerve transection in cats anesthetized with α-chloralose. With all nerves intact, intermittent PN stimulation emptied the bladder (64 ± 14% of initial volume, n = 37 across six cats) more effectively than either distention-evoked micturition (40 ± 19%, p < 0.001, n = 27 across six cats) or bilateral intermittent SR stimulation (25 ± 23%, p < 0.005, n = 4 across two cats). After bilateral transection of the nerves innervating the urethral sphincter, intermittent SR stimulation voided 79 ± 17% (n = 12 across three cats), comparable to clinical results obtained with SR stimulation. Voiding via intermittent PN stimulation did not increase after neurotomy (p > 0.10), indicating that PN stimulation was not limited by bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. Intermittent PN stimulation holds promise for restoring bladder emptying following spinal injury without requiring nerve transection.

  15. Safe neuromuscular electrical stimulator designed for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Matthias; Haller, Michael; Bijak, Manfred; Unger, Ewald; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    A stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) was designed, especially suiting the requirements of elderly people with reduced cognitive abilities and diminished fine motor skills. The aging of skeletal muscle is characterized by a progressive decline in muscle mass, force, and condition. Muscle training with NMES reduces the degradation process. The discussed system is intended for evoked muscle training of the anterior and posterior thigh. The core of the stimulator is based on a microcontroller with two modular output stages. The system has two charge-balanced biphasic voltage-controlled stimulation channels. Additionally, the evoked myoelectric signal (M-wave) and the myokinematic signal (surface acceleration) are measured. A central controller unit allows using the stimulator as a stand-alone device. To set up the training sequences and to evaluate the compliance data, a personal computer is connected to the stimulator via a universal serial bus. To help elderly people handle the stimulator by themselves, the user interface is kept very simple. For safety reasons, the electrode impedance is monitored during stimulation. A comprehensive compliance management with included measurements of muscle activity and stimulation intensity enables a scientific use of the stimulator in clinical trials. PMID:21401669

  16. Mapping of electrical muscle stimulation using MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Harris, Robert T.; Woodard, Daniel; Dudley, Gary A.

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of muscle contractile activity elicited by electromyostimulation (EMS) was mapped and compared to the contractile-activity pattern produced by voluntary effort. This was done by examining the patterns and the extent of contrast shift, as indicated by T2 values, im magnetic resonance (MR) images after isometric activity of the left m. quadriceps of human subjects was elicited by EMS (1-sec train of 500-microsec sine wave pulses at 50 Hz) or voluntary effort. The results suggest that, whereas EMS stimulates the same fibers repeatedly, thereby increasing the metabolic demand and T2 values, the voluntary efforts are performed by more diffuse asynchronous activation of skeletal muscle even at forces up to 75 percent of maximal to maintain performance.

  17. Characterization of silent afferents in the pelvic and splanchnic innervations of the mouse colorectum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G F

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity in inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome is contributed to in part by changes in the receptive properties of colorectal afferent endings, likely including mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; silent afferents) that have the ability to acquire mechanosensitivity. The proportion and attributes of colorectal MIAs, however, have not previously been characterized. The distal ∼3 cm of colorectum with either pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached was removed, opened longitudinally, pinned flat in a recording chamber, and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Colorectal receptive endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. MIA endings were tested for response to and acquisition of mechanosensitivity by localized exposure to an inflammatory soup (IS). Colorectal afferents were also tested with twin-pulse and repetitive electrical stimulation paradigms. PN MIAs represented 23% of 211 afferents studied, 71% (30/42) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after application of IS to their receptive ending. LSN MIAs represented 33% of 156 afferents studied, only 23% (11/48) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after IS exposure. Mechanosensitive PN endings uniformly exhibited significant twin-pulse slowing whereas LSN endings showed no significant twin-pulse difference. PN MIAs displayed significantly greater activity-dependent slowing than LSN MIAs. In conclusion, significant proportions of MIAs are present in the colorectal innervation; significantly more in the PN than LSN acquire mechanosensitivity in an inflammatory environment. This knowledge contributes to our understanding of the possible roles of MIAs in colon-related disorders like inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:21071510

  18. Characterization of silent afferents in the pelvic and splanchnic innervations of the mouse colorectum

    PubMed Central

    Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity in inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome is contributed to in part by changes in the receptive properties of colorectal afferent endings, likely including mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; silent afferents) that have the ability to acquire mechanosensitivity. The proportion and attributes of colorectal MIAs, however, have not previously been characterized. The distal ∼3 cm of colorectum with either pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached was removed, opened longitudinally, pinned flat in a recording chamber, and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Colorectal receptive endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. MIA endings were tested for response to and acquisition of mechanosensitivity by localized exposure to an inflammatory soup (IS). Colorectal afferents were also tested with twin-pulse and repetitive electrical stimulation paradigms. PN MIAs represented 23% of 211 afferents studied, 71% (30/42) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after application of IS to their receptive ending. LSN MIAs represented 33% of 156 afferents studied, only 23% (11/48) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after IS exposure. Mechanosensitive PN endings uniformly exhibited significant twin-pulse slowing whereas LSN endings showed no significant twin-pulse difference. PN MIAs displayed significantly greater activity-dependent slowing than LSN MIAs. In conclusion, significant proportions of MIAs are present in the colorectal innervation; significantly more in the PN than LSN acquire mechanosensitivity in an inflammatory environment. This knowledge contributes to our understanding of the possible roles of MIAs in colon-related disorders like inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:21071510

  19. Impaired excitability of renal afferent innervation after exposure to the inflammatory chemokine CXCL1.

    PubMed

    Ditting, Tilmann; Freisinger, Wolfgang; Rodionova, Kristina; Schatz, Johannes; Lale, Nena; Heinlein, Sonja; Linz, Peter; Ott, Christian; Schmieder, Roland E; Scrogin, Karie E; Veelken, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we showed that renal afferent neurons exhibit a unique firing pattern, i.e., predominantly sustained firing, upon stimulation. Pathological conditions such as renal inflammation likely alter excitability of renal afferent neurons. Here, we tested whether the proinflammatory chemokine CXCL1 alters the firing pattern of renal afferent neurons. Rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (Th11-L2), retrogradely labeled with dicarbocyanine dye, were incubated with CXCL1 (20 h) or vehicle before patch-clamp recording. The firing pattern of neurons was characterized as tonic, i.e., sustained action potential (AP) firing, or phasic, i.e., <5 APs following current injection. Of the labeled renal afferents treated with vehicle, 58.9% exhibited a tonic firing pattern vs. 7.8%, in unlabeled, nonrenal neurons (P < 0.05). However, after exposure to CXCL1, significantly more phasic neurons were found among labeled renal neurons; hence the occurrence of tonic neurons with sustained firing upon electrical stimulation decreased (35.6 vs. 58.9%, P < 0.05). The firing frequency among tonic neurons was not statistically different between control and CXCL1-treated neurons. However, the lower firing frequency of phasic neurons was even further decreased with CXCL1 exposure [control: 1 AP/600 ms (1-2) vs. CXCL1: 1 AP/600 ms (1-1); P < 0.05; median (25th-75th percentile)]. Hence, CXCL1 shifted the firing pattern of renal afferents from a predominantly tonic to a more phasic firing pattern, suggesting that CXCL1 reduced the sensitivity of renal afferent units upon stimulation.

  20. Cortical excitability changes following grasping exercise augmented with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Gergely I; Popovic, Dejan B; Tarkka, Ina M; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Grey, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    Rehabilitation with augmented electrical stimulation can enhance functional recovery after stroke, and cortical plasticity may play a role in this process. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three training paradigms on cortical excitability in healthy subjects. Cortical excitability was evaluated by analysing the input-output relationship between transcranial magnetic stimulation intensity and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the flexor muscles of the fingers. The study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers who underwent 20-min simulated therapy sessions of: (1) functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the finger flexors and extensors, (2) voluntary movement (VOL) with sensory stimulation, and (3) therapeutic FES (TFES) where the electrical stimulation augmented voluntary activation. TFES training produced a significant increase in MEP magnitude throughout the stimulation range, suggesting an increase in cortical excitability. In contrast, neither the FES nor voluntary movement alone had such an effect. These results suggest that the combination of voluntary effort and FES has greater potential to induce plasticity in the motor cortex and that TFES might be a more effective approach in rehabilitation after stroke than FES or repetitive voluntary training alone.

  1. Corticospinal potentials after electrical and magnetic stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Berardelli, A; Inghilleri, M; Cruccu, G; Manfredi, M

    1991-01-01

    The present report deals with our study of the descending volley evoked by both electrical and magnetic transcranial stimulation in man. We discuss the differences of these two techniques specifically as regards the latency and amplitude of evoked potentials. In both cases, electrodes were placed either in the epidural space or directly on the spinal cord. Following electrical stimulation, the descending volley consisted of an early wave which appeared at low stimulation intensity and increased in amplitude and decreased in latency when the strength of the stimulus was increased. At high stimulation intensities the early wave was followed by later waves which travel at the same speed as the initial wave. By delivering paired cortical stimuli, the early wave evoked by the test stimuli is present at 1-msec interval and progressively recovered with longer intervals. The recovery cycle of the later waves is also extremely short. Following magnetic stimulation, the descending volley also consisted of an initial wave followed by later waves. The initial wave has a slightly longer latency, a higher threshold and a smaller amplitude than the early wave evoked by electrical stimulation. The results are discussed with reference to the D and I waves recorded from the pyramidal tract in animals.

  2. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Luke J.; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s-1. A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s-1. Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  3. Electrically stimulated contractions of Vorticella convallaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantha, Deependra; van Winkle, David

    2009-03-01

    The contraction of Vorticella convallaria was triggered by applying a voltage pulse in its host culturing medium. The 50V, 1ms wide pulse was applied across platinum wires separated by 0.7 cm on a microscope slide. The contractions were recorded as cines (image sequences) by a Phantom V5 camera (Vision Research) on a bright field microscope with 20X objective, with the image size of 256 pixels x 128 pixels at 7352 pictures per second. The starting time of the cines was synchronized with the starting of the electrical pulse. We recorded five contractions of each of 12 organisms. The cines were analyzed to obtain the initiation time, defined as the difference in time between the leading edge of the electrical pulse and the first frame showing zooid movement. From multiple contractions of same organism, we found the initiation time is reproducible. In comparing different organisms, we found the average initiation time of 1.73 ms with a standard deviation of 0.63 ms. This research is supported by the state of Florida (MARTECH) and Research Corporation.

  4. An update on functional electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorman, P H

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical engineering as applied to neurologic rehabilitation have finally borne clinically relevant fruit. Nowhere is this more evident than in the field of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This article highlights the remarkable clinical progress that has been made in the use of electrical stimulation for restoring movement and function in individuals with spinal cord injury. Specific attention is given to respiratory-assist devices, hand-grasp systems, standing and walking, and bladder control. This review article features discussion of eight devices that have gone through the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory approval process. PMID:11402876

  5. Exploring Selective Neural Electrical Stimulation for Upper Limb Function Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Tigra, Wafa; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Coulet, Bertrand; Gelis, Anthony; Fattal, Charles; Maciejasz, Pawel; Picq, Chloé; Rossel, Olivier; Teissier, Jacques; Coste, Christine Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach of selective neural electrical stimulation of the upper limb nerves. Median and radial nerves of individuals with tetraplegia are stimulated via a multipolar cuff electrode to elicit movements of wrist and hand in acute conditions during a surgical intervention. Various configurations corresponding to various combinations of a 12-poles cuff electrode contacts are tested. Video recording and electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded via sterile surface electrodes are used to evaluate the selectivity of each stimulation configuration in terms of activated muscles. In this abstract we introduce the protocol and preliminary results will be presented during the conference. PMID:27478571

  6. Hearing suppression induced by electrical stimulation of human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, Albert J; Severson, Meryl A; Volkov, Igor O; Brugge, John F; Howard, Matthew A

    2006-11-01

    In the course of performing electrical stimulation functional mapping (ESFM) in neurosurgery patients, we identified three subjects who experienced hearing suppression during stimulation of sites within the superior temporal gyrus (STG). One of these patients had long standing tinnitus that affected both ears. In all subjects, auditory event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from chronically implanted intracranial electrodes and the results were used to localize auditory cortical fields within the STG. Hearing suppression sites were identified within anterior lateral Heschl's gyrus (HG) and posterior lateral STG, in what may be auditory belt and parabelt fields. Cortical stimulation suppressed hearing in both ears, which persisted beyond the period of electrical stimulation. Subjects experienced other stimulation-evoked perceptions at some of these same sites, including symptoms of vestibular activation and alteration of audio-visual speech processing. In contrast, stimulation of presumed core auditory cortex within posterior medial HG evoked sound perceptions, or in one case an increase in tinnitus intensity, that affected the contralateral ear and did not persist beyond the period of stimulation. The current results confirm a rarely reported experimental observation, and correlate the cortical sites associated with hearing suppression with physiologically identified auditory cortical fields. PMID:16979144

  7. Electrical low-frequency stimulation induces long-term depression of sensory and affective components of pain in healthy man.

    PubMed

    Rottmann, Silke; Jung, Kerstin; Ellrich, Jens

    2010-04-01

    Electrical low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of nociceptive skin afferents reliably induces long-term depression (LTD) of pain. Recent experiments have assessed the effects of LTD on pain perception by using a simple one-dimensional rating scale. The psychophysical study investigated the impact of noxious LFS on the sensory and affective aspects of pain perception by multidimensional rating scales. In 20 healthy volunteers, nociceptive fibers of the left hand dorsum were electrically stimulated by a concentric electrode. Test stimulation series (15 stimuli each, 0.125Hz) were performed before (Pre) and after (Post) a conditioning LFS (1Hz, 20min) or no stimulation period (Control). Pain ratings concerning test stimulation and LFS were obtained by multidimensional assessment including Verbal rating scale of perceived stimulus intensity (VRS-I) and unpleasantness (VRS-U) and pain perception scale with sensory (SES-S) and affective items (SES-A). After the conditioning LFS, VRS-I, VRS-U, SES-S, and SES-A decreased as compared to Pre series and Control. During conditioning LFS, ratings decreased. Factor analysis of SES-S revealed sole reduction of superficial sharp pain perception after conditioning LFS in contrast to Control experiment. Perception of deep rhythmic pain decreased over time. Deep constant pain and superficial heat pain were not affected. Electrical test stimulation via concentric electrode evokes sensory as well as affective pain perception. Both components decrease during noxious, conditioning LFS and remain depressed for at least one hour. Reduction of sharp pain points to Adelta fiber mediated LTD. These results stress the analgesic potency of LTD and its possible impact on future therapy in chronic pain.

  8. Spatially Patterned Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Resolution of Retinal Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Hottowy, Paweł; Mathieson, Keith; Gunning, Deborah E.; Dąbrowski, Władysław; Litke, Alan M.; Chichilnisky, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal prostheses electrically stimulate neurons to produce artificial vision in people blinded by photoreceptor degenerative diseases. The limited spatial resolution of current devices results in indiscriminate stimulation of interleaved cells of different types, precluding veridical reproduction of natural activity patterns in the retinal output. Here we investigate the use of spatial patterns of current injection to increase the spatial resolution of stimulation, using high-density multielectrode recording and stimulation of identified ganglion cells in isolated macaque retina. As previously shown, current passed through a single electrode typically induced a single retinal ganglion cell spike with submillisecond timing precision. Current passed simultaneously through pairs of neighboring electrodes modified the probability of activation relative to injection through a single electrode. This modification could be accurately summarized by a piecewise linear model of current summation, consistent with a simple biophysical model based on multiple sites of activation. The generalizability of the piecewise linear model was tested by using the measured responses to stimulation with two electrodes to predict responses to stimulation with three electrodes. Finally, the model provided an accurate prediction of which among a set of spatial stimulation patterns maximized selective activation of a cell while minimizing activation of a neighboring cell. The results demonstrate that tailored multielectrode stimulation patterns based on a piecewise linear model may be useful in increasing the spatial resolution of retinal prostheses. PMID:24695706

  9. Cortical responses to C-fiber stimulation by intra-epidermal electrical stimulation: an MEG study.

    PubMed

    Motogi, Jun; Kodaira, Minori; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Inui, Koji; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-06-01

    Intra-epidermal electric stimulation (IES) is an alternative to laser stimulation for selective activation of cutaneous Aδ-fibers. IES is based on the fact that nociceptive fiber terminals are located in the epidermis, whereas receptors of other fibers end deep in the dermis. IES can selectively stimulate C-fibers if the electrode structure and stimulation parameters are carefully selected. However, stable selective stimulation of C-fibers using IES has proven difficult and cannot currently be used in clinical settings. The purpose of the present study was to determine if IES performed using a modified electrode reliably stimulates C-fibers. Magnetoencephalographic responses to IES to the foot were measured in seven healthy subjects. IES elicited somatosensory evoked fields in all subjects. The mean peak latency was 1,327 ± 116 ms in the opercular region contralateral to the stimulated side, 1,318 ± 90 ms in the opercular region ipsilateral to the stimulated side, and 1350 ± 139 ms in the primary somatosensory cortex. These results indicate that IES performed using the modified electrode can selectively stimulate C-fibers and may be a useful tool for pain research as well as clinical evaluation of peripheral small fiber function.

  10. Electrical and mechanical stimulation of cardiac cells and tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2016-01-15

    The field of cardiac tissue engineering has made significant strides over the last few decades, highlighted by the development of human cell derived constructs that have shown increasing functional maturity over time, particularly using bioreactor systems to stimulate the constructs. However, the functionality of these tissues is still unable to match that of native cardiac tissue and many of the stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes display an immature, fetal like phenotype. In this review, we seek to elucidate the biological underpinnings of both mechanical and electrical signaling, as identified via studies related to cardiac development and those related to an evaluation of cardiac disease progression. Next, we review the different types of bioreactors developed to individually deliver electrical and mechanical stimulation to cardiomyocytes in vitro in both two and three-dimensional tissue platforms. Reactors and culture conditions that promote functional cardiomyogenesis in vitro are also highlighted. We then cover the more recent work in the development of bioreactors that combine electrical and mechanical stimulation in order to mimic the complex signaling environment present in vivo. We conclude by offering our impressions on the important next steps for physiologically relevant mechanical and electrical stimulation of cardiac cells and engineered tissue in vitro.

  11. Acetylation mediates Cx43 reduction caused by electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Azzimato, Valerio; Colussi, Claudia; Florio, Maria Cristina; Binda, Anna; Panariti, Alice; Qanud, Khaled; Suffredini, Silvia; Gennaccaro, Laura; Miragoli, Michele; Barbuti, Andrea; Lampe, Paul D.; Gaetano, Carlo; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Pompilio, Giulio; Rivolta, Ilaria; Rossini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Communication between cardiomyocytes depends upon Gap Junctions (GJ). Previous studies have demonstrated that electrical stimulation induces GJ remodeling and modifies histone acetylases (HAT) and deacetylases (HDAC) activities, although these two results have not been linked. The aim of this work was to establish whether electrical stimulation modulates GJ-mediated cardiac cell-cell communication by acetylation-dependent mechanisms. Field stimulation of HL-1 cardiomyocytes at 0.5 Hz for 24 hours significantly reduced Connexin43 (Cx43) expression and cell-cell communication. HDAC activity was down-regulated whereas HAT activity was not modified resulting in increased acetylation of Cx43. Consistent with a post-translational mechanism, we did not observe a reduction in Cx43 mRNA in electrically stimulated cells, while the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 maintained Cx43 expression. Further, the treatment of paced cells with the HAT inhibitor Anacardic Acid maintained both the levels of Cx43 and cell-cell communication. Finally, we observed increased acetylation of Cx43 in the left ventricles of dogs subjected to chronic tachypacing as a model of abnormal ventricular activation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that altered electrical activity can regulate cardiomyocyte communication by influencing the acetylation status of Cx43. PMID:26264759

  12. Electrical stimulation mapping of nouns and verbs in Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Havas, Viktória; Gabarrós, Andreu; Juncadella, Montserrat; Rifa-Ros, Xavi; Plans, Gerard; Acebes, Juan José; de Diego Balaguer, Ruth; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Electric stimulation mapping (ESM) is frequently used during brain surgery to localise higher cognitive functions to avoid post-chirurgical disabilities. Experiments with brain imaging techniques and neuropsychological studies showed differences in the cortical representation and processing of nouns and verbs. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether electric stimulation in specific sites in the frontal cortex disrupted noun and verb production selectively. We found that most of the stimulated areas showed disruption of both verbs and nouns at the inferior frontal gyrus. However, when selective effects were obtained, verbs were more prone to disruption than nouns with important individual differences. The overall results indicate that selective impairments can be observed at inferior and middle frontal regions and the action naming task seems to be more suitable to avoid post-chirurgical language disabilities, as it shows a greater sensitivity to disruption with ESM than the classical object naming task. PMID:25957505

  13. Electrical stimulation mapping of nouns and verbs in Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Havas, Viktória; Gabarrós, Andreu; Juncadella, Montserrat; Rifa-Ros, Xavi; Plans, Gerard; Acebes, Juan José; de Diego Balaguer, Ruth; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Electric stimulation mapping (ESM) is frequently used during brain surgery to localise higher cognitive functions to avoid post-chirurgical disabilities. Experiments with brain imaging techniques and neuropsychological studies showed differences in the cortical representation and processing of nouns and verbs. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether electric stimulation in specific sites in the frontal cortex disrupted noun and verb production selectively. We found that most of the stimulated areas showed disruption of both verbs and nouns at the inferior frontal gyrus. However, when selective effects were obtained, verbs were more prone to disruption than nouns with important individual differences. The overall results indicate that selective impairments can be observed at inferior and middle frontal regions and the action naming task seems to be more suitable to avoid post-chirurgical language disabilities, as it shows a greater sensitivity to disruption with ESM than the classical object naming task.

  14. The organization of primary afferent depolarization in the isolated spinal cord of the frog

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, D. O.; Rudomin, P.

    1973-01-01

    1. The organization of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) produced by excitation of peripheral sensory and motor nerves was studied in the frog cord isolated with hind limb nerves. 2. Dorsal root potentials from sensory fibres (DR-DRPs) were evoked on stimulation of most sensory nerves, but were largest from cutaneous, joint and flexor muscle afferents. With single shock stimulation the largest cutaneous and joint afferent fibres gave DR-DRPs, but potentials from muscle nerves resulted from activation of sensory fibres with thresholds to electrical stimulation higher than 1·2-1·5 times the threshold of the most excitable fibres in the nerve. This suggests that PAD from muscle afferents is probably due to excitation of extrafusal receptors. 3. Dorsal root potentials produced by antidromic activation of motor fibres (VR-DRPs) were larger from extensor muscles and smaller or absent from flexor muscles. The VR-DRPs were produced by activation of the lowest threshold motor fibres. 4. Three types of interactions were found between test and conditioning DRPs from the same or different nerves. With maximal responses occlusion was usually pronounced. At submaximal levels linear summation occurred. Near threshold the conditioning stimulus frequently resulted in a large facilitation of the test DRP. All three types of interactions were found with two DR-DRPs, two VR-DRPs or one DR-DRP and one VR-DRP. 5. The excitability of sensory nerve terminals from most peripheral nerves was increased during the DR-DRP. The magnitude of the excitability increase varied roughly with the magnitude of the DR-DRP evoked by the conditioning stimulus. 6. There was a marked excitability increase of cutaneous and extensor muscle afferent terminals during the VR-DRP. Flexor muscle afferent terminals often showed no excitability changes to ventral root stimulation. In those experiments where afferent terminals from flexor muscles did show an excitability increase, the effects were smaller than

  15. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  16. Influence of motor imagination on cortical activation during functional electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Clare; Osuagwu, Bethel A.; Vuckovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective Motor imagination (MI) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) can activate the sensory-motor cortex through efferent and afferent pathways respectively. Motor imagination can be used as a control strategy to activate FES through a brain–computer interface as the part of a rehabilitation therapy. It is believed that precise timing between the onset of MI and FES is important for strengthening the cortico-spinal pathways but it is not known whether prolonged MI during FES influences cortical response. Methods Electroencephalogram was measured in ten able-bodied participants using MI strategy to control FES through a BCI system. Event related synchronisation/desynchronisation (ERS/ERD) over the sensory-motor cortex was analysed and compared in three paradigms: MI before FES, MI before and during FES and FES alone activated automatically. Results MI practiced both before and during FES produced strongest ERD. When MI only preceded FES it resulted in a weaker beta ERD during FES than when FES was activated automatically. Following termination of FES, beta ERD returns to the baseline level within 0.5 s while alpha ERD took longer than 1 s. Conclusions When MI and FES are combined for rehabilitation purposes it is recommended that MI is practiced throughout FES activation period. Significance The study is relevant for neurorehabilitation of movement. PMID:25454278

  17. Closing of venus flytrap by electrical stimulation of motor cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Adesina, Tejumade; Jovanov, Emil

    2007-05-01

    Electrical signaling and rapid closure of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula Ellis (Venus flytrap) have been attracting the attention of researchers since XIX century, but the exact mechanism of Venus flytrap closure is still unknown. We found that the electrical stimulus between a midrib and a lobe closes the Venus flytrap leaf by activating motor cells without mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. The closing time of Venus flytrap by electrical stimulation of motor cells is 0.3 s, the same as mechanically induced closing. The mean electrical charge required for the closure of the Venus flytrap leaf is 13.6 microC. Ion channel blockers such as Ba(2+), TEACl as well as uncouplers such as FCCP, 2,4-dinitrophenol and pentachlorophenol dramatically decrease the speed of the trap closing. Using an ultra-fast data acquisition system with measurements in real time, we found that the action potential in the Venus flytrap has a duration time of about 1.5 ms. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation can be used to study mechanisms of fast activity in motor cells of the plant kingdom.

  18. Estimating nerve excitation thresholds to cutaneous electrical stimulation by finite element modeling combined with a stochastic branching nerve fiber model.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Hennings, Kristian; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2011-04-01

    Electrical stimulation of cutaneous tissue through surface electrodes is an often used method for evoking experimental pain. However, at painful intensities both non-nociceptive Aβ-fibers and nociceptive Aδ- and C-fibers may be activated by the electrical stimulation. This study proposes a finite element (FE) model of the extracellular potential and stochastic branching fiber model of the afferent fiber excitation thresholds. The FE model described four horizontal layers; stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and hypodermal used to estimate the excitation threshold of Aβ-fibers terminating in dermis and Aδ-fibers terminating in epidermis. The perception thresholds of 11 electrodes with diameters ranging from 0.2 to 20 mm were modeled and assessed on the volar forearm of healthy human volunteers by an adaptive two-alternative forced choice algorithm. The model showed that the magnitude of the current density was highest for smaller electrodes and decreased through the skin. The excitation thresholds of the Aδ-fibers were lower than the excitation thresholds of Aβ-fibers when current was applied through small, but not large electrodes. The experimentally assessed perception threshold followed the lowest excitation threshold of the modeled fibers. The model confirms that preferential excitation of Aδ-fibers may be achieved by small electrode stimulation due to higher current density in the dermoepidermal junction. PMID:21207174

  19. Short-latency afferent inhibition determined by the sensory afferent volley.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Aaron Z; Asmussen, Michael J; Nelson, Aimee J

    2016-08-01

    Short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) is characterized by the suppression of the transcranial magnetic stimulation motor evoked potential (MEP) by the cortical arrival of a somatosensory afferent volley. It remains unknown whether the magnitude of SAI reflects changes in the sensory afferent volley, similar to that observed for somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). The present study investigated stimulus-response relationships between sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs), SAI, and SEPs and their interrelatedness. Experiment 1 (n = 23, age 23 ± 1.5 yr) investigated the stimulus-response profile for SEPs and SAI in the flexor carpi radialis muscle after stimulation of the mixed median nerve at the wrist using ∼25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the maximum SNAP and at 1.2× and 2.4× motor threshold (the latter equated to 100% of the maximum SNAP). Experiment 2 (n = 20, age 23.1 ± 2 yr) probed SEPs and SAI stimulus-response relationships after stimulation of the cutaneous digital nerve at ∼25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the maximum SNAP recorded at the elbow. Results indicate that, for both nerve types, SAI magnitude is dependent on the volume of the sensory afferent volley and ceases to increase once all afferent fibers within the nerve are recruited. Furthermore, for both nerve types, the magnitudes of SAI and SEPs are related such that an increase in excitation within somatosensory cortex is associated with an increase in the magnitude of afferent-induced MEP inhibition. PMID:27226451

  20. Volume conductor model of transcutaneous electrical stimulation with kilohertz signals

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Leonel E.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Incorporating high-frequency components in transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) waveforms may make it possible to stimulate deeper nerve fibers since the impedance of tissue declines with increasing frequency. However, the mechanisms of high-frequency TES remain largely unexplored. We investigated the properties of TES with frequencies beyond those typically used in neural stimulation. Approach We implemented a multilayer volume conductor model including dispersion and capacitive effects, coupled to a cable model of a nerve fiber. We simulated voltage- and current-controlled transcutaneous stimulation, and quantified the effects of frequency on the distribution of potentials and fiber excitation. We also quantified the effects of a novel transdermal amplitude modulated signal (TAMS) consisting of a non-zero offset sinusoidal carrier modulated by a square-pulse train. Main results The model revealed that high-frequency signals generated larger potentials at depth than did low frequencies, but this did not translate into lower stimulation thresholds. Both TAMS and conventional rectangular pulses activated more superficial fibers in addition to the deeper, target fibers, and at no frequency did we observe an inversion of the strength-distance relationship. Current regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by fiber depth, whereas voltage regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by skin thickness. Finally, our model reproduced the threshold-frequency relationship of experimentally measured motor thresholds. Significance The model may be used for prediction of motor thresholds in TES, and contributes to the understanding of high-frequency TES. PMID:25380254

  1. Electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex improves memory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chua, Elizabeth F; Ahmed, Rifat

    2016-05-01

    The ability to accurately monitor one's own memory is an important feature of normal memory function. Converging evidence from neuroimaging and lesion studies have implicated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in memory monitoring. Here we used high definition transcranial direct stimulation (HD-tDCS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, to test whether the DLPFC has a causal role in memory monitoring, and the nature of that role. We used a metamemory monitoring task, in which participants first attempted to recall the answer to a general knowledge question, then gave a feeling-of-knowing (FOK) judgment, followed by a forced choice recognition task. When participants received DLPFC stimulation, their feeling-of-knowing judgments were better predictors of memory performance, i.e., they had better memory monitoring accuracy, compared to stimulation of a control site, the anterior temporal lobe (ATL). Effects of DLPFC stimulation were specific to monitoring accuracy, as there was no significant increase in memory performance, and if anything, there was poorer memory performance with DLPFC stimulation. Thus we have demonstrated a causal role for the DLPFC in memory monitoring, and showed that electrically stimulating the left DLPFC led people to more accurately monitor and judge their own memory. PMID:26970142

  2. Electrical Stimulation of Coleopteran Muscle for Initiating Flight.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hao Yu; Li, Yao; Cao, Feng; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Some researchers have long been interested in reconstructing natural insects into steerable robots or vehicles. However, until recently, these so-called cyborg insects, biobots, or living machines existed only in science fiction. Owing to recent advances in nano/micro manufacturing, data processing, and anatomical and physiological biology, we can now stimulate living insects to induce user-desired motor actions and behaviors. To improve the practicality and applicability of airborne cyborg insects, a reliable and controllable flight initiation protocol is required. This study demonstrates an electrical stimulation protocol that initiates flight in a beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata, Coleoptera). A reliable stimulation protocol was determined by analyzing a pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), flight muscles that oscillate the wings. DLM stimulation has achieved with a high success rate (> 90%), rapid response time (< 1.0 s), and small variation (< 0.33 s; indicating little habituation). Notably, the stimulation of DLMs caused no crucial damage to the free flight ability. In contrast, stimulation of optic lobes, which was earlier demonstrated as a successful flight initiation protocol, destabilized the beetle in flight. Thus, DLM stimulation is a promising secure protocol for inducing flight in cyborg insects or biobots. PMID:27050093

  3. Electrical Stimulation of Coleopteran Muscle for Initiating Flight.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hao Yu; Li, Yao; Cao, Feng; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Some researchers have long been interested in reconstructing natural insects into steerable robots or vehicles. However, until recently, these so-called cyborg insects, biobots, or living machines existed only in science fiction. Owing to recent advances in nano/micro manufacturing, data processing, and anatomical and physiological biology, we can now stimulate living insects to induce user-desired motor actions and behaviors. To improve the practicality and applicability of airborne cyborg insects, a reliable and controllable flight initiation protocol is required. This study demonstrates an electrical stimulation protocol that initiates flight in a beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata, Coleoptera). A reliable stimulation protocol was determined by analyzing a pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), flight muscles that oscillate the wings. DLM stimulation has achieved with a high success rate (> 90%), rapid response time (< 1.0 s), and small variation (< 0.33 s; indicating little habituation). Notably, the stimulation of DLMs caused no crucial damage to the free flight ability. In contrast, stimulation of optic lobes, which was earlier demonstrated as a successful flight initiation protocol, destabilized the beetle in flight. Thus, DLM stimulation is a promising secure protocol for inducing flight in cyborg insects or biobots.

  4. Electrical Stimulation of Coleopteran Muscle for Initiating Flight

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Hao Yu; Li, Yao; Cao, Feng; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Some researchers have long been interested in reconstructing natural insects into steerable robots or vehicles. However, until recently, these so-called cyborg insects, biobots, or living machines existed only in science fiction. Owing to recent advances in nano/micro manufacturing, data processing, and anatomical and physiological biology, we can now stimulate living insects to induce user-desired motor actions and behaviors. To improve the practicality and applicability of airborne cyborg insects, a reliable and controllable flight initiation protocol is required. This study demonstrates an electrical stimulation protocol that initiates flight in a beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata, Coleoptera). A reliable stimulation protocol was determined by analyzing a pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), flight muscles that oscillate the wings. DLM stimulation has achieved with a high success rate (> 90%), rapid response time (< 1.0 s), and small variation (< 0.33 s; indicating little habituation). Notably, the stimulation of DLMs caused no crucial damage to the free flight ability. In contrast, stimulation of optic lobes, which was earlier demonstrated as a successful flight initiation protocol, destabilized the beetle in flight. Thus, DLM stimulation is a promising secure protocol for inducing flight in cyborg insects or biobots. PMID:27050093

  5. Investigation of electrical responses to acupuncture stimulation: the effect of electrical grounding and insulation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Heum; Ryu, Yeon-Hang; Jung, Byungjo

    2009-03-01

    Acupuncture in Oriental medicine has been widely used as a core therapeutic method due to its minimal side-effects and therapeutic efficacy. However, the electrical response to acupuncture stimulation (ERAS) has not been clearly studied under acupuncture conditions that might affect the efficacy of acupuncture therapy. In this study, the ERAS was objectively investigated by measuring meridian electric potentials (MEPs) when the electrical grounding conditions of the operator and subject were varied, and when the insulation conditions of acupuncture needle were varied. MEPs between Sang-geoheo (ST37) and Ha-geoheo (ST39) of the Stomach Meridian (ST) were measured by stimulating Jok-samni (ST36) with an acupuncture needle. For non-insulated acupuncture stimulation (NIAS), the average MEP peak was 148.6 +/- 20.6 when neither the operator nor the subject were electrically grounded, 23.1 +/- 8.8 when the subject only was electrically grounded, 348 +/- 76.8 when the operator only was electrically grounded, and 19.9 +/- 4.7 when both the operator and the subject were electrically grounded. The MEPs presented various magnitudes and patterns depending on the electrical grounding conditions. The MEP pattern was very similar to that of the charge and discharge of a capacitor. For insulated acupuncture stimulation (IAS), the average MEP peak was 20 +/- 4 in all electrical grounding conditions, which is not a significant electric response for acupuncture stimulation. In terms of electricity, this study verified that acupuncture therapy might be affected by acupuncture conditions such as (1) the electrical grounding condition of the operator and the subject and (2) the insulation condition of the acupuncture needle.

  6. Amplifier design for EMG recording from stimulation electrodes during functional electrical stimulation leg cycling ergometry.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Raafat; Schauer, Thomas; Liedecke, Wolfgang; Raisch, Jörg

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation leg cycle ergometry (FES-LCE), which is often used as exercise for people with spinal cord injury (SCI), has recently been applied in the motor rehabilitation of stroke patients. Recently completed studies show controversial results, but with a tendency to positive training effects. Current technology is identical to that used in FES-LCE for SCI, whereas the pathology of stroke differs strongly. Most stroke patients with hemiparesis are able to drive an ergometer independently. Depending on the degree of spasticity, the paretic leg will partially support or hinder movements. Electrical stimulation increases muscle force and endurance and both are prerequisites for restoring gait. However, the effect of FES-LCE on improving impaired motor coordination is unclear. To measure motor coordination during FES-LCE, an EMG-amplifier design has been investigated which suppresses stimulation artifacts and allows detection of volitional or reflex induced muscle activity. Direct measurement of EMG from stimulation electrodes between stimulation pulses is an important asset of this amplifier. Photo-MOS switches in front of the preamplifier are utilized to achieve this. The technology presented here can be used to monitor the effects of FES-LCE to adapt the stimulation strategy or to realize EMG-biofeedback training. PMID:21162696

  7. Assessment of Neuromuscular Function Using Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rozand, Vianney; Grosprêtre, Sidney; Stapley, Paul J; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-09-13

    Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a non-invasive method commonly used to evaluate neuromuscular function from brain to muscle (supra-spinal, spinal and peripheral levels). The present protocol describes how this method can be used to stimulate the posterior tibial nerve that activates plantar flexor muscles. Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation consists of inducing an electrical stimulus to a motor nerve to evoke a muscular response. Direct (M-wave) and/or indirect (H-reflex) electrophysiological responses can be recorded at rest using surface electromyography. Mechanical (twitch torque) responses can be quantified with a force/torque ergometer. M-wave and twitch torque reflect neuromuscular transmission and excitation-contraction coupling, whereas H-reflex provides an index of spinal excitability. EMG activity and mechanical (superimposed twitch) responses can also be recorded during maximal voluntary contractions to evaluate voluntary activation level. Percutaneous nerve stimulation provides an assessment of neuromuscular function in humans, and is highly beneficial especially for studies evaluating neuromuscular plasticity following acute (fatigue) or chronic (training/detraining) exercise.

  8. Direct-current electrical stimulation of tendon healing in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nessler, J.P.; Mass, D.P.

    1987-04-01

    The intrinsic capacity of tendons to heal in response to injury has recently been demonstrated by many investigators. Electrical stimulation is often assumed to augment regeneration of various tissues. Using newly developed methods of whole-tendon culture, the authors examined the effect of direct-current electricity on healing in vitro. Deep flexor tendons of rabbits were excised, transected, repaired, and grown in an acellular culture medium for seven, 14, 21, or 42 days. Tendons through which a continuous 7-microAmp current was passed at the repair site were compared with nonstimulated controls. The incorporation of (/sup 14/C)proline and its conversion to (/sup 14/C)hydroxyproline was measured at seven days. The mean (/sup 14/C)proline and (/sup 14/C)hydroxyproline activities were 91% and 255% greater, respectively, in the stimulated group. The activity was also higher in the stimulated group, by 42 days. Histologic sections showed that intrinsic tenoblastic repair may be enhanced with electrical stimulation in vitro.

  9. Neural Responses to Electrical Stimulation on Patterned Silk Films

    PubMed Central

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie; Raja, Waseem Khan; Tang-Schomer, Min; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a critical issue for trauma patients. Following injury, incomplete axon regeneration or misguided axon innervation into tissue will result in loss of sensory and motor functions. The objective of this study was to examine axon outgrowth and axon alignment in response to surface patterning and electrical stimulation. To accomplish our objective, metal electrodes with dimensions of 1.5 mm × 4 cm, were sputter coated onto micropatterned silk protein films, with surface grooves 3.5 μm wide × 500 nm deep. P19 neurons were seeded on the patterned electronic silk films and stimulated at 120 mV, 1 kHz, for 45 minutes each day for 7 days. Responses were compared to neurons on flat electronic silk films, patterned silk films without stimulation, and flat silk films without stimulation. Significant alignment was found on the patterned film groups compared to the flat film groups. Axon outgrowth was greater (p < 0.05) on electronic films on day 5 and day 7 compared to the unstimulated groups. In conclusion, electrical stimulation, at 120 mV, 1 kHz, for 45 minutes daily, in addition to surface patterning, of 3.5 μm wide × 500 nm deep grooves, offered control of nerve axon outgrowth and alignment. PMID:23401351

  10. Remote Electrical Stimulation by Means of Implanted Rectifiers

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of active implantable medical devices is currently compromised by the available means for electrically powering them. Most common energy supply techniques for implants – batteries and inductive couplers – comprise bulky parts which, in most cases, are significantly larger than the circuitry they feed. Here, for overcoming such miniaturization bottleneck in the case of implants for electrical stimulation, it is proposed to make those implants act as rectifiers of high frequency bursts supplied by remote electrodes. In this way, low frequency currents will be generated locally around the implant and these low frequency currents will perform stimulation of excitable tissues whereas the high frequency currents will cause only innocuous heating. The present study numerically demonstrates that low frequency currents capable of stimulation can be produced by a miniature device behaving as a diode when high frequency currents, neither capable of thermal damage nor of stimulation, flow through the tissue where the device is implanted. Moreover, experimental evidence is provided by an in vivo proof of concept model consisting of an anesthetized earthworm in which a commercial diode was implanted. With currently available microelectronic techniques, very thin stimulation capsules (diameter <500 µm) deliverable by injection are easily conceivable. PMID:21850274

  11. Remote electrical stimulation by means of implanted rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of active implantable medical devices is currently compromised by the available means for electrically powering them. Most common energy supply techniques for implants--batteries and inductive couplers--comprise bulky parts which, in most cases, are significantly larger than the circuitry they feed. Here, for overcoming such miniaturization bottleneck in the case of implants for electrical stimulation, it is proposed to make those implants act as rectifiers of high frequency bursts supplied by remote electrodes. In this way, low frequency currents will be generated locally around the implant and these low frequency currents will perform stimulation of excitable tissues whereas the high frequency currents will cause only innocuous heating. The present study numerically demonstrates that low frequency currents capable of stimulation can be produced by a miniature device behaving as a diode when high frequency currents, neither capable of thermal damage nor of stimulation, flow through the tissue where the device is implanted. Moreover, experimental evidence is provided by an in vivo proof of concept model consisting of an anesthetized earthworm in which a commercial diode was implanted. With currently available microelectronic techniques, very thin stimulation capsules (diameter <500 µm) deliverable by injection are easily conceivable. PMID:21850274

  12. [Electrical nerve stimulation for plexus and nerve blocks].

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Bogusch, G; Volk, T

    2007-11-01

    Despite the increasing use of ultrasound, electrical nerve stimulation is commonly used as the standard for both plexus and peripheral nerve blocks. Several recent randomized trials have contributed to a better understanding of physiological and clinical correlations. Traditionally used currents and impulse widths are better defined in relation to the distance between needle tip and nerves. Commercially available devices enable transcutaneous nerve stimulation and provide new opportunities for the detection of puncture sites and for training. The electrically ideal position of the needle usually is defined by motor responses which can not be interpreted without profound anatomical knowledge. For instance, interscalene blocks can be successful even after motor responses of deltoid or pectoral muscles. Infraclavicular blocks should be aimed at stimulation of the posterior fascicle (extension). In contrast to multiple single nerve blocks, axillary single-shot blocks more commonly result in incomplete anaesthesia. Blockade of the femoral nerve can be performed without any nerve stimulation if the fascia iliaca block is used. Independently of the various approaches to the sciatic nerve, inversion and plantar flexion are the best options for single-shot blocks. Further clinical trials are needed to define the advantages of stimulating catheters in continuous nerve blocks.

  13. Electrical stimulation of the nervous system for pain control.

    PubMed

    Long, D M

    1978-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation appears to be a valid technique for the treatment of many pain states. Its use in chronic pain is limited and it appears to be much more likely to be effective in the relief of acute painful states. Nevertheless, since it provides a simple way to treat a significant number of patients whose pain would otherwise by intractable, it has been a valuable addition to the armamentarium of the physician dealing with chronic pain. Peripheral nerve stimulation is an excellent way to relieve pain of peripheral nerve injury origin and certain painful, poorly understood, vasopastic or reflex sympathetic states. Spinal cord stimulation has been revived by the advent of percutaneous stimulators. The technique is currently the best available for the treatment of the patient suffering from the chronic low back syndrome with severe arachnoiditis, for whom no definitive therapy is available. Brain stimulation has been relegated to therapy for pain of central nervous system origin. It is a most promising technique though its application appears to be limited at this point to a few specific problems. The seriousness of potential complications has kept it from being widely applicable to date. There is little information concerning the mechanism whereby these various techniques are effective. Transcutaneous and peripheral nerve stimulation might have their effect through peripheral mechanisms or through a gating mechanism in the posterior horn (Melzack and Wall 1965; Campbell and Taub 1973). Spinal cord stimulation could act through a retrograde effect upon a dorsal horn gate or have more central actions. Brain stimulation in the opiate receptor system may be effective through activation of this system. The mechanisms of action of stimulation in the sensory system centrally are certainly not well understood (Bloedel 1974).

  14. Determinants of the electric field during transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Paulus, Walter; Will, Susanne; Antunes, Andre; Thielscher, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) causes a complex spatial distribution of the electric current flow in the head which hampers the accurate localization of the stimulated brain areas. In this study we show how various anatomical features systematically shape the electric field distribution in the brain during tDCS. We constructed anatomically realistic finite element (FEM) models of two individual heads including conductivity anisotropy and different skull layers. We simulated a widely employed electrode montage to induce motor cortex plasticity and moved the stimulating electrode over the motor cortex in small steps to examine the resulting changes of the electric field distribution in the underlying cortex. We examined the effect of skull thickness and composition on the passing currents showing that thinner skull regions lead to higher electric field strengths. This effect is counteracted by a larger proportion of higher conducting spongy bone in thicker regions leading to a more homogenous current over the skull. Using a multiple regression model we could identify key factors that determine the field distribution to a significant extent, namely the thicknesses of the cerebrospinal fluid and the skull, the gyral depth and the distance to the anode and cathode. These factors account for up to 50% of the spatial variation of the electric field strength. Further, we demonstrate that individual anatomical factors can lead to stimulation "hotspots" which are partly resistant to electrode positioning. Our results give valuable novel insights in the biophysical foundation of tDCS and highlight the importance to account for individual anatomical factors when choosing an electrode montage.

  15. Determinants of the electric field during transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Paulus, Walter; Will, Susanne; Antunes, Andre; Thielscher, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) causes a complex spatial distribution of the electric current flow in the head which hampers the accurate localization of the stimulated brain areas. In this study we show how various anatomical features systematically shape the electric field distribution in the brain during tDCS. We constructed anatomically realistic finite element (FEM) models of two individual heads including conductivity anisotropy and different skull layers. We simulated a widely employed electrode montage to induce motor cortex plasticity and moved the stimulating electrode over the motor cortex in small steps to examine the resulting changes of the electric field distribution in the underlying cortex. We examined the effect of skull thickness and composition on the passing currents showing that thinner skull regions lead to higher electric field strengths. This effect is counteracted by a larger proportion of higher conducting spongy bone in thicker regions leading to a more homogenous current over the skull. Using a multiple regression model we could identify key factors that determine the field distribution to a significant extent, namely the thicknesses of the cerebrospinal fluid and the skull, the gyral depth and the distance to the anode and cathode. These factors account for up to 50% of the spatial variation of the electric field strength. Further, we demonstrate that individual anatomical factors can lead to stimulation "hotspots" which are partly resistant to electrode positioning. Our results give valuable novel insights in the biophysical foundation of tDCS and highlight the importance to account for individual anatomical factors when choosing an electrode montage. PMID:25613437

  16. Electrical stimulation for pressure sore prevention and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bogie, K M; Reger, S I; Levine, S P; Sahgal, V

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of therapeutic electrical stimulation (ES) specific to wound healing and pressure sore prevention. The application of ES for wound healing has been found to increase the rate of healing by more than 50%. Furthermore, the total number of wounds healed is also increased. However, optimal delivery techniques for ES therapy have not been established to date. A study of stimulation current effects on wound healing in a pig model has shown that direct current (DC) stimulation is most effective in wound area reduction and alternating current (AC) stimulation for wound volume reduction at current densities of 127 microA/cm2 and 1,125 microA/cm2, respectively. Preliminary studies have been carried out at two research centers to assess the role of ES in pressure sore prevention. Surface stimulation studies have shown that ES can produce positive short-term changes in tissue health variables such as regional blood flow and pressure distribution. The use of an implanted stimulation system consisting of intramuscular electrodes with percutaneous leads has been found to produce additional long-term changes. Specifically, gluteal muscle thickness increased by 50% with regular long-term ES application concurrent with a 20% decrease in regional interface pressures and increased tissue oxygen levels. These findings indicate that an implantable ES system may have great potential for pressure sore prevention, particularly for individuals who lack sensation or who are physically unable to perform regular independent pressure relief.

  17. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Mobility Support of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within “MOBIL” we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in “compliance data storage” as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC) were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period. Therefore the

  18. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Mobility Support of Elderly.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Winfried

    2015-08-24

    The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within "MOBIL" we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in "compliance data storage" as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC) were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period. Therefore the

  19. Characterization of electrical stimulation electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Chris; Figallo, Elisa; Voldman, Joel; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. The goal of this study was to assess the conditions of electrical stimulation with respect to the electrode geometry, material properties and charge-transfer characteristics at the electrode-electrolyte interface. We compared various biocompatible materials, including nanoporous carbon, stainless steel, titanium and titanium nitride, for use in cardiac tissue engineering bioreactors. The faradaic and non-faradaic charge transfer mechanisms were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), studying current injection characteristics, and examining surface properties of electrodes with scanning electron microscopy. Carbon electrodes were found to have the best current injection characteristics. However, these electrodes require careful handling because of their limited mechanical strength. The efficacy of various electrodes for use in 2-D and 3-D cardiac tissue engineering systems with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes is being determined by assessing cell viability, amplitude of contractions, excitation thresholds, maximum capture rate, and tissue morphology.

  20. Clinical application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation induced cardiovascular exercise.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Brian; Crowe, Louis; Coughlan, Garrett; Minogue, Conor

    2011-01-01

    We need to find novel ways of increasing exercise participation, particularly in those populations who find it difficult to participate in voluntary exercise. In recent years researchers have started to investigate the potential for using electrical stimulation to artificially stimulate a pattern of muscle activity that would induce a physiological response consistent with cardiovascular exercise. Work to date has indicated that this is best achieved by using a stimulation protocol that results in rapid rhythmical isometric contractions of the large leg muscle groups at sub tetanic frequencies. Studies completed by our group indicate that this technique can serve as a viable alternative to voluntary cardiovascular exercise. Apart from being able to induce a cardiovascular exercise effect in patient populations (e.g. heart failure, COPD, spinal cord injury, obesity), this approach may also have value in promotion of exercise activity in a microgravity environment. PMID:22255036

  1. Electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve: a potential therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Alan R; Smith, Philip L; Oliven, Arie

    2014-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by recurrent episodes of pharyngeal collapse, which result from a decrease in pharyngeal dilator muscle tone. The genioglossus is a major pharyngeal dilator that maintains airway patency during sleep. Early studies in animal and humans have demonstrated that electrical stimulation of this muscle reduces pharyngeal collapsibility, increases airflow, and mitigates obstructive sleep apnea. These findings impelled the development of fully implantable hypoglossal nerve stimulating systems (HGNS), for which feasibility trial results are now available. These pilot studies have confirmed that hypoglossal nerve stimulation can prevent pharyngeal collapse without arousing patients from sleep. Potentially, a substantial segment of the patient population with obstructive sleep apnea can be treated with this novel approach. Furthermore, the feasibility trial findings suggest that the therapeutic potential of HGNS can be optimized by selecting patients judiciously, titrating the stimulus intensity optimally, and characterizing the underlying function and anatomy of the pharynx. These strategies are currently being examined in ongoing pivotal trials of HGNS.

  2. New algorithm to control a cycle ergometer using electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, J S

    2003-01-01

    Data were collected from four male subjects to determine the relationships between load, speed and muscle use during cycle ergometry. These data were then used to construct equations to govern the stimulation of muscle in paralysed individuals, during cycle ergometry induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the quadriceps, gluteus maximus and hamstring muscles. The algorithm was tested on four subjects who were paralysed owing to a complete spinal cord injury between T4 and T11. Using the multivariate equation, the control of movement was improved, and work was accomplished that was double (2940 Nm min(-1) compared with 5880 Nm min(-1)) that of traditional FES cycle ergometry, when muscle stimulation was also controlled by electrical stimulation. Stress on the body, assessed by cardiac output, was increased almost two-fold during maximum work with the new algorithm (81 min(-1) compared with 15 l min(-1) with the new algorithm). These data support the concept that the limitation to workload that a person can achieve on FES cycle ergometry is in the control equations and not in the paralysed muscle.

  3. A Computational Framework for Electrical Stimulation of Vestibular Nerve.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Prisca; Capogrosso, Marco; Bassi Luciani, Lorenzo; Panarese, Alessandro; Micera, Silvestro

    2015-09-01

    The vestibular organs are very important to generate reflexes critical for stabilizing gaze and body posture. Vestibular diseases significantly reduce the quality of life of people who are affected by them. Some research groups have recently started developing vestibular neuroprostheses to mitigate these symptoms. However, many scientific and technological issues need to be addressed to optimise their use in clinical trials. We developed a computational model able to mimic the response of human vestibular nerves and which can be exploited for "in-silico" testing of new strategies to design implantable vestibular prostheses. First, a digital model of the vestibular system was reconstructed from anatomical data. Monopolar stimulation was delivered at different positions and distances from ampullary nerves. The electrical potential induced by the injected current was computed through finite-element methods and drove extra-cellular stimulation of fibers in the vestibular, facial, and cochlear nerves. The electrical activity of vestibular nerves and the resulting eye movements elicited by different stimulation protocols were investigated. A set of electrode configurations was analyzed in terms of selectivity at increasing injected current. Electrode position along the nerve plays a major role in producing undesired activity in other nontargeted nerves, whereas distance from the fiber does not significantly affect selectivity. Indications are provided to minimize misalignment in nonoptimal electrode locations. Eye movements elicited by the different stimulation protocols are calculated and compared to experimental values, for the purpose of model validation. PMID:25751868

  4. Effects of ankle extensor muscle afferent inputs on hip abductor and adductor activity in the decerebrate walking cat.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D A E; Misiaszek, J E

    2012-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus (LGS) nerve at group I afferent strength leads to adaptations in the amplitude and timing of extensor muscle activity during walking in the decerebrate cat. Such afferent feedback in the stance leg might result from a delay in stance onset of the opposite leg. Concomitant adaptations in hip abductor and adductor activity would then be expected to maintain lateral stability and balance until the opposite leg is able to support the body. As many hip abductors and adductors are also hip extensors, we hypothesized that stimulation of the LGS nerve at group I afferent strength would produce increased activation and prolonged burst duration in hip abductor and adductor muscles in the premammillary decerebrate walking cat. LGS nerve stimulation during the extensor phase of the locomotor cycle consistently increased burst amplitude of the gluteus medius and adductor femoris muscles, but not pectineus or gracilis. In addition, LGS stimulation prolonged the burst duration of both gluteus medius and adductor femoris. Unexpectedly, long-duration LGS stimulus trains resulted in two distinct outcomes on the hip abductor and adductor bursting pattern: 1) a change of burst duration and timing similar to medial gastrocnemius; or 2) to continue rhythmically bursting uninterrupted. These results indicate that activation of muscle afferents from ankle extensors contributes to the regulation of activity of some hip abductor and adductor muscles, but not all. These results have implications for understanding the neural control of stability during locomotion, as well as the organization of spinal locomotor networks. PMID:22972967

  5. Neuronal activity of the cat supraoptic nucleus is influenced by muscle small-diameter afferent (groups III and IV) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kannan, H; Yamashita, H; Koizumi, K; Brooks, C M

    1988-08-01

    In anesthetized cats, responses of single neurosecretory neurons of the supraoptic nucleus to activation of muscle receptors were investigated. Electrical stimulation (1-3 pulses at 200 Hz) of group III and IV pure muscle afferents (gastrocnemius nerve) evoked excitation of greater than 50% of supraoptic nucleus neurons (n = 50), whereas stimulation of group Ia or Ib fibers was ineffective. Baroreceptor stimulation inhibited 95% of these supraoptic nucleus neurons that responded to activation of muscle afferents. Excitation of receptors in the gastrocnemius muscle by intra-arterial injection of chemicals (NaCl, KCl, and bradykinin) increased firing rates of most (84%, 74%, and 80%, respectively) neurosecretary neurons. The magnitude of the excitatory response was dose dependent--bradykinin being the most effective. The response disappeared after muscle denervation. When the gastrocnemius muscle alone was contracted phasically by ventral root stimulation, discharges of the supraoptic nucleus neurons increased, whereas quick stretch of the muscle had no effect. We conclude that activation of muscle receptors by chemical or mechanical stimulus can directly excite neurosecretory neurons in the supraoptic nucleus and that afferent impulses are carried by polymodal fibers of small diameter but not by the largest afferents (group I) from the muscle. The results may relate to increased concentrations of plasma vasopressin during exercise.

  6. Neuromuscular electric stimulation in patellofemoral dysfunction: literature review

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ricardo Lucas; Souza, Márcia Leal São Pedro; dos Santos, Fernanda Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Patellofemoral dysfunction is a fairly common deficiency among young individuals that primarily affects females and may be characterized by pain, swelling and retropatellar crepitation. The purpose of this review of literature from the period between 2005 and 2011 was to systematize knowledge in relation to the increase in quadriceps muscle strength and pain relief in patients with patellofemoral dysfunction, using neuromuscular electrical stimulation and resistance exercises. The inclusion criteria were intervention articles from the past six years, in English, Spanish and Portuguese, which used muscle strengthening and neuromuscular electrical stimulation for rehabilitation obtained through searches in the electronic databases Medline and Lilacs and in the Bireme library. The bibliographic search yielded 28 references, of which nine were excluded in accordance with the aims and inclusion criteria while 16 articles were selected for reading of the abstracts and subsequent analysis. Mediumfrequency Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) can be used in association with resistance exercises as an adjuvant in the treatment of patellofemoral dysfunction (PFD), both to achieve muscle rebalance and for pain relief. PMID:24453645

  7. Laparoscopic insertion of gastric electrodes for electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brody, Fred; Nam, Arthur; Drenon, Elizabeth; Ali, Aamir; Soffer, Edy

    2007-02-01

    Gastric electrical stimulation can provide symptomatic relief for patients with refractory gastroparesis. Traditionally, these wires are placed through a midline laparotomy. This paper describes and illustrates, in detail, the laparoscopic technique for successful implantation. Thirty-one consecutive patients from October 2003 to March 2005 underwent laparoscopic insertion of gastric stimulating wires for gastroparesis. Twenty-six patients were female. Four laparoscopic ports were used to insert a pair of electrodes. Anterior, cephalad retraction of the gastric wall is critical for accurate seromuscular placement of gastric leads. Intraoperative endoscopy was used to verify the seromuscular placement of the leads. Both leads were secured to a subcutaneous generator and electrical parameters were immediately established in the operating room. Patient demographics, operative details, and postoperative morbidities were recorded. All procedures were completed laparoscopically. The mean operative time was 114.4 +/- 20.9 minutes (range, 95-140). No perioperative mortality occurred. Two patients developed cellulitis at the generator site postoperatively and oral antibiotics were prescribed for one week postoperatively. No hardware was removed. Two patients had their generators repositioned due to pain at the pocket site. Gastric electrical stimulation is a novel treatment modality for patients with refractory gastroparesis and can be accomplished safely via laparoscopy. Laparoscopic insertion is successful even in patients with prior surgery and intact gastrointestinal tubes. Long-term follow-up and the current prospective multicenter trial continue to assess the efficacy of this treatment modality. PMID:17362169

  8. Practical aspects of cardiac tissue engineering with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Christopher; Tandon, Nina; Figallo, Elisa; Park, Hyoungshin; Gerecht, Sharon; Radisic, Milica; Elvassore, Nicola; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2007-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in western society. Despite the success of heart transplantation, a chronic shortage of donor organs, along with the associated immunological complications of this approach, demands that alternative treatments be found. One such option is to repair, rather than replace, the heart with engineered cardiac tissue. Multiple studies have shown that to attain functional tissue, assembly signaling cues must be recapitulated in vitro. In their native environment, cardiomyocytes are directed to beat in synchrony by propagation of pacing current through the tissue. Recently, we have shown that electrical stimulation directs neonatal cardiomyocytes to assemble into native-like tissue in vitro. This chapter provides detailed methods we have employed in taking this "biomimetic" approach. After an initial discussion on how electric field stimulation can influence cell behavior, we examine the practical aspects of cardiac tissue engineering with electrical stimulation, such as electrode selection and cell seeding protocols, and conclude with what we feel are the remaining challenges to be overcome.

  9. [Research progress in reanimation of peripheral facial paralysis by use of functional electrical stimulation].

    PubMed

    Deng, Simin; Shen, Guofang

    2010-08-01

    With the development of electronics and information technology, the application of functional electrical stimulation in the medical field has been expanding. However, the use of functional electrical stimulation to treat patients with peripheral facial paralysis is still in its infancy. The main problems include: (1) Finding in the signals which could fire the stimulator; (2) Exploring the parameters for the stimulator; (3) The effects on the muscle attributed to the electrical stimulation. A review on these problems is presented.

  10. Giovanni Aldini: from animal electricity to human brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Parent, André

    2004-11-01

    Two hundred years ago, Giovanni Aldini published a highly influential book that reported experiments in which the principles of Luigi Galvani (animal electricity) and Alessandro Volta (bimetallic electricity) were used together for the first time. Aldini was born in Bologna in 1762 and graduated in physics at the University of his native town in 1782. As nephew and assistant of Galvani, he actively participated in a series of crucial experiments with frog's muscles that led to the idea that electricity was the long-sought vital force coursing from brain to muscles. Aldini became professor of experimental physics at the University of Bologna in 1798. He traveled extensively throughout Europe, spending much time defending the concept of his discreet uncle against the incessant attacks of Volta, who did not believe in animal electricity. Aldini used Volta's bimetallic pile to apply electric current to dismembered bodies of animals and humans; these spectacular galvanic reanimation experiments made a strong and enduring impression on his contemporaries. Aldini also treated patients with personality disorders and reported complete rehabilitation following transcranial administration of electric current. Aldini's work laid the ground for the development of various forms of electrotherapy that were heavily used later in the 19th century. Even today, deep brain stimulation, a procedure currently employed to relieve patients with motor or behavioral disorders, owes much to Aldini and galvanism. In recognition of his merits, Aldini was made a knight of the Iron Crown and a councillor of state at Milan, where he died in 1834.

  11. Giovanni Aldini: from animal electricity to human brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Parent, André

    2004-11-01

    Two hundred years ago, Giovanni Aldini published a highly influential book that reported experiments in which the principles of Luigi Galvani (animal electricity) and Alessandro Volta (bimetallic electricity) were used together for the first time. Aldini was born in Bologna in 1762 and graduated in physics at the University of his native town in 1782. As nephew and assistant of Galvani, he actively participated in a series of crucial experiments with frog's muscles that led to the idea that electricity was the long-sought vital force coursing from brain to muscles. Aldini became professor of experimental physics at the University of Bologna in 1798. He traveled extensively throughout Europe, spending much time defending the concept of his discreet uncle against the incessant attacks of Volta, who did not believe in animal electricity. Aldini used Volta's bimetallic pile to apply electric current to dismembered bodies of animals and humans; these spectacular galvanic reanimation experiments made a strong and enduring impression on his contemporaries. Aldini also treated patients with personality disorders and reported complete rehabilitation following transcranial administration of electric current. Aldini's work laid the ground for the development of various forms of electrotherapy that were heavily used later in the 19th century. Even today, deep brain stimulation, a procedure currently employed to relieve patients with motor or behavioral disorders, owes much to Aldini and galvanism. In recognition of his merits, Aldini was made a knight of the Iron Crown and a councillor of state at Milan, where he died in 1834. PMID:15595271

  12. Tinnitus suppression by electric stimulation of the auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Janice E.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant (CI) has been observed to suppress tinnitus, but parameters of an effective electric stimulus remain unexplored. Here we used CI research processors to systematically vary pulse rate, electrode place, and current amplitude of electric stimuli, and measure their effects on tinnitus loudness and stimulus loudness as a function of stimulus duration. Thirteen tinnitus subjects who used CIs were tested, with nine (70%) being “Responders” who achieved greater than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to at least one stimulation condition and the remaining four (30%) being “Non-Responders” who had less than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to any stimulus condition tested. Despite large individual variability, several interesting observations were made between stimulation parameters, tinnitus characteristics, and tinnitus suppression. If a subject's tinnitus was suppressed by one stimulus, then it was more likely to be suppressed by another stimulus. If the tinnitus contained a “pulsating” component, then it would be more likely suppressed by a given combination of stimulus parameters than tinnitus without these components. There was also a disassociation between the subjects' clinical speech processor and our research processor in terms of their effectiveness in tinnitus suppression. Finally, an interesting dichotomy was observed between loudness adaptation to electric stimuli and their effects on tinnitus loudness, with the Responders exhibiting higher degrees of loudness adaptation than the Non-Responders. Although the mechanisms underlying these observations remain to be resolved, their clinical implications are clear. When using a CI to manage tinnitus, the clinical processor that is optimized for speech perception needs to be customized for optimal tinnitus suppression. PMID:22479238

  13. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Sánchez, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10(-4)) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10(-4)). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects.

  14. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Sánchez, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10(-4)) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10(-4)). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects. PMID:19481236

  15. Modeling and percept of transcorneal electrical stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Xie, John; Wang, Gene-Jack; Yow, Lindy; J Cela, Carlos; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lazzi, Gianluca; Jadvar, Hossein

    2011-07-01

    Retinal activation via transcorneal electrical stimulation (TcES) in normal humans was investigated by comparing subject perception, model predictions, and brain activation patterns. The preferential location of retinal stimulation was predicted from 3-D admittance modeling. Visual cortex activation was measured using positron emission tomography (PET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Two different corneal electrodes were investigated: DTL-Plus and ERG-Jet. Modeling results predicted preferential stimulation of the peripheral, inferior, nasal retina during right eye TcES using DTL-Plus, but more extensive activation of peripheral, nasal hemiretina using ERG-Jet. The results from human FDG PET study using both corneal electrodes showed areas of visual cortex activation that consistently corresponded with the reported phosphene percept and modeling predictions. ERG-Jet was able to generate brighter phosphene percept than DTL-Plus and elicited retinotopically mapped primary visual cortex activation. This study demonstrates that admittance modeling and PET imaging consistently predict the perceived location of electrically elicited phosphenes produced during TcES.

  16. Static γ-motoneurones couple group Ia and II afferents of single muscle spindles in anaesthetised and decerebrate cats

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, M H; Matsuzaki, H

    2002-01-01

    Ideas about the functions of static γ-motoneurones are based on the responses of primary and secondary endings to electrical stimulation of single static γ-axons, usually at high frequencies. We compared these effects with the actions of spontaneously active γ-motoneurones. In anaesthetised cats, afferents and efferents were recorded in intramuscular nerve branches to single muscle spindles. The occurrence of γ-spikes, identified by a spike shape recognition system, was linked to video-taped contractions of type-identified intrafusal fibres in the dissected muscle spindles. When some static γ-motoneurones were active at low frequency (< 15 Hz) they coupled the firing of group Ia and II afferents. Activity of other static γ-motoneurones which tensed the intrafusal fibres appeared to enhance this effect. Under these conditions the secondary ending responded at shorter latency than the primary ending. In another series of experiments on decerebrate cats, responses of primary and secondary endings of single muscle spindles to activation of γ-motoneurones by natural stimuli were compared with their responses to electrical stimulation of single γ-axons supplying the same spindle. Electrical stimulation mimicked the natural actions of γ-motoneurones on either the primary or the secondary ending, but not on both together. However, γ-activity evoked by natural stimuli coupled the firing of afferents with the muscle at constant length, and also when it was stretched. Analysis showed that the timing and tightness of this coupling determined the degree of summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by each afferent in α-motoneurones and interneurones contacted by terminals of both endings, and thus the degree of facilitation of reflex actions of group II afferents. PMID:12181298

  17. Effect of electrical stimulation superimposed with isokinetic contractions.

    PubMed

    Poumarat, G; Squire, P; Lawani, M

    1992-09-01

    Previous studies have considered the effects of the superimposition of electrical stimulation (ES) upon maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) under isometric conditions. This investigation considered these effects using isokinetic muscle action. Eleven males, non athletes, volunteered for the experiment. Isokinetic torque for extension of the right knee was measured by means of a Cybex 340 using two speeds of movement, 12 degrees/s and 30 degrees/s. Torque was measured at 5 degrees increments (from 100 degrees flexion to full extension) under conditions of MVC alone and MVC+ES. Stimulation was provided by means of a bi-phasic, symmetrical, square wave with a pulse width of 600 mu. Frequency of stimulation was either 30 Hz or 80 Hz. It was found that the pattern of torque production was unaffected by the application of ES. Peak torque values at both speeds were significantly lower when ES was applied at both frequencies compared to MVC alone. This inhibitory effect was found to extend throughout the middle range of movement. This tended to be more pronounced with the 80 Hz frequency. In general these findings were in agreement with those reported previously for isometric conditions. Possible explanations for these results include the inability of ES to recruit more motor units than MVC alone; the limitations of the subjects to tolerate a current of a sufficiently high intensity to elicit a stronger contraction, possibly due to lack of familiarization with these forms of muscle action; and the characteristics, especially pulse width, of the stimulating current.

  18. Modulating Human Auditory Processing by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Heimrath, Kai; Fiene, Marina; Rufener, Katharina S.; Zaehle, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial alternating current stimulation, and transcranial random noise stimulation has emerged. While the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders. PMID:27013969

  19. Generation of Electrical Power from Stimulated Muscle Contractions Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Kilgore, Kevin; Ercegovic, David B.

    2004-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort between NASA Glenn Research Center's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) Project, part of the NASA Aerospace Propulsion and Power Program of the Aerospace Technology Enterprise, and Case Western Reserve University's Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Center. The RAC Project foresees implantable power requirements for future applications such as organically based sensor platforms and robotics that can interface with the human senses. One of the goals of the FES Center is to develop a totally implantable neural prosthesis. This goal is based on feedback from patients who would prefer a system with an internal power source over the currently used system with an external power source. The conversion system under investigation would transform the energy produced from a stimulated muscle contraction into electrical energy. We hypothesize that the output power of the system will be greater than the input power necessary to initiate, sustain, and control the electrical conversion system because of the stored potential energy of the muscle. If the system can be made biocompatible, durable, and with the potential for sustained use, then the biological power source will be a viable solution.

  20. Photoacoustic microscopy of microvascular responses to cortical electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Hu, Song; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin; Barbour, Dennis L.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-07-01

    Advances in the functional imaging of cortical hemodynamics have greatly facilitated the understanding of neurovascular coupling. In this study, label-free optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) was used to monitor microvascular responses to direct electrical stimulations of the mouse somatosensory cortex through a cranial opening. The responses appeared in two forms: vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. The transition between these two forms of response was observed in single vessels by varying the stimulation intensity. Marked correlation was found between the current-dependent responses of two daughter vessels bifurcating from the same parent vessel. Statistical analysis of twenty-seven vessels from three different animals further characterized the spatial-temporal features and the current dependence of the microvascular response. Our results demonstrate that OR-PAM is a valuable tool to study neurovascular coupling at the microscopic level.

  1. Technical Rebuilding of Movement Function Using Functional Electrical Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gföhler, Margit

    To rebuild lost movement functions, neuroprostheses based on functional electrical stimulation (FES) artificially activate skeletal muscles in corresponding sequences, using both residual body functions and artificial signals for control. Besides the functional gain, FES training also brings physiological and psychological benefits for spinal cord-injured subjects. In this chapter, current stimulation technology and the main components of FES-based neuroprostheses including enhanced control systems are presented. Technology and application of FES cycling and rowing, both approaches that enable spinal cord-injured subjects to participate in mainstream activities and improve their health and fitness by exercising like able-bodied subjects, are discussed in detail, and an overview of neuroprostheses that aim at restoring movement functions for daily life as walking or grasping is given.

  2. Neuronal excitability level transition induced by electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florence, G.; Kurths, J.; Machado, B. S.; Fonoff, E. T.; Cerdeira, H. A.; Teixeira, M. J.; Sameshima, K.

    2014-12-01

    In experimental studies, electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied to induce neuronal activity or to disrupt pathological patterns. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of these activity pattern transitions are not clear. To study these phenomena, we simulated a model of the hippocampal region CA1. The computational simulations using different amplitude levels and duration of ES revealed three states of neuronal excitability: burst-firing mode, depolarization block and spreading depression wave. We used the bifurcation theory to analyse the interference of ES in the cellular excitability and the neuronal dynamics. Understanding this process would help to improve the ES techniques to control some neurological disorders.

  3. New Perspectives in Edema Control via Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Frank C.; Fish, Dale R.

    1993-01-01

    Clinicians commonly use electrical stimulation (ES) to control acute edema. But, except for anecdotal reports, there is little evidence to support that practice. We recently conducted a series of controlled, blinded studies on several nonhuman animal models to determine the efficacy of several forms of ES, but high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC) in particular, in controlling acute posttraumatic edema. We observed that acute posttraumatic edema is curbed by HVPC when certain protocols are used. Results of these studies suggest to us that wave form, polarity, treatment schedule, intensity and frequency of pulses all influence ES, and that clinical protocols need revision. PMID:16558209

  4. Safety measures implemented for modular functioning electrical stimulators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiun-Fan; Lai, Jin-Shin; Chen, Shih-Wei; Lin, Yin-Tsong; Kuo, Te-Son

    2009-01-01

    The modular architecture allows for greater flexibility in the building of neural prostheses with a variety of channels but may result in unpredictable accidents under circumstances such as sensor displacements, improper coordination of the connected modules and malfunction of any individual module. A novel fail-safe interface is offered as a solution that puts in place the necessary safety measures when building a module based functional electrical stimulator. By using a single reference line in the interconnecting bus of the modules, various commands would immediately be directed to each module so that proper actions may be taken.

  5. Electrical stimulation of the salivatory nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, J; Mitchell, J; Templeton, D

    1984-01-01

    Unilateral electrical stimulation of the salivatory nucleus evoked a secretion from the ipsilateral parotid gland which was well maintained. Flow rate was not affected by sympathetic decentralization or by adrenoceptor antagonists but was abolished by atropine. Protein secretion was reduced by beta-adrenoceptor antagonists but not by sympathetic decentralization or adrenalectomy. In support of previous histochemical findings it is concluded that the cells of the reticular formation are the origin of the preganglionic parasympathetic fibres to the salivary glands but that a beta-adrenoceptor mechanism as yet unidentified is also involved in the protein secretion. PMID:6520785

  6. Modulation of proprioceptive feedback during functional electrical stimulation: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Grey, Michael James

    2013-06-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is sometimes used as a therapeutic modality in motor rehabilitation to augment voluntary motor drive to effect movement that would otherwise not be possible through voluntary activation alone. Effective motor rehabilitation should require that the central nervous system integrate efferent commands and appropriate afferent information to update the internal models of acquired skills. Here, we investigate whether FES-evoked (FES-ev) and FES-assisted (FES-as) movement are associated with the normal integration of motor commands and sensory feedback in a group of healthy participants during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Sensory feedback was removed with a peripheral ischaemic nerve block while the participants performed voluntary (VOL), FES-ev or FES-as movement during fMRI. Before the peripheral nerve block, secondary somatosensory area (S2) activation was greater for the FES-ev and FES-as conditions than for the VOL condition. During the ischaemic nerve block, S2 activation was reduced for the FES-ev condition but not for FES-as and VOL conditions. The nerve block also reduced activation during FES in the primary somatosensory cortex and other motor areas including primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor area. In contrast, superior parietal lobule (area 7A) and precuneus activation was reduced as a consequence of the ischaemic nerve block in the VOL condition. These data suggest FES-related S2 activation is mainly a sensory phenomenon and does not reflect integration of sensory signals with motor commands. PMID:23461704

  7. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS. PMID:25674327

  8. Baroreceptor afferents modulate brain excitation and influence susceptibility to toxic effects of hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Ivan T; Gasier, Heath G; Zhilyaev, Sergei Yu; Moskvin, Alexander N; Krivchenko, Alexander I; Piantadosi, Claude A; Allen, Barry W

    2014-09-01

    Unexplained adjustments in baroreflex sensitivity occur in conjunction with exposures to potentially toxic levels of hyperbaric oxygen. To investigate this, we monitored central nervous system, autonomic and cardiovascular responses in conscious and anesthetized rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen at 5 and 6 atmospheres absolute, respectively. We observed two contrasting phases associated with time-dependent alterations in the functional state of the arterial baroreflex. The first phase, which conferred protection against potentially neurotoxic doses of oxygen, was concurrent with an increase in baroreflex sensitivity and included decreases in cerebral blood flow, heart rate, cardiac output, and sympathetic drive. The second phase was characterized by baroreflex impairment, cerebral hyperemia, spiking on the electroencephalogram, increased sympathetic drive, parasympatholysis, and pulmonary injury. Complete arterial baroreceptor deafferentation abolished the initial protective response, whereas electrical stimulation of intact arterial baroreceptor afferents prolonged it. We concluded that increased afferent traffic attributable to arterial baroreflex activation delays the development of excessive central excitation and seizures. Baroreflex inactivation or impairment removes this protection, and seizures may follow. Finally, electrical stimulation of intact baroreceptor afferents extends the normal delay in seizure development. These findings reveal that the autonomic nervous system is a powerful determinant of susceptibility to sympathetic hyperactivation and seizures in hyperbaric oxygen and the ensuing neurogenic pulmonary injury.

  9. Transcranial electric stimulation entrains cortical neuronal populations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Simal; Sirota, Anton; Belluscio, Mariano A.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Stark, Eran; Koch, Christof; Buzsáki, György

    2010-01-01

    Low intensity electric fields have been suggested to affect the ongoing neuronal activity in vitro and in human studies. However, the physiological mechanism of how weak electrical fields affect and interact with intact brain activity is not well understood. We performed in vivo extracellular and intracellular recordings from the neocortex and hippocampus of anaesthetized rats and extracellular recordings in behaving rats. Electric fields were generated by sinusoid patterns at slow frequency (0.8, 1.25 or 1.7 Hz) via electrodes placed on the surface of the skull or the dura. Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) reliably entrained neurons in widespread cortical areas, including the hippocampus. The percentage of TES phase-locked neurons increased with stimulus intensity and depended on the behavioral state of the animal. TES-induced voltage gradient, as low as 1 mV/mm at the recording sites, was sufficient to phase-bias neuronal spiking. Intracellular recordings showed that both spiking and subthreshold activity were under the combined influence of TES forced fields and network activity. We suggest that TES in chronic preparations may be used for experimental and therapeutic control of brain activity. PMID:20739569

  10. Visualizing Simulated Electrical Fields from Electroencephalography and Transcranial Electric Brain Stimulation: A Comparative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Dannhauer, Moritz; Hlawitschka, Mario; Brooks, Dana; Knösche, Thomas R.; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2014-01-01

    Electrical activity of neuronal populations is a crucial aspect of brain activity. This activity is not measured directly but recorded as electrical potential changes using head surface electrodes (electroencephalogram - EEG). Head surface electrodes can also be deployed to inject electrical currents in order to modulate brain activity (transcranial electric stimulation techniques) for therapeutic and neuroscientific purposes. In electroencephalography and noninvasive electric brain stimulation, electrical fields mediate between electrical signal sources and regions of interest (ROI). These fields can be very complicated in structure, and are influenced in a complex way by the conductivity profile of the human head. Visualization techniques play a central role to grasp the nature of those fields because such techniques allow for an effective conveyance of complex data and enable quick qualitative and quantitative assessments. The examination of volume conduction effects of particular head model parameterizations (e.g., skull thickness and layering), of brain anomalies (e.g., holes in the skull, tumors), location and extent of active brain areas (e.g., high concentrations of current densities) and around current injecting electrodes can be investigated using visualization. Here, we evaluate a number of widely used visualization techniques, based on either the potential distribution or on the current-flow. In particular, we focus on the extractability of quantitative and qualitative information from the obtained images, their effective integration of anatomical context information, and their interaction. We present illustrative examples from clinically and neuroscientifically relevant cases and discuss the pros and cons of the various visualization techniques. PMID:24821532

  11. Enhanced brain responses to C-fiber input in the area of secondary hyperalgesia induced by high-frequency electrical stimulation of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Mouraux, André

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of the human skin induces an increase in both mechanical and heat pain sensitivity in the surrounding unconditioned skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HFS on the intensity of perception and brain responses elicited by the selective activation of C fibers. HFS was applied to the ventral forearm of 15 healthy volunteers. Temperature-controlled CO2 laser stimulation was used to activate selectively low-threshold C-fiber afferents without concomitantly activating Aδ-fiber afferents. These stimuli were detected with reaction times compatible with the conduction velocity of C fibers. The intensity of perception and event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by thermal stimuli delivered to the surrounding unconditioned skin were recorded before (T0) and after HFS (T1: 20 min after HFS; T2: 45 min after HFS). The contralateral forearm served as a control. Mechanical hyperalgesia following HFS was confirmed by measuring the change in the intensity of perception elicited by mechanical punctate stimuli. HFS resulted in increased intensity of perception to mechanical punctate stimulation and selective C-fiber thermal stimulation at both time points. In contrast, the N2 wave of the ERP elicited by C-fiber stimulation (679 ± 88 ms; means ± SD) was enhanced at T1 but not at T2. The P2 wave (808 ± 105 ms) was unaffected by HFS. Our results suggest that HFS enhances the sensitivity to thermal C-fiber input in the area of secondary hyperalgesia. However, there was no significant enhancement of the magnitude of the C-fiber ERPs at T2, suggesting that quickly adapting C fibers do not contribute to this enhancement. PMID:25098966

  12. Emerging technology: electrical stimulation in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Steier, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) of the upper airway (UAW) dilator muscles for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been used for several decades, but in recent years research in this field has experienced a renaissance; the results of several studies have triggered a steady rise in the interest in this topic. Prospective trials, although still lacking a sham-controlled and randomised approach, have revealed the potential of ES. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) leads to a significant reduction in the apnoea-hypopnoea index and the oxygen desaturation index (ODI). There are similar results published from feasibility studies for transcutaneous ES. A limitation of HNS remains the invasive procedure, the costs involved and severe adverse events, while for the non-invasive approach complications are rare and limited. The limiting step for transcutaneous ES is to deliver a sufficient current without causing arousal from sleep. Despite the progress up to date, numerous variables including optimal stimulation settings, different devices and procedures remain to be further defined for the invasive and the non-invasive method. Further studies are required to identify which patients respond to this treatment. ES of the UAW dilator muscles in OSA has the potential to develop into a clinical alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. It could benefit selected patients who fail standard therapy due to poor long-term compliance. It is likely that international societies will need to review and update their existing guidance on the use of ES in OSA. PMID:26380757

  13. Electrical stimulation to optimize cardioprotective exosomes from cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C R; Berman, A E; Weintraub, N L; Tang, Y L

    2016-03-01

    Injured or ischemic cardiac tissue has limited intrinsic capacity for regeneration. While stem cell transplantation is a promising approach to stimulating cardiac repair, its success in humans has thus far been limited. Harnessing the therapeutic benefits of stem cells requires a better understanding of their mechanisms of action and methods to optimize their function. Cardiac stem cells (CSC) represent a particularly effective cellular source for cardiac repair, and pre-conditioning CSC with electrical stimulation (EleS) was demonstrated to further enhance their function, although the mechanisms are unknown. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells primarily exert their effects through communicating with endogenous tissues via the release of exosomes containing cardioprotective molecules such as miRNAs, which upon uptake by recipient cells may stimulate survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Exosomes are also effective therapeutic agents in isolation and may provide a feasible alternative to stem cell transplantation. We hypothesize that EleS enhances CSC-mediated cardiac repair through its beneficial effects on production of cardioprotective exosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the beneficial effects of biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure may in part result from EleS-induced preconditioning of endogenous CSC to promote cardiac repair. With future research, our hypothesis may provide applications to optimize stem cell therapy and augment current pacing protocols, which may significantly advance the treatment of patients with heart disease. PMID:26880625

  14. Functional regeneration of severed peripheral nerve using an implantable electrical stimulator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hyung; Pan, Hui; Kim, In Sook; Hwang, Soon Jung; Kim, Sung June

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents functional regeneration of severed peripheral nerve using a polymer-based implantable electrical stimulator. A polyimide based conduit electrode was made by micro-fabrication and a stimulation chip was designed to generate biphasic current pulse for electrical stimulation. The stimulation chip was packaged with a battery using silicone elastomer, and integrated with the electrode. The implantable electrical stimulator was implanted in the rat sciatic nerve with 7 mm gap. The electrical stimulation was applied for periods of one, two and four weeks between the proximal and the distal nerve stumps. After four weeks of post-operations, the degree of regeneration was evaluated through walking track assessments and by measuring neural response of the regenerated nerve. Based on these results, electrical stimulation, especially for two weeks of stimulation, could accelerate functional regeneration of the severed nerve.

  15. A systematic review of electric-acoustic stimulation: device fitting ranges, outcomes, and clinical fitting practices.

    PubMed

    Incerti, Paola V; Ching, Teresa Y C; Cowan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Cochlear implant systems that combine electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear are now commercially available and the number of patients using these devices is steadily increasing. In particular, electric-acoustic stimulation is an option for patients with severe, high frequency sensorineural hearing impairment. There have been a range of approaches to combining electric stimulation and acoustic hearing in the same ear. To develop a better understanding of fitting practices for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation, we conducted a systematic review addressing three clinical questions: what is the range of acoustic hearing in the implanted ear that can be effectively preserved for an electric-acoustic fitting?; what benefits are provided by combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation?; and what clinical fitting practices have been developed for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation? A search of the literature was conducted and 27 articles that met the strict evaluation criteria adopted for the review were identified for detailed analysis. The range of auditory thresholds in the implanted ear that can be successfully used for an electric-acoustic application is quite broad. The effectiveness of combined electric and acoustic stimulation as compared with electric stimulation alone was consistently demonstrated, highlighting the potential value of preservation and utilization of low frequency hearing in the implanted ear. However, clinical procedures for best fitting of electric-acoustic devices were varied. This clearly identified a need for further investigation of fitting procedures aimed at maximizing outcomes for recipients of electric-acoustic devices. PMID:23539259

  16. Influence of electrical stimulation on hip joint adductor muscle activity during maximum effort

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether hip adductor activity was influenced by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 nondisabled males. Each subject was asked to adduct the hip joint with maximum effort. The electromyogram of the adductor longus was recorded under two experimental conditions, with and without electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. [Results] In the presence of electrical stimulation, muscle activity decreased to 72.9% (57.8–89.3%) of that without stimulation. [Conclusion] These results suggested that inactivation of the adductor group was promoted by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. PMID:27313387

  17. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment. (a) General. Electrical stimulating (EST) equipment is... separate pieces—the control system and the applicator. The EST control system contains the circuitry...

  18. Electrical high-frequency stimulation of the human thoracolumbar fascia evokes long-term potentiation-like pain amplification.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Magerl, Walter; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-10-01

    Nociceptive long-term potentiation, a use dependent increase in synaptic efficacy in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is thought to contribute to the development of persistent pain states. So far, no study has analyzed the effects of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of afferents from deep tissues (muscle and fascia) on pain perception in the back in humans. In 16 healthy volunteers, the multifidus muscle and the overlying thoracolumbar fascia were stimulated with electrical high-frequency pulses (5 × 100 pulses at 100 Hz) through bipolar concentric needle electrodes placed at lumbar level (L3/L4). Electrical pain thresholds were lower (P < 0.001) and pain ratings were higher for fascia compared with muscle stimulation (P < 0.05). For both tissues, pain ratings increased significantly across the five 100 Hz trains (from 15 to 22 numerical rating scale for fascia, from 8 to 12 numerical rating scale for muscle; both P < 0.01). Fascia HFS increased fascia pain ratings 2.17 times compared with the unconditioned control site (P < 0.001), but had no significant effect on pain sensitivity of the muscle. The HFS in muscle had no significant effect on muscle pain, but decreased pain sensitivity of the overlying fascia by 20% (P < 0.05). In additional experiments using the same electrodes and followed over >60 minutes post-HFS, potentiation by fascia HFS was similar to that of skin HFS. These findings show that the spinal input from the fascia can induce long-term changes in pain sensitivity for at least 60 minutes making it a candidate potentially contributing to nonspecific low back pain. PMID:27322440

  19. Electrical high-frequency stimulation of the human thoracolumbar fascia evokes long-term potentiation-like pain amplification.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Magerl, Walter; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-10-01

    Nociceptive long-term potentiation, a use dependent increase in synaptic efficacy in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is thought to contribute to the development of persistent pain states. So far, no study has analyzed the effects of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of afferents from deep tissues (muscle and fascia) on pain perception in the back in humans. In 16 healthy volunteers, the multifidus muscle and the overlying thoracolumbar fascia were stimulated with electrical high-frequency pulses (5 × 100 pulses at 100 Hz) through bipolar concentric needle electrodes placed at lumbar level (L3/L4). Electrical pain thresholds were lower (P < 0.001) and pain ratings were higher for fascia compared with muscle stimulation (P < 0.05). For both tissues, pain ratings increased significantly across the five 100 Hz trains (from 15 to 22 numerical rating scale for fascia, from 8 to 12 numerical rating scale for muscle; both P < 0.01). Fascia HFS increased fascia pain ratings 2.17 times compared with the unconditioned control site (P < 0.001), but had no significant effect on pain sensitivity of the muscle. The HFS in muscle had no significant effect on muscle pain, but decreased pain sensitivity of the overlying fascia by 20% (P < 0.05). In additional experiments using the same electrodes and followed over >60 minutes post-HFS, potentiation by fascia HFS was similar to that of skin HFS. These findings show that the spinal input from the fascia can induce long-term changes in pain sensitivity for at least 60 minutes making it a candidate potentially contributing to nonspecific low back pain.

  20. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation decreases food consumption and weight gain in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gil, Krzysztof; Bugajski, A; Thor, P

    2011-12-01

    There is growing evidence that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has a suppressive effect on both short- and long-term feeding in animal models. We previously showed that long-term VNS (102 days) with low-frequency electrical impulses (0.05 Hz) decreased food intake and body weight in rats. In the present study, we investigated the effect of high frequency (10 Hz) VNS on feeding behavior and appetite in rats fed a high-fat diet; peptide secretion and other parameters were assessed as well. Adult male Wistar rats were each implanted subcutaneously with a microstimulator (MS) and fed a high-fat diet throughout the entire study period (42 days). The left vagus nerve was stimulated by rectangular electrical pulses (10 ms, 200 mV, 10 Hz, 12 h a day) generated by the MS. Body weight and food intake were measured each morning. At the end of the experimental period, animals were euthanized and blood samples were taken. Serum levels of ghrelin, leptin and nesfatin-1 were assessed using radioimmunoassays. Adipose tissue content was evaluated by weighing epididymal fat pads, which were incised at the time of sacrifice. To determine whether VNS activated the food-related areas of the brain, neuronal c-Fos induction in the nuclei of the solitary tract (NTS) was assessed. Chronic vagus nerve stimulation significantly decreased food intake, body weight gain and epididymal fat pad weight in animals that received VNS compared with control animals. Significant neuronal responses in the NTS were observed following VNS. Finally, serum concentrations of ghrelin were increased, while serum levels of leptin were decreased. Although not significant, serum nesfatin-1 levels were also elevated. These results support the theory that VNS leads to reductions in food intake, body weight gain and adipose tissue by increasing brain satiety signals conducted through the vagal afferents. VNS also evoked a feed-related hormonal response, including elevated blood concentrations of nesfatin-1.

  1. High-Voltage Pulsed Current Electrical Stimulation in Wound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Anna; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Significance: A range of studies point to the efficacy of electrical stimulation (ES) in wound treatment, but the methodology of its application has not been determined to date. This article provides a critical review of the results of clinical trials published by researchers using high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC) to treat chronic wounds. In describing the methodology of the trials, the article gives special attention to electric stimulus parameters, the frequency of procedures and total treatment duration. Recent Advances: HVPC is a monophasic pulsed electric current that consists of double-peaked impulses (5–200 μs), at very high peak-current amplitude (2–2.5 A), and high voltage (up to 500 V), at a frequency of 1–125 pulses per second. HVPC can activate “skin battery” and cellular galvanotaxis, and improves blood flow and capillary density. Critical Issues: HVPC efficacy was evaluated in conservatively treated patients with diabetic foot, venous leg and pressure ulcers (PUs), and in some patients with surgically treated venous insufficiency. Future Directions: The efficacy of HVPC as one of several biophysical energies promoting venous leg ulcer (VLU) and PU healing has been confirmed. Additional studies are needed to investigate its effect on the healing of other types of soft tissue defects. Other areas that require more research include the identification of the therapeutic effect of HVPC on infected wounds, the determination of the efficacy of cathodal versus anodal stimulation, and the minimal daily/weekly duration of HVPC required to ensure optimal promotion of wound healing. PMID:24761351

  2. A quantitative study of the central projection patterns of unmyelinated ventral root afferents in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M; McMahon, S B

    1990-01-01

    1. The ventral roots of the spinal cord contain a large number of unmyelinated primary afferent neurones. There is some controversy, however, about the function of these fibres and the route of their central projection. Here we have used electrophysiological techniques to quantify the central projection patterns of these neurones in the segment S2 of adult chloralose-anaesthesized cats. 2. A total of 1185 single unmyelinated units were recorded in small filaments isolated from intact and de-efferented ventral roots or intact dorsal roots of the segment S2 in nineteen cats. The projection patterns of these neurones were tested using supramaximal electrical stimulation of the pelvic and pudendal nerve (the main tributaries of the spinal nerve of this segment) and of the segmental companion root (dorsal or ventral as appropriate). 3. The principal finding of this study is that 85% of unmyelinated afferent axons in the ventral root are direct and exclusive projections. They constitute a separate class of afferents which is only capable of transmitting information from the periphery via the ventral roots. However, the proportion of these fibres that enter the central nervous system is unknown and it seems likely that some of them peter out as they approach the spinal cord and end blindly. The functional role of such afferents remains obscure. 4. For the remaining 15% of unmyelinated ventral root afferents, a projection into the segmental dorsal root was found. The majority of those fibres (about two-thirds) are primary afferent neurones innervating the pia mater. Some of these units had a small spot-like receptive field and responded to mechanical stimuli such as pressure and stretch of the root. They did not have axon projections in a peripheral nerve. 5. A few (5%) unmyelinated ventral root fibres are collateral branches of normal primary afferents projecting through the dorsal root. These trifurcating neurones are a small population which make up only some 0.5% of

  3. A method for the study of the effects of combining multiple pseudorandom fusimotor stimulation on the responses of muscle-spindle primary-ending afferents.

    PubMed

    Hulliger, Manuel; Banks, Robert W

    2009-03-30

    We describe a new method of investigation of the integrative action of fusimotor inputs in mammalian muscle spindles by stimulation of multiple fusimotor axons using independent pseudorandom pulse trains, each of low mean rate with pseudorandomly distributed stimulus intervals. Technically it was feasible only because of the development of (1) a novel, highly efficient approach to functional isolation of fusimotor efferents in ventral-root filaments, which we have called the isodyne strategy; (2) a real-time, microprocessor-based stimulus artefact cancellation device (SACAD); and (3) a highly adjustable, multi-branch stimulation electrode array. The general approach of using multiple, independent, pseudorandom stimulation of several input channels has wider applications in controlled-activation paradigms. PMID:19109995

  4. Electrical stimulation: a novel tool for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Balint, Richard; Cassidy, Nigel J; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2013-02-01

    New advances in tissue engineering are being made through the application of different types of electrical stimuli to influence cell proliferation and differentiation. Developments made in the last decade have allowed us to improve the structure and functionality of tissue-engineered products through the use of growth factors, hormones, drugs, physical stimuli, bioreactor use, and two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) artificial extracellular matrices (with various material properties and topography). Another potential type of stimulus is electricity, which is important in the physiology and development of the majority of all human tissues. Despite its great potential, its role in tissue regeneration and its ability to influence cell migration, orientation, proliferation, and differentiation has rarely been considered in tissue engineering. This review highlights the importance of endogenous electrical stimulation, gathering the current knowledge on its natural occurrence and role in vivo, discussing the novel methods of delivering this stimulus and examining its cellular and tissue level effects, while evaluating how the technique could benefit the tissue engineering discipline in the future.

  5. Dopamine D1/D5, But not D2/D3, Receptor Dependency of Synaptic Plasticity at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses that Is Enabled by Patterned Afferent Stimulation, or Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    Hagena, Hardy; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Although the mossy fiber (MF) synapses of the hippocampal CA3 region display quite distinct properties in terms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie synaptic plasticity, they nonetheless exhibit persistent (>24 h) synaptic plasticity that is akin to that observed at the Schaffer collateral (SCH)-CA1 and perforant path (PP)-dentate gyrus (DG) synapses of freely behaving rats. In addition, they also respond to novel spatial learning with very enduring forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). These latter forms of synaptic plasticity are directly related to the learning behavior: novel exploration of generalized changes in space facilitates the expression of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses, whereas exploration of novel configurations of large environmental features facilitates the expression of LTD. In the absence of spatial novelty, synaptic plasticity is not expressed. Motivation is a potent determinant of whether learning about the spatial experience effectively occurs and the neuromodulator dopamine (DA) plays a key role in motivation-based learning. Prior research on the regulation by DA receptors of long-term synaptic plasticity in CA1 and DG synapses in vivo suggests that whereas D2/D3 receptors may modulate a general predisposition toward expressing plasticity, D1/D5 receptors may directly regulate the direction of change in synaptic strength that occurs during learning. Although the CA3 region is believed to play a pivotal role in many forms of learning, the role of dopamine receptors in persistent (>24 h) forms of synaptic plasticity at MF-CA3 synapses is unknown. Here, we report that whereas pharmacological antagonism of D2/D3 receptors had no impact on LTP or LTD, antagonism of D1/D5 receptors significantly impaired LTP and LTD that were induced by solely by means of patterned afferent stimulation, or LTP/LTD that are typically enhanced by the conjunction of afferent stimulation and novel spatial learning. These data indicate an

  6. Modulation of two types of jaw-opening reflex by stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Yajima, Eriko; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Nagamine, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2013-08-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is divided cytoarchitecturally into two parts, the parvicellular part (RPC) and the magnocellular part (RMC). The present study aims, first, to compare the effects of RN stimulation between low- and high-threshold afferents-evoked jaw opening reflexes (JORs), and secondly to compare the size of these effects in the RPC and RMC. Experiments were performed on rats anesthetized with urethane-chloralose. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was either 1.2 (low-threshold) or 4.0 (high-threshold) times that necessary to elicit the JOR. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RN significantly facilitated the JOR evoked by the low-threshold afferents. On the other hand, conditioning electrical stimulation of the RN significantly suppressed the JOR evoked by the high-threshold afferents. Microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the RN also facilitated the JOR evoked by the low-threshold afferents, but suppressed that evoked by high-threshold afferents. Facilitation did not differ between the RMC and the RPC. Suppression by the RMC stimulation was significantly greater than that by the RPC stimulation. These results suggest that the RN has distinct functional roles in the control of the JOR. PMID:23708019

  7. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  12. Electrical stimulation: Its role in growth, repair and remodeling of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the increasingly popular field of electrical stimulation of lesions of the musculoskeletal system, exploring its use in both research and treatment. The book describes clinical experience with electrical stimulation in orthopedic, neuro- and plastic surgery, biological sources of electrical signals, and electromechanical characterization of tissues. Contents include: growth; remodeling and repair; electricity and magnetism; electrical properties of tissues; natural electrical signals in the musculoskeletal system; methods for stimulating tissues; cell, tissue and organ culture; animal studies; clinical applications; overview and a glossary.

  13. A personal user's view of functional electrical stimulation cycling.

    PubMed

    Fitzwater, Roger

    2002-03-01

    Two years of functional electrical stimulation cycling (FESC) as a researcher and subject have given me an insight into the direction that future FESC should take as well as providing me with significant health benefits and an enjoyable and functional ability to cycle. If FESC is to benefit spinal cord injured persons (SCIPs), researchers must turn their attention to making the activity convenient and enjoyable. What follows is a personal view and will be less scientifically rigorous than other presentations but hopefully still of value. It calls upon my experience as a general medical practitioner with a special interest in the value of exercise, a human powered vehicle enthusiast, an amateur FES researcher, but most importantly, an SCIP and FES cyclist.

  14. Electrical nerve stimulation for overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Ubirajara; Lordêlo, Patrícia

    2011-07-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a urological condition that is frequently observed in children and requires treatment. Standard urotherapy is usually the first line of treatment; however, children with severe OAB do not respond to this therapy. Antimuscarinic drugs may be used, but complete resolution of symptoms with this medication is low. Studies, including two randomized clinical trials, have demonstrated that electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) can be used successfully for OAB in children. Electrodes have been placed in the genitals, anus, and intravesical area, and on the tibial posterior nerve, as well as used transcutaneously or implanted during a surgical procedure. This Review will discuss the use of ENS in children with OAB, with particular focus on the putative mechanisms of action, the different ENS techniques available, and clinical results for this therapy.

  15. A personal user's view of functional electrical stimulation cycling.

    PubMed

    Fitzwater, Roger

    2002-03-01

    Two years of functional electrical stimulation cycling (FESC) as a researcher and subject have given me an insight into the direction that future FESC should take as well as providing me with significant health benefits and an enjoyable and functional ability to cycle. If FESC is to benefit spinal cord injured persons (SCIPs), researchers must turn their attention to making the activity convenient and enjoyable. What follows is a personal view and will be less scientifically rigorous than other presentations but hopefully still of value. It calls upon my experience as a general medical practitioner with a special interest in the value of exercise, a human powered vehicle enthusiast, an amateur FES researcher, but most importantly, an SCIP and FES cyclist. PMID:11940034

  16. Role of Functional Electrical Stimulation in Tetraplegia Hand Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bersch, Ines; Fridén, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to improve upper limb function is an established method in the rehabilitation of persons with tetraplegia after spinal cord injury. Surgical reconstruction is another well-established yet underused technique to improve the performance of the upper extremities. Hand surgery plays an essential role in restoring hand function, mobility, and quality of life in the tetraplegic population. The knowledge about the effects of FES on a structural and functional level is fundamental for understanding how and when FES can be used best to support the effect of hand surgery, both pre- and postoperatively. In this article we discuss principles of FES and how FES improves functional outcome after surgical reconstruction. The reported results are based on preliminary clinical observations. PMID:27233590

  17. Repair of nonunions by electrically pulsed current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zichner, L

    1981-01-01

    Five congenital and 52 acquired nonunions of bone were stimulated using an invasive device. The unit delivered a constant but pulsed right-angled current of positive polarity measuring 20 to 25 muAmps (voltage of 750 mV) and a frequency of 20 Hz. The power pack encapsulated in epoxy resin was implanted at the time of operative fragment stabilization. THe cathode was inserted at the site of the nonunion gap. After two to 12 months, all but two of the acquired nonunions and one of the congenital pseudarthroses healed. In the unsuccessful cases, the bone ends were often totally necrotic. Four cases required reimplantation because of broken wires or expiration of the battery, and two cases failed owing to purulent infection. Electrostimulation is an adjuvant treatment to fragment stabilization in hyporeactive and hypovascular or congenital pseudarthroses. Electrical stimuli may be assumed to simulate conditions which are essential for bone healing.

  18. Spatiotemporal structure of intracranial electric fields induced by transcranial electric stimulation in humans and nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Alexander; Falchier, Arnaud; Yan, Chao-Gan; Yeagle, Erin M.; Linn, Gary S.; Megevand, Pierre; Thielscher, Axel; Deborah A., Ross; Milham, Michael P.; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an emerging technique, developed to non-invasively modulate brain function. However, the spatiotemporal distribution of the intracranial electric fields induced by TES remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how much current actually reaches the brain, and how it distributes across the brain. Lack of this basic information precludes a firm mechanistic understanding of TES effects. In this study we directly measure the spatial and temporal characteristics of the electric field generated by TES using stereotactic EEG (s-EEG) electrode arrays implanted in cebus monkeys and surgical epilepsy patients. We found a small frequency dependent decrease (10%) in magnitudes of TES induced potentials and negligible phase shifts over space. Electric field strengths were strongest in superficial brain regions with maximum values of about 0.5 mV/mm. Our results provide crucial information of the underlying biophysics in TES applications in humans and the optimization and design of TES stimulation protocols. In addition, our findings have broad implications concerning electric field propagation in non-invasive recording techniques such as EEG/MEG. PMID:27535462

  19. Spatiotemporal structure of intracranial electric fields induced by transcranial electric stimulation in humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Falchier, Arnaud; Yan, Chao-Gan; Yeagle, Erin M; Linn, Gary S; Megevand, Pierre; Thielscher, Axel; Deborah A, Ross; Milham, Michael P; Mehta, Ashesh D; Schroeder, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an emerging technique, developed to non-invasively modulate brain function. However, the spatiotemporal distribution of the intracranial electric fields induced by TES remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how much current actually reaches the brain, and how it distributes across the brain. Lack of this basic information precludes a firm mechanistic understanding of TES effects. In this study we directly measure the spatial and temporal characteristics of the electric field generated by TES using stereotactic EEG (s-EEG) electrode arrays implanted in cebus monkeys and surgical epilepsy patients. We found a small frequency dependent decrease (10%) in magnitudes of TES induced potentials and negligible phase shifts over space. Electric field strengths were strongest in superficial brain regions with maximum values of about 0.5 mV/mm. Our results provide crucial information of the underlying biophysics in TES applications in humans and the optimization and design of TES stimulation protocols. In addition, our findings have broad implications concerning electric field propagation in non-invasive recording techniques such as EEG/MEG. PMID:27535462

  20. The influence of antagonist muscle electrical stimulation on maximal hip adduction force

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle decreases voluntary maximum resistance to passive abduction motion in participants without disease of the central nervous system. [Subjects] The participants were 16 healthy men. [Methods] The hip joint was moved from 10° adduction to 0° adduction with an angular velocity of 7°/s. During the passive leg motion, the subject was asked to resist the motion with maximum force. Two experimental conditions were prepared: (1) electrical stimulation provided to the tensor fascia lata muscle during the passive motion; and (2) no electrical stimulation provided. [Results] The force was 10.2 ± 3.5 kgf with electrical stimulation and 12.2 ± 3.8 kgf without electrical stimulation. [Conclusion] The results suggested that the maximum hip adduction force decreased in participants because of electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. PMID:26957742

  1. Chronic Stress Decreases Cerebrovascular Responses During Rat Hindlimb Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sohee; Kang, Bok-Man; Shin, Min-Kyoo; Min, Jiwoong; Heo, Chaejeong; Lee, Yubu; Baeg, Eunha; Suh, Minah

    2015-01-01

    Repeated stress is one of the major risk factors for cerebrovascular disease, including stroke, and vascular dementia. However, the functional alterations in the cerebral hemodynamic response induced by chronic stress have not been clarified. Here, we investigated the in vivo cerebral hemodynamic changes and accompanying cellular and molecular changes in chronically stressed rats. After 3 weeks of restraint stress, the elicitation of stress was verified by behavioral despair in the forced swimming test and by physical indicators of stress. The evoked changes in the cerebral blood volume and pial artery responses following hindpaw electrical stimulation were measured using optical intrinsic signal imaging. We observed that, compared to the control group, animals under chronic restraint stress exhibited a decreased hemodynamic response, with a smaller pial arterial dilation in the somatosensory cortex during hindpaw electrical stimulation. The effect of chronic restraint stress on vasomodulator enzymes, including neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2), was assessed in the somatosensory cortex. Chronic restraint stress downregulated nNOS and HO-2 compared to the control group. In addition, we examined the subtypes of cells that can explain the environmental changes due to the decreased vasomodulators. The expression of parvalbumin in GABAergic interneurons and glutamate receptor-1 in neurons were decreased, whereas the microglial activation was increased. Our results suggest that the chronic stress-induced alterations in cerebral vascular function and the modulations of the cellular expression in the neuro-vasomodulatory system may be crucial contributing factors in the development of various vascular-induced conditions in the brain. PMID:26778944

  2. The value of electrical stimulation as an exercise training modality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currier, Dean P.; Ray, J. Michael; Nyland, John; Noteboom, Tim

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary exercise is the traditional way of improving performance of the human body in both the healthy and unhealthy states. Physiological responses to voluntary exercise are well documented. It benefits the functions of bone, joints, connective tissue, and muscle. In recent years, research has shown that neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) simulates voluntary exercise in many ways. Generically, NMES can perform three major functions: suppression of pain, improve healing of soft tissues, and produce muscle contractions. Low frequency NMES may gate or disrupt the sensory input to the central nervous system which results in masking or control of pain. At the same time NMES may contribute to the activation of endorphins, serotonin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptides, and ACTH which control pain and may even cause improved athletic performances. Soft tissue conditions such as wounds and inflammations have responded very favorably to NMES. NMES of various amplitudes can induce muscle contractions ranging from weak to intense levels. NMES seems to have made its greatest gains in rehabilitation where directed muscle contractions may improve joint ranges of motion correct joint contractures that result from shortening muscles; control abnormal movements through facilitating recruitment or excitation into the alpha motoneuron in orthopedically, neurologically, or healthy subjects with intense sensory, kinesthetic, and proprioceptive information; provide a conservative approach to management of spasticity in neurological patients; by stimulation of the antagonist muscle to a spastic muscle stimulation of the agonist muscle, and sensory habituation; serve as an orthotic substitute to conventional bracing used with stroke patients in lieu of dorsiflexor muscles in preventing step page gait and for shoulder muscles to maintain glenohumeral alignment to prevent subluxation; and of course NMES is used in maintaining or improving the performance or torque producing

  3. Highly Flexible Silicone Coated Neural Array for Intracochlear Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, P.; Van Beek-King, J.; Sharpe, A.; Crawford, J.; Tridandapani, S.; McKinnon, B.; Blake, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective method for tailoring the flexibility of a commercial thin-film polymer electrode array for intracochlear electrical stimulation. Using a pneumatically driven dispensing system, an average 232 ± 64 μm (mean ± SD) thickness layer of silicone adhesive coating was applied to stiffen the underside of polyimide multisite arrays. Additional silicone was applied to the tip to protect neural tissue during insertion and along the array to improve surgical handling. Each array supported 20 platinum sites (180 μm dia., 250 μm pitch), spanning nearly 28 mm in length and 400 μm in width. We report an average intracochlear stimulating current threshold of 170 ± 93 μA to evoke an auditory brainstem response in 7 acutely deafened felines. A total of 10 arrays were each inserted through a round window approach into the cochlea's basal turn of eight felines with one delamination occurring upon insertion (preliminary results of the in vivo data presented at the 48th Annual Meeting American Neurotology Society, Orlando, FL, April 2013, and reported in Van Beek-King 2014). Using microcomputed tomography imaging (50 μm resolution), distances ranging from 100 to 565 μm from the cochlea's central modiolus were measured. Our method combines the utility of readily available commercial devices with a straightforward postprocessing step on the order of 24 hours. PMID:26236714

  4. Individual differences in transcranial electrical stimulation current density

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Michael J; Goodman, Theodore; Pierson, Ronald; Shepherd, Shane; Wang, Qiang; Groshong, Bennett; Wiley, David F

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (TCES) is effective in treating many conditions, but it has not been possible to accurately forecast current density within the complex anatomy of a given subject's head. We sought to predict and verify TCES current densities and determine the variability of these current distributions in patient-specific models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment estimated conductivity from MRIs and compared the current density results against actual measurements from the scalp surface of 3 subjects. In the second experiment, virtual electrodes were placed on the scalps of 18 subjects to model simulated current densities with 2 mA of virtually applied stimulation. This procedure was repeated for 4 electrode locations. Current densities were then calculated for 75 brain regions. Comparison of modeled and measured external current in experiment 1 yielded a correlation of r = .93. In experiment 2, modeled individual differences were greatest near the electrodes (ten-fold differences were common), but simulated current was found in all regions of the brain. Sites that were distant from the electrodes (e.g. hypothalamus) typically showed two-fold individual differences. MRI-based modeling can effectively predict current densities in individual brains. Significant variation occurs between subjects with the same applied electrode configuration. Individualized MRI-based modeling should be considered in place of the 10-20 system when accurate TCES is needed. PMID:24285948

  5. Interaction of poststroke voluntary effort and functional neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Nathaniel; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John; Crago, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be able to augment functional arm and hand movement after stroke. Poststroke neuroprostheses that incorporate voluntary effort and FES to produce the desired movement must consider how forces generated by voluntary effort and FES combine, even in the same muscle, in order to provide an appropriate level of stimulation to elicit the desired assistive force. The goal of this study was to determine whether the force produced by voluntary effort and FES add together independently of effort or whether the increment in force depends on the level of voluntary effort. Isometric force matching tasks were performed under different combinations of voluntary effort and FES. Participants reached a steady level of force, and while attempting to maintain a constant effort level, FES was applied to augment the force. Results indicate that the increment in force produced by FES decreases as the level of initial voluntary effort increases. Potential mechanisms causing the change in force output are proposed, but the relative contribution of each mechanism is unknown.

  6. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Séguéla, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8(+) primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2(+)-Arch(+) mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8(+) afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  7. Numerical simulation of electrically stimulated osteogenesis in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2014-04-01

    Cell behavior and tissue formation are influenced by a static electric field (EF). Several protocols for EF exposure are aimed at increasing the rate of tissue recovery and reducing the healing times in wounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of the EF action on cells and tissues are still a matter of research. In this work we introduce a mathematical model for electrically stimulated osteogenesis at the bone-dental implant interface. The model describes the influence of the EF in the most critical biological processes leading to bone formation at the bone-dental implant interface. The numerical solution is able to reproduce the distribution of spatial-temporal patterns describing the influence of EF during blood clotting, osteogenic cell migration, granulation tissue formation, displacements of the fibrillar matrix, and formation of new bone. In addition, the model describes the EF-mediated cell behavior and tissue formation which lead to an increased osteogenesis in both smooth and rough implant surfaces. Since numerical results compare favorably with experimental evidence, the model can be used to predict the outcome of using electrostimulation in other types of wounds and tissues.

  8. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  9. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c—interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  10. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  11. Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Wendy; Nagy, James I; Dai, Yue; McCrea, David A

    2012-01-01

    Electrical synapses formed by gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cx36) promote synchronous activity of interneurones in many regions of mammalian brain; however, there is limited information on the role of electrical synapses in spinal neuronal networks. Here we show that Cx36 is widely distributed in the spinal cord and is involved in mechanisms that govern presynaptic inhibition of primary afferent terminals. Electrophysiological recordings were made in spinal cord preparations from 8- to 11-day-old wild-type and Cx36 knockout mice. Several features associated with presynaptic inhibition evoked by conditioning stimulation of low threshold hindlimb afferents were substantially compromised in Cx36 knockout mice. Dorsal root potentials (DRPs) evoked by low intensity stimulation of sensory afferents were reduced in amplitude by 79% and in duration by 67% in Cx36 knockouts. DRPs were similarly affected in wild-types by bath application of gap junction blockers. Consistent with presynaptic inhibition of group Ia muscle spindle afferent terminals on motoneurones described in adult cats, conditioning stimulation of an adjacent dorsal root evoked a long duration inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes recorded from the ventral root in wild-type mice, and this inhibition was antagonized by bicuculline. The same conditioning stimulation failed to inhibit monosynaptic reflexes in Cx36 knockout mice. Immunofluorescence labelling for Cx36 was found throughout the dorsal and ventral horns of the spinal cord of juvenile mice and persisted in mature animals. In deep dorsal horn laminae, where interneurones involved in presynaptic inhibition of large diameter muscle afferents are located, cells were extensively dye-coupled following intracellular neurobiotin injection. Coupled cells displayed Cx36-positive puncta along their processes. Our results indicate that gap junctions formed by Cx36 in spinal cord are required for maintenance of presynaptic inhibition, including the

  12. Validating computationally predicted TMS stimulation areas using direct electrical stimulation in patients with brain tumors near precentral regions.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Zafar, Noman; Bockermann, Volker; Rohde, Veit; Paulus, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The spatial extent of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is of paramount interest for all studies employing this method. It is generally assumed that the induced electric field is the crucial parameter to determine which cortical regions are excited. While it is difficult to directly measure the electric field, one usually relies on computational models to estimate the electric field distribution. Direct electrical stimulation (DES) is a local brain stimulation method generally considered the gold standard to map structure-function relationships in the brain. Its application is typically limited to patients undergoing brain surgery. In this study we compare the computationally predicted stimulation area in TMS with the DES area in six patients with tumors near precentral regions. We combine a motor evoked potential (MEP) mapping experiment for both TMS and DES with realistic individual finite element method (FEM) simulations of the electric field distribution during TMS and DES. On average, stimulation areas in TMS and DES show an overlap of up to 80%, thus validating our computational physiology approach to estimate TMS excitation volumes. Our results can help in understanding the spatial spread of TMS effects and in optimizing stimulation protocols to more specifically target certain cortical regions based on computational modeling.

  13. Validating computationally predicted TMS stimulation areas using direct electrical stimulation in patients with brain tumors near precentral regions.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Zafar, Noman; Bockermann, Volker; Rohde, Veit; Paulus, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The spatial extent of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is of paramount interest for all studies employing this method. It is generally assumed that the induced electric field is the crucial parameter to determine which cortical regions are excited. While it is difficult to directly measure the electric field, one usually relies on computational models to estimate the electric field distribution. Direct electrical stimulation (DES) is a local brain stimulation method generally considered the gold standard to map structure-function relationships in the brain. Its application is typically limited to patients undergoing brain surgery. In this study we compare the computationally predicted stimulation area in TMS with the DES area in six patients with tumors near precentral regions. We combine a motor evoked potential (MEP) mapping experiment for both TMS and DES with realistic individual finite element method (FEM) simulations of the electric field distribution during TMS and DES. On average, stimulation areas in TMS and DES show an overlap of up to 80%, thus validating our computational physiology approach to estimate TMS excitation volumes. Our results can help in understanding the spatial spread of TMS effects and in optimizing stimulation protocols to more specifically target certain cortical regions based on computational modeling. PMID:24818076

  14. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. III. Effects of bilateral labyrinthine electrical stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Dickman, J. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of functional, reversible ablation and potential recruitment of the most irregular otolith afferents on the dynamics and sensitivity of the translational vestibuloocular reflexes (trVORs) were investigated in rhesus monkeys trained to fixate near and far targets. Translational motion stimuli consisted of either steady-state lateral and fore-aft sinusoidal oscillations or short-lasting transient lateral head displacements. Short-duration (usually <2 s) anodal (inhibitory) and cathodal (excitatory) currents (50-100 microA) were delivered bilaterally during motion. In the presence of anodal labyrinthine stimulation, trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance were significantly decreased. In addition, anodal currents significantly increased phase lags. During transient motion, anodal stimulation resulted in significantly lower initial eye acceleration and more sluggish responses. Cathodal currents tended to have opposite effects. The main characteristics of these results were simulated by a simple model where both regularly and irregularly discharging afferents contribute to the trVORs. Anodal labyrinthine currents also were found to decrease eye velocity during long-duration, constant velocity rotations, although results were generally more variable compared with those during translational motion.

  15. Effects of a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system on hemiplegic gait and muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Rong, Ke; Qian, Zhenyun; Wen, Chen; Zhang, Songning

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to design and implement a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system and investigate acute effects of functional electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris on ankle and knee sagittal-plane kinematics and related muscle forces of hemiplegic gait. [Subjects and Methods] A multichannel dynamic electrical stimulation system was developed with 8-channel low frequency current generators. Eight male hemiplegic patients were trained for 4 weeks with electric stimulation of the tibia anterior and rectus femoris muscles during walking, which was coupled with active contraction. Kinematic data were collected, and muscle forces of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris of the affected limbs were analyzed using a musculoskelatal modeling approach before and after training. A paired sample t-test was used to detect the differences between before and after training. [Results] The step length of the affected limb significantly increased after the stimulation was applied. The maximum dorsiflexion angle and maximum knee flexion angle of the affected limb were both increased significantly during stimulation. The maximum muscle forces of both the tibia anterior and rectus femoris increased significantly during stimulation compared with before functional electrical stimulation was applied. [Conclusion] This study established a functional electrical stimulation strategy based on hemiplegic gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. The multichannel functional electrical stimulation system successfully corrected foot drop and altered circumduction hemiplegic gait pattern.

  16. Electrical stimulation vs. pulsed and continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CNs) during prostate cancer surgery is critical for post-operative sexual function. Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) mapping has previously been tested as an intraoperative tool for CN identification, but was found to be unreliable. ENS is limited by the need for electrode-tissue contact, poor spatial precision from electrical current spreading, and stimulation artifacts interfering with detection. Alternatively, optical nerve stimulation (ONS) provides noncontact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of stimulation artifacts. This study compares ENS to pulsed/CW ONS to explore the ONS mechanism. A total of eighty stimulations were performed in 5 rats, in vivo. ENS (4 V, 5 ms, 10 Hz) was compared to ONS using a pulsed diode laser nerve stimulator (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz) or CW diode laser nerve stimulator (1455 nm). Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response and nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) were measured. All three stimulation modes (ENS, ONS-CW, ONS-P) produced comparable ICP magnitudes. However, ENS demonstrated more rapid ICP response times and well defined nCAPs compared to unmeasurable nCAPs for ONS. Further experiments measuring single action potentials during ENS and ONS are warranted to further understand differences in the ENS and ONS mechanisms.

  17. Kinetics of neuromuscular changes during low-frequency electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Papaiordanidou, Maria; Guiraud, David; Varray, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the time course of neuromuscular fatigue components during a low-frequency electrostimulation (ES) session. Three bouts of 17 trains of stimulation at 30 HZ (4 s on, 6 s off) were used to electrically induce fatigue in the plantar flexor muscles. Before and after every 17-train bout, torque, electromyographic activity [expressed as root mean square (RMS) and median frequency (MF) values], evoked potentials (M-wave and H-reflex), and the level of voluntary activation (LOA, using twitch interpolation technique) were assessed. Torque during maximal voluntary contraction decreased significantly from the very first stimulation bout (-6.6 +/- 1.11%, P < 0.001) and throughout the session (-10.32 +/- 1.68% and -11.53 +/- 1.27%, for the second and third bouts, respectively). The LOA and RMS/Mmax values were significantly decreased during the ES session (-2.9 +/- 1.07% and -17.5 +/- 6.14%, P < 0.01 and P< 0.001, respectively, at the end of the protocol), while MF showed no changes. The Hmax/Mmax ratio and Mmax were not significantly modified during the session. All twitch parameters were significantly potentiated after the first bout and throughout the session (P < 0.001). The maximal torque decrease was evident from the early phase of a low-frequency ES protocol, with no concomitant inhibition of motoneuron excitability or depression of muscle contractile properties. These results are consistent with an early failure of the central drive to the muscle. PMID:19882645

  18. Electrical Vestibular Stimulation after Vestibular Deafferentation and in Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Swee Tin; Todd, Michael John; Lehnen, Nadine; Aw, Grace Elizabeth; Weber, Konrad Peter; Eggert, Thomas; Halmagyi, Gabor Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Vestibular reflexes, evoked by human electrical (galvanic) vestibular stimulation (EVS), are utilized to assess vestibular function and investigate its pathways. Our study aimed to investigate the electrically-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex (eVOR) output after bilateral and unilateral vestibular deafferentations to determine the characteristics for interpreting unilateral lesions such as vestibular schwannomas. Methods EVOR was recorded with dual-search coils as binocular three-dimensional eye movements evoked by bipolar 100 ms-step at EVS intensities of [0.9, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0]mA and unipolar 100 ms-step at 5 mA EVS intensity. Five bilateral vestibular deafferented (BVD), 12 unilateral vestibular deafferented (UVD), four unilateral vestibular schwannoma (UVS) patients and 17 healthy subjects were tested with bipolar EVS, and five UVDs with unipolar EVS. Results After BVD, bipolar EVS elicited no eVOR. After UVD, bipolar EVS of one functioning ear elicited bidirectional, excitatory eVOR to cathodal EVS with 9 ms latency and inhibitory eVOR to anodal EVS, opposite in direction, at half the amplitude with 12 ms latency, exhibiting an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry. The eVOR patterns from UVS were consistent with responses from UVD confirming the vestibular loss on the lesion side. Unexpectedly, unipolar EVS of the UVD ear, instead of absent response, evoked one-third the bipolar eVOR while unipolar EVS of the functioning ear evoked half the bipolar response. Conclusions The bidirectional eVOR evoked by bipolar EVS from UVD with an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry and the 3 ms latency difference between normal and lesion side may be useful for detecting vestibular lesions such as UVS. We suggest that current spread could account for the small eVOR to 5 mA unipolar EVS of the UVD ear. PMID:24349188

  19. Electrical stimulation for the treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunction after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Meredith J.; Amundsen, Cindy L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation for bladder control is an alternative to traditional methods of treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). In this review, we systematically discuss the neurophysiology of bladder dysfunction following SCI and the applications of electrical stimulation for bladder control following SCI, spanning from historic clinical approaches to recent pre-clinical studies that offer promising new strategies that may improve the feasibility and success of electrical stimulation therapy in patients with SCI. Electrical stimulation provides a unique opportunity to control bladder function by exploiting neural control mechanisms. Our understanding of the applications and limitations of electrical stimulation for bladder control has improved due to many pre-clinical studies performed in animals and translational clinical studies. Techniques that have emerged as possible opportunities to control bladder function include pudendal nerve stimulation and novel methods of stimulation, such as high frequency nerve block. Further development of novel applications of electrical stimulation will drive progress towards effective therapy for SCI. The optimal solution for restoration of bladder control may encompass a combination of efficient, targeted electrical stimulation, possibly at multiple locations, and pharmacological treatment to enhance symptom control. PMID:25582564

  20. [Transesophageal electric stimulation of the left atrium in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Liakishev, A A; Kozlov, S G; Grosu, A A; Kulikova, T V; Sidorenko, B A

    1984-10-01

    The clinical picture and the results of bicycle ergometry and selective coronarography were compared with the findings of electrical stimulation of the left atrium in 24 patients. It was demonstrated that transesophagus electric stimulation of the left atrium may serve as a diagnostic method in coronary heart disease.

  1. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Spinal Cord Injury Respiratory Care

    PubMed Central

    Jarosz, Renata; Littlepage, Meagan M.; Creasey, Graham; McKenna, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    The management of chronic respiratory insufficiency and/or long-term inability to breathe independently has traditionally been via positive-pressure ventilation through a mechanical ventilator. Although life-sustaining, it is associated with limitations of function, lack of independence, decreased quality of life, sleep disturbance, and increased risk for infections. In addition, its mechanical and electronic complexity requires full understanding of the possible malfunctions by patients and caregivers. Ventilator-associated pneumonia, tracheal injury, and equipment malfunction account for common complications of prolonged ventilation, and respiratory infections are the most common cause of death in spinal cord–injured patients. The development of functional electric stimulation (FES) as an alternative to mechanical ventilation has been motivated by a goal to improve the quality of life of affected individuals. In this article, we will review the physiology, types, characteristics, risks and benefits, surgical techniques, and complications of the 2 commercially available FES strategies – phrenic nerve pacing (PNP) and diaphragm motor point pacing (DMPP). PMID:23459661

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Mannheimer, C; Carlsson, C A; Vedin, A; Wilhelmsson, C

    1986-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the treatment of chronic stable severe angina pectoris. In a short-term study the effect of TENS was studied in 10 male patients with angina pectoris (functional class III and IV). All patients had previously been stabilized on long-term maximal oral treatment. The effects of the treatment were measured by means of repeated bicycle ergometer tests. All patients had an increased working capacity (16-85%), decreased ST segment depression and reduced recovery time during TENS. No adverse effects were observed. A long-term study of TENS on similarly selected patients showed beneficial effects in terms of pain reduction, reduced frequency of anginal attacks, increased physical activity and increased working capacity during bicycle ergometer tests. An invasive study was carried out with respect to systemic and coronary hemodynamics and myocardial metabolism during pacing provoked myocardial ischemia in 13 patients. The results showed that TENS led to an increased tolerance to pacing, improved lactate metabolism, less pronounced ST segment depression. A drop in systolic blood pressure during TENS treatment at identical pacing rates indicated a decreased afterload. An increased coronary flow to ischemic areas in the myocardium was supported by the fact that the rate pressure product during anginal pain increased during TENS.

  3. Revealing humans’ sensorimotor functions with electrical cortical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Desmurget, Michel; Sirigu, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the human brain has been used by neurosurgeons for almost a century. Although this procedure serves only clinical purposes, it generates data that have a great scientific interest. Had DES not been employed, our comprehension of the organization of the sensorimotor systems involved in movement execution, language production, the emergence of action intentionality or the subjective feeling of movement awareness would have been greatly undermined. This does not mean, of course, that DES is a gold standard devoid of limitations and that other approaches are not of primary importance, including electrophysiology, modelling, neuroimaging or psychophysics in patients and healthy subjects. Rather, this indicates that the contribution of DES cannot be restricted, in humans, to the ubiquitous concepts of homunculus and somatotopy. DES is a fundamental tool in our attempt to understand the human brain because it represents a unique method for mapping sensorimotor pathways and interfering with the functioning of localized neural populations during the performance of well-defined behavioural tasks. PMID:26240422

  4. Electrical stimulation for difficult wounds: only an alternative procedure?

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Salomone, Marco; Zingarelli, Enrico M; Rivarossa, Filippo; Bruschi, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    In the wound healing research, the exact mechanism of action of different modalities of electrical stimulation (ES) remains controversial and unresolved. In this study we discuss a particular ES, with a different type of waveform, corresponding to the principle of stochastic resonance. Between July 2008 and May 2010, 32 patients were enrolled and ES was applied to wounds using the bioelectrical signal therapy (BST) device (LifeWave, Petach Tiqwa, Israel). The outcome evaluated in group 1 (n = 21) was wound healing, while group 2 (n = 11) was evaluated for wound-related pain [Visual Number Scale (VNS) pain scale] during treatment. In group 1, 87% of the wounds closed in an average time of 97 days (range 10-150 days); three patients were lost to follow-up. In group 2, 45% of the patients experienced a complete pain disappearance after 7 days of treatment; 36% reported a reduction in VNS from 9·3 to 3·2 in 7 days; 19% stopped morphine-like painkillers after 2 weeks. The clinical application of the stochastic resonance enables the usage of easy-to-use, non-invasive, painless and pain-relief treatment. Our experience with ES has demonstrated the BST device to be a very good alternative in cases of small size defects, compared with other therapies such as surgery, dressing and negative pressure devices. PMID:24443795

  5. Electrical stimulation and swallowing: how much do we know?

    PubMed

    Humbert, Ianessa A; Michou, Emilia; MacRae, Phoebe R; Crujido, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Consequences of dysphagia substantially reduce quality of life, increase the risk of medical complications and mortality, and pose a substantial cost to healthcare systems. As a result, it is of no wonder that the clinical and scientific communities are showing interest in new avenues for dysphagia rehabilitation. Electrical stimulation (e-stim) for the treatment of swallowing impairments is among the most studied swallowing interventions in the published literature, yet many unanswered questions about its efficacy remain. In the meantime, many speech-language pathologists who treat dysphagia are attending educational and training sessions to obtain certifications to use this technique. Here, we review the values and limitations of the published literature on the topic of e-stim for swallowing to assist clinicians in decision making in their clinical practice. The discussion provides a review of swallowing anatomy and physiology, the fundamentals of e-stim, and information essential for the readers' independent critique of these studies--all of which are crucial for evaluating the possible effects of e-stim.

  6. Electric Field Model of Transcranial Electric Stimulation in Nonhuman Primates: Correspondence to Individual Motor Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Laine, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a pipeline for realistic head models of nonhuman primates (NHPs) for simulations of noninvasive brain stimulation, and use these models together with empirical threshold measurements to demonstrate that the models capture individual anatomical variability. Methods Based on structural MRI data, we created models of the electric field (E-field) induced by right unilateral (RUL) electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in four rhesus macaques. Individual motor threshold (MT) was measured with transcranial electric stimulation (TES) administered through the RUL electrodes in the same subjects. Results The interindividual anatomical differences resulted in 57% variation in median E-field strength in the brain at fixed stimulus current amplitude. Individualization of the stimulus current by MT reduced the E-field variation in the target motor area by 27%. There was significant correlation between the measured MT and the ratio of simulated electrode current and E-field strength (r2 = 0.95, p = 0.026). Exploratory analysis revealed significant correlations of this ratio with anatomical parameters including of the superior electrode-to-cortex distance, vertex-to-cortex distance, and brain volume (r2 > 0.96, p < 0.02). The neural activation threshold was estimated to be 0.45 ± 0.07 V/cm for 0.2 ms stimulus pulse width. Conclusion These results suggest that our individual-specific NHP E-field models appropriately capture individual anatomical variability relevant to the dosing of TES/ECT. These findings are exploratory due to the small number of subjects. Significance This work can contribute insight in NHP studies of ECT and other brain stimulation interventions, help link the results to clinical studies, and ultimately lead to more rational brain stimulation dosing paradigms. PMID:25910001

  7. Cortical electrical stimulation in humans. The negative motor areas.

    PubMed

    Lüders, H O; Dinner, D S; Morris, H H; Wyllie, E; Comair, Y G

    1995-01-01

    Summarizing, we have presented evidence in humans for two "negative motor areas" which we had speculated play a significant role in the planning of voluntary motor movements. A review of the more recent experimental literature shows that histological, physiological, and electrical stimulation studies in animals reveal the existence of two frontal regions that from the experimental data also seem to play an essential role in the preparation (as opposed to execution) of voluntary movements. Current available evidence suggests that these two areas (areas F5 and F6 of Rizzolatti et al.) correspond to the negative motor areas we have described in human studies. Also of interest is that Broca's area in the dominant hemisphere overlaps the corresponding negative motor area. This observation suggests that Broca's area has evolved from area F5 of monkeys specializing in the planning of fine movements necessary for speech production. We feel that current evidence suggests the existence of three mechanisms by which cortical stimulation (by electrical stimulation or by epileptic activation) can generate negative motor phenomena: 1. The "silent period," which is consistently contralateral, has a somatotopic distribution, and tends to affect predominantly muscles involved in fine movements. It is of relatively short duration and seems to be generated by the activation of cortical areas in the primary sensorimotor region. The H-reflex is not inhibited during the silent period, suggesting that the silent period is generated by a decrease in the excitatory input through direct corticospinal neurons on the spinal alpha motoneurons. It is possible that in normal individuals this system is used for fine tuning of fine distal movements. The negative myoclonus seen in some patients with focal cortical epilepsy is probably generated by this mechanism. The primary and supplementary "negative motor areas" described in this chapter. This effect also has a somatotopic distribution but can

  8. Primary afferent depolarization and frequency processing in auditory afferents.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Hedwig, Berthold

    2010-11-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is a widespread mechanism modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission and in sensory pathways is coupled to primary afferent depolarizations. Axonal terminals of bush-cricket auditory afferents received 2-5 mV graded depolarizing inputs, which reduced the amplitude of invading spikes and indicated presynaptic inhibition. These inputs were linked to a picrotoxin-sensitive increase of Ca(2+) in the terminals. Electrophysiological recordings and optical imaging showed that in individual afferents the sound frequency tuning based on spike rates was different from the tuning of the graded primary afferent depolarizations. The auditory neuropil of the bush-cricket Mecopoda elongata is tonotopically organized, with low frequencies represented anteriorly and high frequencies represented posteriorly. In contrast graded depolarizing inputs were tuned to high-frequencies anteriorly and to low-frequencies posteriorly. Furthermore anterior and posterior axonal branches of individual afferents received different levels of primary afferent depolarization depending on sound frequency. The presence of primary afferent depolarization in the afferent terminals indicates that presynaptic inhibition may shape the synaptic transmission of frequency-specific activity to auditory interneurons.

  9. Electrical stimulation therapy improves sleep respiratory parameters in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jie-wen; Qi, Wei-wei; Ye, Rui-xin; Wu, Yuan-yuan

    2013-10-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that electrical stimulation has beneficial effects in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of electrical stimulation therapy for OSAS with a meta-analysis. The meta-analysis of all relative studies was performed through searching international literature, including PUBMED, CNKI, and EMBASE databases. This literature analysis compared all patients undergoing electrical stimulation therapy with respect to the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) and changes in sleep structure. Six studies were selected involving a total of 91 patients. The meta-analysis indicated that electrical stimulation therapy reduced RDI, longest apnea time, and improved the minimum SaO2. Based on the evidence found, electrical stimulation may be a potential therapy for OSAS, warranting further clinical trials.

  10. Videoradiography at submental electrical stimulation during apnea in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hillarp, B; Rosén, I; Wickström, O

    1991-05-01

    Percutaneous submental electrical stimulation during sleep may be a new therapeutic method for patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Electrical stimulation to the submental region during obstructive apnea is reported to break the apnea without arousal and to diminish apneic index, time spent in apnea, and oxygen desaturation. The mode of breaking the apnea by electrical stimulation has not yet been shown. However, genioglossus is supposed to be the muscle responsible for breaking the apnea by forward movement of the tongue. To visualize the effect of submental electrical stimulation, one patient with severe OSAS has been examined with videoradiography. Submental electrical stimulation evoked an immediate complex muscle activity in the tongue, palate, and hyoid bone. This was followed by a forward movement of the tongue which consistently broke obstructive apnea without apparent arousal. Time spent in apnea was diminished but intervals between apnea were not affected.

  11. Principles of electrical stimulation and dorsal column mapping as it relates to spinal cord stimulation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ramasubbu, Chitra; Flagg, Artemus; Williams, Kayode

    2013-02-01

    The last 30 years have witnessed the growth of spinal cord stimulation as a treatment modality for an increasing number of chronic pain conditions. In spite of this growth, one of the greatest criticisms is the lack of concrete evidence for the mechanism of action. With the ever increasing enlightenment with regards to the neurophysiology of pain, and the development of more dynamic neuroimaging techniques, the opportunity to better define the mechanism of action of the spinal cord stimulator will continue to expand. In the interim, clinicians will benefit from the consolidation of the available knowledge that will enhance the effective use of the device. This review serves to provide an overview of the key principles of electrical stimulation and dorsal column mapping as it relates to spinal cord stimulation. We aim at enhancing the understanding regarding the basis for successful placement of leads and manipulation of electrical parameters. PMID:23299905

  12. Saccade Modulation by Optical and Electrical Stimulation in the Macaque Frontal Eye Field

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Piercesare; Schweers, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that strong neural modulations can be evoked with optogenetic stimulation in macaque motor cortex without observing any evoked movements (Han et al., 2009, 2011; Diester et al., 2011). It remains unclear why such perturbations do not generate movements and if conditions exist under which they may evoke movements. In this study, we examine the effects of five optogenetic constructs in the macaque frontal eye field and use electrical microstimulation to assess whether optical perturbation of the local network leads to observable motor changes during optical, electrical, and combined stimulation. We report a significant increase in the probability of evoking saccadic eye movements when low current electrical stimulation is coupled to optical stimulation compared with when electrical stimulation is used alone. Experiments combining channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) and electrical stimulation with simultaneous fMRI revealed no discernible fMRI activity at the electrode tip with optical stimulation but strong activity with electrical stimulation. Our findings suggest that stimulation with current ChR2 optogenetic constructs generates subthreshold activity that contributes to the initiation of movements but, in most cases, is not sufficient to evoke a motor response. PMID:24133271

  13. Microprocessor controlled movement of liquid gastric content using sequential neural electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Mintchev, M; Sanmiguel, C; Otto, S; Bowes, K

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric electrical stimulation has been attempted for several years with little success. 
Aims—To determine whether movement of liquid gastric content could be achieved using microprocessor controlled sequential electrical stimulation. 
Methods—Eight anaesthetised dogs underwent laparotomy and implantation of four sets of bipolar stainless steel wire electrodes. Each set consisted of two to six electrodes (10×0.25 mm, 3 cm apart) implanted circumferentially. The stomach was filled with water and the process of gastric emptying was monitored. Artificial contractions were produced using microprocessor controlled phase locked bipolar four second trains of 50 Hz, 14 V (peak to peak) rectangular voltage. In four of the dogs four force transducers were implanted close to each circumferential electrode set. In one gastroparetic patient the effect of direct electrical stimulation was determined at laparotomy. 
Results—Using the above stimulating parameters circumferential gastric contractions were produced which were artificially propagated distally by phase locking the stimulating voltage. Averaged stimulated gastric emptying times were significantly shorter than spontaneus emptying times (t1/2 6.7 (3.0) versus 25.3 (12.9) minutes, p<0.01). Gastric electrical stimulation of the gastroparetic patient at operation produced circumferential contractions. 
Conclusions—Microprocessor controlled electrical stimulation produced artificial peristalsis and notably accelerated the movement of liquid gastric content. 

 Keywords: gastric electrical stimulation; gastric motility PMID:9824339

  14. Representation of Afferent Signals from Forearm Muscle and Cutaneous Nerves in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of the Macaque Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Tomatsu, Saeka; Takei, Tomohiko; Oya, Tomomichi

    2016-01-01

    Proprioception is one’s overall sense of the relative positions and movements of the various parts of one’s body. The primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is involved in generating the proprioception by receiving peripheral sensory inputs from both cutaneous and muscle afferents. In particular, area 3a receives input from muscle afferents and areas 3b and 1 from cutaneous afferents. However, segregation of two sensory inputs to these cortical areas has not been evaluated quantitatively because of methodological difficulties in distinguishing the incoming signals. To overcome this, we applied electrical stimulation separately to two forearm nerves innervating muscle (deep radial nerve) and skin (superficial radial nerve), and examined the spatiotemporal distribution of sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in SI of anaesthetized macaques. The SEPs arising from the deep radial nerve were observed exclusively at the bottom of central sulcus (CS), which was identified as area 3a using histological reconstruction. In contrast, SEPs evoked by stimulation of the superficial radial nerve were observed in the superficial part of SI, identified as areas 3b and 1. In addition to these earlier, larger potentials, we also found small and slightly delayed SEPs evoked by cutaneous nerve stimulation in area 3a. Coexistence of the SEPs from both deep and superficial radial nerves suggests that area 3a could integrate muscle and cutaneous signals to shape proprioception. PMID:27701434

  15. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  16. Audio-Visual Stimulation in Conjunction with Functional Electrical Stimulation to Address Upper Limb and Lower Limb Movement Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepesh; Verma, Sunny; Bhattacharya, Sutapa; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-06-13

    Neurological disorders often manifest themselves in the form of movement deficit on the part of the patient. Conventional rehabilitation often used to address these deficits, though powerful are often monotonous in nature. Adequate audio-visual stimulation can prove to be motivational. In the research presented here we indicate the applicability of audio-visual stimulation to rehabilitation exercises to address at least some of the movement deficits for upper and lower limbs. Added to the audio-visual stimulation, we also use Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). In our presented research we also show the applicability of FES in conjunction with audio-visual stimulation delivered through VR-based platform for grasping skills of patients with movement disorder. PMID:27478568

  17. Audio-Visual Stimulation in Conjunction with Functional Electrical Stimulation to Address Upper Limb and Lower Limb Movement Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepesh; Verma, Sunny; Bhattacharya, Sutapa; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders often manifest themselves in the form of movement deficit on the part of the patient. Conventional rehabilitation often used to address these deficits, though powerful are often monotonous in nature. Adequate audio-visual stimulation can prove to be motivational. In the research presented here we indicate the applicability of audio-visual stimulation to rehabilitation exercises to address at least some of the movement deficits for upper and lower limbs. Added to the audio-visual stimulation, we also use Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). In our presented research we also show the applicability of FES in conjunction with audio-visual stimulation delivered through VR-based platform for grasping skills of patients with movement disorder. PMID:27478568

  18. Programmed electrical stimulation protocols: variations on a theme.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J D; Kim, S G; Ferrick, K J; Roth, J

    1992-11-01

    A series of prospective protocols were designed to determine the yield ratio (true positives vs. false positives = nonclinical) in various patient groups using a variety of programmed electrical stimulation (PES) variables. First, a PES protocol was used in 772 patients. Single, double, and triple extrastimuli were delivered in sequence (leaving each successive extrastimulus just beyond its refractory period before moving to the next extrastimulus) during sinus rhythm and two ventricular paced rates at the RV apex, before moving to the outflow tract and repeating the sequence and then moving on to isoproterenol infusion with the PES sequence repeated at the apex. This protocol met NASPE standards for induction of VT in patients with coronary artery disease and a history of VT, while failing to induce monomorphic VT in any control patient. The best yield ratios combined with the greatest likelihood of inducing clinical tachycardia were achieved with sinus rhythm and three extrastimuli, and pacing at the lower rate and three extrastimuli. Pacing at the faster rate and triple extrastimuli was highly inductive of clinical arrhythmias, but had a low yield ratio due to induction of more nonclinical arrhythmias than other steps. The next protocol was performed in 61 patients with inducible ventricular tachycardia. In each case, the protocol described above was completed at the RV apex, even if tachycardia was also induced at an earlier point in the protocol. This allowed for more accurate yield ratios to be established for each step in the protocol, since each patient was exposed to each of these steps.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1279622

  19. Probing the physiology of ASH neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans using electric current stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokshi, Trushal Vijaykumar; Bazopoulou, Daphne; Chronis, Nikos

    2011-08-01

    Electrical stimulation has been widely used to modulate and study the in vitro and in vivo functionality of the nervous system. Here, we characterized the effect of electrical stimulation on ASH neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans and employed it to probe the neuron's age dependent properties. We utilized an automated microfluidic-based platform and characterized the ASH neuronal activity in response to an electric current applied to the worm's body. The electrically induced ASH neuronal response was observed to be dependent on the magnitude, polarity, and spatial location of the electrical stimulus as well as on the age of the worm.

  20. Olfactory hallucinations elicited by electrical stimulation via subdural electrodes: effects of direct stimulation of olfactory bulb and tract.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gogi; Juhász, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2012-06-01

    In 1954, Penfield and Jasper briefly described that percepts of unpleasant odor were elicited by intraoperative electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb in patients with epilepsy. Since then, few peer-reviewed studies have reported such phenomena elicited by stimulation mapping via subdural electrodes implanted on the ventral surface of the frontal lobe. Here, we determined what types of olfactory hallucinations could be reproduced by such stimulation in children with focal epilepsy. This study included 16 children (age range: 5 to 17 years) who underwent implantation of subdural electrodes to localize the presumed epileptogenic zone and eloquent areas. Pairs of electrodes were electrically stimulated, and clinical responses were observed. In case a patient reported a perception, she/he was asked to describe its nature. We also described the stimulus parameters to elicit a given symptom. Eleven patients reported a perception of smell in response to electrical stimulation while the remaining five did not. Nine patients perceived an unpleasant smell (like bitterness, smoke, or garbage) while two perceived a pleasant smell (like strawberry or good food). Such olfactory hallucinations were induced by stimulation proximal to the olfactory bulb or tract on either hemisphere but not by that of orbitofrontal gyri lateral to the medial orbital sulci. The range of stimulus parameters employed to elicit olfactory hallucinations was comparable to those for other sensorimotor symptoms. Our systematic study of children with epilepsy replicated stimulation-induced olfactory hallucinations. We failed to provide evidence that a positive olfactory perception could be elicited by conventional stimulation of secondary olfactory cortex alone.

  1. Electrical Stimulation as an Adjunctive Treatment of Painful and Sensory Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; Kim, Paul J.; LaFontaine, Javier; Menzies, Robert; Najafi, Bijan; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this review is to evaluate the use of electrical stimulation to treat diabetic neuropathy. Application of electrical stimulation may provide a novel treatment option for large and small fiber neuropathy in persons with diabetes. Large and small nerve neuropathy alters pain, proprioception, touch perception, and motor function, which cause burning foot pain and serve as protective mechanisms from ulcerations. Methods A content search for clinical trials involving electrical stimulation, neuropathy, and diabetes was conducted through PubMed. Randomized clinical trials and prospective studies with outcome measures affecting the lower extremity function were selected for review. Results We identified eight studies in which electrical stimulation was used to treat diabetic neuropathy. Six studies evaluated small fiber neuropathy. Two studies evaluated patients with both small and large fiber neuropathy and reported significant improvement in vibration and monofilament testing and reduction in symptoms in the electrical stimulation treatment group. Six of the eight painful neuropathy studies identified significant improvement in symptoms. There were no studies that evaluated electrical stimulation to treated diabetic motor neuropathy, fall prevention or postural instability. Conclusions Electrical stimulation may be an effective alternative and adjunctive therapy to current interventions for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24124947

  2. Semiochemicals released by electrically stimulated red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Vander Meer, R K; Slowik, T J; Thorvilson, H G

    2002-12-01

    The red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren, has evolved sophisticated chemical communication systems that regulate the activities of the colony. Among these are recruitment pheromones that effectively attract and stimulate workers to follow a trail to food or alternative nesting sites. Alarm pheromones alert, activate, and attract workers to intruders or other disturbances. The attraction and accumulation of fire ant workers in electrical equipment may be explained by their release of pheromones that draw additional worker ants into the electrical contacts. We used chemical analysis and behavioral bioassays to investigate if semiochemicals were released by electrically shocked fire ants. Workers were subjected to a 120 V, alternating-current power source. In all cases, electrically stimulated workers released venom alkaloids as revealed by gas chromatography. We also demonstrated the release of alarm pheromones and recruitment pheromones that elicited attraction and orientation. Arrestant behavior was observed with the workers not electrically stimulated but near those that were, indicating release of unkown behavior-modifying substances from the electrically stimulated ants. It appears that fire ants respond to electrical stimulus by generally releasing exocrine gland products. The behaviors associated with these products support the hypothesis that the accumulation of fire ants in electrical equipment is the result of a foraging worker finding and closing electrical contacts, then releasing exocrine gland products that attract other workers to the site, who in turn are electrically stimulated. PMID:12564802

  3. Enhancement of muscle activity by electrical stimulation in cerebral palsy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Katz, Amir; Tirosh, Emanuel; Marmur, Rachel; Mizrahi, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of low-intensity electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle in children with cerebral palsy in the following 2 modes: reconditioning by long-term training of the muscle versus real-time assist to the muscle during motion. To evaluate the force enhancement in the assist mode, we developed a method to dissociate the volitional and the induced components from the total electromyographic signal. The study group, including 5 children with cerebral palsy (mean age, 3.3 years; 0.4 SD), underwent 2 testing sessions: 1 before and 1 after 3-month training by electrical stimulation. Each session included 2 series of trials: 1 with electrical stimulation, as an orthotic assist, and 1 without electrical stimulation. The tests included flexion-extension movements of the knee at a self-selected pace. The results showed that, compared to before training, there was a significant increase in the average motion velocity and a decrease in motion jerk and in knee torque after training in both the electrical stimulation- assisted and -unassisted modes. Of special interest was the significant decrease in quadriceps-hamstrings co-contraction following training by electrical stimulation but not during electrical stimulation-assisted motion. The results obtained for the group with cerebral palsy were statistically different from those of the control group, but this difference decreased after long-term training by electrical stimulation. It was concluded that, in children with cerebral palsy, electrical stimulation is more beneficial in long-term training than when used as a real-time motion assist. Although muscle strength is not affected, more centrally controlled attributes such as co-contraction are improved.

  4. Bioreactor for modulation of cardiac microtissue phenotype by combined static stretch and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W; Nunes, Sara S; Sofla, Aarash; Reis, Lewis A; Pahnke, Aric; Xiao, Yun; Laschinger, Carol; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    We describe here a bioreactor capable of simultaneously applying mechanical and electrical field stimulation in conjunction with static strain and on-line force of contraction measurements. It consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tissue chamber and a pneumatically driven stretch platform. The chamber contained eight tissue microwells (8.05 mm in length and 2.5 mm in width) with a pair of posts (2.78 mm in height and 0.8 mm in diameter) in each well to serve as fixation points and for measurements of contraction force. Carbon rods, stimulating electrodes, were placed into the PDMS chamber such that one pair stimulated four microwells. For feasibility studies, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded in collagen gels into the microwells. Following three days of gel compaction, electrical field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm and 1Hz, mechanical stimulation of 5% static strain or electromechanical stimulation (field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm, 1Hz and 5% static strain) were applied for 3 days. Cardiac microtissues subjected to electromechanical stimulation exhibited elevated amplitude of contraction and improved sarcomere structure as evidenced by sarcomeric α-actinin, actin and troponin T staining compared to microtissues subjected to electrical or mechanical stimulation alone or non-stimulated controls. The expression of atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide was also elevated in the electromechanically stimulated group. PMID:24876342

  5. Observation of pressure stimulated voltages in rocks using an electric potential sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Harland, C. J.

    2009-09-21

    Recent interest in the electrical activity in rock and the use of electric field transients as candidates for earthquake precursors has led to studies of pressure stimulated currents in laboratory samples. In this paper, an electric field sensor is used to measure directly the voltages associated with these currents. Stress was applied as uniaxial compression to marble and granite at an approximately constant rate. In contrast with the small pressure stimulated currents previously measured, large voltage signals are reported. Polarity reversal of the signal was observed immediately before fracture for the marble, in agreement with previous pressure stimulated current studies.

  6. Characterization of Mouse Lumbar Splanchnic and Pelvic Nerve Urinary Bladder Mechanosensory Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linjing; Gebhart, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory information from the urinary bladder is conveyed via lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and sacral pelvic (PN) nerves to the spinal cord. In the present report we compared the mechanosensitive properties of single afferent fibers in these two pathways using an in vitro mouse bladder preparation. Mechanosensitive primary afferents were recorded from the LSN or PN and distinguished based on their response to receptive field stimulation with different mechanical stimuli: probing (160 mg to 2 g), stretch (1–25 g), and stroking of the urothelium (10–1,000 mg). Four different classes of afferent were recorded from the LSN and PN: serosal, muscular, muscular/urothielial, and urothelial. The LSN contained principally serosal and muscular afferents (97% of the total sample), whereas all four afferent classes of afferent were present in the PN (63% of which were muscular afferents). In addition, the respective proportions and receptive field distributions differed between the two pathways. Both low- and high-threshold stretch-sensitive muscular afferents were present in both pathways, and muscular afferents in the PN were shown to sensitize after exposure to an inflammatory soup cocktail. The LSN and PN pathways contain different populations of mechanosensitive afferents capable of detecting a range of mechanical stimuli and individually tuned to detect the type, magnitude, and duration of the stimulus. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the potential roles these two pathways play in conveying mechanical information from the bladder to the spinal cord. PMID:18003875

  7. Effect of intravaginal electrical stimulation on pelvic floor muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Amaro, João Luiz; Gameiro, Mônica Orsi; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of intravaginal electrical stimulation (IES) on pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength in patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). Between January 2001 and February 2002, 40 MUI women (mean age: 48 years) were studied. Urge incontinence was the predominant symptom; 92.5% also presented mild stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Selection criteria were clinical history and urodynamics. Pre-treatment urodynamic study showed no statistical differences between the groups. Ten percent of the women in each group had involuntary detrusor contractions. Patients were randomly distributed, in a double-blind study, into two groups. Group G1 (n=20), effective IES, and group G2 (n=20), sham IES, with follow-up at 1 month. The following parameters were studied: (1) clinical questionnaire, (2) examiner's evaluation of perineal muscle strength, (3) objective evaluation of perineal muscle by perineometry, (4) vaginal weight test, and (5) urodynamic study. The IES protocol consisted of three 20-min sessions per week over a 7-week period using a Dualpex Uro 996 at 4 Hz. There was no statistically significant difference in the demographic data of both groups. The number of micturitions per 24 h after treatment was reduced significantly in both groups. Urge incontinence, present in all patients before treatment, was reduced to 15% in G1 and 31.5% in G2 post-treatment. The subjective evaluation of PFM strength demonstrated a significant improvement in G1. Objective evaluation of PFM force by perineometer showed a significant improvement in maximum peak contraction post-treatment in both groups. In the vaginal weight test, there was a significant increase in average number of cone retentions post-treatment in both groups. With regard to satisfaction level, after treatment, 80% of the patients in G1 and 65% of the patients in G2 were satisfied. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups. There was a significant

  8. Distribution of electrical stimulation current in a planar multilayer anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Merletti, Roberto

    2008-02-01

    This study analytically addresses the problem of neuromuscular electrical stimulation for a planar, multilayer, anisotropic model of a physiological tissue (referred to as volume conductor). Both conductivity and permittivity of the volume conductor are considered, including dispersive properties. The analytical solution is obtained in the 2-D Fourier transform domain, transforming in the planes parallel to the volume conductor surface. The model is efficient in terms of computational cost, as the solution is analytical (only numerical Fourier inversion is needed). It provides the current distribution in a physiological tissue induced by an electrical current delivered at the skin surface. Three representative examples of application of the model are considered. 1) The simulation of stimulation artefact during transcutaneous electrical stimulation and EMG detection. Only the effect of the volume conductor is considered, neglecting the other sources of artefact (such as the capacitive coupling between the stimulating and recording electrodes). 2) The simulation of the electrical current distribution within the muscle and the low-pass filter effect of the volume conductor on sinusoidal stimulation currents with different stimulation frequencies. 3) The estimation of the amplitude modulated current distribution within the muscle for interferential stimulation. The model is devoted to the simulation of neuromuscular stimulation, but the same method could be applied in other fields in which the estimation of the electrical current distribution in a medium induced by the injection of a current from the boundary of the medium is of interest.

  9. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. C.; Correia, L.; Salvador, R.; Basser, P. J.

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m-1 to 0.333 S m-1, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  10. Long-Term Effects of Gastric Stimulation on Gastric Electrical Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Patrick A.; Nikitina, Yana; Kedar, Archana; Lahr, Christopher J.; Helling, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluates the modeling of gastric electrophysiology tracings during long-term gastric electrical stimulation for gastroparesis. We hypothesized that serosal electrogastrogram may change over time representing gastric remodeling from gastric stimulation. Patients Sixty-five patients with gastroparesis underwent placement of gastric stimulator for refractory symptoms. Mean age at initial stimulator placement was 44 years (range, 8–76), current mean age was 49, and the majority of the subjects were female (n = 51, 78 %). Only a minority had diabetes-induced gastroparesis (n = 16, 25 %); the remainder were either idiopathic or postsurgical. Methods At the time of stimulator placement, electrogastrogram was performed after the gastric leads were placed but before stimulation was begun. Patients underwent continuous stimulation until pacer batteries depleted. At the time of replacement, before the new pacemaker was attached, electrogastrogram was again performed. Results After a mean of 3.9 years of stimulation therapy, the mean of baseline frequency before stimulation therapy was 5.06 cycles/min and declined to 3.66 after replacement (p = 0.0000002). The mean amplitude was 0.33 mV before stimulation therapy and decreased to 0.31 mV (p = 0.73). The frequency/amplitude ratio was 38.4 before stimulation therapy and decreased to 21.9 (p = 0.001). Conclusion Long-term gastric electrical stimulation causes improvement in basal unstimulated gastric frequency to near normal. PMID:22956404

  11. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  12. Selectivity and resolution of surface electrical stimulation for grasp and release.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Ard J; Schouten, Alfred C; Veltink, Peter H; van der Kooij, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of arm and hand muscles can be a functional tool for patients with motor dysfunction. Sufficient stimulation of finger and thumb musculature can support natural grasping function. Yet it remains unclear how different grasping movements can be selectively supported by electrical stimulation. The goal of this study is to determine to what extent activation of individual fingers is possible with surface electrical stimulation for the purpose of rehabilitation following stroke. The extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle, flexor pollicis longus (FPL) muscle, and the thenar muscle group, all involved in grasp and release, were selected for stimulation. The evoked forces in individual fingers were measured. Stimulation thresholds and selective ranges were determined for each subject. Electrode locations where the highest selective range occurred were compared between subjects and influences of different isometric wrist positions were assessed. In all subjects selective stimulation of middle finger extension and thumb flexion was possible. In addition, selective stimulation of index and ring finger extension was possible in most cases. In nine out of the ten EDC subjects we were able to stimulate three or all four fingers selectively. However, large variability in electrode locations for high selectivity was observed between the subjects. Within the designs of grasping prostheses and grasping rehabilitation devices, the variability of electrode locations should be taken into account. The results of our study facilitate the optimization of such designs and favour a design which allows individualized stimulation locations. PMID:22180518

  13. Electrical stimulation in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis alleviates severe obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Luyten, L; Hendrickx, S; Raymaekers, S; Gabriëls, L; Nuttin, B

    2016-09-01

    In 1998, we proposed deep brain stimulation as a last-resort treatment option for patients suffering from severe, treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here, 24 OCD patients were included in a long-term follow-up study to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation in the anterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). We find that electrical stimulation in the ALIC/BST area is safe and significantly decreases obsessions, compulsions, and associated anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improves global functioning in a blinded crossover trial (n=17), after 4 years (n=18), and at last follow-up (up to 171 months, n=24). Moreover, our data indicate that BST may be a better stimulation target compared with ALIC to alleviate OCD symptoms. We conclude that electrical stimulation in BST is a promising therapeutic option for otherwise treatment-resistant OCD patients. PMID:26303665

  14. Alternating stimulation of synergistic muscles during functional electrical stimulation cycling improves endurance in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Decker, M J; Griffin, L; Abraham, L D; Brandt, L

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are limited by high rates of muscular fatigue. FES-cycling performance limits and surface mechanomyography (MMG) of 12 persons with SCI were compared under two different stimulation protocols of the quadriceps muscles. One strategy used the standard "co-activation" protocol from the manufacturer of the FES cycle which involved intermittent simultaneous activation of the entire quadriceps muscle group for 400 ms. The other strategy was an "alternation" stimulation protocol which involved alternately stimulating the rectus femoris (RF) muscle for 100 ms and the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles for 100 ms, with two sets with a 400 ms burst. Thus, during the alternation protocol, each of the muscle groups rested for two 100 ms "off" periods in each 400 ms burst. There was no difference in average cycling cadence (28 RPM) between the two protocols. The alternation stimulation protocol produced longer ride times and longer virtual distances traveled and used lower stimulation intensity levels with no differences in average MMG amplitudes compared to the co-activation protocol. These results demonstrate that FES-cycling performance can be enhanced by a synergistic muscle alternation stimulation strategy. PMID:20708950

  15. Alternating stimulation of synergistic muscles during functional electrical stimulation cycling improves endurance in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Decker, M J; Griffin, L; Abraham, L D; Brandt, L

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are limited by high rates of muscular fatigue. FES-cycling performance limits and surface mechanomyography (MMG) of 12 persons with SCI were compared under two different stimulation protocols of the quadriceps muscles. One strategy used the standard "co-activation" protocol from the manufacturer of the FES cycle which involved intermittent simultaneous activation of the entire quadriceps muscle group for 400 ms. The other strategy was an "alternation" stimulation protocol which involved alternately stimulating the rectus femoris (RF) muscle for 100 ms and the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles for 100 ms, with two sets with a 400 ms burst. Thus, during the alternation protocol, each of the muscle groups rested for two 100 ms "off" periods in each 400 ms burst. There was no difference in average cycling cadence (28 RPM) between the two protocols. The alternation stimulation protocol produced longer ride times and longer virtual distances traveled and used lower stimulation intensity levels with no differences in average MMG amplitudes compared to the co-activation protocol. These results demonstrate that FES-cycling performance can be enhanced by a synergistic muscle alternation stimulation strategy.

  16. Stimulating Music: The Pleasures and Dangers of “Electric Music,” 1750–1900

    PubMed Central

    Kennaway, James

    2014-01-01

    Far from being a purely modern idea, the notion of “electric music” was already common in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The shift in thinking about music from cosmic harmony to nervous stimulation made metaphors and speculative theories relating music and electricity irresistible. This essay considers the development of the idea of electric music, looking at its associations with a sexual “body electric.” It will then examine how this conception of music went from being the subject of sympathy to becoming part of a medical critique of music as a dangerous stimulant, with echoes in music criticism and beyond. PMID:24587689

  17. Luteinizing hormone releasing factor in rat hypophysial portal blood collected during electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G. W.; Ruf, K. B.

    1970-01-01

    1. Ovulation was induced in Nembutal-blocked pro-oestrous rats by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. 2. The same type of electrical stimulation was applied during the collection of hypophysial portal blood. 3. Pooled hypophysial portal plasma from donors in pro-oestrus, oestrus and met-oestrus was assayed for ovarian ascorbic acid depleting (OAAD) activity. 4. Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus increased the OAAD activity, believed to be due to luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF), in pro-oestrus and met-oestrus, but not in oestrus. 5. It is concluded that the hypothalamic nerve fibres responsible for releasing LRF into the hypophysial portal vessels are depleted of their store of this releasing factor, or are refractory to electrical stimulation, during oestrus. PMID:5499765

  18. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  19. Prevention of quadriceps wasting after immobilization: an evaluation of the effect of electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, I; Arvidsson, H; Eriksson, E; Jansson, E

    1986-11-01

    Eighteen male and 20 female patients who underwent reconstruction of their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with a flap from the patellar tendon were randomly assigned into either closed cast, isometric muscle training and electric stimulation (ES group), or closed cast and isometric training alone (control group). The degree of quadriceps wasting was determined from computerized tomographic scans (CT) before and 6 weeks after surgery. Electrical stimulation was given with a battery operated stimulator that produced a rectangular asymmetric balanced biphasic pulse shape. The pulse rate was 40 Hz and the pulse width 300 microseconds. Patients received 30 min of stimulation three times daily during 5.5 weeks. Female control patients showed a larger decrease in quadriceps area on CT than male control patients (P less than .001). No significant difference was found between male electrically stimulated patients and control patients. In female patients, there was on the contrary, a highly significant difference in favor of electrical stimulation (P less than .001) When the different parts of the quadriceps were studied, a significantly lower degree of atrophy of the vastus medialis was found after electrical stimulation. Vastus lateralis did not show any difference. Measurements of CT attenuation, pre- and post-operatively, showed a decrease in attenuation of 17% for the vastus medialis and lateralis of the operated leg after immobilization, indicating an increase in fat content. In the rectus femoris, however, there was an increase in attenuation of 14.6%. Percutaneous muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained before, one week after, and 6 weeks after surgery revealed that the cross-sectional area of the individual muscle fibers decreased less in the electrically stimulated than in controls, but the difference was not significant. There were no differences between the two groups in the activity of an oxidative enzyme, citrate synthase, or a glycolytic enzyme

  20. Vestibulo-ocular responses evoked via bilateral electrical stimulation of the lateral semicircular canals

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wangsong; Haburcakova, Csilla; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the vestibulo-ocular responses (VOR) evoked by bilateral electrical stimulation of the nerves innervating horizontal semicircular canals in squirrel monkeys and compared these responses to those evoked by unilateral stimulation. In response to sinusoidal modulation of the electrical pulse rate, the VOR for bilateral stimulation roughly equals the addition of the responses evoked by unilateral right ear and unilateral left ear stimulation; the VOR time constants were about the same for bilateral and unilateral stimulation and both were much shorter than for normal animals. In response to individual pulse stimulation, the VOR evoked by bilateral stimulation closely matches the point-by-point addition of responses evoked by unilateral right ear and unilateral left ear stimulation. We conclude that, to first order, the VOR responses evoked by bilateral stimulation are the summation of the responses evoked by unilateral stimulation. These findings suggest that – from a physiologic viewpoint – unilateral and bilateral vestibular prostheses are about equally viable. Given these findings, one possible advantage of a bilateral prosthesis is higher gain. However, at least for short-term stimulation like that studied herein, no inherent advantage in terms of the response time constant (“velocity storage”) was found. PMID:18990631

  1. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... enter: (i) A red light that flashes distinctly during the operating cycle of the stimulating equipment..., mechanical inspection, maintenance or testing are performed. (3) Water. To prevent an electrical shock, personnel shall not spray streams of water on energized carcasses or on energized stimulating surfaces....

  2. 42 CFR 414.232 - Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nerve stimulators (TENS). 414.232 Section 414.232 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... § 414.232 Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS). (a) General payment rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, payment for TENS is made on a...

  3. 42 CFR 414.232 - Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nerve stimulators (TENS). 414.232 Section 414.232 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS). (a) General payment rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, payment for TENS is made on a purchase basis...

  4. 42 CFR 414.232 - Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nerve stimulators (TENS). 414.232 Section 414.232 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Surgical Dressings § 414.232 Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS). (a) General payment rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, payment for TENS...

  5. Modeling binaural responses in the auditory brainstem to electric stimulation of the auditory nerve.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand; Colburn, H Steven

    2015-02-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) provide improvements in sound localization and speech perception in noise over unilateral CIs. However, the benefits arise mainly from the perception of interaural level differences, while bilateral CI listeners' sensitivity to interaural time difference (ITD) is poorer than normal. To help understand this limitation, a set of ITD-sensitive neural models was developed to study binaural responses to electric stimulation. Our working hypothesis was that central auditory processing is normal with bilateral CIs so that the abnormality in the response to electric stimulation at the level of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) is the source of the limited ITD sensitivity. A descriptive model of ANF response to both acoustic and electric stimulation was implemented and used to drive a simplified biophysical model of neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO). The model's ITD sensitivity was found to depend strongly on the specific configurations of membrane and synaptic parameters for different stimulation rates. Specifically, stronger excitatory synaptic inputs and faster membrane responses were required for the model neurons to be ITD-sensitive at high stimulation rates, whereas weaker excitatory synaptic input and slower membrane responses were necessary at low stimulation rates, for both electric and acoustic stimulation. This finding raises the possibility of frequency-dependent differences in neural mechanisms of binaural processing; limitations in ITD sensitivity with bilateral CIs may be due to a mismatch between stimulation rate and cell parameters in ITD-sensitive neurons. PMID:25348578

  6. A new treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by electrical stimulation of submental region.

    PubMed

    Miki, H; Hida, W; Inoue, H; Takishima, T

    1988-01-01

    Loss of upper airway muscle tone during sleep has been thought to be responsible for obstructive apnea episodes. To examine the effect of electrical stimulation of the submental region on sleep apnea episodes, patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome were polysomnographically studied during all-night session with and without stimulation.

  7. Putative role of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in the afferent limb of cardio renal reflexes in rats.

    PubMed

    Ditting, Tilmann; Linz, Peter; Hilgers, Karl F; Jung, Oliver; Geiger, Helmut; Veelken, Roland

    2003-11-01

    Recent studies suggest a role of ion channels of the DEG/ENaC family for mechanosensation in different species and in baroreceptor reflex control in rats. We tested the hypothesis that ENaC within the cardiac sensory network are mandatory for mechanosensation. Experiments were performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats, isolated nodose ganglion cells with cardiac afferents and isolated vagus nerves. Epicardial delivery of the amiloride analogue benzamil intended to specifically inhibit ENaC presumably located on cardiac sensory afferents indeed blunted the mechanosensitive (i. e., sympathoinhibition by intravenous volume loading [-32% and -42% in treated groups vs. -67% in controls; n = 7 each; p < 0.05]) as well as-though to a lesser extent-the 5-HT(3)-mediated chemosensitive cardiorenal reflex in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. Using patch clamp technique, however, it turned out that neither amiloride nor benzamil influenced mechanically induced currents in ganglion nodosum cells in vitro, stimulated by hypoosmotic stress. The unspecific stretch activated ion channel blocker gadolinium completely abolished mechanically induced currents, indicating respective cells were mechanosensitive. In isolated vagus nerves benzamil impaired action potentials obtained by electrical stimulation (C-spike amplitude [-33%]; latency [+12%]; n = 8; p < 0.05). Our findings at least cast doubt on ENaC exclusively playing a specific role as mechanotransducers within the cardiac sensory network. Other ion channels might be involved. Furthermore the observed findings in vivo could also be due to unspecific disturbance of afferent signal conduction. PMID:14556084

  8. The effects of electrical stimulation and exercise therapy in patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Muhammed; Yıldırım, Sibel A.; Tan, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation on muscle strength and functional activities in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Methods: This controlled clinical trial included 24 subjects who were diagnosed with LGMD by the Neurology Department of the Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey and were referred to the Physical Therapy Department between May 2013 and December 2014. Subjects were enrolled into an electrical stimulation (11 patients) group, or an exercise therapy (13 patients) group. Results: The mean age of patients was 31.62 years in the electrical stimulation group, and 30.14 years in the exercise therapy group. The most important results in this controlled clinical study were that the muscle strength in both groups was significantly decreased and post-treatment evaluation results indicated that muscle strength of the Deltoideus was higher in the electrical stimulation group, and the difference between the groups was maintained in the follow-up period (p<0.05). However, the muscle strength of quadriceps was similar in both groups, according to the post-treatment and follow-up evaluation results (p>0.05). Additionally, the electrical stimulation group presented more obvious overall improvements than the exercise therapy group according to muscle strength, endurance, and timed performance tests. Conclusions: Since no definitive treatments currently exist for patients with LGMD, these results provide important information on the role of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation for clinicians working in rehabilitation. PMID:26166595

  9. Manganese-enhanced MR imaging of brain activation evoked by noxious peripheral electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Myeounghoon; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Chulhyun; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Cheong, Chaejoon; Sohn, Jin-Hun; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2016-02-01

    As imaging technology develops, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has furthered our understanding of brain function by clarifying the anatomical structure and generating functional imaging data related to information processing in pain conditions. Recent studies have reported that manganese (Mn(2+))-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides valuable information about the functions of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to identify specific brain regions activated during noxious electric stimulation using high-resolution MEMRI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: naïve, sham electrical stimulation, and noxious electric stimulation. Under urethane with α-chloralose mixture anesthesia, a catheter was placed in the external carotid artery to administrate 20% mannitol and manganese chloride (25mM MnCl2). Noxious electric stimulation (2Hz, 10V) was applied to the hind paw with a needle electrode. Stimulation-induced neuronal activation was detected using 4.7-T MRI. In response to noxious electrical stimulation, remarkable Mn(2+)-enhanced signals were observed in the agranular insular cortex, auditory cortex, primary somatosensory cortex of the hind limb, and granular and dysgranular insular cortex, which correspond to sensory tactile electric stimulus to the hindpaws. These results indicate that the combination of MEMRI with activity-induced Mn(2+)-dependent contrast can delineate functional areas in the rat brain.

  10. Manganese-enhanced MR imaging of brain activation evoked by noxious peripheral electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Myeounghoon; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Chulhyun; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Cheong, Chaejoon; Sohn, Jin-Hun; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2016-02-01

    As imaging technology develops, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has furthered our understanding of brain function by clarifying the anatomical structure and generating functional imaging data related to information processing in pain conditions. Recent studies have reported that manganese (Mn(2+))-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides valuable information about the functions of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to identify specific brain regions activated during noxious electric stimulation using high-resolution MEMRI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: naïve, sham electrical stimulation, and noxious electric stimulation. Under urethane with α-chloralose mixture anesthesia, a catheter was placed in the external carotid artery to administrate 20% mannitol and manganese chloride (25mM MnCl2). Noxious electric stimulation (2Hz, 10V) was applied to the hind paw with a needle electrode. Stimulation-induced neuronal activation was detected using 4.7-T MRI. In response to noxious electrical stimulation, remarkable Mn(2+)-enhanced signals were observed in the agranular insular cortex, auditory cortex, primary somatosensory cortex of the hind limb, and granular and dysgranular insular cortex, which correspond to sensory tactile electric stimulus to the hindpaws. These results indicate that the combination of MEMRI with activity-induced Mn(2+)-dependent contrast can delineate functional areas in the rat brain. PMID:26733299

  11. Novel application of GI electrical stimulation in Roux stasis syndrome (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Daram, Sumanth R.; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vick, Kenneth; Aru, Giorgio; Lahr, Christopher; Amin, Om; Taylor, Michelle; Sheehan, John J.; Abell, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Background About one-third of patients undergoing a Roux-en-Y anastomosis develop Roux stasis syndrome, likely because of disordered electrical conduction. GI electrical stimulation has been previously used successfully in the management of postsurgical gastroparesis. Objective Endoscopic placement of temporary electrodes and GI electrical stimulation in the management of severe Roux stasis syndrome in a patient with esophagojejunostomy and to determine whether the patient would be a candidate for surgical permanent electrode placement. Design Case report. Setting Academic medical center. Patients This study involved a patient with Roux stasis syndrome. Intervention Upper endoscopy was performed, followed by endoscopic placement of two temporary electrodes, one each in the two jejunal limbs. Electrical stimulation was provided by an external stimulation device. The patient was re-evaluated 5 days later. Main Outcome Measurements Electrogastrogram (EGG) parameters including frequency, amplitude, and frequency-amplitude ratio and total symptom score and health-related quality of life score. Results There was a significant improvement in EGG parameters with electrical stimulation. Also, the patient had a marked improvement in total GI symptom score, from 11 to 4, with a dramatic improvement in the health-related quality of life score from −3 to +3. Limitations Single case report. Conclusion Endoscopic placement of temporary electrodes is feasible and safe. GI electrical stimulation of the jejunal limb is a potentially effective treatment for Roux stasis syndrome. PMID:21872718

  12. The Role of the Paratrigeminal Nucleus in Vagal Afferent Evoked Respiratory Reflexes: A Neuroanatomical and Functional Study in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Alexandria K.; Farrell, Michael J.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; McGovern, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory tree receives sensory innervation from the jugular and nodose vagal sensory ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia are derived from embryologically distinct origins and as such demonstrate differing molecular, neurochemical and physiological phenotypes. Furthermore, whereas nodose afferent neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS), recent neuroanatomical studies in rats suggest that jugular neurons have their central terminations in the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5). In the present study we confirm that guinea pigs demonstrate a comparable distinction between the brainstem terminations of nodose and jugular ganglia afferents. Thus, microinjection of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CT-B) neural tracers into the caudal nTS and Pa5 resulted in highly specific retrograde labeling of neurons in the nodose and jugular ganglia, respectively. Whereas, nodose neurons more often expressed 160 KD neurofilament proteins and the alpha3 subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase, significantly more jugular neurons expressed the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and, especially, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP). Indeed, terminal fibers in the Pa5 compared to the nTS were characterized by their significantly greater expression of CGRP, further supporting the notion that jugular afferents project to trigeminal-related brainstem regions. Electrical stimulation of the guinea pig larynx following selective surgical denervation of the nodose afferent innervation to the larynx (leaving intact the jugular innervation) resulted in stimulus dependent respiratory slowing and eventual apnea. This jugular ganglia neuron mediated response was unaffected by bilateral microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the nTS, but was abolished by muscimol injected into the Pa5. Taken together these data confirm that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia afferent neurons innervate distinct central circuits and support the notion that multiple peripheral and central pathways

  13. Failure of naloxone to reverse analgesia from transcutaneous electrical stimulation in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Abram, S E; Reynolds, A C; Cusick, J F

    1981-02-01

    To investigate the possible role of endogenous opiates in the mediation of analgesia produced by low intensity, high frequency transcutaneous electrical stimulation in the presence of chronic pain, an attempt was made to reverse stimulation-induced analgesia with naloxone. Fifteen patients with chronic pain who were consistently relieved of pain by low intensity, high frequency transcutaneous stimulation were studied. During stimulation at 58 Hz, patients were given double-blind intravenous injections of either naloxone (0.4 or 1.2 mg) or saline. Subjective pain ratings were recorded before stimulation, after stimulation, and after naloxone and saline injections. No reversal of analgesia was seen after naloxone or saline. These results suggest that transcutaneous stimulation at low intensity and high frequency may provide analgesia that is not associated with release of endogenous opiates in patients with chronic pain.

  14. Magnetic Versus Electrical Stimulation in the Interpolation Twitch Technique of Elbow Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Lampropoulou, Sofia I.; Nowicky, Alexander V.; Marston, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The study compared peripheral magnetic with electrical stimulation of the biceps brachii m. (BB) in the single pulse Interpolation Twitch Technique (ITT). 14 healthy participants (31±7 years) participated in a within-subjects repeated-measures design study. Single, constant-current electrical and magnetic stimuli were delivered over the motor point of BB with supramaximal intensity (20% above maximum) at rest and at various levels of voluntary contraction. Force measurements from right elbow isometric flexion and muscle electromyograms (EMG) from the BB, the triceps brachii m. (TB) and the abductor pollicis brevis m. (APB) were obtained. The twitch forces at rest and maximal contractions, the twitch force-voluntary force relationship, the M-waves and the voluntary activation (VA) of BB between magnetic and electrical stimulation were compared. The mean amplitude of the twitches evoked at MVC was not significantly different between electrical (0.62 ± 0.49 N) and magnetic (0.81 ± 0.49 N) stimulation (p > 0.05), and the maximum VA of BB was comparable between electrical (95%) and magnetic (93%) stimulation (p > 0. 05). No differences (p >0.05) were revealed in the BB M-waves between electrical (13.47 ± 0.49 mV.ms) and magnetic (12.61 ± 0.58 mV.ms) stimulation. The TB M-waves were also similar (p > 0.05) but electrically evoked APB M-waves were significantly larger than those evoked by magnetic stimulation (p < 0.05). The twitch-voluntary force relationship over the range of MVCs was best described by non-linear functions for both electrical and magnetic stimulation. The electrically evoked resting twitches were consistently larger in amplitude than the magnetically evoked ones (mean difference 3.1 ± 3.34 N, p < 0.05). Reduction of the inter-electrodes distance reduced the twitch amplitude by 6.5 ± 6.2 N (p < 0.05). The fundamental similarities in voluntary activation assessment of BB with peripheral electrical and magnetic stimulation point towards a promising

  15. Intrusive Thoughts Elicited by Direct Electrical Stimulation during Stereo-Electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Popa, Irina; Donos, Cristian; Barborica, Andrei; Opris, Ioan; Mălîia, Mihai Dragoş; Ene, Mirela; Ciurea, Jean; Mîndruţă, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Cortical direct electrical stimulation (DES) is a method of brain mapping used during invasive presurgical evaluation of patients with intractable epilepsy. Intellectual auras like intrusive thoughts, also known as forced thinking (FT), have been reported during frontal seizures. However, there are few reports on FT obtained during DES in frontal cortex. We report three cases in which we obtained intrusive thoughts while stimulating the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the white matter in the prefrontal region. In order to highlight the effective connectivity that might explain this clinical response, we have analyzed cortico-cortical potentials evoked by single pulse electrical stimulation. PMID:27486431

  16. On the Cause and Control of Residual Voltage Generated by Electrical Stimulation of Neural Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ashwati; Kelly, Shawn K.

    2016-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation of neural tissue is traditionally performed with symmetric cathodic-first biphasic pulses of current through an electrode/electrolyte interface. When the interface is modeled by a series R-C circuit, as is sometimes done for stimulator circuit design, the appearance of a net residual voltage across the electrode cannot be explained. Residual voltage can cause polarization of the electrode and pose a problem for safe electrical stimulation. This paper aims to (1) theoretically explain one reason for the residual voltage, which is the inclusion of the Faradaic impedance (2) suggest a simple dynamic feedback mechanism to eliminate residual voltage. PMID:23366780

  17. Intrusive Thoughts Elicited by Direct Electrical Stimulation during Stereo-Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Irina; Donos, Cristian; Barborica, Andrei; Opris, Ioan; Mălîia, Mihai Dragoş; Ene, Mirela; Ciurea, Jean; Mîndruţă, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Cortical direct electrical stimulation (DES) is a method of brain mapping used during invasive presurgical evaluation of patients with intractable epilepsy. Intellectual auras like intrusive thoughts, also known as forced thinking (FT), have been reported during frontal seizures. However, there are few reports on FT obtained during DES in frontal cortex. We report three cases in which we obtained intrusive thoughts while stimulating the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the white matter in the prefrontal region. In order to highlight the effective connectivity that might explain this clinical response, we have analyzed cortico-cortical potentials evoked by single pulse electrical stimulation. PMID:27486431

  18. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  19. Effects of acute selective pudendal nerve electrical stimulation after simulated childbirth injury

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Bradley C.; Dissaranan, Charuspong; Zutshi, Massarat; Balog, Brian M.; Lin, Danli; Damaser, Margot S.

    2013-01-01

    During childbirth, a combinatorial injury occurs and can result in stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simulated childbirth injury, consisting of vaginal distension (VD) and pudendal nerve crush (PNC), results in slowed recovery of continence, as well as decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a regenerative cytokine. Electrical stimulation has been shown to upregulate BDNF in motor neurons and facilitate axon regrowth through the increase of βII-tubulin expression after injury. In this study, female rats underwent selective pudendal nerve motor branch (PNMB) stimulation after simulated childbirth injury or sham injury to determine whether such stimulation affects bladder and anal function after injury and whether the stimulation increases BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus after injury. Rats received 4 h of VD followed by bilateral PNC and 1 h of subthreshold electrical stimulation of the left PNMB and sham stimulation of the right PNMB. Rats underwent filling cystometry and anal pressure recording before, during, and after the stimulation. Bladder and anal contractile function were partially disrupted after injury. PNMB stimulation temporarily inhibited bladder contraction after injury. Two days and 1 wk after injury, BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased compared with the sham-stimulated side, whereas βII-tubulin expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased only 1 wk after injury. Acute electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve proximal to the crush site upregulates BDNF and βII-tubulin in Onuf's nucleus after simulated childbirth injury, which could be a potential preventive option for SUI after childbirth injury. PMID:23152293

  20. Chronic effects of low-frequency low-intensity electrical stimulation of stretched human muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Lyubaeva, Ekaterina V.; Popov, Daniil V.; Netreba, Aleksey I.; Bravy, Yan R.; Tarakin, Pavel P.; Lemesheva, Yulia S.; Vinogradova, Olga L.

    2007-02-01

    Effects of low-frequency electrical stimulation, which is currently considered to be a possible countermeasure for long-duration spaceflights, with and without stretch were evaluated. Twelve young male volunteers were randomly distributed into two groups. In one group anterior thigh muscles—knee extensors of both legs were stimulated with frequency of 15 Hz for 4.5 wks, six times a week; each session was 6-h long. In the other group, electrical stimulation with the same parameters was applied to stretched knee extensors. Following stimulation the subjects exhibited an increase in fatigue resistance, and in the succinate dehydrogenase activity and a 10% gain in the percentage of muscle fibers with slow myosin heavy chain isoforms. In a stimulated group the peak voluntary strength went down significantly, the CSA of fast muscle fibers in m. quadriceps femoris became slightly less in size (10%). Electrical stimulation of the stretched muscles induced an insignificant decline in their strength and an increase of cross-sectional area of muscle fibers of both types. Thus chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation may be proposed as a candidate countermeasure against muscle strength and mass loss if it is combined with stretch.

  1. Biphasic Electrical Field Stimulation Aids in Tissue Engineering of Multicell-Type Cardiac Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Loraine L.Y.; Iyer, Rohin K.; King, John-Paul

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence. PMID:18783322

  2. Biphasic electrical field stimulation aids in tissue engineering of multicell-type cardiac organoids.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; Iyer, Rohin K; King, John-Paul; Radisic, Milica

    2011-06-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence.

  3. High and low frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation inhibits nociceptive responses induced by CO2 laser stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Fiore, Pietro; Camporeale, Alfonso; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Losito, Luciana; Megna, Marisa; Puca, Francomichele; Megna, Gianfranco

    2003-05-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) on CO(2) laser evoked potentials (LEPs) in 16 normal subjects. The volar side of the forearm was stimulated by 10 Hz TENS in eight subjects and by 100 Hz TENS in the remainder; the skin of the forearm was stimulated by CO(2) laser and the LEPs were recorded in basal conditions and soon after and 15 min after TENS. Both low and high frequency TENS significantly reduced the subjective rating of heat stimuli and the LEPs amplitude, although high frequency TENS appeared more efficacious. TENS seemed to exert a mild inhibition of the perception and processing of pain induced by laser Adelta fibres activation; the implications of these effects in the clinical employment of TENS remain to be clarified. PMID:12727307

  4. High and low frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation inhibits nociceptive responses induced by CO2 laser stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Fiore, Pietro; Camporeale, Alfonso; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Losito, Luciana; Megna, Marisa; Puca, Francomichele; Megna, Gianfranco

    2003-05-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) on CO(2) laser evoked potentials (LEPs) in 16 normal subjects. The volar side of the forearm was stimulated by 10 Hz TENS in eight subjects and by 100 Hz TENS in the remainder; the skin of the forearm was stimulated by CO(2) laser and the LEPs were recorded in basal conditions and soon after and 15 min after TENS. Both low and high frequency TENS significantly reduced the subjective rating of heat stimuli and the LEPs amplitude, although high frequency TENS appeared more efficacious. TENS seemed to exert a mild inhibition of the perception and processing of pain induced by laser Adelta fibres activation; the implications of these effects in the clinical employment of TENS remain to be clarified.

  5. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping the mesenteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation

  6. Continuous electrical stimulation decreases retinal excitability but does not alter retinal morphology.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Lee, E-J; Humayun, M S; Weiland, J D

    2011-08-01

    Retinal prostheses aim to provide visual perception through electrical stimulation of the retina. Hence they have to operate between threshold charge density and maximum safe charge density. To date most studies in the retina have concentrated on understanding the threshold, while stimulation safety has predominantly been studied in structures other than the retina. Toward this end, the present study focuses on determining the effect of continuous electrical stimulation of the retina both on retinal morphology and on the electrically evoked responses in the superior colliculus in a rodent model. The results demonstrate that the retina is able to tolerate 1 h long stimulation with only minor changes evident in retinal histology when examined three to 14 days later, even at charge densities (0.68 mC cm(-2)) above the safe limit of platinum delivered at high stimulus frequency (300 Hz). However, this continuous electrical stimulation causes an elevation in the threshold of the electrically evoked response in the superior colliculus, indicating some form of adaptation to continuous stimulation. PMID:21775787

  7. Dynamic Impedance Model of the Skin-Electrode Interface for Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Cortés Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes. PMID:25942010

  8. A unique electrical thermal stimulation system comparable to moxibustion of subcutaneous tissue.

    PubMed

    Myoung, Hyoun-Seok; Lee, Kyoung-Joung

    2014-01-01

    Moxibustion strengthens immunity and it is an effective treatment modality, but, depending on the material quantity, shape, and composition, the thermal strength and intensity can be difficult to control, which may cause pain or epidermal burns. To overcome these limitations, a heat stimulating system which is able to control the thermal intensity was developed. The temperature distributions on epidermis, at 5 mm and 10 mm of depth, in rabbit femoral tissue were compared between moxibustion and the electric thermal stimulation system. The stimulation system consists of a high radio frequency dielectric heating equipment (2 MHz frequency, maximum power 200 W), isolation probe, isolation plate, negative pressure generator, and a temperature assessment system. The temperature was modulated by controlling the stimulation pulse duty ratio, repetition number, and output. There were 95% and 91% temperature distribution correlations between moxibustion and the thermal stimulus at 5 mm and 10 mm of depth in tissue, respectively. Moreover, the epidermal temperature in thermal stimulation was lower than that in moxibustion. These results showed that heat loss by the electric thermal stimulation system is less than that by the traditional moxibustion method. Furthermore, the proposed electric thermal stimulation did not cause adverse effects, such as suppuration or blisters, and also provided subcutaneous stimulation comparable to moxibustion. PMID:25126101

  9. Dynamic impedance model of the skin-electrode interface for transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Cortés Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes. PMID:25942010

  10. Tissue engineering bioreactor systems for applying physical and electrical stimulations to cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, GyuHyun; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-05-01

    Bioreactor systems in tissue engineering applications provide various types of stimulation to mimic the tissues in vitro and in vivo. Various bioreactors have been designed to induce high cellular activities, including initial cell attachment, cell growth, and differentiation. Although cell-stimulation processes exert mostly positive effects on cellular responses, in some cases such stimulation can also have a negative effect on cultured cells. In this review, we discuss various types of bioreactor and the positive and negative effects of stimulation (physical, chemical, and electrical) on various cultured cell types.

  11. Release of noradrenaline and ATP by electrical stimulation and nicotine in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed

    von Kügelgen, I; Starke, K

    1991-10-01

    Effects of electrical stimulation and nicotine on ATP and tritium outflow and smooth muscle tension were studied in the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. ATP was measured using the luciferase technique. Electrical stimulation caused biphasic contractions and an acceleration of ATP and tritium outflow. The contraction amplitude and the overflow of ATP increased markedly, whereas the overflow of tritium increased only slightly with the frequency of stimulation (1-10 Hz; constant number of 60 pulses). The contraction amplitude did not increase with an increase in pulse number (20-540 pulses; constant frequency of 5 Hz), whereas the overflow of ATP increased slightly, and that of tritium markedly. Nicotine caused monophasic, transient contractions and, again, an acceleration of ATP and tritium outflow. Contractions, ATP and tritium overflow increased with the concentration of nicotine (56-320 mumol/l) in an approximately parallel manner. The influence of some drugs on responses to electrical stimulation (60 pulses, 5 Hz) and nicotine (180 mumol/l) was investigated. Tetrodotoxin blocked all effects of electrical stimulation but did not change those of nicotine. The reverse was true for hexamethonium. Neither electrical stimulation nor nicotine caused contraction or an increase in ATP outflow after pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. The main effects of prazosin 0.3 mumol/l were to reduce electrically evoked contractions (above all second phase) as well as nicotine-evoked contractions and the nicotine-evoked overflow of ATP (the latter by about 81%). Prazosin also tended to diminish the electrically evoked overflow of ATP. alpha,beta-Methylene-ATP 10 mumol/l elicited a transient contraction and ATP overflow on its own. The main change in the subsequent state of desensitization was a decrease of the first phase of electrically evoked contractions. The main effects of prazosin combined with desensitization by alpha

  12. Electrical stimulation of nerve cells using conductive nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-11-01

    Fabrication of scaffolds with suitable chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties is critical for the success of nerve tissue engineering. Electrical stimulation was directly applied to electrospun conductive nanofibrous scaffolds to enhance the nerve regeneration process. In the present study, electrospun conductive nanofibers were prepared by mixing 10 and 15 wt% doped polyaniline (PANI) with poly (epsilon-caprolactone)/gelatin (PG) (70:30) solution (PANI/PG) by electrospinning. The fiber diameter, pore size, hydrophilicity, tensile properties, conductivity, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of nanofibers were determined, and the in vitro biodegradability of the different nanofibrous scaffolds was also evaluated. Nanofibrous scaffolds containing 15% PANI was found to exhibit the most balanced properties to meet all the required specifications for electrical stimulation for its enhanced conductivity and is used for in vitro culture and electrical stimulation of nerve stem cells. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and scanning electron microscopy results showed that conductive nanofibrous scaffolds are suitable substrates for the attachment and proliferation of nerve stem cells. Electrical stimulation through conductive nanofibrous PANI/PG scaffolds showed enhanced cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth compared to the PANI/PG scaffolds that were not subjected to electrical stimulation.

  13. Applied electric field enhances DRG neurite growth: influence of stimulation media, surface coating and growth supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Matthew D.; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2009-08-01

    Electrical therapies have been found to aid repair of nerve injuries and have been shown to increase and direct neurite outgrowth during stimulation. This enhanced neural growth existed even after the electric field (EF) or stimulation was removed, but the factors that may influence the enhanced growth, such as stimulation media or surface coating, have not been fully investigated. This study characterized neurite outgrowth and branching under various conditions: EF magnitude and application time, ECM surface coating, medium during EF application and growth supplements. A uniform, low-magnitude EF (24 or 44 V m-1) was applied to dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglia seeded on collagen or laminin-coated surfaces. During the growth period, cells were either exposed to NGF or N2, and during stimulation cells were exposed to either unsupplemented media (Ca2+) or PBS (no Ca2+). Parallel controls for each experiment included cells exposed to the chamber with no stimulation and cells remaining outside the chamber. After brief electrical stimulation (10 min), neurite length significantly increased 24 h after application for all conditions studied. Of particular interest, increased stimulation time (10-100 min) further enhanced neurite length on laminin but not on collagen surfaces. Neurite branching was not affected by stimulation on any surface, and no preferential growth of neurites was noted after stimulation. Overall, the results of this report suggest that short-duration electric stimulation is sufficient to enhance neurite length under a variety of conditions. While further data are needed to fully elucidate a mechanism for this increased growth, these data suggest that one focus of those investigations should be the interaction between the growth cone and the substrata.

  14. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lucas Lima; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcomes enabled by the neuromuscular electric stimulation in critically ill patients in intensive care unit assisted. Methods A systematic review of the literature by means of clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 in the databases LILACS, SciELO, MEDLINE and PEDro using the descriptors “intensive care unit”, “physical therapy”, “physiotherapy”, “electric stimulation” and “randomized controlled trials”. Results We included four trials. The sample size varied between 8 to 33 individuals of both genders, with ages ranging between 52 and 79 years, undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation. Of the articles analyzed, three showed significant benefits of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients, such as improvement in peripheral muscle strength, exercise capacity, functionality, or loss of thickness of the muscle layer. Conclusion The application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation promotes a beneficial response in critically patients in intensive care. PMID:25295458

  15. Chronic Spinal Cord Electrical Stimulation Protects Against 6-hydroxydopamine Lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amol P.; Fuentes, Romulo; Zhang, Hao; Vinholo, Thais; Wang, Chi-Han; Freire, Marco Aurelio M.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Although L-dopa continues to be the gold standard for treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), it presents long-term complications. Deep brain stimulation is effective, but only a small percentage of idiopathic PD patients are eligible. Based on results in animal models and a handful of patients, dorsal column stimulation (DCS) has been proposed as a potential therapy for PD. To date, the long-term effects of DCS in animal models have not been quantified. Here, we report that DCS applied twice a week in rats treated with bilateral 6-OHDA striatal infusions led to a significant improvement in symptoms. DCS-treated rats exhibited a higher density of dopaminergic innervation in the striatum and higher neuronal cell count in the substantia nigra pars compacta compared to a control group. These results suggest that DCS has a chronic therapeutical and neuroprotective effect, increasing its potential as a new clinical option for treating PD patients.

  16. Epilepsia partialis continua responsive to neocortical electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Antonio; Ughratdar, Ismail; Cheserem, Beverly; Morris, Robert; Selway, Richard; Alarcon, Gonzalo

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsia partialis continua (EPC), defined as a syndrome of continuous focal jerking, is a rare form of focal status epilepticus that usually affects a distal limb, and when prolonged, can produce long-lasting deficits in limb function. Substantial electrophysiologic evidence links the origin of EPC to the motor cortex; thus surgical resection carries the risk of significant handicap. We present two patients with focal, drug-resistant EPC, who were admitted for intracranial video-electroencephalography monitoring to elucidate the location of the epileptogenic focus and identification of eloquent motor cortex with functional mapping. In both cases, the focus resided at or near eloquent motor cortex and therefore precluded resective surgery. Chronic cortical stimulation delivered through subdural strips at the seizure focus (continuous stimulation at 60-130 Hz, 2-3 mA) resulted in >90% reduction in seizures and abolition of the EPC after a follow-up of 22 months in both patients. Following permanent implantation of cortical stimulators, no adverse effects were noted. EPC restarted when intensity was reduced or batteries depleted. Battery replacement restored previous improvement. This two-case report opens up avenues for the treatment of this debilitating condition. PMID:26174165

  17. Epilepsia partialis continua responsive to neocortical electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Antonio; Ughratdar, Ismail; Cheserem, Beverly; Morris, Robert; Selway, Richard; Alarcon, Gonzalo

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsia partialis continua (EPC), defined as a syndrome of continuous focal jerking, is a rare form of focal status epilepticus that usually affects a distal limb, and when prolonged, can produce long-lasting deficits in limb function. Substantial electrophysiologic evidence links the origin of EPC to the motor cortex; thus surgical resection carries the risk of significant handicap. We present two patients with focal, drug-resistant EPC, who were admitted for intracranial video-electroencephalography monitoring to elucidate the location of the epileptogenic focus and identification of eloquent motor cortex with functional mapping. In both cases, the focus resided at or near eloquent motor cortex and therefore precluded resective surgery. Chronic cortical stimulation delivered through subdural strips at the seizure focus (continuous stimulation at 60-130 Hz, 2-3 mA) resulted in >90% reduction in seizures and abolition of the EPC after a follow-up of 22 months in both patients. Following permanent implantation of cortical stimulators, no adverse effects were noted. EPC restarted when intensity was reduced or batteries depleted. Battery replacement restored previous improvement. This two-case report opens up avenues for the treatment of this debilitating condition.

  18. [Exploration Research of Treatment Effect Improvement of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Using Parameter-changing Chaotic Signal].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jincun; Zhang, Hui; Qin, Binyi; Wang, Hai; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Tiejun

    2015-10-01

    This article presents a transcutaneous electric stimulator that is based on chaotic signal. Firstly, we in the study used the MATLAB platform in the PC to generate chaotic signal through the chaos equation, and then we transferred the signal out by data acquisition equipment of USB-6251 manufactured by NI Company. In order to obtain high-power signal for transcutaneous electric stimulator, we used the chip of LM3886 to amplify the signal. Finally, we used the power-amplified chaotic signal to stimulate the internal nerve of human through the electrodes fixed on the skin. We obtained different stimulation effects of transcutaneous electric stimulator by changing the parameters of chaotic model. The preliminary test showed that the randomness of chaotic signals improved the applicability of electrical stimulation and the rules of chaos ensured that the stimulation was comfort. The method reported in this paper provides a new way for the design of transcutaneous electric stimulator.

  19. Comparison of Twitch Responses During Current- or Voltage-Controlled Transcutaneous Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Löfler, Stefan; Kern, Helmut; Cortés R, Jorge A; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is an established method for functional restoration of muscle function, rehabilitation, and diagnostics. In this work, NMES was applied with surface electrodes placed on the anterior thigh to identify the main differences between current-controlled (CC) and voltage-controlled (VC) modes. Measurements of the evoked knee extension force and the myoelectric signal of quadriceps and hamstrings were taken during stimulation with different amplitudes, pulse widths, and stimulation techniques. The stimulation pulses were rectangular and symmetric biphasic for both stimulation modes. The electrode-tissue impedance influences the differences between CC and VC stimulation. The main difference is that for CC stimulation, variation of pulse width and amplitude influences the amount of nerve depolarization, whereas VC stimulation is only dependent on amplitude variations for pulse widths longer than 150 μs. An important remark is that these findings are strongly dependent on the characteristics of the electrode-skin interface. In our case, we used large stimulation electrodes placed on the anterior thigh, which cause higher capacitive effects. The controllability, voltage compliance, and charge characteristics of each stimulation technique should be considered during the stimulators design. For applications that require the activation of a large amount of nerve fibers, VC is a more suitable option. In contrast, if the application requires a high controllability, then CC should be chosen prior to VC. PMID:26471138

  20. Neurite outgrowth on electrospun PLLA fibers is enhanced by exogenous electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach. To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide films or electrospun fibers (2 µm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Main Results. Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurites, indicating topographical cues are responsible for guiding neurite extension. Significance. Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury.

  1. Neurite Outgrowth On Electrospun PLLA Fibers Is Enhanced By Exogenous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from DRG neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide (PLLA) films or electrospun fibers (2 μm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Results Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurite, indicating topographical cues are responsible to guide neurite extension. Significance Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:24891494

  2. Chronic Electrical Stimulation with a Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis: A Preclinical Safety and Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, David A. X.; Williams, Richard A.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar M.; Finch, Sue; Ayton, Lauren N.; Saunders, Alexia L.; McPhedran, Michelle; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Wise, Andrew K.; Yeoh, Jonathan; Xu, Jin; Feng, Helen; Millard, Rodney; McWade, Melanie; Thien, Patrick C.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of chronic electrical stimulation of the retina with a suprachoroidal visual prosthesis. Methods Seven normally-sighted feline subjects were implanted for 96–143 days with a suprachoroidal electrode array and six were chronically stimulated for 70–105 days at levels that activated the visual cortex. Charge balanced, biphasic, current pulses were delivered to platinum electrodes in a monopolar stimulation mode. Retinal integrity/function and the mechanical stability of the implant were assessed monthly using electroretinography (ERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus photography. Electrode impedances were measured weekly and electrically-evoked visual cortex potentials (eEVCPs) were measured monthly to verify that chronic stimuli were suprathreshold. At the end of the chronic stimulation period, thresholds were confirmed with multi-unit recordings from the visual cortex. Randomized, blinded histological assessments were performed by two pathologists to compare the stimulated and non-stimulated retina and adjacent tissue. Results All subjects tolerated the surgical and stimulation procedure with no evidence of discomfort or unexpected adverse outcomes. After an initial post-operative settling period, electrode arrays were mechanically stable. Mean electrode impedances were stable between 11–15 kΩ during the implantation period. Visually-evoked ERGs & OCT were normal, and mean eEVCP thresholds did not substantially differ over time. In 81 of 84 electrode-adjacent tissue samples examined, there were no discernible histopathological differences between stimulated and unstimulated tissue. In the remaining three tissue samples there were minor focal fibroblastic and acute inflammatory responses. Conclusions Chronic suprathreshold electrical stimulation of the retina using a suprachoroidal electrode array evoked a minimal tissue response and no adverse clinical or histological findings. Moreover, thresholds and

  3. Thermal nociceptive properties of trigeminal afferent neurons in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although nociceptive afferents innervating the body have been heavily studied form many years, much less attention has been paid to trigeminal afferent biology. In particular, very little is known concerning trigeminal nociceptor responses to heat, and almost nothing in the rat. This study uses a highly controlled and reproducible diode laser stimulator to investigate the activation of trigeminal afferents to noxious skin heating. Results The results of this experiment demonstrate that trigeminal thermonociceptors are distinct from themonociceptors innervating the limbs. Trigeminal nociceptors have considerably slower action potential conduction velocities and lower temperature thresholds than somatic afferent neurons. On the other hand, nociceptors innervating both tissue areas separate into those that respond to short pulse, high rate skin heating and those that respond to long pulse, low rate skin heating. Conclusions This paper provides the first description in the literature of the in vivo properties of thermonociceptors in rats. These finding of two separate populations aligns with the separation between C and A-delta thermonociceptors innervating the paw, but have significant differences in terms of temperature threshold and average conduction velocities. An understanding of the temperature response properties of afferent neurons innervating the paw skin have been critical in many mechanistic discoveries, some leading to new pain therapies. A clear understanding of trigeminal nociceptors may be similarly useful in the investigation of trigeminal pain mechanisms and potential therapies. PMID:20609212

  4. Effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with facial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with facial palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Nine subjects received the electrical stimulation and traditional dysphagia therapy. Electrical stimulation was applied to stimulate each subject’s facial muscles 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. [Results] Subjects showed significant improvement in cheek and lip strength and oral function after the intervention. [Conclusion] This study demonstrates that electrical stimulation improves facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with dysphagia. PMID:27799689

  5. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain123

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8+ primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch+ mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2+-Arch+mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch+ mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8+ afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  6. An afferent explanation for sexual dimorphism in the aortic baroreflex of rat.

    PubMed

    Santa Cruz Chavez, Grace C; Li, Bai-Yan; Glazebrook, Patricia A; Kunze, Diana L; Schild, John H

    2014-09-15

    Sex differences in baroreflex (BRx) function are well documented. Hormones likely contribute to this dimorphism, but many functional aspects remain unresolved. Our lab has been investigating a subset of vagal sensory neurons that constitute nearly 50% of the total population of myelinated aortic baroreceptors (BR) in female rats but less than 2% in male rats. Termed "Ah," this unique phenotype has many of the nonoverlapping electrophysiological properties and chemical sensitivities of both myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type BR afferents. In this study, we utilize three distinct experimental protocols to determine if Ah-type barosensory afferents underlie, at least in part, the sex-related differences in BRx function. Electron microscopy of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) revealed that female rats have less myelin (P < 0.03) and a smaller fiber cross-sectional area (P < 0.05) per BR fiber than male rats. Electrical stimulation of the ADN evoked compound action potentials and nerve conduction profiles that were markedly different (P < 0.01, n = 7 females and n = 9 males). Selective activation of ADN myelinated fibers evoked a BRx-mediated depressor response that was 3-7 times greater in female (n = 16) than in male (n = 17) rats. Interestingly, the most striking hemodynamic difference was functionally dependent upon the rate of myelinated barosensory fiber activation. Only 5-10 Hz of stimulation evoked a rapid, 20- to 30-mmHg reduction in arterial pressure of female rats, whereas rates of 50 Hz or higher were required to elicit a comparable depressor response from male rats. Collectively, our experimental results are suggestive of an alternative myelinated baroreceptor afferent pathway in females that may account for, at least in part, the noted sex-related differences in autonomic control of cardiovascular function.

  7. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  8. Influence of air ions on brain activity induced by electrical stimulation in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivereau, J. M.; Lambert, J. F.; Truong-Ngoc, A.

    1981-03-01

    The brain induced activity was studied in 18 rats wearing chronically skull implanted electrodes. The stimulating factor was various electrical stimulations of the mesencephalic reticular activating formation, given during the slow wave state of sleep. The results of 300 stimulations were measured by amplitude and frequency changes in the EEG simultaneously recorded. Animals previously exposed to positive air ions (3 weeks 80,000 ions/ml) exhibited lowered excitability of the reticulocortical system. Significantly higher stimulations were necessary to induce arousal. Negative air ions induced more intricate effects: brain excitability was lowered when tested with weak stimulations, but normal when evaluated with medium high level stimilations. Sleep seems first more stable but as stimulation increases, arousal is soon as effective as in controls. These results are in agreement with others findings in behavioral fields and partly explains them.

  9. Role of the lateral reticular nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Yajima, Eriko; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-03-01

    We found in a previous study that stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) facilitated the low-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR) and suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. It has been reported that the RN projections to the contralateral lateral reticular nucleus (LRt), and stimulation of the LRt inhibits the nociceptive JOR. These facts suggest that RN-induced modulation of the JOR is mediated via the LRt. We investigated whether electrically induced lesions of the LRt, or microinjection of muscimol into the LRt, affects RN-induced modulation of the JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was either 1.2 (low-threshold) or 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Electrically induced lesion of the LRt and microinjection of muscimol into the LRt reduced the RN-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR, but did not affect the RN-induced facilitation of the low-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. These results suggest that the RN-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the contralateral LRt. PMID:24370814

  10. Electrically stimulated osteogenesis on Ti-PPy/PLGA constructs prepared by laser-assisted processes.

    PubMed

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Stokker-Cheregi, Flavian; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Acasandrei, Adriana Maria; Ion, Valentin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Mihailescu, Mona; Dinescu, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This work describes a versatile laser-based protocol for fabricating micro-patterned, electrically conductive titanium-polypyrrole/poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (Ti-PPy/PLGA) constructs for electrically stimulated (ES) osteogenesis. Ti supports were patterned using fs laser ablation in order to create high spatial resolution microstructures meant to provide mechanical resistance and physical cues for cell growth. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) was used to coat the patterned Ti supports with PPy/PLGA layers acting as biocompatible surfaces having chemical and electrical properties suitable for cell differentiation and mineralization. In vitro biological assays on osteoblast-like MG63 cells showed that the constructs maintained cell viability without cytotoxicity. At 24 h after cell seeding, electrical stimulation with currents of 200 μA was applied for 4 h. This treatment was shown to promote earlier onset of osteogenesis. More specifically, the alkaline phosphatase activity of the stimulated cultures reached the maximum before that of the non-stimulated ones, i.e. controls, indicating faster cell differentiation. Moreover, mineralization was found to occur at an earlier stage in the stimulated cultures, as compared to the controls, starting with Day 6 of cell culture. At later stages, calcium levels in the stimulated cultures were higher than those in control samples by about 70%, with Ca/P ratios similar to those of natural bone. In all, the laser-based protocol emerges as an efficient alternative to existing fabrication technologies. PMID:26117739

  11. Effect of electrical stimulation on thermal shrinkage temperature of bovine muscle collagen.

    PubMed

    Judge, M D; Reeves, E S; Aberle, E D

    1981-03-01

    The effect of beef carcass electrical stimulation on the thermal stability of intramuscular collagen was determined. Differential scanning calorimetric determinations of thermal shrinkage temperature revealed that electrical stimulation lowered the shrinkage temperature of collagen by an average of .6 C in the population of cattle studied. No difference between Hereford x Angus crossbreds and Charolais crossbreds were found, but the extent of the reduction of collagen shrinkage temperature caused by electrical stimulation was greater in animals that did not receive high grain diets or received grain for only a short period than in those fed grain for up to 210 days. Furthermore, panel tenderness and Warner-Bratzler shear tests showed that stimulation-induced tenderization was also greater in animals fed no grain or fed grain for a short time. No evidence of stimulation effects on myofibrillar proteins was observed from data on sarcomere length or myofibrillar fragmentation index. The reduction of thermal stability of bovine intramuscular collagen by electrical stimulation may result from a decrease in the number or strength of the collagen cross-links.

  12. The Neural Correlates of Long-Term Carryover following Functional Electrical Stimulation for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gandolla, Marta; Ward, Nick S.; Molteni, Franco; Guanziroli, Eleonora; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neurorehabilitation effective delivery for stroke is likely to be improved by establishing a mechanistic understanding of how to enhance adaptive plasticity. Functional electrical stimulation is effective at reducing poststroke foot drop; in some patients, the effect persists after therapy has finished with an unknown mechanism. We used fMRI to examine neural correlates of functional electrical stimulation key elements, volitional intent to move and concurrent stimulation, in a group of chronic stroke patients receiving functional electrical stimulation for foot-drop correction. Patients exhibited task-related activation in a complex network, sharing bilateral sensorimotor and supplementary motor activation with age-matched controls. We observed consistent separation of patients with and without carryover effect on the basis of brain responses. Patients who experienced the carryover effect had responses in supplementary motor area that correspond to healthy controls; the interaction between experimental factors in contralateral angular gyrus was seen only in those without carryover. We suggest that the functional electrical stimulation carryover mechanism of action is based on movement prediction and sense of agency/body ownership—the ability of a patient to plan the movement and to perceive the stimulation as a part of his/her own control loop is important for carryover effect to take place. PMID:27073701

  13. Electrically stimulated osteogenesis on Ti-PPy/PLGA constructs prepared by laser-assisted processes.

    PubMed

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Stokker-Cheregi, Flavian; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Acasandrei, Adriana Maria; Ion, Valentin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Mihailescu, Mona; Dinescu, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This work describes a versatile laser-based protocol for fabricating micro-patterned, electrically conductive titanium-polypyrrole/poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (Ti-PPy/PLGA) constructs for electrically stimulated (ES) osteogenesis. Ti supports were patterned using fs laser ablation in order to create high spatial resolution microstructures meant to provide mechanical resistance and physical cues for cell growth. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) was used to coat the patterned Ti supports with PPy/PLGA layers acting as biocompatible surfaces having chemical and electrical properties suitable for cell differentiation and mineralization. In vitro biological assays on osteoblast-like MG63 cells showed that the constructs maintained cell viability without cytotoxicity. At 24 h after cell seeding, electrical stimulation with currents of 200 μA was applied for 4 h. This treatment was shown to promote earlier onset of osteogenesis. More specifically, the alkaline phosphatase activity of the stimulated cultures reached the maximum before that of the non-stimulated ones, i.e. controls, indicating faster cell differentiation. Moreover, mineralization was found to occur at an earlier stage in the stimulated cultures, as compared to the controls, starting with Day 6 of cell culture. At later stages, calcium levels in the stimulated cultures were higher than those in control samples by about 70%, with Ca/P ratios similar to those of natural bone. In all, the laser-based protocol emerges as an efficient alternative to existing fabrication technologies.

  14. Stimulants

    MedlinePlus

    Stimulants are drugs that increase your heart rate, breathing rate, and brain function. Some stimulants affect only a specific organ, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or nervous system. Epinephrine is a stimulant. It ...

  15. Effects of electrical stimulation on rat limb regeneration, a new look at an old model

    PubMed Central

    Leppik, Liudmila P.; Froemel, Dara; Slavici, Andrei; Ovadia, Zachri N.; Hudak, Lukasz; Henrich, Dirk; Marzi, Ingo; Barker, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Limb loss is a devastating disability and while current treatments provide aesthetic and functional restoration, they are associated with complications and risks. The optimal solution would be to harness the body’s regenerative capabilities to regrow new limbs. Several methods have been tried to regrow limbs in mammals, but none have succeeded. One such attempt, in the early 1970s, used electrical stimulation and demonstrated partial limb regeneration. Several researchers reproduced these findings, applying low voltage DC electrical stimulation to the stumps of amputated rat forelimbs reporting “blastema, and new bone, bone marrow, cartilage, nerve, skin, muscle and epiphyseal plate formation”. In spite of these encouraging results this research was discontinued. Recently there has been renewed interest in studying electrical stimulation, primarily at a cellular and subcellular level, and studies have demonstrated changes in stem cell behavior with increased proliferation, differentiation, matrix formation and migration, all important in tissue regeneration. We applied electrical stimulation, in vivo, to the stumps of amputated rat limbs and observed significant new bone, cartilage and vessel formation and prevention of neuroma formation. These findings demonstrate that electricity stimulates tissue regeneration and form the basis for further research leading to possible new treatments for regenerating limbs. PMID:26678416

  16. The effects of aging and electrical stimulation exercise on bone after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dolbow, James D; Dolbow, David R; Gorgey, Ashraf S; Adler, Robert A; Gater, David R

    2013-06-01

    Age related bone loss predisposes adults to osteoporosis. This is especially true for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effects of decreased bone loading with older age and paralysis significantly contribute to decreased bone mass and increased risk for fragility fractures. Loading bone via volitional muscle contractions or by using electrical stimulation are common methods for helping to prevent and/or decrease bone loss. However the effectiveness and safety of electrical stimulation activities remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to investigate the factors associated with aging and osteoporosis after SCI, the accuracy of bone measurement, the effects of various forms of bone loading activities with a focus on electrical stimulation activities and the safety of physical exercise with a focus on electrical stimulation cycling. Osteoporosis remains a disabling and costly condition for older adults and for those with paralysis. Both dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography are valuable techniques for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) with the latter having the ability to differentiate trabecular and cortical bone. Physical activities have shown to be beneficial for increasing BMD however, the extent of the benefits related to aging and paralysis remain undetermined. Electrical stimulation activities administered appropriately are assumed safe due to thousands of documented safe FES cycling sessions. However, specific documentation is needed to verify safety and to development formal guidelines for optimal use.

  17. The Effects of Aging and Electrical Stimulation Exercise on Bone after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dolbow, James D.; Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Adler, Robert A.; Gater, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Age related bone loss predisposes adults to osteoporosis. This is especially true for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effects of decreased bone loading with older age and paralysis significantly contribute to decreased bone mass and increased risk for fragility fractures. Loading bone via volitional muscle contractions or by using electrical stimulation are common methods for helping to prevent and/or decrease bone loss. However the effectiveness and safety of electrical stimulation activities remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to investigate the factors associated with aging and osteoporosis after SCI, the accuracy of bone measurement, the effects of various forms of bone loading activities with a focus on electrical stimulation activities and the safety of physical exercise with a focus on electrical stimulation cycling. Osteoporosis remains a disabling and costly condition for older adults and for those with paralysis. Both dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography are valuable techniques for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) with the latter having the ability to differentiate trabecular and cortical bone. Physical activities have shown to be beneficial for increasing BMD however, the extent of the benefits related to aging and paralysis remain undetermined. Electrical stimulation activities administered appropriately are assumed safe due to thousands of documented safe FES cycling sessions. However, specific documentation is needed to verify safety and to development formal guidelines for optimal use. PMID:23730530

  18. Percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianggang; Xu, Xiaomei; Gong, Yongsheng; Fan, Xiaofang; Wang, Liangxing; Zhang, Jianhua; Zeng, Yanjun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of stimulation of the genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic electrical pulses on patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The experiment was conducted in 22 patients clinically diagnosed with OSAS. The patients were monitored with polysomnography (PSG) in the trial. When the sleep apnea was detected, the genioglossus was stimulated with percutaneous biphasic electrical pulses that were automatically regulated by a microcontroller to achieve the optimal effect. The percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation caused contraction of the genioglossus, forward movement of the tongue, and relieving of the glossopharyngeal airway obstruction. The SaO2, apnea time, hypoxemia time, and change of respiratory disturbance index (RDI) were compared in patients with treatment and without treatment. With percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation of the genioglossus, the OSAS patients showed apnea time decreased (P < 0.01), RDI decreased (P < 0.01), and SaO2 increased (P < 0.01). No tissue injury or major discomfort was noticed during the trial. The stimulation of genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic electrical current pulse is an effective method for treating OSAS. PMID:18232360

  19. Role of electrical stimulation for rehabilitation and regeneration after spinal cord injury: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Structural discontinuity in the spinal cord after injury results in a disruption in the impulse conduction resulting in loss of various bodily functions depending upon the level of injury. This article presents a summary of the scientific research employing electrical stimulation as a means for anatomical or functional recovery for patients suffering from spinal cord injury. Electrical stimulation in the form of functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help facilitate and improve upper/lower limb mobility along with other body functions lost due to injury e.g. respiratory, sexual, bladder or bowel functions by applying a controlled electrical stimulus to generate contractions and functional movement in the paralysed muscles. The available rehabilitative techniques based on FES technology and various Food and Drug Administration, USA approved neuroprosthetic devices that are in use are discussed. The second part of the article summarises the experimental work done in the past 2 decades to study the effects of weakly applied direct current fields in promoting regeneration of neurites towards the cathode and the new emerging technique of oscillating field stimulation which has shown to promote bidirectional regeneration in the injured nerve fibres. The present article is not intended to be an exhaustive review but rather a summary aiming to highlight these two applications of electrical stimulation and the degree of anatomical/functional recovery associated with these in the field of spinal cord injury research. PMID:18677518

  20. Percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianggang; Xu, Xiaomei; Gong, Yongsheng; Fan, Xiaofang; Wang, Liangxing; Zhang, Jianhua; Zeng, Yanjun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of stimulation of the genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic electrical pulses on patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The experiment was conducted in 22 patients clinically diagnosed with OSAS. The patients were monitored with polysomnography (PSG) in the trial. When the sleep apnea was detected, the genioglossus was stimulated with percutaneous biphasic electrical pulses that were automatically regulated by a microcontroller to achieve the optimal effect. The percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation caused contraction of the genioglossus, forward movement of the tongue, and relieving of the glossopharyngeal airway obstruction. The SaO2, apnea time, hypoxemia time, and change of respiratory disturbance index (RDI) were compared in patients with treatment and without treatment. With percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation of the genioglossus, the OSAS patients showed apnea time decreased (P < 0.01), RDI decreased (P < 0.01), and SaO2 increased (P < 0.01). No tissue injury or major discomfort was noticed during the trial. The stimulation of genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic electrical current pulse is an effective method for treating OSAS.

  1. Non-invasive electric current stimulation for restoration of vision after unilateral occipital stroke.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carolin; Silvennoinen, Katri; Granata, Giuseppe; de Rossi, Francesca; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Brösel, Doreen; Bola, Michał; Sailer, Michael; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J; Rossini, Paolo M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    Occipital stroke often leads to visual field loss, for which no effective treatment exists. Little is known about the potential of non-invasive electric current stimulation to ameliorate visual functions in patients suffering from unilateral occipital stroke. One reason is the traditional thinking that visual field loss after brain lesions is permanent. Since evidence is available documenting vision restoration by means of vision training or non-invasive electric current stimulation future studies should also consider investigating recovery processes after visual cortical strokes. Here, protocols of repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are presented and the European consortium for restoration of vision (REVIS) is introduced. Within the consortium different stimulation approaches will be applied to patients with unilateral occipital strokes resulting in homonymous hemianopic visual field defects. The aim of the study is to evaluate effects of current stimulation of the brain on vision parameters, vision-related quality of life, and physiological parameters that allow concluding about the mechanisms of vision restoration. These include EEG-spectra and coherence measures, and visual evoked potentials. The design of stimulation protocols involves an appropriate sham-stimulation condition and sufficient follow-up periods to test whether the effects are stable. This is the first application of non-invasive current stimulation for vision rehabilitation in stroke-related visual field deficits. Positive results of the trials could have far-reaching implications for clinical practice. The ability of non-invasive electrical current brain stimulation to modulate the activity of neuronal networks may have implications for stroke rehabilitation also in the visual domain.

  2. Non-invasive electric current stimulation for restoration of vision after unilateral occipital stroke.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carolin; Silvennoinen, Katri; Granata, Giuseppe; de Rossi, Francesca; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Brösel, Doreen; Bola, Michał; Sailer, Michael; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J; Rossini, Paolo M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    Occipital stroke often leads to visual field loss, for which no effective treatment exists. Little is known about the potential of non-invasive electric current stimulation to ameliorate visual functions in patients suffering from unilateral occipital stroke. One reason is the traditional thinking that visual field loss after brain lesions is permanent. Since evidence is available documenting vision restoration by means of vision training or non-invasive electric current stimulation future studies should also consider investigating recovery processes after visual cortical strokes. Here, protocols of repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are presented and the European consortium for restoration of vision (REVIS) is introduced. Within the consortium different stimulation approaches will be applied to patients with unilateral occipital strokes resulting in homonymous hemianopic visual field defects. The aim of the study is to evaluate effects of current stimulation of the brain on vision parameters, vision-related quality of life, and physiological parameters that allow concluding about the mechanisms of vision restoration. These include EEG-spectra and coherence measures, and visual evoked potentials. The design of stimulation protocols involves an appropriate sham-stimulation condition and sufficient follow-up periods to test whether the effects are stable. This is the first application of non-invasive current stimulation for vision rehabilitation in stroke-related visual field deficits. Positive results of the trials could have far-reaching implications for clinical practice. The ability of non-invasive electrical current brain stimulation to modulate the activity of neuronal networks may have implications for stroke rehabilitation also in the visual domain. PMID:26072125

  3. Sustained cortical and subcortical neuromodulation induced by electrical tongue stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Mitchell E.; Danilov, Yuri P.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Meyerand, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to show that information-free stimulation of the tongue can improve behavioral measures and induce sustained neuromodulation of the balance-processing network in individuals with balance dysfunction. Twelve balance-impaired subjects received one week of cranial nerve non-invasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM). Before and after the week of stimulation, postural sway and fMRI activation were measured to monitor susceptibility to optic flow. Nine normal controls also underwent the postural sway and fMRI tests but did not receive CN-NINM. Results showed that before CN-NINM balance-impaired subjects swayed more than normal controls as expected (p≤0.05), and that overall sway and susceptibility to optic flow decreased after CN-NINM (p≤0.005 & p≤0.05). fMRI showed upregulation of visual sensitivity to optic flow in balance-impaired subjects that decreased after CN-NINM. A region of interest analysis indicated that CN-NINM may induce neuromodulation by increasing activity within the dorsal pons (p≤0.01). PMID:20614202

  4. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  5. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-15

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg{sub 0.66}Nb{sub 0.33})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  6. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures. PMID:26329198

  7. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg0.66Nb0.33)O3-PbTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  8. Electrical stimulation causes rapid changes in electrode impedance of cell-covered electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbold, Carrie; Richardson, Rachael; Millard, Rodney; Seligman, Peter; Cowan, Robert; Shepherd, Robert

    2011-06-01

    Animal and clinical observations of a reduction in electrode impedance following electrical stimulation encouraged the development of an in vitro model of the electrode-tissue interface. This model was used previously to show an increase in impedance with cell and protein cover over electrodes. In this paper, the model was used to assess the changes in electrode impedance and cell cover following application of a charge-balanced biphasic current pulse train. Following stimulation, a large and rapid drop in total impedance (Zt) and access resistance (Ra) occurred. The magnitude of this impedance change was dependent on the current amplitude used, with a linear relationship determined between Ra and the resulting cell cover over the electrodes. The changes in impedance due to stimulation were shown to be transitory, with impedance returning to pre-stimulation levels several hours after cessation of stimulation. A loss of cells over the electrode surface was observed immediately after stimulation, suggesting that the level of stimulation applied was creating localized changes to cell adhesion. Similar changes in electrode impedance were observed for in vivo and in vitro work, thus helping to verify the in vitro model, although the underlying mechanisms may differ. A change in the porosity of the cellular layer was proposed to explain the alterations in electrode impedance in vitro. These in vitro studies provide insight into the possible mechanisms occurring at the electrode-tissue interface in association with electrical stimulation.

  9. Electrical stimulation causes rapid changes in electrode impedance of cell-covered electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, Carrie; Richardson, Rachael; Millard, Rodney; Seligman, Peter; Cowan, Robert; Shepherd, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Animal and clinical observations of a reduction in electrode impedance following electrical stimulation encouraged the development of an in vitro model of the electrode-tissue interface. This model was used previously to show an increase in impedance with cell and protein cover over electrodes. In this paper, the model was used to assess the changes in electrode impedance and cell cover following application of a charge-balanced biphasic current pulse train. Following stimulation, a large and rapid drop in total impedance (Zt) and access resistance (Ra) occurred. The magnitude of this impedance change was dependent on the current amplitude used, with a linear relationship determined between Ra and the resulting cell cover over the electrodes. The changes in impedance due to stimulation were shown to be transitory, with impedance returning to pre-stimulation levels several hours after cessation of stimulation. A loss of cells over the electrode surface was observed immediately after stimulation suggesting that the level of stimulation applied was creating localised changes to cell adhesion. Similar changes in electrode impedance were observed for in vivo and in vitro work, thus helping to verify the in vitro model, although the underlying mechanisms may differ. A change in the porosity of the cellular layer was proposed to explain the alterations in electrode impedance in vitro. These in vitro studies provide insight into the possible mechanisms occurring at the electrode-tissue interface in association with electrical stimulation. PMID:21572219

  10. Application of conductive polymers, scaffolds and electrical stimulation for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein; Kiani, Sahar; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-04-01

    Among the numerous attempts to integrate tissue engineering concepts into strategies to repair nearly all parts of the body, neuronal repair stands out. This is partially due to the complexity of the nervous anatomical system, its functioning and the inefficiency of conventional repair approaches, which are based on single components of either biomaterials or cells alone. Electrical stimulation has been shown to enhance the nerve regeneration process and this consequently makes the use of electrically conductive polymers very attractive for the construction of scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. In this review, by taking into consideration the electrical properties of nerve cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerve cells, we discuss the most commonly utilized conductive polymers, polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PANI), along with their design and modifications, thus making them suitable scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. Other electrospun, composite, conductive scaffolds, such as PANI/gelatin and PPy/poly(ε-caprolactone), with or without electrical stimulation, are also discussed. Different procedures of electrical stimulation which have been used in tissue engineering, with examples on their specific applications in tissue engineering, are also discussed.

  11. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  12. A Closed Loop Brain-machine Interface for Epilepsy Control Using Dorsal Column Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pais-Vieira, Miguel; Yadav, Amol P; Moreira, Derek; Guggenmos, David; Santos, Amílcar; Lebedev, Mikhail; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2016-01-01

    Although electrical neurostimulation has been proposed as an alternative treatment for drug-resistant cases of epilepsy, current procedures such as deep brain stimulation, vagus, and trigeminal nerve stimulation are effective only in a fraction of the patients. Here we demonstrate a closed loop brain-machine interface that delivers electrical stimulation to the dorsal column (DCS) of the spinal cord to suppress epileptic seizures. Rats were implanted with cortical recording microelectrodes and spinal cord stimulating electrodes, and then injected with pentylenetetrazole to induce seizures. Seizures were detected in real time from cortical local field potentials, after which DCS was applied. This method decreased seizure episode frequency by 44% and seizure duration by 38%. We argue that the therapeutic effect of DCS is related to modulation of cortical theta waves, and propose that this closed-loop interface has the potential to become an effective and semi-invasive treatment for refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:27605389

  13. A Closed Loop Brain-machine Interface for Epilepsy Control Using Dorsal Column Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Vieira, Miguel; Yadav, Amol P.; Moreira, Derek; Guggenmos, David; Santos, Amílcar; Lebedev, Mikhail; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Although electrical neurostimulation has been proposed as an alternative treatment for drug-resistant cases of epilepsy, current procedures such as deep brain stimulation, vagus, and trigeminal nerve stimulation are effective only in a fraction of the patients. Here we demonstrate a closed loop brain-machine interface that delivers electrical stimulation to the dorsal column (DCS) of the spinal cord to suppress epileptic seizures. Rats were implanted with cortical recording microelectrodes and spinal cord stimulating electrodes, and then injected with pentylenetetrazole to induce seizures. Seizures were detected in real time from cortical local field potentials, after which DCS was applied. This method decreased seizure episode frequency by 44% and seizure duration by 38%. We argue that the therapeutic effect of DCS is related to modulation of cortical theta waves, and propose that this closed-loop interface has the potential to become an effective and semi-invasive treatment for refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:27605389

  14. A Closed Loop Brain-machine Interface for Epilepsy Control Using Dorsal Column Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pais-Vieira, Miguel; Yadav, Amol P; Moreira, Derek; Guggenmos, David; Santos, Amílcar; Lebedev, Mikhail; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2016-09-08

    Although electrical neurostimulation has been proposed as an alternative treatment for drug-resistant cases of epilepsy, current procedures such as deep brain stimulation, vagus, and trigeminal nerve stimulation are effective only in a fraction of the patients. Here we demonstrate a closed loop brain-machine interface that delivers electrical stimulation to the dorsal column (DCS) of the spinal cord to suppress epileptic seizures. Rats were implanted with cortical recording microelectrodes and spinal cord stimulating electrodes, and then injected with pentylenetetrazole to induce seizures. Seizures were detected in real time from cortical local field potentials, after which DCS was applied. This method decreased seizure episode frequency by 44% and seizure duration by 38%. We argue that the therapeutic effect of DCS is related to modulation of cortical theta waves, and propose that this closed-loop interface has the potential to become an effective and semi-invasive treatment for refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

  15. High intensity electrical stimulation effect on thigh musculature during immobilization for knee sprain. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nitz, A J; Dobner, J J

    1987-02-01

    We conducted high intensity electrical stimulation of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle groups daily during a three-week period of lower extremity cast immobilization for an athlete who sustained Grade II medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament sprains. Thigh muscle hypertrophy of the injured (stimulated) leg was suggested by an increase in girth measurement on the day of cast removal. Three weeks after cast removal, single-leg, vertical-leap height was 92% of that accomplished by the dominant, uninjured leg, and the patient was able to return to athletic competition. This case report documents the usefulness of high intensity electrical stimulation for maintaining limb motor function during cast immobilization. Limb stabilization during stimulation and simultaneous excitation of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs also are discussed.

  16. [Changes in the brain spontaneous bioelectrical activity during transcranial electrical and electromagnetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Sharova, E V; Mel'nikov, A V; Novikova, M R; Kulikov, M A; Grechenko, T N; Shekhter, E D; Zaslavskiĭ, A Iu

    2006-01-01

    In order to study systemic brain reactions on transcranial electrical or electromagnetic medical stimulation and specify the neurophysiological criteria of its efficiency, comparative clinical and experimental examination was performed with the analysis of spontaneous bioelectric activity and behavioral or clinical parameters. We examined 6 patients with prolonged posttraumatic unconsciousness states treated with electrical stimulation and 17 intact Wistar rats subjected to electromagnetic stimulation of the brain. The effect of the transcranial stimulation was shown to depend on the initial level of the intercentral interactions of brain bioelectrical activity, estimated by the EEG coherence. Hypersynchronization of biopotentials as the main element of the brain reactivity can be the most useful for the rehabilitation of patients with cerebral pathology in cases of initially lowered level of the intercentral interactions in the absence of pathologically strengthened functional connections.

  17. Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldie, Simon; Sandeman, Jack; Cole, Richard; Dennis, Simon; Swain, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surgery for pleomorphic adenoma recurrence presents a significant risk of facial nerve damage that can result in facial weakness effecting patients’ ability to communicate, mental health and self-image. We report two case studies that had marked facial weakness after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma and their progress with electrical stimulation. Subjects received electrical stimulation twice daily for 24 weeks during which photographs of expressions, facial measurements and Sunnybrook scores were recorded. Both subjects recovered good facial function demonstrating Sunnybrook scores of 54 and 64 that improved to 88 and 96, respectively. Neither subjects demonstrated adverse effects of treatment. We conclude that electrical stimulation is a safe treatment and may improve facial palsy in patients after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Larger studies would be difficult to pursue due to the low incidence of cases. PMID:27106613

  18. Femoral quadriceps neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Helena Bruna Bettoni; Szego, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Milan, Silvia Lefone; Talerman, Claudia; Ferretti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. This was a systematic review with no language or publication status restriction. Our search was made in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. Randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials evaluating neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty were included. Four studies with moderate risk of bias and low statistical power were included, totalizing 376 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in knee function, pain and range of motion during 12 month follow-up. This review concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation was less effective than traditional rehabilitation in function, muscular strength and range of motion. However, this technique was useful for quadriceps activation during the first days after surgery. PMID:26537511

  19. Interleukin-1β sensitizes abdominal visceral afferents of cats to ischaemia and histamine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    1999-01-01

    Activation of abdominal splanchnic visceral afferents during mesenteric ischaemia induces visceral pain and evokes excitatory cardiovascular responses. Previous studies have shown that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentration is increased locally in tissues during ischaemia and reperfusion. Local administration of IL-1β sensitizes somatic afferents to mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-1β stimulates or sensitizes splanchnic visceral afferents to ischaemia and to the action of chemical stimuli such as histamine. The concentration of IL-1β in mesenteric lymph and portal venous plasma in anaesthetized cats was measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before, during and after 10 min of abdominal ischaemia. The level of IL-1β was significantly increased during ischaemia in lymph, but not in plasma. Discharge activity of single-unit abdominal visceral C fibre afferents was measured from the right thoracic sympathetic chain. Ischaemically sensitive C fibre afferents were identified according to their response to 5–10 min of abdominal ischaemia. Intra-arterial (i.a.) injection of a high dose of IL-1β (500 ng kg−1), but not of a lower dose (i.e. 15, 50 or 150 ng kg−1), stimulated most (six of seven) abdominal visceral afferents. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly enhanced the increased activity of 11 of 13 C fibre afferents during 10 min of ischaemia. Conversely, an IL-1 type I receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, 1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the increased activity in six of seven other C fibre afferents during ischaemia. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly augmented the responses of 13 of 16 ischaemically sensitive abdominal afferents to histamine (5–10 μg kg−1, i.a.). Conversely, IL-1ra (1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the responses of five of six other C fibre afferents to histamine. These data strongly suggest that stimulation of IL-1 type I receptors by IL-1

  20. Effortful swallowing training combined with electrical stimulation in post-stroke dysphagia: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Youngsun; Oh, Jong-Chi; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2012-12-01

    We tested the effect of effortful swallow combined with surface electrical stimulation used as a form of resistance training in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. Twenty post-stroke dysphagic patients were randomly divided into two groups: those who underwent effortful swallow with infrahyoid motor electrical stimulation (experimental group, n = 10) and effortful swallow with infrahyoid sensory electrical stimulation (control group, n = 10). In the experimental group, electrical stimulation was applied to the skin above the infrahyoid muscle with the current was adjusted until muscle contraction occurred and the hyoid bone was depressed. In the control group, the stimulation intensity was applied just above the sensory threshold. The patients in both groups were then asked to swallow effortfully in order to elevate their hyolaryngeal complex when the stimulation began. A total of 12 sessions of 20 min of training for 4 weeks were performed. Blinded biomechanical measurements of the extent of hyolaryngeal excursion, the maximal width of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening, and the penetration-aspiration scale before and after training were performed. In the experimental group, the maximal vertical displacement of the larynx was increased significantly after the intervention (p < 0.05). The maximal vertical displacement of the hyoid bone and the maximal width of the UES opening increased but the increase was not found to be significant (p = 0.066). There was no increase in the control group. Effortful swallow training combined with electrical stimulation increased the extent of laryngeal excursion. This intervention can be used as a new treatment method in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. PMID:22447240

  1. Stimulated oxidation of metals (laser, electric field, etc.): Comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánai, László; Füle, Miklós

    2014-11-01

    In this report we demonstrate the importance of metal oxides, e.g. thin films and nanostructures, in modern science and technology. The basic laws of oxide thickness on base of diffusion of specimens versus time in different circumstances (Cabrera-Mott and Wagner laws) under the influence of external fields, e.g. electromagnetic field, static electric and magnetic field, are demonstrated. We give experimental results for various metal oxide layers over a wide range of different metals. Theoretical explanations are provided as well for the most reliable circumstances.

  2. Differential changes in gingival somatosensory sensitivity after painful electrical tooth stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Lu, Shengyi; Kemppainen, Pentti; List, Thomas; Zhang, Zhenting; Svensson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of painful tooth stimulation on gingival somatosensory sensitivity of healthy volunteers in a randomized, controlled design. Thirteen healthy volunteers (six women, seven men; 28.4 ± 5.0 years) were included for two experimental sessions of electrical tooth stimulation: painful tooth stimulation and tooth stimulation below the sensory threshold (control). Eight of the human subjects participated in a third session without tooth stimulation. In all sessions, the somatosensory sensitivity of the gingiva adjacent to the stimulated tooth was evaluated with a standardized battery of quantitative sensory tests (QST) before, immediately after and 30 min after tooth stimulation. Painful tooth stimulation evoked significant decreases in warmth and heat pain thresholds (P < 0.001) as well as pressure pain thresholds (increased sensitivity) (P = 0.024) and increases in mechanical detection thresholds (decreased sensitivity) (P < 0.050). Similar thermal threshold changes (P < 0.019) but no mechanical changes were found after tooth stimulation below the sensory threshold (P > 0.086). No QST changes were detected in the session without tooth stimulation (P > 0.060). In conclusion, modest increased gingival sensitivity to warmth, painful heat and pressure stimuli as well as desensitization to non-painful mechanical stimulation were demonstrated after tooth stimulation. This suggests involvement of competing heterotopic facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Furthermore, stimulation below the sensory threshold induced similar thermal sensitization suggesting the possibility of activation of axon-reflex-like mechanisms even at intensities below the perception threshold. These findings may have implications for interpretation of somatosensory results in patients with chronic intraoral pain. PMID:25567087

  3. Differential changes in gingival somatosensory sensitivity after painful electrical tooth stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Lu, Shengyi; Kemppainen, Pentti; List, Thomas; Zhang, Zhenting; Svensson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of painful tooth stimulation on gingival somatosensory sensitivity of healthy volunteers in a randomized, controlled design. Thirteen healthy volunteers (six women, seven men; 28.4 ± 5.0 years) were included for two experimental sessions of electrical tooth stimulation: painful tooth stimulation and tooth stimulation below the sensory threshold (control). Eight of the human subjects participated in a third session without tooth stimulation. In all sessions, the somatosensory sensitivity of the gingiva adjacent to the stimulated tooth was evaluated with a standardized battery of quantitative sensory tests (QST) before, immediately after and 30 min after tooth stimulation. Painful tooth stimulation evoked significant decreases in warmth and heat pain thresholds (P < 0.001) as well as pressure pain thresholds (increased sensitivity) (P = 0.024) and increases in mechanical detection thresholds (decreased sensitivity) (P < 0.050). Similar thermal threshold changes (P < 0.019) but no mechanical changes were found after tooth stimulation below the sensory threshold (P > 0.086). No QST changes were detected in the session without tooth stimulation (P > 0.060). In conclusion, modest increased gingival sensitivity to warmth, painful heat and pressure stimuli as well as desensitization to non-painful mechanical stimulation were demonstrated after tooth stimulation. This suggests involvement of competing heterotopic facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Furthermore, stimulation below the sensory threshold induced similar thermal sensitization suggesting the possibility of activation of axon-reflex-like mechanisms even at intensities below the perception threshold. These findings may have implications for interpretation of somatosensory results in patients with chronic intraoral pain.

  4. Does therapeutic electrical stimulation improve function in children with disabilities? A comprehensive literature review.

    PubMed

    Bosques, Glendaliz; Martin, Rebecca; McGee, Leah; Sadowsky, Cristina

    2016-05-31

    The use of therapeutic electrical stimulation for medical purposes is not new; it has been described in medical textbooks since the 18th century, but its use has been limited due to concerns for tolerance and lack of research showing efficacy. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential clinical applicability, while clarifying the differences in electrical stimulation (ES) treatments and the theory behind potential benefits to remediate functional impairments in youth.The literature review was performed as follows: A total of 37 articles were reviewed and the evidence for use in pediatric diagnoses is reported.The synthesis of the literature suggests that improvements in various impairments may be possible with the integration of ES. Most studies were completed on children with cerebral palsy (CP). Electrical stimulation may improve muscle mass and strength, spasticity, passive range of motion (PROM), upper extremity function, walking speed, and positioning of the foot and ankle kinematics during walking. Sitting posture and static/dynamic sitting balance may be improved with ES to trunk musculature. Bone mineral density may be positively affected with the use of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) ergometry. ES may also be useful in the management of urinary tract dysfunction and chronic constipation. Among all reviewed studies, reports of direct adverse reactions to electrical stimulation were rare.In conclusion, NMES and FES appear to be safe and well tolerated in children with various disabilities. It is suggested that physiatrists and other healthcare providers better understand the indications and parameters in order to utilize these tools effectively in the pediatric population. MeSH terms: Electrical stimulation; child; review. PMID:27285801

  5. Nanowires and Electrical Stimulation Synergistically Improve Functions of hiPSC Cardiac Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Richards, Dylan J; Tan, Yu; Coyle, Robert; Li, Yang; Xu, Ruoyu; Yeung, Nelson; Parker, Arran; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2016-07-13

    The advancement of human induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hiPSC-CM) technology has shown promising potential to provide a patient-specific, regenerative cell therapy strategy to treat cardiovascular disease. Despite the progress, the unspecific, underdeveloped phenotype of hiPSC-CMs has shown arrhythmogenic risk and limited functional improvements after transplantation. To address this, tissue engineering strategies have utilized both exogenous and endogenous stimuli to accelerate the development of hiPSC-CMs. Exogenous electrical stimulation provides a biomimetic pacemaker-like stimuli that has been shown to advance the electrical properties of tissue engineered cardiac constructs. Recently, we demonstrated that the incorporation of electrically conductive silicon nanowires to hiPSC cardiac spheroids led to advanced structural and functional development of hiPSC-CMs by improving the endogenous electrical microenvironment. Here, we reasoned that the enhanced endogenous electrical microenvironment of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids would synergize with exogenous electrical stimulation to further advance the functional development of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. For the first time, we report that the combination of nanowires and electrical stimulation enhanced cell-cell junction formation, improved development of contractile machinery, and led to a significant decrease in the spontaneous beat rate of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. The advancements made here address critical challenges for the use of hiPSC-CMs in cardiac developmental and translational research and provide an advanced cell delivery vehicle for the next generation of cardiac repair.

  6. Perception of electrical and mechanical stimulation of the skin: implications for electrotactile feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Patrick L.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2009-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is often accompanied by impaired tactile and proprioceptive sensations. Normally, somatosensensory information derived from such sensations is important in the formation of voluntary motor commands. Therefore, as a preliminary step toward the development of an electrotactile feedback system to restore somatosensation, psychophysical methods were used to characterize perceptual attributes associated with electrical stimulation of the skin on the back of the neck in human subjects. These data were compared to mechanical stimulation of the skin on the back of neck and on the distal pad of the index finger. Spatial acuity of the neck, evaluated using two-point thresholds, was not significantly different for electrical (37 ± 14 mm) or mechanical stimulation (39 ± 10 mm). The exponent (β) of the best fitting power function relating perceived intensity to applied stimulus strength was used to characterize perceptual sensitivity to mechanical and electrical stimuli. For electrical stimuli, both current amplitude-modulated and frequency-modulated trains of pulses were tested. Perceptual sensitivity was significantly greater for current amplitude modulation (β = 1.14 ± 0.37) compared to frequency modulation (β = 0.57 ± 0.24) and mechanical stimulation (0.51 ± 0.12). Finally, based on the data gathered here, we derive a transfer function that could be used in the future to convert mechanical stimuli detected with artificial sensors placed on the fingers into electrotactile signals that evoke perceptions similar to those arising from normal mechanical stimulation of the skin.

  7. Auditory Responses to Electric and Infrared Neural Stimulation of the Rat Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rohit; Guex, Amelie A.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Durakovic, Nedim; McKay, Colette M.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the auditory brainstem implant, a prosthesis in which user outcomes are modest, we applied electric and infrared neural stimulation (INS) to the cochlear nucleus in a rat animal model. Electric stimulation evoked regions of neural activation in the inferior colliculus and short-latency, multipeaked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Pulsed INS, delivered to the surface of the cochlear nucleus via an optical fiber, evoked broad neural activation in the inferior colliculus. Strongest responses were recorded when the fiber was placed at lateral positions on the cochlear nucleus, close to the temporal bone. INS-evoked ABRs were multipeaked but longer in latency than those for electric stimulation; they resembled the responses to acoustic stimulation. After deafening, responses to electric stimulation persisted, whereas those to INS disappeared, consistent with a reported “optophonic” effect, a laser-induced acoustic artifact. Thus, for deaf individuals who use the auditory brainstem implant, INS alone did not appear promising as a new approach. PMID:24508368

  8. Effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Da-Sheng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Qian, Jun; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration in rats with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] A rat model of spinal cord injury was constructed by using the Allen weight-drop method. These rats were randomly divided into normal, spinal cord injury, and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation groups. The experimental group received the intervention with oscillating electrical field stimulation, and the control group received the intervention with an electrical field stimulator without oscillating electrical field stimulation. Each group was then randomly divided into seven subgroups according to observation time (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and inclined plate test score evaluation, motor evoked potential detection, and histological observation were performed. [Results] In the first 2 weeks of oscillating electrical field stimulation, the oscillating electrical field stimulation and inclined plate test scores of spinal cord injury group and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group were not significantly different. In the fourth week, the scores of the spinal cord injury group were significantly lower than those of the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group. The motor evoked potential incubation period in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group at the various time points was shorter than that in the spinal cord injury group. In the sixth week, the relative area of myelin in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group was evidently larger than that in the spinal cord injury group. [Conclusion] Oscillating electrical field stimulation could effectively improve spinal cord conduction function and promote motor function recovery in rats with spinal cord injury, as well as promote myelin

  9. Effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Da-Sheng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Qian, Jun; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration in rats with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] A rat model of spinal cord injury was constructed by using the Allen weight-drop method. These rats were randomly divided into normal, spinal cord injury, and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation groups. The experimental group received the intervention with oscillating electrical field stimulation, and the control group received the intervention with an electrical field stimulator without oscillating electrical field stimulation. Each group was then randomly divided into seven subgroups according to observation time (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and inclined plate test score evaluation, motor evoked potential detection, and histological observation were performed. [Results] In the first 2 weeks of oscillating electrical field stimulation, the oscillating electrical field stimulation and inclined plate test scores of spinal cord injury group and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group were not significantly different. In the fourth week, the scores of the spinal cord injury group were significantly lower than those of the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group. The motor evoked potential incubation period in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group at the various time points was shorter than that in the spinal cord injury group. In the sixth week, the relative area of myelin in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group was evidently larger than that in the spinal cord injury group. [Conclusion] Oscillating electrical field stimulation could effectively improve spinal cord conduction function and promote motor function recovery in rats with spinal cord injury, as well as promote myelin

  10. Effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Da-Sheng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Qian, Jun; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration in rats with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] A rat model of spinal cord injury was constructed by using the Allen weight-drop method. These rats were randomly divided into normal, spinal cord injury, and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation groups. The experimental group received the intervention with oscillating electrical field stimulation, and the control group received the intervention with an electrical field stimulator without oscillating electrical field stimulation. Each group was then randomly divided into seven subgroups according to observation time (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and inclined plate test score evaluation, motor evoked potential detection, and histological observation were performed. [Results] In the first 2 weeks of oscillating electrical field stimulation, the oscillating electrical field stimulation and inclined plate test scores of spinal cord injury group and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group were not significantly different. In the fourth week, the scores of the spinal cord injury group were significantly lower than those of the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group. The motor evoked potential incubation period in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group at the various time points was shorter than that in the spinal cord injury group. In the sixth week, the relative area of myelin in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group was evidently larger than that in the spinal cord injury group. [Conclusion] Oscillating electrical field stimulation could effectively improve spinal cord conduction function and promote motor function recovery in rats with spinal cord injury, as well as promote myelin

  11. Severe hypoxia affects exercise performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Millet, Guillaume Y; Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; Laursen, Paul B; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that hypoxia centrally affects performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue, we conducted two experiments under complete vascular occlusion of the exercising muscle under different systemic O(2) environmental conditions. In experiment 1, 12 subjects performed repeated submaximal isometric contractions of the elbow flexor to exhaustion (RCTE) with inspired O(2) fraction fixed at 9% (severe hypoxia, SevHyp), 14% (moderate hypoxia, ModHyp), 21% (normoxia, Norm), or 30% (hyperoxia, Hyper). The number of contractions (performance), muscle (biceps brachii), and prefrontal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) parameters and high-frequency paired-pulse (PS100) evoked responses to electrical muscle stimulation were monitored. In experiment 2, 10 subjects performed another RCTE in SevHyp and Norm conditions in which the number of contractions, biceps brachii electromyography responses to electrical nerve stimulation (M wave), and transcranial magnetic stimulation responses (motor-evoked potentials, MEP, and cortical silent period, CSP) were recorded. Performance during RCTE was significantly reduced by 10-15% in SevHyp (arterial O(2) saturation, SpO(2) = ∼75%) compared with ModHyp (SpO(2) = ∼90%) or Norm/Hyper (SpO(2) > 97%). Performance reduction in SevHyp occurred despite similar 1) metabolic (muscle NIRS parameters) and functional (changes in PS100 and M wave) muscle states and 2) MEP and CSP responses, suggesting comparable corticospinal excitability and spinal and cortical inhibition between SevHyp and Norm. It is concluded that, in SevHyp, performance and central drive can be altered independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue. It is concluded that submaximal performance in SevHyp is partly reduced by a mechanism related directly to brain oxygenation. PMID:22323647

  12. Invasive and transcranial photoacoustic imaging of the vascular response to brain electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Yao, Junjie; Hu, Song; Li, Li; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Advances in the brain functional imaging greatly facilitated the understanding of neurovascular coupling. For monitoring of the microvascular response to the brain electrical stimulation in vivo we used optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) through the cranial openings as well as transcranially. Both types of the vascular response, vasoconstriction and vasodilatation, were clearly observed with good spatial and temporal resolution. Obtained results confirm one of the primary points of the neurovascular coupling theory that blood vessels could present vasoconstriction or vasodilatation in response to electrical stimulation, depending on the balance between inhibition and excitation of the different parts of the elements of the neurovascular coupling system.

  13. Pupillary responses evoked by electrical stimulation of area pretectalis in cats.

    PubMed

    Shoumura, K; Imai, H

    1986-01-01

    Pupillary responses evoked by electrical stimulation of the area pretectalis and neighboring midbrain structures were studied in the cat. The pupillary responses evoked were recorded using an infrared pupilloanalyzing system. Bilateral pupillary constriction was evoked with a low threshold current intensity by stimulation of the nucleus pretectalis medialis, nucleus pretectalis olivaris, rostral part of the nucleus pretectalis posterior, the most rostral part of the periaqueductal grey and the nucleus of posterior commissure. Bilateral pupillary dilation was induced with a low threshold current intensity by stimulating the nucleus pretectalis anterior, caudal periaqueductal grey and the midbrain tegmentum. The effects of changing stimulus intensity and stimulus frequency were also studied.

  14. Technical aspects of neurostimulation: Focus on equipment, electric field modeling, and stimulation protocols.

    PubMed

    Klooster, D C W; de Louw, A J A; Aldenkamp, A P; Besseling, R M H; Mestrom, R M C; Carrette, S; Zinger, S; Bergmans, J W M; Mess, W H; Vonck, K; Carrette, E; Breuer, L E M; Bernas, A; Tijhuis, A G; Boon, P

    2016-06-01

    Neuromodulation is a field of science, medicine, and bioengineering that encompasses implantable and non-implantable technologies for the purpose of improving quality of life and functioning of humans. Brain neuromodulation involves different neurostimulation techniques: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS), which are being used both to study their effects on cognitive brain functions and to treat neuropsychiatric disorders. The mechanisms of action of neurostimulation remain incompletely understood. Insight into the technical basis of neurostimulation might be a first step towards a more profound understanding of these mechanisms, which might lead to improved clinical outcome and therapeutic potential. This review provides an overview of the technical basis of neurostimulation focusing on the equipment, the present understanding of induced electric fields, and the stimulation protocols. The review is written from a technical perspective aimed at supporting the use of neurostimulation in clinical practice. PMID:27021215

  15. Electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kezirian, Eric J; Boudewyns, An; Eisele, David W; Schwartz, Alan R; Smith, Philip L; Van de Heyning, Paul H; De Backer, Wilfried A

    2010-10-01

    Upper airway occlusion in obstructive sleep apnea has been attributed to a decline in pharyngeal neuromuscular activity occurring in a structurally narrowed airway. Surgical treatment focuses on the correction of anatomic abnormalities, but there is a potential role for activation of the upper airway musculature, especially with stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve and genioglossus muscle. We present evidence from research on upper airway neuromuscular electrical stimulation in animals and humans. We also present results from eight obstructive sleep apnea patients with a fully implanted system for hypoglossal nerve stimulation, demonstrating an improvement in upper airway collapsibility and obstructive sleep apnea severity. Future research, including optimization of device features and stimulation parameters as well as patient selection, is necessary to make hypoglossal nerve stimulation a viable alternative to positive airway pressure therapy and upper airway surgical procedures.

  16. The effects of stimulating lower leg muscles on the mechanical work and metabolic response in functional electrically stimulated pedaling.

    PubMed

    Hakansson, Nils A; Hull, M L

    2010-10-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) pedaling with the muscles of the upper leg has been shown to provide benefit to spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals. FES pedaling with electrical stimulation timing patterns that minimize the stress-time integral of activated muscles has been shown to increase the work individuals can perform during the exercise compared to existing FES stimulation timing patterns. Activation of the lower leg muscles could further enhance the benefit of FES pedaling by increasing the metabolic response to the exercise. For SCI individuals, the objectives of this study were to experimentally determine whether FES pedaling with the upper and lower leg muscles would affect the work generated and increase the physiological responses compared to pedaling with the upper leg muscles alone. Work, rate of oxygen consumption ·VO₂, and blood lactate data were measured from nine SCI subjects (injury level T4-T12) as they pedaled using upper leg and upper and lower leg muscle groups on repeated trials. The subjects performed 6% more work with the upper and lower legs than with the upper legs alone, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.2433). The average rate of oxygen consumption associated with the upper leg muscles (441 ±231 mL/min) was not significantly different from the corresponding average for the upper and lower legs (473 ±213 mL/min) (p = 0.1176). The blood lactate concentration associated with the upper leg muscles (5.9 ±2.3 mmoles/L) was significantly lower than the corresponding average for the upper and lower legs (6.8 ±2.3 mmoles/L) (p = 0.0049). The results indicate that electrical stimulation timing patterns that incorporate the lower leg muscles do increase the blood lactate concentrations. However, there was not enough evidence to reject the null hypothesis that stimulating the lower leg muscles affected the work accomplished or increased the rate of oxygen consumption. In conclusion, incorporating the lower leg muscles

  17. An investigation into the induced electric fields from transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadimani, Ravi; Lee, Erik; Duffy, Walter; Waris, Mohammed; Siddiqui, Waquar; Islam, Faisal; Rajamani, Mahesh; Nathan, Ryan; Jiles, David; David C Jiles Team; Walter Duffy Collaboration

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for noninvasive brain stimulation that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depressive disorder. To stimulate the brain, TMS uses large, transient pulses of magnetic field to induce an electric field in the head. This transient magnetic field is large enough to cause the depolarization of cortical neurons and initiate a synaptic signal transmission. For this study, 50 unique head models were created from MRI images. Previous simulation studies have primarily used a single head model, and thus give a limited image of the induced electric field from TMS. This study uses finite element analysis simulations on 50 unique, heterogeneous head models to better investigate the relationship between TMS and the electric field induced in brain tissues. Results showed a significant variation in the strength of the induced electric field in the brain, which can be reasonably predicted by the distance from the TMS coil to the stimulated brain. Further, it was seen that some models had high electric field intensities in over five times as much brain volume as other models.

  18. Manual and Electrical Needle Stimulation in Acupuncture Research: Pitfalls and Challenges of Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Schnyer, Rosa; MacPherson, Hugh; Davis, Robert; Harris, Richard E.; Napadow, Vitaly; Wayne, Peter M.; Milley, Ryan J.; Lao, Lixing; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the field of acupuncture research there is an implicit yet unexplored assumption that the evidence on manual and electrical stimulation techniques, derived from basic science studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, is generally interchangeable. Such interchangeability would justify a bidirectional approach to acupuncture research, where basic science studies and clinical trials each inform the other. This article examines the validity of this fundamental assumption by critically reviewing the literature and comparing manual to electrical acupuncture in basic science studies, clinical trials, and meta-analyses. The evidence from this study does not support the assumption that these techniques are interchangeable. This article also identifies endemic methodologic limitations that have impaired progress in the field. For example, basic science studies have not matched the frequency and duration of manual needle stimulation to the frequency and duration of electrical stimulation. Further, most clinical trials purporting to compare the two types of stimulation have instead tested electroacupuncture as an adjunct to manual acupuncture. The current findings reveal fundamental gaps in the understanding of the mechanisms and relative effectiveness of manual versus electrical acupuncture. Finally, future research directions are suggested to better differentiate electrical from manual simulation, and implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25710206

  19. Poisson-process electrical stimulation: circuit and axonal responses.

    PubMed

    Moradmand, K; Goldfinger, M D

    1995-12-01

    This work describes a simple circuit which generated a highly Poisson-like sequence of pulses. Resistor noise was amplified in three series stages followed by rectification through a relatively large shunt resistance. This yielded a sequence of variable-amplitude transients, which were inverted, amplified with DC adjustment, and fed into a Schmitt trigger/multivibrator chip for pulse generation. The pulse generation frequency was modulated by the amplification of the rectified transients. The stochastic characteristics of the output pulse train were Poisson-like over a wide frequency range, as assessed using the intervent interval distribution and expectation density as steady-state and real-time estimators, respectively. In separate tests, the output pulse train was applied to forelimb cutaneous axons of the anesthetized cat; trains of elicited propagating action potentials were recorded extracellularly from individual G1 axons in the cuneate fasciculus. The stochastic properties of the action potential train differed from those of the stimulus, with longer deadtime, lower mean rate, and an early expectation density peak. These physiological responses to circuit output were similar to those elicited by other generators of Poisson-like stimulation. PMID:8788055

  20. Slow Calcium Signals after Tetanic Electrical Stimulation in Skeletal Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Eltit, José M.; Hidalgo, Jorge; Liberona, José L.; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    The fluorescent calcium signal from rat myotubes in culture was monitored after field-stimulation with tetanic protocols. After the calcium signal sensitive to ryanodine and associated to the excitation-contraction coupling, a second long-lasting calcium signal refractory to ryanodine was consistently found. The onset kinetics of this slow signal were slightly modified in nominally calcium-free medium, as were both the frequency and number of pulses during tetanus. No signal was detected in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The participation of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) as the voltage sensor for this signal was assessed by treatment with agonist and antagonist dihydropyridines (Bay K 8644 and nifedipine), showing an enhanced and inhibitory response, respectively. In the dysgenic GLT cell line, which lacks the α1S subunit of the DHPR, the signal was absent. Transfection of these cells with the α1S subunit restored the slow signal. In myotubes, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) mass increase induced by a tetanus protocol preceded in time the slow calcium signal. Both an IP3 receptor blocker and a phospholipase C inhibitor (xestospongin C and U73122, respectively) dramatically inhibit this signal. Long-lasting, IP3-generated slow calcium signals appear to be a physiological response to activity-related fluctuations in membrane potential sensed by the DHPR. PMID:15111418

  1. Cell stimulation and calcium mobilization by picosecond electric pulses

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Kang, Dongkoo; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    We tested if picosecond electric pulses (psEP; 190 kV/cm, 500 ps at 50% height), which are much shorter than channel activation time, can activate voltage-gated (VG) channels. Cytosolic Ca2+ was monitored by Fura-2 ratiometric imaging in GH3 and NG108 cells (which express multiple types of VG calcium channels, VGCC), and in CHO cells (which express no VGCC). Trains of up to 100 psEP at 1 kHz elicited no response in CHO cells. However, even a single psEP significantly increased Ca2+ in both GH3 (by 114+/−48 nM) and NG108 cells (by 6 +/−1.1 nM). Trains of 100 psEP amplified the response to 379+/−33 nM and 719+/−315 nM, respectively. Ca2+ responses peaked within 2–15 s and recovered for over 100 s; they were 80–100% inhibited by verapamil and ω-conotoxin, but not by the substitution of Na+ with N-methyl-D-glucamine. There was no response to psEP in Ca2+-free medium, but adding external Ca2+ even 10 s later evoked Ca2+ response. We conclude that electrical stimuli as short as 500 ps can cause long-lasting opening of VGCC by a mechanism which does not involve conventional electroporation, heating (which was under 0.06 °K per psEP), or membrane depolarization by opening of VG Na+ channels. PMID:26011130

  2. Cell stimulation and calcium mobilization by picosecond electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Kang, Dongkoo; Schoenbach, Karl H; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2015-10-01

    We tested if picosecond electric pulses (psEP; 190 kV/cm, 500 ps at 50% height), which are much shorter than channel activation time, can activate voltage-gated (VG) channels. Cytosolic Ca(2+) was monitored by Fura-2 ratiometric imaging in GH3 and NG108 cells (which express multiple types of VG calcium channels, VGCC), and in CHO cells (which express no VGCC). Trains of up to 100 psEP at 1 kHz elicited no response in CHO cells. However, even a single psEP significantly increased Ca(2+) in both GH3 (by 114 ± 48 nM) and NG108 cells (by 6 ± 1.1 nM). Trains of 100 psEP amplified the response to 379 ± 33 nM and 719 ± 315 nM, respectively. Ca(2+) responses peaked within 2-15s and recovered for over 100 s; they were 80-100% inhibited by verapamil and ω-conotoxin, but not by the substitution of Na(+) with N-methyl-D-glucamine. There was no response to psEP in Ca(2+)-free medium, but adding external Ca(2+) even 10s later evoked Ca(2+) response. We conclude that electrical stimuli as short as 500 ps can cause long-lasting opening of VGCC by a mechanism which does not involve conventional electroporation, heating (which was under 0.06 K per psEP), or membrane depolarization by opening of VG Na(+) channels.

  3. Mandarin Speech Perception in Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Zhang, Guoping; Galvin, John J.; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2014-01-01

    For deaf individuals with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing, combined use of a cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid (HA) typically provides better speech understanding than with either device alone. Because of coarse spectral resolution, CIs do not provide fundamental frequency (F0) information that contributes to understanding of tonal languages such as Mandarin Chinese. The HA can provide good representation of F0 and, depending on the range of aided acoustic hearing, first and second formant (F1 and F2) information. In this study, Mandarin tone, vowel, and consonant recognition in quiet and noise was measured in 12 adult Mandarin-speaking bimodal listeners with the CI-only and with the CI+HA. Tone recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in noise, but not in quiet. Vowel recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in quiet, but not in noise. There was no significant difference in consonant recognition between the CI-only and the CI+HA in quiet or in noise. There was a wide range in bimodal benefit, with improvements often greater than 20 percentage points in some tests and conditions. The bimodal benefit was compared to CI subjects’ HA-aided pure-tone average (PTA) thresholds between 250 and 2000 Hz; subjects were divided into two groups: “better” PTA (<50 dB HL) or “poorer” PTA (>50 dB HL). The bimodal benefit differed significantly between groups only for consonant recognition. The bimodal benefit for tone recognition in quiet was significantly correlated with CI experience, suggesting that bimodal CI users learn to better combine low-frequency spectro-temporal information from acoustic hearing with temporal envelope information from electric hearing. Given the small number of subjects in this study (n = 12), further research with Chinese bimodal listeners may provide more information regarding the contribution of acoustic and electric hearing to tonal language perception. PMID:25386962

  4. EFFECTS OF NEONATAL PARTIAL DEAFNESS AND CHRONIC INTRACOCHLEAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON AUDITORY AND ELECTRICAL RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS IN PRIMARY AUDITORY CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K.; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    The use of cochlear implants in patients with severe hearing losses but residual low-frequency hearing raises questions concerning the effects of chronic intracochlear electrical stimulation(ICES) on cortical responses to auditory and electrical stimuli. We investigated these questions by studying responses to tonal and electrical stimuli in primary auditory cortex (AI) of two groups of neonatally-deafened cats with residual high-threshold, low-frequency hearing. One group were implanted with a multi-channel intracochlear electrode at eight weeks of age, and received chronic ICES for up to nine months before cortical recording. Cats in the other group were implanted immediately prior to cortical recording as adults. In all cats in both groups, multi-neuron responses throughout the rostro-caudal extent of AI had low characteristic frequencies (CFs), in the frequency range of the residual hearing, and high-thresholds. Threshold and minimum latency at CF did not differ between the groups, but in the chronic ICES animals there was a higher proportion of electrically but not acoustically excited recording sites. Electrical response thresholds were higher and latencies shorter in the chronically stimulated animals. Thus, chronic implantation and ICES affected the extent of AI that could be activated by acoustic stimuli and resulted in changes in electrical response characteristics. PMID:19703532

  5. Using evoked EMG as a synthetic force sensor of isometric electrically stimulated muscle.

    PubMed

    Erfanian, A; Chizeck, H J; Hashemi, R M

    1998-02-01

    A method for the estimation of the force generated by electrically stimulated muscle during isometric contraction is developed here. It is based upon measurements of the evoked electromyogram (EMG) [EEMG] signal. Muscle stimulation is provided to the quadriceps muscle of a paralyzed human subject using percutaneous intramuscular electrodes, and EEMG signals are collected using surface electrodes. Through the use of novel signal acquisition and processing techniques, as well as a mathematical model that reflects both the excitation and activation phenomena involved in isometric muscle force generation, accurate prediction of stimulated muscle forces is obtained for large time horizons. This approach yields synthetic muscle force estimates for both unfatigued and fatigued states of the stimulated muscle. In addition, a method is developed that accomplishes automatic recalibration of the model to account for day-to-day changes in pickup electrode mounting as well as other factors contributing to EEMG gain variations. It is demonstrated that the use of the measured EEMG as the input to a predictive model of muscle torque generation is superior to the use of the electrical stimulation signal as the model input. This is because the measured EEMG signal captures all of the neural excitation, whereas stimulation-to-torque models only reflect that portion of the neural excitation that results directly from stimulation. The time-varying properties of the excitation process cannot be captured by existing stimulation-to-torque models, but they are tracked by the EEMG-to-torque models that are developed here. This work represents a promising approach to the real-time estimation of stimulated muscle force in functional neuromuscular stimulation applications.

  6. Short latency vestibular potentials evoked by electrical round window stimulation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bordure, P; Desmadryl, G; Uziel, A; Sans, A

    1989-11-01

    Short-latency potentials evoked by round window electrical stimulation were recorded in guinea pig by means of vertex-pinna skin electrodes using averaging techniques. Constant current shocks of 20 microseconds or 50 microseconds (25-300 microA) were used to evoke both auditory and vestibular brain-stem potentials. Pure auditory potentials, comparable to those evoked by acoustic clicks, were obtained by 20 microseconds electrical stimuli and disappeared during an auditory masking procedure made with a continuous white noise (110 dB SPL). Short latency potentials labeled V1, V2 and V3 were obtained by 50 microseconds electrical stimuli during an auditory masking procedure. This response disappeared after specific vestibular neurectomy, whereas the auditory response evoked by acoustic clicks or by electrical stimulation remained unchanged, suggesting that these latter potentials had a vestibular origin.

  7. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  8. Short latency vestibular potentials evoked by electrical round window stimulation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bordure, P; Desmadryl, G; Uziel, A; Sans, A

    1989-11-01

    Short-latency potentials evoked by round window electrical stimulation were recorded in guinea pig by means of vertex-pinna skin electrodes using averaging techniques. Constant current shocks of 20 microseconds or 50 microseconds (25-300 microA) were used to evoke both auditory and vestibular brain-stem potentials. Pure auditory potentials, comparable to those evoked by acoustic clicks, were obtained by 20 microseconds electrical stimuli and disappeared during an auditory masking procedure made with a continuous white noise (110 dB SPL). Short latency potentials labeled V1, V2 and V3 were obtained by 50 microseconds electrical stimuli during an auditory masking procedure. This response disappeared after specific vestibular neurectomy, whereas the auditory response evoked by acoustic clicks or by electrical stimulation remained unchanged, suggesting that these latter potentials had a vestibular origin. PMID:2479525

  9. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  10. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogi A.

    2015-01-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5–70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1–3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function. PMID:25878155

  11. Electrical Stimulation via a Biocompatible Conductive Polymer Directs Retinal Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Rajiv; Cimetta, Elisa; Tandon, Nina; Zhou, Jing; Langer, Robert; Young, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to simulate in vitro the spontaneous electrical wave activity associated with retinal development and investigate if such biometrically designed signals can enhance differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells (mRPC). To this end, we cultured cells on an electroconductive transplantable polymer, polypyrrole (PPy) and measured gene expression and morphology of the cells. Custom-made 8-well cell culture chambers were designed to accommodate PPy deposited onto indium tin oxide-coated (ITO) glass slides, with precise control of the PPy film thickness. mRPCs were isolated from post-natal day 1 (P1) green fluorescent protein positive (GFP+) mice, expanded, seeded onto PPY films, allowed to adhere for 24 hours, and then subjected to electrical stimulation (100 μA pulse trains, 5 s in duration, once per minute) for 4 days. Cultured cells and non-stimulated controls were processed for immunostaining and confocal analysis, and for RNA extraction and quantitative PCR. Stimulated cells expressed significantly higher levels of the early photoreceptor marker cone-rod homebox (CRX, the earliest known marker of photoreceptor identity), and protein kinase-C (PKC), and significantly lower levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Consistently, stimulated cells developed pronounced neuronal morphologies with significantly longer dendritic processes and larger cell bodies than non-stimulated controls. Taken together, the experimental evidence shows that the application of an electrical stimulation designed based on retinal development can be implemented to direct and enhance retinal differentiation of mRPCs, suggesting a role for biomimetic electrical stimulation in directing progenitor cells toward neural fates. PMID:24110015

  12. Influence of transcutaneous electrical stimulation on heterotopic ossification: an experimental study in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues, resulting in joint mobility deficit and pain. Different treatment modalities have been tried to prevent HO development, but there is no consensus on a therapeutic approach. Since electrical stimulation is a widely used resource in physiotherapy practice to stimulate joint mobility, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, its usefulness for HO treatment was investigated. We aimed to identify the influence of electrical stimulation on induced HO in Wistar rats. Thirty-six male rats (350-390 g) were used, and all animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction, to quantify the serum alkaline phosphatase. HO induction was performed by bone marrow implantation in both quadriceps of the animals, which were then divided into 3 groups: control (CG), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (TG), and functional electrical stimulation (FES) group (FG) with 12 rats each. All animals were anesthetized and electrically stimulated twice per week, for 35 days from induction day. After this period, another blood sample was collected and quadriceps muscles were bilaterally removed for histological and calcium analysis and the rats were killed. Calcium levels in muscles showed significantly lower results when comparing TG and FG (P<0.001) and between TG and CG (P<0.001). Qualitative histological analyses confirmed 100% HO in FG and CG, while in TG the HO was detected in 54.5% of the animals. The effects of the muscle contractions caused by FES increased HO, while anti-inflammatory effects of TENS reduced HO. PMID:26292223

  13. Influence of transcutaneous electrical stimulation on heterotopic ossification: an experimental study in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Zotz, T G G; Paula, J B de

    2015-11-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues, resulting in joint mobility deficit and pain. Different treatment modalities have been tried to prevent HO development, but there is no consensus on a therapeutic approach. Since electrical stimulation is a widely used resource in physiotherapy practice to stimulate joint mobility, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, its usefulness for HO treatment was investigated. We aimed to identify the influence of electrical stimulation on induced HO in Wistar rats. Thirty-six male rats (350-390 g) were used, and all animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction, to quantify the serum alkaline phosphatase. HO induction was performed by bone marrow implantation in both quadriceps of the animals, which were then divided into 3 groups: control (CG), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (TG), and functional electrical stimulation (FES) group (FG) with 12 rats each. All animals were anesthetized and electrically stimulated twice per week, for 35 days from induction day. After this period, another blood sample was collected and quadriceps muscles were bilaterally removed for histological and calcium analysis and the rats were killed. Calcium levels in muscles showed significantly lower results when comparing TG and FG (P<0.001) and between TG and CG (P<0.001). Qualitative histological analyses confirmed 100% HO in FG and CG, while in TG the HO was detected in 54.5% of the animals. The effects of the muscle contractions caused by FES increased HO, while anti-inflammatory effects of TENS reduced HO.

  14. Electrical stimulation accelerates and enhances expression of regeneration-associated genes in regenerating rat femoral motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa

    2004-06-01

    1. In this study we investigated whether electrical stimulation accelerates the upregulation of Talpha1-tubulin and GAP-43 (regeneration-associated genes; RAGs) and the downregulation of the medium-molecular-weight neurofilament (NFM), in concert with stimulation-induced acceleration of BDNF and trkB gene expression and axonal regeneration. 2. Two weeks prior to unilateral femoral nerve transection and suture, fluorogold (Fluorochrome Inc., Denver) or fluororuby (Dextran tetramethylrhodamine, Mol. Probes, D-1817, Eugene, OR) was injected into quadriceps muscles of the left and right hindlimbs to label the femoral motoneuron pools as previously described. Over a period of 7 days, fresh spinal cords were processed for semiquantitation of mRNA by using in situ hybridization. 3. There was an increase in Talpha1-tubulin and GAP-43 mRNA and a decline in the NFM mRNA at 7 days after nerve suture and sham stimulation but not in intact nerves. In contrast, 1-h stimulation of sutured but not intact nerves dramatically accelerated the changes in gene expression: mRNA levels of Talpha1-tubulin and GAP-43 were significantly elevated above control levels by 2 days while NFM mRNA was significantly reduced by 2 days in the sutured nerves. Thereby, the neurofilament/tubulin expression ratio was reduced at 2 days after suture and stimulation, possibly allowing more tubulin to be transported faster into the growing axons to accelerate the elongation rate following stimulation. Importantly, the changes in RAGs and NFM gene expression were delayed relative to the accelerated upregulation of BDNF and trkB mRNA by electrical stimulation. 4. The temporal sequence of upregulation of BDNF and trkB, altered gene expression of RAGs and NFM, and accelerated axonal outgrowth from the proximal nerve stump are consistent with a key role of BDNF and trkB in mediating the altered expression of RAGs and, in turn, the promotion of axonal outgrowth after electrical stimulation.

  15. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  16. Implantable power generation system utilizing muscle contractions excited by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Genta; Hijikata, Wataru; Tomioka, Kota; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2016-06-01

    An implantable power generation system driven by muscle contractions for supplying power to active implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, is proposed. In this system, a muscle is intentionally contracted by an electrical stimulation in accordance with the demands of the active implantable medical device for electrical power. The proposed system, which comprises a small electromagnetic induction generator, electrodes with an electrical circuit for stimulation and a transmission device to convert the linear motion of the muscle contractions into rotational motion for the magneto rotor, generates electrical energy. In an ex vivo demonstration using the gastrocnemius muscle of a toad, which was 28 mm in length and weighed 1.3 g, the electrical energy generated by the prototype exceeded the energy consumed for electrical stimulation, with the net power being 111 µW. It was demonstrated that the proposed implantable power generation system has the potential to replace implantable batteries for active implantable medical devices.

  17. Fast multigrid-based computation of the induced electric field for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2012-12-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), the distribution of the induced electric field, and the affected brain areas, depends on the position of the stimulation coil and the individual geometry of the head and brain. The distribution of the induced electric field in realistic anatomies can be modelled using computational methods. However, existing computational methods for accurately determining the induced electric field in realistic anatomical models have suffered from long computation times, typically in the range of tens of minutes or longer. This paper presents a matrix-free implementation of the finite-element method with a geometric multigrid method that can potentially reduce the computation time to several seconds or less even when using an ordinary computer. The performance of the method is studied by computing the induced electric field in two anatomically realistic models. An idealized two-loop coil is used as the stimulating coil. Multiple computational grid resolutions ranging from 2 to 0.25 mm are used. The results show that, for macroscopic modelling of the electric field in an anatomically realistic model, computational grid resolutions of 1 mm or 2 mm appear to provide good numerical accuracy compared to higher resolutions. The multigrid iteration typically converges in less than ten iterations independent of the grid resolution. Even without parallelization, each iteration takes about 1.0 s or 0.1 s for the 1 and 2 mm resolutions, respectively. This suggests that calculating the electric field with sufficient accuracy in real time is feasible.

  18. Implantable power generation system utilizing muscle contractions excited by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Genta; Hijikata, Wataru; Tomioka, Kota; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2016-06-01

    An implantable power generation system driven by muscle contractions for supplying power to active implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, is proposed. In this system, a muscle is intentionally contracted by an electrical stimulation in accordance with the demands of the active implantable medical device for electrical power. The proposed system, which comprises a small electromagnetic induction generator, electrodes with an electrical circuit for stimulation and a transmission device to convert the linear motion of the muscle contractions into rotational motion for the magneto rotor, generates electrical energy. In an ex vivo demonstration using the gastrocnemius muscle of a toad, which was 28 mm in length and weighed 1.3 g, the electrical energy generated by the prototype exceeded the energy consumed for electrical stimulation, with the net power being 111 µW. It was demonstrated that the proposed implantable power generation system has the potential to replace implantable batteries for active implantable medical devices. PMID:27006422

  19. Successful Treatment of Dercum's Disease by Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinenghi, Sabina; Caretto, Amelia; Losio, Claudio; Scavini, Marina; Bosi, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dercum's disease is a rare condition of painful subcutaneous growth of adipose tissue. Etiology is unknown and pain is difficult to control. We report the case of a 57-year-old man with generalized diffuse Dercum's disease, who improved after the treatment with transcutaneous frequency rhythmic electrical modulation system (FREMS). Treatment consisted in 4 cycles of 30 minutes FREMS sessions over a 6-month period. Measures of efficacy included pain assessment (visual analogue scale, VAS), adipose tissue thickness by magnetic resonance imaging, total body composition and regional fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, physical disability (Barthel index), and health status (Short Form-36 questionnaire). After FREMS treatment the patient's clinical conditions significantly improved, with reduction of pain on the VAS scale from 64 to 17 points, improvement of daily life abilities (the Barthel index increased from 12 to 18) and amelioration of health status (higher scores than baseline in all Short Form-36 domains). Furthermore, we documented a 12 mm reduction in subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness at the abdominal wall and a 7040 g decrease in total body fat mass. FREMS therapy proved to be effective and safe in the treatment of this rare and disabling condition.

  20. Successful Treatment of Dercum's Disease by Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinenghi, Sabina; Caretto, Amelia; Losio, Claudio; Scavini, Marina; Bosi, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dercum's disease is a rare condition of painful subcutaneous growth of adipose tissue. Etiology is unknown and pain is difficult to control. We report the case of a 57-year-old man with generalized diffuse Dercum's disease, who improved after the treatment with transcutaneous frequency rhythmic electrical modulation system (FREMS). Treatment consisted in 4 cycles of 30 minutes FREMS sessions over a 6-month period. Measures of efficacy included pain assessment (visual analogue scale, VAS), adipose tissue thickness by magnetic resonance imaging, total body composition and regional fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, physical disability (Barthel index), and health status (Short Form-36 questionnaire). After FREMS treatment the patient's clinical conditions significantly improved, with reduction of pain on the VAS scale from 64 to 17 points, improvement of daily life abilities (the Barthel index increased from 12 to 18) and amelioration of health status (higher scores than baseline in all Short Form-36 domains). Furthermore, we documented a 12 mm reduction in subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness at the abdominal wall and a 7040 g decrease in total body fat mass. FREMS therapy proved to be effective and safe in the treatment of this rare and disabling condition. PMID:26091459

  1. Effect of stimulation parameters on electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses.

    PubMed

    Tavartkiladze, G A; Potalova, L A; Kruglov, A V; Belov, A

    2000-03-01

    It is evident that the conventional technique for cochlear implant adjustment is not suitable for children in their first years of life. In order to find a solution to this problem, the possibility of electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (EABR) recording was investigated. EABRs were recorded in 9 patients with the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant. The main problems that have to be solved during EABR recording in cochlear implantees are: i) EABR distortion due to the stimulus artefact: and ii) difference in the stimulus presentation rate during EABR registration (low pulse rate) and conventional psychophysical threshold estimation (high pulse rate) in cochlear implant patients. The influence of stimulus artefact on the recording results was minimized by setting the implant to the widest amplifier frequency band and by zeroing the initial segment containing the stimulus artefact with subsequent zero-phase digital filtering. The dependence of the EABR amplitude and latency on the stimulus intensity, width, electrode location and interstimulus interval was investigated. It was concluded that despite the difference revealed between absolute values of EABR thresholds and psychophysical threshold levels, it is possible to calculate implant adjustment parameters based on the EABR data with the proper correction applied. PMID:11603775

  2. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue.

  3. Electrical stimulation of the insular region attenuates nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Abhiram; Hamani, Clement; Yu, Wilson; Shin, Damian S; Kang, Bin; Nobrega, José N; Le Foll, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacological inactivation of the granular insular cortex is able to block nicotine-taking and -seeking behaviors in rats. In this study, we explored the potential of modulating activity in the insular region using electrical stimulation. Animals were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.03 mg/kg per infusion) under a fixed ratio-5 (FR-5) schedule of reinforcement followed by a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Evaluation of the effect of stimulation in the insular region was performed on nicotine self-administration under FR-5 and PR schedules, as well on reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior induced by nicotine-associated cues or nicotine-priming injections. The effect of stimulation was also examined in brain slices containing insular neurons. Stimulation significantly attenuated nicotine-taking, under both schedules of reinforcement, as well as nicotine-seeking behavior induced by cues and priming. These effects appear to be specific to nicotine-associated behaviors, as stimulation did not have any effect on food-taking behavior. They appear to be anatomically specific, as stimulation surrounding the insular region had no effect on behavior. Stimulation of brain slices containing the insular region was found to inactivate insular neurons. Our results suggest that deep brain stimulation to modulate insular activity should be further explored. PMID:23249816

  4. Automatic electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles increases tidal volume and cough peak flow in tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Gollee, H; Hunt, K J; Allan, D B; Fraser, M H; McLean, A N

    2008-01-01

    Paralysis of the respiratory muscles in people with tetraplegia affects their ability to breathe and contributes to respiratory complications. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) of abdominal wall muscles can be used to increase tidal volume (V_{T}) and improve cough peak flow (CPF) in tetraplegic subjects who are able to breathe spontaneously. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel abdominal FES system which generates stimulation automatically, synchronised with the subjects' voluntary breathing activity. Four subjects with complete tetraplegia (C4-C6), breathing spontaneously, were recruited. The automatic stimulation system ensured that consistent stimulation was achieved. We compared spirometry during unassisted and FES-assisted quiet breathing and coughing, and measured the effect of stimulation on end-tidal CO_2 (EtCO_2) during quiet breathing. The system dependably recognised spontaneous respiratory effort, stimulating appropriately, and was well tolerated by patients. Significant increases in V_T during quiet breathing (range 0.05-0.23 L) and in CPF (range 0.04-0.49 L/s) were observed. Respiratory rate during quiet breathing decreased in all subjects when stimulated, whereas minute ventilation increased by 1.05-2.07 L/min. The changes in EtCO_2 were inconclusive. The automatic stimulation system augmented spontaneous breathing and coughing in tetraplegic patients and may provide a potential means of respiratory support for tetraplegic patients with reduced respiratory capacity.

  5. Aligned Nanofibers from Polypyrrole/Graphene as Electrodes for Regeneration of Optic Nerve via Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lu; Zhao, Bingxin; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, Xuan; Zeng, Chao; Shi, Haiyan; Xu, Xiaoxue; Lin, Tong; Dai, Liming; Liu, Yong

    2016-03-23

    The damage of optic nerve will cause permanent visual field loss and irreversible ocular diseases, such as glaucoma. The damage of optic nerve is mainly derived from the atrophy, apoptosis or death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Though some progress has been achieved on electronic retinal implants that can electrically stimulate undamaged parts of RGCs or retina to transfer signals, stimulated self-repair/regeneration of RGCs has not been realized yet. The key challenge for development of electrically stimulated regeneration of RGCs is the selection of stimulation electrodes with a sufficient safe charge injection limit (Q(inj), i.e., electrochemical capacitance). Most traditional electrodes tend to have low Q(inj) values. Herein, we synthesized polypyrrole functionalized graphene (PPy-G) via a facile but efficient polymerization-enhanced ball milling method for the first time. This technique could not only efficiently introduce electron-acceptor nitrogen to enhance capacitance, but also remain a conductive platform-the π-π conjugated carbon plane for charge transportation. PPy-G based aligned nanofibers were subsequently fabricated for guided growth and electrical stimulation (ES) of RGCs. Significantly enhanced viability, neurite outgrowth and antiaging ability of RGCs were observed after ES, suggesting possibilities for regeneration of optic nerve via ES on the suitable nanoelectrodes. PMID:26926578

  6. [Morphologic basis for electric stimulation therapy of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles].

    PubMed

    Chomiak, J

    1993-01-01

    Based on knowledge of the pattern of motorend plates in the m. vastus medialis (VM) and lateralis (VL), the author investigated the electrically most excitable sites which can be used in standard procedures of transcutaneous electric stimulation in muscular hypotrophy. The investigation was made in 21 patients, most of them after a reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and one healthy adult. For stimulation and recording of potentials the EMG device Neuromatic 2000 C (Dantec, Scovlunde, Denmark) was used. First by means of a needle electrode the zone of motorend plates was verified. Then the minimal intensities causing muscular contraction and equal amplitude were compared during stimulation of the zone of motorend plates and 2.5 proximal and distal from the zone. The potentials were recorded by means of surface electrodes from distal portions of the muscle bellies. In five patients automatic RTI 50 analysis according to Brismar was used as well as monopolar stimulation where the cathode was placed at different sites above the muscle belly and the anode above the proximal margin of the muscle. The results of evaluation of minimal stimulation intensities of both muscles revealed significantly lowest values during stimulation of the zone of motorend plates (mean VM 8.5 mA, VL 9.9 mA) followed by intensities on stimulation proximally from the zone (VM 18.2 mA, VL 17.5 mA) and the highest intensities were recorded on stimulation of the distal part of the muscle (VM 21.2 mA, VL 25.8 mA). Similarly the results of RTI 50 analysis and monopolar stimulation provide evidence of maximal excitability in the area of the motorend plate zone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Self directed home based electrical muscle stimulation training improves exercise tolerance and strength in healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Brian; Prendergast, Ann; Rainsford, Gary; Minogue, Conor

    2013-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with a gradual decline in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and subsequent capacity for activities of daily living. It is important that we develop effective strategies to halt this process of gradual decline in order to enhance functional ability and capacity for independent living. To achieve this, we must overcome the challenge of sustaining ongoing engagement in physical exercise programmes in the sedentary elderly population, particularly those who experience barriers to exercise participation. Recent developments in electrical muscle stimulation technology could provide a potential solution. In this pilot case-control study we investigated the effects of a self-directed home based programme of electrical muscle stimulation training on muscle strength and exercise tolerance in a group of 16 healthy elderly volunteers (10f, 6m). Study participants completed 30 separate 1-hour electrical muscle stimulation sessions at home over a 6-week period. We observed significant improvements in quadriceps muscle strength and 6-minute walk distance, suggesting that this form of electrical muscle stimulation training has promise as an exercise modality in the elderly population.

  8. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  9. 42 CFR 414.232 - Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS). 414.232 Section 414.232 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for...

  10. Intensity discrimination as a function of stimulus level with electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D A; Schmitz, J L; Donaldson, G S; Viemeister, N F; Javel, E

    1996-10-01

    Difference limens (DLs) for changes in electric current were measured from multiple electrodes in each of eight cochlear-implanted subjects. Stimuli were 200-microseconds/phase biphasic pulse trains delivered at 125 Hz in 300-ms bursts. DLs were measured with an adaptive three-alternative forced-choice procedure. Fixed-level psychometric functions were also obtained in four subjects to validate the adaptive DLs. Relative intensity DLs, specified as Weber fractions in decibels [10 log (delta I/I)] for standards above absolute threshold, decreased as a power function of stimulus intensity relative to absolute threshold [delta I/I = beta (I/I0) alpha] in the same manner as Weber fractions for normal acoustic stimulation reported in previous studies. Exponents (alpha) of the power function for electric stimulation ranged from -0.4 to -3.2, on average, an order of magnitude larger than exponents for acoustic stimulation, which range from -0.07 to -0.11. Normalization of stimulus intensity to the dynamic range of hearing resulted in Weber functions with similar negative slopes for electric and acoustic stimulation, corresponding to an 8-dB average improvement in Weber fractions across the dynamic range. Sensitivity to intensity change ¿10 log beta¿ varied from -0.42 to -13.5 dB compared to +0.60 to -3.34 dB for acoustic stimulation, but on average was better with electric stimulation than with acoustic stimulation. Psychometric functions for intensity discrimination yielded Weber fractions consistent with adaptive procedures and d' was a linear function of delta I. Variability among repeated Weber-fraction estimates was constant across dynamic range. Relatively constant Weber fractions across all or part of the dynamic range, observed in some subjects, were traced to the intensity resolution limits of individual implanted receiver/stimulators. DLs could not be accurately described by constant amplitude changes, expressed as a percentage of dynamic range ¿delta A(% DR

  11. A preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in vivo in rat.

    PubMed

    Baig-Silva, M S; Hathcock, C D; Hetling, J R

    2005-03-01

    A remaining challenge to the development of electronic prostheses for vision is improving the effectiveness of retinal stimulation. Electrode design and stimulus parameters need to be optimized such that the neural output from the retina conveys information to the mind's eye that aids the patient in interpreting his or her environment. This optimization will require a detailed understanding of the response of the retina to electrical stimulation. The identity and response characteristics of the cellular targets of stimulation need to be defined and evaluated. Described here is an in vivo preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in rat at the cellular level. The use of rat makes available a number of well-described models of retinal disease that motivate prosthesis development. Artificial stimulation can be investigated by adapting techniques traditionally employed to study the response of the retina to photic stimuli, such as recording at the cornea, single-cell recording, and pharmacological dissection of the response. Pilot studies include amplitude-intensity response data for subretinal and transretinal stimulation paradigms recorded in wild-type rats and a transgenic rat model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The ability to record single-unit ganglion cell activity in vivo is also demonstrated.

  12. Repeated electrical stimulation of reward-related brain regions affects cocaine but not "natural" reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dino; Shabat-Simon, Maytal; Shalev, Uri; Barnea-Ygael, Noam; Cooper, Ayelet; Zangen, Abraham

    2007-12-19

    Drug addiction is associated with long-lasting neuronal adaptations including alterations in dopamine and glutamate receptors in the brain reward system. Treatment strategies for cocaine addiction and especially the prevention of craving and relapse are limited, and their effectiveness is still questionable. We hypothesized that repeated stimulation of the brain reward system can induce localized neuronal adaptations that may either potentiate or reduce addictive behaviors. The present study was designed to test how repeated interference with the brain reward system using localized electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle at the lateral hypothalamus (LH) or the prefrontal cortex (PFC) affects cocaine addiction-associated behaviors and some of the neuronal adaptations induced by repeated exposure to cocaine. Repeated high-frequency stimulation in either site influenced cocaine, but not sucrose reward-related behaviors. Stimulation of the LH reduced cue-induced seeking behavior, whereas stimulation of the PFC reduced both cocaine-seeking behavior and the motivation for its consumption. The behavioral findings were accompanied by glutamate receptor subtype alterations in the nucleus accumbens and the ventral tegmental area, both key structures of the reward system. It is therefore suggested that repeated electrical stimulation of the PFC can become a novel strategy for treating addiction. PMID:18094257

  13. Cell-stimulation therapy of lateral epicondylitis with frequency-modulated low-intensity electric current.

    PubMed

    Aliyev, R M; Geiger, G

    2012-03-01

    In addition to the routine therapy, the patients with lateral epicondylitis included into experimental group were subjected to a 12-week cell-stimulation therapy with low-intensity frequency-modulated electric current. The control group received the same routine therapy and sham stimulation (the therapeutic apparatus was not energized). The efficiency of this microcurrent therapy was estimated by comparing medical indices before therapy and at the end of a 12-week therapeutic course using a 10-point pain severity numeric rating scale (NRS) and Roles-Maudsley pain score. The study revealed high therapeutic efficiency of cell-stimulation with low-intensity electric current resulting probably from up-regulation of intracellular transmitters, interleukins, and prostaglandins playing the key role in the regulation of inflammation.

  14. Seizures induced by direct electrical cortical stimulation--Mechanisms and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Stjepana; Kahane, Philippe; Diehl, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Direct electrical cortical stimulation (CS) is widely used to map eloquent cortex. It can be applied extraoperatively in patients undergoing intracranial EEG recordings using chronically implanted electrodes (subdural, depth or a combination), or it can be used intraoperatively. Seizures can be induced by CS but there is controversy regarding the utility of CS induced seizures in defining the epileptogenic zone and hence practice varies considerably between centres. Some centres use seizures induced by direct CS routinely to aid in defining the epileptogenic zone. In contrast, others do not rely on such information and explicitly avoid stimulating seizures during cortical mapping. Intra- and extraoperative techniques have been used to stimulate seizures with varying results, which may in part reflect these methodological differences. We here aim to review current views, definitions and studies on seizures induced by direct electrical CS. In addition we discuss mechanisms and methodological considerations of this procedure. PMID:25613034

  15. [Real-time Gait Training System with Embedded Functional Electrical Stimulation].

    PubMed

    Gu, Linyan; Ruan, Zhaomin; Jia, Guifeng; Xla, Jing; Qiu, Lijian; Wu, Changwang; Jin, Xiaoqing; Ning, Gangmin

    2015-07-01

    To solve the problem that mostly gait analysis is independent from the treatment, this work proposes a system that integrates the functions of gait training and assessment for foot drop treatment. The system uses a set of sensors to collect gait parameters and designes multi-mode functional electrical stimulators as actuator. Body area network technology is introduced to coordinate the data communication and execution of the sensors and stimulators, synchronize the gait analysis and foot drop treatment. Bluetooth 4.0 is applied to low the power consumption of the system. The system realizes the synchronization of treatment and gait analysis. It is able to acquire and analyze the dynamic parameters of ankle, knee and hip in real-time, and treat patients by guiding functional electrical stimulation delivery to the specific body locations of patients. PMID:26665943

  16. The effects of bilateral electric and bimodal electric--acoustic stimulation on language development.

    PubMed

    Nittrouer, Susan; Chapman, Christopher

    2009-09-01

    There is no doubt that cochlear implants have improved the spoken language abilities of children with hearing loss, but delays persist. Consequently, it is imperative that new treatment options be explored. This study evaluated one aspect of treatment that might be modified, that having to do with bilateral implants and bimodal stimulation. A total of 58 children with at least one implant were tested at 42 months of age on four language measures spanning a continuum from basic to generative in nature. When children were grouped by the kind of stimulation they had at 42 months (one implant, bilateral implants, or bimodal stimulation), no differences across groups were observed. This was true even when groups were constrained to only children who had at least 12 months to acclimatize to their stimulation configuration. However, when children were grouped according to whether or not they had spent any time with bimodal stimulation (either consistently since their first implant or as an interlude to receiving a second) advantages were found for children who had some bimodal experience, but those advantages were restricted to language abilities that are generative in nature. Thus, previously reported benefits of simultaneous bilateral implantation early in a child's life may not extend to generative language. In fact, children may benefit from a period of bimodal stimulation early in childhood because low-frequency speech signals provide prosody and serve as an aid in learning how to perceptually organize the signal that is received through a cochlear implant. PMID:19713210

  17. The effects of bilateral electric and bimodal electric--acoustic stimulation on language development.

    PubMed

    Nittrouer, Susan; Chapman, Christopher

    2009-09-01

    There is no doubt that cochlear implants have improved the spoken language abilities of children with hearing loss, but delays persist. Consequently, it is imperative that new treatment options be explored. This study evaluated one aspect of treatment that might be modified, that having to do with bilateral implants and bimodal stimulation. A total of 58 children with at least one implant were tested at 42 months of age on four language measures spanning a continuum from basic to generative in nature. When children were grouped by the kind of stimulation they had at 42 months (one implant, bilateral implants, or bimodal stimulation), no differences across groups were observed. This was true even when groups were constrained to only children who had at least 12 months to acclimatize to their stimulation configuration. However, when children were grouped according to whether or not they had spent any time with bimodal stimulation (either consistently since their first implant or as an interlude to receiving a second) advantages were found for children who had some bimodal experience, but those advantages were restricted to language abilities that are generative in nature. Thus, previously reported benefits of simultaneous bilateral implantation early in a child's life may not extend to generative language. In fact, children may benefit from a period of bimodal stimulation early in childhood because low-frequency speech signals provide prosody and serve as an aid in learning how to perceptually organize the signal that is received through a cochlear implant.

  18. Neuromechanism Study of Insect–Machine Interface: Flight Control by Neural Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A.; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect–machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee–machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control. PMID:25409523

  19. Cerebellar and Spinal Direct Current Stimulation in Children: Computational Modeling of the Induced Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Priori, Alberto; Parazzini, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the specific application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum can modulate cerebellar activity. In parallel, transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) was found to be able to modulate conduction along the spinal cord and spinal cord functions. Of particular interest is the possible use of these techniques in pediatric age, since many pathologies and injuries, which affect the cerebellar cortex as well as spinal cord circuits, are diffuse in adults as well as in children. Up to now, experimental studies of cerebellar and spinal DC stimulation on children are completely missing and therefore there is a lack of information about the safety of this technique as well as the appropriate dose to be used during the treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of electric quantities induced into the cerebellum and over the spinal cord during cerebellar tDCS and tsDCS, respectively, is required. This work attempts to address this issue by estimating through computational techniques, the electric field distributions induced in the target tissues during the two stimulation techniques applied to different models of children of various ages and gender. In detail, we used four voxel child models, aged between 5- and 8-years. Results revealed that, despite inter-individual differences, the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS, whereas the electric field generated by tsDCS can reach the spinal cord also in children. Moreover, it was found that there is a considerable spread toward the anterior area of the cerebellum and the brainstem region for cerebellar tDCS and in the spinal nerve for spinal direct current stimulation. Our study therefore predicts that the electric field spreads in complex patterns that strongly depend on individual anatomy, thus giving further insight into safety issues and informing data for pediatric investigations of these stimulation techniques. PMID:27799905

  20. Neuromechanism study of insect-machine interface: flight control by neural electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect-machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee-machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control. PMID:25409523

  1. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain increases heart rate and arterial blood pressure in awake humans

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Judith M; Aziz, Tipu; Schlugman, David; Paterson, David J

    2002-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus, basal ganglia or pedunculopontine nucleus in decorticate animals results in locomotion and a cardiorespiratory response resembling that seen during exercise. This has led to the hypothesis that parallel activation of cardiorespiratory and locomotor systems from the midbrain could form part of the ‘central command’ mechanism of exercise. However, the degree to which subcortical structures play a role in cardiovascular activation in awake humans has not been established. We studied the effects on heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of electrically stimulating the thalamus and basal ganglia in awake humans undergoing neurosurgery for movement disorders (n = 13 Parkinson's disease, n = 1 myoclonic dystonia, n = 1 spasmodic torticollis). HR and MAP increased during high frequency (> 90 Hz) electrical stimulation of the thalamus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 4 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.05, n = 9), subthalamic nucleus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 5 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.006, n = 8) or substantia nigra (HR 6 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.001, MAP 5 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005, n = 8). This was accompanied by the facilitation of movement, but without the movement itself. Stimulation of the internal globus pallidus did not increase cardiovascular variables but did facilitate movement. Low frequency (< 20 Hz) stimulation of any site did not affect cardiovascular variables or movement. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain in awake humans can cause a modest increase in cardiovascular variables that is not dependent on movement feedback from exercising muscles. The relationship between this type of response and that occurring during actual exercise is unclear, but it indicates that subcortical command could be involved in ‘parallel activation’ of the locomotor and cardiovascular systems and thus contribute to the neurocircuitry of ‘central command’. PMID:11882692

  2. Neuro-fuzzy decoding of sensory information from ensembles of simultaneously recorded dorsal root ganglion neurons for functional electrical stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigosa, J.; Weber, D. J.; Prochazka, A.; Stein, R. B.; Micera, S.

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is used to improve motor function after injury to the central nervous system. Some FES systems use artificial sensors to switch between finite control states. To optimize FES control of the complex behavior of the musculo-skeletal system in activities of daily life, it is highly desirable to implement feedback control. In theory, sensory neural signals could provide the required control signals. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of deriving limb-state estimates from the firing rates of primary afferent neurons recorded in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These studies used multiple linear regression (MLR) methods to generate estimates of limb position and velocity based on a weighted sum of firing rates in an ensemble of simultaneously recorded DRG neurons. The aim of this study was to test whether the use of a neuro-fuzzy (NF) algorithm (the generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks (GD-FNN)) could improve the performance, robustness and ability to generalize from training to test sets compared to the MLR technique. NF and MLR decoding methods were applied to ensemble DRG recordings obtained during passive and active limb movements in anesthetized and freely moving cats. The GD-FNN model provided more accurate estimates of limb state and generalized better to novel movement patterns. Future efforts will focus on implementing these neural recording and decoding methods in real time to provide closed-loop control of FES using the information extracted from sensory neurons.

  3. Low frequency chronic electrical stimulation of normal and dystrophic chicken muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, E A; Barnard, P J; Jarvis, J C; Lai, J

    1986-01-01

    The fast-twitch posterior latissimus dorsi muscle of normal and genetically dystrophic chickens was subjected to continuous indirect electrical stimulation at 10 Hz for periods of 4-8 weeks. To sustain this in vivo nerve stimulation an internally implantable miniature stimulator device was designed. This regime of stimulation caused complete fatigue of the normal muscle within 5 min of its initiation. The dystrophic muscles maintained a very small degree of contractile activity during this initial phase. Tangible twitching of the muscle returned in 5 week birds between 3 and 5 days and in 10 week birds between 11 and 16 days after implantation. After 4 weeks of stimulation, no significant change was measured in the time-to-peak of the isometric twitch response, nor in the half-relaxation time. The resistance to fatigue was significantly increased in the stimulated muscles when tested with a series of tetani at 40 Hz. The mean fibre area was decreased, in all muscles stimulated for longer than 3 weeks, in comparison to their contralateral controls, except where fibre splitting in dystrophic birds abnormally reduced the control value. The majority fibre type of the muscle was changed from type IIB to IIA. The histochemical reactions for both NADH-linked oxidation and phosphorylase were distinctly increased in the stimulated muscles. In normal muscle, stimulation increased somewhat the number of nuclei per unit area and changed their intracellular distribution, so that a greater proportion was found adjacent to the sarcolemma. The normal posterior latissimus dorsi muscle responded to chronic stimulation with increases of 3-6-fold in its acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The maximum change in AChE occurred after 2 weeks stimulation; a steady level, 3 times that of the control unstimulated muscle, persisted at later times. Chronic stimulation suppressed the over-production of AChE that is characteristic of dystrophic chicken fast-twitch muscle, to attain a level

  4. Playing the electric light orchestra—how electrical stimulation of visual cortex elucidates the neural basis of perception

    PubMed Central

    Cicmil, Nela; Krug, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Vision research has the potential to reveal fundamental mechanisms underlying sensory experience. Causal experimental approaches, such as electrical microstimulation, provide a unique opportunity to test the direct contributions of visual cortical neurons to perception and behaviour. But in spite of their importance, causal methods constitute a minority of the experiments used to investigate the visual cortex to date. We reconsider the function and organization of visual cortex according to results obtained from stimulation techniques, with a special emphasis on electrical stimulation of small groups of cells in awake subjects who can report their visual experience. We compare findings from humans and monkeys, striate and extrastriate cortex, and superficial versus deep cortical layers, and identify a number of revealing gaps in the ‘causal map′ of visual cortex. Integrating results from different methods and species, we provide a critical overview of the ways in which causal approaches have been used to further our understanding of circuitry, plasticity and information integration in visual cortex. Electrical stimulation not only elucidates the contributions of different visual areas to perception, but also contributes to our understanding of neuronal mechanisms underlying memory, attention and decision-making. PMID:26240421

  5. Playing the electric light orchestra--how electrical stimulation of visual cortex elucidates the neural basis of perception.

    PubMed

    Cicmil, Nela; Krug, Kristine

    2015-09-19

    Vision research has the potential to reveal fundamental mechanisms underlying sensory experience. Causal experimental approaches, such as electrical microstimulation, provide a unique opportunity to test the direct contributions of visual cortical neurons to perception and behaviour. But in spite of their importance, causal methods constitute a minority of the experiments used to investigate the visual cortex to date. We reconsider the function and organization of visual cortex according to results obtained from stimulation techniques, with a special emphasis on electrical stimulation of small groups of cells in awake subjects who can report their visual experience. We compare findings from humans and monkeys, striate and extrastriate cortex, and superficial versus deep cortical layers, and identify a number of revealing gaps in the 'causal map' of visual cortex. Integrating results from different methods and species, we provide a critical overview of the ways in which causal approaches have been used to further our understanding of circuitry, plasticity and information integration in visual cortex. Electrical stimulation not only elucidates the contributions of different visual areas to perception, but also contributes to our understanding of neuronal mechanisms underlying memory, attention and decision-making.

  6. Myoneural necrosis following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the cast-immobilized rabbit hindlimb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friden, J.; Lieber, R. L.; Myers, R. R.; Powell, H. C.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The morphological and physiological effects of 4 weeks of high-frequency electrical stimulation (1 h/day, 5 days/week) on cast-immobilized rabbit hindlimbs were investigated in the tibialis anterior muscle and peroneal nerve. In 2 out of 6 animals, high-frequency stimulation with immobilization caused muscle fiber death, internalization of muscle fiber nuclei, connective tissue proliferation, inflammatory response, altered fiber size distribution and variable staining intensities. The fast-twitch fibers were predominantly affected. Two of six peripheral nerves subjected to immobilization and stimulation showed severe damage. Tetanic forces were significantly reduced in the affected muscles. Therefore, the immobilization and high-frequency stimulation may be detrimental to myoneural structure and function and, thus, this combination of therapies should be applied conservatively.

  7. Technique of electrical stimulation of the vestibular analyzer under clinical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khechinashvili, S. N.; Zargaryan, B. M.; Karakozov, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular reactions appear under the action of direct current (dc) on the labyrinth of man and animals. A decrease of the stimulation effect of dc on the extralabyrinthine nervous formations in the suggested method is achieved by the use of electric pulses with steep front and back parts, as well as by previous anesthetization of the skin in the electrode application area by means of novocain solution electrophoresis. For this purpose a pulse producer giving trapezoid pulses with smoothly changing fronts and duration was constructed. With the help of an interrupter it is possible to stop the current increase instantly, and stimulation is performed at the level of the pulse 'plateau'. To induce vestibular reactions under monopolar stimulation, it is necessary to apply the current twice as high as that with bipolar electrode position. The use of short pulses with steep front and back parts for electrode stimulation of the vestibular analyzer is considered to be inexpedient.

  8. Electrical stimulation of dog pudendal nerve regulates the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yan-he; Liao, Li-min

    2016-01-01

    Pudendal nerve plays an important role in urine storage and voiding. Our hypothesis is that a neuroprosthetic device placed in the pudendal nerve trunk can modulate bladder function after suprasacral spinal cord injury. We had confirmed the inhibitory pudendal-to-bladder reflex by stimulating either the branch or the trunk of the pudendal nerve. This study explored the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex in beagle dogs, with intact or injured spinal cord, by electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk. The optimal stimulation frequency was approximately 15–25 Hz. This excitatory effect was dependent to some extent on the bladder volume. We conclude that stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk is a promising method to modulate bladder function. PMID:27212934

  9. Effects of Sensitive Electrical Stimulation Based Cueing in Parkinson’s Disease: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sijobert, Benoît; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Andreu, David; Verna, Claudia; Geny, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of a sensitive cueing on Freezing of Gait (FOG) and gait disorders in subjects suffering from Parkinson’s disease (PD). 13 participants with Parkinson’s disease were equipped with an electrical stimulator and a foot mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU). An IMU based algorithm triggered in real time an electrical stimulus applied on the arch of foot at heel off detection. Starting from standing, subjects were asked to walk at their preferred speed on a path comprising 5m straight, u-turn and walk around tasks. Cueing globally decreased the time to achieve the different tasks in all the subjects. In “freezer” subjects, the time to complete the entire path was reduced by 19%. FOG events occurrence was lowered by 12% compared to baseline before and after cueing. This preliminary work showed a positive global effect of an electrical stimulation based cueing on gait and FOG in PD. PMID:27478565

  10. Effects of Sensitive Electrical Stimulation Based Cueing in Parkinson's Disease: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Sijobert, Benoît; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Andreu, David; Verna, Claudia; Geny, Christian

    2016-06-13

    This study aims to investigate the effect of a sensitive cueing on Freezing of Gait (FOG) and gait disorders in subjects suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). 13 participants with Parkinson's disease were equipped with an electrical stimulator and a foot mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU). An IMU based algorithm triggered in real time an electrical stimulus applied on the arch of foot at heel off detection. Starting from standing, subjects were asked to walk at their preferred speed on a path comprising 5m straight, u-turn and walk around tasks. Cueing globally decreased the time to achieve the different tasks in all the subjects. In "freezer" subjects, the time to complete the entire path was reduced by 19%. FOG events occurrence was lowered by 12% compared to baseline before and after cueing. This preliminary work showed a positive global effect of an electrical stimulation based cueing on gait and FOG in PD. PMID:27478565

  11. Application of electrical stimulation for functional tissue engineering in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Milica (Inventor); Park, Hyoungshin (Inventor); Langer, Robert (Inventor); Freed, Lisa (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides new methods for the in vitro preparation of bioartificial tissue equivalents and their enhanced integration after implantation in vivo. These methods include submitting a tissue construct to a biomimetic electrical stimulation during cultivation in vitro to improve its structural and functional properties, and/or in vivo, after implantation of the construct, to enhance its integration with host tissue and increase cell survival and functionality. The inventive methods are particularly useful for the production of bioartificial equivalents and/or the repair and replacement of native tissues that contain electrically excitable cells and are subject to electrical stimulation in vivo, such as, for example, cardiac muscle tissue, striated skeletal muscle tissue, smooth muscle tissue, bone, vasculature, and nerve tissue.

  12. Purinergic 2 receptor blockade prevents the responses of group IV afferents to post-contraction circulatory occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, Angela E; Hayes, Shawn G; Kaufman, Marc P

    2007-01-01

    ATP, by activating purinergic 2 (P2) receptors on group III and IV afferents, is thought to evoke the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. Previously we have shown that injection of PPADS, a P2 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of skeletal muscle of decerebrated cats attenuated the responses of group III and IV afferents to static contraction while the muscles were freely perfused. We have now tested the hypothesis that injection of PPADS (10 mg kg−1) attenuated the responses of group III (n = 13) and group IV afferents (n = 9) to post-contraction circulatory occlusion. In the present study, we found that PPADS attenuated the group III afferent responses to static contraction during circulatory occlusion (P < 0.05). Likewise, PPADS abolished the group IV afferent responses to static contraction during occlusion (P = 0.001). During a 1 minute period of post-contraction circulatory occlusion, four of the 13 group III afferents and eight of the nine group IV afferents maintained their increased discharge. A Fischer's exact probability test revealed that more group IV afferents than group III afferents were stimulated by post-contraction circulatory occlusion (P < 0.02). In addition, the nine group IV afferents increased their mean discharge rate over baseline levels during the post-contraction circulatory occlusion period, whereas the 13 group III afferents did not (P < 0.05). PPADS abolished this post-contraction increase in discharge by the group IV afferents (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that P2 receptors on group IV afferents play a role in evoking the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:17038431

  13. Coding of stimuli by ampullary afferents in Gnathonemus petersii.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, J; Gertz, S; Goulet, J; Schuh, A; von der Emde, G

    2010-10-01

    Weakly electric fish use electroreception for both active and passive electrolocation and for electrocommunication. While both active and passive electrolocation systems are prominent in weakly electric Mormyriform fishes, knowledge of their passive electrolocation ability is still scarce. To better estimate the contribution of passive electric sensing to the orientation toward electric stimuli in weakly electric fishes, we investigated frequency tuning applying classical input-output characterization and stimulus reconstruction methods to reveal the encoding capabilities of ampullary receptor afferents. Ampullary receptor afferents were most sensitive (threshold: 40 μV/cm) at low frequencies (<10 Hz) and appear to be tuned to a mix of amplitude and slope of the input signals. The low-frequency tuning was corroborated by behavioral experiments, but behavioral thresholds were one order of magnitude higher. The integration of simultaneously recorded afferents of similar frequency-tuning resulted in strongly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios and increased mutual information rates but did not increase the range of frequencies detectable by the system. Theoretically the neuronal integration of input from receptors experiencing opposite polarities of a stimulus (left and right side of the fish) was shown to enhance encoding of such stimuli, including an increase of bandwidth. Covariance and coherence analysis showed that spiking of ampullary afferents is sufficiently explained by the spike-triggered average, i.e., receptors respond to a single linear feature of the stimulus. Our data support the notion of a division of labor of the active and passive electrosensory systems in weakly electric fishes based on frequency tuning. Future experiments will address the role of central convergence of ampullary input that we expect to lead to higher sensitivity and encoding power of the system. PMID:20685928

  14. Oligosynaptic inhibition of group I afferents between the brachioradialis and flexor carpi radialis in humans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Hayashi, Masahiro; Shinozaki, Katsuhiro; Nito, Mitsuhiro; Hashizume, Wataru; Miyasaka, Takuji; Shindo, Masaomi; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Spinal reflex arcs mediated by low threshold afferents between the brachioradialis (BR) and flexor carpi radialis (FCR) were studied in eleven healthy human subjects using a post-stimulus time-histogram method. Electrical conditioning stimuli (ES) to the radial nerve branch innervating BR with the intensity below the motor threshold (MT) induced an early and significant trough (inhibition) in 32/85 FCR motor units (MUs) in 9/9 subjects. Such inhibition was never provoked by cutaneous stimulation. The central synaptic delay (CSD) of the inhibition was approximately 1.1ms longer than that of the homonymous FCR facilitation. ES to the median nerve branch innervating FCR with the intensity below MT induced an inhibition in 27/71 BR-MUs in 10/10 subjects. CSD of the inhibition was about 1.1ms longer than that of the homonymous BR facilitation. These findings suggest that inhibition between BR and FCR exists in humans. Group I afferents seem to mediate the inhibition through an oligo(di or tri)-synaptic path. PMID:26996830

  15. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Idaira; Wanat, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review, we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders. PMID:27014097

  16. Changes in monkey horizontal semicircular canal afferent responses after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.; Perachio, A. A.; Dickman, J. D.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.; Sirota, M. G.; Iakushin, S. B.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular responses from single horizontal semicircular canal afferents in two rhesus monkeys were studied after recovery from a 14-day biosatellite (Cosmos 2044) orbital spaceflight. On the 1st postflight day, the mean gain for 9 different horizontal canal afferents, tested using one or several different passive yaw rotation waveforms, was nearly twice that for 20 horizontal canal afferents similarly tested during preflight and postflight control studies. Adaptation of the afferent response to passive yaw rotation on the 1st postflight day was also greater. These results suggest that at least one component of the vestibular end organ (the semicircular canals) is transiently modified after exposure to 14 days of microgravity. It is unclear whether the changes are secondary to other effects of microgravity, such as calcium loss, or an adaptive response. If the response is adaptive, then this report is the first evidence that the response of the vestibular end organ may be modified (presumably by the central nervous system via efferent connections) after prolonged unusual vestibular stimulation. If this is the case, the sites of plasticity of vestibular responses may not be exclusively within central nervous system vestibular structures, as previously believed.

  17. Electrical stimulation of dorsal root entry zone attenuates wide-dynamic range neuronal activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Zhang, Chen; Xu, Qian; Tiwari, Vinod; He, Shao-Qiu; Wang, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P.; Wacnik, Paul W.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Guan, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent clinical studies suggest that neurostimulation at the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) may alleviate neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms of action for this therapeutic effect are unclear. Here, we examined whether DREZ stimulation inhibits spinal wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neuronal activity in nerve-injured rats. Materials and Methods We conducted in vivo extracellular single-unit recordings of WDR neurons in rats after an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) or sham surgery. We set bipolar electrical stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 5 min) of the DREZ at the intensity that activated only Aα/β-fibers by measuring the lowest current at which DREZ stimulation evoked a peak antidromic sciatic Aα/β-compound action potential without inducing an Aδ/C-compound action potential (i.e., Ab1). Results The elevated spontaneous activity rate of WDR neurons in SNL rats [n=25; data combined from day 14–16 (n = 15) and day 45–75 post-SNL groups (n=10)] was significantly decreased from the pre-stimulation level (p<0.01) at 0–15 min and 30–45 min post-stimulation. In both sham-operated (n=8) and nerve-injured rats, DREZ stimulation attenuated the C-component, but not A-component, of the WDR neuronal response to graded intracutaneous electrical stimuli (0.1–10 mA, 2 ms) applied to the skin receptive field. Further, DREZ stimulation blocked windup (a short form of neuronal sensitization) to repetitive noxious stimuli (0.5 Hz) at 0–15 min in all groups (p<0.05). Conclusions Attenuation of WDR neuronal activity may contribute to DREZ stimulation-induced analgesia. This finding supports the notion that DREZ may be a useful target for neuromodulatory control of pain. PMID:25308522

  18. Development of network-based multichannel neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hongen; Xie, Yongji; Liu, Xiaoxuan; He, Xin; Hao, Manzhao; Bao, Yong; Xie, Qing; Lan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a promising assistive technology for stroke rehabilitation. Here we present the design and development of a multimuscle stimulation system as an emerging therapy for people with paretic stroke. A network-based multichannel NMES system was integrated based on dual bus architecture of communication and an H-bridge current regulator with a power booster. The structure of the system was a body area network embedded with multiple stimulators and a communication protocol of controlled area network to transmit muscle stimulation parameter information to individual stimulators. A graphical user interface was designed to allow clinicians to specify temporal patterns and muscle stimulation parameters. We completed and tested a prototype of the hardware and communication software modules of the multichannel NMES system. The prototype system was first verified in nondisabled subjects for safety, and then tested in subjects with stroke for feasibility with assisting multijoint movements. Results showed that synergistic stimulation of multiple muscles in subjects with stroke improved performance of multijoint movements with more natural velocity profiles at elbow and shoulder and reduced acromion excursion due to compensatory trunk rotation. The network-based NMES system may provide an innovative solution that allows more physiological activation of multiple muscles in multijoint task training for patients with stroke. PMID:27149687

  19. Physiological processes non-linearly affect electrophysiological recordings during transcranial electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Noury, Nima; Hipp, Joerg F; Siegel, Markus

    2016-10-15

    Transcranial electric stimulation (tES) is a promising tool to non-invasively manipulate neuronal activity in the human brain. Several studies have shown behavioral effects of tES, but stimulation artifacts complicate the simultaneous investigation of neural activity with EEG or MEG. Here, we first show for EEG and MEG, that contrary to previous assumptions, artifacts do not simply reflect stimulation currents, but that heartbeat and respiration non-linearly modulate stimulation artifacts. These modulations occur irrespective of the stimulation frequency, i.e. during both transcranial alternating and direct current stimulations (tACS and tDCS). Second, we show that, although at first sight previously employed artifact rejection methods may seem to remove artifacts, data are still contaminated by non-linear stimulation artifacts. Because of their complex nature and dependence on the subjects' physiological state, these artifacts are prone to be mistaken as neural entrainment. In sum, our results uncover non-linear tES artifacts, show that current techniques fail to fully remove them, and pave the way for new artifact rejection methods.

  20. Sensory electrical stimulation improves foot placement during targeted stepping post-stroke

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Eric R.; Hyngstrom, Allison S.

    2015-01-01

    Proper foot placement is vital for maintaining balance during walking, requiring the integration of multiple sensory signals with motor commands. Disruption of brain structures post-stroke likely alters the processing of sensory information by motor centers, interfering with precision control of foot placement and walking function for stroke survivors. In this study, we examined whether somatosensory stimulation, which improves functional movements of the paretic hand, could be used to improve foot placement of the paretic limb. Foot placement was evaluated before, during, and after application of somatosensory electrical stimulation to the paretic foot during a targeted stepping task. Starting from standing, twelve chronic stroke participants initiated movement with the non-paretic limb and stepped to one of five target locations projected onto the floor with distances normalized to the paretic stride length. Targeting error and lower extremity kinematics were used to assess changes in foot placement and limb control due to somatosensory stimulation. Significant reductions in placement error in the medial–lateral direction (p = 0.008) were observed during the stimulation and post-stimulation blocks. Seven participants, presenting with a hip circumduction walking pattern, had reductions (p = 0.008) in the magnitude and duration of hip abduction during swing with somatosensory stimulation. Reductions in circumduction correlated with both functional and clinical measures, with larger improvements observed in participants with greater impairment. The results of this study suggest that somatosensory stimulation of the paretic foot applied during movement can improve the precision control of foot placement. PMID:24449007

  1. Development of network-based multichannel neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hongen; Xie, Yongji; Liu, Xiaoxuan; He, Xin; Hao, Manzhao; Bao, Yong; Xie, Qing; Lan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a promising assistive technology for stroke rehabilitation. Here we present the design and development of a multimuscle stimulation system as an emerging therapy for people with paretic stroke. A network-based multichannel NMES system was integrated based on dual bus architecture of communication and an H-bridge current regulator with a power booster. The structure of the system was a body area network embedded with multiple stimulators and a communication protocol of controlled area network to transmit muscle stimulation parameter information to individual stimulators. A graphical user interface was designed to allow clinicians to specify temporal patterns and muscle stimulation parameters. We completed and tested a prototype of the hardware and communication software modules of the multichannel NMES system. The prototype system was first verified in nondisabled subjects for safety, and then tested in subjects with stroke for feasibility with assisting multijoint movements. Results showed that synergistic stimulation of multiple muscles in subjects with stroke improved performance of multijoint movements with more natural velocity profiles at elbow and shoulder and reduced acromion excursion due to compensatory trunk rotation. The network-based NMES system may provide an innovative solution that allows more physiological activation of multiple muscles in multijoint task training for patients with stroke.

  2. Comparison of skin sensory thresholds using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the sensory thresholds of healthy subjects using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Subjects] Ninety healthy adult subjects were randomly assigned to pre-programmed or single-frequency stimulation groups, each consisting of 45 participants. [Methods] Sensory thresholds were measured in the participants’ forearms using von Frey filaments before and after pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and the result in values were analyzed. [Results] Significant increases in sensory threshold after stimulation were observed in both groups. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in sensory thresholds after stimulation or in the magnitude of threshold increases following stimulation. [Conclusion] Our results show that there are no differences between sensory threshold increases induced by pre-programmed and single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. PMID:26834358

  3. The influence of functional electrical stimulation on hand motor recovery in stroke patients: a review