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Sample records for afferent fibers innervating

  1. The effect of deep tissue incision on pH responses of afferent fibers and dorsal root ganglia innervating muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Kanta; Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.; Gu, He; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms underlying deep tissue pain in the postoperative period is critical to improve therapies. Using the in vitro plantar flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle-nerve preparation and patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating incised and unincised muscle, we investigated responses to various pH changes. Methods Incision including the plantar FDB muscle or sham operation was made in the rat hindpaw. On postoperative day one, in vitro single fiber recording was undertaken. Based on previous studies, we recorded from at least 40 fibers per group. Also Di-I labeled DRG innervating muscle from rats undergoing incision and a sham operation were cultured and tested for acid responses using whole cell patch-clamp recordings. Results The prevalence of responsive group IV afferents to lactic acid pH 6.5 in the incision group (15 of 67, 22.3%) was greater than that in the control group (2 of 35, 5.7%, p=0.022). In DRG neurons innervating muscle, incision increased mean current amplitudes of acid-evoked currents; the acid-sensing ion channel blocker, amiloride 300 μM, inhibited more than 75% of the acid-evoked current, whereas the transient receptor vanilloid receptor 1 blocker (AMG9810 1 μM) did not cause significant inhibition. Conclusion Our experiments demonstrated that incision increases the responses of FDB muscle afferent fibers to weak acid solutions, and increased acid-evoked currents in DRG innervating muscle. Our data suggest that upregulation of acid-sensing ion channels might underlie this increased chemosensitivity caused by surgery. PMID:23732174

  2. Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakir, M.; Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.

  3. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  4. A phenotypically restricted set of primary afferent nerve fibers innervate the bone versus skin: therapeutic opportunity for treating skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Xu, Kevin Haili; Ferng, Alice S.; Dussor, Gregory; Vanderah, Todd W.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2009-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of chronic pain and physical disability in both developed as well as developing countries, relatively little is known about the nerve fibers and mechanisms that drive skeletal pain. Small diameter sensory nerve fibers, most of which are C-fiber nociceptors, can be separated into two broad populations: the peptide-rich and peptide-poor nerve fibers. Peptide-rich nerve fibers express substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). In contrast, the peptide-poor nerve fibers bind to isolectin B4 (IB4) and express the purinergic receptor P2X3 and Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor member d (Mrgprd). In the present report, we used mice in which the Mrgprd+ nerve fibers express genetically encoded axonal tracers to determine the peptide-rich and peptide-poor sensory nerve fibers that innervate the glabrous skin of the hindpaw as compared to the bone marrow, mineralized bone and periosteum of the femur. Whereas the skin is richly innervated by CGRP+, SP+, P2X3+ and Mrgprd+ sensory nerve fibers, the bone marrow, mineralized bone and periosteum receive a significant innervation by SP+ and CGRP+, but not Mrgprd+ and P2X3+ nerve fibers. This lack of redundancy in the populations of C-fibers that innervate the bone may present a unique therapeutic opportunity for targeting skeletal pain, as the peptide-rich and peptide-poor sensory nerve fibers generally express a different repertoire of receptors and channels to detect noxious stimuli. Thus, therapies that target the specific types of C-nerve fibers that innervate the bone may be uniquely effective in attenuating skeletal pain as compared to skin pain. PMID:19766746

  5. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  6. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  7. Inflammation-induced plasticity of the afferent innervation of the airways.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M J; Undem, B J

    2001-01-01

    The activation of primary afferent neurons that innervate the airways leads to homeostatic and defensive reflexes. The anatomic and physiologic characteristics of these afferent fibers do not appear to be static properties but rather appear to change rapidly in response to inflammation. The threshold for activation of airway afferent neurons to various stimuli, for example, is not fixed; these fibers can be become sensitized during inflammation. A subset of nociceptive-like (C-fibers) airway afferent neurons not only participates in centrally mediated reflexes but is also thought to release neuropeptides at their peripheral terminals, leading to neurogenic inflammation. An increase in the content of tachykinins is commonly seen in inflamed tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that irritation and inflammation of the airways is associated with the induction of tachykinin synthesis in non-nociceptive airway afferent fibers that under normal conditions do not contain neuropeptides. The release of neurokinins from the peripheral terminals in the airways and their central terminals in the brain stem may contribute to the symptoms of inflammatory airway diseases. Elevated release of neurokinins from peripheral terminals may promote local inflammatory responses, and the release of neurokinins in the brainstem, together with inflammation-induced increases in the excitability of afferent fibers, may culminate in altered visceral autonomic reflex activity, changes in breathing pattern, and cough. PMID:11544165

  8. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  9. Vagal afferent innervation of the rat fundic stomach: morphological characterization of the gastric tension receptor.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Powley, T L

    1992-05-01

    Although the gastric tension receptor has been characterized behaviorally and electrophysiologically quite well, its location and structure remains elusive. Therefore, the vagal afferents to the rat fundus (forestomach or nonglandular stomach) were anterogradely labeled in vivo with injections of the carbocyanine dye Dil into the nodose ganglia, and the nerves and ganglia of the enteric nervous system were labeled in toto with intraperitoneal Fluorogold injection. Dissected layers and cryostat cross sections of the fundic wall were mounted in glycerin and analyzed by means of conventional and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Particularly in the longitudinal, and to a lesser extent in the circular, smooth muscle layers, Dil-labeled fibers and terminals were abundant. These processes, which originated from fibers coursing through the myenteric ganglia and connectives, entered either muscle coat and then ran parallel to the respective muscle fibers, often for several millimeters. They ran in close association with the Fluorogold-labeled network of interstitial cells of Cajal, upon which they appeared to form multiple spiny appositions or varicosities. In the myenteric plexus, two different types of afferent vagal structures were observed. Up to 300 highly arborizing endings forming dense accumulations of small puncta similar to the esophageal intraganglionic laminar endings (Rodrigo et al., '75 Acta Anat. 92:79-100) were found in the fundic wall ipsilateral to the injected nodose ganglion. They often covered small clusters of myenteric neurons or even single isolated ganglion cells (mean = 5.8 neurons) and tended to extend throughout the neuropil of the ganglia. In a second pattern, fine varicose fibers with less profuse arborizations innervated mainly the central regions of myenteric ganglia. Camera lucida analyses established that single vagal afferent fibers had separate collaterals in both a smooth muscle layer and the myenteric ganglia. Finally, Dil

  10. Physiological identification of morphologically distinct afferent classes innervating the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysakowski, A.; Minor, L. B.; Fernandez, C.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. Semicircular-canal afferents in the squirrel monkey were characterized by their resting discharge, discharge regularity, sensitivity to galvanic currents delivered to the ear (beta *), the gain (g2Hz), and phase lead (phi 2Hz) of their response to 2-Hz sinusoidal head rotations, and their antidromic conduction velocity. Discharge regularity was measured by a normalized coefficient of variation (CV*); the higher the CV*, the more irregular the discharge. g2Hz and phi 2Hz were expressed relative to angular head velocity. 2. These physiological measures were used in an attempt to discern the discharge properties of the three morphological classes of afferents innervating the crista. Presumed bouton (B) fibers were identified as slowly conducting afferents. Presumed calyx (C) fibers were recognized by their irregular discharge and low rotational gains. The remaining fibers were considered to be dimorphic (D) units. Single letters (B, C, and D) are used to emphasize that the classification is based on circumstantial evidence and may be wrong for individual fibers. Of the 125 identified fibers, 13 (10%) were B units, 36 (29%) were C units, and 76 (61%) were D units. 3. B units were regularly discharging D units ranged from regularly to irregularly discharging. C units were the most irregularly discharging afferents encountered. The mean resting discharge for the entire sample was 74 spikes/s. Resting rates were similar for regularly discharging B and D units and higher than those for irregularly discharging C and D units. 4. Except for their lower conduction velocities, the discharge properties of B units are indistinguishable from those of regularly discharging D units. Many of the discharge properties of B and D units vary with discharge regularity. There is a strong, positive relation when beta *, g2Hz, or phi 2Hz is plotted against CV*. For beta * or phi 2Hz, C units conform to the relation for B and D units. In contrast, values of g2Hz for C units are three to

  11. Perceptual responses to microstimulation of single afferents innervating joints, muscles and skin of the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, G; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1990-01-01

    1. Microneurographic techniques were used to isolate single afferent axons within cutaneous and motor fascicles of the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist in thirteen subjects. Of the sixty-five identified afferents, eleven innervated the interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints, sixteen innervated muscle spindles, three innervated Golgi tendon organs and thirty-five supplied the glabrous skin of the hand. 2. Intrafascicular stimulation through the recording microelectrode, using trains of constant-voltage positive pulses (0.3-0.8 V, 0.1-0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz) or constant-current biphasic pulses (0.4-13.0 microA, 0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz), evoked specific sensations from sites associated with some afferent species but not others. 3. Microstimulation of eight of the eleven joint afferent sites (73%) evoked specific sensations. With four, subjects reported innocuous deep sensations referred to the relevant joint. With the other four, the subjects reported a sensation of joint displacement that partially reflected the responsiveness of the afferents to joint rotation. 4. Microstimulation of fourteen of the sixteen muscle spindle afferent sites (88%) generated no perceptions when the stimuli did not produce overt movement. However, subjects could correctly detect the slight movements generated when the stimuli excited the motor axons to the parent muscle. 5. With seven of the nine rapidly adapting (type RA or FAI) cutaneous afferents (88%) microstimulation evoked sensations of 'flutter-vibration', and with two of eight slowly adapting (type SAI) afferents (25%) it evoked sensations of 'sustained pressure'. Of the eighteen SAII afferents, which were classified as such by their responses to planar skin stretch, the majority (83%) generated no perceptions, confirming previous work, but three evoked sensations of movements or pressure. 6. The present results suggest a relatively secure transmission of joint afferent traffic to perceptual levels, and it is concluded that the

  12. Central changes in primary afferent fibers following peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Lekan, H A; Doubell, T P; Allchorne, A; Woolf, C J

    1997-04-01

    Cutting or crushing rat sciatic nerve does not significantly reduce the number of central myelinated sensory axons in the dorsal roots entering the fourth and fifth lumbar segments even over very extended periods of time. Unmyelinated axons were reduced by approximately 50%, but only long after sciatic nerve lesions (four to eight months), and reinnervation of the peripheral target did not rescue these axons. This indicates that a peripheral nerve lesion sets up a slowly developing but major shift towards large afferent fiber domination of primary afferent input into the spinal cord. In addition, since myelinated axons are never lost, this is good evidence that the cells that give rise to these fibers are also not lost. If this is the case, this would indicate that adult primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons do not depend on peripheral target innervation for survival. PMID:9130791

  13. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  14. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum

    PubMed Central

    Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding characteristics of colorectal afferents. The colorectum with PN attached was dissected, opened longitudinally, and pinned flat in a Sylgard-lined chamber. Action potentials of afferent fibers evoked by circumferential stretch (servo-controlled force actuator) were recorded from the PN. Stretch-sensitive fibers were categorized into the following four groups: colonic muscular, colonic muscular/mucosal, rectal muscular, and rectal muscular/mucosal. Seventy-nine stretch-sensitive PN afferents evenly distributed into the above four groups were studied. Rectal muscular afferents had significantly greater stretch-responses than the other three groups. Virtually all rectal afferents (98%) had low thresholds for response and encoded stimulus intensity into the noxious range without obvious saturation. Most colonic afferents (72%) also had low thresholds (<14 mmHg), but a significant proportion (28%) had high thresholds (>18 mmHg) for response. These high-threshold colonic afferents were sensitized to stretch by inflammatory soup; response threshold was significantly reduced (from 23 to 12 mmHg), and response magnitude significantly increased. These results suggest that the encoding of mechanosensory information differs between colonic and rectal stretch-sensitive PN afferents. Rectal afferents have a wide response range to stretch, whereas high-threshold colonic afferents likely contribute to visceral nociception. PMID:20075141

  15. Characterization of silent afferents in the pelvic and splanchnic innervations of the mouse colorectum

    PubMed Central

    Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity in inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome is contributed to in part by changes in the receptive properties of colorectal afferent endings, likely including mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; silent afferents) that have the ability to acquire mechanosensitivity. The proportion and attributes of colorectal MIAs, however, have not previously been characterized. The distal ∼3 cm of colorectum with either pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached was removed, opened longitudinally, pinned flat in a recording chamber, and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Colorectal receptive endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. MIA endings were tested for response to and acquisition of mechanosensitivity by localized exposure to an inflammatory soup (IS). Colorectal afferents were also tested with twin-pulse and repetitive electrical stimulation paradigms. PN MIAs represented 23% of 211 afferents studied, 71% (30/42) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after application of IS to their receptive ending. LSN MIAs represented 33% of 156 afferents studied, only 23% (11/48) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after IS exposure. Mechanosensitive PN endings uniformly exhibited significant twin-pulse slowing whereas LSN endings showed no significant twin-pulse difference. PN MIAs displayed significantly greater activity-dependent slowing than LSN MIAs. In conclusion, significant proportions of MIAs are present in the colorectal innervation; significantly more in the PN than LSN acquire mechanosensitivity in an inflammatory environment. This knowledge contributes to our understanding of the possible roles of MIAs in colon-related disorders like inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:21071510

  16. Hair-cell counts and afferent innervation patterns in the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey with a comparison to the chinchilla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, C.; Lysakowski, A.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The numbers of type I and type II hair cells were estimated by dissector techniques applied to semithin, stained sections of the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae in the squirrel monkey and the chinchilla. 2. The crista in each species was divided into concentrically arranged central, intermediate, and peripheral zones of equal areas. The three zones can be distinguished by the sizes of individual hair cells and calyx endings, by the density of hair cells, and by the relative frequency of calyx endings innervating single or multiple type I hair cells. 3. In the monkey crista, type I hair cells outnumber type II hair cells by a ratio of almost 3:1. The ratio decreases from 4-5:1 in the central and intermediate zones to under 2:1 in the peripheral zone. For the chinchilla, the ratio is near 1:1 for the entire crista and decreases only slightly between the central and peripheral zones. 4. Nerve fibers supplying the cristae in the squirrel monkey were labeled by extracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve. Peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the zones of the cristae they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. Results were similar for the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae. 5. Axons seldom bifurcate below the neuroepithelium. Most fibers begin branching shortly after crossing the basement membrane. Their terminal arbors are compact, usually extending no more than 50-100 microns from the parent exon. A small number of long intraepithelial fibers enter the intermediate and peripheral zones of the cristae near its base, then run unbranched for long distances through the neuroepithelium to reach the central zone. 6. There are three classes of afferent fibers innervating the monkey crista. Calyx fibers terminate exclusively on type I hair cells, and bouton fibers end only on type II hair cells. Dimorphic fibers provide a mixed innervation, including calyx

  17. Evidence that antidromically stimulated vagal afferents activate inhibitory neurones innervating guinea-pig trachealis.

    PubMed Central

    Canning, B J; Undem, B J

    1994-01-01

    1. We recently described a capsaicin-sensitive vagal pathway mediating non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxations of an isolated, innervated rostral guinea-pig tracheal preparation. These afferent fibres are carried by the superior laryngeal nerves and relaxations elicited by their activation are insensitive to autonomic ganglion blockers such as hexamethonium. In the present study this vagal relaxant pathway was further characterized. 2. Relaxations of the trachealis elicited by electrical stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents were mimicked by bath application of capsaicin. Relaxations elicited by both methods were abolished when the tissue between the trachea and the adjacent oesophagus was disrupted. Indeed, separating the trachea from the oesophagus uncovered a contractile effect of capsaicin administration on the trachealis. 3. Capsaicin-induced, oesophagus-dependent relaxations of the trachealis were blocked by pretreatment with the fast sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX). By contrast, capsaicin-induced contractions of the trachealis (obtained in the absence of the oesophagus) were unaffected by tetrodotoxin. 4. Substance P, neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) also elicited NANC relaxations of precontracted trachealis that were abolished by separating the trachea from the oesophagus or by TTX pretreatment. Like capsaicin, the tachykinins elicited only contractions of the trachealis following TTX pretreatment or separation of the trachea from the adjacent oesophagus. 5. Relaxations elicited by stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive nerves were unaffected by a concentration of the tachykinin NK2 receptor-selective antagonist, SR 48968, that is selective for NK2 receptor blockade and were not mimicked by the NK2 receptor-selective agonist [beta-Ala8]-NKA(4-10). This suggests that NK2 receptors are not responsible for these relaxations. By contrast, the NK3 receptor-selective agonist, senktide analogue, and the NK1 receptor

  18. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception. PMID:25591866

  19. An autoradiographic study of the afferent innervation of the trachea, syrinx and extrapulmonary primary bronchus of Gallus gallus domesticus.

    PubMed Central

    Bower, A J; Parker, S; Molony, V

    1978-01-01

    A method for injecting a small quantity of tritiated leucine directly into the nodose ganglion of the adult hen is described. The presence of an inner and an outer nerve plexus in the trachea and extrapulmonary primary bronchus is confirmed. Structures in the luminal epithelium of the trachea, syrinx and extrapulmonary primary bronchus having an afferent innervation are described and their possible function is discussed. The question of positive chemography in autoradiographic studies is discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:649496

  20. Mechano- and thermosensitivity of regenerating cutaneous afferent nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid; Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    Crush lesion of a skin nerve is followed by sprouting of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers into the distal nerve stump. Here, we investigate quantitatively both ongoing activity and activity evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the nerve in 43 A- and 135 C-fibers after crush lesion of the sural nerve using neurophysiological recordings in anesthetized rats. The discharge patterns in the injured afferent nerve fibers and in intact (control) afferent nerve fibers were compared. (1) Almost all (98%) A-fibers were mechanosensitive, some of them exhibited additionally weak cold/heat sensitivity; 7% had ongoing activity. (2) Three patterns of physiologically evoked activity were present in the lesioned C-fibers: (a) C-fibers with type 1 cold sensitivity (low cold threshold, inhibition on heating, high level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%): almost all of them were mechanoinsensitive and 40% of them were additionally heat-sensitive; (b) C-fibers with type 2 cold sensitivity (high cold threshold, low level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%). All of them were excited by mechanical and/or heat stimuli; (c) cold-insensitive C-fibers (54%), which were heat- and/or mechanosensitive. (3) The proportions of C-fibers exhibiting these three patterns of discharge to physiological stimuli were almost identical in the population of injured C-fibers and in a population of 91 intact cutaneous C-fibers. 4. Ongoing activity was present in 56% of the lesioned C-fibers. Incidence and rate of ongoing activity were the same in the populations of lesioned and intact type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers. The incidence (but not rate) of ongoing activity was significantly higher in lesioned type 2 cold-sensitive and cold insensitive C-fibers than in the corresponding populations of intact C-fibers (42/93 fibers vs. 11/72 fibers). PMID:19139872

  1. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  2. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  3. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE2 induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE2 effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE2 itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE2-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type 4 (EP4) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE2 effects. PGE2 induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE2 potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors by selectively targeting EP4 receptor/PKA pathway without interrupt prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:25446121

  4. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    PubMed

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve. PMID:2719524

  5. Thalamic territories innervated by cerebellar nuclear afferents in the hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1998-12-21

    To gain more insight into the evolution and functional significance of cerebrocerebellar circuits, the cerebellothalamic projections were studied with anterograde tracer substances in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog, tenrec. This insectivore shows one of the lowest size indices among mammals for both the cerebellar nuclei and the neocortex. Almost all cerebellodiencephalic target areas found in the tenrec have been described in other mammals. The intensity and extent of particular projections, however, vary considerably in the tenrec compared with the other mammals investigated so far. The most remarkable finding may be the tenrec's cerebellar projection to the nucleus ventralis medialis. This projection is the most prominent cerebellothalamic projection and originates in predominantly the lateral portion of the cerebellar nuclear complex. The projection to the caudolateral portion of the ventralis anterior complex (VAC) is located immediately rostral to the area receiving ascending somatosensory afferents and appears to originate, in particular, from the intermediate cerebellar nuclear complex. Another cerebellothalamic focus of terminations lies in the paralamellar region of the VAC, whereas the proper intralaminar nuclei, at best, receive a sparse cerebellar input. A faint-to-moderate projection, on the other hand, has been traced consistently to the ventral portion of the lateralis posterior-pulvinar complex and the adjacent dorsal geniculate nucleus. In addition, there are prominent cerebellosubthalamic projections to the zona incerta and the ventral geniculate nucleus. The latter projection is confined mainly to the ventralmost subdivision, which has been shown previously to receive ascending somatosensory, but not retinal, afferents. With the exception of the nucleus ventralis medialis, the projections were essentially confined to the contralateral side. PMID:9853902

  6. Electrophysiology of the afferent innervation of the penis of the domestic ram.

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, D F; Iggo, A; Kitchell, R L

    1978-01-01

    1. The discharge of impulses in afferent fibres dissected from the dorsal nerve of the penis of chloralose-anaesthetized rams was recorded electrophysiologically during controlled natural stimulation of the surgically exposed penis maintained at body temperature and mechanically stabilized in a plaster of Paris mould. 2. Fifty-eight slowly adapting mechanorecptor units were examined and their pressure, velocity and displacement thresholds were determined. Units often responded best to integumental stretch. Few had resting discharges. During a sustained perpendicularly applied displacement most units adapted to silence within 1.5 min. The units were classified into types from an analysis of their adapted impulse trains in response to a sustained mechanical stimulus. 3. Twenty-five mechanoreceptive units had rapidly adapting responses. Most units had typical rapid adapting characteristics and discharged impulses only during the dynamic phase of the application of the displacement. A subgroup had intermediate adapting characteristics, and discharged intermittently during steady displacement of the integument. 4. The mechanical sensitivity of most receptors altered when the temperature of the receptive field was changed with a positive correlation in eleven units, a negative correlation in six. Six slowly adapting units were thermally insensitive. Twelve rapidly adapting units were tested. Six had a positive thermal correlation and four a negative correlation. 5. The conduction velocities of axons of mechanoreceptor units in the dorsal nerve of the penis were in the Aalpha range (12--77 msec-1). 6. Two specific warm and five specific cold units were found. The conduction velocities of the axons supplying warm receptors were 45.4 msec-1 (one unit) and those for cold receptors were 7.5, 7.8, 30, 45.5, 48.7 msec-1. 7. No correlation could be found between the receptor submodality and the profuse receptor end bulb population demonstrated histologically. PMID:722579

  7. Effect of hypergravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.

    Gravity is a critical factor in the normal development of the vestibular system, as prolonged prenatal exposures to either micro- or hypergravity will alter the pattern of projections from specific vestibular organs to specific targets in the vestibular nuclei. This study addresses the effect of gravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar projections. In adult rats the semicircular canal afferents project mainly to the cerebellar nodulus whereas the otolith maculae project mainly to the ventral uvula of the cerebellum. To determine if the distribution pattern of these afferents is altered by exposures to altered gravity, 10 pregnant rats were exposed to hypergravity (1.5g) from embryonic day 12 (before vestibular ganglion neurons contact vestibular nuclei) to embryonic day 21 (near the time when the vestibular system becomes functional). Controls were exposed to Earth's gravity but otherwise received the same treatment. At the end of the exposure the embryos were deeply anesthetized and fixed by transcardiac perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH7.4). Filter strips coated with DiI and PTIR were implanted into the saccule (gravistatic vestibular receptor) or into the posterior vertical canal (angular acceleration receptor), and allowed to diffuse for 2 weeks at 37°C. Then the brains were dissected and sectioned for fluorescent confocal imaging. Examination of the control cerebella revealed that the canal and otolith afferents have reached the nodulus and uvula, and axons extend into the internal granular, Purkinje, and molecular layers. Projections from the saccule and posterior vertical canal were partially segregated into their respective domains, the uvula and nodulus. In contrast, in hypergravity-exposed rat fetuses the saccule and posterior vertical canal projections were poorly segregated, and both organs contributed labeled fibers to all layers of the nodulus and uvula. This contrasts with the increased afferent segregation

  8. Bilateral tectal innervation by regenerating optic nerve fibers in goldfish: a radioautographic, electrophysiological and behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Springer, A D; Heacock, A M; Schmidt, J T; Agranoff, B W

    1977-06-17

    Following unilateral enucleation and optic nerve crush in goldfish, the remaining nerve regenerates and innervates both optic tecta. Approximately 5% of the nerve fibers reach the ipsilateral optic tectum (IOT) via the ipsilateral tract at the chiasma. Comparable debris in both tracts was not sufficient to result in an IOT projection since when both nerves were crushed simultaneously the usual pattern was seen, i.e., each nerve innervated a contralateral optic tectum (COT). When the arrival of one nerve at the chiasma was delayed by staggering the nerve crushes, the nerve that first arrived at the chiasma partially innervated the Iot. In most instances the entire IOT was innervated, however, the stratigraphic distribution of fibers in the various tectal lamina was atypical. Electrophysiological analysis indicated that fibers from each area of the retina innervated the IOT visuotopically. The COT was ablated in order to determine whether the IOT projection could mediate behavior. All fish failed to respond to changes in illumination as measured by respiration and failed to swim with or against the stripes in an optomotor drum. Thus, the IOT input, possibly because of its sparseness, could not be shown to be behaviorally functional. PMID:69466

  9. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  10. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  11. Age-related modifications of the morphological organization of pituicytes are associated with alteration of the GABAergic and dopaminergic innervation afferent to the neurohypophysial lobe.

    PubMed

    Alonso, G; Runquist, M; Hussy, N; Duvoid, A; Moos, F

    2003-10-01

    Ageing is known to induce a marked activation of astrocytes within various regions of the central nervous system. To date, the age-related factors responsible for these modifications are unknown. The neural lobe of the hypophysis (NL) is a particular brain region which does not contain neurons but does contain specialized astrocytes, called pituicytes, and numerous terminals of afferent axons, including (i) peptidergic neurohypophysial axons which terminate on the NL blood vessels, and (ii) axons containing both gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) and dopamine (DA) which form contacts with pituicytes. Because evidence has recently been provided that GABA signalling mediates the morphological organization of astrocytes, the present study was designed to determine whether modifications of pituicytes during ageing were associated with modifications of the GABAergic axons innervating the NL. We show here that, in adult rats, GABA/DA axons form preferential synaptic-like contacts with pituicytes which express both GABAA and D2 dopamine receptors. We then show that, during ageing, pituicytes undergo dramatic modifications of their morphology, correlatively with marked modifications of the GABA/DA fibres innervating the NL. Lastly, in vitro experiments indicate that modifications of the morphology of pituicytes similar to those observed during ageing were obtained by incubating isolated NL of adult rats with a GABAA receptor agonist and/or a D2 dopamine receptor antagonist, whereas inverse modifications were observed when NL of aged rats were incubated with a GABAA receptor antagonist and a D2 dopamine receptor agonist. Taken together, these data suggest that the age-related morphological changes of pituicytes result from the alteration of the GABA/DAergic innervation of the NL. PMID:14622222

  12. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  13. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  14. Distribution of cardiac sympathetic afferent fibers in the guinea pig heart labeled by anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Quigg, M; Elfvin, L G; Aldskogius, H

    1988-12-01

    Anterogradely transported wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was used to selectively label the distribution within the guinea pig heart of cardiac sympathetic afferent fibers whose cell bodies lie in the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of C6, C8, T1-3. The majority of fibers were seen in the posterior atrial wall, the pulmonary arterial walls, and along the major branches of the coronary arteries. Labeled fibers were also found in the parietal pericardium and associated with the atrioventricular and aortic valves. The labeling pattern was dependent upon segmental level: the most general labeling followed upper thoracic DRG injection, while labeled fibers associated with the coronary arteries were nearly absent after lower cervical DRG injection. Comparison of heart labeling among chemically sympathectomized and untreated animals demonstrated no difference in the distribution of frequency of WGA-HRP labeled fibers, indicating the specificity of this technique. The present findings indicate that the spinal sensory innervation of the heart has its major origins in the uppermost thoracic dorsal root ganglia and has a highly selective regional distribution. The implications of these findings in relation to cardiac autonomic dysfunction and pain are discussed. PMID:3148648

  15. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  16. THE MAJORITY OF MYELINATED AND UNMYELINATED SENSORY NERVE FIBERS THAT INNERVATE BONE EXPRESS THE TROPOMYOSIN RECEPTOR KINASE A

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Taylor, Reid N.; Mantyh, William G.; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Although skeletal pain is a leading cause of chronic pain and disability, relatively little is known about the specific populations of nerve fibers that innervate the skeleton. Recent studies have reported that therapies blocking nerve growth factor (NGF) or its cognate receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) are efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. A potential factor to consider when assessing the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling in a pain state is the fraction of NGF-responsive TrkA+ nociceptors that innervate the tissue from which the pain is arising, as this innervation and the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling may vary considerably from tissue to tissue. To explore this in the skeleton, tissue slices and whole mount preparations of the normal, adult mouse femur were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Analysis of these preparations revealed that 80% of the unmyelinated/thinly myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also express TrkA. Similarly, the majority of myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) which innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also co-express TrkA. In the normal femur, the relative density of CGRP+, NF200+ and TrkA+ sensory nerve fibers per unit volume is: periosteum > bone marrow > mineralized bone > cartilage with the respective relative densities being 100: 2: 0.1: 0. The observation that the majority of sensory nerve fibers innervating the skeleton express TrkA+, may in part explain why therapies that block NGF/TrkA pathway are highly efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. PMID:21277945

  17. Clusters of cerebellar Purkinje cells control their afferent climbing fiber discharge

    PubMed Central

    Chaumont, Joseph; Guyon, Nicolas; Valera, Antoine M.; Dugué, Guillaume P.; Popa, Daniela; Marcaggi, Paikan; Gautheron, Vanessa; Reibel-Foisset, Sophie; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Stephan, Aline; Barrot, Michel; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Doussau, Frédéric; Poulain, Bernard; Selimi, Fekrije; Léna, Clément; Isope, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Climbing fibers, the projections from the inferior olive to the cerebellar cortex, carry sensorimotor error and clock signals that trigger motor learning by controlling cerebellar Purkinje cell synaptic plasticity and discharge. Purkinje cells target the deep cerebellar nuclei, which are the output of the cerebellum and include an inhibitory GABAergic projection to the inferior olive. This pathway identifies a potential closed loop in the olivo-cortico-nuclear network. Therefore, sets of Purkinje cells may phasically control their own climbing fiber afferents. Here, using in vitro and in vivo recordings, we describe a genetically modified mouse model that allows the specific optogenetic control of Purkinje cell discharge. Tetrode recordings in the cerebellar nuclei demonstrate that focal stimulations of Purkinje cells strongly inhibit spatially restricted sets of cerebellar nuclear neurons. Strikingly, such stimulations trigger delayed climbing-fiber input signals in the stimulated Purkinje cells. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Purkinje cells phasically control the discharge of their own olivary afferents and thus might participate in the regulation of cerebellar motor learning. PMID:24046366

  18. Clusters of cerebellar Purkinje cells control their afferent climbing fiber discharge.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Joseph; Guyon, Nicolas; Valera, Antoine M; Dugué, Guillaume P; Popa, Daniela; Marcaggi, Paikan; Gautheron, Vanessa; Reibel-Foisset, Sophie; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Stephan, Aline; Barrot, Michel; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Doussau, Frédéric; Poulain, Bernard; Selimi, Fekrije; Léna, Clément; Isope, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Climbing fibers, the projections from the inferior olive to the cerebellar cortex, carry sensorimotor error and clock signals that trigger motor learning by controlling cerebellar Purkinje cell synaptic plasticity and discharge. Purkinje cells target the deep cerebellar nuclei, which are the output of the cerebellum and include an inhibitory GABAergic projection to the inferior olive. This pathway identifies a potential closed loop in the olivo-cortico-nuclear network. Therefore, sets of Purkinje cells may phasically control their own climbing fiber afferents. Here, using in vitro and in vivo recordings, we describe a genetically modified mouse model that allows the specific optogenetic control of Purkinje cell discharge. Tetrode recordings in the cerebellar nuclei demonstrate that focal stimulations of Purkinje cells strongly inhibit spatially restricted sets of cerebellar nuclear neurons. Strikingly, such stimulations trigger delayed climbing-fiber input signals in the stimulated Purkinje cells. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Purkinje cells phasically control the discharge of their own olivary afferents and thus might participate in the regulation of cerebellar motor learning. PMID:24046366

  19. Identification of different functional types of spinal afferent neurons innervating the mouse large intestine using a novel CGRPα transgenic reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Kestell, Garreth R; Kyloh, Melinda A; Brookes, Simon J H; Wattchow, David A; Spencer, Nick J

    2016-04-15

    Spinal afferent neurons detect noxious and physiological stimuli in visceral organs. Five functional classes of afferent terminals have been extensively characterized in the colorectum, primarily from axonal recordings. Little is known about the corresponding somata of these classes of afferents, including their morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology. To address this, we made intracellular recordings from somata in L6/S1 dorsal root ganglia and applied intraluminal colonic distensions. A transgenic calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα)-mCherry reporter mouse, which enabled rapid identification of soma neurochemistry and morphology following electrophysiological recordings, was developed. Three distinct classes of low-threshold distension-sensitive colorectal afferent neurons were characterized; an additional group was distension-insensitive. Two of three low-threshold classes expressed CGRPα. One class expressing CGRPα discharged phasically, with inflections on the rising phase of their action potentials, at low frequencies, to both physiological (<30 mmHg) and noxious (>30 mmHg) distensions. The second class expressed CGRPα and discharged tonically, with smooth, briefer action potentials and significantly greater distension sensitivity than phasically firing neurons. A third class that lacked CGRPα generated the highest-frequency firing to distension and had smaller somata. Thus, CGRPα expression in colorectal afferents was associated with lower distension sensitivity and firing rates and larger somata, while colorectal afferents that generated the highest firing frequencies to distension had the smallest somata and lacked CGRPα. These data fill significant gaps in our understanding of the different classes of colorectal afferent somata that give rise to distinct functional classes of colorectal afferents. In healthy mice, the majority of sensory neurons that respond to colorectal distension are low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range afferents

  20. Cortical Responses to Aδ-Fiber Stimulation: Magnetoencephalographic Recordings in a Subject Lacking Large Myelinated Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Håkan; Cole, Jonathan; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    Controversy persists over the role of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in processing small-fiber peripheral afferent input. We therefore examined subject I.W, who, due to sensory neuronopathy syndrome, has no large-fiber afferents below C3 level. Cortical evoked responses were recorded with a whole-scalp neuromagnetometer to high-intensity electrical stimulation of the distal right radial, median, and tibial nerves and skin over the forearm and mechanical stimulation of (neurologically intact) lip. The responses to electrical stimulation in the Aβ-denervated limbs peaked at 110–140 ms in contralateral SI and at 140–220 ms in contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), consistent with Aδ-mediated input. I.W. was able to localize pin-prick stimuli with 4 cm accuracy. Responses to laser stimuli on the radial dorsum of the hand peaked in contralateral SII cortex at 215 ms, also compatible with Aδ-mediated input. These results support the role of the SI cortex in processing the sensory discriminative aspects of Aδ-mediated input. PMID:19959562

  1. Effects of hypergravity on the prenatal development of peripheral vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.; Burke, J. M.; Dobrowolska, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between vestibular stimulation and the distribution of peripheral vestibulocerebellar sensory fibers was studied in embryonic rats that developed in normal gravity (1G), 1.75G, 2.0G, or rotational environments from 10 to 20 days of gestation. Subsequently a fluorescent neuronal tracer was applied to the cerebellum, and allowed to diffuse retrogradely to the vestibular periphery. The distribution of labeled fibers and terminals in the posterior vertical canal and the utricle was analyzed. Sensory fibers in the rotation- and hypergravity-exposed embryos of the posterior semicircular canal and utricle displayed fewer long extending fibers and more terminal fields, suggesting faster rates of maturation as compared to the synchronous controls. Hypergravity exposures in the posterior canal caused increased terminal formation in the central zone of the cristae, and in the utricle caused increased terminal formation, including calyces, in the medial extrastriolar zone. These results show the importance of the vestibular environment in the development of peripheral vestibular innervation.

  2. Relative Contributions of Afferent Vagal Fibers to Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, A. T.; Balakrishnan, A.; Radmanesh, A.; Ashley, S. W.; Rhoads, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated vagal neural pathways, specifically subdiaphragmatic afferent fibers, regulate expression of the intestinal sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT1, the intestinal transporter responsible for absorption of dietary glucose. We hypothesized targeting this pathway could be a novel therapy for obesity. We therefore tested the impact of disrupting vagal signaling by total vagotomy or selective vagal de-afferentation on weight gain and fat content in diet-induced obese rats. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 5–8) underwent truncal vagotomy, selective vagal de-afferentation with capsaicin, or sham procedure. Animals were maintained for 11 months on a high-caloric Western diet. Abdominal visceral fat content was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging together with weight of fat pads at harvest. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by fasting blood glucose and HbA1C. Jejunal SGLT1 gene expression was assessed by qPCR and immunoblotting and function by glucose uptake in everted jejunal sleeves. Results At 11-months, vagotomized rats weighed 19% less (P = 0.003) and de-afferented rats 7% less (P = 0.19) than shams. Vagotomized and de-afferented animals had 52% (P < 0.0001) and 18% reduction (P = 0.039) in visceral abdominal fat, respectively. There were no changes in blood glucose or glycemic indexes. SGLT1 mRNA, protein and function were unchanged across all cohorts at 11-months postoperatively. Conclusions Truncal vagotomy led to significant reductions in both diet-induced weight gain and visceral abdominal fat deposition. Vagal de-afferentation led to a more modest, but clinically and statistically significant, reduction in visceral abdominal fat. As increased visceral abdominal fat is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, vagal de-afferentation may be a useful adjunct in bariatric surgery. PMID:22138962

  3. A new technique for the direct demonstration of overlapping cutaneous innervation territories of peptidergic C-fibre afferents of rat hindlimb nerves.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Jancsó, G

    1994-11-01

    A new technique based on the phenomenon of vascular labelling has been devised for the direct visualisation of overlapping innervation territories of cutaneous nerves. The saphenous, peroneal and sural nerves on one side in anaesthetised rats were exposed, cut centrally and successively stimulated antidromically to induce a neurogenic inflammatory response after an intravenous injection of either a 1% colloidal silver solution or a suspension of 3% Monastral Blue B. Light microscopic examination of transparent preparations of the dorsal hindpaw skin revealed labelled blood vessels of different colours which represented cutaneous territories served by different nerves. Blood vessels labelled with both substances were regarded as areas of overlapping innervation. Such areas were typically localised along the border of adjacent innervation territories. In addition, distinct areas exhibiting double-labelled blood vessels were regularly encountered in regions separate from this border zone. Areas of interest were drawn with the aid of a camera lucida and measured by means of a computerised system. The results indicate a significant, although topographically variable, degree of overlap of these cutaneous innervation areas. This new technique offers a possibility to explore the importance of normally existing overlap in the reinnervation of a denervated skin area by collateral nerve sprouting. PMID:7891461

  4. Catecholaminergic Fiber Innervation of the Vocal Motor System Is Intrasexually Dimorphic in a Teleost with Alternative Reproductive Tactics.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Zachary N; Timothy, Miky; Kaur, Gurpreet; Gorbonosov, Michelle; Chernenko, Alena; Forlano, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines, which include the neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline, are known modulators of sensorimotor function, reproduction, and sexually motivated behaviors across vertebrates, including vocal-acoustic communication. Recently, we demonstrated robust catecholaminergic (CA) innervation throughout the vocal motor system in the plainfin midshipman fish Porichthys notatus, a seasonal breeding marine teleost that produces vocal signals for social communication. There are 2 distinct male reproductive morphs in this species: type I males establish nests and court females with a long-duration advertisement call, while type II males sneak spawn to steal fertilizations from type I males. Like females, type II males can only produce brief, agonistic, grunt type vocalizations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that intrasexual differences in the number of CA neurons and their fiber innervation patterns throughout the vocal motor pathway may provide neural substrates underlying divergence in reproductive behavior between morphs. We employed immunofluorescence (-ir) histochemistry to measure tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; a rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis) neuron numbers in several forebrain and hindbrain nuclei as well as TH-ir fiber innervation throughout the vocal pathway in type I and type II males collected from nests during the summer reproductive season. After controlling for differences in body size, only one group of CA neurons displayed an unequivocal difference between male morphs: the extraventricular vagal-associated TH-ir neurons, located just lateral to the dimorphic vocal motor nucleus (VMN), were significantly greater in number in type II males. In addition, type II males exhibited greater TH-ir fiber density within the VMN and greater numbers of TH-ir varicosities with putative contacts on vocal motor neurons. This strong inverse relationship between the predominant vocal morphotype and the CA innervation of vocal motor neurons suggests

  5. A computational model for estimating recruitment of primary afferent fibers by intraneural stimulation in the dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, D. J.; Hokanson, J. A.; Rubin, J. E.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Primary afferent microstimulation has been proposed as a method for activating cutaneous and muscle afferent fibers to restore tactile and proprioceptive feedback after limb loss or peripheral neuropathy. Large populations of primary afferent fibers can be accessed directly by implanting microelectrode arrays in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which provide a compact and stable target for stimulating a diverse group of sensory fibers. To gain insight into factors affecting the number and types of primary afferents activated, we developed a computational model that simulates the recruitment of fibers in the feline L7 DRG. The model comprises two parts. The first part is a single-fiber model used to describe the current-distance relation and was based on the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill model for excitability. The second part uses the results of the singe-fiber model and published data on fiber size distributions to predict the probability of recruiting a given number of fibers as a function of stimulus intensity. The range of intensities over which exactly one fiber was recruited was approximately 0.5-5 µA (0.1-1 nC per phase); the stimulus intensity at which the probability of recruiting exactly one fiber was maximized was 2.3 µA. However, at 2.3 µA, it was also possible to recruit up to three fibers, albeit with a lower probability. Stimulation amplitudes up to 6 µA were tested with the population model, which showed that as the amplitude increased, the number of fibers recruited increased exponentially. The distribution of threshold amplitudes predicted by the model was similar to that previously reported by in vivo experimentation. Finally, the model suggested that medium diameter fibers (7.3-11.5 µm) may be recruited with much greater probability than large diameter fibers (12.8-16 µm). This model may be used to efficiently test a range of stimulation parameters and nerve morphologies to complement results from electrophysiology experiments and to aid in the

  6. The effect of aging on the density of the sensory nerve fiber innervation of bone and acute skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Freeman, Katie T.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    As humans age there is a decline in most sensory systems including vision, hearing, taste, smell, and tactile acuity. In contrast, the frequency and severity of musculoskeletal pain generally increases with age. To determine whether the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce skeletal pain changes with age, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) sensory nerve fibers that innervate the femur were examined in the femurs of young (4 month old), middle-aged (13 month) and old (36 month) male F344/BNF1 rats. Whereas the bone quality showed a significant age-related decline, the density of CGRP+ and NF200+ nerve fibers that innervate the bone remained remarkably unchanged as well as the severity of acute skeletal fracture pain. Thus, while bone mass, quality and strength undergo a significant decline with age, the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce noxious stimuli remain largely intact. These data may in part explain why musculoskeletal pain increases with age. PMID:20947214

  7. Cationic influences upon synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse of the frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of inorganic cations (K+, Na+, and Ca2+) bathing the isolated frog labyrinth were varied in order to assess their role in influencing and mediating synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse. Experiments employed intracellular recordings of synaptic activity from VIIIth nerve afferents. Recordings were digitized continuously at 50 kHz, and excitatory postsynaptic potentials were detected and parameters quantified by computer algorithms. Particular attention was focused on cationic effects upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence and excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude, in order to discriminate between pre- and postsynaptic actions. Because the small size of afferents preclude long term stable recordings, alterations in cationic concentrations were applied transiently and their peak effects on synaptic activity were assessed. Increases in extracellular K+ concentration of a few millimolar produced a large increase in the frequency of occurrence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials with little change in amplitude, indicating that release of transmitter from the hair cell is tightly coupled to its membrane potential. Increasing extracellular Na+ concentration resulted in an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude with no significant change in excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence, suggesting that the transmitter-gated subsynaptic channel conducts Na+ ions. Decreases in extracellular Ca2+ concentration had little effect upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency, but increased excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency and amplitude. These findings suggest that at higher concentrations Ca2+ act presynaptically to prevent transmitter release and postsynaptically to prevent Na+ influx during the generation of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. The influences of these ions on synaptic activity at this synapse are remarkably similar to those reported at the

  8. Development and organization of polarity-specific segregation of primary vestibular afferent fibers in mice.

    PubMed

    Maklad, Adel; Kamel, Suzan; Wong, Elaine; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    A striking feature of vestibular hair cells is the polarized arrangement of their stereocilia as the basis for their directional sensitivity. In mammals, each of the vestibular end organs is characterized by a distinct distribution of these polarized cells. We utilized the technique of post-fixation transganglionic neuronal tracing with fluorescent lipid soluble dyes in embryonic and postnatal mice to investigate whether these polarity characteristics correlate with the pattern of connections between the endorgans and their central targets; the vestibular nuclei and cerebellum. We found that the cerebellar and brainstem projections develop independently from each other and have a non-overlapping distribution of neurons and afferents from E11.5 on. In addition, we show that the vestibular fibers projecting to the cerebellum originate preferentially from the lateral half of the utricular macula and the medial half of the saccular macula. In contrast, the brainstem vestibular afferents originate primarily from the medial half of the utricular macula and the lateral half of the saccular macula. This indicates that the line of hair cell polarity reversal within the striola region segregates almost mutually exclusive central projections. A possible interpretation of this feature is that this macular organization provides an inhibitory side-loop through the cerebellum to produce synergistic tuning effects in the vestibular nuclei. The canal cristae project to the brainstem vestibular nuclei and cerebellum, but the projection to the vestibulocerebellum originates preferentially from the superior half of each of the cristae. The reason for this pattern is not clear, but it may compensate for unequal activation of crista hair cells or may be an evolutionary atavism reflecting a different polarity organization in ancestral vertebrate ears. PMID:20424840

  9. A synergistic effect of simultaneous TRPA1 and TRPV1 activations on vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Ruan, Ting; Khosravi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors are coexpressed in vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. Because both these receptors are sensitive to a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators, it is conceivable that they can be activated simultaneously during airway inflammation. This study aimed to determine whether there is an interaction between these two polymodal transducers upon simultaneous activation, and how it modulates the activity of vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. In anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats, the reflex-mediated apneic response to intravenous injection of a combined dose of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, a TRPA1 activator) and capsaicin (Cap, a TRPV1 activator) was ∼202% greater than the mathematical sum of the responses to AITC and Cap when they were administered individually. Similar results were also observed in anesthetized mice. In addition, the synergistic effect was clearly demonstrated when the afferent activity of single vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents were recorded in anesthetized, artificially ventilated rats; C-fiber responses to AITC, Cap and AITC + Cap (in combination) were 0.6 ± 0.1, 0.8 ± 0.1, and 4.8 ± 0.6 impulses/s (n = 24), respectively. This synergism was absent when either AITC or Cap was replaced by other chemical activators of pulmonary C-fiber afferents. The pronounced potentiating effect was further demonstrated in isolated vagal pulmonary sensory neurons using the Ca2+ imaging technique. In summary, this study showed a distinct positive interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1 when they were activated simultaneously in pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. PMID:25414245

  10. Whisker-related afferents in superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A; Favero, Morgana

    2016-05-01

    Rodents use their whiskers to explore the environment, and the superior colliculus is part of the neural circuits that process this sensorimotor information. Cells in the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus integrate trigeminotectal afferents from trigeminal complex and corticotectal afferents from barrel cortex. Using histological methods in mice, we found that trigeminotectal and corticotectal synapses overlap somewhat as they innervate the lower and upper portions of the intermediate granular layer, respectively. Using electrophysiological recordings and optogenetics in anesthetized mice in vivo, we showed that, similar to rats, whisker deflections produce two successive responses that are driven by trigeminotectal and corticotectal afferents. We then employed in vivo and slice experiments to characterize the response properties of these afferents. In vivo, corticotectal responses triggered by electrical stimulation of the barrel cortex evoke activity in the superior colliculus that increases with stimulus intensity and depresses with increasing frequency. In slices from adult mice, optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing trigeminotectal and corticotectal fibers revealed that cells in the intermediate layers receive more efficacious trigeminotectal, than corticotectal, synaptic inputs. Moreover, the efficacy of trigeminotectal inputs depresses more strongly with increasing frequency than that of corticotectal inputs. The intermediate layers of superior colliculus appear to be tuned to process strong but infrequent trigeminal inputs and weak but more persistent cortical inputs, which explains features of sensory responsiveness, such as the robust rapid sensory adaptation of whisker responses in the superior colliculus. PMID:26864754

  11. Tissue engineering the mechanosensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc: sensory neuron innervation of intrafusal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Rumsey, John W; Das, Mainak; Bhalkikar, Abhijeet; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J

    2010-01-01

    The sensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc, composed of specialized intrafusal muscle fibers and type Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons, converts mechanical information regarding muscle length and stretch to electrical action potentials and relays them to the central nervous system. Utilizing a non-biological substrate, surface patterning photolithography and a serum-free medium formulation a co-culture system was developed that facilitated functional interactions between intrafusal muscle fibers and sensory neurons. The presence of annulospiral wrappings (ASWs) and flower spray endings (FSEs), both physiologically relevant morphologies in sensory neuron-intrafusal fiber interactions, were demonstrated and quantified using immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, two proposed components of the mammalian mechanosensory transduction system, BNaC1 and PICK1, were both identified at the ASWs and FSEs. To verify functionality of the mechanoreceptor elements the system was integrated with a MEMS cantilever device, and Ca2+ currents were imaged along the length of an axon innervating an intrafusal fiber when stretched by cantilever deflection. This system provides a platform for examining the role of this mechanosensory complex in the pathology of myotonic and muscular dystrophies, peripheral neuropathy, and spasticity inducing diseases like Parkinson's. These studies will also assist in engineering fine motor control for prosthetic devices by improving our understanding of mechanosensitive feedback. PMID:20708792

  12. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in hypertrophic intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Pengmin; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Grundy, David; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-03-15

    Partial intestinal obstruction causes smooth muscle hypertrophy, enteric neuronal plasticity, motility disorders, and biomechanical remodeling. In this study we characterized the stimulus-response function of afferent fibers innervating the partially obstructed jejunum. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled mechanical tissue properties or from adaptive afferent processes. Partial obstruction was created by placing a polyethylene ring for 2 wk in jejunum of seven rats. Sham obstruction was made in six rats and seven rats served as normal controls. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerve bundles was recorded during mechanical ramp, relaxation, and creep tests. Stress-strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR), and firing rate in single units were assessed for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations, histomorphometry data, and afferent nerve discharge. Partial intestinal obstruction resulted in hypertrophy and jejunal stiffening proximal to the obstruction site. Low SRIR at low strains during fast distension and at high stresses during slow distension was found in the obstructed rats. Single unit analysis showed increased proportion of mechanosensitive units but absent high-threshold (HT) units during slow stimulation, decreased number of HT units during fast stimulation, and shift from HT sensitivity towards low threshold sensitivity in the obstructed jejunum. Biomechanical remodeling and altered afferent response to mechanical stimulations were found in the obstructed jejunum. Afferents from obstructed jejunum preserved their function in encoding ongoing mechanical stimulation but showed changes in their responsiveness. The findings support that mechanical factors rather than adaption are important for afferent remodeling. PMID:26585414

  13. Innervation regulates synaptic ribbons in lateral line mechanosensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Suli, Arminda; Pujol, Remy; Cunningham, Dale E; Hailey, Dale W; Prendergast, Andrew; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-06-01

    Failure to form proper synapses in mechanosensory hair cells, the sensory cells responsible for hearing and balance, leads to deafness and balance disorders. Ribbons are electron-dense structures that tether synaptic vesicles to the presynaptic zone of mechanosensory hair cells where they are juxtaposed with the post-synaptic endings of afferent fibers. They are initially formed throughout the cytoplasm, and, as cells mature, ribbons translocate to the basolateral membrane of hair cells to form functional synapses. We have examined the effect of post-synaptic elements on ribbon formation and maintenance in the zebrafish lateral line system by observing mutants that lack hair cell innervation, wild-type larvae whose nerves have been transected and ribbons in regenerating hair cells. Our results demonstrate that innervation is not required for initial ribbon formation but suggest that it is crucial for regulating the number, size and localization of ribbons in maturing hair cells, and for ribbon maintenance at the mature synapse. PMID:27103160

  14. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain. PMID:26520849

  15. Utricular afferents: morphology of peripheral terminals

    PubMed Central

    Huwe, J. A.; Logan, G. J.; Williams, B.; Rowe, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The utricle provides critical information about spatiotemporal properties of head movement. It comprises multiple subdivisions whose functional roles are poorly understood. We previously identified four subdivisions in turtle utricle, based on hair bundle structure and mechanics, otoconial membrane structure and hair bundle coupling, and immunoreactivity to calcium-binding proteins. Here we ask whether these macular subdivisions are innervated by distinctive populations of afferents to help us understand the role each subdivision plays in signaling head movements. We quantified the morphology of 173 afferents and identified six afferent classes, which differ in structure and macular locus. Calyceal and dimorphic afferents innervate one striolar band. Bouton afferents innervate a second striolar band; they have elongated terminals and the thickest processes and axons of all bouton units. Bouton afferents in lateral (LES) and medial (MES) extrastriolae have small-diameter axons but differ in collecting area, bouton number, and hair cell contacts (LES >> MES). A fourth, distinctive population of bouton afferents supplies the juxtastriola. These results, combined with our earlier findings on utricular hair cells and the otoconial membrane, suggest the hypotheses that MES and calyceal afferents encode head movement direction with high spatial resolution and that MES afferents are well suited to signal three-dimensional head orientation and striolar afferents to signal head movement onset. PMID:25632074

  16. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Li, Xingde; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE. PMID:25591867

  17. Oxytocin nerve fibers innervate beta-endorphin neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Csiffáry, A; Ruttner, Z; Tóth, Z; Palkovits, M

    1992-09-01

    Fine, varicose oxytocin-containing nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in rats. Using Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinin as an anterograde tracer, fine neuronal fibers of paraventricular nucleus origin could be seen throughout the arcuate nucleus. Using double immunostaining, oxytocin-immunoreactive varicose fibers were observed around or in the close vicinity of beta-endorphin-immunoreactive neurons. Silver-gold-labeled oxytocin-immunoreactive presynaptic boutons were shown to make synaptic contacts with diaminobenzidine-labeled beta-endorphin-immunoreactive neurons by electron microscopy. These findings provide morphological evidence for a possible influence of oxytocin on the activity of the brain beta-endorphin system at the hypothalamic level. PMID:1279446

  18. Central distribution of the efferent cells and the primary afferent fibers of the trigeminal nerve in Pleurodeles waltlii (Amphibia, Urodela).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, A; Muñoz, M

    1988-04-22

    As part of a study on the organization of the brainstem in a primitive group of vertebrates, the efferent cells and primary afferent fibers of the urodele amphibian Pleurodeles waltlii were examined by means of retrograde and anterograde axonal transport and anterograde degeneration. The trigeminal motor nucleus is located in the periventricular gray just medial to the sulcus limitans. Its rostral part is a band of pear-shaped cells lying parallel to the wall of the ventricle, whereas its caudal part is a round mass consisting of polygonal cells. In addition, a small group of scattered neurons is situated ventral to the rostral part of the nucleus. The primary afferent fibers enter the brainstem in the dorsal two-thirds of the trigeminal root. They diverge into a short ascending and a long descending tract. The former distributes its axons to the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus, which is an ill-defined cell group located at the ventrolateral edge of the periventricular gray. In the descending tract, the fibers of the ophthalmic nerve are predominantly located ventromedially, and those of the maxillomandibular nerve dorsolaterally. A fascicle of the ophthalmic nerve leaves the descending tract and, apparently, makes contact with the accessory abducens nucleus. The descending tract extends caudally into the three upper cervical segments of the spinal cord. The mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus consists of conspicuous large cells, which are scattered through the tectum of the mesencephalon. The cells with peripheral branches in the ophthalmic nerve are mainly located in the caudal half of the tectum, and those with peripheral branches in the maxillomandibular nerve in the rostral half. Collaterals of the central branches of the mesencephalic trigeminal system were traced to an area of the periventricular gray situated between the motor nucleus and the principal sensory nucleus of the trigeminus. PMID:2836480

  19. Spatial orientation of semicircular canals and afferent sensitivity vectors in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Dickman, J D

    1996-09-01

    Rotational head motion in vertebrates is detected by the semicircular canal system, whose innervating primary afferent fibers carry information about movement in specific head planes. The semicircular canals have been qualitatively examined over a number of years, and the canal planes have been quantitatively characterized in several animal species. The present study first determined the geometric relationship between individual semicircular canals and between the canals and the stereotactic head planes in pigeons. Stereotactic measurements of multiple points along the circumference of the bony canals were taken, and the measured points fitted with a three-dimensional planar surface. Direction normals to the plane's surface were calculated and used to define angles between semicircular canal pairs. Because of the unusual shape of the anterior semicircular canals in pigeons, two planes, a major and a minor, were fitted to the canal's course. Calculated angle values for all canals indicated that the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals are nearly orthogonal, but the anterior canals have substantial deviations from orthogonality with other canal planes. Next, the responses of the afferent fibers that innervate each of the semicircular canals to 0.5 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth-vertical axis were obtained. The head orientation relative to the rotation axis was systematically varied so that directions of maximum sensitivity for each canal afferent could be determined. These sensitivity vectors were then compared with the canal plane direction normals. The afferents that innervated specific semicircular canals formed homogeneous clusters of sensitivity vectors in different head planes. The horizontal and posterior afferents had average sensitivity vectors that were largely co-incident with the innervated canal plane direction normals. Anterior canal afferents, however, appeared to synthesize contributions from the major and minor plane components of the

  20. Spatial orientation of semicircular canals and afferent sensitivity vectors in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Rotational head motion in vertebrates is detected by the semicircular canal system, whose innervating primary afferent fibers carry information about movement in specific head planes. The semicircular canals have been qualitatively examined over a number of years, and the canal planes have been quantitatively characterized in several animal species. The present study first determined the geometric relationship between individual semicircular canals and between the canals and the stereotactic head planes in pigeons. Stereotactic measurements of multiple points along the circumference of the bony canals were taken, and the measured points fitted with a three-dimensional planar surface. Direction normals to the plane's surface were calculated and used to define angles between semicircular canal pairs. Because of the unusual shape of the anterior semicircular canals in pigeons, two planes, a major and a minor, were fitted to the canal's course. Calculated angle values for all canals indicated that the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals are nearly orthogonal, but the anterior canals have substantial deviations from orthogonality with other canal planes. Next, the responses of the afferent fibers that innervate each of the semicircular canals to 0.5 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth-vertical axis were obtained. The head orientation relative to the rotation axis was systematically varied so that directions of maximum sensitivity for each canal afferent could be determined. These sensitivity vectors were then compared with the canal plane direction normals. The afferents that innervated specific semicircular canals formed homogeneous clusters of sensitivity vectors in different head planes. The horizontal and posterior afferents had average sensitivity vectors that were largely co-incident with the innervated canal plane direction normals. Anterior canal afferents, however, appeared to synthesize contributions from the major and minor plane components of the

  1. Origin of primary sensory neurons innervating the buccal stretch receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Onozuka, M; Nagasaki, S; Watanabe, K; Ozono, S

    1999-01-01

    The primary sensory neurons innervating mechanoreceptors in oro-facial regions have their cell bodies in either the trigeminal ganglion or the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve. The buccal stretch receptor (BSR), a type of mechanoreceptor in the jaw of rodents, has recently been recognized as signaling the position of the mandible. The location of the primary afferent neurons innervating this receptor is unknown. To investigate the cell bodies of the BSR afferent neurons in rats, we applied wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) to the proximal stump of the severed nerve branch of the buccal nerve that supplied the BSR. HRP-labeled cell bodies were observed in the posterolateral portion of the ipsilateral trigeminal ganglion. None was found in the contralateral trigeminal ganglion or in the brainstem. All labeled cell bodies were oval or round and closely resembled pseudo-unipolar neurons. The mean diameter of the labeled somata ranged between 25.5 and 52.5 microm, with small (< or = 30 microm), medium (from 31 to 40 microm), and large somata (> or = 41 microm) accounting for 8.8%, 54.9%, and 36.3%, respectively. Among the myelinated nerve fibers in the branch in which WGA-HRP was applied, 78.5% terminated in the BSR and had larger fiber diameters than the rest, indicating that most of the medium and large HRP-labeled cell bodies were BSR afferents. From these results and the ontogenetic origin of this receptor, it is suggested that the BSR differentiated from the mechanoreceptors in the oral mucosa or the fascia of masticatory muscles. PMID:10065945

  2. Functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 sodium channel in Aβ afferent fibers subjected to chronic peripheral inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional alterations in the properties of Aβ afferent fibers may account for the increased pain sensitivity observed under peripheral chronic inflammation. Among the voltage-gated sodium channels involved in the pathophysiology of pain, Nav1.8 has been shown to participate in the peripheral sensitization of nociceptors. However, to date, there is no evidence for a role of Nav1.8 in controlling Aβ-fiber excitability following persistent inflammation. Methods Distribution and expression of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves were qualitatively or quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemical staining and by real time-polymerase chain reaction at different time points following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) administration. Using a whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, we further determined both total INa and TTX-R Nav1.8 currents in large-soma dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons isolated from sham or CFA-treated rats. Finally, we analyzed the effects of ambroxol, a Nav1.8-preferring blocker on the electrophysiological properties of Nav1.8 currents and on the mechanical sensitivity and inflammation of the hind paw in CFA-treated rats. Results Our findings revealed that Nav1.8 is up-regulated in NF200-positive large sensory neurons and is subsequently anterogradely transported from the DRG cell bodies along the axons toward the periphery after CFA-induced inflammation. We also demonstrated that both total INa and Nav1.8 peak current densities are enhanced in inflamed large myelinated Aβ-fiber neurons. Persistent inflammation leading to nociception also induced time-dependent changes in Aβ-fiber neuron excitability by shifting the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.8 in the hyperpolarizing direction, thus decreasing the current threshold for triggering action potentials. Finally, we found that ambroxol significantly reduces the potentiation of Nav1.8 currents in Aβ-fiber neurons observed following intraplantar CFA injection and

  3. Cholinergic innervation and receptors in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, D; Ruigrok, T J; Caffé, R; Cozzari, C; Levey, A I; Mugnaini, E; Voogd, J

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the source and ultrastructural characteristics of ChAT-immunoreactive fibers in the cerebellum of the rat, and the distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in the cerebellum of the rat, rabbit, cat and monkey, in order to define which of the cerebellar afferents may use ACh as a neurotransmitter, what target structures are they, and which cholinergic receptor mediate the actions of these pathways. Our data confirm and extend previous observations that cholinergic markers occur at relatively low density in the cerebellum and show not only interspecies variability, but also heterogeneity between cerebellar lobules in the same species. As previously demonstrated by Barmack et al. (1992a,b), the predominant fiber system in the cerebellum that might use ACh as a transmitter or a co-transmitter is formed by mossy fibers originating in the vestibular nuclei and innervating the nodulus and ventral uvula. Our results show that these fibers innervate both granule cells and unipolar brush cells, and that the presumed cholinergic action of these fibers most likely is mediated by nicotinic receptors. In addition to cholinergic mossy fibers, the rat cerebellum is innervated by beaded ChAT-immunoreactive fibers. We have demonstrated that these fibers originate in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg), the lateral paragigantocellular nucleus (LPGi), and to a lesser extent in various raphe nuclei. In both the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar nuclei these fibers make asymmetric synaptic junctions with small and medium-sized dendritic profiles. Both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor could mediate the action of these diffuse beaded fibers. In the cerebellar nuclei the beaded cholinergic fibers form a moderately dense network, and could in principle have a significant effect on neuronal activity. For instance, the cholinergic fibers arising in the PPTg may modulate the excitability of the cerebellonuclear neurons in relation to sleep and arousal (e

  4. The innervation of the mammalian adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T L; Kesse, W K; Mohamed, A A; Afework, M

    1993-01-01

    Early conflicting reports and the lack of sensitive anatomical methods have led to an oversimplified view of adrenal gland innervation. It was not until the introduction of nerve fibre tracing techniques in the mid-1970s that the true complexity of adrenal innervation began to emerge. The first part of this article comprises a brief review of these and other relevant reports dealing with both medullary and cortical innervation. In the second part a detailed account is given of the work undertaken in Rex Coupland's Department relating to the innervation of the rodent and primate adrenal medulla using a retrograde fluorescent tracer technique. It was concluded that, in all 3 species studied, the adrenal medulla receives a sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent and an afferent innervation. The possible interrelationship between neural control of cortical and medullar secretions is discussed briefly. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:8300416

  5. The Role of the Paratrigeminal Nucleus in Vagal Afferent Evoked Respiratory Reflexes: A Neuroanatomical and Functional Study in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Alexandria K.; Farrell, Michael J.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; McGovern, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory tree receives sensory innervation from the jugular and nodose vagal sensory ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia are derived from embryologically distinct origins and as such demonstrate differing molecular, neurochemical and physiological phenotypes. Furthermore, whereas nodose afferent neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS), recent neuroanatomical studies in rats suggest that jugular neurons have their central terminations in the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5). In the present study we confirm that guinea pigs demonstrate a comparable distinction between the brainstem terminations of nodose and jugular ganglia afferents. Thus, microinjection of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CT-B) neural tracers into the caudal nTS and Pa5 resulted in highly specific retrograde labeling of neurons in the nodose and jugular ganglia, respectively. Whereas, nodose neurons more often expressed 160 KD neurofilament proteins and the alpha3 subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase, significantly more jugular neurons expressed the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and, especially, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP). Indeed, terminal fibers in the Pa5 compared to the nTS were characterized by their significantly greater expression of CGRP, further supporting the notion that jugular afferents project to trigeminal-related brainstem regions. Electrical stimulation of the guinea pig larynx following selective surgical denervation of the nodose afferent innervation to the larynx (leaving intact the jugular innervation) resulted in stimulus dependent respiratory slowing and eventual apnea. This jugular ganglia neuron mediated response was unaffected by bilateral microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the nTS, but was abolished by muscimol injected into the Pa5. Taken together these data confirm that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia afferent neurons innervate distinct central circuits and support the notion that multiple peripheral and central pathways

  6. Aδ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors innervating mammalian hairy skin: A review of their receptive, electrophysiological and cytochemical properties in relation to Aδ-fiber high threshold mechanoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche

    2016-02-01

    The sensation of gentle touch of the mammalian hairy skin is mediated by morphologically and physiologically distinct classes of low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMs) which are classified, according to their axonal conduction velocities, into Aβ-, Aδ- and C-LTMs. Although Aδ-LTMs (D-hair cells) were first described about five decades ago, and have been found in hairy skin of every species examined including humans, it is commonly assumed that all Aδ-fiber neurons are nociceptors. This view is endorsed by many textbooks. This article reviews the evidence that Aδ-LTMs exist in substantial proportions in different species, and that their peripheral and central axonal endings, molecular markers, receptive, electrophysiological and cytochemical properties are distinct from those of Aδ-high-threshold mechanoreceptors (Aδ-HTMs). A brief overview of some of the ion channels and markers that are expressed by the two populations of primary afferent neurons is also provided. Failure to recognize the existence and properties of Aδ-LTMs might lead/have led to misinterpretations of data. Aβ-LTMs and C-LTMs have been reviewed elsewhere and are not subject of this review. PMID:26746589

  7. Collateral sprouting of uninjured primary afferent A-fibers into the superficial dorsal horn of the adult rat spinal cord after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Doubell, T P; Coggeshall, R E; Woolf, C J

    1996-08-15

    That terminals of uninjured primary sensory neurons terminating in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord can collaterally sprout was first suggested by Liu and Chambers (1958), but this has since been disputed. Recently, horseradish peroxidase conjugated to the B subunit of cholera toxin (B-HRP) and intracellular HRP injections have shown that sciatic nerve section or crush produces a long-lasting rearrangement in the organization of primary afferent central terminals, with A-fibers sprouting into lamina II, a region that normally receives only C-fiber input (Woolf et al., 1992). The mechanism of this A-fiber sprouting has been thought to involve injury-induced C-fiber transganglionic degeneration combined with myelinated A-fibers being conditioned into a regenerative growth state. In this study, we ask whether C-fiber degeneration and A-fiber conditioning are both necessary for the sprouting of A-fibers into lamina II. Local application of the C-fiber-specific neurotoxin capsaicin to the sciatic nerve has previously been shown to result in C-fiber damage and degenerative atrophy in lamina II. We have used B-HRP to transganglionically label A-fiber central terminals and have shown that 2 weeks after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve, the pattern of B-HRP staining in the dorsal horn is indistinguishable from that seen after axotomy, with lamina II displaying novel staining in the identical region containing capsaicin-treated C-fiber central terminals. These results suggest that after C-fiber injury, uninjured A-fiber central terminals can collaterally sprout into lamina II of the dorsal horn. This phenomenon may help to explain the pain associated with C-fiber neuropathy. PMID:8756447

  8. Bipolar spinal cord stimulation attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity at an intensity that activates a small portion of A-fiber afferents in spinal nerve-injured rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Carteret, A F; Wacnik, P W; Chung, C-Y; Xing, L; Dong, X; Meyer, R A; Raja, S N; Guan, Y

    2011-12-29

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is used clinically to treat neuropathic pain states, but the precise mechanism by which it attenuates neuropathic pain remains to be established. The profile of afferent fiber activation during SCS and how it may correlate with the efficacy of SCS-induced analgesia are unclear. After subjecting rats to an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), we implanted a miniature quadripolar electrode similar to that used clinically. Our goal was to determine the population and number of afferent fibers retrogradely activated by SCS in SNL rats by recording the antidromic compound action potential (AP) at the sciatic nerve after examining the ability of bipolar epidural SCS to alleviate mechanical hypersensitivity in this model. Notably, we compared the profiles of afferent fiber activation to SCS between SNL rats that exhibited good SCS-induced analgesia (responders) and those that did not (nonresponders). Additionally, we examined how different contact configurations affect the motor threshold (MoT) and compound AP threshold. Results showed that three consecutive days of SCS treatment (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 30 min, 80-90% of MoT), but not sham stimulation, gradually alleviated mechanical hypersensitivity in SNL rats. The MoT obtained in the animal behavioral study was significantly less than the Aα/β-threshold of the compound AP determined during electrophysiological recording, suggesting that SCS could attenuate mechanical hypersensitivity with a stimulus intensity that recruits only a small fraction of the A-fiber population in SNL rats. Although both the MoT and compound AP threshold were similar between responders and nonresponders, the size of the compound AP waveform at higher stimulation intensities was larger in the responders, indicating a more efficient activation of the dorsal column structure in responders. PMID:22001681

  9. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Paivi M.; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models utilized by our laboratory. Here, we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to utilize these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of Red-Eared Turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed. PMID:25560461

  10. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Paivi M; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C

    2015-06-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models used by our laboratory. Here we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to use these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of red-eared turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide. Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed. PMID:25560461

  11. An In Vitro Adult Mouse Muscle-nerve Preparation for Studying the Firing Properties of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joy A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn; Wilkinson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sensory neurons innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs encode length and force changes essential to proprioception. Additional afferent fibers monitor other characteristics of the muscle environment, including metabolite buildup, temperature, and nociceptive stimuli. Overall, abnormal activation of sensory neurons can lead to movement disorders or chronic pain syndromes. We describe the isolation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and nerve for in vitro study of stretch-evoked afferent responses in the adult mouse. Sensory activity is recorded from the nerve with a suction electrode and individual afferents can be analyzed using spike sorting software. In vitro preparations allow for well controlled studies on sensory afferents without the potential confounds of anesthesia or altered muscle perfusion. Here we describe a protocol to identify and test the response of muscle spindle afferents to stretch. Importantly, this preparation also supports the study of other subtypes of muscle afferents, response properties following drug application and the incorporation of powerful genetic approaches and disease models in mice. PMID:25285602

  12. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity. PMID:26485650

  13. Role played by NaV 1.7 channels on thin-fiber muscle afferents in transmitting the exercise pressor reflex.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Copp, Steven W; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-11-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) 1.7 are highly expressed on the axons of somatic afferent neurons and are thought to play an important role in the signaling of inflammatory pain. NaV 1.7 channels are classified as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, meaning that they are blocked by TTX concentrations of less than 300 nM. These findings prompted us to determine in decerebrated, unanesthetized rats, the role played by NaV 1.7 channels in the transmission of muscle afferent input evoking the exercise pressor reflex. We first showed that the exercise pressor reflex, which was evoked by static contraction of the triceps surae muscles, was reversibly attenuated by application of 50 nM TTX, but not 5 nM TTX, to the L4-L5 dorsal roots (control: 21 ± 1 mmHg, TTX: 8 ± 2 mmHg, recovery: 21 ± 3 mmHg; n = 6; P < 0.01). We next found that the peak pressor responses to contraction were significantly attenuated by dorsal root application of 100 nM Ssm6a, a compound that is a selective NaV 1.7 channel inhibitor. Removal of Ssm6a restored the reflex to its control level (control: 19 ± 3 mmHg, Ssm6a: 10 ± 1 mmHg, recovery: 19 ± 4 mmHg; n = 6; P < 0.05). Compound action potentials recorded from the L4 and L5 dorsal roots and evoked by single-pulse stimulation of the sciatic nerve showed that both TTX and Ssm6a attenuated input from group III, as well as group IV afferents. We conclude that NaV 1.7 channels play a role in the thin-fiber muscle afferent pathway evoking the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:26310938

  14. The correlated blanching of synaptic bodies and reduction in afferent firing rates caused by transmitter-depleting agents in the frog semicircular canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guth, P.; Norris, C.; Fermin, C. D.; Pantoja, M.

    1993-01-01

    Synaptic bodies (SBs) associated with rings of synaptic vesicles and well-defined, pre- and post-synaptic membrane structures are indicators of maturity in most hair cell-afferent nerve junctions. The role of the SBs remains elusive despite several experiments showing that they may be involved in storage of neurotransmitter. Our results demonstrate that SBs of the adult posterior semicircular canal (SCC) cristae hair cells become less electron dense following incubation of the SCC with the transmitter-depleting drug tetrabenazine (TBZ). Objective quantification and comparison of the densities of the SBs in untreated and TBZ-treated frog SCC demonstrated that TBZ significantly decreased the electron density of SBs. This reduction in electron density was accompanied by a reduction in firing rates of afferent fibers innervating the posterior SCC. A second transmitter-depleting drug, guanethidine, previously shown to reduce the electron density of hair cell SBs, also reduced the firing rates of afferent fibers innervating the posterior SCC. In contrast, the electron density of dense granules (DG), similar in size and shape to synaptic bodies (SB) in hair cells, did not change after incubation in TBZ, thus indicating that granules and SBs are not similar in regard to their electron density. The role of SBs in synaptic transmission and the transmitter, if any, stored in the SBs remain unknown. Nonetheless, the association of the lessening of electron density with a reduction in afferent firing rate provides impetus for the further investigation of the SB's role in neurotransmission.

  15. α(5)GABA(A) receptors mediate primary afferent fiber tonic excitability in the turtle spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; Canto-Bustos, Martha; Aguilar, Justo; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2013-11-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) plays a key role in the regulation of central nervous system by activating synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. It is acknowledged that extrasynaptic GABAA receptors located in the soma, dendrites, and axons may be activated tonically by low extracellular GABA concentrations. The activation of these receptors produces a persistent conductance that can hyperpolarize or depolarize nerve cells depending on the Cl(-) equilibrium potential. In an in vitro preparation of the turtle spinal cord we show that extrasynaptic α5GABAA receptors mediate the tonic state of excitability of primary afferents independently of the phasic primary afferent depolarization mediated by synaptic GABAA receptors. Blockade of α5GABAA receptors with the inverse agonist L-655,708 depressed the dorsal root reflex (DRR) without affecting the phasic increase in excitability of primary afferents. Using RT-PCR and Western blotting, we corroborated the presence of the mRNA and the α5GABAA protein in the dorsal root ganglia of the turtle spinal cord. The receptors were localized in primary afferents in dorsal root, dorsal root ganglia, and peripheral nerve terminals using immunoconfocal microscopy. Considering the implications of the DRR in neurogenic inflammation, α5GABAA receptors may serve as potential pharmacological targets for the treatment of pain. PMID:23966669

  16. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, Robert P.; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C.; Boyle, Kieran A.; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to “unclassified” cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn. PMID:25972186

  17. Nociceptive responses and spinal plastic changes of afferent C-fibers in three neuropathic pain models induced by sciatic nerve injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Casals-Díaz, Laura; Vivó, Meritxell; Navarro, Xavier

    2009-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries induce plastic changes on primary afferent fibers and on the spinal circuitry, which are related to the emergence of neuropathic pain. In this study we compared three models of sciatic nerve injury in the rat with different degrees of damage and impact on regeneration capability: crush nerve injury, chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury (SNI). All three models were characterized by means of nerve histology, in order to describe the degenerative and regenerative process of injured axons. Nociceptive responses were evaluated by mechanical and thermal algesimetry tests. Crush animals displayed higher withdrawal thresholds on the ipsilateral paw compared to the contralateral during the time of denervation, while CCI and SNI animals showed mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Central plasticity was evaluated by immunohistochemical labeling of non-peptidergic (IB4-positive) and peptidergic (substance P-positive) nociceptive C-fibers on L4-L6 spinal cord sections. After crush nerve injury and SNI, we observed progressive and sustained reduction of IB4 and SP immunolabeling at the sciatic projection territory in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn, which affected only the tibial and peroneal nerves projection areas in the case of SNI. After CCI, changes on SP-immunoreactivity were not observed, and IB4-immunoreactive area decreased initially but recovered to normal levels on the second week post-injury. Thus, nociceptive responses depend on the type of injury, and the immunoreactivity pattern of afferent fibers at the spinal cord display changes less pronounced after partial than complete sciatic nerve injury. Although signs of neuropathic pain appear in all three lesion models, nociceptive responses and central plasticity patterns differ between them. PMID:19416675

  18. Development of an anatomical technique for visualizing the mode of climbing fiber innervation in Purkinje cells and its application to mutant mice lacking GluRδ2 and Ca(v)2.1.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Taisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2011-03-01

    In the adult cerebellum, a single climbing fiber (CF) innervates proximal dendrites of Purkinje cells (PCs). This monoinnervation is established by the developmental elimination of surplus CFs through homosynaptic competition among multiply innervating CFs and heterosynaptic competition between CFs and parallel fibers, i.e., granule cell axons innervating distal PC dendrites. Although the developmental process of CF monoinnervation and defects in it in mutant and experimental animal models have been extensively studied by electrophysiological techniques, for quite some time this subject was poorly understood from a morphological perspective due to a lack of neuroanatomical methods that could distinguish CFs with different neuronal origins. Soon after the identification of type 2 vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT2) that selectively detects CF terminals in the molecular layer, we developed a novel method of combined anterograde tracer labeling and VGluT2 immunohistochemistry. This method enables us to identify the mode (mono vs. multiple) of CF innervation and the site of multiple innervation. Since then, we have applied this method to various kinds of gene-manipulated mice manifesting ataxia and other cerebellar phenotypes. In this review, we summarize experimental procedures for the combined tracer/VGluT2 labeling method, and then introduce what we have learned by applying this method in studies on the role of GluRδ2 and Ca(v)2.1 in CF monoinnervation. This method has provided informative anatomical correlates to electrophysiological data and vice versa, and will extend our knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms for the development, plasticity, degeneration, and repair of the CF-PC projection system. PMID:21153457

  19. Identification of bladder and colon afferents in the nodose ganglia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Hubscher, Charles H

    2014-11-01

    The sensory neurons innervating the urinary bladder and distal colon project to similar regions of the central nervous system and often are affected simultaneously by various diseases and disorders, including spinal cord injury. Anatomical and physiological commonalities between the two organs involve the participation of shared spinally derived pathways, allowing mechanisms of communication between the bladder and colon. Prior electrophysiological data from our laboratory suggest that the bladder also may receive sensory innervation from a nonspinal source through the vagus nerve, which innervates the distal colon as well. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether anatomical evidence exists for vagal innervation of the male rat urinary bladder and to assess whether those vagal afferents also innervate the colon. Additionally, the relative contribution to bladder and colon sensory innervation of spinal and vagal sources was determined. By using lipophilic tracers, neurons that innervated the bladder and colon in both the nodose ganglia (NG) and L6/S1 and L1/L2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were quantified. Some single vagal and spinal neurons provided dual innervation to both organs. The proportions of NG afferents labeled from the bladder did not differ from spinal afferents labeled from the bladder when considering the collective population of total neurons from either group. Our results demonstrate evidence for vagal innervation of the bladder and colon and suggest that dichotomizing vagal afferents may provide a neural mechanism for cross-talk between the organs. PMID:24845615

  20. Pathophysiology of Small-Fiber Sensory System in Parkinson's Disease: Skin Innervation and Contact Heat Evoked Potential.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Hsien; Chao, Chi-Chao; Wu, Shao-Wei; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Feng, Fang-Ping; Lin, Yea-Huey; Chen, Ya-Mei; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2016-03-01

    Sensory symptoms are frequent nonmotor complaints in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, few investigations integrally explored the physiology and pathology of the thermonociceptive pathway in PD. We aim to investigate the involvement of the thermonociceptive pathway in PD.Twenty-eight PD patients (16 men, with a mean age and standard deviation of 65.6 ± 10.7 years) free of neuropathic symptoms and systemic disorders were recruited for the study and compared to 23 age- and gender-matched control subjects (12 men, with a mean age and standard deviation of 65.1 ± 9.9 years). We performed skin biopsy, contact heat-evoked potential (CHEP), and quantitative sensory tests (QST) to study the involvement of the thermonociceptive pathway in PD.The duration of PD was 7.1 ± 3.2 (range 2-17 years) years and the UPDRS part III score was 25.6 ± 9.7 (range 10-48) during the off period. Compared to control subjects, PD patients had reduced intra-epidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density (2.48 ± 1.65 vs 6.36 ± 3.19 fibers/mm, P < 0.001) and CHEP amplitude (18.02 ± 10.23 vs 33.28 ± 10.48 μV, P < 0.001). Twenty-three patients (82.1%) had abnormal IENF densities and 18 (64.3%) had abnormal CHEP. Nine patients (32.1%) had abnormal thermal thresholds in the feet. In total 27 patients (96.4%) had at least 1 abnormality in IENF, CHEP, or thermal thresholds of the foot, indicating dysfunctions in the small-fiber nerve system. In control subjects, CHEP amplitude linearly correlated with IENF density (P < 0.001). In contrast, this relationship disappeared in PD (P = 0.312) and CHEP amplitude was negatively correlated with motor severity of PD independent of age, gender, and anti-PD medication dose (P = 0.036), suggesting the influences of central components on thermonociceptive systems in addition to peripheral small-fiber nerves in PD.The present study suggested impairment of small-fiber sensory system at both

  1. Innervation of the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Duckles, S P

    1983-01-01

    With the development of specific antibodies to vasoactive peptides and application of immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay methods, knowledge of vascular innervation has grown rapidly. In the cerebral circulation, four possible neurotransmitters are present: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P. There is a dense adrenergic innervation of cerebral arteries, but contractile responses to nerve stimulation or circulating catecholamines are relatively small both in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies using radioligand binding techniques indicate a lack of specific 3H-prazosin binding in cerebral arteries, in contrast to other vascular beds. Thus a lack of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cerebral arteries may account for weak responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Both VIP and acetylcholine may be vasodilator neurotransmitters, but blockade of cholinergic responses does not alter neurogenic vasodilation. The lack of specific VIP antagonists hampers efforts to explore this system more fully. Substance P-containing nerves are affected by capsaicin, supporting the hypothesis that these are primary sensory afferents, perhaps mediating pain. Future work in this area may focus on defining the pathways of these nerves and exploring the role of co-transmitters and possible interactions between nerves. With this basic information, experiments can be designed to elucidate more clearly the functional roles these nerves play. PMID:6210001

  2. Quantification of sweat gland innervation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Illigens, Ben M. W.; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a novel method to quantify the density of nerve fibers innervating sweat glands in healthy control and diabetic subjects, to compare the results to an unbiased stereologic technique, and to identify the relationship to standardized physical examination and patient-reported symptom scores. Methods: Thirty diabetic and 64 healthy subjects had skin biopsies performed at the distal leg and distal and proximal thigh. Nerve fibers innervating sweat glands, stained with PGP 9.5, were imaged by light microscopy. Sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) was quantified by manual morphometry. As a gold standard, three additional subjects had biopsies analyzed by confocal microscopy using unbiased stereologic quantification. Severity of neuropathy was measured by standardized instruments including the Neuropathy Impairment Score in the Lower Limb (NIS-LL) while symptoms were measured by the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument. Results: Manual morphometry increased with unbiased stereology (r = 0.93, p < 0.01). Diabetic subjects had reduced SGNFD compared to controls at the distal leg (p < 0.001), distal thigh (p < 0.01), and proximal thigh (p < 0.05). The SGNFD at the distal leg of diabetic subjects decreased as the NIS-LL worsened (r = −0.89, p < 0.001) and was concordant with symptoms of reduced sweat production (p < 0.01). Conclusions: We describe a novel method to quantify the density of nerve fibers innervating sweat glands. The technique differentiates groups of patients with mild diabetic neuropathy from healthy control subjects and correlates with both physical examination scores and symptoms relevant to sudomotor dysfunction. This method provides a reliable structural measure of sweat gland innervation that complements the investigation of small fiber neuropathies. GLOSSARY AOI = area of interest; CI = confidence interval; ICC = intraclass correlation coefficient; IENFD = intraepidermal nerve fiber density; IgG = immunoglobulin G; NIS

  3. TRPA1 in mast cell activation-induced long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal afferent C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z; Ouyang, Ann

    2009-07-01

    Sensitization of esophageal sensory afferents by inflammatory mediators plays an important role in esophageal nociception. We have shown esophageal mast cell activation induces long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity in vagal nodose C-fibers. However, the roles of mast cell mediators and downstream ion channels in this process are unclear. Mast cell tryptase via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)-mediated pathways sensitizes sensory nerves and induces hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) plays an important role in mechanosensory transduction and nociception. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cell activation via a PAR2-dependent mechanism sensitizes TRPA1 to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in esophageal vagal C-fibers. The expression profiles of PAR2 and TRPA1 in vagal nodose ganglia were determined by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings from esophageal nodose neurons were performed in ex vivo guinea pig esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distention and chemical perfusion were compared. Both PAR2 and TRPA1 expressions were identified in vagal nodose neurons by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Ninety-one percent of TRPA1-positive neurons were of small and medium diameters, and 80% coexpressed PAR2. Esophageal mast cell activation significantly enhanced the response of nodose C-fibers to esophageal distension (mechanical hypersensitivity). This was mimicked by PAR2-activating peptide, which sustained for 90 min after wash, but not by PAR2 reverse peptide. TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 pretreatment significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity induced by either mast cell activation or PAR2 agonist. Collectively, our data provide new evidence that sensitizing TRPA1 via a PAR2-dependent mechanism plays an important role in mast cell activation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal nodose C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus. PMID:19423751

  4. Optogenetic activation of mechanically insensitive afferents in mouse colorectum reveals chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Joyce, Sonali C; Gebhart, G F

    2016-05-15

    The sensory innervation of the distal colorectum includes mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; ∼25%), which acquire mechanosensitivity in persistent visceral hypersensitivity and thus generate de novo input to the central nervous system. We utilized an optogenetic approach to bypass the process of transduction (generator potential) and focus on transformation (spike initiation) at colorectal MIA sensory terminals, which is otherwise not possible in typical functional studies. From channelrhodopsin2-expressing mice (driven by Advillin-Cre), the distal colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested for ex vivo single-fiber recordings. Afferent receptive fields (RFs) were identified by electrical stimulation and tested for response to mechanical stimuli (probing, stroking, and stretch), and afferents were classified as either MIAs or mechanosensitive afferents (MSAs). All MIA and MSA RFs were subsequently stimulated optically and MIAs were also tested for activation/sensitization with inflammatory soup (IS), acidic hypertonic solution (AHS), and/or bile salts (BS). Responses to pulsed optical stimuli (1-10 Hz) were comparable between MSAs and MIAs whereas 43% of MIAs compared with 86% of MSAs responded tonically to stepped optical stimuli. Tonic-spiking MIAs responded preferentially to AHS (an osmotic stimulus) whereas non-tonic-spiking MIAs responded to IS (an inflammatory stimulus). A significant proportion of MIAs were also sensitized by BS. These results reveal transformation as a critical factor underlying the differences between MIAs (osmosensors vs. inflammatory sensors), revealing a previously unappreciated heterogeneity of MIA endings. The current study draws attention to the sensory encoding of MIA nerve endings that likely contribute to afferent sensitization and thus have important roles in visceral pain. PMID:26950857

  5. Systemic morphine treatment induces changes in firing patterns and responses of nociceptive afferent fibers in mouse glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Dale; Baker, Alyssa L; Morón, Jose A; Carlton, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    Patients receiving opioids for pain may experience decreased effectiveness of the drug and even abnormal pain sensitivity-hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. We hypothesized that peripheral nociceptor hyperexcitability contributes to opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tested this using an in vitro mouse glabrous skin-nerve preparation. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of morphine (5, 8, 10, 15 mg/kg) or saline every 12 hours for 48 hours and killed approximately 12 hours after the last injection. Receptive fields of nociceptors were tested for mechanical, heat, and cold sensitivity. Activity was also measured during an initial 2-minute period and during 5-minute periods between stimuli. Aberrant activity was common in fibers from morphine-treated mice but rare in saline-treated mice. Resting background activity was elevated in C-fibers from morphine-treated mice. Both C- and Aδ-fibers had afterdischarge in response to mechanical, heat, and/or cold stimulation of the skin as well as spontaneous, unevoked activity. Compared to saline, morphine treatment increased the proportion of fibers displaying polymodal rather than mechanical-only responses. A significant increase in Aδ-mechanoreceptive fibers responding to cold accounted for most of this change. In agreement with this, morphine-treated mice showed increased sensitivity in the cold tail flick test. In morphine-treated mice, aberrant activity and hyperexcitability of nociceptors could contribute to increased pain sensitivity. Importantly, this activity is likely driving central sensitization, a phenomenon contributing to abnormal sensory processing and chronic pain. If similar changes occur in human patients, aberrant nociceptor activity is likely to be interpreted as pain and could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:23711478

  6. Monosynaptic convergence of somatic and visceral C-fiber afferents on projection and local circuit neurons in lamina I: a substrate for referred pain

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Liliana L.; Fernandes, Elisabete C.; Sivado, Miklos; Kokai, Eva; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Referred pain is a phenomenon of feeling pain at a site other than the site of the painful stimulus origin. It arises from a pathological mixing of nociceptive processing pathways for visceral and somatic inputs. Despite numerous studies based on unit recordings from spinal and supraspinal neurons, the exact mechanism and site of this mixing within the central nervous system are not known. Here, we selectively recorded from lamina I neurons, using a visually guided patch-clamp technique, in thoracic spinal cord preparation with preserved intercostal (somatic) and splanchnic (visceral) nerves. We show that somatic and visceral C fibers converge monosynaptically onto a group of lamina I neurons, which includes both projection and local circuit neurons. Other groups of lamina I neurons received inputs from either somatic or visceral afferents. We have also identified a population of lamina I local circuit neurons showing overall inhibitory responses upon stimulation of both nerves. Thus, the present data allow us to draw two major conclusions. First, lamina I of the spinal cord is the first site in the central nervous system where somatic and visceral pathways directly converge onto individual projection and local circuit neurons. Second, the mechanism of somatovisceral convergence is complex and based on functional integration of monosynaptic and polysynaptic excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs in specific groups of neurons. This complex pattern of convergence provides a substrate for alterations in the balance between visceral and somatic inputs causing referred pain. PMID:26098437

  7. trkA modulation of developing somatosensory neurons in oro-facial tissues: tooth pulp fibers are absent in trkA knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, S; Ichikawa, H; Henderson, T A; Silos-Santiago, I; Barbacid, M; Arends, J J; Jacquin, M F

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the nerve growth factor requirement of developing oro-facial somatosensory afferents, we have studied the survival of sensory fibers subserving nociception, mechanoreception or proprioception in receptor tyrosine kinase (trkA) knockout mice using immunohistochemistry. trkA receptor null mutant mice lack nerve fibers in tooth pulp, including sympathetic fibers, and showed only sparse innervation of the periodontal ligament. Ruffini endings were formed definitively in the periodontal ligament of the trkA knockout mice, although calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-immunoreactive fibers were reduced in number or had disappeared completely. trkA gene deletion had also no obvious effect on the formation of Meissner corpuscles in the palate. In the vibrissal follicle, however, some mechanoreceptive afferents were sensitive for trkA gene deletion, confirming a previous report [Fundin et al. (1997) Dev. Biol. 190, 94-116]. Moreover, calretinin-positive fibers innervating longitudinal lanceolate endings were completely lost in trkA knockout mice, as were the calretinin-containing parent cells in the trigeminal ganglion.These results indicate that trkA is indispensable for developing nociceptive neurons innervating oral tissues, but not for developing mechanoreceptive neurons innervating oral tissues (Ruffini endings and Meissner corpuscles), and that calretinin-containing, trkA dependent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion normally participate in mechanoreception through longitudinal lanceolate endings of the vibrissal follicle. PMID:11516838

  8. Intact sciatic myelinated primary afferent terminals collaterally sprout in the adult rat dorsal horn following section of a neighbouring peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Doubell, T P; Mannion, R J; Woolf, C J

    1997-03-31

    Peripheral nerve section induces sprouting of the central terminals of axotomized myelinated primary afferents outside their normal dorsoventral termination zones in lamina I, III, and IV of the dorsal horn into lamina II, an area that normally only receives unmyelinated C-fiber input. This axotomy-induced regenerative sprouting is confined to the somatotopic boundaries of the injured nerve in the spinal cord. We examined whether intact myelinated sciatic afferents are able to sprout novel terminals into neighbouring areas of the dorsal horn in the adult rat following axotomy of two test nerves, either the posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh or the saphenous nerve. These peripheral nerves have somatotopically organized terminal areas in the dorsal horn that overlap in some areas and are contiguous in others, with that of the sciatic central terminal field. Two weeks after cutting either the posterior cutaneous or the saphenous nerve, intact sciatic myelinated fibers labelled with the B fragment of cholera toxin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP) sprouted into an area of lamina II normally only innervated by the adjacent injured test nerve. This collateral sprouting was strictly limited, however, to those particular areas of the dorsal horn where the A-fiber terminal field of the control sciatic and the C-fiber terminal field of the injured test nerve overlapped in the dorsoventral plane. No mediolateral sprouting was seen into those areas of neuropil solely innervated by the test nerve. We conclude that intact myelinated primary afferents do have the capacity to collaterally sprout, but that any resultant somatotopic reorganization of central projections is limited to the dorsoventral plane. These changes may contribute to sensory hypersensitivity at the edges of denervated skin. PMID:9073085

  9. Nerve injury induces a new profile of tactile and mechanical nociceptor input from undamaged peripheral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Aschenbrenner, Carol A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Ririe, Douglas G.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain after nerve injury is often accompanied by hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli, yet whether this reflects altered input, altered processing, or both remains unclear. Spinal nerve ligation or transection results in hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in skin innervated by adjacent dorsal root ganglia, but no previous study has quantified the changes in receptive field properties of these neurons in vivo. To address this, we recorded intracellularly from L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons of anesthetized young adult rats, 1 wk after L5 partial spinal nerve ligation (pSNL) or sham surgery. One week after pSNL, hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold in awake, freely behaving animals was decreased in the L4 distribution on the nerve-injured side compared with sham controls. Electrophysiology revealed that high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells of A-fiber conduction velocity in L4 were sensitized, with a seven-fold reduction in mechanical threshold, a seven-fold increase in receptive field area, and doubling of maximum instantaneous frequency in response to peripheral stimuli, accompanied by reductions in after-hyperpolarization amplitude and duration. Only a reduction in mechanical threshold (minimum von Frey hair producing neuronal activity) was observed in C-fiber conduction velocity high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells. In contrast, low-threshold mechanoreceptive cells were desensitized, with a 13-fold increase in mechanical threshold, a 60% reduction in receptive field area, and a 40% reduction in instantaneous frequency to stimulation. No spontaneous activity was observed in L4 ganglia, and the likelihood of recording from neurons without a mechanical receptive field was increased after pSNL. These data suggest massively altered input from undamaged sensory afferents innervating areas of hypersensitivity after nerve injury, with reduced tactile and increased nociceptive afferent response. These findings differ importantly from previous preclinical

  10. Contribution of the cervical sympathetic ganglia to the innervation of the pharyngeal arch arteries and the heart in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Verberne, M E; Gittenberger-De Groot, A C; Van Iperen, L; Poelmann, R E

    1999-08-01

    In the chick heart, sympathetic innervation is derived from the sympathetic neural crest (trunk neural crest arising from somite level 10-20). Since the trunk neural crest gives rise to sympathetic ganglia of their corresponding level, it suggests that the sympathetic neural crest develops into cervical ganglia 4-14. We therefore tested the hypothesis that, in addition to the first thoracic ganglia, the cervical ganglia might contribute to cardiac innervation as well. Putative sympathetic nerve connections between the cervical ganglia and the heart were demonstrated using the differentiation markers tyrosine hydroxylase and HNK-1. In addition, heterospecific transplantation (quail to chick) of the cardiac and trunk neural crest was used to study the relation between the sympathetic neural crest and the cervical ganglia. Quail cells were visualized using the quail nuclear antibody QCPN. The results by immunohistochemical study show that the superior and the middle cervical ganglia and possibly the carotid paraganglia contribute to the carotid nerve. This nerve subsequently joins the nodose ganglion of the vagal nerve via which it contributes to nerve fibers in cardiac vagal branches entering the arterial and venous pole of the heart. In addition, the carotid nerve contributes to nerve fibers connected to putative baro- and chemoreceptors in and near the wall of pharyngeal arch arteries suggesting a role of the superior and middle cervical ganglia and the paraganglia of the carotid plexus in sensory afferent innervation. The lower cervical ganglia 13 and 14 contribute predominantly to nerve branches entering the venous pole via the anterior cardinal veins. We did not observe a thoracic contribution. Heterospecific transplantation shows that the cervical ganglia 4-14 as well as the carotid paraganglia are derived from the sympathetic neural crest. The cardiac neural crest does not contribute to the neurons of the cervical ganglia. We conclude that the cervical ganglia

  11. Neuroanatomical evidence for segregation of nerve fibers conveying light touch and pain sensation in Eimer's organ of the mole.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Paul D; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Bautista, Diana M; Julius, David; Catania, Kenneth C

    2006-06-13

    Talpid moles are small insectivores that live in dark underground tunnels. They depend heavily on touch to navigate and find food. Most species have an array of complex epidermal sensory structures called Eimer's organs that cover the tip of the nose. In this study, the anatomy of Eimer's organ was examined in the coast mole and star-nosed mole by using the fluorescent styryl pyridinium dye AM1-43 and immunocytochemical staining for neurofilament 200 and substance P. In addition, DiI was used to label neural components of Eimer's organ. AM1-43 labeled all of the Eimer's organ receptors after systemic injection, suggesting a role in mechanotransduction. Immunostaining with neurofilament 200 and substance P labeled distinct subtypes of sensory fibers. Substance P labeled a group of free nerve endings along the outer edge of Eimer's organ, indicating a nociceptive role for these fibers. In contrast, neurofilament 200 labeled a more central set of nerve endings, suggesting that these fibers function as low-threshold mechanoreceptors. By labeling subsets of trigeminal afferents distant from the receptor array with DiI, we revealed innervation patterns indicating that one afferent supplies the outer, substance P-positive set of free nerve endings, whereas several afferents differentially innervate the central free nerve endings. Our results suggest that the free nerve endings innervating Eimer's organ are largely mechanosensitive and may play an important role in the rapid sensory discrimination observed in these species. PMID:16751268

  12. Correlation of peripheral innervation density and dorsal horn map scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Millecchia, R; Brown, P B

    1997-08-01

    Dorsal horn map scale and peripheral innervation density were compared to test a hypothesized linear relationship. In anesthetized cats, low-threshold mechanoreceptive peripheral nerve innervation fields (IFs) were measured by outlining areas of skin from which action potentials could be elicited in cutaneous nerves. The same nerves were processed histologically and used to count myelinated axons. Innervation density for each nerve was calculated as number of axons divided by IF area. Single units were recorded throughout the hindlimb representation, in laminae III and IV. These data, combined with single-unit data from other animals and with cell counts in laminae III and IV, permitted estimation of numbers of cells whose receptive field centers fell in contiguous 1-cm bands from tips of toes to proximal thigh. A similar estimate was performed with the use of the nerve innervation data, so that peripheral innervation densities and map scales for the different 1-cm bands of skin could be compared. Correlation between the two was quite high (r = 0.8), and highly significant (P = 2.5 x 10(-7)). These results are consistent with a proposed developmental model in which map scale, peripheral innervation density, and reciprocal of dorsal horn cell receptive field size are mutually proportional, as a result of developmental mechanisms that produce constant divergence and convergence between primary afferent axons and dorsal horn cells. PMID:9307105

  13. Identification and properties of parietal pleural afferents in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Jammes, Yves; Trousse, Delphine; Delpierre, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    Although pain and dyspnoea are common symptoms in pleural diseases, there are few studies on the sensory innervation of the pleura. Using rabbits, after removal of all muscles in the intercostal space to be studied, we investigated the afferents of the internal intercostal nerve by applying to the internal thoracic wall pieces of gauze soaked in warmed (37°C), buffered saline (mechanical stimulation) or solutions containing lactic acid, inflammatory mediators or capsaicin (chemical stimulation). The afferent conduction velocity ranged from 0.5 to 14 m s−1. Most units (97%) were activated by mechanical stimulation of the pleura (local positive pressure range = 4.5–8.5 cmH2O) and we found a linear relationship between the discharge rate of afferents and the force applied to the thoracic wall. The majority of mechanosensitive units (70%) also responded to one or several chemical agents. Thus, the afferents were activated by lactic acid (49%) and/or a mixture of inflammatory mediators (50%). Local application of capsaicin elicited an initial increased or decreased background afferent activity in 57% of the afferents, a delayed decrease in firing rate being noted in some units initially activated by capsaicin. Capsaicin blocked the afferent response to a further application of inflammatory mediators but did not affect the mechanosensitive units. Thus, sensory endings connected with thin myelinated and unmyelinated fibres in the internal intercostal nerve detect the mechanical and chemical events of pleural diseases. PMID:15975985

  14. Neural circuits underlying tongue movements for the prey-catching behavior in frog: distribution of primary afferent terminals on motoneurons supplying the tongue.

    PubMed

    Kecskes, Szilvia; Matesz, Clara; Gaál, Botond; Birinyi, András

    2016-04-01

    The hypoglossal motor nucleus is one of the efferent components of the neural network underlying the tongue prehension behavior of Ranid frogs. Although the appropriate pattern of the motor activity is determined by motor pattern generators, sensory inputs can modify the ongoing motor execution. Combination of fluorescent tracers were applied to investigate whether there are direct contacts between the afferent fibers of the trigeminal, facial, vestibular, glossopharyngeal-vagal, hypoglossal, second cervical spinal nerves and the hypoglossal motoneurons. Using confocal laser scanning microscope, we detected different number of close contacts from various sensory fibers, which were distributed unequally between the motoneurons innervating the protractor, retractor and inner muscles of the tongue. Based on the highest number of contacts and their closest location to the perikaryon, the glossopharyngeal-vagal nerves can exert the strongest effect on hypoglossal motoneurons and in agreement with earlier physiological results, they influence the protraction of the tongue. The second largest number of close appositions was provided by the hypoglossal and second cervical spinal afferents and they were located mostly on the proximal and middle parts of the dendrites of retractor motoneurons. Due to their small number and distal location, the trigeminal and vestibular terminals seem to have minor effects on direct activation of the hypoglossal motoneurons. We concluded that direct contacts between primary afferent terminals and hypoglossal motoneurons provide one of the possible morphological substrates of very quick feedback and feedforward modulation of the motor program during various stages of prey-catching behavior. PMID:25575900

  15. Electrophysiological Properties of Dural Afferents in the Absence and Presence of Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Harriott, Andrea M.; Gold, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating condition characterized by recurrent severe head pain. Although mechanisms underlying a migraine attack remain controversial, one proposal is that inflammatory mediator (IM)–induced activation and sensitization of dural afferents contribute to the initiation of migraine pain. We and others have shown that the electrophysiological properties of afferents, both in the absence and the presence of IM, vary as a function of target of innervation. These differences may account for unique aspects of pain syndromes associated with specific body regions. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the electrophysiological properties of dural afferents differ from those innervating the temporalis muscle (TM), a structure in close proximity to the dura but that is not associated with pain syndromes at all similar to migraine. Acutely dissociated retrograde labeled primary afferents innervating the dura and TM were examined with whole cell current-clamp recordings. Passive and active electrophysiological properties were determined before and after the application of IM: (in μM) prostaglandin E2 (1), bradykinin (10), and histamine (1). In the absence of IM, there were significant differences between the two populations, particularly with respect to the response to suprathreshold stimulation where dural afferents were more excitable than TM afferents. Importantly, although both populations of afferents were sensitized by IM, the pattern of passive and active electrophysiological changes associated with IM-induced sensitization of these two populations of afferents suggested that there were both similarities and marked differences between the two with respect to underlying mechanisms of sensitization. If the differences between dural and TM afferents are due to a differential pattern of ion channel expression rather than differences in the relative density/biophysical properties of the same ion channels, it may be

  16. The Innervation of Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bradlaw, Robert

    1936-01-01

    The author, using the staining methods of Bielschowski, Gross, Beckwith, Weigert-Pal and Cajal in frozen and serial paraffin and celloidin sections, has investigated the dental innervations of man, monkey, dog, cat, and guinea-pig in health and disease. He discusses the anatomy and physiology of the dental innervation and the effect of section of the inferior dental nerve on the trophic, vasomotor, protective, and sensory functions, with special reference to the relation between dental disease and neuropathies. He describes the innervation of the tooth germ and the nature of the growing fibrils seen before calcification in the dentinal papilla and draws attention to the innervation of the periodontal membrane. He has found that these nerves anastomose across the crest of the interdental septa with their fellows and demonstrates coiled sub-cemental nerve-endings. He has been unable to find any difference in the eruption and casting of teeth after section of the inferior dental nerve, and does not find degeneration of the nerves of deciduous teeth prior to casting to be inevitable. He discusses the effect of local anæsthesia on the dental pulp, some of the causes of odontalgia and neuralgia and the effect of old age and general disease on the dental innervation. He has failed with lethal or continued sublethal doses of ethyl and methyl alcohol, lead or tetanus and diphtheria toxins, using the oral, gastric, subcutaneous and intravenous route, to produce dental neuronic change. The effects of fracture of teeth and jaws, the introduction of arsenic into the pulp chamber and amputation and extirpation of the pulp are examined. The vital resistance of the pulp and the significance of granulomata as a protective mechanism are discussed. The author has found that after extraction although there is at first degeneration of the nerve-fibres concerned, there may subsequently be regeneration, sometimes in the form of plexiform neuroma. He has produced degenerative changes in

  17. Transgenic BDNF induces nerve fiber regrowth into the auditory epithelium in deaf cochleae.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Seiji B; Cortez, Sarah R; Beyer, Lisa A; Wiler, James A; Di Polo, Adriana; Pfingst, Bryan E; Raphael, Yehoash

    2010-06-01

    Sensory organs typically use receptor cells and afferent neurons to transduce environmental signals and transmit them to the CNS. When sensory cells are lost, nerves often regress from the sensory area. Therapeutic and regenerative approaches would benefit from the presence of nerve fibers in the tissue. In the hearing system, retraction of afferent innervation may accompany the degeneration of auditory hair cells that is associated with permanent hearing loss. The only therapy currently available for cases with severe or complete loss of hair cells is the cochlear implant auditory prosthesis. To enhance the therapeutic benefits of a cochlear implant, it is necessary to attract nerve fibers back into the cochlear epithelium. Here we show that forced expression of the neurotrophin gene BDNF in epithelial or mesothelial cells that remain in the deaf ear induces robust regrowth of nerve fibers towards the cells that secrete the neurotrophin, and results in re-innervation of the sensory area. The process of neurotrophin-induced neuronal regeneration is accompanied by significant preservation of the spiral ganglion cells. The ability to regrow nerve fibers into the basilar membrane area and protect the auditory nerve will enhance performance of cochlear implants and augment future cell replacement therapies such as stem cell implantation or induced transdifferentiation. This model also provides a general experimental stage for drawing nerve fibers into a tissue devoid of neurons, and studying the interaction between the nerve fibers and the tissue. PMID:20109446

  18. Transgenic BDNF induces nerve fiber regrowth into the auditory epithelium in deaf cochleae

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Seiji B.; Cortez, Sarah R.; Beyer, Lisa A.; Wiler, Jim A.; Di Polo, Adriana; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2010-01-01

    Sensory organs typically use receptor cells and afferent neurons to transduce environmental signals and transmit them to the CNS. When sensory cells are lost, nerves often regress from the sensory area. Therapeutic and regenerative approaches would benefit from the presence of nerve fibers in the tissue. In the hearing system, retraction of afferent innervation may accompany the degeneration of auditory hair cells that is associated with permanent hearing loss. The only therapy currently available for cases with severe or complete loss of hair cells is the cochlear implant auditory prosthesis. To enhance the therapeutic benefits of a cochlear implant, it is necessary to attract nerve fibers back into the cochlear epithelium. Here we show that forced expression of the neurotrophin gene BDNF in epithelial or mesothelial cells that remain in the deaf ear, induces robust regrowth of nerve fibers towards the cells that secrete the neurotrophin, and results in re-innervation of the sensory area. The process of neurotrophin-induced neuronal regeneration is accompanied by significant preservation of the spiral ganglion cells. The ability to regrow nerve fibers into the basilar membrane area and protect the auditory nerve will enhance performance of cochlear implants and augment future cell replacement therapies such as stem cell implantation or induced transdifferentiation. This model also provides a general experimental stage for drawing nerve fibers into a tissue devoid of neurons, and studying the interaction between the nerve fibers and the tissue. PMID:20109446

  19. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  20. Amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex innervating the maxillary barbel in the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Caprio, John; Shimohara, Mami; Marui, Takayuki; Kohbara, Jun; Harada, Shuitsu; Kiyohara, Sadao

    2015-12-01

    The Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus, possesses taste and solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) located on the external body surface that detect specific water-soluble substances. Here, we identify two major fiber types of the facial/trigeminal complex that transmit amino acid information to the medulla. Both single and few fiber preparations respond to amino acid stimulation in the 0.1 μM to mM range. One fiber type responds best to glycine and l-alanine (i.e. Gly/Ala fibers) whereas the other fiber type is best stimulated by l-proline and glycine betaine (hereafter referred to only as betaine) (i.e. Pro/Bet fibers). We demonstrate that betaine, which does not alter the pH of the seawater and therefore does not activate the animals' highly sensitive pH sensors (Caprio et al., Science 344:1154-1156, 2014), is sufficient to elicit appetitive food search behavior. We further show that the amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex in P. japonicus is different from that in Ariopsis felis (Michel and Caprio, J. Neurophysiol. 66:247-260, 1991; Michel et al., J. Comp. Physiol. A. 172:129-138, 1993), a representative member of the only other family (Ariidae) of extant marine catfishes. PMID:26459116

  1. Effects of methylmercury on the motor and sensory innervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, R.K.; Riley, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    The histochemical study examined the effects of chronic methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication on the motor and sensory innervation of extensor digitorum longus muscles. Light microscopic examination of silver-stained axons in the intramuscular nerve bundles of MeHg-treated rats showed Wallerian-like degeneration and a reduction in the number of nerve fibers. Disrupted axons were predominantly sensory because 22.2% of spindle afferents (I/sub a/) and 90.0% of Golgi tendon organ (I/sub b/) sensory fibers were completely degenerated whereas less than 1% of motor ending were totally destroyed. Partial disruption occurred in the cholinesterase and motor terminals of 13.7% of endplates. Their results demonstrated greater vulnerability of sensory nerves than of motor nerves to MeHg-induced degeneration. Thus, the abnormal reflexes, ataxia, and muscle weakness following MeHg poisoning appear related to reduction of proprioceptive feedback from muscles and tendons irradiation to the documented lesions in the central nervous system.

  2. Vagal Intramuscular Arrays: The Specialized Mechanoreceptor Arbors That Innervate the Smooth Muscle Layers of the Stomach Examined in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Powley, Terry L; Hudson, Cherie N; McAdams, Jennifer L; Baronowsky, Elizabeth A; Phillips, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental roles that the stomach plays in ingestion and digestion notwithstanding, little morphological information is available on vagal intramuscular arrays (IMAs), the afferents that innervate gastric smooth muscle. To characterize IMAs better, rats were given injections of dextran biotin in the nodose ganglia, and, after tracer transport, stomach whole mounts were collected. Specimens were processed for avidin-biotin permanent labeling, and subsets of the whole mounts were immunohistochemically processed for c-Kit or stained with cuprolinic blue. IMAs (n = 184) were digitized for morphometry and mapping. Throughout the gastric muscle wall, IMAs possessed common phenotypic features. Each IMA was generated by a parent neurite arborizing extensively, forming an array of multiple (mean = 212) branches averaging 193 µm in length. These branches paralleled, and coursed in apposition with, bundles of muscle fibers and interstitial cells of Cajal. Individual arrays averaged 4.3 mm in length and innervated volumes of muscle sheet, presumptive receptive fields, averaging 0.1 mm(3) . Evaluated by region and by muscle sheet, IMAs displayed architectural adaptations to the different loci. A subset (32%) of circular muscle IMAs issued specialized polymorphic collaterals to myenteric ganglia, and a subset (41%) of antral longitudinal muscle IMAs formed specialized net endings associated with the serosal boundary. IMAs were concentrated in regional patterns that correlated with the unique biomechanical adaptations of the stomach, specifically proximal stomach reservoir functions and antral emptying operations. Overall, the structural adaptations and distributions of the IMAs were consonant with the hypothesized stretch receptor roles of the afferents. PMID:26355387

  3. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Sam M; Andresen, Michael C; Aicher, Sue A

    2016-03-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  4. Distribution of presumptive chemosensory afferents with FMRFamide- or substance P-like immunoreactivity in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M

    1997-01-23

    In five species of decapod crustaceans--Cherax destructor (crayfish), Carcinus maenas (crab), Homarus americanus (clawed lobster), Eriocheir sinensis (crab), Macrobrachium rosenbergii (shrimp)--immunocytochemical stainings revealed the presence of sensory afferents with FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system. These afferents were extremely thin, very numerous, and innervated all sensory neuropils except the optic and olfactory lobes. In their target neuropils they gave rise to condensed net- or ball-like terminal structures. Only in Homarus americanus but not in any other studied species immunocytochemistry revealed a separate, non-overlapping class of sensory afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity. Also the afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity were very thin and numerous, innervated all sensory neuropils except optic and olfactory lobes, and gave rise to condensed terminal structures. From their morphological characteristics it can be concluded that likely both classes of afferents are chemosensory. The substance P-like immunoreactivity suggests a link with the nociceptor afferents of vertebrates, with which both classes of afferents share several other morphological features. PMID:9037486

  5. Brain imaging signatures of the relationship between epidermal nerve fibers and heat pain perception.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-11-15

    Although the small-diameter primary afferent fibers in the skin promptly respond to nociceptive stimuli and convey sensory inputs to the central nervous system, the neural signatures that underpin the relationship between cutaneous afferent fibers and pain perception remain elusive. We combined skin biopsy at the lateral aspect of the distal leg, which is used to quantify cutaneous afferent fibers, with fMRI, which is used to assess brain responses and functional connectivity, to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensory nerves and the corresponding pain perception in the brain after applying heat pain stimulation to the dorsum of the right foot in healthy subjects. During painful stimulation, the degree of cutaneous innervation, as measured by epidermal nerve fiber density, was correlated with individual blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the posterior insular cortex and of the thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and rostral ventromedial medulla. Pain perception was associated with the activation of the anterior insular cortex and with the functional connectivity from the anterior insular cortex to the primary somatosensory cortex during painful stimulation. Most importantly, both epidermal nerve fiber density and activity in the posterior insular cortex showed a positive correlation with the strength of coupling under pain between the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex. Thus, our findings support the notion that the neural circuitry subserving pain perception interacts with the cerebral correlates of peripheral nociceptive fibers, which implicates an indirect role for skin nerves in human pain perception. PMID:26279210

  6. Depletion of cutaneous peptidergic innervation in HIV-associated xerosis.

    PubMed

    Rowe, A; Mallon, E; Rosenberger, P; Barrett, M; Walsh, J; Bunker, C B

    1999-03-01

    Severe xerosis occurs in approximately 20% of human immunodeficiency virus seropositive patients. Changes in cutaneous innervation have been found in various inflammatory skin diseases and in xerotic skin in familial amyloid. We have therefore carried out a quantitative examination of the cutaneous peptidergic innervation in human immunodeficiency virus-associated xerosis. Immunohistochemistry and image analysis quantitation were used to compare total cutaneous innervation (protein gene product 9.5), calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide peptidergic fibers, at two sites in the skin of human immunodeficiency virus-associated xerosis patients (upper arm, n = 12; upper leg, n = 11) and site-matched seronegative controls (upper arm, n = 10; upper leg, n = 10). Measurement of lengths of fibers of each type was carried out for each subject in the epidermis and papillary dermis, and around the sweat glands. Immunostained mast cells in these areas were counted. Epidermal integrity and maturation were assessed by immunostaining for involucrin. There were significant (Mann-Whitney U test; p < 0.02) decreases in total lengths of protein gene product 9.5 fibers in both epidermis/papillary dermis and sweat gland fields; of calcitonin gene-related peptide innervation in the epidermis/papillary dermis; and of substance P innervation of the sweat glands. There were no differences in the distribution of mast cells, or in the epidermal expression of involucrin. Depletion of the calcitonin gene-related peptide innervation may affect the nutrient blood supply of the upper dermis, and the integrity and function of basal epidermis and Langerhans cells. Diminished substance P innervation of the sweat glands may affect their secretory activity. Both of these changes may be implicated in the development of xerosis. PMID:10084303

  7. Injury-specific functional alteration of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in synaptic transmission of primary afferent C-fibers in the rat spinal superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Keiko; Ogawa, Koichi; Minami, Kazuhisa; Shinohara, Shunji; Kato, Akira

    2016-02-01

    We investigated functional alterations of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferent A- and C-fibers after peripheral nerve injury. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of spinal cord slices with an attached dorsal root, prepared from L5 spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) rats. The effects of neuronal VGCC blockers, ω-conotoxin GVIA (ω-CgTX) for N-type channels and ω-agatoxin IVA (ω-AgaIVA) for P/Q-type channels, on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) by stimulation of A- or C-fibers were studied. Besides, electrophysiological assay using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and immunohistochemistry were done. In naïve rats, ω-CgTX (0.1-1μM) reduced more effectively A-fiber eEPSCs than C-fiber ones. After nerve injury, ω-CgTX produced great inhibition of C-fiber eEPSCs in slices with the injured L5 dorsal root of SNL model rats, as compared to sham-operated rats. By contrast, in slices with the non-injured L4 one, inhibitory effects of ω-CgTX were not changed. This occurred concurrently with increased expression of N-type VGCCs in L5 spinal dorsal horn and with enhanced Ca(2+) currents through N-type VGCCs in small-sized (C-type) L5 DRG. In terms of A-fiber eEPSCs, ω-CgTX elicited similar inhibition in nerve-injured and sham-operated rats. ω-AgaIVA (0.1μM) had less effect on A- or C-fiber eEPSCs. These results indicate that N-type, but not P/Q-type, VGCCs mainly contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission from A- and C-fibers in the spinal dorsal horn. More importantly, following nerve injury, the functional contribution of N-type VGCCs to nociceptive transmission is increased in the pre-synaptic terminals of injured C-fibers. PMID:26708163

  8. Social temperament and lymph node innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Erica K.; Capitanio, John P.; Tarara, Ross P.; Cole, Steve W.

    2008-01-01

    Socially inhibited individuals show increased vulnerability to viral infections, and this has been linked to increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To determine whether structural alterations in SNS innervation of lymphoid tissue might contribute to these effects, we assayed the density of catecholaminergic nerve fibers in 13 lymph nodes from 7 healthy adult rhesus macaques that showed stable individual differences in propensity to socially affiliate (Sociability). Tissues from Low Sociable animals showed a 2.8-fold greater density of catecholaminergic innervation relative to tissues from High Sociable animals, and this was associated with a 2.3-fold greater expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNA, suggesting a molecular mechanism for observed differences. Low Sociable animals also showed alterations in lymph node expression of the immunoregulatory cytokine genes IFNG and IL4, and lower secondary IgG responses to tetanus vaccination. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that structural differences in lymphoid tissue innervation might potentially contribute to relationships between social temperament and immunobiology. PMID:18068331

  9. Histaminergic afferent system in the cerebellum: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Histaminergic afferent system of the cerebellum, having been considered as an essential component of the direct hypothalamocerebellar circuits, originates from the tuberomammillary nucleus in the hypothalamus. Unlike the mossy fibers and climbing fibers, the histaminergic afferent fibers, a third type of cerebellar afferents, extend fine varicose fibers throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. Histamine receptors, belonging to the family of G protein-coupled receptors, are widely present in the cerebellum. Through these histamine receptors, histamine directly excites Purkinje cells and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as the cerebellar nuclear neurons. Therefore, the histaminergic afferents parallelly modulate these dominant components in the cerebellar circuitry and consequently influence the final output of the cerebellum. In this way, the histaminergic afferent system actively participates in the cerebellum-mediated motor balance and coordination and nonsomatic functions. Accordingly, histaminergic reagents may become potential drugs for clinical treatment of cerebellar ataxia and other cerebellar disease. On the other hand, considering the hypothalamus is a high regulatory center for autonomic and visceral activities, the hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers/projections, bridging the nonsomatic center to somatic structure, may play a critical role in the somatic-nonsomatic integration. PMID:26331029

  10. Selective Thalamic Innervation of Rat Frontal Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Naoki; Ueta, Yoshifumi; Mohamed, Alsayed A; Hatada, Sayuri; Fukuda, Takaichi; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Most glutamatergic inputs in the neocortex originate from the thalamus or neocortical pyramidal cells. To test whether thalamocortical afferents selectively innervate specific cortical cell subtypes and surface domains, we investigated the distribution patterns of thalamocortical and corticocortical excitatory synaptic inputs in identified postsynaptic cortical cell subtypes using intracellular and immunohistochemical staining combined with confocal laser scanning and electron microscopic observations in 2 thalamorecipient sublayers, lower layer 2/3 (L2/3b) and lower layer 5 (L5b) of rat frontal cortex. The dendrites of GABAergic parvalbumin (PV) cells preferentially received corticocortical inputs in both sublayers. The somata of L2/3b PV cells received thalamic inputs in similar proportions to the basal dendritic spines of L2/3b pyramidal cells, whereas L5b PV somata were mostly innervated by cortical inputs. The basal dendrites of L2/3b pyramidal and L5b corticopontine pyramidal cells received cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs in proportion to their local abundance, whereas crossed-corticostriatal pyramidal cells in L5b exhibited a preference for thalamic inputs, particularly in their distal dendrites. Our data demonstrate an exquisite selectivity among thalamocortical afferents in which synaptic connectivity is dependent on the postsynaptic neuron subtype, cortical sublayer, and cell surface domain. PMID:26045568

  11. In vitro Functional Characterization of Mouse Colorectal Afferent Endings

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    This video demonstrates in detail an in vitro single-fiber electrophysiological recording protocol using a mouse colorectum-nerve preparation. The approach allows unbiased identification and functional characterization of individual colorectal afferents. Extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials (APs) that originate from one or a few afferent (i.e., single-fiber) receptive fields (RFs) in the colorectum are made from teased nerve fiber fascicles. The colorectum is removed with either the pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached and opened longitudinally. The tissue is placed in a recording chamber, pinned flat and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Focal electrical stimulation is used to locate the colorectal afferent endings, which are further tested by three distinct mechanical stimuli (blunt probing, mucosal stroking and circumferential stretch) to functionally categorize the afferents into five mechanosensitive classes. Endings responding to none of these mechanical stimuli are categorized as mechanically-insensitive afferents (MIAs). Both mechanosensitive and MIAs can be assessed for sensitization (i.e., enhanced response, reduced threshold, and/or acquisition of mechanosensitivity) by localized exposure of RFs to chemicals (e.g., inflammatory soup (IS), capsaicin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)). We describe the equipment and colorectum–nerve recording preparation, harvest of colorectum with attached PN or LSN, identification of RFs in the colorectum, single-fiber recording from nerve fascicles, and localized application of chemicals to the RF. In addition, challenges of the preparation and application of standardized mechanical stimulation are also discussed. PMID:25651300

  12. Involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerves in the proteinase-activated receptor 2-mediated vasodilatation in the rat dura mater.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Rosta, J; Sántha, P; Jancsó, G

    2009-07-01

    Neurogenic inflammation of the dura mater encephali has been suggested to contribute to the mechanisms of meningeal nociception and blood flow regulation. Recent findings demonstrated that the rat dura mater is innervated by trigeminal capsaicin-sensitive peptidergic nociceptive afferent nerves which mediate meningeal vascular responses through activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. The present work explored the functional significance of the capsaicin-sensitive subpopulation of dural afferent nerves via their contribution to the meningeal vascular responses evoked through activation of the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). The vascular responses of the dura mater were studied by laser Doppler flowmetry in a rat open cranial window preparation. Topical applications of trypsin, a PAR-2-activator, or Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-amide (SLIGRL-NH(2)), a selective PAR-2 agonist peptide, resulted in dose-dependent increases in meningeal blood flow. The SLIGRL-NH(2)-induced vasodilatation was significantly reduced following capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerve defunctionalization by prior systemic capsaicin treatment and by pretreatment of the dura mater with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37). Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) an unspecific inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production, but not 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole (TRIM), a neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, also inhibited the vasodilator response to SLIGRL-NH(2). The vasodilator responses elicited by very low concentrations of capsaicin (10 nM) were significantly enhanced by prior application of SLIGRL-NH(2). The present findings demonstrate that activation of the PAR-2 localized on capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal nociceptive afferent nerves induces vasodilatation in the dural vascular bed by mechanisms involving NO and CGRP release. The results indicate that the PAR-2-mediated activation and

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  14. A quantitative study of cutaneous receptors and afferent fibres in the cat and rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. G.; Iggo, A.

    1967-01-01

    1. The discharge in myelinated afferent fibres innervating hairs in anaesthetized cats and rabbits, dissected from the saphenous nerve, was recorded during controlled movements of the hairs. 2. Three types of rapidly adapting afferent unit were found and they innervated three kinds of hair follicle—down hair, guard hair and tylotrich. 3. The down hair units had low thresholds (critical slopes) and some of the guard hairs had the highest thresholds and least sensitivity to displacement. 4. There was a good fit to a power function for the relation between velocity of displacement of a hair and the frequency of discharge in the corresponding afferent fibre. 5. It is concluded that the rapidly adapting hair follicle receptors can function as efficient exact movement detectors. 6. Tylotrich follicles were often associated with touch corpuscles, but there was independent innervation of the rapidly adapting tylotrich follicle receptors and the slowly adapting touch corpuscle receptors. 7. The conduction velocities of large populations of myelinated cutaneous axons innervating cutaneous mechanoreceptors were measured in cats and rabbits. PMID:16992307

  15. Topographic and quantitative evaluation of gentamicin-induced damage to peripheral innervation of mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qingwei; Ao, Huafei; He, Jingchun; Chen, Zhengnong; Yu, Zhuowei; Zhang, Ruxin; Wang, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2014-01-01

    Ototoxicity induced by aminoglycoside antibiotics appears to occur both in hair cells (HCs) and the cochlear nerves that innervate them. Although HC loss can be easily quantified, neuronal lesions are difficult to quantify because two types of afferent dendrites and two types of efferent axons are tangled beneath the hair cells. In the present study, ototoxicity was induced by gentamicin in combination with the diuretic agent furosemide. Neuronal lesions were quantified in cochlear whole-mount preparations combined with microsections across the habenular perforate (HP) openings to achieve a clear picture of the topographic relationship between neuronal damage and HC loss. Multiple immunostaining methods were employed to differentiate the two types of afferent dendrites and two types of efferent axons. The results show that co-administration of gentamicin and furosemide resulted in a typical dynamic pattern of HC loss that spread from the basal turn to the outer hair cells to the apex and inner hair cells, depending on the dose and survival time after drug administration. Lesions of the innervation appeared to occur at two stages. At the early stage (2-4 days), the loss of labeling of the two types of afferent dendrites was more obvious than the loss of labeled efferent axons. At the late stage (2-4 weeks), the loss of labeled efferent axons was more rapid. In the high-dose gentamicin group, the loss of outer HCs was congruent with afferent dendrite loss at the early stage and efferent axon loss at the late stage. In the low-dose gentamicin group, the loss of labeling for cochlear innervation was more severe and widespread. Thus, we hypothesize that the gentamicin-induced damage to cochlear innervation occurs independently of hair cell loss. PMID:24308912

  16. Long-term sensitization of mechanosensitive and -insensitive afferents in mice with persistent colorectal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-ho; Schwartz, Erica S.; Tanaka, Takahiro; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Afferent input contributes significantly to the pain and colorectal hypersensitivity that characterize irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we investigated the contributions of mechanically sensitive and mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; or silent afferents) to colorectal hypersensitivity. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD; 15–60 mmHg) was recorded in mice before and for weeks after intracolonic treatment with zymosan or saline. After CRD tests, the distal colorectum with the pelvic nerve attached was removed for single-fiber electrophysiological recordings. Colorectal afferent endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. Intracolonic zymosan produced persistent colorectal hypersensitivity (>24 days) associated with brief colorectal inflammation. Pelvic nerve muscular-mucosal but not muscular mechanosensitive afferents recorded from mice with colorectal hypersensitivity exhibited persistent sensitization. In addition, the proportion of MIAs (relative to control) was significantly reduced from 27% to 13%, whereas the proportion of serosal afferents was significantly increased from 34% to 53%, suggesting that MIAs acquired mechanosensitivity. PGP9.5 immunostaining revealed no significant loss of colorectal nerve fiber density, suggesting that the reduction in MIAs is not due to peripheral fiber loss after intracolonic zymosan. These results indicate that colorectal MIAs and sensitized muscular-mucosal afferents that respond to stretch contribute significantly to the afferent input that sustains hypersensitivity to CRD, suggesting that targeted management of colorectal afferent input could significantly reduce patients' complaints of pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:22268098

  17. Immunomodulation Stimulates the Innervation of Engineered Tooth Organ

    PubMed Central

    Kökten, Tunay; Bécavin, Thibault; Keller, Laetitia; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine; Lesot, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The sensory innervation of the dental mesenchyme is essential for tooth function and protection. Sensory innervation of the dental pulp is mediated by axons originating from the trigeminal ganglia and is strictly regulated in time. Teeth can develop from cultured re-associations between dissociated dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells from Embryonic Day 14 mouse molars, after implantation under the skin of adult ICR mice. In these conditions however, the innervation of the dental mesenchyme did not occur spontaneously. In order to go further with this question, complementary experimental approaches were designed. Cultured cell re-associations were implanted together with trigeminal ganglia for one or two weeks. Although axonal growth was regularly observed extending from the trigeminal ganglia to all around the forming teeth, the presence of axons in the dental mesenchyme was detected in less than 2.5% of samples after two weeks, demonstrating a specific impairment of their entering the dental mesenchyme. In clinical context, immunosuppressive therapy using cyclosporin A was found to accelerate the innervation of transplanted tissues. Indeed, when cultured cell re-associations and trigeminal ganglia were co-implanted in cyclosporin A-treated ICR mice, nerve fibers were detected in the dental pulp, even reaching odontoblasts after one week. However, cyclosporin A shows multiple effects, including direct ones on nerve growth. To test whether there may be a direct functional relationship between immunomodulation and innervation, cell re-associations and trigeminal ganglia were co-implanted in immunocompromised Nude mice. In these conditions as well, the innervation of the dental mesenchyme was observed already after one week of implantation, but axons reached the odontoblast layer after two weeks only. This study demonstrated that immunodepression per se does stimulate the innervation of the dental mesenchyme. PMID:24465840

  18. Innervation of amphibian reproductive system. Histological and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Cisint, Susana; Crespo, Claudia A; Medina, Marcela F; Iruzubieta Villagra, Lucrecia; Fernández, Silvia N; Ramos, Inés

    2014-10-01

    In the present study we describe for the first time in anuran amphibians the histological and ultrastructural characteristics of innervation in the female reproductive organs. The observations in Rhinella arenarum revealed the presence of nerve fibers located predominantly in the ovarian hilium and in the oviduct wall. In both organs the nerves fibers are placed near blood vessels and smooth muscles fibers. In the present study the histological observations were confirmed using antibodies against peripherin and neurofilament 200 proteins. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated that the innervation of the reproductive organs is constituted by unmyelinated nerve fibers surrounded by Schwann cells. Axon terminals contain a population of small, clear, translucent vesicles that coexist with a few dense cored vesicles. The ultrastructural characteristics together with the immunopositive reaction to tyrosine hydroxylase of the nerve fibers and the type of synaptic vesicles present in the axon terminal would indicate that the reproductive organs of R. arenarum females are innervated by the sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:24882461

  19. Compartmental Innervation of the Superior Oblique Muscle in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Le, Alan; Poukens, Vadims; Ying, Howard; Rootman, Daniel; Goldberg, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular innervation of mammalian horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is compartmental. We sought evidence of similar compartmental innervation of the superior oblique (SO) muscle. Methods Three fresh bovine orbits and one human orbit were dissected to trace continuity of SO muscle and tendon fibers to the scleral insertions. Whole orbits were also obtained from four humans (two adults, a 17-month-old child, and a 33-week stillborn fetus), two rhesus monkeys, one rabbit, and one cow. Orbits were formalin fixed, embedded whole in paraffin, serially sectioned in the coronal plane at 10-μm thickness, and stained with Masson trichrome. Extraocular muscle fibers and branches of the trochlear nerve (CN4) were traced in serial sections and reconstructed in three dimensions. Results In the human, the lateral SO belly is in continuity with tendon fibers inserting more posteriorly on the sclera for infraducting mechanical advantage, while the medial belly is continuous with anteriorly inserting fibers having mechanical advantage for incycloduction. Fibers in the monkey superior SO insert more posteriorly on the sclera to favor infraduction, while the inferior portion inserts more anteriorly to favor incycloduction. In all species, CN4 bifurcates prior to penetrating the SO belly. Each branch innervates a nonoverlapping compartment of EOM fibers, consisting of medial and lateral compartments in humans and monkeys, and superior and inferior compartments in cows and rabbits. Conclusions The SO muscle of humans and other mammals is compartmentally innervated in a manner that could permit separate CN4 branches to selectively influence vertical versus torsional action. PMID:26426404

  20. Postnatal reduction of BDNF regulates the developmental remodeling of taste bud innervation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-09-15

    The refinement of innervation is a common developmental mechanism that serves to increase the specificity of connections following initial innervation. In the peripheral gustatory system, the extent to which innervation is refined and how refinement might be regulated is unclear. The initial innervation of taste buds is controlled by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Following initial innervation, taste receptor cells are added and become newly innervated. The connections between the taste receptor cells and nerve fibers are likely to be specific in order to retain peripheral coding mechanisms. Here, we explored the possibility that the down-regulation of BDNF regulates the refinement of taste bud innervation during postnatal development. An analysis of BDNF expression in Bdnf(lacZ/+) mice and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that BDNF was down-regulated between postnatal day (P) 5 and P10. This reduction in BDNF expression was due to a loss of precursor/progenitor cells that express BDNF, while the expression of BDNF in the subpopulations of taste receptor cells did not change. Gustatory innervation, which was identified by P2X3 immunohistochemistry, was lost around the perimeter where most progenitor/precursor cells are located. In addition, the density of innervation in the taste bud was reduced between P5 and P10, because taste buds increase in size without increasing innervation. This reduction of innervation density was blocked by the overexpression of BDNF in the precursor/progenitor population of taste bud cells. Together these findings indicate that the process of BDNF restriction to a subpopulation of taste receptor cells between P5 and P10, results in a refinement of gustatory innervation. We speculate that this refinement results in an increased specificity of connections between neurons and taste receptor cells during development. PMID:26164656

  1. Three-dimensional analysis of vestibular efferent neurons innervating semicircular canals of the gerbil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, I. M.; Perachio, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Anterograde labeling techniques were used to examine peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular efferent neurons in the crista ampullares of the gerbil. Vestibular efferent neurons were labeled by extracellular injections of biocytin or biotinylated dextran amine into the contralateral or ipsilateral dorsal subgroup of efferent cell bodies (group e) located dorsolateral to the facial nerve genu. Anterogradely labeled efferent terminal field varicosities consist mainly of boutons en passant with fewer of the terminal type. The bouton swellings are located predominately in apposition to the basolateral borders of the afferent calyces and type II hair cells, but several boutons were identified close to the hair cell apical border on both types. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphological analysis of the terminal fields from these cells located in the sensory neuroepithelium of the anterior, horizontal, and posterior cristae were performed. We show that efferent neurons densely innervate each end organ in widespread terminal fields. Subepithelial bifurcations of parent axons were minimal, with extensive collateralization occurring after the axons penetrated the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium. Axonal branching ranged between the 6th and 27th orders and terminal field collecting area far exceeds that of the peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. The terminal fields of the efferent neurons display three morphologically heterogeneous types: central, peripheral, and planum. All cell types possess terminal fields displaying a high degree of anisotropy with orientations typically parallel to or within +/-45 degrees of the longitudinal axis if the crista. Terminal fields of the central and planum zones predominately project medially toward the transverse axis from the more laterally located penetration of the basement membrane by the parent axon. Peripheral zone terminal fields extend predominately toward the planum semilunatum. The innervation

  2. [Innervation of the intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    García-Cosamalón, José; Fernández-Fernández, Javier; González-Martínez, Emilio; Ibáñez-Plágaro, Javier; Robla Costales, Javier; Martínez-Madrigal, Milton; López Muñíz, Alfonso; del Valle, Miguel Enrique; Vega, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently, intervertebral disc innervation was a subject of considerable debate. Nowadays, the introduction of inmunohistochemical techniques associated to specific antibodies and studies with retrograde tracers in nerves have allowed greater understanding of disc innervation in physiological and pathological conditions and also endings characteristics and their patterns of distribution in both situations. The existing controversies regarding structural basis of discogenic pain, have raised the interest of knowing the influence of innervation in back pain from discal origin and its characteristics. Today, we know that pathologic neoinnervation accompanying radial fissures is an important factor in the genesis of discogenic pain; within a complex mechanism in which other neurobiomechemical, inflammatory and biomechanical factors are involved. PMID:23582224

  3. Compartmentalized Innervation of Primate Lateral Rectus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Michelle; Poukens, Vadims; da Silva Costa, Roberta Martins; Yoo, Lawrence; Tychsen, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Skeletal and craniofacial muscles are frequently composed of multiple neuromuscular compartments that serve different physiological functions. Evidence of possible regional selectivity in LR intramuscular innervation was sought in a study of the anatomic potential of lateral rectus (LR) muscle compartmentalization. Methods. Whole orbits of two humans and five macaque monkeys were serially sectioned at 10-μm thickness and stained with Masson trichrome. The abducens nerve (CN6) was traced anteriorly from the deep orbit as it branched to enter the LR and arborized among extraocular muscle (EOM) fibers. Three-dimensional reconstruction was performed in human and monkey orbits. Results. Findings were in concordance in the monkey and human orbits. External to the LR global surface, CN6 bifurcated into approximately equal-sized trunks before entering the global layer. Subsequent arborization showed a systematic topography, entering a well-defined inferior zone 0.4 to 2.5 mm more posteriorly than branches entering the largely nonoverlapping superior zone. Zonal innervation remained segregated anteriorly and laterally within the LR. Conclusions. Consistent segregation of intramuscular CN6 arborization in humans and monkeys suggests functionally distinct superior and inferior zones for the LR. Since the LR is shaped as a broad vertical strap, segregated control of the two zones could activate them separately, potentially mediating previously unappreciated but substantial torsional and vertical oculorotary LR actions. PMID:20435590

  4. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  5. Characterization of Mouse Lumbar Splanchnic and Pelvic Nerve Urinary Bladder Mechanosensory Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linjing; Gebhart, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory information from the urinary bladder is conveyed via lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and sacral pelvic (PN) nerves to the spinal cord. In the present report we compared the mechanosensitive properties of single afferent fibers in these two pathways using an in vitro mouse bladder preparation. Mechanosensitive primary afferents were recorded from the LSN or PN and distinguished based on their response to receptive field stimulation with different mechanical stimuli: probing (160 mg to 2 g), stretch (1–25 g), and stroking of the urothelium (10–1,000 mg). Four different classes of afferent were recorded from the LSN and PN: serosal, muscular, muscular/urothielial, and urothelial. The LSN contained principally serosal and muscular afferents (97% of the total sample), whereas all four afferent classes of afferent were present in the PN (63% of which were muscular afferents). In addition, the respective proportions and receptive field distributions differed between the two pathways. Both low- and high-threshold stretch-sensitive muscular afferents were present in both pathways, and muscular afferents in the PN were shown to sensitize after exposure to an inflammatory soup cocktail. The LSN and PN pathways contain different populations of mechanosensitive afferents capable of detecting a range of mechanical stimuli and individually tuned to detect the type, magnitude, and duration of the stimulus. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the potential roles these two pathways play in conveying mechanical information from the bladder to the spinal cord. PMID:18003875

  6. Morphology and Neurochemistry of Rabbit Iris Innervation

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiucheng; Bazan, Haydee E.P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to map the entire nerve architecture and sensory neuropeptide content of the rabbit iris. Irises from New Zealand rabbits were stained with antibodies against neuronal-class βIII-tubulin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP), and whole-mount images were acquired to build a two-dimensional view of the iridal nerve architecture. After taking images in time-lapse mode, we observed thick nerves running in the iris stroma close to the anterior epithelia, forming four to five stromal nerve rings from the iris periphery to the pupillary margin and sub-branches that connected with each other, constituting the stromal nerve plexus. In the anterior side, fine divisions derivated from the stromal nerves, forming a nerve network-like structure to innervate the superficial anterior border layer, with the pupillary margin having the densest innervation. In the posterior side, the nerve bundles ran along with the pupil dilator muscle in a radial pattern. The morphology of the iris nerves on both sides changed with pupil size. To obtain the relative content of the neuropeptides in the iris, the specimens were double stained with βIII-tubulin and CGRP or SP antibodies. Relative nerve fiber densities for each fiber population were assessed quantitatively by computer-assisted analysis. On the anterior side, CGRP-positive nerve fibers constituted about 61%, while SP-positive nerves constitute about 30.5%, of the total nerve content, which was expressed as βIII tubulin-positive fibers. In addition, in the anterior stroma of the collarette region, there were non-neuronal cells that were positive for SP. On the posterior side, CGRP-positive nerve fibers were about 69% of total nerve content, while SP constituted only up to 20%. Similarly, in the trigeminal ganglia (TG), the number of CGRP-positive neurons significantly outnumbered those that were positive for SP. Also, all the SP-positive neurons were labeled with CGRP. This is the

  7. Intraspinal sprouting of unmyelinated pelvic afferents after complete spinal cord injury is correlated with autonomic dysreflexia induced by visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Duale, Hanad; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a potentially life-threatening hypertensive syndrome following high thoracic (T) spinal cord injury (SCI). It is commonly triggered by noxious pelvic stimuli below the injury site that correlates with increased sprouting of primary afferent C-fibers into the lumbosacral spinal cord. We have recently demonstrated that injury-induced plasticity of lumbosacral propriospinal neurons, which relay pelvic visceral sensations to thoracolumbar sympathetic preganglionic neurons, is also correlated with the development of this syndrome. To determine the phenotype of pelvic afferent fiber sprouts after SCI, cholera toxin subunit beta (CTb) was injected into the distal colon 2 weeks post T4 transection/sham to label colonic visceral afferents. After 1 week transport, the lumbosacral spinal cords were cryosectioned and immunohistochemically stained for CTb, the nociceptive-specific marker calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and the myelinated fiber marker RT97. Quantitative analysis showed that the density of CGRP+ afferent fibers was significantly increased in the L6/S1 dorsal horns of T4-transected versus sham rats, whereas RT97+ afferent fiber density showed no change. Importantly, CTb-labeled pelvic afferent fibers were co-localized with CGRP+ fibers, but not with RT97+ fibers. These results suggest that the sprouting of unmyelinated nociceptive pelvic afferents following high thoracic SCI, but not myelinated fibers, contributes to hypertensive autonomic dysreflexia induced by pelvic visceral pain. PMID:19146928

  8. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  9. Identification of Different Types of Spinal Afferent Nerve Endings That Encode Noxious and Innocuous Stimuli in the Large Intestine Using a Novel Anterograde Tracing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  10. Determinants of Spatial and Temporal Coding by Semicircular Canal Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Stephen M.; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Holstein, Gay R.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular semicircular canals are internal sensors that signal the magnitude, direction, and temporal properties of angular head motion. Fluid mechanics within the 3-canal labyrinth code the direction of movement and integrate angular acceleration stimuli over time. Directional coding is accomplished by decomposition of complex angular accelerations into 3 biomechanical components—one component exciting each of the 3 ampullary organs and associated afferent nerve bundles separately. For low-frequency angular motion stimuli, fluid displacement within each canal is proportional to angular acceleration. At higher frequencies, above the lower corner frequency, real-time integration is accomplished by viscous forces arising from the movement of fluid within the slender lumen of each canal. This results in angular velocity sensitive fluid displacements. Reflecting this, a subset of afferent fibers indeed report angular acceleration to the brain for low frequencies of head movement and report angular velocity for higher frequencies. However, a substantial number of afferent fibers also report angular acceleration, or a signal between acceleration and velocity, even at frequencies where the endolymph displacement is known to follow angular head velocity. These non-velocity-sensitive afferent signals cannot be attributed to canal biomechanics alone. The responses of non-velocity-sensitive cells include a mathematical differentiation (first-order or fractional) imparted by hair-cell and/or afferent complexes. This mathematical differentiation from velocity to acceleration cannot be attributed to hair cell ionic currents, but occurs as a result of the dynamics of synaptic transmission between hair cells and their primary afferent fibers. The evidence for this conclusion is reviewed below. PMID:15845995

  11. Modulation of vagal afferent excitation and reduction of food intake by leptin and cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Peters, James H; Simasko, Steven M; Ritter, Robert C

    2006-11-30

    The gut-peptide, cholecystokinin (CCK), reduces food intake by acting at CCK-1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons, whereas the feeding effects of the adipokine hormone, leptin, are associated primarily with its action on receptors (ObRb) in the hypothalamus. Recently, however, ObRb mRNA has been reported in vagal afferent neurons, some of which also express CCK-1 receptor, suggesting that leptin, alone or in cooperation with CCK, might activate vagal afferent neurons, and influence food intake via a vagal route. To evaluate these possibilities we have been examining the cellular and behavioral effects of leptin and CCK on vagal afferent neurons. In cultured vagal afferent neurons leptin and CCK evoked short latency, transient depolarizations, often leading to action potentials, and increases in cytosolic calcium. There was a much higher prevalence of CCK and leptin sensitivity amongst cultured vagal afferent neurons that innervate stomach or duodenum than there was in the overall vagal afferent population. Furthermore, almost all leptin-responsive gastric and duodenal vagal afferents also were sensitive to CCK. Leptin, infused into the upper GI tract arterial supply, reduced meal size, and enhanced satiation evoked by CCK. These results indicate that vagal afferent neurons are activated by leptin, and that this activation is likely to participate in meal termination, perhaps by enhancing vagal sensitivity to CCK. Our findings are consistent with the view that leptin and CCK exert their influence on food intake by accessing multiple neural systems (viscerosensory, motivational, affective and motor) at multiple points along the neuroaxis. PMID:16872644

  12. Innervation of propatagial musculature in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans (Rodentia, Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Chickering, J G; Sokoloff, A J

    1996-01-01

    The propatagium of gliding and flying mammals is of both functional and phylogenetic interest. The innervation of the propatagial muscle, platysma II, was studied with the axonal tracer wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans. Injections of WGA-HRP into the proximal third of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the lateral part of the medial subdivision of the ipsilateral facial nucleus and in the ipsilateral ventral horn of the brachial enlargement. Injections into distal regions of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the ipsilateral ventral horn of spinal segments C5-C8 but not in the facial nucleus. Injections along the whole length of the muscle labeled afferent axons in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of spinal segments C4-T1. These results demonstrate a mixed facial and spinal motor innervation of propatagial musculature in the flying squirrel and indicate that this pattern of mixed innervation is more widespread among flying and gliding mammals than previously reported. Mixed facial and cervical propatagial innervation, independently derived in different flying and gliding mammals, may represent a common solution in the design of the propatagium. These findings complicate the use of propatagial muscle innervation patterns for the establishment of phylogenetic relationships among flying and gliding mammals. PMID:8834780

  13. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  14. Structure of the Afferent Terminals in Terminal Ganglion of a Cricket and Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacob; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    We use topological data analysis to investigate the three dimensional spatial structure of the locus of afferent neuron terminals in crickets Acheta domesticus. Each afferent neuron innervates a filiform hair positioned on a cercus: a protruding appendage at the rear of the animal. The hairs transduce air motion to the neuron signal that is used by a cricket to respond to the environment. We stratify the hairs (and the corresponding afferent terminals) into classes depending on hair length, along with position. Our analysis uncovers significant structure in the relative position of these terminal classes and suggests the functional relevance of this structure. Our method is very robust to the presence of significant experimental and developmental noise. It can be used to analyze a wide range of other point cloud data sets. PMID:22649516

  15. Enhanced Muscle Afferent Signals during Motor Learning in Humans.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2016-04-25

    Much has been revealed concerning human motor learning at the behavioral level [1, 2], but less is known about changes in the involved neural circuits and signals. By examining muscle spindle responses during a classic visuomotor adaptation task [3-6] performed by fully alert humans, I found substantial modulation of sensory afferent signals as a function of adaptation state. Specifically, spindle control was independent of concurrent muscle activity but was specific to movement direction (representing muscle lengthening versus shortening) and to different stages of learning. Increased spindle afferent responses to muscle stretch occurring early during learning reflected individual error size and were negatively related to subsequent antagonist activity (i.e., 60-80 ms thereafter). Relative increases in tonic afferent output early during learning were predictive of the subjects' adaptation rate. I also found that independent spindle control during sensory realignment (the "washout" stage) induced afferent signal "linearization" with respect to muscle length (i.e., signals were more tuned to hand position). The results demonstrate for the first time that motor learning also involves independent and state-related modulation of sensory mechanoreceptor signals. The current findings suggest that adaptive motor performance also relies on the independent control of sensors, not just of muscles. I propose that the "γ" motor system innervating spindles acts to facilitate the acquisition and extraction of task-relevant information at the early stages of sensorimotor adaptation. This designates a more active and targeted role for the human proprioceptive system during motor learning. PMID:27040776

  16. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds123

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  17. Immunohistochemical evidence for preserved innervation of the human cervix during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bryman, I; Norström, A; Dahlström, A; Lindblom, B

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence for a denervation of the human myometrium during pregnancy has previously been demonstrated. In the present study the innervation of the human cervix has been investigated in nonpregnant, early pregnant and term pregnant women. An indirect immunofluorescence method, using an antiserum to the Schwann cell specific S-100 protein, was applied to document the distribution of nerve fibers in cervical tissue biopsies. In nonpregnant, as well as in pregnant women, the cervix was by far more densely innervated than the rest of the uterus. No obvious difference in nerve density was observed between nonpregnant, early pregnant and term pregnant women, and still during labor the innervation appeared morphologically preserved. It is suggested that the segmental difference in innervation of the human uterus (corpus versus cervix) may have specific importance for myometrial and cervical contractility during pregnancy and parturition. PMID:3653786

  18. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  19. The afferent signaling complex: Regulation of type I spiral ganglion neuron responses in the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Reijntjes, Daniël O J; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-06-01

    The spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the first action potential generating neurons in the auditory pathway. The type I SGNs contact the sensory inner hair cells via their peripheral dendrites and relay auditory information to the brainstem via their central axon fibers. Individual afferent fibers show differences in response properties that are essential for normal hearing. The mechanisms that give rise to the heterogeneity of afferent responses are very poorly understood but are likely already in place at the peripheral dendrites where synapses are formed and action potentials are generated. To identify these molecular mechanisms, this review synthesizes a variety of literature and comprehensively outlines the cellular and molecular components positioned to regulate SGN afferent dendrite excitability, especially following glutamate release. These components include 1) proteins of the SGN postsynapses and neighboring supporting cells that together shape glutamatergic signaling, 2) the ion channels and transporters that determine the intrinsic excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites, and 3) the neurotransmitter receptors that extrinsically modify this excitability via synaptic input from the lateral olivocochlear efferents. This cellular and molecular machinery, together with presynaptic specializations of the inner hair cells, can be collectively referred to as the type I afferent signaling complex. As this review underscores, interactions of this signaling complex determine excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites and the afferent fiber responses. Moreover, this complex establishes the environmental milieu critical for the development and maintenance of the SGN afferent dendrites and synapses. Motivated by these important functions, this review also indicates areas of future research to elucidate the contributions of the afferent signaling complex to both normal hearing and also hearing loss. PMID:27018296

  20. Fiber components of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gacek, R R; Lyon, M J

    1976-01-01

    Experimental neuroanatomical methods were employed in 21 adult cats to determine 1) the number and size of myelinated motor and sensory fibers in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and 2) the fiber components originating in the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and retrofacial nucleus (RFN) of the brain stem. Intracranial transection of the X and XI cranial nerves and selective destruction of the NA or RFN were the experimental lesions inflicted in order to obtain the following results. About 55% (312) of the right RLN (565 fibers) is composed of myelinated motor nerve fibers which measure 4 mu - 9 mu in diameter. Nine percent come from the RFN and are smaller (4-6 mu) than the 46% which emanate from the NA and measure 6-9 mu in diameter. The remaining 45% of the RLN is made up of sensory neurons which can be divided into three groups. 1) The largest numerical group (32%) is very small in caliber (1-3 mu) and supplies extralaryngeal regions (trachea, esophagus). 2) The intermediate size fiber group (4-9 mu) comprises 11% of the RLN and probably supplies the subglottic mucosa. 3) The smallest group (2%) of sensory fibers is the largest in diameter (10-15 mu) and may represent either the innervation of muscle spindles or afferents from the superior laryngeal nerve coursing down into the chest. PMID:949153

  1. Response properties of gerbil otolith afferents to small angle pitch and roll tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Angelaki, D. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The responses from isolated single otolith afferent fibers were obtained to small angle sinusoidal pitch and roll tilts in anesthetized gerbils. The stimulus directions that produced the maximum (response vector) and minimum response sensitivities were determined for each otolith afferent, with response vectors for the units being spread throughout the horizontal plane, similar to those reported for other species. A breadth of tuning measure was derived, with narrowly tuned neurons responding maximally to stimulation in one direction and minimally along an orthogonal ('null') direction. Most (approximately 80%) otolith afferents are narrowly tuned, however, some fibers were broadly tuned responding significantly to stimulations in any direction in the horizontal plane. The number of broadly tuned otolith afferents (approximately 20%) differs significantly from the more substantial number of broadly tuned vestibular nuclei neurons (88%) recently reported in rats.

  2. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  3. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spikemore » due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.« less

  4. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons.

    PubMed

    Dieni, Cristina V; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B; Kuo, Chay T; Wadiche, Jacques I; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  5. Roles of isolectin B4-binding afferents in colorectal mechanical nociception.

    PubMed

    La, Jun-Ho; Feng, Bin; Kaji, Kaori; Schwartz, Erica S; Gebhart, G F

    2016-02-01

    Isolectin B4-binding (IB4+) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are distinct from peptidergic DRG neurons in their terminal location in the spinal cord and respective contributions to various classes and modalities of nociception. In DRG neurons innervating the mouse colon (c-DRG neurons), the reported proportion of IB4+ population is inconsistent across studies, and little is known regarding their role in colorectal mechanonociception. To address these issues, in C57BL/6J mice, we quantified IB4+ binding after labeling c-DRG neurons with Fast Blue and examined functional consequences of ablating these neurons by IB4-conjugated saporin. Sixty-one percent of Fast Blue-labeled neurons in the L6 DRG were IB4+, and 95% of these IB4+ c-DRG neurons were peptidergic. Intrathecal administration of IB4-conjugated saporin reduced the proportion of IB4+ c-DRG neurons to 37%, which was due to the loss of c-DRG neurons showing strong to medium IB4+ intensity; c-DRG neurons with weak IB4+ intensity were spared. However, this loss altered neither nociceptive behaviors to colorectal distension nor the relative proportions of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent classes characterized by single-fiber recordings. These findings demonstrate that more than 1 half of viscerosensory L6 c-DRG neurons in C57BL/6J mouse are IB4+ and suggest, in contrast to the reported roles of IB4+/nonpeptidergic neurons in cutaneous mechanonociception, c-DRG neurons with strong-to-medium IB4+ intensity do not play a significant role in colorectal mechanonociception. PMID:26447707

  6. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  7. Efferent Control of Hair Cell and Afferent Responses in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Richard; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Highstein, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The sensations of sound and motion generated by the inner ear are controlled by the brain through extensive centripetal innervation originating within the brain stem. In the semicircular canals, brain stem efferent neurons make synaptic contacts with mechanosensory hair cells and with the dendrites of afferent neurons. Here, we examine the relative contributions of efferent action on hair cells and afferents. Experiments were performed in vivo in the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. The efferent system was activated via electrical pulses to the brain stem and sensory responses to motion stimuli were quantified by simultaneous voltage recording from afferents and intracellular current- and/or voltage-clamp recordings from hair cells. Results showed synaptic inputs to both afferents and hair cells leading to relatively long-latency intracellular signaling responses: excitatory in afferents and inhibitory in hair cells. Generally, the net effect of efferent action was an increase in afferent background discharge and a simultaneous decrease in gain to angular motion stimuli. Inhibition of hair cells was likely the result of a ligand-gated opening of a major basolateral conductance. The reversal potential of the efferent-evoked current was just below the hair cell resting potential, thus resulting in a small hyperpolarization. The onset latency averaged about 90 ms and latency to peak response was 150–400 ms. Hair cell inhibition often outlasted afferent excitation and, in some cases, latched hair cells in the “off” condition for >1 s following cessation of stimulus. These features endow the animal with a powerful means to adjust the sensitivity and dynamic range of motion sensation. PMID:19571186

  8. Crossed motor innervation of the base of human tongue

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S.; Nicholas, Christian L.; Cori, Jennifer M.; Semmler, John G.; Trinder, John

    2015-01-01

    Muscle fibers of the genioglossus (GG) form the bulk of the muscle mass at the base of the tongue. The motor control of the tongue is critical for vocalization, feeding, and breathing. Our goal was to assess the patterns of motor innervation of GG single motor units (SMUs) in humans. Simultaneous monopolar recordings were obtained from four sites in the base of the tongue bilaterally at two antero-posterior levels from 16 resting, awake, healthy adult males, who wore a face mask with airway pressure and airflow sensors. We analyzed 69 data segments in which at least one lead contained large action potentials generated by an SMU. Such potentials served as triggers for spike-triggered averaging (STA) of signals recorded from the other three sites. Spontaneous activity of the SMUs was classified as inspiratory modulated, expiratory modulated, or tonic. Consistent with the antero-posterior orientation of GG fibers, 44 STAs (77%) recorded ipsilateral to the trigger yielded sharp action potentials with a median amplitude of 52 μV [interquartile range (IQR): 25–190] that were time shifted relative to the trigger by about 1 ms. Notably, 48% of recordings on the side opposite to the trigger also yielded sharp action potentials. Of those, 17 (29%) had a median amplitude of 63 μV (IQR: 39–96), and most were generated by tonic SMUs. Thus a considerable proportion of GG muscle fibers receive a crossed motor innervation. Crossed innervation may help ensure symmetry and stability of tongue position and movements under normal conditions and following injury or degenerative changes affecting the tongue. PMID:25855691

  9. Crossed motor innervation of the base of human tongue.

    PubMed

    Kubin, Leszek; Jordan, Amy S; Nicholas, Christian L; Cori, Jennifer M; Semmler, John G; Trinder, John

    2015-06-01

    Muscle fibers of the genioglossus (GG) form the bulk of the muscle mass at the base of the tongue. The motor control of the tongue is critical for vocalization, feeding, and breathing. Our goal was to assess the patterns of motor innervation of GG single motor units (SMUs) in humans. Simultaneous monopolar recordings were obtained from four sites in the base of the tongue bilaterally at two antero-posterior levels from 16 resting, awake, healthy adult males, who wore a face mask with airway pressure and airflow sensors. We analyzed 69 data segments in which at least one lead contained large action potentials generated by an SMU. Such potentials served as triggers for spike-triggered averaging (STA) of signals recorded from the other three sites. Spontaneous activity of the SMUs was classified as inspiratory modulated, expiratory modulated, or tonic. Consistent with the antero-posterior orientation of GG fibers, 44 STAs (77%) recorded ipsilateral to the trigger yielded sharp action potentials with a median amplitude of 52 μV [interquartile range (IQR): 25-190] that were time shifted relative to the trigger by about 1 ms. Notably, 48% of recordings on the side opposite to the trigger also yielded sharp action potentials. Of those, 17 (29%) had a median amplitude of 63 μV (IQR: 39-96), and most were generated by tonic SMUs. Thus a considerable proportion of GG muscle fibers receive a crossed motor innervation. Crossed innervation may help ensure symmetry and stability of tongue position and movements under normal conditions and following injury or degenerative changes affecting the tongue. PMID:25855691

  10. Receptive field size, chemical and thermal responses, and fiber conduction velocity of rat chorda tympani geniculate ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yusuke; Bradley, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    Afferent chorda tympani (CT) fibers innervating taste and somatosensory receptors in fungiform papillae have neuron cell bodies in the geniculate ganglion (GG). The GG/CT fibers branch in the tongue to innervate taste buds in several fungiform papillae. To investigate receptive field characteristics of GG/CT neurons, we recorded extracellular responses from GG cells to application of chemical and thermal stimuli. Receptive field size was mapped by electrical stimulation of individual fungiform papillae. Response latency to electrical stimulation was used to determine fiber conduction velocity. Responses of GG neurons to lingual application of stimuli representing four taste qualities, and water at 4°C, were used to classify neuron response properties. Neurons classified as SALT, responding only to NaCl and NH4Cl, had a mean receptive field size of six papillae. Neurons classified as OTHER responded to salts and other chemical stimuli and had smaller mean receptive fields of four papillae. Neurons that responded to salts and cold stimuli, classified as SALT/THERMAL, and neurons responding to salts, other chemical stimuli and cold, classified as OTHER/THERMAL, had mean receptive field sizes of six and five papillae, respectively. Neurons responding only to cold stimuli, categorized as THERMAL, had receptive fields of one to two papillae located at the tongue tip. Based on conduction velocity most of the neurons were classified as C fibers. Neurons with large receptive fields had higher conduction velocities than neurons with small receptive fields. These results demonstrate that GG neurons can be distinguished by receptive field size, response properties and afferent fiber conduction velocity derived from convergent input of multiple taste organs. PMID:27030734

  11. Spatial convergence and divergence between cutaneous afferent axons and dorsal horn cells are not constant.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Harton, P; Millecchia, R; Lawson, J; Kunjara-Na-Ayudhya, T; Stephens, S; Miller, M A; Hicks, L; Culberson, J

    2000-05-01

    We have proposed a quantitative model of the development of dorsal horn cell receptive fields (RFs) and somatotopic organization (Brown et al. [1997] Somatosens. Motor Res. 14:93-106). One component of that model is a hypothesis that convergence and divergence of connections between low-threshold primary afferent mechanoreceptive axons and dorsal horn cells are invariant over skin location and dorsal horn location. The more limited, and more easily tested, hypothesis that spatial convergence and divergence between cutaneous mechanoreceptors and dorsal horn cell are constant was examined. Spatial divergence is the number of dorsal horn cells whose RFs overlap the RF center of a primary afferent, and spatial convergence is the number of afferent RF centers that lie within the RF of a dorsal horn cell. Innervation density was determined as a function of location on the hindlimb by using peripheral nerve recording and axon counting. A descriptive model of dorsal horn cell receptive fields (Brown et al. [1998] J. Neurophysiol. 31:833-848) was used to simulate RFs of the entire dorsal horn cell population in order to estimate RF area and map scale as a function of location on the hindlimb. Previously reported correlations among innervation density, map scale, and RF size were confirmed. However, these correlations were not linear. The hypothesis that spatial convergence and divergence are constant was rejected. The previously proposed model of development of dorsal horn cell somatotopy and RF geometries must be revised to take variable spatial convergence and divergence into account. PMID:10754502

  12. Control of arousal through neuropeptide afferents of the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Gerard A

    2016-06-15

    The locus coeruleus-norepinephine (LC-NE) system is implicated in mediating several aspects of arousal. Alterations in LC neuronal discharge is associated with distinct changes in behavior, cognition, sensory processing and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Changes in LC output and subsequent release of NE in target brain regions help adjust arousal state to respond appropriately to environmental conditions and behavioral circumstances. One way in which LC activity is controlled is through release of endogenous neuropeptides. Based on the sleep-wake cycle and environmental cues specific neuropeptide afferent systems are activated, innervating the LC. These neuropeptides include: corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), orexin (ORX), endogenous opioids, substance P (SP), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS). This review summarizes studies examining the neuroanatomical projections of these neuropeptides, their receptors in the LC, the actions on LC neurons and downstream NE release, as well as the behavioral and cognitive effects associated individual neuropeptide-mediated innervation of the LC. Finally, the relationship between individual neuropeptides, the LC-NE system and various clinical disorders is discussed, providing evidence for possible therapeutic targets for treatment of several arousal- and stress-related disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26688115

  13. Alterations in the distal colon innervation in Winnie mouse model of spontaneous chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ahmed A; Robinson, Ainsley M; Jovanovska, Valentina; Eri, Rajaraman; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2015-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is innervated by extrinsic sympathetic, parasympathetic and sensory nerve fibers as well as by intrinsic fibers from the neurons in myenteric and submucosal ganglia embedded into the gastrointestinal wall. Morphological and functional studies of intestinal innervation in animal models are important for understanding the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The recently established Winnie mouse model of spontaneous chronic colitis caused by a point mutation in the Muc2 mucin gene develops inflammation due to a primary epithelial defect. Winnie mice display symptoms of diarrhea, ulcerations and rectal bleeding similar to those in IBD. In this study, we investigated myenteric neurons, noradrenergic, cholinergic and sensory nerve fibers in the distal colon of Winnie (Win/Win) mice compared to C57/BL6 and heterozygote littermates (Win/Wt) using histological and immunohistochemical methods. All Win/Win mice used in this study had inflammation with signs of mucosal damage, goblet cell loss, thickening of muscle and mucosal layers, and increased CD45-immunoreactivity in the distal colon. The density of sensory, cholinergic and noradrenergic fibers innervating the myenteric plexus, muscle and mucosa significantly decreased in the distal colon of Win/Win mice compared to C57/BL6 and Win/Wt mice, while the total number of myenteric neurons as well as subpopulations of cholinergic and nitrergic neurons remained unchanged. In conclusion, changes in the colon morphology and innervation found in Winnie mice have multiple similarities with changes observed in patients with ulcerative colitis. PMID:26227258

  14. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S.; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15–60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14–28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14–28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs. PMID:22859364

  15. Thyroid hormone is required for the pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Balasubbu, S; Mustapha, M

    2016-01-15

    Afferent connections to the sensory inner (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) in the cochlea refine and functionally mature during the thyroid hormone (TH)-critical period of inner ear development that occurs perinatally in rodents. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypothyroidism on afferent type II innervation to outer hair cells using the Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1(dw)). Using a transgenic approach to specifically label type II spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), we found that lack of TH causes persistence of excess type II SGN connections to the OHCs, as well as continued expression of the hair cell functional marker, otoferlin (OTOF), in the OHCs beyond the maturation period. We also observed a concurrent delay in efferent attachment to the OHCs. Supplementing with TH during the early postnatal period from postnatal day (P) 3 to P4 reversed the defect in type II SGN pruning but did not alter OTOF expression. Our results show that hypothyroidism causes a defect in the large-scale pruning of afferent type II SGNs in the cochlea, and a delay in efferent attachment and the maturation of OTOF expression. Our data suggest that the state of maturation of hair cells, as determined by OTOF expression, may not regulate the pruning of their afferent innervation. PMID:26592716

  16. Circadian variation in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Frisby, Claudine L; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2013-12-01

    Food intake is coordinated to cellular metabolism by clock gene expression with a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus synchronized by light exposure. Gastric vagal afferents play a role in regulating food intake, but it is unknown whether they exhibit circadian variation in their mechanosensitivity. We aimed to determine whether gastric vagal afferents express clock genes and whether their response to mechanical stimuli oscillates throughout the light/dark cycle. Nodose ganglia were collected from 8-week-old female C57BL/6 mice every 3 h starting at lights off (1800 h) to quantify Bmal1, Per1, Per2, and Nr1d1 mRNA by qRT-PCR. Additionally in vitro single-fiber recordings of gastric vagal mechanoreceptors were taken at all time points. Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Nr1d1 mRNA is expressed in the nodose ganglia and levels oscillated over a 24 h period. In mice fed ad libitum, gastric content was 3 times higher at 0000 h and 0300 h than 1200 h. The response of tension receptors to 3 g stretch was reduced by up to 70% at 2100 h, 0000 h, and 0300 h compared with 1200 h. Gastric mucosal receptor response to stroking with a 50 mg von Frey hair was 3 times greater at 1200 h and 1500 h than the response at 0000 h. Similar findings were obtained in mice fasted for 6 h or maintained in darkness for 3 d before study. Therefore, these changes do not result from food intake or the light/dark cycle. Thus, gastric vagal mechanoreceptors display circadian rhythm, which may act to control food intake differentially at different times of the day. PMID:24305819

  17. A Method to Target and Isolate Airway-innervating Sensory Neurons in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kaelberer, Melanie Maya; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory nerves transduce thermal, mechanical, chemical, and noxious stimuli caused by both endogenous and environmental agents. The cell bodies of these afferent neurons are located within the sensory ganglia. Sensory ganglia innervate a specific organ or portion of the body. For instance, the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are located in the vertebral column and extend processes throughout the body and limbs. The trigeminal ganglia are located in the skull and innervate the face, and upper airways. Vagal afferents of the nodose ganglia extend throughout the gut, heart, and lungs. The nodose neurons control a diverse array of functions such as: respiratory rate, airway irritation, and cough reflexes. Thus, to understand and manipulate their function, it is critical to identify and isolate airway specific neuronal sub-populations. In the mouse, the airways are exposed to a fluorescent tracer dye, Fast Blue, for retrograde tracing of airway-specific nodose neurons. The nodose ganglia are dissociated and fluorescence activated cell (FAC) sorting is used to collect dye positive cells. Next, high quality ribonucleic acid (RNA) is extracted from dye positive cells for next generation sequencing. Using this method airway specific neuronal gene expression is determined. PMID:27168016

  18. Type II spiral ganglion afferent neurons drive medial olivocochlear reflex suppression of the cochlear amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Froud, Kristina E.; Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Cederholm, Jennie M. E.; Klugmann, Matthias; Sandow, Shaun L.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F.; Housley, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic adjustment of hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity is mediated by the medial olivocochlear efferent reflex, which suppresses the gain of the ‘cochlear amplifier' in each ear. Such efferent feedback is important for promoting discrimination of sounds in background noise, sound localization and protecting the cochleae from acoustic overstimulation. However, the sensory driver for the olivocochlear reflex is unknown. Here, we resolve this longstanding question using a mouse model null for the gene encoding the type III intermediate filament peripherin (Prph). Prph(−/−) mice lacked type II spiral ganglion neuron innervation of the outer hair cells, whereas innervation of the inner hair cells by type I spiral ganglion neurons was normal. Compared with Prph(+/+) controls, both contralateral and ipsilateral olivocochlear efferent-mediated suppression of the cochlear amplifier were absent in Prph(−/−) mice, demonstrating that outer hair cells and their type II afferents constitute the sensory drive for the olivocochlear efferent reflex. PMID:25965946

  19. Npn-1 Contributes to Axon-Axon Interactions That Differentially Control Sensory and Motor Innervation of the Limb

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Novitch, Bennett G.; Huber, Andrea B.

    2011-01-01

    The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs. PMID:21364975

  20. Deficient Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Innervation in the Sweat Glands of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz-Erian, Peter; Dey, Richard D.; Flux, Marinus; Said, Sami I.

    1985-09-01

    The innervation of acini and ducts of eccrine sweat glands by immunoreactive, vasoactive intestinal peptide--containing nerve fibers was sharply reduced in seven patients with cystic fibrosis compared to eight normal subjects. The decrease in innervation by this neuropeptide, which has been shown to promote blood flow and the movement of water and chloride across epithelial surfaces in other systems, may be a basic mechanism for the decreased water content and relative impermeability of the epithelium to chloride and other ions that characterize cystic fibrosis.

  1. Botulinum toxin in Migraine: Role of transport in trigemino-somatic and trigemino-vascular afferents

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, Ramachandran; Carmen, Lam; Yaksh Tony, L

    2015-01-01

    Migraine secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Reported efficacy of extracranial botulinum toxin (BoNT) in treating migraine is surprising since a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for its effect upon meningeal input. We hypothesize that intradermal BoNT acts through central transport in somatic afferents. Anesthetized C57Bl/6 mice (male) received unilateral supraorbital (SO) injections of BoNT-B (1.5 U/40 μl) or saline. 3 days later, mice received ipsilateral (ipsi) -SO capsaicin (2.5 μg/30 μl) or meningeal capsaicin (4 μl of 1mg/ml). Pre-treatment with ipsi-SO BONT-B i) decreased nocicsponsive ipsilateral wiping behavior following ipsi-SO capsaicin; ii) produced cleavage of VAMP in the V1 region of ipsi-TG and in TG neurons showing WGA after SO injection; iii) reduced expression of c-fos in ipsi-TNC following ipsi-SO capsaicin; iv) reduced c-fos activation and NK-1 internalization in ipsi-TNC secondary to ipsi-meningeal capsaicin; vi) SO WGA did not label dural afferents. We conclude that BoNT-B is taken up by peripheral afferents and transported to central terminals where it inhibits transmitter release resulting in decreased activation of second order neurons. Further, this study supports the hypothesis that SO BoNT exerts a trans-synaptic action on either the second order neuron (which receives convergent input from the meningeal afferent) or the terminal/TG of the converging meningeal afferent. PMID:25958249

  2. Direct targeting of peptidergic amygdalar neurons by noradrenergic afferents: linking stress-integrative circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Kravets, J. L.; Reyes, B. A. S.; Unterwald, E. M.; Van Bockstaele, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalar norepinephrine (NE) plays a key role in regulating neural responses to emotionally arousing stimuli and is involved in memory consolidation of emotionally charged events. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and dynorphin (DYN), two neuropeptides that mediate the physiological and behavioral responses to stress, are abundant in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and directly innervate brainstem noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. Whether the CRF- and DYN-containing amygdalar neurons receive direct noradrenergic innervation has not yet been elucidated. The present study sought to define cellular substrates underlying noradrenergic modulation of CRF- and DYN-containing neurons in the CeA using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that NE-labeled axon terminals form synapses with CRF- and DYN-containing neurons in the CeA. Semi-quantitative analysis showed that approximately 31% of NET-labeled axon terminals targeted CeA neurons that co-expressed DYN and CRF. As a major source of CRF innervation to the LC, it is also not known whether CRF-containing CeA neurons are directly targeted by noradrenergic afferents. To test this, retrograde tract-tracing using FluoroGold (FG) from the LC was combined with immunocytochemical detection of CRF and NET in the CeA. Our results revealed a population of LC-projecting CRF-containing CeA neurons that are directly innervated by NE afferents. Analysis showed that approximately 34% of NET-labeled axon terminals targeted LC-projecting CeA neurons that contain CRF. Taken together, these results indicate significant interactions between NE, CRF, and DYN in this critical limbic region and reveal direct synaptic interactions of NE with amygdalar CRF that influence the LC-NE arousal system. PMID:24271021

  3. Extrinsic Sensory Innervation of the Gut: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Simon; Chen, Nan; Humenick, Adam; Spencer, Nick J; Costa, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Extrinsic sensory neurons play a key role in the function of the gastrointestinal tract. They are responsible for the sensations that arise in the gut and can initiate automatic reflexes. In some cases, disordered sensation is clinically problematic-pain, bloating, excessive urgency and nausea are well-known examples. Major advances have been made in understanding the function of somatic sensory neurons in the last 50 years. However, the sensory neurons that mediate sensations from the viscera remain less well understood. This is partly because viscera receive a dense autonomic innervation that can be difficult to separate from extrinsic sensory neurons. A key requirement to understand the genesis of sensation is to distinguish the different classes of sensory neurons and the types of stimuli which they encode. The aim of this short paper is to summarise what was known about these matters 30 years ago and highlight some of the major advances in the understanding of the types of extrinsic sensory neurons to the gut. Necessarily, the choice of papers is somewhat idiosyncratic, but they illustrate the range of advances that have been made in distinguishing the different classes of gastrointestinal afferent nerves. PMID:27379635

  4. Xanthine oxidase, but not neutrophils, contributes to activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2002-01-01

    Activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia causes angina and induces important cardiovascular reflex responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important chemical stimuli of cardiac afferents during and after ischaemia. Iron-catalysed Fenton chemistry constitutes one mechanism of production of hydroxyl radicals. Another potential source of these species is xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) also contribute to the production of ROS in some conditions. The present study tested the hypothesis that both xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines and neutrophils provide a source of ROS sufficient to activate cardiac afferents during ischaemia. We recorded single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the ventricles recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1-5) of anaesthetized cats to identify the afferents' responses to ischaemia. The role of xanthine oxidase in activation of these afferents was determined by infusion of oxypurinol (10 mg kg−1, i.v.), an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The importance of neutrophils as a potential source of ROS in the activation of cardiac afferents during ischaemia was assessed by the infusion of a polyclonal antibody (3 mg ml−1 kg−1, i.v.) raised in rabbits immunized with cat PMNs. This antibody decreased the number of circulating PMNs and, to a smaller extent, platelets. Since previous data suggest that platelets release serotonin (5-HT), which activates cardiac afferents through a serotonin receptor (subtype 3,5-HT3 receptor) mechanism, before treatment with the antibody in another group, we blocked 5-HT3 receptors on sensory nerve endings with tropisetron (300 μg kg−1, i.v.). We observed that oxypurinol significantly decreased the activity of cardiac afferents during myocardial ischaemia from 1.5 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 impulses s−1. Similarly, the polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the discharge frequency of

  5. Excitatory and inhibitory innervation of the mouse orofacial motor nuclei: A stereological study.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Oñate-Ponce, Alejandro; Fernández-Collemann, Sara; Henny, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Neurons in the trigeminal (Mo5), facial (Mo7), ambiguus (Amb), and hypoglossal (Mo12) motor nuclei innervate jaw, facial, pharynx/larynx/esophagus, and tongue muscles, respectively. They are essential for movements subserving feeding, exploration of the environment, and social communication. These neurons are largely controlled by sensory afferents and premotor neurons of the reticular formation, where central pattern generator circuits controlling orofacial movements are located. To provide a description of the orofacial nuclei of the adult mouse and to ascertain the influence of excitatory and inhibitory afferents upon them, we used stereology to estimate the number of motoneurons as well as of varicosities immunopositive for glutamate (VGluT1+, VGluT2+) and GABA/glycine (known as VIAAT+ or VGAT+) vesicular transporters in the Mo5, Mo7, Amb, and Mo12. Mo5, Mo7, Amb, and Mo12 contain ∼1,000, ∼3,000, ∼600, and ∼1,700 cells, respectively. VGluT1+, VGluT2+, and VIAAT+ varicosities respectively represent: 28%, 41%, and 31% in Mo5; 2%, 49%, and 49% in Mo7; 12%, 42%, and 46% in Amb; and 4%, 54%, and 42% in Mo12. The Mo5 jaw-closing subdivision shows the highest VGluT1+ innervation. Noticeably, the VGluT2+ and VIAAT+ varicosity density in Mo7 is 5-fold higher than in Mo5 and 10-fold higher than in Amb and Mo12. The high density of terminals in Mo7 likely reflects the convergence and integration of numerous inputs to motoneurons subserving the wide range of complex behaviors to which this nucleus contributes. Also, somatic versus neuropil location of varicosities suggests that most of these afferents are integrated in the dendritic trees of Mo7 neurons. PMID:26224546

  6. Endogenous bradykinin activates ischaemically sensitive cardiac visceral afferents through kinin B2 receptors in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Pan, Hui-Lin; Longhurst, John C

    1998-01-01

    Activity of ischaemically sensitive cardiac visceral afferents during myocardial ischaemia induces both angina and cardiovascular reflexes. Increased production of bradykinin (BK) and cyclo-oxygenase products (i.e. prostaglandins (PGs)) occurs during myocardial ischaemia. However, the role of these agents in activation of ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents has not been established. The present study tested the hypothesis that BK produced during ischaemia activates cardiac afferents through kinin B2 receptors. Single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the left ventricle was recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1–T4) of anaesthetized cats. Ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents were identified according to their response to 5 min of myocardial ischaemia. The mechanism of BK in activation of ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents was determined by injection of BK (1 μg kg−1 i.a.), des-Arg9-BK (1 μg kg−1 i.a., a specific kinin B1 receptor agonist), kinin B2 receptor antagonists: HOE140 (30 μg kg−1 i.v.) and NPC-17731 (40 μg kg−1 i.v.), cyclo-oxygenase inhibition with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1 i.v.) and NPC-17731 (40 μg kg−1 i.v.) after pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1 i.v.). We observed that BK increased the discharge rate of all eleven ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents from 0.39 ± 0.12 to 1.47 ± 0.37 impulses s−1 (P < 0.05). Conversely, des-Arg9-BK did not significantly increase the activity of eleven ischaemically sensitive fibres (0.58 ± 0.02 vs. 0.50 ± 0.18 impulses s−1). HOE140 significantly attenuated the response of twelve afferents to ischaemia (0.61 ± 0.22 to 1.85 ± 0.5 vs. 0.53 ± 0.16 to 1.09 ± 0.4 impulses s−1). NPC-17731, another kinin B2 receptor antagonist, had similar inhibitory effects on six other ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents (0.35 ± 0.14 to 1.19 ± 0.29 vs. 0.22 ± 0.08 to 0.23 ± 0.07 impulses s−1). Indomethacin significantly reduced the

  7. Involvement of catecholaminergic neurons in motor innervation of striated muscle in the mouse esophagus.

    PubMed

    van der Keylen, Piet; Garreis, Fabian; Steigleder, Ruth; Sommer, Daniel; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Enteric co-innervation is a peculiar innervation pattern of striated esophageal musculature. Both anatomical and functional data on enteric co-innervation related to various transmitters have been collected in different species, although its function remains enigmatic. However, it is unclear whether catecholaminergic components are involved in such a co-innervation. Thus, we examined to identify catecholaminergic neuronal elements and clarify their relationship to other innervation components in the esophagus, using immunohistochemistry with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), α-bungarotoxin (α-BT) and PCR with primers for amplification of cDNA encoding TH and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH). TH-positive nerve fibers were abundant throughout the myenteric plexus and localized on about 14% of α-BT-labelled motor endplates differing from VAChT-positive vagal nerve terminals. TH-positive perikarya represented a subpopulation of only about 2.8% of all PGP 9.5-positive myenteric neurons. Analysis of mRNA showed both TH and DBH transcripts in the mouse esophagus. As ChAT-positive neurons in the compact formation of the nucleus ambiguus were negative for TH, the TH-positive nerve varicosities on motor endplates are presumably of enteric origin, although a sympathetic origin cannot be excluded. In the medulla oblongata, the cholinergic ambiguus neurons were densely supplied with TH-positive varicosities. Thus, catecholamines may modulate vagal motor innervation of esophageal-striated muscles not only at the peripheral level via enteric co-innervation but also at the central level via projections to the nucleus ambiguus. As Parkinson's disease, with a loss of central dopaminergic neurons, also affects the enteric nervous system and dysphagia is prevalent in patients with this disease, investigation of intrinsic catecholamines in the esophagus may

  8. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  9. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Improves Decreased Oxidative Capacity of Spinal Motoneurons Innervating the Soleus Muscle of Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Ai; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Rats with type 2 diabetes exhibit decreased oxidative capacity, such as reduced oxidative enzyme activity, low-intensity staining for oxidative enzymes in fibers, and no high-oxidative type IIA fibers, in the skeletal muscle, especially in the soleus muscle. In contrast, there are no data available concerning the oxidative capacity of spinal motoneurons innervating skeletal muscle of rats with type 2 diabetes. This study examined the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle of non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. In addition, this study examined the effects of mild hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with 36 % oxygen for 10 weeks on the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle because mild hyperbaric oxygen improves the decreased oxidative capacity of the soleus muscle in non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. Spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle were identified using nuclear yellow, a retrograde fluorescent neuronal tracer. Thereafter, the cell body sizes and succinate dehydrogenase activity of identified motoneurons were analyzed. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized alpha motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle was observed in rats with type 2 diabetes. The decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of these motoneurons was improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen. Therefore, we concluded that rats with type 2 diabetes have decreased oxidative capacity in motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle and this decreased oxidative capacity is improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen. PMID:27220333

  10. Subcellular localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract in relation to vagal afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, L; Batten, T F C; Corbett, E K A; Sinfield, J K; Deuchars, J

    2003-01-01

    In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), nitric oxide (NO) modulates neuronal circuits controlling autonomic functions. A proposed source of this NO is via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) present in vagal afferent fibre terminals, which convey visceral afferent information to the NTS. Here, we first determined with electron microscopy that neuronal NOS (nNOS) is present in both presynaptic and postsynaptic structures in the NTS. To examine the relationship of nNOS to vagal afferent fibres the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the nodose ganglion and detected in brainstem sections using peroxidase-based methods. nNOS was subsequently visualised using a pre-embedding immunogold procedure. Ultrastructural examination revealed nNOS immunoreactivity in dendrites receiving vagal afferent input. However, although nNOS-immunoreactive terminals were frequently evident in the NTS, none were vagal afferent in origin. Dual immunofluorescence also confirmed lack of co-localisation. Nevertheless, nNOS immunoreactivity was observed in vagal afferent neurone cell bodies of the nodose ganglion. To determine if these labelled cells in the nodose ganglion were indeed vagal afferent neurones nodose ganglion sections were immunostained following application of cholera toxin B subunit to the heart. Whilst some cardiac-innervating neurones were also nNOS immunoreactive, nNOS was never detected in the central terminals of these neurones. These data show that nNOS is present in the NTS in both pre- and postsynaptic structures. However, these presynaptic structures are unlikely to be of vagal afferent origin. The lack of nNOS in vagal afferent terminals in the NTS, yet the presence in some vagal afferent cell bodies, suggests it is selectively targeted to specific regions of the same neurones. PMID:12676143

  11. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  12. Effects of gastric distension and infusion of umami and bitter taste stimuli on vagal afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Charles C; Murat, Chloé; Rosazza, Matthew; Still, Liz

    2011-10-24

    Until recently, sensory nerve pathways from the stomach to the brain were thought to detect distension and play little role in nutritional signaling. Newer data have challenged this view, including reports on the presence of taste receptors in the gastrointestinal lumen and the stimulation of multi-unit vagal afferent activity by glutamate infusions into the stomach. However, assessing these chemosensory effects is difficult because gastric infusions typically evoke a distension-related vagal afferent response. In the current study, we recorded gastric vagal afferent activity in the rat to investigate the possibility that umami (glutamate, 150 mM) and bitter (denatonium, 10 mM) responses could be dissociated from distension responses by adjusting the infusion rate and opening or closing the drainage port in the stomach. Slow infusions of saline (5 ml over 2 min, open port) produced no significant effects on vagal activity. Using the same infusion rate, glutamate or denatonium solutions produced little or no effects on vagal afferent activity. In an attempt to reproduce a prior report that showed distention and glutamate responses, we produced a distension response by closing the exit port. Under this condition, response to the infusion of glutamate or denatonium was similar to saline. In summary, we found little or no effect of gastric infusion of glutamate or denatonium on gastric vagal afferent activity that could be distinguished from distension responses. The current results suggest that sensitivity to umami or bitter stimuli is not a common property of gastric vagal afferent fibers. PMID:21925651

  13. Asynaptic feature and heterogeneous distribution of the cholinergic innervation of the globus pallidus in primates.

    PubMed

    Eid, Lara; Parent, André; Parent, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The internal (GPi) and external (GPe) segments of the primate globus pallidus receive a significant cholinergic (ACh) innervation from the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. The present immunohistochemical study describes this innervation in the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), as visualized with an antibody raised against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). At the light microscopic level, unbiased stereological quantification of ChAT positive (+) axon varicosities reveals a significantly lower density of innervation in GPi (0.26 ± 0.03 × 10(6)) than in GPe (0.47 ± 0.07 × 10(6) varicosities/mm(3) of tissue), with the anterior half of both segments more densely innervated than the posterior half. Neuronal density of GPi (3.00 ± 0.13 × 10(3) neurons/mm(3)) and GPe (3.62 ± 0.22 × 10(3) neurons/mm(3)) yields a mean ratio of ChAT+ axon varicosities per pallidal neuron of 74 ± 10 in the GPi and 128 ± 28 in the GPe. At the electron microscopic level, the pallidal ChAT+ axon varicosities are significantly smaller than their unlabeled counterparts, but are comparable in size and shape in the two pallidal segments. Only a minority of ChAT+ varicosities displays a synaptic specialization (12 % in the GPi and 17 % in the GPe); these scarce synaptic contacts are mostly of the symmetrical type and occur exclusively on pallidal dendrites. No ChAT+ axo-axonic synaptic contacts are observed, suggesting that ACh exerts its modulatory action on pallidal afferents through diffuse transmission, whereas pallidal neurons may be influenced by both volumic and synaptic delivery of ACh. PMID:25523104

  14. Microfluidics co-culture systems for studying tooth innervation

    PubMed Central

    Pagella, Pierfrancesco; Neto, Estrela; Jiménez-Rojo, Lucia; Lamghari, Meriem; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2014-01-01

    Innervation plays a key role in the development and homeostasis of organs and tissues of the orofacial complex. Among these structures, teeth are peculiar organs as they are not innervated until later stages of development. Furthermore, the implication of neurons in tooth initiation, morphogenesis and differentiation is still controversial. Co-cultures constitute a valuable method to investigate and manipulate the interactions of nerve fibers with their target organs in a controlled and isolated environment. Conventional co-cultures between neurons and their target tissues have already been performed, but these cultures do not offer optimal conditions that are closely mimicking the in vivo situation. Indeed, specific cell populations require different culture media in order to preserve their physiological properties. In this study we evaluate the usefulness of a microfluidics system for co-culturing mouse trigeminal ganglia and developing teeth. This device allows the application of specific media for the appropriate development of both neuronal and dental tissues. The results show that mouse trigeminal ganglia and teeth survive for long culture periods in this microfluidics system, and that teeth maintain the attractive or repulsive effect on trigeminal neurites that has been observed in vivo. Neurites are repealed when co-cultured with embryonic tooth germs, while postnatal teeth exert an attractive effect to trigeminal ganglia-derived neurons. In conclusion, microfluidics system devices provide a valuable tool for studying the behavior of neurons during the development of orofacial tissues and organs, faithfully imitating the in vivo situation. PMID:25202282

  15. Facilitation of motor evoked potentials by somatosensory afferent stimulation.

    PubMed

    Deletis, V; Schild, J H; Berić, A; Dimitrijević, M R

    1992-10-01

    The effect of an electrically induced peripheral afferent volley upon electrical and magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from muscles of the upper and lower extremities was studied in 16 healthy volunteers. A standard conditioning-test (C-T) paradigm was employed whereby the test stimulus (transcranial electric or magnetic) was applied at random time intervals, from 10 msec prior to 90 msec after the conditioning stimulus (peripheral nerve stimulus). MEP amplitude facilitation was observed for the majority of the upper extremity muscles tested at two distinct periods, one occurring at short, and the other at long C-T intervals. This bimodal trend of MEP facilitation was found to be equally as prominent in the lower extremity muscles tested. The period of short C-T interval facilitation is consistent with modifications in the spinal excitability of the segmental motoneuron pool. On the other hand, the period of long C-T interval facilitation is suggested to be due to alterations in excitability of the motor cortex as a result of the arrival of the orthodromic sensory volley. Although most pronounced in muscles innervated by the nerve to which the conditioning stimulus was applied, this bimodal facilitatory effect was also observed in adjacent muscles not innervated by the stimulated nerve. Qualitatively, the conditioned MEPs from the upper and lower extremities responded similarly to both electrical and magnetic trans-cranial stimulation. In addition, our study demonstrates that the C-T paradigm has potential for use in the assessment of spinal and cortical sensorimotor integration by providing quantitative information which cannot be obtained through isolated assessment of sensory and/or motor pathways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1385090

  16. Transient, afferent input-dependent, postnatal niche for neural progenitor cells in the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Oshima, Kazuo; Sinkkonen, Saku T.; Corrales, C. Eduardo; Most, Sam P.; Chai, Renjie; Jan, Taha A.; van Amerongen, Renée; Cheng, Alan G.; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear nucleus (CN), the first central relay of the auditory pathway, the survival of neurons during the first weeks after birth depends on afferent innervation from the cochlea. Although input-dependent neuron survival has been extensively studied in the CN, neurogenesis has not been evaluated as a possible mechanism of postnatal plasticity. Here we show that new neurons are born in the CN during the critical period of postnatal plasticity. Coincidently, we found a population of neural progenitor cells that are controlled by a complex interplay of Wnt, Notch, and TGFβ/BMP signaling, in which low levels of TGFβ/BMP signaling are permissive for progenitor proliferation that is promoted by Wnt and Notch activation. We further show that cells with activated Wnt signaling reside in the CN and that these cells have high propensity for neurosphere formation. Cochlear ablation resulted in diminishment of progenitors and Wnt/β-catenin-active cells, suggesting that the neonatal CN maintains an afferent innervation-dependent population of progenitor cells that display active canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:23940359

  17. Influence of map scale on primary afferent terminal field geometry in cat dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R J; Pubols, L M; Sonty, R V; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W E; Brown, P B

    1991-09-01

    1. Thirty-one physiologically identified primary afferent fibers were labeled intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). 2. A computer analysis was used to determine whether the distribution of cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferent terminals varies as a function of location within the dorsal horn somatotopic map. 3. An analysis of the geometry of the projections of these afferents has shown that 1) terminal arbors have a greater mediolateral width within the region of the foot representation than lateral to it, 2) terminal arbors have larger length-to-width ratios outside the foot representation than within it, and 3) the orientation of terminal arbors near the boundary of the foot representation reflects the angle of the boundary. Previous attribution of mediolateral width variations to primary afferent type are probably in error, although there appear to be genuine variations of longitudinal extent as a function of primary afferent type. 4. Nonuniform terminal distributions represent the first of a three-component process underlying assembly of the monosynaptic portions of cell receptive fields (RFs) and the somatotopic map. The other two components consist of the elaboration of cell dendritic trees and the establishment of selective connections. 5. The variation of primary afferent terminal distributions with map location is not an absolute requirement for development of the map; for example, the RFs of postsynaptic cells could be assembled with the use of a uniform terminal distribution for all afferents, everywhere in the map, as long as cell dendrites penetrate the appropriate portions of the presynaptic neuropil and receive connections only from afferent axons contributing to their RFs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1753281

  18. Activation of guanylate cyclase-C attenuates stretch responses and sensitization of mouse colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Kiyatkin, Michael E.; La, Jun-Ho; Ge, Pei; Solinga, Robert; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by altered bowel habits, persistent pain and discomfort, and typically colorectal hypersensitivity. Linaclotide, a peripherally-restricted 14-amino acid peptide approved for the treatment of IBS with constipation, relieves constipation and reduces IBS-associated pain in these patients presumably by activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), which stimulates production and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated whether activation of GC-C by the endogenous agonist uroguanylin or the primary downstream effector of that activation, cGMP, directly modulates responses and sensitization of mechanosensitive colorectal primary afferents. The distal 2 cm of mouse colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested, pinned flat mucosal side up for in vitro single-fiber recordings and the encoding properties of mechanosensitive afferents (serosal, mucosal, muscular and muscular-mucosal) to probing and circumferential stretch studied. Both cGMP (10–300μM) and uroguanylin (1–1000nM) applied directly to colorectal receptive endings significantly reduced responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents to stretch; serosal and mucosal afferents were not affected. Sensitized responses (i.e., increased responses to stretch) of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents were reversed by cGMP, returning responses to stretch to control. Blocking the transport of cGMP from colorectal epithelia by probenecid, a mechanism validated by studies in cultured intestinal T84 cells, abolished the inhibitory effect of uroguanylin on muscular-mucosal afferents. These results suggest that GC-C agonists like linaclotide alleviate colorectal pain and hypersensitivity by dampening stretch-sensitive afferent mechanosensitivity and normalizing afferent sensitization. PMID:23739979

  19. Withdrawal and Restoration of Central Vagal Afferents Within the Dorsal Vagal Complex Following Subdiaphragmatic Vagotomy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, James H.; Gallaher, Zachary R.; Ryu, Vitaly; Czaja, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Vagotomy, a severing of the peripheral axons of the vagus nerve, has been extensively utilized to determine the role of vagal afferents in viscerosensory signaling. Vagotomy is also an unavoidable component of some bariatric surgeries. Although it is known that peripheral axons of the vagus nerve degenerate and then regenerate to a limited extent following vagotomy, very little is known about the response of central vagal afferents in the dorsal vagal complex to this type of damage. We tested the hypothesis that vagotomy results in the transient withdrawal of central vagal afferent terminals from their primary central target, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Sprague–Dawley rats underwent bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and were sacrificed 10, 30, or 60 days later. Plastic changes in vagal afferent fibers and synapses were investigated at the morphological and functional levels by using a combination of an anterograde tracer, synapse-specific markers, and patch-clamp electrophysiology in horizontal brain sections. Morphological data revealed that numbers of vagal afferent fibers and synapses in the NTS were significantly reduced 10 days following vagotomy and were restored to control levels by 30 days and 60 days, respectively. Electrophysiology revealed transient decreases in spontaneous glutamate release, glutamate release probability, and the number of primary afferent inputs. Our results demonstrate that subdiaphragmatic vagotomy triggers transient withdrawal and remodeling of central vagal afferent terminals in the NTS. The observed vagotomy-induced plasticity within this key feeding center of the brain may be partially responsible for the response of bariatric patients following gastric bypass surgery. PMID:23749657

  20. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-03-15

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  1. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-01-01

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  2. Developmental changes in pulpal sensory innervation of rat incisors and molars shown on a single injection of the fluorescent dye AM1-43.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sumio

    2007-12-01

    Developmental changes in pulpal innervation of rat incisors and molars were examined using the fluorescent styryl dye AM1-43, which labels sensory cells and nerves in vivo. From 2 to 40 days after birth, the animals were injected once with a small amount of AM1-43 solution (2 microg/g bodyweight). One day after the injection, the animals were killed and examined. In 3-day-old rats, neither incisors nor molars were innervated. In 7-day-old rats, the pulp of incisors and molars was innervated as indicated by fine intensely stained varicose sensory fibers and thicker intensely stained fibers running mostly along the blood vessels. In 15-, 27-, and 41-day-old rats, sensory nerve fibers neither passed through the odontoblast layer nor penetrated into the dentin in incisors, whereas the sensory nerve fibers penetrated into the coronal dentin through the odontoblast layers in molars. These results suggest that innervation of dental pulp is composed of two phases: (i) linear penetration of nerve fibers along blood vessels into the pulp space; and (ii) sprouting and extension of nerve fibers into coronal dentin. Innervation of the incisor pulp may stop at the first phase. PMID:18062152

  3. Membrane particle aggregates in innervated and noninnervated cultures of Xenopus embryonic muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, H B; Nakajima, Y

    1978-01-01

    Clusters of membrane particle aggregates were found in the cultures of Xenopus embryonic muscle cells. In innervated cultures, the aggregates were usually found in the vicinity of the nerve. In terms of particle density and morphology, they resembled the postsynaptic particle aggregates of adult skeletal muscle fibers, suggesting that they may be related to acetylcholine receptors. Similar particle aggregates were also found in noninnervated cultures. They may correspond to extrajunctional clusters of acetylcholine receptors or "hot spots." Images PMID:272667

  4. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording to study the acid responsiveness and action potential (AP) configuration of capsaicin-sensitive neurons innervating to gastrocnemius muscle. Here we showed that IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons are heterogeneous in terms of cell size, resting membrane potential, AP configuration, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistance, and acid-induced current (Iacid), as well as capsaicin-induced current (Icap). TRPV1-expressing neurons were all acid-sensitive and could be divided into two acid-sensitive groups depending on an acid-induced sustained current (type I) or an acid-induced biphasic ASIC3-like current (type II). Type I TRPV1-expressing neurons were distinguishable from type II TRPV1-expressing neurons in AP overshoot, after-hyperpolarization duration, and all Iacid parameters, but not in AP threshold, TTX-resistance, resting membrane potential, and Icap parameters. These differential biophysical properties of TRPV1-expressing neurons might partially annotate their different roles involved in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. PMID:27493509

  5. Interpersonal stroking touch is targeted to C tactile afferent activation.

    PubMed

    Croy, I; Luong, A; Triscoli, C; Hofmann, E; Olausson, H; Sailer, U

    2016-01-15

    C tactile fibers are a specialized group of fibers innervating the non-glabrous skin that are tuned to light gentle stroking applied with velocities between 1 and 10 cm/s. Those fibers add to the sensation of interpersonal caressing and pleasant touch. It is unclear whether people spontaneously apply touch that is tuned to optimally activate those fibers. This was investigated in three studies. In study one, 45 participants (21.8 ± 2.3 years, 24 women) were asked to stroke an artificial arm. In study two, 32 participants (28.3 ± 8.7 years, 16 women) were asked to stroke their partner. In study three, 11 parents (29.4 ± 5.7 years, 6 women) were asked to stroke their babies. Stroking velocity was tracked in all conditions. Stroking velocities were significantly slower in the partner touch and baby touch condition than in the artificial arm condition and all of the participants stroking their partner or baby used velocities that can activate C tactile fibers. We conclude that human social stroking is optimized for C tactile stimulation. PMID:26433145

  6. Active "itch fibers" in chronic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, M; Hilliges, M; Schmidt, R; Ørstavik, K; Vahlquist, C; Weidner, C; Handwerker, H O; Torebjörk, H E

    2003-08-26

    An itch-specific neuronal pathway was recently discovered in healthy humans and animals. Here the authors report that activity in this specific pathway coincides with itch under pathophysiologic conditions in a patient with chronic pruritus. Microneurographic recordings from the symptomatic area revealed spontaneous activity in six single C-fiber afferents that had the characteristic features of "itch fibers." Itch may be caused by activity in a specific subpopulation of C-fiber afferents. PMID:12939442

  7. Patterns of peripheral innervation of the tongue and hyobranchial apparatus in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Wake, M H

    1992-04-01

    The innervation of the musculature of the tongue and the hyobranchial apparatus of caecilians has long been assumed to be simple and to exhibit little interspecific variation. A study of 14 genera representing all six families of caecilians demonstrates that general patterns of innervation by the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves are similar across taxa but that the composition of the "hypoglossal" nerve is highly variable. Probably in all caecilians, spinal nerves 1 and 2 contribute to the hypoglossal. In addition, in certain taxa, an "occipital," the vagus, and/or spinal 3 appear to contribute fibers to the composition of the hypoglossal nerve. These patterns, the lengths of fusion of the contributing elements, and the branching patterns of the hypoglossal are assessed according to the currently accepted hypothesis of phylogenetic relationships of caecilians, and of amphibians. An hypothesis is proposed that limblessness and a simple tongue, with concomitant reduced complexity of innervation of muscles associated with limbs and the tongue, has released a constraint on pattern of innervation. As a consequence, a greater diversity and, in several taxa, greater complexity of neuroanatomical associations of nerve roots to form the hypoglossal are expressed. PMID:1588590

  8. Characterization and modeling of P-type electrosensory afferent responses to amplitude modulations in a wave-type electric fish.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M E; Xu, Z; Payne, J R

    1997-11-01

    The first stage of information processing in the electrosensory system involves the encoding of local changes in transdermal potential into trains of action potentials in primary electrosensory afferent nerve fibers. To develop a quantitative model of this encoding process for P-type (probability-coding) afferent fibers in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus, we recorded single unit activity from electrosensory afferent axons in the posterior branch of the anterior lateral line nerve and analyzed responses to electronically generated sinusoidal amplitude modulations of the local transdermal potential. Over a range of AM frequencies from 0.1 to 200 Hz, the modulation transfer function of P-type afferents is high-pass in character, with a gain that increases monotonically up to AM frequencies of 100 Hz where it begins to roll off, and a phase advance with a range of 15-60 degrees. Based on quantitative analysis of the observed gain and phase characteristics, we present a computationally efficient model of P-type afferent response dynamics which accurately characterizes changes in afferent firing rate in response to amplitude modulations of the fish's own electric organ discharge over a wide range of AM frequencies relevant to active electrolocation. PMID:9373958

  9. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A; Nelson, Mark T

    2015-09-15

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms. PMID:26224686

  10. Vascular Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure Regulation in Afferent Autonomic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by loss of afferent autonomic neural fiber signaling and consequent profound impairment of arterial baroreflex function and blood pressure regulation. Whether vascular endothelial dysfunction contributes to defective vasomotor control in this form of afferent autonomic failure is not known. METHODS We assessed blood pressure response to orthostatic stress and vascular endothelial function with brachial artery reactivity testing in 34 FD subjects with afferent autonomic failure and 34 healthy control subjects. RESULTS Forty-four percent of the afferent autonomic failure subjects had uncontrolled hypertension at supine rest (median systolic blood pressure = 148mm Hg, interquartile range (IQR) = 144–155mm Hg; median diastolic blood pressure = 83mm Hg, IQR = 78–105mm Hg), and 88% had abnormal response to orthostatic stress (median decrease in systolic blood pressure after upright tilt = 48mm Hg, IQR = 29–61mm Hg). Flow-mediated brachial artery reactivity did not differ in subjects with afferent autonomic failure vs. healthy control subjects (median = 6.00%, IQR = 1.86–11.77%; vs. median = 6.27%, IQR = 4.65–9.34%; P = 0.75). In afferent autonomic failure subjects, brachial artery reactivity was not associated with resting blood pressure or the magnitude of orthostatic hypotension but was decreased in association with reduced glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Brachial artery reactivity was preserved in subjects with afferent autonomic failure despite the presence of marked blood pressure dysregulation. Comorbid renal dysfunction was associated with reduced brachial artery reactivity. PMID:25128693

  11. A geometric analysis of semicircular canals and induced activity in their peripheral afferents in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisine, H.; Simpson, J. I.; Henn, V.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine anatomically the planes of the semicircular canals of two juvenile rhesus monkeys, using plastic casts of the semicircular canals, and the anatomical measurements were related to the directional coding of neural signals transmitted by primary afferents innervating the same simicircular canals. In the experiments, animals were prepared for monitoring the eye position by the implantation of silver-silver chloride electrodes into the bony orbit. Following the recording of semicircular canal afferent activity, the animals were sacrificed; plastic casting resin was injected into the bony canals; and, when the temporal bone was demineralized and removed, the coordinates of points spaced along the circumference of the canal casts were measured. A comparison of the sensitivity vectors determined in these experiments and the anatomical measures showed that the average difference between a sensitivity vector and its respective normal vector was 6.3 deg.

  12. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  13. Prognostic Significance of Imaging Myocardial Sympathetic Innervation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Saurabh; Fernandez, Stanley F; Fallavollita, James A; Canty, John M

    2015-08-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in understanding whether the presence of inhomogeneity in myocardial sympathetic innervation can predict patients at risk of sudden cardiac arrest from lethal ventricular arrhythmias. The advent of radiolabeled norepinephrine analogs has allowed this to be imaged in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy using single, photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Several observational studies have demonstrated that globally elevated myocardial sympathetic tone (as reflected by reduced myocardial norepinephrine analog uptake) can predict composite cardiac end-points including total cardiovascular mortality. More recent studies have indicated that quantifying the extent of regional denervation can predict the risk of lethal ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This review will summarize our current understanding of the prognostic significance of altered myocardial sympathetic innervation. PMID:26087899

  14. Sensory and autonomic innervation of the rat eyelid: neuronal origins and peptide phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Simons, E; Smith, P G

    1994-07-01

    Neuronal origins, peptide phenotypes and target distributions were determined for sensory and autonomic nerves projecting to the eyelid. The retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Ruby, was injected into the superior tarsal muscle and meibomian gland of Sprague-Dawley rats. Labelled neurons were observed within the pterygopalatine (31 +/- 6 of a total of 8238 +/- 1610 ganglion neurons), trigeminal (173 +/- 43 of 62,082 +/- 5869) and superior cervical ganglia (184 +/- 35 of 21,900 +/- 1741). Immunostaining revealed vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity (VIP-ir) in nearly all Fluoro-Ruby-labelled pterygopalatine ganglion neurons (86 +/- 5%) but only rarely in trigeminal (0.3 +/- 0.3%) or superior cervical (1.4 +/- 1.4%) ganglion neurons. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-ir was not observed in pterygopalatine or superior cervical ganglion somata, but was present in 24 +/- 4% of trigeminal neurons. Bright dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunofluorescence was observed in the majority of eyelid-projecting neurons within the superior cervical ganglia (65 +/- 5%) and lighter staining was detected in pterygopalatine neurons (63 +/- 3%), but no DBH-ir was observed in trigeminal neurons. Examination of eyelid sections revealed dense VIP-ir innervation of meibomian gland acini and vasculature and modest distribution within tarsal muscle. CGRP-ir fibers surrounded ductal and vascular elements of the meibomian gland and the perimeter of tarsal muscle. DBH-ir fibers were associated with meibomian gland blood vessels and acini, and were more densely distributed within tarsal muscle. This study provides evidence for prominent meibomian gland innervation by parasympathetic pterygopalatine ganglion VIP-ir neurons, with more restricted innervation by sensory trigeminal CGRP-ir and sympathetic neurons. Tarsal muscle receives abundant sympathetic innervation, as well as moderate parasympathetic and sensory CGRP-ir projections. The eyelid contains substantial non-CGRP-ir sensory

  15. Scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation

    SciTech Connect

    Dae, M.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Botvinick, E.H.; Ahearn, T.; Yee, E.; Huberty, J.P.; Mori, H.; Chin, M.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Herre, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of noninvasively imaging the regional distribution of myocardial sympathetic innervation, we evaluated the distribution of sympathetic nerve endings, using 123I metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), and compared this with the distribution of myocardial perfusion, using 201Tl. Twenty dogs were studied: 11 after regional denervation, and nine as controls. Regional denervation was done by left stellate ganglion removal, right stellate ganglion removal, and application of phenol to the epicardial surface. Computer-processed functional maps displayed the relative distribution of MIBG and thallium in multiple projections in vivo and excised heart slices in all animals. In six animals, dual isotope emission computed tomograms were acquired in vivo. Tissue samples taken from innervated and denervated regions of the MIBG images were analyzed for norepinephrine content to validate image findings. Normal controls showed homogeneous and parallel distributions of MIBG and thallium in the major left ventricular mass. In the left stellectomized hearts, MIBG was reduced relative to thallium in the posterior left ventricle; whereas in right stellectomized hearts, reduced MIBG was in the anterior left ventricle. Phenol-painted hearts showed a broad area of decreased MIBG extending beyond the area of phenol application. In both stellectomized and phenol-painted hearts, thallium distribution remained homogeneous and normal. Norepinephrine content was greater in regions showing normal MIBG (550 +/- 223 ng/g) compared with regions showing reduced MIBG (39 +/- 44 ng/g) (p less than 0.001), confirming regional denervation. Combined MIBG-thallium functional maps display the regional distribution of sympathetic innervation.

  16. Experimental and computational evidence for an essential role of NaV1.6 in spike initiation at stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; La, Jun-Ho; Wills, Zachary P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferents comprise ∼33% of the pelvic nerve innervation of mouse colorectum, which are activated by colorectal distension and encode visceral nociception. Stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings respond tonically to stepped or ramped colorectal stretch, whereas dissociated colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons generally fail to spike repetitively upon stepped current stimulation. The present study investigated this difference in the neural encoding characteristics between the soma and afferent ending using pharmacological approaches in an in vitro mouse colon-nerve preparation and complementary computational simulations. Immunohistological staining and Western blots revealed the presence of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) 1.6 and NaV1.7 at sensory neuronal endings in mouse colorectal tissue. Responses of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings were significantly reduced by targeting NaV1.6 using selective antagonists (μ-conotoxin GIIIa and μ-conotoxin PIIIa) or tetrodotoxin. In contrast, neither selective NaV1.8 (A803467) nor NaV1.7 (ProTX-II) antagonists attenuated afferent responses to stretch. Computational simulation of a colorectal afferent ending that incorporated independent Markov models for NaV1.6 and NaV1.7, respectively, recapitulated the experimental findings, suggesting a necessary role for NaV1.6 in encoding tonic spiking by stretch-sensitive afferents. In addition, computational simulation of a dorsal root ganglion soma showed that, by adding a NaV1.6 conductance, a single-spiking neuron was converted into a tonic spiking one. These results suggest a mechanism/channel to explain the difference in neural encoding characteristics between afferent somata and sensory endings, likely caused by differential expression of ion channels (e.g., NaV1.6) at different parts of the neuron. PMID:25652923

  17. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Duncan B.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (<0.1 mm2) receptive fields, often from a single ISO, were recorded from the premaxilla, the rostral dentary, the gingivae and the distal digits. These responded to a median threshold of 0.08 mN. The less densely innervated caudal margins of the jaws had larger receptive fields (>100 mm2) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20–35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws. PMID:23136155

  18. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Duncan B; Catania, Kenneth C

    2012-12-01

    Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (<0.1 mm(2)) receptive fields, often from a single ISO, were recorded from the premaxilla, the rostral dentary, the gingivae and the distal digits. These responded to a median threshold of 0.08 mN. The less densely innervated caudal margins of the jaws had larger receptive fields (>100 mm(2)) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20-35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws. PMID:23136155

  19. Differential impact of hypergravity on maturating innervation in vestibular epithelia during rat development.

    PubMed

    Gaboyard, Sophie; Sans, Alain; Lehouelleur, Jacques

    2003-06-12

    Over the past decades, the new opportunity of space flights has revealed the importance of gravity as a mechanical constraint for terrestrial organisms as well as its influence on the somatosensory system. The lack of gravitational reference in orbital flight induces changes in equilibrium, with major modifications involving neuromorphological and physiological adaptations. However, few data have illustrated the putative effect of gravity on sensory vestibular epithelial development. We asked if gravity, the primary stimulus of utricles could act as an epigenetic factor. As sensorial deprivation linked to weightlessness is technically difficult, we used a ground-based centrifuge to increase the gravitational vector, in order to hyperstimulate the vestibule. In this study, 3 days after mating, pregnant females were submitted to hypergravity, 2 g (HG). Their embryos were raised, born and postnatally developed under HG. The establishment of connections between primary vestibular afferent neurons and hair cells in the utricle of these young rats was followed from birth to postnatal day 6 (PN6) and compared to embryos developed in normogravity (NG): Immunocytochemistry for neurofilaments and microvesicles revealed the differential effects of gravity on the late neuritogenic and synaptogenic processes in utricles. Taking type I hair cell innervation as a criterion of maturation, we found that primary afferent fibres reached the vestibular epithelium and enveloped hair cells in the same way, both under NG and HG. Thus, this phenomenon of leading growth cones to their epithelial target appears to be dependent on intrinsic genetic properties and not on an external stimulus. In contrast, the maturation of connection processes between type 1 hair cells and the afferent calyx, concerning specifically the microvesicles at their apex, was delayed under HG. Therefore, gravity appears to be an epigenetic factor influencing the late maturation of utricles. These differential

  20. Two-photon microscopy of dermal innervation in a human re-innervated model of skin.

    PubMed

    Sevrain, David; Le Grand, Yann; Buhé, Virginie; Jeanmaire, Christine; Pauly, Gilles; Carré, Jean-Luc; Misery, Laurent; Lebonvallet, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    When skin is injured, innervation can be severely disrupted. The subsequent re-innervation processes are poorly understood notably because of the inability to image the full meandering course of nerves with their ramifications and endings from histological slices. In this letter, we report on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy of entire human skin explants re-innervated by rodent sensory neurons labelled with the styryl dye FM1-43. TPEF imaging of nerve fibres to a depth up to roughly 300 μm within the dermis was demonstrated, allowing three-dimensional reconstruction of the neural tree structure. Endogenous second-harmonic imaging of type I fibrillar collagen was performed in parallel to TPEF imaging using the same nonlinear microscope, revealing the path of the nerves through the dermis. PMID:23445261

  1. Innervation of the human vaginal mucosa as revealed by PGP 9.5 immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hilliges, M; Falconer, C; Ekman-Ordeberg, G; Johansson, O

    1995-01-01

    In order to obtain a description of the innervation of the vaginal wall we employed an antiserum against the general neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5, on normal human vaginal mucosa. Specimens were taken from the anterior and posterior fornices, from the anterior vaginal wall at the bladder neck level and from the introitus vaginae region, and then processed for indirect immunohistochemistry. All regions studied revealed a profound innervation, although regional differences were noted. The more distal areas of the vaginal wall had more nerve fibers compared to the more proximal parts. Also, biopsies from the anterior wall generally were more densely innervated than the posterior wall. Some large nerve coils were observed in lamina propria of the anterior wall as well as gatherings of thick-walled medium-sized blood vessels. Free intraepithelial nerve endings were only detected in the introitus vaginae region. These fibers were very thin, always varicose and could be observed just a few cell layers from the surface. In this part of the vagina, protein gene product 9.5 antibodies also stained cells within the basal parts of the epithelium. These cells were also neurone-specific enolase positive and resembled, from a morphological point of view, Merkel cells. PMID:8560964

  2. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  3. Vestibular afferent responses to microrotational stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1991-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recording/labeling techniques were used to investigate vestibular afferent responses in the bullfrog, to very small amplitude (less than 5 deg p-p) sinusoidal rotations in the vertical plane over the frequency range of 0.063-4 Hz. Robust responses to peak accelerations as low as 0.031 deg/sec per sec were obtained from units subsequently traced to either the central portion of the anterior canal crista or the striolar region of the utricle. All of these microrotationally sensitive afferent neurons had irregular resting discharge rates, and the majority had transfer ratios (relative to rotational velocity) of 1-40 spikes/sec per deg/sec. Individual utricular afferent velocity transfer ratios were nearly constant over the frequency range of 0.125-4 Hz. Canal units displayed decreasing response transfer ratios as stimulus frequencies increased. These findings indicate that, although utricular striolar and central crista afferent velocity transfer ratios to microrotations were very similar, utricular striolar afferent neurons were more faithful sensors of very small amplitude rotational velocity in the vertical plane.

  4. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  5. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... short period of time can cause intestinal gas ( flatulence ), bloating , and abdominal cramps . This problem often goes ... 213. National Research Council. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and ...

  6. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing. PMID:26676806

  7. Losing the battle but winning the war: game theoretic analysis of the competition between motoneurons innervating a skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nowik, Irit; Zamir, Shmuel; Segev, Idan

    2012-01-01

    The fibers in a skeletal muscle are divided into groups called "muscle units" whereby each muscle unit is innervated by a single neuron. It was found that neurons with low activation thresholds have smaller muscle units than neurons with higher activation thresholds. This results in a fixed recruitment order of muscle units, from smallest to largest, called the "size principle." It is thought that the size principle results from a competitive process-taking place after birth-between the neurons innervating the muscle. The underlying mechanism of the competition was not understood. Moreover, the results in the majority of experiments that manipulated the activity during the competition period seemed to contradict the size principle. Experiments at the isolated muscle fibers showed that the competition is governed by a Hebbian-like rule, whereby neurons with low activation thresholds have a competitive advantage at any single muscle fiber. Thus neurons with low activation thresholds are expected to have larger muscle units in contradiction to what is seen empirically. This state of affairs was termed "paradoxical." In the present study we developed a new game theoretic framework to analyze such competitive biological processes. In this game, neurons are the players competing to innervate a maximal number of muscle fibers. We showed that in order to innervate more muscle fibers, it is advantageous to win (as the neurons with higher activation thresholds do) later competitions. This both explains the size principle and resolves the seemingly paradoxical experimental data. Our model establishes that the competition at each muscle fiber may indeed be Hebbian and that the size principle still emerges from these competitions as an overall property of the system. Thus, the less active neurons "lose the battle but win the war." Our model provides experimentally testable predictions. The new game-theoretic approach may be applied to competitions in other biological systems

  8. Afferent nipple valve malfunction caused by anchoring collar: an unexpected late complication of the Kock continent ileal reservoir.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Okada, Y; Matsuda, T; Hida, S; Takeuchi, H; Kihara, Y; Yoshida, O

    1991-01-01

    In the construction of a Kock continent ileal reservoir for urinary diversion, significantly high rates of late postoperative complications regarding nipple valves, the efferent limb in particular, have been reported. There are only a few reports on afferent nipple valve malfunction. A total of 42 patients who underwent a Kock pouch operation and were observed for more than 12 months (mean 38 months) was evaluated in terms of afferent nipple valve malfunction. Late afferent nipple valve complications were observed in 10 of the 42 patients (24%). These complications included erosion of the polyester fiber fabric used as a collar (5 patients), stenosis of the afferent limb (2) and obstruction of the afferent nipple by a mucous plug or fungus ball (3). The latter 2 complications were due to mechanical or dynamic obstruction of urine flow caused by a nonabsorbable collar. None of the 10 patients had problems with efferent nipple valve function. Our results suggest that the peristaltic direction of the intestine and the use of nonabsorbable material as a collar are primarily responsible for the late afferent nipple valve complications. Further modifications are needed to produce a stable nipple valve. Otherwise, simpler and more reliable alternative techniques of antireflux anastomosis should be considered. PMID:1984094

  9. Temperature Differentially Facilitates Spontaneous but Not Evoked Glutamate Release from Cranial Visceral Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, Jessica A.; Hofmann, Mackenzie E.; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is fundamentally important to all biological functions including synaptic glutamate release. Vagal afferents from the solitary tract (ST) synapse on second order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract, and glutamate release at this first central synapse controls autonomic reflex function. Expression of the temperature-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 receptor separates ST afferents into C-fibers (TRPV1+) and A-fibers (TRPV1-). Action potential-evoked glutamate release is similar between C- and A-fiber afferents, but TRPV1 expression facilitates a second form of synaptic glutamate release in C-fibers by promoting substantially more spontaneous glutamate release. The influence of temperature on different forms of glutamate release is not well understood. Here we tested how temperature impacts the generation of evoked and spontaneous release of glutamate and its relation to TRPV1 expression. In horizontal brainstem slices of rats, activation of ST primary afferents generated synchronous evoked glutamate release (ST-eEPSCs) at constant latency whose amplitude reflects the probability of evoked glutamate release. The frequency of spontaneous EPSCs in these same neurons measured the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. We measured both forms of glutamate from each neuron during ramp changes in bath temperature of 4–5°C. Spontaneous glutamate release from TRPV1+ closely tracked with these thermal changes indicating changes in the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. In the same neurons, temperature changed axon conduction registered as latency shifts but ST-eEPSC amplitudes were constant and independent of TRPV1 expression. These data indicate that TRPV1-operated glutamate release is independent of action potential-evoked glutamate release in the same neurons. Together, these support the hypothesis that evoked and spontaneous glutamate release originate from two pools of vesicles that are independently

  10. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:23989007

  11. Human-specific increase of dopaminergic innervation in a striatal region associated with speech and language: A comparative analysis of the primate basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Raghanti, Mary Ann; Edler, Melissa K; Stephenson, Alexa R; Wilson, Lakaléa J; Hopkins, William D; Ely, John J; Erwin, Joseph M; Jacobs, Bob; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-07-01

    The dopaminergic innervation of the striatum has been implicated in learning processes and in the development of human speech and language. Several lines of evidence suggest that evolutionary changes in dopaminergic afferents of the striatum may be associated with uniquely human cognitive and behavioral abilities, including the association of the human-specific sequence of the FOXP2 gene with decreased dopamine in the dorsomedial striatum of mice. To examine this possibility, we quantified the density of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive axons as a measure of dopaminergic innervation within five basal ganglia regions in humans, great apes, and New and Old World monkeys. Our results indicate that humans differ from nonhuman primate species in having a significant increase in dopaminergic innervation selectively localized to the medial caudate nucleus. This region of the striatum is highly interconnected, receiving afferents from multiple neocortical regions, and supports behavioral and cognitive flexibility. The medial caudate nucleus also shows hyperactivity in humans lacking a functional FOXP2 allele and exhibits altered dopamine concentrations in humanized Foxp2 mice. Additionally, striatal dopaminergic input was not altered in chimpanzees that used socially learned attention-getting sounds versus those that did not. This evidence indicates that the increase in dopamine innervation of the medial caudate nucleus in humans is a species-typical characteristic not associated with experience-dependent plasticity. The specificity of this increase may be related to the degree of convergence from cortical areas within this region of the striatum and may also be involved in human speech and language. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2117-2129, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26715195

  12. Neuroanatomy of extrinsic afferents supplying the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Blackshaw, L A; Brookes, S J H; Grundy, D

    2004-04-01

    Here we discuss the neuroanatomy of extrinsic gastrointestinal (GI) afferent neurones, the relationship between structure and function and the role of afferents in disease. Three pathways connect the gut to the central nervous system: vagal afferents signal mainly from upper GI regions, pelvic afferents mainly from the colorectal region and splanchnic afferents from throughout. Vagal afferents mediate reflex regulation of gut function and behaviour, operating mainly at physiological levels. There are two major functional classes - tension receptors, responding to muscular contraction and distension, and mucosal receptors. The function of vagal endings correlates well with their anatomy: tracing studies show intramuscular arrays (IMAs) and intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs); IGLEs are now known to respond to tension. Functional mucosal receptors correlate with endings traced to the lamina propria. Pelvic afferents serve similar functions to vagal afferents, and additionally mediate both innocuous and noxious sensations. Splanchnic afferents comprise mucosal and stretch-sensitive afferents with low thresholds in addition to high-threshold serosal/mesenteric afferents suggesting diverse roles. IGLEs, probably of pelvic origin, have been identified recently in the rectum and respond similarly to gastric vagal IGLEs. Gastrointestinal afferents may be sensitized or inhibited by chemical mediators released from several cell types. Whether functional changes have anatomical correlates is not known, but it is likely that they underlie diseases involving visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:15066001

  13. Contractile properties of afferent and efferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Abe, K

    1997-07-01

    1. The balance of vascular tone of the afferent and efferent arteriole is a crucial determinant of glomerular haemodynamics. Despite their intimate anatomical relationship in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, the mechanisms that regulate afferent and efferent arteriolar tone are different. 2. In the afferent arteriole, two intrinsic mechanisms, the myogenic response and macula densa-mediated tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) play a dominant role, maintaining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at a constant level over a wide range of renal perfusion pressure. Studies have shown that these two mechanisms are modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In addition, an interaction between TGF and angiotensin II (AngII) seems to be essential to maintaining GFR despite large variations in daily intake of salt and water. 3. In the efferent arteriole, neither myogenic response nor TGF seems to be important, while AngII is one major factor involved in the control of vascular resistance. In addition, recent studies have provided evidence that NO and prostaglandins produced by the glomerulus may control resistance of the downstream efferent arteriole. 4. As the early segment of the efferent arteriole resides within the glomerulus, various autacoid hormones produced by the glomerulus may reach and directly act on this segment, thereby controlling the glomerular capillary pressure. Thus, it would be important to understand the differences in the mechanisms operating at the afferent and efferent arteriole, as well as their alterations in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9248673

  14. Innervation of the renal proximal convoluted tubule of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas, L.; Powers, K. )

    1989-12-01

    Experimental data suggest the proximal tubule as a major site of neurogenic influence on tubular function. The functional and anatomical axial heterogeneity of the proximal tubule prompted this study of the distribution of innervation sites along the early, mid, and late proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) of the rat. Serial section autoradiograms, with tritiated norepinephrine serving as a marker for monoaminergic nerves, were used in this study. Freehand clay models and graphic reconstructions of proximal tubules permitted a rough estimation of the location of the innervation sites along the PCT. In the subcapsular nephrons, the early PCT (first third) was devoid of innervation sites with most of the innervation occurring in the mid (middle third) and in the late (last third) PCT. Innervation sites were found in the early PCT in nephrons located deeper in the cortex. In juxtamedullary nephrons, innervation sites could be observed on the PCT as it left the glomerulus. This gradient of PCT innervation can be explained by the different tubulovascular relationships of nephrons at different levels of the cortex. The absence of innervation sites in the early PCT of subcapsular nephrons suggests that any influence of the renal nerves on the early PCT might be due to an effect of neurotransmitter released from renal nerves reaching the early PCT via the interstitium and/or capillaries.

  15. Implications for Bidirectional Signaling Between Afferent Nerves and Urothelial Cells—ICI-RS 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Anthony; Fry, Christopher; Ikeda, Youko; Kullmann, Florenta Aura; Parsons, Brian; Birder, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Aims To present a synopsis of the presentations and discussions from Think Tank I, “Implications for afferent–urothelial bidirectional communication” of the 2014 International Consultation on Incontinence-Research Society (ICI-RS) meeting in Bristol, UK. Methods The participants presented what is new, currently understood or still unknown on afferent–urothelial signaling mechanisms. New avenues of research and experimental methodologies that are or could be employed were presented and discussed. Results It is clear that afferent–urothelial interactions are integral to the regulation of normal bladder function and that its disruption can have detrimental consequences. The urothelium is capable of releasing numerous signaling factors that can affect sensory neurons innervating the suburothelium. However, the understanding of how factors released from urothelial cells and afferent nerve terminals regulate one another is incomplete. Utilization of techniques such as viruses that genetically encode Ca2+ sensors, based on calmodulin and green fluorescent protein, has helped to address the cellular mechanisms involved. Additionally, the epithelial–neuronal interactions in the urethra may also play a significant role in lower urinary tract regulation and merit further investigation. Conclusion The signaling capabilities of the urothelium and afferent nerves are well documented, yet how these signals are integrated to regulate bladder function is unclear. There is unquestionably a need for expanded methodologies to further our understanding of lower urinary tract sensory mechanisms and their contribution to various pathologies. PMID:26872567

  16. Ontogeny of Neuro-Insular Complexes and Islets Innervation in the Human Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Proshchina, Alexandra E.; Krivova, Yulia S.; Barabanov, Valeriy M.; Saveliev, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    The ontogeny of the neuro-insular complexes (NIC) and the islets innervation in human pancreas has not been studied in detail. Our aim was to describe the developmental dynamics and distribution of the nervous system structures in the endocrine part of human pancreas. We used double-staining with antibodies specific to pan-neural markers [neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 protein] and to hormones of pancreatic endocrine cells. NSE and S100-positive nerves and ganglia were identified in the human fetal pancreas from gestation week (gw) 10 onward. Later the density of S100 and NSE-positive fibers increased. In adults, this network was sparse. The islets innervation started to form from gw 14. NSE-containing endocrine cells were identified from gw 12 onward. Additionally, S100-positive cells were detected both in the periphery and within some of the islets starting at gw 14. The analysis of islets innervation has shown that the fetal pancreas contained NIC and the number of these complexes was reduced in adults. The highest density of NIC is detected during middle and late fetal periods, when the mosaic islets, typical for adults, form. The close integration between the developing pancreatic islets and the nervous system structures may play an important role not only in the hormone secretion, but also in the islets morphogenesis. PMID:24795697

  17. Involvement of sensory innervation in the skin of SOD1(G93A) ALS mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel A; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Vilches, Jorge J; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Sensory alterations have been described in both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and mouse models. While involvement of intraepidermal and subepidermal axons has been shown in skin biopsies of ALS patients, it is unclear if the SOD1(G93A) mouse presents similar alterations. We analyzed the epidermal and dermal innervation, based on PGP9.5 immunostaining, of SOD1(G93A) mice at different stages. The results showed a marked reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, Meissner's corpuscles, and subepidermal nerve density already at 4 weeks. This loss of innervation progressed over time. Dermal axonal density decreased at a later stage of the disease. There was a gradient of axonal loss, with a more severe decline in the epidermis compared with deeper structures, indicating a distal axonal neuropathy as the mechanism of degeneration. These findings suggest that the analysis of the cutaneous sensory innervation may be an accessible and useful tool to assess the neurodegeneration process in motoneuron diseases. PMID:26880731

  18. Symptoms of notalgia paresthetica may be explained by increased dermal innervation.

    PubMed

    Springall, D R; Karanth, S S; Kirkham, N; Darley, C R; Polak, J M

    1991-09-01

    Notalgia paresthetica is a sensory neuropathy characterized by infrascapular pruritus, burning pain, hyperalgesia, or tenderness. To assess whether the symptoms may be caused by alterations in the cutaneous innervation, skin from the affected area of patients (n = 5) was compared with controls (n = 10) comprising the contralateral unaffected area from the same patients and site-matched biopsies of normals, using immunohistochemistry. Frozen sections were immunostained with antisera to the neuropeptides substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and neuropeptide with tyrosine, and to the general neural marker PGP 9.5 and the glial marker S-100 to show the overall innervation and glial cells, respectively. No discernible change in the distribution of neuropeptide-immunoreactive axons was found, but all of the specimens from the affected areas had a significant increase in the number of intradermal PGP 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibers compared with unaffected areas from the same patients and normal controls. Epidermal dendritic cells immunoreactive for S-100, possibly Langerhans cells, were substantially increased. It is concluded that there is an increase in the sensory epidermal innervation in the affected skin areas in notalgia paresthetica, which could contribute to the symptoms, and that neural immunohistochemistry of skin biopsies could be helpful in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:1831466

  19. The vestibular nerve of the chinchilla. III. Peripheral innervation patterns in the utricular macula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, C.; Goldberg, J. M.; Baird, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Nerve fibers supplying the utricular macula of the chinchilla were labeled by extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase into the vestibular nerve. The peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the regions of the end organ they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. 2. The macula is divided into medial and lateral parts by the striola, a narrow zone that runs for almost the entire length of the sensory epithelium. The striola can be distinguished from the extrastriolar regions to either side of it by the wider spacing of its hair cells. Calyx endings in the striola have especially thick walls, and, unlike similar endings in the extrastriola, many of them innervate more than one hair cell. The striola occupies 10% of the sensory epithelium; the lateral extrastriola, 50%; and the medial extrastriola, 40%. 3. The utricular nerve penetrates the bony labyrinth anterior to the end organ. Axons reaching the anterior part of the sensory epithelium run directly through the connective tissue stroma. Those supplying more posterior regions first enter a fiber layer located at the bottom of the stroma. Approximately one-third of the axons bifurcate below the epithelium, usually within 5-20 microns of the basement membrane. Bifurcations are more common in fibers destined for the extrastriola than for the striola. 4. Both calyx and bouton endings were labeled. Calyces can be simple or complex. Simple calyces innervate individual hair cells, whereas complex calyces supply 2-4 adjacent hair cells. Complex endings are more heavily concentrated in the striola than in the extrastriola. Simple calyces and boutons are found in all parts of the epithelium. Calyces emerge from the parent axon or one of its thick branches. Boutons, whether en passant or terminal, are located on thin collaterals. 5. Fibers can be classified into calyx, bouton, or dimorphic categories. The first type only has calyx endings; the second, only bouton

  20. Allometry of left ventricular myocardial innervation.

    PubMed

    Schipke, Julia; Mayhew, Terry M; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Body mass (BM) of terrestrial mammalian species ranges from a few grams in the case of the Etruscan shrew to a few tonnes for an elephant. The mass-specific metabolic rate, as well as heart rate, decrease with increasing BM, whereas heart mass is proportional to BM. In the present study, we investigated the scaling behaviour of several compartments of the left ventricular myocardium, notably its innervation, capillaries and cardiomyocytes. Myocardial samples were taken from 10 mammalian species with BM between approximately 2 g and 900 kg. Samples were analysed by design-based stereology and electron microscopy and the resulting data were subjected to linear regression and correlation analyses. The total length of nerve fibres (axons) in the left ventricle increased from 0.017 km (0.020 km) in the shrew to 7237 km (13,938 km) in the horse. The innervation density was similar among species but the mean number of axons per nerve fibre profile increased with rising BM. The total length of capillaries increased from 0.119 km (shrew) to 10,897 km (horse). The volume of cardiomyocytes was 0.017 cm(3) in the shrew and 1818 cm(3) in the horse. Scaling of the data against BM indicated a higher degree of complexity of the axon tree in larger animals and an allometric relationship between total length of nerve fibres/axons and BM. In contrast, the density of nerve fibres is independent of BM. It seems that the structural components of the autonomic nervous system in the heart are related to BM and heart mass rather than to functional parameters such as metabolic rate. PMID:24325466

  1. In pursuit of P2X3 antagonists: novel therapeutics for chronic pain and afferent sensitization.

    PubMed

    Ford, Anthony P

    2012-02-01

    Treating pain by inhibiting ATP activation of P2X3-containing receptors heralds an exciting new approach to pain management, and Afferent's program marks the vanguard in a new class of drugs poised to explore this approach to meet the significant unmet needs in pain management. P2X3 receptor subunits are expressed predominately and selectively in so-called C- and Aδ-fiber primary afferent neurons in most tissues and organ systems, including skin, joints, and hollow organs, suggesting a high degree of specificity to the pain sensing system in the human body. P2X3 antagonists block the activation of these fibers by ATP and stand to offer an alternative approach to the management of pain and discomfort. In addition, P2X3 is expressed pre-synaptically at central terminals of C-fiber afferent neurons, where ATP further sensitizes transmission of painful signals. As a result of the selectivity of the expression of P2X3, there is a lower likelihood of adverse effects in the brain, gastrointestinal, or cardiovascular tissues, effects which remain limiting factors for many existing pain therapeutics. In the periphery, ATP (the factor that triggers P2X3 receptor activation) can be released from various cells as a result of tissue inflammation, injury or stress, as well as visceral organ distension, and stimulate these local nociceptors. The P2X3 receptor rationale has aroused a formidable level of investigation producing many reports that clarify the potential role of ATP as a pain mediator, in chronic sensitized states in particular, and has piqued the interest of pharmaceutical companies. P2X receptor-mediated afferent activation has been implicated in inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain states, as well as in airways hyperreactivity, migraine, itch, and cancer pain. It is well appreciated that oftentimes new mechanisms translate poorly from models into clinical efficacy and effectiveness; however, the breadth of activity seen from P2X3 inhibition in models offers

  2. Human nasociliary nerve with special reference to its unique parasympathetic cutaneous innervation

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Fumio; Cho, Kwang Ho; Jang, Hyung Suk; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The frontal nerve is characterized by its great content of sympathetic nerve fibers in contrast to cutaneous branches of the maxillary and mandibular nerves. However, we needed to add information about composite fibers of cutaneous branches of the nasociliary nerve. Using cadaveric specimens from 20 donated cadavers (mean age, 85), we performed immunohistochemistry of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). The nasocilliary nerve contained abundant nNOS-positive fibers in contrast to few TH- and VIP-positive fibers. The short ciliary nerves also contained nNOS-positive fibers, but TH-positive fibers were more numerous than nNOS-positive ones. Parasympathetic innervation to the sweat gland is well known, but the original nerve course seemed not to be demonstrated yet. The present study may be the first report on a skin nerve containing abundant nNOS-positive fibers. The unique parasympathetic contents in the nasocilliary nerve seemed to supply the forehead sweat glands as well as glands in the eyelid and nasal epithelium. PMID:27382515

  3. Catecholaminergic Innervation of Central and Peripheral Auditory Circuitry Varies with Reproductive State in Female Midshipman Fish, Porichthys notatus

    PubMed Central

    Forlano, Paul M.; Ghahramani, Zachary N.; Monestime, Camillia M.; Kurochkin, Philip; Chernenko, Alena; Milkis, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    In seasonal breeding vertebrates, hormone regulation of catecholamines, which include dopamine and noradrenaline, may function, in part, to modulate behavioral responses to conspecific vocalizations. However, natural seasonal changes in catecholamine innervation of auditory nuclei is largely unexplored, especially in the peripheral auditory system, where encoding of social acoustic stimuli is initiated. The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, has proven to be an excellent model to explore mechanisms underlying seasonal peripheral auditory plasticity related to reproductive social behavior. Recently, we demonstrated robust catecholaminergic (CA) innervation throughout the auditory system in midshipman. Most notably, dopaminergic neurons in the diencephalon have widespread projections to auditory circuitry including direct innervation of the saccule, the main endorgan of hearing, and the cholinergic octavolateralis efferent nucleus (OE) which also projects to the inner ear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that gravid, reproductive summer females show differential CA innervation of the auditory system compared to non-reproductive winter females. We utilized quantitative immunofluorescence to measure tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir) fiber density throughout central auditory nuclei and the sensory epithelium of the saccule. Reproductive females exhibited greater density of TH-ir innervation in two forebrain areas including the auditory thalamus and greater density of TH-ir on somata and dendrites of the OE. In contrast, non-reproductive females had greater numbers of TH-ir terminals in the saccule and greater TH-ir fiber density in a region of the auditory hindbrain as well as greater numbers of TH-ir neurons in the preoptic area. These data provide evidence that catecholamines may function, in part, to seasonally modulate the sensitivity of the inner ear and, in turn, the appropriate behavioral response to reproductive acoustic signals. PMID

  4. Rare human nerve growth factor-β mutation reveals relationship between C-afferent density and acute pain evaluation.

    PubMed

    Perini, Irene; Tavakoli, Mitra; Marshall, Andrew; Minde, Jan; Morrison, India

    2016-08-01

    The rare nerve growth factor-β (NGFB) mutation R221W causes a selective loss of thinly myelinated fibers and especially unmyelinated C-fibers. Carriers of this mutation show altered pain sensation. A subset presents with arthropathic symptoms, with the homozygous most severely affected. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between peripheral afferent loss and pain evaluation by performing a quantification of small-fiber density in the cornea of the carriers, relating density to pain evaluation measures. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) was used to quantify C-fiber loss in the cornea of 19 R221W mutation carriers (3 homozygous) and 19 age-matched healthy control subjects. Pain evaluation data via the Situational Pain Questionnaire (SPQ) and the severity of neuropathy based on the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS) were assessed. Homozygotes, heterozygotes, and control groups differed significantly in corneal C-nerve fiber density, with the homozygotes showing a significant afferent reduction. Importantly, peripheral C-fiber loss correlated negatively with pain evaluation, as revealed by SPQ scores. This study is the first to investigate the contribution of small-fiber density to the perceptual evaluation of pain. It demonstrates that the lower the peripheral small-fiber density, the lower the degree of reported pain intensity, indicating a functional relationship between small-fiber density and higher level pain experience. PMID:27146986

  5. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  6. Pain processing by spinal microcircuits: afferent combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Steven A; Ratté, Stéphanie

    2012-08-01

    Pain, itch, heat, cold, and touch represent different percepts arising from somatosensory input. How stimuli give rise to these percepts has been debated for over a century. Recent work supports the view that primary afferents are highly specialized to transduce and encode specific stimulus modalities. However, cross-modal interactions (e.g. inhibition or exacerbation of pain by touch) support convergence rather than specificity in central circuits. We outline how peripheral specialization together with central convergence could enable spinal microcircuits to combine inputs from distinctly specialized, co-activated afferents and to modulate the output signals thus formed through computations like normalization. These issues will be discussed alongside recent advances in our understanding of microcircuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:22409855

  7. Blockage of vibrissae afferents: I. Motor effects.

    PubMed

    Prchal, A; Albarracín, A L; Décima, E E

    2004-02-01

    In the past, it has been proposed that the rat vibrissae play an important role in other hand, postural abnormalities, muscle tone decreases and hypomotility after sensory organ destructions were proposed as evidence supporting the "level setting" or "tonic" hypothesis. This hypothesis postulates that afferent activity, besides its well know transductive functions, sets the excitability state of the central nervous system. We thought the vibrissal system to be a good model to dissect these two postulated roles because vibrissae trimming would annul the transductive function without affecting the integrity of nerve activity. Thus we compare the effects of trimming the whiskers with blocking the vibrissal afferent nerves on two types of motor behavior: activity in an open field and walking over a rope connecting two elevated platforms. We found that only vibrissal afferent blockage (both nerve section and local anaesthesia) produced severe failures in the motor performances studied. These effects could not be fully explained by the abolition of the vibrissae as a sensory modality because cutting the whiskers did not significantly affect the motor performance. These data are discussed in reference to a tonic or general excitatory function of sensory inputs upon the central nervous system. PMID:15143620

  8. Central connectivity of the chorda tympani afferent terminals in the rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Kyung; Lee, Dae Seop; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-03-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives gustatory input via chorda tympani (CT) afferents from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and transmits it to higher brain regions. To help understand how the gustatory information is processed at the 1st relay nucleus of the brain stem, we investigated the central connectivity of the CT afferent terminals in the central subdivision of the rat rNST through retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, immunogold staining for GABA, glycine, and glutamate, and quantitative ultrastructural analysis. Most CT afferents were small myelinated fibers (<5 µm(2) in cross-sectional area) and made simple synaptic arrangements with 1-2 postsynaptic dendrites. It suggests that the gustatory signal is relayed to a specific group of neurons with a small degree of synaptic divergence. The volume of the identified synaptic boutons was positively correlated with their mitochondrial volume and active zone area, and also with the number of their postsynaptic dendrites. One-fourth of the boutons received synapses from GABA-immunopositive presynaptic profiles, 27 % of which were also glycine-immunopositive. These results suggest that the gustatory information mediated by CT afferents to the rNST is processed in a simple and specific manner. They also suggest that the minority of CT afferents are presynaptically modulated by GABA- and/or glycine-mediated mechanism. PMID:25503820

  9. Effect of estrogen on vagal afferent projections to the brainstem in the female.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John; Caverson, Monica M

    2016-04-01

    The effects of 17β-estradiol (E) on the distribution and density of brainstem projections of small or large diameter primary vagal afferents were investigated in Wistar rats using transganglionic transport of wheat germ agglutinin- (WGA; preferentially transported by non-myelinated afferent C-fibers; 2%), or cholera toxin B-subunit- (CTB, 5%; preferentially transported by large myelinated afferent A-fibers) conjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in combination with the tetramethylbenzidine method in age matched ovariectomized (OVX) only or OVX and treated with E (OVX+E; 30 pg/ml plasma) females for 12 weeks. Additionally, these projections were compared to aged matched males. Unilateral microinjection of WGA-HRP into the nodose ganglion resulted in dense anterograde labeling bilaterally, with an ipsilateral predominance in several subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and in area postrema that was greatest in OVX+E animals compared to OVX only and males. Moderately dense anterograde labeling was also observed in paratrigeminal nucleus (PAT) of the OVX+E animals. CTB-HRP produced less dense anterograde labeling in the NTS complex, but had a wider distribution within the brainstem including the area postrema, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, PAT, the nucleus ambiguus complex and ventrolateral medulla in all groups. The distribution of CTB-HRP anterograde labeling was densest in OVX+E, less dense in OVX only females and least dense in male rats. Little, if any, labeling was found within PAT in males using either WGA-or CTB-HRP. Taken together, these data suggest that small, non-myelinated (WGA-labeled) and large myelinated (CTB-labeled) diameter vagal afferents projecting to brainstem autonomic areas are differentially affected by circulating levels of estrogen. These effects of estrogen on connectivity may contribute to the sex differences observed in central autonomic mechanisms between gender, and in females with and without estrogen. PMID

  10. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion. PMID:25416508

  11. An afferent explanation for sexual dimorphism in the aortic baroreflex of rat.

    PubMed

    Santa Cruz Chavez, Grace C; Li, Bai-Yan; Glazebrook, Patricia A; Kunze, Diana L; Schild, John H

    2014-09-15

    Sex differences in baroreflex (BRx) function are well documented. Hormones likely contribute to this dimorphism, but many functional aspects remain unresolved. Our lab has been investigating a subset of vagal sensory neurons that constitute nearly 50% of the total population of myelinated aortic baroreceptors (BR) in female rats but less than 2% in male rats. Termed "Ah," this unique phenotype has many of the nonoverlapping electrophysiological properties and chemical sensitivities of both myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type BR afferents. In this study, we utilize three distinct experimental protocols to determine if Ah-type barosensory afferents underlie, at least in part, the sex-related differences in BRx function. Electron microscopy of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) revealed that female rats have less myelin (P < 0.03) and a smaller fiber cross-sectional area (P < 0.05) per BR fiber than male rats. Electrical stimulation of the ADN evoked compound action potentials and nerve conduction profiles that were markedly different (P < 0.01, n = 7 females and n = 9 males). Selective activation of ADN myelinated fibers evoked a BRx-mediated depressor response that was 3-7 times greater in female (n = 16) than in male (n = 17) rats. Interestingly, the most striking hemodynamic difference was functionally dependent upon the rate of myelinated barosensory fiber activation. Only 5-10 Hz of stimulation evoked a rapid, 20- to 30-mmHg reduction in arterial pressure of female rats, whereas rates of 50 Hz or higher were required to elicit a comparable depressor response from male rats. Collectively, our experimental results are suggestive of an alternative myelinated baroreceptor afferent pathway in females that may account for, at least in part, the noted sex-related differences in autonomic control of cardiovascular function. PMID:25038145

  12. S1 nerve is the most efficient nerve rootlet innervating the anal canal and rectum in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Luo, Pengbo; Zheng, Xianyou; Zhu, Xiaozhong; Wang, Lei; Chai, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic and somatic components participate in the defecation process in mammals, combining signals from the brainstem and forebrain. The innervation pattern involved in micturition in rats has been well studied, while defecation has been less studied. The aim of the present study was to identify the most important sensory and motor nerves of the anal canal and rectum involved in defecation. The amplitudes of evoked potential of the anal canal and rectum were higher when L6 and S1 ventral rootlets were stimulated, compared with the other segments (ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test, all P < 0.05). The S1 segment was more strongly cholera toxin subunit B conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (CB-HRP) positive compared with the other segments (ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test, P < 0.05). Ventral spinal rootlets of L6 and S1 mainly contributed to the pressure change in the anal canal and rectum when the ventral spinal rootlets from L5 to S3 were stimulated electrically. In conclusion, many afferent and efferent nerves innervate the anal canal and rectum and are involved in defecation, but the S1 nerve rootlet could be the most efficient one. These results could provide a basis for defecation reconstruction, especially for patients with spinal cord injuries. PMID:26260583

  13. Neuropilin-2/Semaphorin-3F-mediated repulsion promotes inner hair cell innervation by spiral ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Coate, Thomas M; Spita, Nathalie A; Zhang, Kaidi D; Isgrig, Kevin T; Kelley, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Auditory function is dependent on the formation of specific innervation patterns between mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) and afferent spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). In particular, type I SGNs must precisely connect with inner HCs (IHCs) while avoiding connections with nearby outer HCs (OHCs). The factors that mediate these patterning events are largely unknown. Using sparse-labeling and time-lapse imaging, we visualized for the first time the behaviors of developing SGNs including active retraction of processes from OHCs, suggesting that some type I SGNs contact OHCs before forming synapses with IHCs. In addition, we demonstrate that expression of Semaphorin-3F in the OHC region inhibits type I SGN process extension by activating Neuropilin-2 receptors expressed on SGNs. These results suggest a model in which cochlear innervation patterns by type I SGNs are determined, at least in part, through a Semaphorin-3F-mediated inhibitory signal that impedes processes from extending beyond the IHC region. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07830.001 PMID:26302206

  14. Glutamate-induced sensitization of rat masseter muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Cairns, B E; Gambarota, G; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Berde, C B

    2002-01-01

    In rats, intradermal or intraarticular injection of glutamate or selective excitatory amino acid receptor agonists acting at peripheral excitatory amino acid receptors can decrease the intensity of mechanical stimulation required to evoke nocifensive behaviors, an indication of hyperalgesia. Since excitatory amino acid receptors have been found on the terminal ends of cutaneous primary afferent fibers, it has been suggested that increased tissue glutamate levels may have a direct sensitizing effect on primary afferent fibers, in particular skin nociceptors. However, less is known about the effects of glutamate on deep tissue afferent fibers. In the present study, a series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of intramuscular injection of glutamate on the excitability and mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers in anesthetized rats of both sexes. Injection of 1.0 M, but not 0.1 M glutamate evoked masseter muscle afferent activity that was significantly greater than that evoked by isotonic saline. The mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers, which was assessed with a Von Frey hair, was reduced by approximately 50% for a period of 30 min after injection of 1.0 M glutamate, but was unaffected by injections of 0.1 M glutamate or isotonic saline. Injection of 25% dextrose, which has the same osmotic strength as 1.0 M glutamate, did not evoke significant activity in or decrease the mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers. Magnetic resonance imaging experiments confirmed that injection of 25% dextrose and 1.0 M glutamate produced similar edema volumes in the masseter muscle tissue. Co-injection of 0.1 M kynurenate, an excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, and 1.0 M glutamate attenuated glutamate-evoked afferent activity and prevented glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. When male and female rats were compared, no difference in the baseline mechanical threshold or in the magnitude of glutamate

  15. Effect of excitatory and inhibitory agents and a glial inhibitor on optically-recorded primary-afferent excitation.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kiritoshi, Takaki; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The effects of GABA, excitatory amino-acid receptors antagonists and a glial metabolism inhibitor on primary-afferent excitation in the spinal dorsal horn were studied by imaging the presynaptic excitation of high-threshold afferents in cord slices from young rats with a voltage-sensitive dye. Primary afferent fibers and terminals were anterogradely labeled with a voltage-sensitive dye from the dorsal root attached to the spinal cord slice. Single-pulse stimulation of C fiber-activating strength to the dorsal root elicited compound action potential-like optical responses in the superficial dorsal horn. The evoked presynaptic excitation was increased by the GABAA receptor antagonists picrotoxin and bicuculline, by glutamate receptor antagonists D-AP5 and CNQX, and by the glial metabolism inhibitor mono-fluoroacetic acid (MFA). The increase in presynaptic excitation by picrotoxin was inhibited in the presence of D-AP5, CNQX and MFA. Presynaptic modulation in the central terminal of fine primary afferents by excitatory and inhibitory amino acids may represent a mechanism that regulates the transmission of pain. PMID:18817580

  16. Innervation of sonic muscles in teleosts: occipital vs. spinal nerves.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Atsushi; Somiya, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    The innervation of sonic muscles in teleosts has been categorized into three types: occipital nerve, spinal nerve, and a combination of occipital and spinal nerves. The innervation patterns of sonic muscles were examined (or re-examined) in seven sonic fish species (rockfish, pinecone fish, sweeper, tigerfish, piranha, dory, and pollack) that use the sonic muscles to vibrate the swimbladder. The peripheral nerves (occipital or spinal) were identified based on skeletal preparations. The sonic muscle innervation was of the occipital type in four species (rockfish, pinecone fish, sweeper, and tigerfish) and of the spinal type in three species (piranha, dory, and pollack); none of the seven species examined showed the combination type. Therefore, we hypothesized that innervation patterns could be divided simply into occipital and spinal types. Moreover, the present results revealed that previously reported innervation patterns are inaccurate for three species (tigerfish, piranha, and dory) re-examined in this study. Therefore, it is important to define the peripheral nerves precisely, by using skeletal preparations, in future investigations of sonic muscle innervation. PMID:17230021

  17. Effects of acid on vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-08-15

    Acid reflux-induced heartburn and noncardiac chest pain are processed peripherally by sensory nerve endings in the wall of the esophagus, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effects of acid on esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in guinea pig vagal nodose or jugular C fiber neurons by using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. We recorded action potentials (AP) of esophageal nodose or jugular C fibers evoked by acid perfusion and compared esophageal distension-evoked AP before and after acid perfusion. Acid perfusion for 30 min (pH range 7.4 to 5.8) did not evoke AP in nodose C fibers but significantly decreased their responses to esophageal distension, which could be recovered after washing out acid for 90 min. In jugular C fibers, acid perfusion not only evoked AP but also inhibited their responses to esophageal distension, which were not recovered after washing out acid for 120 min. Lower concentration of capsaicin perfusion mimicked acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fibers. Pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) inhibitor amiloride, significantly inhibited acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fiber. These results demonstrate that esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent nerve subtypes display distinctive responses to acid. Acid activates jugular, but not nodose, C fibers and inhibits both of their responses to esophageal distension. These effects are mediated mainly through TRPV1. This inhibitory effect is a novel finding and may contribute to esophageal sensory/motor dysfunction in acid reflux diseases. PMID:24994852

  18. Reorganization of central terminals of myelinated primary afferents in the rat dorsal horn following peripheral axotomy.

    PubMed

    Woolf, C J; Shortland, P; Reynolds, M; Ridings, J; Doubell, T; Coggeshall, R E

    1995-09-11

    We have investigated the time course and extent to which peripheral nerve lesions cause a morphological reorganization of the central terminals of choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP)-labelled primary afferent fibers in the mammalian dorsal horn. Choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase is retrogradely transported by myelinated (A) sensory axons to laminae I, III, IV and V of the normal dorsal horn of the spinal cord, leaving lamina II unlabelled. We previously showed that peripheral axotomy results in the sprouting of numerous B-HRP-labelled large myelinated sensory axons into lamina II. We show here that this spread of B-HRP-labelled axons into lamina II is detectable at 1 week, maximal by 2 weeks and persists for over 6 months postlesion. By 9 months, however, B-HRP fibers no longer appear in lamina II. The sprouting into lamina II occurs whether regeneration is allowed (crush) or prevented (section with ligation), and does not reverse at times when peripheral fibers reinnervate the periphery. We also show that 15 times more synaptic terminals in lamina II are labelled by B-HRP 2 weeks after axotomy than in the normal. We interpret this as indicating that the sprouting fibers are making synaptic contacts with postsynaptic targets. This implies that A-fiber terminal reorganization is a prominent and long-lasting but not permanent feature of peripheral axotomy. We also provide evidence that this sprouting is the consequence of a combination of an atrophic loss of central synaptic terminals and the conditioning of the sensory neurons by peripheral axotomy. The sprouting of large sensory fibers into the spinal territory where postsynaptic targets usually receive only small afferent fiber input may bear on the intractable touch-evoked pain that can follow nerve injury. PMID:7499558

  19. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI) before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm), mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is observed in afferent

  20. Adaptations in the structure and innervation of follicle-sinus complexes to an aquatic environment as seen in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Sarko, Diana K; Reep, Roger L; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Rice, Frank L

    2007-09-20

    Florida manatees are large-bodied aquatic herbivores that use large tactile vibrissae for several purposes. Facial vibrissae are used to forage in a turbid water environment, and the largest perioral vibrissae can also grasp and manipulate objects. Other vibrissae distributed over the entire postfacial body appear to function as a lateral line system. All manatee vibrissae emanate from densely innervated follicle-sinus complexes (FSCs) like those in other mammals, although proportionately larger commensurate with the caliber of the vibrissae. As revealed by immunofluorescence, all manatee FSCs have many types of C, Adelta and Abeta innervation including Merkel, club, and longitudinal lanceolate endings at the level of the ring sinus, but they lack other types such as reticular and spiny endings at the level of the cavernous sinus. As in non-whisking terrestrial species, the inner conical bodies of facial FSCs are well innervated but lack Abeta-fiber terminals. Importantly, manatee FSCs have two unique types of Abeta-fiber endings. First, all of the FSCs have exceptionally large-caliber axons that branch to terminate as novel, gigantic spindle-like endings located at the upper ring sinus. Second, facial FSCs have smaller caliber Abeta fibers that terminate in the trabeculae of the cavernous sinus as an ending that resembles a Golgi tendon organ. In addition, the largest perioral vibrissae, which are used for grasping, have exceptionally well-developed medullary cores that have a structure and dense small-fiber innervation resembling that of tooth pulp. Other features of the epidermis and upper dermis structure and innervation differ from that seen in terrestrial mammals. PMID:17640045

  1. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  2. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  3. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated. PMID:9390960

  4. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Séguéla, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8(+) primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2(+)-Arch(+) mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8(+) afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  5. Different tonotopic regions of the lateral superior olive receive a similar combination of afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Álvarez, Marcelo; Saldaña, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian lateral superior olive (LSO) codes disparities in the intensity of the sound that reaches the two ears by integrating ipsilateral excitation and contralateral inhibition, but it remains unclear what particular neuron types convey acoustic information to the nucleus. It is also uncertain whether the known conspicuous morphofunctional differences and gradients along the tonotopic axis of the LSO relate to qualitative and/or quantitative regional differences in its afferents. To clarify these issues, we made small, single injections of the neuroanatomical tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into different tonotopic regions of the LSO of albino rats and analyzed the neurons labeled retrogradely in brainstem auditory nuclei. We demonstrate that the LSO is innervated tonotopically by four brainstem neuron types: spherical bushy cells and planar multipolar neurons of the ipsilateral ventral cochlear nucleus, principal neurons of the ipsilateral medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, and small multipolar neurons of the contralateral ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body. Unexpectedly, the proportion of labeled neurons of each type was virtually identical in all cases, thus indicating that all tonotopic regions of the LSO receive a similar combination of inputs. Even more surprisingly, our data also suggest that the representation of frequencies in the LSO differs from that of the nuclei that innervate it: compared to the latter nuclei, the LSO seems to possess a relatively larger portion of its volume devoted to processing frequencies in the lower-middle part of the spectrum, and a relative smaller portion devoted to higher frequencies. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2230-2250, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659473

  6. Central projections of antennular chemosensory and mechanosensory afferents in the brain of the terrestrial hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus; Coenobitidae, Anomura).

    PubMed

    Tuchina, Oksana; Koczan, Stefan; Harzsch, Steffen; Rybak, Jürgen; Wolff, Gabriella; Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hansson, Bill S

    2015-01-01

    The Coenobitidae (Decapoda, Anomura, Paguroidea) is a taxon of hermit crabs that includes two genera with a fully terrestrial life style as adults. Previous studies have shown that Coenobitidae have evolved a sense of spatial odor localization that is behaviorally highly relevant. Here, we examined the central olfactory pathway of these animals by analyzing central projections of the antennular nerve of Coenobita clypeatus, combining backfilling of the nerve with dextran-coupled dye, Golgi impregnations and three-dimensional reconstruction of the primary olfactory center, the antennular lobe. The principal pattern of putative olfactory sensory afferents in C. clypeatus is in many aspects similar to what have been established for aquatic decapod crustaceans, such as the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. However, there are also obvious differences that may, or may not represent adaptations related to a terrestrial lifestyle. In C. clypeatus, the antennular lobe dominates the deutocerebrum, having more than one thousand allantoid-shaped subunits. We observed two distinct patterns of sensory neuron innervation: putative olfactory afferents from the aesthetascs either supply the cap/subcap region of the subunits or they extend through its full depth. Our data also demonstrate that any one sensory axon can supply input to several subunits. Putative chemosensory (non-aesthetasc) and mechanosensory axons represent a different pathway and innervate the lateral and median antennular neuropils. Hence, we suggest that the chemosensory input in C. clypeatus might be represented via a dual pathway: aesthetascs target the antennular lobe, and bimodal sensilla target the lateral antennular neuropil and median antennular neuropil. The present data is compared to related findings in other decapod crustaceans. PMID:26236202

  7. Central projections of antennular chemosensory and mechanosensory afferents in the brain of the terrestrial hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus; Coenobitidae, Anomura)

    PubMed Central

    Tuchina, Oksana; Koczan, Stefan; Harzsch, Steffen; Rybak, Jürgen; Wolff, Gabriella; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    The Coenobitidae (Decapoda, Anomura, Paguroidea) is a taxon of hermit crabs that includes two genera with a fully terrestrial life style as adults. Previous studies have shown that Coenobitidae have evolved a sense of spatial odor localization that is behaviorally highly relevant. Here, we examined the central olfactory pathway of these animals by analyzing central projections of the antennular nerve of Coenobita clypeatus, combining backfilling of the nerve with dextran-coupled dye, Golgi impregnations and three-dimensional reconstruction of the primary olfactory center, the antennular lobe. The principal pattern of putative olfactory sensory afferents in C. clypeatus is in many aspects similar to what have been established for aquatic decapod crustaceans, such as the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. However, there are also obvious differences that may, or may not represent adaptations related to a terrestrial lifestyle. In C. clypeatus, the antennular lobe dominates the deutocerebrum, having more than one thousand allantoid-shaped subunits. We observed two distinct patterns of sensory neuron innervation: putative olfactory afferents from the aesthetascs either supply the cap/subcap region of the subunits or they extend through its full depth. Our data also demonstrate that any one sensory axon can supply input to several subunits. Putative chemosensory (non-aesthetasc) and mechanosensory axons represent a different pathway and innervate the lateral and median antennular neuropils. Hence, we suggest that the chemosensory input in C. clypeatus might be represented via a dual pathway: aesthetascs target the antennular lobe, and bimodal sensilla target the lateral antennular neuropil and median antennular neuropil. The present data is compared to related findings in other decapod crustaceans. PMID:26236202

  8. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Allen, A M

    1998-08-01

    1. A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1, Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype. 2. The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells. 3. To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95 % O2, 5 % CO2), maintained at 36 C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode. 4. Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 +/- 11 % with 10 nM angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nM. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 microM), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 microM). 5. In approximately 50 % of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 +/- 8 % with 10 nM angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319. 6. These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  9. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger to the site of persistent inflammation in nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Nicole N; Gold, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and recruitment of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) implicating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a major Ca(2+) extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca(2+) loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca(2+) transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation. PMID:26041911

  10. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A M

    1998-01-01

    A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1,Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype.The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells.To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2), maintained at 36 °C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode.Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 ± 11% with 10 nm angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nm. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 μm), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 μm).In approximately 50% of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 ± 8% with 10 nm angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319.These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  11. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley–Day syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B.; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    The Riley–Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10–30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  12. Morphology of single primary spindle afferents of the intercostal muscles in the cat.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Niwa, M; Sasaki, S I; Ichikawa, T; Hirai, N

    1998-09-01

    A reconstruction was made of the trajectory of primary spindle afferents from the intercostal muscles in the spinal cord of the cat. Intraaxonal recordings were performed from the primary spindle afferents that were identified by their response to lung inflation and stimulus threshold to activate the action potentials. The afferents were stained by using intraaxonal injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Results were obtained mainly from internal intercostal Ia fibers, which entered the spinal cord and bifurcated into ascending and descending branches. The ascending branches could be traced up to 10.7 mm, and the descending branches could be traced up to 7.3 mm. The ascending branches extended to the next segment. Collaterals ranging from one to six were given off from these branches. The distances between adjacent collaterals ranged from 0.9 mm to 4.7 mm. Each collateral had similar morphological characteristics. The collaterals entered the dorsal horn and ran toward lamina IX through the medial half of the gray matter. Fine branches and boutons were given off in laminae V, VII, VIII, and IX. The aggregations of these branches were found in lamina VII, mainly in the region of Clarke's column and in the ventral and ventrolateral regions thereof and in lamina IX, mainly in the nucleus lateromedialis. Most terminals did not contact the somata of target neurons in all laminae in which terminals were found. However, a few terminals were found to contact large neurons in lamina IX. In addition to these aggregates, there were some terminals scattered throughout the ventral horn. Thus, it was concluded that single intercostal Ia afferents project to the region of Clarke's column, to the intercostal motor nucleus, and to the intermediate regions. PMID:9717703

  13. Presynaptic Inhibition of Diverse Afferents to the Locus Coeruleus by Kappa Opiate Receptors: a Novel Mechanism for Regulating the Central Norepinephrine System

    PubMed Central

    Kreibich, Arati S.; Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Curtis, Andre L.; Ecke, Laurel; Chavkin, Charles; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.; Valentino, Rita J.

    2008-01-01

    The norepinephrine nucleus, locus coeruleus (LC), is activated by diverse stimuli and modulates arousal and behavioral strategies in response to these stimuli through its divergent efferent system. Afferents communicating information to the LC include excitatory amino acids (EAA), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and endogenous opioids acting at μ-opiate receptors. As the LC is also innervated by the endogenous κ-opiate receptor (κ-OR) ligand, dynorphin, and expresses κ-ORs, this study investigated κ-OR regulation of LC neuronal activity in rat. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed a prominent localization of κ-ORs in axon terminals in the LC that also contained either the vesicular glutamate transporter or CRF. Microinfusion of the κ-OR agonist, U50488, into the LC did not alter LC spontaneous discharge but attenuated phasic discharge evoked by stimuli that engage EAA afferents to the LC, including sciatic nerve stimulation and auditory stimuli and the tonic activation associated with opiate withdrawal. Inhibitory effects of the κ-OR agonist were not restricted to EAA afferents, as U50488 also attenuated tonic LC activation by hypotensive stress, an effect mediated by CRF afferents. Together, these results indicate that κ-ORs are poised to presynaptically inhibit diverse afferent signaling to the LC. This is a novel and potentially powerful means of regulating the LC-NE system that can impact on forebrain processing of stimuli and the organization of behavioral strategies in response to environmental stimuli. The results implicate κ-ORs as a novel target for alleviating symptoms of opiate withdrawal, stress-related disorders or disorders characterized by abnormal sensory responses, such as autism. PMID:18562623

  14. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  15. Unilateral innervation of guinea pig vallate taste buds as determined by glossopharyngeal neurectomy and HRP neural tracing.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y J; Lu, K S

    1996-01-01

    The innervation pattern by primary afferent nerve fibres and the neurotrophic effect on taste cells were investigated in the guinea pig vallate taste bud by means of glossopharyngeal neurectomy and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) tracing. In the glossopharyngeal neurectomy study, taste buds in the vallate papillae of adult guinea pigs were denervated by unilateral resection of the right glossopharyngeal nerve. Denervated animals were killed on days 1, 3 and 5 and weeks 1-9, 12 and 24 postneurectomy. The results showed that, on the denervated side, the taste buds decreased significantly in number during the 1st 2 wk, and disappeared completely by wk 3; no mature taste buds were present even 24 wk after neurectomy. This suggests that the vallate taste buds disappear in the absence of the glossopharyngeal nerve. In the neural tracing study, HRP or WGA-HRP was injected into the proximal end of the right glossopharyngeal nerve, near the jugular foramen. After a survival time of 24 h, the vallate papillae were sectioned and examined by light and electron microscopy. Light microscopy revealed that the HRP or WGA-HRP-labelled fibres innervated the vallate taste buds of the injected side. Most of the taste cells in the buds were labelled with HRP or WGA-HRP reaction products from the basal to the apical region. At the ultrastructural level, the reaction products were confined to the cytoplasm of the labelled cells, which were identified as type I, II and III cells, but not basal cells. Labelled intragemmal nerve profiles were seen among the taste cells. No synapse formation was seen with nerve profiles abutting on type I and II cells, whereas on certain type III cells, typical synapses were formed. We conclude that both the right and left vallate papilla in the guinea pig are unilaterally innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve without cross-innervation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID

  16. Release of acetylcholine by chick embryo heart before innervation

    PubMed Central

    Coraboeuf, E.; Le Douarin, G.; Obrecht-Coutris, G.

    1970-01-01

    1. In chick embryo hearts, 3-day-old and not yet innervated, repetitive direct stimulation causes a transitory inhibition of the spontaneous rhythm. 2. The degree of post-stimulation inhibition depends on the frequency and duration of the artificial stimulation and on the concentration of K and Ca ions in the extracellular solution. 3. After treatment with atropine (10-5 g/ml.) post-stimulation inhibition is no longer observed. The spontaneous rhythm is accelerated by atropine. The findings therefore suggest that an ACh-like substance is released from the non-innervated embryonic heart during activity. 4. By use of the dorsal muscle of the leech for biological assay the liberation of an ACh-like substance from the non-innervated embryonic heart was confirmed. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:5498489

  17. The innervation of the zebrafish pharyngeal jaws and teeth.

    PubMed

    Crucke, Jeroen; Van de Kelft, Annelore; Huysseune, Ann

    2015-07-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) teeth are increasingly used as a model to study odontogenesis in non-mammalians. Using serial semi-thin section histology and immunohistochemistry, the nerves innervating the pharyngeal jaws and teeth have been identified. The last pair of branchial arches, which are non-gill bearing but which carry the teeth, are innervated by an internal branch of a post-trematic ramus of the vagal nerve. Another, external, branch is probably responsible for the motor innervation of the branchiomeric musculature. Nerve fibres appear in the pulp cavity of the teeth only late during cytodifferentiation, and are therefore likely not involved in early steps of tooth formation. The precise role of the nervous system during continuous tooth replacement remains to be determined. Nonetheless, this study provides the necessary morphological background information to address this question. PMID:26018453

  18. The innervation of canine hip joint capsule: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H; Hou, S M; Yeh, L S

    2013-12-01

    To clarify the contributions of the nerves supplying the canine hip joint capsule for clinical application, cadaver study of six healthy mongrel dogs was performed. The pelvises and hindlimbs of cadavers were dissected and fixed in formaldehyde. Innervation of the joint capsule was investigated with the aid of an operative microscope. As a result, the canine hip joint capsule receives multiple innervations from articular branches of four nerves. They are articular nerve fibres of femoral, obturator, cranial gluteal and sciatic nerves from the cranioventral, caudoventral, craniolateral and dorsolateral directions of the joint, respectively. No branch originating from the caudal gluteal nerve was observed innervating the hip joint capsule. Our data provides useful information for research on the canine hip joint, including pain analysis with hip disorders and surgical nerve blockade to relieve pain. PMID:23410229

  19. FMRFamide-like immunoreactive nervus terminalis innervation to the pituitary in the catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linn.): demonstration by lesion and immunocytochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna, N. S.; Subhedar, N.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    Certain thick FMRFamide-like immunoreactive fibers arising from the ganglion cells of nervus terminalis in the olfactory bulb of Clarias batrachus can be traced centripetally through the medial olfactory tract, telencephalon, lateral preoptic area, tuberal area, and hypothalamohypophysial tract to the pituitary. Following 6 days of bilateral olfactory tract transection, the immunoreactivity in the thick fibers, caudal to the lesion site, was partially eliminated, whereas after 10 and 14 days, it was totally abolished in the processes en route to the pituitary. The results indicate a direct innervation of the pituitary gland by the FMRFamide-like peptide containing fibers of the nervus terminalis.

  20. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  1. Transplantation of tectal tissue in rats. I. Organization of transplants and pattern of distribution of host afferents within them

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, R.D.; Harvey, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined the maturation of tectal tissue transplanted from fetal rats to the midbrain of newborns and have characterized the distribution of host retinal and cortical afferents within the transplants. The transplants develop characteristic internal order and connections which distinguish them from either embryonic cortex or retina placed in the same region. Host retinal afferents project to clearly circumscribed regions, where they synapse mainly on small dendrites or dendritic spines, and only rarely on vesicle-containing profiles. The retinorecipient areas contain few stained axons in neurofibrillar preparations and are almost always located at the surface of the transplant. There is very little overlap in the input from the two eyes into a single transplant even though the projections from each eye may lie adjacent to one another. Cortical afferents spread more broadly in the transplants, but are largely absent from areas of optic termination and from other more deeply located regions with sparse fiber staining properties. The observations suggest that when placed close to its normal location, tectal tissue can develop a number of features characteristic of normal superior colliculus. Appreciation of the internal order of the transplants makes it possible to investigate the cortical and retinal afferent pathways using physiological techniques.

  2. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersensitivity remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of the GDNF family receptor α-3 (GFRα3) signaling in visceral hypersensitivity by quantifying visceromotor responses (VMR) to colorectal distension before and after intracolonic treatment with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baseline responses to colorectal distension did not differ between C57BL/6 and GFRα3 knockout (KO) mice. Relative to intracolonic saline treatment, TNBS significantly enhanced the VMR to colorectal distension in C57BL/6 mice 2, 7, 10, and 14 days posttreatment, whereas TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed in GFRα3 KO mice. The proportion of GFRα3 immunopositive thoracolumbar and lumbosacral colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly elevated 2 days after TNBS treatment. In single fiber recordings, responses to circumferential stretch of colorectal afferent endings in C57BL/6 mice were significantly increased (sensitized) after exposure to an inflammatory soup, whereas responses to stretch did not sensitize in GFRα3 KO mice. These findings suggest that enhanced GFRα3 signaling in visceral afferents may contribute to development of colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:21193524

  3. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  4. Effect of systemic nitroglycerin on CGRP and 5-HT afferents to rat caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus and its modulation by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Pardutz, A; Multon, S; Malgrange, B; Parducz, A; Vecsei, L; Schoenen, J

    2002-06-01

    Systemic administration of nitroglycerin, a nitric oxide donor, triggers in migraine patients a delayed attack of unknown mechanism. After puberty migraine is more prevalent in women. Attacks can be triggered by abrupt falls in plasma estrogen levels, which accounts in part for sexual dimorphism, but lacks an established neurobiological explanation. We studied the effect of nitroglycerin on the innervated area of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and serotonin-immunoreactive afferents to the superficial laminae of the spinal portion of trigeminal nucleus caudalis, and its modulation by estrogen. In male rats, nitroglycerin produced after 4 h a significant decrease of the area innervated by CGRP-immunoreactive afferents and an increase of that covered by serotonin-immunoreactive fibres. These effects were not observed in the superficial laminae of thoracic dorsal horns. The effect of nitroglycerin was similar in ovariectomized females. In estradiol-treated ovariectomized females the area in the spinal portion of trigeminal nucleus caudalis laminae I-II covered by CGRP-immunoreactive fibres was lower and that of serotonin-immunoreactive fibres was higher than in males and for both transmitters not significantly changed after nitroglycerin. The bouton size of CGRP profiles was smaller in estradiol-treated ovariectomized females, whereas after nitroglycerin it decreased significantly but only in males and ovariectomized females. Nitroglycerin, i.e. nitric oxide, is thus able to differentially influence afferent fibres in the superficial laminae of rat spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Estradiol modulates the basal expression of these transmitters and blocks the nitroglycerin effect. These data may contribute to understanding the mechanisms by which estrogens influence migraine severity and the triggering of attacks by nitric oxide. PMID:12081660

  5. Unmyelinated type II afferent neurons report cochlear damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian cochlea, acoustic information is carried to the brain by the predominant (95%) large-diameter, myelinated type I afferents, each of which is postsynaptic to a single inner hair cell. The remaining thin, unmyelinated type II afferents extend hundreds of microns along the cochlear duct to contact many outer hair cells. Despite this extensive arbor, type II afferents are weakly activated by outer hair cell transmitter release and are insensitive to sound. Intriguingly, type II afferents remain intact in damaged regions of the cochlea. Here, we show that type II afferents are activated when outer hair cells are damaged. This response depends on both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors, binding ATP released from nearby supporting cells in response to hair cell damage. Selective activation of P2Y receptors increased type II afferent excitability by the closure of KCNQ-type potassium channels, a potential mechanism for the painful hypersensitivity (that we term “noxacusis” to distinguish from hyperacusis without pain) that can accompany hearing loss. Exposure to the KCNQ channel activator retigabine suppressed the type II fiber’s response to hair cell damage. Type II afferents may be the cochlea’s nociceptors, prompting avoidance of further damage to the irreparable inner ear. PMID:26553995

  6. Cooling reduces the cutaneous afferent firing response to vibratory stimuli in glabrous skin of the human foot sole.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Catherine R; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R

    2013-02-01

    Skin on the foot sole plays an important role in postural control. Cooling the skin of the foot is often used to induce anesthesia to determine the role of skin in motor and balance control. The effect of cooling on the four classes of mechanoreceptor in the skin is largely unknown, and thus the aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of cooling on individual skin receptors in the foot sole. Such insight will better isolate individual receptor contributions to balance control. Using microneurography, we recorded 39 single nerve afferents innervating mechanoreceptors in the skin of the foot sole in humans. Afferents were identified as fast-adapting (FA) or slowly adapting (SA) type I or II (FA I n = 16, FA II n = 7, SA I n = 6, SA II n = 11). Receptor response to vibration was compared before and after cooling of the receptive field (2-20 min). Overall, firing response was abolished in 30% of all receptors, and this was equally distributed across receptor type (P = 0.69). Longer cooling times were more likely to reduce firing response below 50% of baseline; however, some afferent responses were abolished with shorter cooling times (2-5 min). Skin temperature was not a reliable indicator of the level of receptor activation and often became uncoupled from receptor response levels, suggesting caution in the use of this parameter as an indicator of anesthesia. When cooled, receptors preferentially coded lower frequencies in response to vibration. In response to a sustained indentation, SA receptors responded more like FA receptors, primarily coding "on-off" events. PMID:23155170

  7. Sympathetic innervation controls homeostasis of neuromuscular junctions in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muzamil Majid; Lustrino, Danilo; Silveira, Willian A.; Wild, Franziska; Straka, Tatjana; Issop, Yasmin; O’Connor, Emily; Cox, Dan; Reischl, Markus; Marquardt, Till; Labeit, Dittmar; Labeit, Siegfried; Benoit, Evelyne; Molgó, Jordi; Lochmüller, Hanns; Witzemann, Veit; Kettelhut, Isis C.; Navegantes, Luiz C. C.; Pozzan, Tullio; Rudolf, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    The distribution and function of sympathetic innervation in skeletal muscle have largely remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that sympathetic neurons make close contact with neuromuscular junctions and form a network in skeletal muscle that may functionally couple different targets including blood vessels, motor neurons, and muscle fibers. Direct stimulation of sympathetic neurons led to activation of muscle postsynaptic β2-adrenoreceptor (ADRB2), cAMP production, and import of the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A) into myonuclei. Electrophysiological and morphological deficits of neuromuscular junctions upon sympathectomy and in myasthenic mice were rescued by sympathicomimetic treatment. In conclusion, this study identifies the neuromuscular junction as a target of the sympathetic nervous system and shows that sympathetic input is crucial for synapse maintenance and function. PMID:26733679

  8. Sympathetic innervation controls homeostasis of neuromuscular junctions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzamil Majid; Lustrino, Danilo; Silveira, Willian A; Wild, Franziska; Straka, Tatjana; Issop, Yasmin; O'Connor, Emily; Cox, Dan; Reischl, Markus; Marquardt, Till; Labeit, Dittmar; Labeit, Siegfried; Benoit, Evelyne; Molgó, Jordi; Lochmüller, Hanns; Witzemann, Veit; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C C; Pozzan, Tullio; Rudolf, Rüdiger

    2016-01-19

    The distribution and function of sympathetic innervation in skeletal muscle have largely remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that sympathetic neurons make close contact with neuromuscular junctions and form a network in skeletal muscle that may functionally couple different targets including blood vessels, motor neurons, and muscle fibers. Direct stimulation of sympathetic neurons led to activation of muscle postsynaptic β2-adrenoreceptor (ADRB2), cAMP production, and import of the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A) into myonuclei. Electrophysiological and morphological deficits of neuromuscular junctions upon sympathectomy and in myasthenic mice were rescued by sympathicomimetic treatment. In conclusion, this study identifies the neuromuscular junction as a target of the sympathetic nervous system and shows that sympathetic input is crucial for synapse maintenance and function. PMID:26733679

  9. Innervation zones of fasciculating motor units: observations by a linear electrode array

    PubMed Central

    Jahanmiri-Nezhad, Faezeh; Barkhaus, Paul E.; Rymer, William Z.; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the innervation zone (IZ) in the biceps brachii muscle in healthy subjects and those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using a 20-channel linear electromyogram (EMG) electrode array. Raster plots of individual waveform potentials were studied to estimate the motor unit IZ. While this work mainly focused on fasciculation potentials (FPs), a limited number of motor unit potentials (MUPs) from voluntary activity of 12 healthy and seven ALS subjects were also examined. Abnormal propagation of MUPs and scattered IZs were observed in fasciculating units, compared with voluntarily activated MUPs in healthy and ALS subjects. These findings can be related to muscle fiber reinnervation following motor neuron degeneration in ALS and the different origin sites of FPs compared with voluntary MUPs. PMID:26029076

  10. Central GABAergic innervation of the pituitary in goldfish: a radioautographic and immunocytochemical study at the electron microscope level

    SciTech Connect

    Kah, O.; Dubourg, P.; Martinoli, M.G.; Rabhi, M.; Gonnet, F.; Geffard, M.; Calas, A.

    1987-09-01

    The GABAergic innervation of the goldfish pituitary was studied at the light and electron microscope levels by means of radioautography after in vitro incubation in tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and immunocytochemistry using antibodies against GABA. Following incubation of pituitary fragments in a medium containing tritiated GABA, a selective uptake of the tracer was observed within the digitations of the neurohypophysis. Silver grain clusters were also observed in the adenohypophyseal tissue. At the electron microscope level, this uptake was found to correspond to nerve endings containing small clear and dense-core vesicles. These labeled profiles were located mainly in neurohypophyseal digitations in close apposition with the basement membrane separating the neurohypophysis from the adenohypophysis. However, they were also encountered in direct contact with most adenohypophyseal cell types in the different lobes. These results were confirmed by immunocytochemical data demonstrating the presence of numerous GABA immunoreactive fibers in both anterior and neurointermediate lobes. They were found either in the digitations of the neurohypophysis or in the adenohypophysis in direct contact with the glandular cells with a distribution and an ultrastructural aspect similar to those observed by radioautography. These data demonstrate that the pituitary of teleosts receives a massive GABAergic innervation. Although physiological data providing a functional significance for such an innervation are lacking, the present study suggests that, as already documented in mammals, GABA may be involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of pituitary functions in teleosts.

  11. The ultrastructure of prosternal sensory hair afferents within the locust central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Watson, A H; Pflüger, H J

    1984-01-01

    The sensory neurones innervating long prosternal hairs of Locusta migratorioides were backfilled with horseradish peroxidase through their dendrites. The neurones' central projections in and around the medial ventral tract were examined with electron microscopy. Most synapses occur on axon collaterals which ramify through the neuropile around the tract where both input and output synapses were observed. Serial sectioning methods were used to determine the relative distribution of inputs and outputs which often lie in close proximity to one another on the axon terminals. The prosternal hair terminals contain agranular synaptic vesicles approximately 37 nm in diameter. Surrounding unidentified neuropilar profiles contain vesicles which are either statistically indistinguishable in size, or are larger, 45 nm diameter agranular vesicles. Neurones which are pre- or postsynaptic to labelled terminals generally contain vesicles of the second type. Input synapses onto the central terminals of primary afferent neurones can be recognised as a widespread phenomenon in the nervous systems of both invertebrates and vertebrates which will allow a fine degree of control of sensory inflow into the central nervous system. PMID:6709188

  12. Role of prostaglandin D2 in mast cell activation-induced sensitization of esophageal vagal afferents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shizhong; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Joo, Moon Kyung; Heldsinger, Andrea; Song, Il; Owyang, Chung; Yu, Shaoyong

    2013-05-15

    Sensitization of esophageal afferents plays an important role in esophageal nociception, but the mechanism is less clear. Our previous studies demonstrated that mast cell (MC) activation releases the preformed mediators histamine and tryptase, which play important roles in sensitization of esophageal vagal nociceptive C fibers. PGD2 is a lipid mediator released by activated MCs. Whether PGD2 plays a role in this sensitization process has yet to be determined. Expression of the PGD2 DP1 and DP2 receptors in nodose ganglion neurons was determined by immunofluorescence staining, Western blotting, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings were performed in ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distension were compared before and after perfusion of PGD2, DP1 and DP2 receptor agonists, and MC activation, with or without pretreatment with antagonists. The effect of PGD2 on 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal nodose neurons was determined by patch-clamp recording. Our results demonstrate that DP1 and DP2 receptor mRNA and protein were expressed mainly in small- and medium-diameter neurons in nodose ganglia. PGD2 significantly increased esophageal distension-evoked action potential discharges in esophageal nodose C fibers. The DP1 receptor agonist BW 245C mimicked this effect. PGD2 directly sensitized DiI-labeled esophageal nodose neurons by decreasing the action potential threshold. Pretreatment with the DP1 receptor antagonist BW A868C significantly inhibited PGD2 perfusion- or MC activation-induced increases in esophageal distension-evoked action potential discharges in esophageal nodose C fibers. In conclusion, PGD2 plays an important role in MC activation-induced sensitization of esophageal nodose C fibers. This adds a novel mechanism of visceral afferent sensitization. PMID:23471341

  13. Roles of innervation in developing and regenerating orofacial tissues.

    PubMed

    Pagella, Pierfrancesco; Jiménez-Rojo, Lucia; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2014-06-01

    The head is innervated by 12 cranial nerves (I-XII) that regulate its sensory and motor functions. Cranial nerves are composed of sensory, motor, or mixed neuronal populations. Sensory neurons perceive generally somatic sensations such as pressure, pain, and temperature. These neurons are also involved in smell, vision, taste, and hearing. Motor neurons ensure the motility of all muscles and glands. Innervation plays an essential role in the development of the various orofacial structures during embryogenesis. Hypoplastic cranial nerves often lead to abnormal development of their target organs and tissues. For example, Möbius syndrome is a congenital disease characterized by defective innervation (i.e., abducens (VI) and facial (VII) nerves), deafness, tooth anomalies, and cleft palate. Hence, it is obvious that the peripheral nervous system is needed for both development and function of orofacial structures. Nerves have a limited capacity to regenerate. However, neural stem cells, which could be used as sources for neural tissue maintenance and repair, have been found in adult neuronal tissues. Similarly, various adult stem cell populations have been isolated from almost all organs of the human body. Stem cells are tightly regulated by their microenvironment, the stem cell niche. Deregulation of adult stem cell behavior results in the development of pathologies such as tumor formation or early tissue senescence. It is thus essential to understand the factors that regulate the functions and maintenance of stem cells. Yet, the potential importance of innervation in the regulation of stem cells and/or their niches in most organs and tissues is largely unexplored. This review focuses on the potential role of innervation in the development and homeostasis of orofacial structures and discusses its possible association with stem cell populations during tissue repair. PMID:24395053

  14. Conduction in ulnar nerve bundles that innervate the proximal and distal muscles: a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate and compare the conduction parameters of nerve bundles in the ulnar nerve that innervates the forearm muscles and hand muscles; routine electromyography study merely evaluates the nerve segment of distal (hand) muscles. Methods An electrophysiological evaluation, consisting of velocities, amplitudes, and durations of ulnar nerve bundles to 2 forearm muscles and the hypothenar muscles was performed on the same humeral segment. Results The velocities and durations of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of the ulnar nerve bundle to the proximal muscles were greater than to distal muscles, but the amplitudes were smaller. Conclusions Bundles in the ulnar nerve of proximal muscles have larger neuronal bodies and thicker nerve fibers than those in the same nerve in distal muscles, and their conduction velocities are higher. The CMAPs of proximal muscles also have smaller amplitudes and greater durations. These findings can be attributed to the desynchronization that is caused by a wider range of distribution in nerve fiber diameters. Conduction parameters of nerve fibers with different diameters in the same peripheral nerve can be estimated. PMID:20836846

  15. The development of colon innervation in trisomy 16 mice and Hirschsprungs disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji Cheng; Mi, Kai Hong; Zhou, Ji Lin; Busch, LC; Kuhnel, W

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the colon innervation of trisomy 16 mouse, an animal model for Down’s syndrome, and the expression of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) in the stenosed segment of colon in Hirschsprungs disease (HD). METHODS: Trisomy 16 mouse breeding; cytogenetic analysis of trisomy 16 mice; and PGP 9.5 immunohistochemistry of colons of trisomy 16 mice and HD were carried out. RESULTS: Compared with their normal littermates, the nervous system of colon in trisomy 16 mice was abnormally developed. There existed developmental delay of muscular plexuses of colon, no submucosal plexus was found in the colon, and there was 5 mm aganglionic bowel aparting from the anus in trisomy 16 mice. The mesentery nerve fibers were as well developed as shown in their normal littermates. Abundant proliferation of PGP 9.5 positive nerve fibers was evealed in the stenosed segment of HD colon. CONCLUSION: Trisomy 16 mice could serve as an animal model for Hirschsprung’s disease for aganglionic bowel in the distal part of colon. Abundant proliferation of PGP 9.5 positive fibers resulted from extrinsic nerve compensation, since no ganglionic cells were observed in the stenosed segment of the colon in HD. HD has a genetic tendency. PMID:11819726

  16. Differential expression of vesicular glutamate transporters by vagal afferent terminals in rat nucleus of the solitary tract: projections from the heart preferentially express vesicular glutamate transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Corbett, E K A; Sinfield, J K; McWilliam, P N; Deuchars, J; Batten, T F C

    2005-01-01

    The central projections and neurochemistry of vagal afferent neurones supplying the heart in the rat were investigated by injecting cholera toxin B-subunit into the pericardium. Transganglionically transported cholera toxin B-subunit was visualized in the medulla oblongata in axons and varicosities that were predominantly aggregated in the dorsomedial, dorsolateral, ventrolateral and commissural subnuclei of the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract. Unilateral vagal section in control rats prevented cholera toxin B-subunit labeling on the ipsilateral side of the nucleus of the solitary tract. Fluorescent and electron microscopic dual labeling showed colocalization of immunoreactivity for vesicular glutamate transporter 1, but only rarely vesicular glutamate transporters 2 or 3 with cholera toxin B-subunit in terminals in nucleus of the solitary tract, suggesting that cardiac vagal axons release glutamate as a neurotransmitter. In contrast, populations of vagal afferent fibers labeled by injection of cholera toxin B-subunit, tetra-methylrhodamine dextran or biotin dextran amine into the aortic nerve, stomach or nodose ganglion colocalized vesicular glutamate transporter 2 more frequently than vesicular glutamate transporter 1. The presence of other neurochemical markers of primary afferent neurones was examined in nucleus of the solitary tract axons and nodose ganglion cells labeled by pericardial cholera toxin B-subunit injections. Immunoreactivity for a 200-kDa neurofilament protein in many large, cholera toxin B-subunit-labeled nodose ganglion cells indicated that the cardiac afferent fibers labeled are mostly myelinated, whereas binding of Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 to fewer small cholera toxin B-subunit-labeled ganglion cells suggested that tracer was also taken up by some non-myelinated axons. A few labeled nucleus of the solitary tract axons and ganglion cells were positive for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are considered as

  17. Convergence in Reflex Pathways from Multiple Cutaneous Nerves Innervating the Foot Depends upon the Number of Rhythmically Active Limbs during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Hundza, Sandra R.; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  18. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin. PMID:24879873

  19. Venous endothelin guides sympathetic innervation of the developing mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Manousiouthakis, Eleana; Mendez, Monica; Garner, Madeline C.; Exertier, Prisca; Makita, Takako

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for establishing correct target innervation during organ development are largely unknown. Sympathetic nerves traverse or follow blood vessels to reach their end-organs, suggesting the existence of vascular guidance cues that direct axonal extension. The sinoatrial node and the ventricle of the heart receive sympathetic innervation from the stellate ganglia (STG). Here we show that STG axons follow veins, specifically the superior vena cavae and sinus venosus, to reach these targets. We find that the election of these routes is determined by venous endothelium-derived endothelin-1, acting through its specific receptor Ednra expressed within a subpopulation of STG neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Edn1-Ednra signaling is essential for functional regulation of the heart by sympathetic nerves. Our findings present venous Edn1 as a sympathetic guidance cue, and show how axon guidance mechanisms are coordinated with end-organ morphogenesis. PMID:24875861

  20. Role of afferent input in load-dependent plasticity of rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, F.; Umemoto, S.; Higo, Y.; Kawabe, N.; Wang, X. D.; Lan, Y. B.; Ohira, Y.

    We have been studying the role of afferent input in the plasticity of skeletal muscles. The present study was performed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the deafferentation-related inhibition of the compensatory hypertrophy in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the control, functionally overloaded (FO), and functionally overloaded + deafferentation (FO+DA) group. The tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were additionally transected in the FO+DA rats. The sampling of the soleus was performed 2 weeks after the surgery and ambulation recovery. The single muscle fibers were isolated in low-calcium relaxing solution. Further, the myonuclei or argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were stained. Significant increase of the fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was seen in the FO, but not in the FO+DA, rats. The myonuclear number in fiber was significantly decreased by FO. Addition of DA to FO further promoted the reduction of myonuclear number. The mean nucleus size and DNA content in single nucleus in all groups were identical. Although a single or double AgNORs were seen in ~90% of myonuclei in the control rats, their distributions were 72 and 76% in the FO and FO+DA rats, respectively (p<0.05). More myonuclei containing 3-5 AgNORs were noted in the FO and FO+DA rats. The mean number of the AgNORs per myonucleus was 1.7 in the control, 2.1 in both FO and FO+DA rats (p<0.05). It was suggested that the FO-related increase of the number of AgNORs may be responsible for the induction of compensatory hypertrophy. It was also indicated that intact afferent input plays an essential role in these phenomena.

  1. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain123

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8+ primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch+ mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2+-Arch+mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch+ mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8+ afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  2. Directional sound sensitivity in utricular afferents in the toadfish Opsanus tau.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Mensinger, Allen F

    2015-06-01

    The inner ear of fishes contains three paired otolithic end organs, the saccule, lagena and utricle, which function as biological accelerometers. The saccule is the largest otolith in most fishes and much of our current understanding on auditory function in this diverse group of vertebrates is derived from anatomical and neurophysiological studies on this end organ. In contrast, less is known about how the utricle contributes to auditory functions. In this study, chronically implanted electrodes were used, along with neural telemetry or tethers to record primary afferent responses from the utricular nerve in free-ranging and naturally behaving oyster toadfish Opsanus tau Linnaeus. The hypothesis was that the utricle plays a role in detecting underwater sounds, including conspecific vocalizations, and exhibits directional sensitivity. Utricular afferents responded best to low frequency (80-200 Hz) pure tones and to playbacks of conspecific boatwhistles and grunts (80-180 Hz fundamental frequency), with the majority of the units (∼75%) displaying a clear, directional response, which may allow the utricle to contribute to sound detection and localization during social interactions. Responses were well within the sound intensity levels of toadfish vocalization (approximately 140 SPL dBrms re. 1 µPa with fibers sensitive to thresholds of approximately 120 SPL dBrms re. 1 µPa). Neurons were also stimulated by self-generated body movements such as opercular movements and swimming. This study is the first to investigate underwater sound-evoked response properties of primary afferents from the utricle of an unrestrained/unanesthetized free-swimming teleost fish. These data provide experimental evidence that the utricle has an auditory function, and can contribute to directional hearing to facilitate sound localization. PMID:25883378

  3. Changes in vagal afferent drive alter tracheobronchial coughing in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Simera, Michal; Poliacek, Ivan; Veternik, Marcel; Babalova, Lucia; Kotmanova, Zuzana; Jakus, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Unilateral cooling of the vagus nerve (<5°C, blocking mainly conductivity of myelinated fibers) and unilateral vagotomy were employed to reduce cough afferent drive in order to evaluate the effects of these interventions on the temporal features of the cough reflex. Twenty pentobarbitone anesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats were used. Cough was induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial airways. The number of coughs during vagal cooling was significantly decreased (p<0.001). Inspiratory cough efforts were reduced by approximately 30% (p<0.001) and expiratory motor drive by more than 80% (p<0.001). Temporal analysis showed prolonged inspiratory and expiratory phases, the total cycle duration, its active portion, and the interval between maxima of the diaphragm and the abdominal activity during coughing (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the average effects on the cough reflex between cooling of the left or the right vagus nerve. Compared to control, vagal cooling produced no significant difference in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure (p>0.05), however, cold block of vagal conduction reduced respiratory rate (p<0.001). Unilateral vagotomy significantly reduced cough number, cough-related diaphragmatic activity, and relative values of maximum expiratory esophageal pressure (all p<0.05). Our results indicate that reduced cough afferent drive (lower responsiveness) markedly attenuates the motor drive to respiratory pump muscles during coughing and alters cough temporal features. Differences in the effects of unilateral vagal cooling and vagotomy on coughing support an inhibitory role of sensory afferents that are relatively unaffected by cooling of the vagus nerve to 5°C on mechanically induced cough. PMID:27184303

  4. Micromotional studies of utricular and canal afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Edwin R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-range goal of this research was to refine our understanding of the sensitivity of the vestibular components of the ear to very-low-amplitude motion, especially, the role of gravity in this sensitivity. We focused on the American bullfrog--a common animal subject for vestibular sensory research. Our principal experimental method was to apply precise, sinusoidal microrotational stimuli to an anesthetized animal subject, to record the resulting responses in an individual vestibular nerve fiber from the intact ear, and to use intracellular dye to trace the fiber and thus identify the vestibular sensor that gave rise to it. In this way, we were able to identify specific micromotional sensitivities and to associate those sensitivities definitely with specific sensors. Furthermore, by recording from nerve fibers after they leave the intact inner-ear cavity, we were able to achieve these identifications without interrupting the delicate micromechanics of the inner ear. We were especially concerned with the relative roles of the utricle and the anterior semicircular canal in the sensing of microrotational motion of the head about horizontal axes, and with the role of gravity in mediating that sensing process in the utricle. The functional characterization of individual nerve fibers was accomplished with a conventional analytical tool, the cycle histogram, in which the nerve impulse rate was plotted against the phase of the sinusoidal stimulus.

  5. The innervated free toe web flap for clitoris reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dabernig, Jörg; Shelley, Odhran P; Schaff, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Clitoris reconstruction is often used in transgender reassignment. Most techniques now reconstruct the clitoris using glans pedicled on the dorsal phallic neurovascular bundle. Other techniques of clitoris reconstruction re-shape retained elements of the proximal segment of the corpora cavernosa, as well as techniques mobilising local flaps. We are presenting a new technique for clitoris reconstruction using an innervated free web space flap. The operative technique and outcome are illustrated and discussed in this case report. PMID:17368123

  6. The Histology and Histopathology of the Dental Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Bradlaw, Robert

    1939-01-01

    The presence of a perivascular neural plexus in the periodontal membrane suggests that the dental structures have both sensory and autonomic nerve supply. The fibres described by Mummery are unaffected by section of the inferior dental nerve although there is marked degeneration in all demonstrable nerves. Nerve-fibres have been observed describing simple and complex looping in the odontogenetic zone and others which, running tangentially between the odontoblast layer and the dentine, form a very definite nerve plexus. Attached to these nerve-fibres are numerous round or pear-shaped bodies which may be either nerve-cells or end-organs. Definite nerve-fibres have been traced into the dentine. The convoluted forms described by growing nerve-fibres approaching transplanted teeth did not resemble the nerve-loops previously reported in the periodontal membrane of monkey and man. Plexiform nerve-fibres have been seen in the gum of the cat and varicose nerve-fibres in the gum of the sheep. In man, intra-epithelial fibres have been observed which pass from the intra-papillary neural coils to terminate near the surface of the epithelium in knob-like endings. No abnormality of innervation has been found in supernumerary teeth and teeth from cleft palates, dentigerous and ovarian cysts, and in the pulps of denticles from compound odontomes. Since there is no difference in the innervation of heterogenous and autogenous tooth-germ transplants, whether of normal or abnormal form, it would seem that abnormalities of form are not due to abnormal innervation. The development and degeneration of the peripheral nerves and the changes produced in the dental innervation by local and general disease in man and experimental animals are described and discussed. ImagesFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17 PMID:19992023

  7. Phase relation changes between the firings of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions in brain-dead human and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    1. Single-nerve fibre action potentials (APs) were recorded with 2 pairs of wire electrodes from lower sacral nerve roots during surgery in patients with spinal cord injury and in a brain-dead human. Conduction velocity distribution histograms were constructed for afferent and efferent fibres, nerve fibre groups were identified and simultaneous impulse patterns of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) were constructed. Temporal relations between afferent and efferent APs were analyzed by interspike interval (II) and phase relation changes to explore the coordinated self-organization of somatic and parasympathetic neuronal networks in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions under physiologic (brain-dead) and pathophysiologic conditions (spinal cord injury). 2. In a paraplegic with hyperreflexia of the bladder, urinary bladder stretch (S1) and tension receptor afferents (ST) fired already when the bladder was empty, and showed a several times higher bladder afferent activity increase upon retrograde bladder filling than observed in the brain-dead individual. Two alpha2-motoneurons (FR) innervating the external bladder sphincter were already oscillatory firing to generate high activity levels when the bladder was empty. They showed activity levels with no bladder filling, comparable to those measured at a bladder filling of 600 ml in the brain-dead individual. A bladder storage volume of 600 ml was thus lost in the paraplegic, due to a too high bladder afferent input to the sacral micturition center, secondary to inflammation and hypertrophy of the detrusor. 3. In a brain-dead human, 2 phase relations existed per oscillation period of 160 ms between the APs of a sphincteric oscillatory firing alpha2-motoneuron, a dynamic fusimotor and a secondary muscle spindle afferent fibre. Following stimulation of mainly somatic afferent fibres, the phase relations changed only little. 4. In a paraplegic with dyssynergia of the

  8. Effect of synthetic cationic protein on mechanoexcitability of vagal afferent nerve subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Ouyang, Ann

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by increased infiltration and degranulation of eosinophils in the esophagus. Whether eosinophil-derived cationic proteins regulate esophageal sensory nerve function is still unknown. Using synthetic cationic protein to investigate such effect, we performed extracellular recordings from vagal nodose or jugular neurons in ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Nerve excitabilities were determined by comparing action potentials evoked by esophageal distensions before and after perfusion of synthetic cationic protein poly-L-lysine (PLL) with or without pretreatment with poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA), which neutralized cationic charges of PLL. Perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials in esophageal nodose C fibers but increased their responses to esophageal distension. This potentiation effect lasted for 30 min after washing out of PLL. Pretreatment with PLGA significantly inhibited PLL-induced mechanohyperexcitability of esophageal nodose C fibers. In esophageal nodose Aδ fibers, perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials. In contrast to nodose C fibers, both the spontaneous discharges and the responses to esophageal distension in nodose Aδ fibers were decreased by perfusion with PLL, which can be restored after washing out PLL for 30-60 min. Pretreatment with PLGA attenuated PLL-induced decrease in spontaneous discharge and mechanoexcitability of esophageal nodose Aδ fibers. In esophageal jugular C fibers, PLL neither evoked action potentials nor changed their responses to esophageal distension. Collectively, these data demonstrated that synthetic cationic protein did not evoke action potential discharges of esophageal vagal afferents but had distinctive sensitization effects on their responses to esophageal distension. PMID:21960520

  9. Deletion of the murine ATP/UTP receptor P2Y2 alters mechanical and thermal response properties in polymodal cutaneous afferents.

    PubMed

    Molliver, Derek C; Rau, Kristofer K; Jankowski, Michael P; Soneji, Deepak J; Baumbauer, Kyle M; Koerber, H Richard

    2016-09-22

    P2Y2 is a member of the P2Y family of G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors that is widely co-expressed with TRPV1 in peripheral sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. To characterize P2Y2 function in cutaneous afferents, intracellular recordings from mouse sensory neurons were made using an ex vivo preparation in which hindlimb skin, saphenous nerve, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord are dissected intact. The peripheral response properties of individual cutaneous C-fibers were analyzed using digitally controlled mechanical and thermal stimuli in male P2Y2(+/+) and P2Y2(-/-) mice. Selected sensory neurons were labeled with Neurobiotin and further characterized by immunohistochemistry. In wildtype preparations, C-fibers responding to both mechanical and thermal stimuli (CMH or CMHC) preferentially bound the lectin marker IB4 and were always immunonegative for TRPV1. Conversely, cells that fired robustly to noxious heat, but were insensitive to mechanical stimuli, were TRPV1-positive and IB4-negative. P2Y2 gene deletion resulted in reduced firing by TRPV1-negative CMH fibers to a range of heat stimuli. However, we also identified an atypical population of IB4-negative, TRPV1-positive CMH fibers. Compared to wildtype CMH fibers, these TRPV1-positive neurons exhibited lower firing rates in response to mechanical stimulation, but had increased firing to noxious heat (43-51°C). Collectively, these results demonstrate that P2Y2 contributes to response properties of cutaneous afferents, as P2Y2 deletion reduces responsiveness of conventional unmyelinated polymodal afferents to heat and appears to result in the acquisition of mechanical responsiveness in a subset of TRPV1-expressing afferents. PMID:27393251

  10. Intrinsic innervation and dopaminergic markers after experimental denervation in rat thymus

    PubMed Central

    Mignini, F.; Sabbatini, M.; D'Andrea, V.; Cavallotti, C.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine rat thymus innervation using denervation techniques and to explore the related microanatomical localization of dopamine, D1, D2 receptors and dopamine membrane transporter (DAT). In the thymus subcapsular region, the parenchymal cholinergic fibers belong exclusively to phrenic nerve branching. No somatic phrenic nerve branching was detected in any other analysed thymus lobule regions. In rats subjected to sympathetic or parasympathetic ablation, it was observed that catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers respectively contributed to forming plexuses along vessel walls. In the subcapsular and septal region, no parenchymal nerve branching, belonging to sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system was noted. Instead, in the deep cortical region, cortico-medullary junction (CM-j) and medulla, catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers were detected along the vessels and parenchyma. Dopamine and dopamine receptors were widely diffused in the lobular cortico-medullary junction region and in the medulla, where the final steps of thymocyte maturation and their trafficking take place. No variation in dopamine and DAT immune reaction was observed following total or partial parasympathectomy or phrenic nerve cutting. After chemical or surgical sympathectomy however, neither dopamine nor DAT immune reaction was noted again. Instead, D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression was not affected by thymus denervation. In rats subjected to specific denervation, it was observed the direct intraparenchymal branching of the phrenic nerve and sympathetic and parasympathetic fibers into thymus parenchyma along vessels. These findings on the dopaminergic system highlight the importance of neurotransmitter receptor expression in the homeostasis of neuroimmune modulation. PMID:20558339

  11. Chronic recruitment of primary afferent neurons by microstimulation in the feline dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lee E.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Ciollaro, Mattia; Ventura, Valérie; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. This study describes results of primary afferent neural microstimulation experiments using microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of four cats. The goal was to test the stability and selectivity of these microelectrode arrays as a potential interface for restoration of somatosensory feedback after damage to the nervous system such as amputation. Approach. A five-contact nerve-cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve was used to record the antidromic compound action potential response to DRG microstimulation (2-15 µA biphasic pulses, 200 µs cathodal pulse width), and the threshold for eliciting a response was tracked over time. Recorded responses were segregated based on conduction velocity to determine thresholds for recruiting Group I and Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers. Main results. Thresholds were initially low (5.1 ± 2.3 µA for Group I and 6.3 ± 2.0 µA for Group II/Aβ) and increased over time. Additionally the number of electrodes with thresholds less than or equal to 15 µA decreased over time. Approximately 12% of tested electrodes continued to elicit responses at 15 µA up to 26 weeks after implantation. Higher stimulation intensities (up to 30 µA) were tested in one cat at 23 weeks post-implantation yielding responses on over 20 additional electrodes. Within the first six weeks after implantation, approximately equal numbers of electrodes elicited only Group I or Group II/Aβ responses at threshold, but the relative proportion of Group II/Aβ responses decreased over time. Significance. These results suggest that it is possible to activate Group I or Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers in isolation with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in the DRG, and that those responses can be elicited up to 26 weeks after implantation, although it may be difficult to achieve a consistent response day-to-day with currently available electrode technology. The DRG are compelling targets

  12. Distinct subclassification of DRG neurons innervating the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra based on the electrophysiological current signature

    PubMed Central

    Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Cooper, Brian Y.; Johnson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal sensory neurons innervating visceral and mucocutaneous tissues have unique microanatomic distribution, peripheral modality, and physiological, pharmacological, and biophysical characteristics compared with those neurons that innervate muscle and cutaneous tissues. In previous patch-clamp electrophysiological studies, we have demonstrated that small- and medium-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can be subclassified on the basis of their patterns of voltage-activated currents (VAC). These VAC-based subclasses were highly consistent in their action potential characteristics, responses to algesic compounds, immunocytochemical expression patterns, and responses to thermal stimuli. For this study, we examined the VAC of neurons retrogradely traced from the distal colon and the glans penis/distal urethra in the adult male rat. The afferent population from the distal colon contained at least two previously characterized cell types observed in somatic tissues (types 5 and 8), as well as four novel cell types (types 15, 16, 17, and 18). In the glans penis/distal urethra, two previously described cell types (types 6 and 8) and three novel cell types (types 7, 14, and 15) were identified. Other characteristics, including action potential profiles, responses to algesic compounds (acetylcholine, capsaicin, ATP, and pH 5.0 solution), and neurochemistry (expression of substance P, CGRP, neurofilament, TRPV1, TRPV2, and isolectin B4 binding) were consistent for each VAC-defined subgroup. With identification of distinct DRG cell types that innervate the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra, future in vitro studies related to the gastrointestinal and urogenital sensory function in normal as well as abnormal/pathological conditions may be benefitted. PMID:24872531

  13. The efferent innervation of the genital chamber by an identified serotonergic neuron in the female cricket Acheta domestica.

    PubMed

    Elekes, K; Hustert, R

    1988-05-01

    The serotonergic innervation of the genital chamber of the female cricket, Acheta domestica, has been investigated applying anti-serotonin (5-HT) immunocytochemistry at both light- and electron-microscopic levels as well as using conventional electron microscopy. Whole mount and pre-embedding chopper techniques of immunocytochemistry reveal a dense 5-HT-immunoreactive network of varicose fibers in the musculature of the genital chamber. All of these immunoreactive fibers originate from the efferent serotonergic neuron projecting through the nerve 8v to the genital chamber (Hustert and Topel 1986; Elekes et al. 1987). At the electron-microscopic level, 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve terminals, which contain small (50-60 nm) and large (approximately 100 nm) agranular vesicles as well as granular vesicles (approximately 100 nm), contact the muscle fibers or the sarcoplasmic processes without establishing specialized neuromuscular connections. In addition to the 5-HT-immunoreactive axons, two types of immunonegative axons can also be found in the musculature. By use of conventional electron microscopy, three ultrastructurally distinct types of axon processes can be observed, one of which resembles 5-HT-immunoreactive axons. While the majority of the varicosities do not synapse on the muscle fibers, terminals containing small (50-60 nm) agranular vesicles occasionally form specialized neuromuscular contacts. It is suggested that the 5-HTergic innervation plays a non-synaptic modulatory role in the regulation circular musculature in the genital chamber of the cricket, while the musculature as a whole may be influenced by both synaptic and modulatory mechanisms. PMID:3383221

  14. Bursting stimulation of proximal urethral afferents improves bladder pressures and voiding

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Tim M; Bhadra, Narendra

    2012-01-01

    Reflex bladder excitation has been evoked via pudendal nerve, pudendal nerve branch and intraurethral stimulation; however, afferent-evoked bladder emptying has been less efficient than direct activation of the bladder via sacral root stimulation. A stimulation method that improves activation of the urethra–bladder excitatory reflex with minimal sphincter recruitment may lead to improved bladder emptying. Fine wire electrodes were placed in the wall of the urethra in five cats. Placement of electrodes near the proximal urethra evoked bladder contractions with minimal sphincter activation. On these electrodes, lower frequency burst-patterned stimuli evoked greater bladder voiding efficiencies (71.2 ± 27.8%) than other stimulus patterns on the same electrodes (50.4 ± 41.5%, p > 0.05) or any stimulus pattern on electrodes that elicited urethral closure (16.5 ± 12.7%, p < 0.05). Fine wire electrodes specifically targeted afferent fibers in the urethra, indicating the feasibility of clinical evaluations using the same method. This work may improve the translation of next generation neuroprostheses for bladder control. PMID:19901447

  15. Bursting stimulation of proximal urethral afferents improves bladder pressures and voiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Tim M.; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2009-12-01

    Reflex bladder excitation has been evoked via pudendal nerve, pudendal nerve branch and intraurethral stimulation; however, afferent-evoked bladder emptying has been less efficient than direct activation of the bladder via sacral root stimulation. A stimulation method that improves activation of the urethra-bladder excitatory reflex with minimal sphincter recruitment may lead to improved bladder emptying. Fine wire electrodes were placed in the wall of the urethra in five cats. Placement of electrodes near the proximal urethra evoked bladder contractions with minimal sphincter activation. On these electrodes, lower frequency burst-patterned stimuli evoked greater bladder voiding efficiencies (71.2 ± 27.8%) than other stimulus patterns on the same electrodes (50.4 ± 41.5%, p > 0.05) or any stimulus pattern on electrodes that elicited urethral closure (16.5 ± 12.7%, p < 0.05). Fine wire electrodes specifically targeted afferent fibers in the urethra, indicating the feasibility of clinical evaluations using the same method. This work may improve the translation of next generation neuroprostheses for bladder control.

  16. Semicircular Canal Geometry, Afferent Sensitivity And Animal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hullar, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry of the semicircular canals has been used in evolutionary studies to predict the behaviors of extinct animals. These predictions have relied on an assumption that the responses of the canals can be determined from their dimensions, and that an organism’s behavior can be determined from these responses. However, the relationship between a canal’s sensitivity and its size is not well known. An intraspecies comparison among canal responses in each of three species (cat, squirrel monkey, and pigeon) was undertaken to evaluate various models of canal function and determine how their dimensions may be related to afferent physiology. All models predicted the responses of the cat afferents, but the models performed less well for squirrel monkey and pigeon. Possible causes for this discrepancy include incorrectly assuming that afferent responses accurately represent canal function, or errors in current biophysical models of the canals. These findings leave open the question as to how reliably canal anatomy can be used to estimate afferent responses and how closely afferent responses are related to behavior. Other labyrinthine features—such as orientation of the horizontal canal, which is reliably held near earth-horizontal across many species—may be better to use when extrapolating the posture and related behavior of extinct animals from labyrinthine morphology. PMID:16550591

  17. Thalamocortical Innervation Pattern in Mouse Auditory and Visual Cortex: Laminar and Cell-Type Specificity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xu-Ying; Zingg, Brian; Mesik, Lukas; Xiao, Zhongju; Zhang, Li I; Tao, Huizhong W

    2016-06-01

    Despite many previous studies, the functional innervation pattern of thalamic axons and their target specificity remains to be investigated thoroughly. Here, in primary auditory cortical slices, we examined thalamic innervation patterns for excitatory and different types of inhibitory neurons across laminae, by optogenetically stimulating axons from the medial geniculate body. We found that excitatory cells and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing inhibitory neurons across layer 2/3 (L2/3) to L6 are directly innervated by thalamic projections, with the strongest innervation occurring in L4. The innervation of PV neurons is stronger than that of excitatory neurons in the same layer, with a relatively constant ratio between their innervation strengths across layers. For somatostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibitory neurons, essentially only L4 neurons were innervated by thalamic axons and the innervation was much weaker compared with excitatory and PV cells. In addition, more than half of inhibitory neurons in L1 were innervated, relatively strongly, by thalamic axons. Similar innervation patterns were also observed in the primary visual cortex. Thus, thalamic information can be processed independently and differentially by different cortical layers, in addition to the generally thought hierarchical processing starting from L4. This parallel processing is likely shaped by feedforward inhibition from PV neurons in each individual lamina, and may extend the computation power of sensory cortices. PMID:25979090

  18. The innervation of the adrenal gland. IV. Innervation of the rat adrenal medulla from birth to old age. A descriptive and quantitative morphometric and biochemical study of the innervation of chromaffin cells and adrenal medullary neurons in Wistar rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, A; Coupland, R E

    1990-01-01

    The innervation of the adrenal medulla has been investigated in normal Wistar rats from birth to old age and ultrastructural findings compared with biochemical markers of the cholinergic innervation of the adrenal gland and catecholamine storage. Morphological evidence of the immaturity of the innervation during the first postnatal week is provided and using quantitative morphometry the innervation of chromaffin cells is shown to reach a mean total of 5.4 synapses per chromaffin cell during the period 26 days to 12 weeks of age. The variation in contents of synaptic profiles is discussed in the light of recent work that demonstrates a major sensory as well as visceral efferent innervation of the gland. Adrenal medullary neurons usually occur in closely packed groups, intimately associated with Schwann cells. Axodendritic and axosomatic synapses on these neurons are described and the likely origin of axonal processes innervating the neurons discussed. In old age the density of innervation remains the same as in young adult animals even though the medulla shows evidence of hyperplasia and hypertrophy of individual chromaffin cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 PMID:2384334

  19. Mechanical sensibility of nociceptive and non-nociceptive fast-conducting afferents is modulated by skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo; Eisenach, James C; Ririe, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish mechanical from thermal input is a critical component of peripheral somatosensory function. Polymodal C fibers respond to both stimuli. However, mechanosensitive, modality-specific fast-conducting tactile and nociceptor afferents theoretically carry information only about mechanical forces independent of the thermal environment. We hypothesize that the thermal environment can nonetheless modulate mechanical force sensibility in fibers that do not respond directly to change in temperature. To study this, fast-conducting mechanosensitive peripheral sensory fibers in male Sprague-Dawley rats were accessed at the soma in the dorsal root ganglia from T11 or L4/L5. Neuronal identification was performed using receptive field characteristics and passive and active electrical properties. Neurons responded to mechanical stimuli but failed to generate action potentials in response to changes in temperature alone, except for the tactile mechanical and cold sensitive neurons. Heat and cold ramps were utilized to determine temperature-induced modulation of response to mechanical stimuli. Mechanically evoked electrical activity in non-nociceptive, low-threshold mechanoreceptors (tactile afferents) decreased in response to changes in temperature while mechanically induced activity was increased in nociceptive, fast-conducting, high-threshold mechanoreceptors in response to the same changes in temperature. These data suggest that mechanical activation does not occur in isolation but rather that temperature changes appear to alter mechanical afferent activity and input to the central nervous system in a dynamic fashion. Further studies to understand the psychophysiological implications of thermal modulation of fast-conducting mechanical input to the spinal cord will provide greater insight into the implications of these findings. PMID:26581873

  20. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  1. Epidermal Nerve Fiber Quantification in the Assessment of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beiswenger, Kristina K.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Assessment of cutaneous innervation in skin biopsies is emerging as a valuable means of both diagnosing and staging diabetic neuropathy. Immunolabeling, using antibodies to neuronal proteins such as protein gene product 9.5, allows for the visualization and quantification of intraepidermal nerve fibers. Multiple studies have shown reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in skin biopsies from patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. More recent studies have focused on correlating these changes with other measures of diabetic neuropathy. A loss of epidermal innervation similar to that observed in diabetic patients has been observed in rodent models of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and several therapeutics have been reported to prevent reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in these models. This review discusses the current literature describing diabetes-induced changes in cutaneous innervation in both human and animal models of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18384843

  2. Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on pulmonary vagal afferents and phrenic nerve activity in cats.

    PubMed

    Aoki, M; Harada, Y; Namiki, A; Ikeda, M; Shimizu, H

    1992-10-01

    The ability of lidocaine to suppress activity of single vagal afferent fiber and that of phrenic nerve was studied in 20 cats anesthetized with pentobarbital. Slowly adapting stretch receptors (SAR, n = 16) and rapidly adapting stretch receptors (RAR, n = 7) were identified by their discharge pattern to pulmonary inflation. Intravenous lidocaine (1 mg.kg(-1) or 2 mg.kg(-1)) produced a suppression of SAR activity but not of RAR activity. Suppression of phrenic nerve activity lasted much longer than that of SAR. These findings indicate that iv lidocaine acts more dominantly on CNS than on peripherals. We conclude that iv lidocaine prevents cough and hemodynamic changes caused by airway manipulation mainly through its action on CNS and not on peripherals (peripheral nerves or their receptor). PMID:15278511

  3. The afferent pupillary defect in acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with acute optic neuritis were studied by the techniques of infrared pupillometry and visual evoked responses (VER) to pattern reversal. A relative afferent pupillary defect was found in all cases and the magnitude of this defect was found to be related to the amplitude, but not to the latency, of the VER. During follow-up the afferent defect was found to remain persistently abnormal while other methods of clinical evaluation could not demonstrate abnormality reliably. The amplitude of the VER also remained low. PMID:501365

  4. A role for nociceptive, myelinated nerve fibers in itch sensation

    PubMed Central

    Ringkamp, M.; Schepers, R. J.; Shimada, S.G.; Johanek, L.M.; Hartke, T.V.; Borzan, J.; Shim, B.; LaMotte, R.H.; Meyer, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the underlying neural mechanisms of itch sensation are poorly understood. In many diseases, pruritus is not effectively treated with antihistamines, indicating the involvement of non-histaminergic mechanisms. To investigate the role of small myelinated afferents in non-histaminergic itch, we tested, in psychophysical studies in humans, the effect of a differential nerve block on itch produced by intradermal insertion of spicules from the pods of a cowhage plant (Mucuna pruriens). Electrophysiological experiments in anesthetized monkey were used to investigate the responsiveness of cutaneous, nociceptive, myelinated afferents to different chemical stimuli (cowhage spicules, histamine, capsaicin). Our results provide several lines of evidence for an important role of myelinated fibers in cowhage-induced itch: 1) a selective conduction block in myelinated fibers substantially reduces itch in a sub-group of subjects with A-fiber dominated itch, 2) the time course of itch sensation differs between subjects with A-fiber versus C-fiber dominated itch, 3) cowhage activates a subpopulation of myelinated and unmyelinated afferents in monkey, 4) the time course of the response to cowhage is different in myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, 5) the time of peak itch sensation for subjects with A-fiber dominated itch matches the time for peak response in myelinated fibers, and 6) the time for peak itch sensation for subjects with C-fiber dominated itch matches the time for the peak response in unmyelinated fibers. These findings demonstrate that activity in nociceptive, myelinated afferents contributes to cowhage-induced sensations, and that non-histaminergic itch is mediated through activity in both unmyelinated and myelinated afferents. PMID:22016517

  5. Regionally distinct cutaneous afferent populations contribute to reflex modulation evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve during walking.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuska, Hiroyuki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Barss, Trevor S; Klarner, Taryn; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    During walking, cutaneous reflexes in ankle flexor muscle [tibialis anterior (TA)] evoked by tibial nerve (TIB) stimulation are predominantly facilitatory at early swing phase but reverse to suppression at late swing phase. Although the TIB innervates a large portion of the skin of the foot sole, the extent to which specific foot-sole regions contribute to the reflex reversals during walking remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated regional cutaneous contributions from discrete portions of the foot sole on reflex reversal in TA following TIB stimulation during walking. Summation effects on reflex amplitudes, when applying combined stimulation from foot-sole regions with TIB, were examined. Middle latency responses (MLRs; 70-120 ms) after TIB stimulation were strongly facilitated during the late stance to mid-swing phases and reversed to suppression just before heel (HL) strike. Both forefoot-medial (f-M) and forefoot-lateral stimulation in the foot sole induced facilitation during stance-to-swing transition phases, but HL stimulation evoked suppression during the late stance to the end of swing phases. At the stance-to-swing transition, a summation of MLR amplitude occurred only for combined f-M&TIB stimulation. However, the same was not true for the combined HL&TIB stimulation. At the swing-to-stance transition, there was a suppressive reflex summation only for HL&TIB stimulation. In contrast, this summation was not observed for the f-M&TIB stimulation. Our results suggest that reflex reversals evoked by TIB stimulation arise from distinct reflex pathways to TA produced by separate afferent populations innervating specific regions of the foot sole. PMID:27075541

  6. Cholinergic neurons in the mouse rostral ventrolateral medulla target sensory afferent areas

    PubMed Central

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Macon, Conrad J.; Nguyen, Thanh M.; Coates, Melissa B.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2012-01-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) primarily regulates respiration and the autonomic nervous system. Its medial portion (mRVLM) contains many choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons of unknown function. We sought to clarify the role of these cholinergic cells by tracing their axonal projections. We first established that these neurons are neither parasympathetic preganglionic neurons nor motor neurons because they did not accumulate intraperitoneally administered Fluorogold. We traced their axonal projections by injecting a Cre-dependent vector (floxed-AAV2) expressing either GFP or mCherrry into the mRVLM of ChAT-Cre mice. Transduced neurons expressing GFP or mCherry were confined to the injection site and were exclusively ChAT-ir. Their axonal projections included the dorsal column nuclei, medullary trigeminal complex, cochlear nuclei, superior olivary complex and spinal cord lamina III. For control experiments, the floxed-AAV2 (mCherry) was injected into the RVLM of dopamine beta-hydroxylase-Cre mice. In these mice mCherry was exclusively expressed by RVLM catecholaminergic neurons. Consistent with data from rats, these catecholaminergic neurons targeted brain regions involved in autonomic and endocrine regulation. These regions were almost totally different from those innervated by the intermingled mRVLM-ChAT neurons. This study emphasizes the advantages of using Cre-driver mouse strains in combination with floxed-AAV2 to trace the axonal projections of chemically defined neuronal groups. Using this technique, we revealed previously unknown projections of mRVLM-ChAT neurons and showed that despite their close proximity to the cardiorespiratory region of the RVLM, these cholinergic neurons regulate sensory afferent information selectively and presumably have little to do with respiration or circulatory control. PMID:22460939

  7. Cholinergic neurons in the mouse rostral ventrolateral medulla target sensory afferent areas.

    PubMed

    Stornetta, Ruth L; Macon, Conrad J; Nguyen, Thanh M; Coates, Melissa B; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2013-03-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) primarily regulates respiration and the autonomic nervous system. Its medial portion (mRVLM) contains many choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons of unknown function. We sought to clarify the role of these cholinergic cells by tracing their axonal projections. We first established that these neurons are neither parasympathetic preganglionic neurons nor motor neurons because they did not accumulate intraperitoneally administered Fluorogold. We traced their axonal projections by injecting a Cre-dependent vector (floxed-AAV2) expressing either GFP or mCherrry into the mRVLM of ChAT-Cre mice. Transduced neurons expressing GFP or mCherry were confined to the injection site and were exclusively ChAT-ir. Their axonal projections included the dorsal column nuclei, medullary trigeminal complex, cochlear nuclei, superior olivary complex and spinal cord lamina III. For control experiments, the floxed-AAV2 (mCherry) was injected into the RVLM of dopamine beta-hydroxylase-Cre mice. In these mice, mCherry was exclusively expressed by RVLM catecholaminergic neurons. Consistent with data from rats, these catecholaminergic neurons targeted brain regions involved in autonomic and endocrine regulation. These regions were almost totally different from those innervated by the intermingled mRVLM-ChAT neurons. This study emphasizes the advantages of using Cre-driver mouse strains in combination with floxed-AAV2 to trace the axonal projections of chemically defined neuronal groups. Using this technique, we revealed previously unknown projections of mRVLM-ChAT neurons and showed that despite their close proximity to the cardiorespiratory region of the RVLM, these cholinergic neurons regulate sensory afferent information selectively and presumably have little to do with respiration or circulatory control. PMID:22460939

  8. Whole-brain mapping of afferent projections to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rong-Jun; Luo, Peng-Hao; Shu, Yu-Mian; Chen, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-10-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) plays an important role in integrating and relaying input information to other brain regions in response to stress. The cytoarchitecture of the BST in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) has been comprehensively described in our previous publications. However, the inputs to the BST have not been described in previous reports. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sources of afferent projections to the BST throughout the brain of tree shrews using the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). The present results provide the first detailed whole-brain mapping of BST-projecting neurons in the tree shrew brain. The BST was densely innervated by the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, ventral subiculum, amygdala, ventral tegmental area, and parabrachial nucleus. Moreover, moderate projections to the BST originated from the medial preoptic area, supramammillary nucleus, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, locus coeruleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract. Afferent projections to the BST are identified in the ventral pallidum, nucleus of the diagonal band, ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus, posterior complex of the thalamus, interfascicular nucleus, retrorubral field, rhabdoid nucleus, intermediate reticular nucleus, and parvicellular reticular nucleus. In addition, the different densities of BST-projecting neurons in various regions were analyzed in the tree shrew brains. In summary, whole-brain mapping of direct inputs to the BST is delineated in tree shrews. These brain circuits are implicated in the regulation of numerous physiological and behavioral processes including stress, reward, food intake, and arousal. PMID:27436534

  9. Localization of motoneurons innervating individual abdominal muscles of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a systematic investigation of the innervation of the cat's individual abdominal muscles. The segmental distribution of the different motor pools was determined by using electrical microstimulation of the ventral horn to produce visible localized muscle twitches and by retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase injected into individual muscles. The segmental distribution of each motor pool was as follows: rectus abdominis, T4-L3; external oblique, T6-L3; transverse abdominis, T9-L3; and internal oblique, T13-L3.

  10. Spinally projecting preproglucagon axons preferentially innervate sympathetic preganglionic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn-Smith, I.J.; Marina, N.; Manton, R.N.; Reimann, F.; Gribble, F.M.; Trapp, S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and medullary reticular formation, produce GLP-1. In transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), these brainstem PPG neurons project to many central autonomic regions where GLP-1 receptors are expressed. The spinal cord also contains GLP-1 receptor mRNA but the distribution of spinal PPG axons is unknown. Here, we used two-color immunoperoxidase labeling to examine PPG innervation of spinal segments T1–S4 in YFP-PPG mice. Immunoreactivity for YFP identified spinal PPG axons and perikarya. We classified spinal neurons receiving PPG input by immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and/or Fluorogold (FG) retrogradely transported from the peritoneal cavity. FG microinjected at T9 defined cell bodies that supplied spinal PPG innervation. The deep dorsal horn of lower lumbar cord contained YFP-immunoreactive neurons. Non-varicose, YFP-immunoreactive axons were prominent in the lateral funiculus, ventral white commissure and around the ventral median fissure. In T1–L2, varicose, YFP-containing axons closely apposed many ChAT-immunoreactive sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) in the intermediolateral cell column (IML) and dorsal lamina X. In the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, about 10% of ChAT-immunoreactive preganglionic neurons received YFP appositions, as did occasional ChAT-positive motor neurons throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ventral horn. YFP appositions also occurred on NOS-immunoreactive spinal interneurons and on spinal YFP-immunoreactive neurons. Injecting FG at T9 retrogradely labeled many YFP-PPG cell bodies in the medulla but none of the spinal YFP-immunoreactive neurons. These results show that brainstem PPG neurons

  11. Competition with Primary Sensory Afferents Drives Remodeling of Corticospinal Axons in Mature Spinal Motor Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Zaaimi, Boubker

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the mature motor system drives significant spontaneous axonal sprouting instead of axon regeneration. Knowing the circuit-level determinants of axonal sprouting is important for repairing motor circuits after injury to achieve functional rehabilitation. Competitive interactions are known to shape corticospinal tract axon outgrowth and withdrawal during development. Whether and how competition contributes to reorganization of mature spinal motor circuits is unclear. To study this question, we examined plastic changes in corticospinal axons in response to two complementary proprioceptive afferent manipulations: (1) enhancing proprioceptive afferents activity by electrical stimulation; or (2) diminishing their input by dorsal rootlet rhizotomy. Experiments were conducted in adult rats. Electrical stimulation produced proprioceptive afferent sprouting that was accompanied by significant corticospinal axon withdrawal and a decrease in corticospinal connections on cholinergic interneurons in the medial intermediate zone and C boutons on motoneurons. In contrast, dorsal rootlet rhizotomy led to a significant increase in corticospinal connections, including those on cholinergic interneurons; C bouton density increased correspondingly. Motor cortex-evoked muscle potentials showed parallel changes to those of corticospinal axons, suggesting that reciprocal corticospinal axon changes are functional. Using the two complementary models, we showed that competitive interactions between proprioceptive and corticospinal axons are an important determinant in the organization of mature corticospinal axons and spinal motor circuits. The activity- and synaptic space-dependent properties of the competition enables prediction of the remodeling of spared corticospinal connection and spinal motor circuits after injury and informs the target-specific control of corticospinal connections to promote functional recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroplasticity is limited in maturity

  12. Innervation of Gill Lateral Cells in the Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential and Cilia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catapane, Edward J; Nelson, Michael; Adams, Trevon; Carroll, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization, similar to plateau potentials, while increasing cilia beating rate. Application of dopamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane while decreasing cilia beating rate. Low frequency (5 Hz) electrical stimulations of the branchial nerve, which cause terminal release of endogenous serotonin, or high frequency (20 Hz) stimulations, which cause terminal release of endogenous dopamine, had the same effects on gill lateral cell membrane potentials and cilia beating rate as the respective applications of serotonin or dopamine. The study shows that innervation of gill lateral cells by the branchial nerve affects membrane potential as well as cilia beating rate, and demonstrates a strong correlation between changes in membrane potential and regulation of cilia beating rate. The study furthers the understanding of serotonin and dopamine signaling in the innervation and regulation of gill cilia in bivalves. The study also shows that voltage sensitive fluorescent probes like DiBAC 4(3) can be successfully used as an alternative to microelectrodes to measure changes in membrane potential of ciliated gill cells and other small cells with fast moving cilia. PMID:27489887

  13. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Idaira; Wanat, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review, we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders. PMID:27014097

  14. Changes in monkey horizontal semicircular canal afferent responses after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.; Perachio, A. A.; Dickman, J. D.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.; Sirota, M. G.; Iakushin, S. B.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular responses from single horizontal semicircular canal afferents in two rhesus monkeys were studied after recovery from a 14-day biosatellite (Cosmos 2044) orbital spaceflight. On the 1st postflight day, the mean gain for 9 different horizontal canal afferents, tested using one or several different passive yaw rotation waveforms, was nearly twice that for 20 horizontal canal afferents similarly tested during preflight and postflight control studies. Adaptation of the afferent response to passive yaw rotation on the 1st postflight day was also greater. These results suggest that at least one component of the vestibular end organ (the semicircular canals) is transiently modified after exposure to 14 days of microgravity. It is unclear whether the changes are secondary to other effects of microgravity, such as calcium loss, or an adaptive response. If the response is adaptive, then this report is the first evidence that the response of the vestibular end organ may be modified (presumably by the central nervous system via efferent connections) after prolonged unusual vestibular stimulation. If this is the case, the sites of plasticity of vestibular responses may not be exclusively within central nervous system vestibular structures, as previously believed.

  15. Skin innervation: important roles during normal and pathological cutaneous repair.

    PubMed

    Laverdet, Betty; Danigo, Aurore; Girard, Dorothée; Magy, Laurent; Demiot, Claire; Desmoulière, Alexis

    2015-08-01

    The skin is a highly sensitive organ. It is densely innervated with different types of sensory nerve endings, which discriminate between pain, temperature and touch. Autonomic nerve fibres which completely derive from sympathetic (cholinergic) neurons are also present. During all the phases of skin wound healing (inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling phases), neuromediators are involved. Several clinical observations indicate that damage to the peripheral nervous system influences wound healing, resulting in chronic wounds within the affected area. Patients with cutaneous sensory defects due to lepromatous leprosy, spinal cord injury and diabetic neuropathy develop ulcers that fail to heal. In addition, numerous experimental observations suggest that neurogenic stimuli profoundly affect wound repair after injury and that delayed wound healing is observed in animal models after surgical resection of cutaneous nerves. All these observations clearly suggest that innervation and neuromediators play a major role in wound healing. Interactions between neuromediators and different skin cells are certainly crucial in the healing process and ultimately the restoration of pain, temperature, and touch perceptions is a major challenge to solve in order to improve patients' quality of life. PMID:25799052

  16. Differential serotonergic innervation of the amygdala in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Cheryl D; Barger, Nicole; Taglialatela, Jared P; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Hof, Patrick R; Hopkins, William D; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-03-01

    Humans' closest living relatives are bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), yet these great ape species differ considerably from each other in terms of social behavior. Bonobos are more tolerant of conspecifics in competitive contexts and often use sexual behavior to mediate social interactions. Chimpanzees more frequently employ aggression during conflicts and actively patrol territories between communities. Regulation of emotional responses is facilitated by the amygdala, which also modulates social decision-making, memory and attention. Amygdala responsiveness is further regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin. We hypothesized that the amygdala of bonobos and chimpanzees would differ in its neuroanatomical organization and serotonergic innervation. We measured volumes of regions and the length density of serotonin transporter-containing axons in the whole amygdala and its lateral, basal, accessory basal and central nuclei. Results showed that accessory basal nucleus volume was larger in chimpanzees than in bonobos. Of particular note, the amygdala of bonobos had more than twice the density of serotonergic axons than chimpanzees, with the most pronounced differences in the basal and central nuclei. These findings suggest that variation in serotonergic innervation of the amygdala may contribute to mediating the remarkable differences in social behavior exhibited by bonobos and chimpanzees. PMID:26475872

  17. Identification of distinct tyraminergic and octopaminergic neurons innervating the central complex of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria

    PubMed Central

    Homberg, Uwe; Seyfarth, Jutta; Binkle, Ulrike; Monastirioti, Maria; Alkema, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    The central complex is a group of modular neuropils in the insect brain with a key role in visual memory, spatial orientation, and motor control. In desert locusts the neurochemical organization of the central complex has been investigated in detail, including the distribution of dopamine-, serotonin-, and histamine-immunoreactive neurons. In the present study we identified neurons immunoreactive with antisera against octopamine, tyramine, and the enzymes required for their synthesis, tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) and tyramine β-hydroxylase (TBH). Octopamine- and tyramine immunostaining in the central complex differed strikingly. In each brain hemisphere tyramine immunostaining was found in four neurons innervating the noduli, 12–15 tangential neurons of the protocerebral bridge, and about 17 neurons that supplied the anterior lip region and parts of the central body. In contrast, octopamine immunostaining was present in two bilateral pairs of ascending fibers innervating the upper division of the central body and a single pair of neurons with somata near the oesophageal foramen that gave rise to arborizations in the protocerebral bridge. Immunostaining for TDC, the enzyme converting tyrosine to tyramine, combined the patterns seen with the tyramine- and octopamine antisera. Immunostaining for TBH, the enzyme converting tyramine to octopamine, in contrast, was strikingly similar to octopamine immunolabeling. We conclude that tyramine and octopamine act as neurotransmitters/modulators in distinct sets of neurons of the locust central complex with TBH likely being the rate limiting enzyme for octopamine synthesis in a small subpopulation of TDC-containing neurons. PMID:23595814

  18. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD. PMID:24595534

  19. Delayed Exercise Is Ineffective at Reversing Aberrant Nociceptive Afferent Plasticity or Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Quiros-Molina, Daniel; Javia, Amy S; Daggubati, Lekhaj; Nehlsen, Anthony D; Naqvi, Ali; Ninan, Vinu; Vannix, Kirsten N; McMullen, Mary-Katharine; Amin, Sheena; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that correlates with sensory fiber sprouting. Recent data indicate that exercise initiated early after SCI prevents the development of allodynia and modulated nociceptive afferent plasticity. This study determined if delaying exercise intervention until pain is detected would similarly ameliorate established SCI-induced pain. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats with a C5 unilateral contusion were separated into SCI allodynic and SCI non-allodynic cohorts at 14 or 28 days postinjury when half of each group began exercising on automated running wheels. Allodynia, assessed by von Frey testing, was not ameliorated by exercise. Furthermore, rats that began exercise with no allodynia developed paw hypersensitivity within 2 weeks. At the initiation of exercise, the SCI Allodynia group displayed marked overlap of peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptive afferents in the C7 and L5 dorsal horn, while the SCI No Allodynia group had scant overlap. At the end of 5 weeks of exercise both the SCI Allodynia and SCI No Allodynia groups had extensive overlap of the 2 c-fiber types. Our findings show that exercise therapy initiated at early stages of allodynia is ineffective at attenuating neuropathic pain, but rather that it induces allodynia-aberrant afferent plasticity in previously pain-free rats. These data, combined with our previous results, suggest that there is a critical therapeutic window when exercise therapy may be effective at treating SCI-induced allodynia and that there are postinjury periods when exercise can be deleterious. PMID:26671215

  20. Analysis of nociception, sex and peripheral nerve innervation in the TMEV animal model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jessica L.; Gallus, Nathan J.; Ericson, Marna E.; Beitz, Alvin J.

    2009-01-01

    Although pain was previously not considered an important element of multiple sclerosis (MS), recent evidence indicates that over 50% of MS patients suffer from chronic pain. In the present study, we utilized the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) model of MS to examine whether changes in nociception occur during disease progression and to investigate whether sex influences the development of nociception or disease-associated neurological symptoms. Using the rotarod assay, TMEV infected male mice displayed increased neurological deficits when compared to TMEV infected female mice, which mimics what is observed in human MS. While both male and female TMEV infected mice exhibited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, female mice developed mechanical allodynia at a faster rate and displayed significantly more mechanical allodynia than male mice. Since neuropathic symptoms have been described in MS patients, we quantified sensory nerve fibers in the epidermis of TMEV-infected and non-infected mice to determine if there were alterations in epidermal nerve density. There was a significantly higher density of PGP9.5 and CGRP immunoreactive axons in the epidermis of TMEV-infected mice versus controls. Collectively these results indicate that the TMEV model is well suited to study the mechanisms of MS-induced nociception and suggest that alterations in peripheral nerve innervation may contribute to MS pain. PMID:17766043

  1. Electrophysiological evidence for the existence of a rare population of C-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptive (C-LTM) neurons in glabrous skin of the rat hindpaw.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian skin in innervated by distinct classes of low-threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) primary afferent neurons that are classified as Aβ-, Aδ- or C-LTMs according to their axonal conduction velocities (CVs). C-LTMs are thought to signal pleasant and erotic touch sensations in humans, and to exist only in the hairy skin of primates and other species. Using intracellular recordings from rat L4/L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that were classified in vivo as C-nociceptors or C-LTMs, according to their dorsal root CVs and their responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli, the present study provides the first electrophysiological evidence that C-LTMs exist in the glabrous skin of the rat's hindpaw. Indeed 6.4% (5/78) of the total sample of lumbar C-fiber DRG neurons with receptive fields in the glabrous skin of the rat hindpaw were C-LTMs. The electrophysiological properties of this rare subpopulation of C-fiber neurons (mean CV=0.48±0.06m/s) are distinct from those of C-fiber high threshold mechanoreceptors (HTMs). Indeed, their mean mechanical (1.7±1.1mN) and electrical (4.0±0.4V) thresholds was significantly different from that of C-HTMs. They also exhibited faster action potential and afterhyperpolarization kinetics than C-HTMs. The present study lends support to previous studies that have provided indirect evidence for the presence of C-LTMs in glabrous skin. If C-LTMs are present in human glabrous skin, they may, in this type of skin, represent a novel peripheral neuronal substrate for the pleasant/social touch sensation, and account for or contribute to touch hypersensitivity after injury. PMID:26752785

  2. The mouse olfactory peduncle. 3. Development of neurons, glia, and centrifugal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Peter C.; Collins, Lindsay N.; Osterberg, Stephen K.; Phillips, Adriana M.

    2014-01-01

    The present series of studies was designed to provide a general overview of the development of the region connecting the olfactory bulb to the forebrain. The olfactory peduncle (OP) contains several structures involved in processing odor information with the anterior olfactory nucleus (cortex) being the largest and most studied. Results indicate that considerable growth occurs in the peduncle from postnatal day (P)10–P20, with reduced expansion from P20 to P30. No evidence was found for the addition of new projection or interneurons during the postnatal period. GABAergic cells decreased in both number and density after P10. Glial populations exhibited different patterns of development, with astrocytes declining in density from P10 to P30, and both oligodendrocytes and microglia increasing through the interval. Myelination in the anterior commissure emerged between P11 and P14. Dense cholinergic innervation was observed at P10 and remained relatively stable through P30, while considerable maturation of serotonergic innervation occurred through the period. Unilateral naris occlusion from P1 to P30 resulted in about a 30% reduction in the size of the ipsilateral peduncle but few changes were observed on the contralateral side. The ipsilateral peduncle also exhibited higher densities of GAD67-containing interneurons and cholinergic fibers suggesting a delay in normal developmental pruning. Lower densities of interneurons expressing CCK, somatostatin, and NPY and in myelin basic protein staining were also observed. Understanding variations in developmental trajectories within the OP may be an important tool for unraveling the functions of the region. PMID:24926238

  3. Ileal bladder substitute: antireflux nipple or afferent tubular segment?

    PubMed

    Studer, U E; Spiegel, T; Casanova, G A; Springer, J; Gerber, E; Ackermann, D K; Gurtner, F; Zingg, E J

    1991-01-01

    Spheroidal bladder substitutes made from double-folded ileal segments, similar to Goodwin's cup-patch technique, are devoid of major coordinated wall contractions. This, together with the reservoir's direct anastomosis to the membranous urethra, prevents major intraluminal pressure peaks and assures a residue-free voiding of sterile urine. In order to determine whether, under these conditions, an afferent tubular isoperistaltic ileal segment of 20-cm length protects the upper urinary tract as efficiently as an antireflux nipple, 60 male patients who were subjected to radical cystectomy were prospectively randomised to groups in which a bladder substitute was formed together with either of these 2 antireflux devices. An analysis of the results obtained in 20 patients from each group who could be followed for more than 1 year (median observation time 30 and 36 months) showed no differences between the groups in metabolic disturbances, kidney size, reservoir capacity, diurnal and nocturnal urinary continence, the incidence of urinary tract infection or episodes of acute pyelonephritis. Later than 1 year postoperatively, intravenous urograms of the renoureteral units of 25% of the patients with antireflux nipples showed persistent but generally slight dilatation of the upper urinary tracts. This observation was significantly more frequent than it was in patients with afferent tubular segments. Urodynamic and radiographic studies showed that the competence of the antireflux nipples was secured by the raised surrounding intravesical pressure. This, however, also resulted in a transient functional obstruction, and a gradual rise of the basal pressure in the upper urinary tracts was recorded. In patients with afferent ileal tubular segments, contrast medium could be forced upwards into the renal pelvis when the bladder substitutes were overfilled. However, despite raised intravesical pressures, peristalsis in the isoperistaltic afferent tubular segment gradually returned

  4. Expression of messenger RNAs for peptides and tyrosine hydroxylase in primary sensory neurons that innervate arterial baroreceptors and chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1991-08-01

    Retrograde fiber tracing and in situ hybridization were used to determine expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin A (ppTA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), preproenkephalin A (ENK), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) as well as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the petrosal ganglia primary sensory neurons which innervate carotid sinus baroreceptors and carotid body chemoreceptors. Perfusion of the carotid sinus with the retrogradely transported dye (Fluoro-Gold) labeled primary sensory neurons in petrosal ganglion. Numerous somata in the petrosal ganglion labeled with dye contained mRNAs for all the above peptides, except SOM. Moreover, TH mRNA was found in a substantial number of retrogradely labeled cells in the petrosal ganglion. This study provides information concerning which of the numerous peptides identified in sensory neurons of petrosal ganglion may be involved in modulation of the arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:1681484

  5. Locomotor-activated neurons of the cat. II. Noradrenergic innervation and colocalization with NEα1a or NEα2b receptors in the thoraco-lumbar spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dawn M. G.; Riesgo, Mirta I.; Pinzon, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is a strong modulator and/or activator of spinal locomotor networks. Thus noradrenergic fibers likely contact neurons involved in generating locomotion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the noradrenergic innervation of functionally related, locomotor-activated neurons within the thoraco-lumbar spinal cord. This was accomplished by immunohistochemical colocalization of noradrenergic fibers using dopamine-β-hydroxylase or NEα1A and NEα2B receptors with cells expressing the c-fos gene activity-dependent marker Fos. Experiments were performed on paralyzed, precollicular-postmamillary decerebrate cats, in which locomotion was induced by electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region. The majority of Fos labeled neurons, especially abundant in laminae VII and VIII throughout the thoraco-lumbar (T13-L7) region of locomotor animals, showed close contacts with multiple noradrenergic boutons. A small percentage (10–40%) of Fos neurons in the T7-L7 segments showed colocalization with NEα1A receptors. In contrast, NEα2B receptor immunoreactivity was observed in 70–90% of Fos cells, with no obvious rostrocaudal gradient. In comparison with results obtained from our previous study on the same animals, a significantly smaller proportion of Fos labeled neurons were innervated by noradrenergic than serotonergic fibers, with significant differences observed for laminae VII and VIII in some segments. In lamina VII of the lumbar segments, the degree of monoaminergic receptor subtype/Fos colocalization examined statistically generally fell into the following order: NEα2B = 5-HT2A ≥ 5-HT7 = 5-HT1A > NEα1A. These results suggest that noradrenergic modulation of locomotion involves NEα1A/NEα2B receptors on noradrenergic-innervated locomotor-activated neurons within laminae VII and VIII of thoraco-lumbar segments. Further study of the functional role of these receptors in locomotion is warranted. PMID:21307324

  6. Cholinergic afferent stimulation induces axonal function plasticity in adult hippocampal granule cells.

    PubMed

    Martinello, Katiuscia; Huang, Zhuo; Lujan, Rafael; Tran, Baouyen; Watanabe, Masahiko; Cooper, Edward C; Brown, David A; Shah, Mala M

    2015-01-21

    Acetylcholine critically influences hippocampal-dependent learning. Cholinergic fibers innervate hippocampal neuron axons, dendrites, and somata. The effects of acetylcholine on axonal information processing, though, remain unknown. By stimulating cholinergic fibers and making electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells, we show that synaptically released acetylcholine preferentially lowered the action potential threshold, enhancing intrinsic excitability and synaptic potential-spike coupling. These effects persisted for at least 30 min after the stimulation paradigm and were due to muscarinic receptor activation. This caused sustained elevation of axonal intracellular Ca(2+) via T-type Ca(2+) channels, as indicated by two-photon imaging. The enhanced Ca(2+) levels inhibited an axonal KV7/M current, decreasing the spike threshold. In support, immunohistochemistry revealed muscarinic M1 receptor, CaV3.2, and KV7.2/7.3 subunit localization in granule cell axons. Since alterations in axonal signaling affect neuronal firing patterns and neurotransmitter release, this is an unreported cellular mechanism by which acetylcholine might, at least partly, enhance cognitive processing. PMID:25578363

  7. Genetic identification of C-fibers that detect massage-like stroking of hairy skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vrontou, Sophia; Wong, Allan M.; Rau, Kristofer K.; Koerber, H. Richard; Anderson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Stroking of the skin produces pleasant sensations that can occur during social interactions with conspecifics, such as grooming1. Despite numerous physiological studies (reviewed in ref. 2), molecularly defined sensory neurons that detect pleasant stroking of hairy skin3,4 in vivo have not been reported. Previously, we identified a rare population of unmyelinated sensory neurons that express the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) MrgprB45,6. These neurons exclusively innervate hairy skin with large terminal arborizations7 that resemble the receptive fields of C-tactile (CT) afferents in humans8. Unlike other molecularly defined mechanosensory C-fiber subtypes9,10, MrgprB4+ neurons could not be detectably activated by sensory stimulation of the skin ex vivo. Therefore, we developed a preparation for calcium imaging in their spinal projections during stimulation of the periphery in intact animals. MrgprB4+ neurons were activated by massage-like stroking of hairy skin, but not by noxious punctate mechanical stimulation. By contrast, a different population of C-fibers expressing MrgprD11 was activated by pinching but not by stroking, consistent with previous physiological and behavioral data10,12. Pharmacogenetic activation of MrgprB4- expressing neurons in freely behaving animals promoted conditioned place preference13, suggesting that such activation is positively reinforcing and/or anxiolytic. These data open the way to understanding the function of MrgprB4 neurons during natural behaviors, and provide a general approach to functionally characterizing genetically identified subsets of somatosensory neurons in vivo. PMID:23364746

  8. Genetically Induced Cholinergic Hyper-Innervation Enhances Taste Learning

    PubMed Central

    Neseliler, Selin; Narayanan, Darshana; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Katz, Donald B.; Birren, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Acute inhibition of acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to impair many forms of simple learning, and notably conditioned taste aversion (CTA). The most adhered-to theory that has emerged as a result of this work – that ACh increases a taste’s perceived novelty, and thereby its associability – would be further strengthened by evidence showing that enhanced cholinergic function improves learning above normal levels. Experimental testing of this corollary hypothesis has been limited, however, by side-effects of pharmacological ACh agonism and by the absence of a model that achieves long-term increases in cholinergic signaling. Here, we present this further test of the ACh hypothesis, making use of mice lacking the p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor gene, which show a resultant over-abundance of cholinergic neurons in sub-regions of the basal forebrain (BF). We first demonstrate that the p75−/− abnormality directly affects portions of the CTA circuit, locating mouse gustatory cortex (GC) using a functional assay and then using immunohistochemisty to demonstrate cholinergic hyper-innervation of GC in the mutant mice – hyper-innervation that is unaccompanied by changes in cell numbers or compensatory changes in muscarinic receptor densities. We then demonstrate that both p75−/− and wild-type (WT) mice learn robust CTAs, which extinguish more slowly in the mutants. Further testing to distinguish effects on learning from alterations in memory retention demonstrate that p75−/− mice do in fact learn stronger CTAs than WT mice. These data provide novel evidence for the hypothesis linking ACh and taste learning. PMID:22144949

  9. Effects of Polysialic Acid on Sensory Innervation of the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiuli; Zhang, Yuntao; Schwend, Tyler; Conrad, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory trigeminal growth cones innervate the cornea in a coordinated fashion during embryonic development. Polysialic acid (polySia) is known for its important roles during nerve development and regeneration. The purpose of this work is to determine whether polySia, present in developing eyefronts and on the surface of sensory nerves, may provide guidance cues to nerves during corneal innervation. Expression and localization of polySia in embryonic day (E)5-14 chick eyefronts and E9 trigeminal ganglia were identified using Western blotting and immunostaining. Effects of polySia removal on trigeminal nerve growth behavior were determined in vivo, using exogenous endoneuraminidase (endoN) treatments to remove polySia substrates during chick cornea development, and in vitro, using neuronal explant cultures. PolySia substrates, made by the physical adsorption of colominic acid to a surface coated with poly-D-lysine (PDL), were used as a model to investigate functions of the polySia expressed in axonal environments. PolySia was localized within developing eyefronts and on trigeminal sensory nerves. Distributions of PolySia in corneas and pericorneal regions are developmentally regulated. PolySia removal caused defasciculation of the limbal nerve trunk in vivo from E7 to E10. Removal of polySia on trigeminal neurites inhibited neurite outgrowth and caused axon defasciculation, but did not affect Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) expression or Schwann cell migration in vitro. PolySia substrates in vitro inhibited outgrowth of trigeminal neurites and promoted their fasciculation. In conclusion, polySia is localized on corneal nerves and in their targeting environment during early developing stages of chick embryos. PolySias promote fasciculation of trigeminal axons in vivo and in vitro, whereas, in contrast, their removal promotes defasciculation. PMID:25478909

  10. Improved bladder emptying in urinary retention by electrical stimulation of pudendal afferents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Cheng, Chen-Li; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-06-01

    Urinary retention is the inability to empty the bladder completely, and may result from bladder hypocontractility, increases in outlet resistance or both. Chronic urinary retention can lead to several urological complications and is often refractory to pharmacologic, behavioral and surgical treatments. We sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of sensory fibers in the pudendal nerve could engage an augmenting reflex and thereby improve bladder emptying in an animal model of urinary retention. We measured the efficiency of bladder emptying with and without concomitant electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents in urethane-anesthetized rats. Voiding efficiency (VE = voided volume/initial volume) was reduced from 72 ± 7% to 29 ± 7% following unilateral transection of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve (UST) and from 70 ± 5% to 18 ± 4% following bilateral transection (BST). Unilateral electrical stimulation of the proximal transected sensory pudendal nerve during distention-evoked voiding contractions significantly improved VE. Low-intensity stimulation at frequencies of 1-50 Hz increased VE to 40-51% following UST and to 39-49% following BST, while high-intensity stimulation was ineffective at increasing VE. The increase in VE was mediated by increases in the duration of distention-evoked voiding bladder contractions, rather than increases in contraction amplitude. These results are consistent with an essential role for pudendal sensory feedback in efficient bladder emptying, and raise the possibility that electrical activation of pudendal nerve afferents may provide a new approach to restore efficient bladder emptying in persons with urinary retention.

  11. Retinal afferents and efferents of an infrared sensitive snake, Crotalus viridis

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The retinal afferents and efferents were examined in Crotalus viridis. Retinofugal fibers were traced by injecting horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or tritiated leucine into the eye, or by removing the eye and staining degenerating axons with silver methods. Terminations were seen contralaterally in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the dorsal and ventral lateral geniculate nuclei (extensive), the pretectal nuclei, including the nucleus posterodorsalis (a very heavy input), the nucleus lentiformis mesencephali, nucleus geniculatus pretectalis, and nucleus pretectalis, the superficial layers of the optic tectum, including the stratum zonale, the stratum opticum, the stratum griseum et fibrosum centrale and the upper portion of stratum griseum centrale, and the basal optic nucleus. Ipsilateral input reaches the intermediate portion of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, a small portion of the pretectal nucleus and nucleus posterodorsalis, and the basal optic nucleus (very minimally). Retinopedal fibers were traced with the HRP method. The cell bodies lie in the ventral thalamus within the nucleus of the ventral supraoptic decussation. These neurons project primarily to the contralateral retina, but some more rostrally located neurons project to the ipsilateral retina.

  12. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  13. Endothelin-1 induced desensitization in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terika P.; Smith, Sherika N.; Sweitzer, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a known algogen that causes acute pain and sensitization in humans and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors when injected into the periphery in rats, and is elevated during vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Previously, our lab has shown that a priming dose of ET-1 produces sensitization to capsaicin-induce secondary hyperalgesia. The goal of this study was to determine if the sensitization induced by ET-1 priming is occurring at the level of the primary afferent neuron. Calcium imaging in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was utilized to examine the effects of ET-1 on primary afferent neurons. ET-1 induces [Ca2+]i transients in unprimed cells. ET-1 induced [Ca2+]i transients are attenuated by priming with ET-1. This priming effect occurs whether the priming dose is given 0-4 days prior to the challenge dose. Similarly, ET-1 priming decreases capsaicin-induced [Ca2+]i transients. At the level of the primary afferent neuron, ET-1 priming has a desensitizing effect on challenge exposures to ET-1 and capsaicin. PMID:25220703

  14. Vagal afferents, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory resistance in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Adams, J M; Farkas, G A; Rochester, D F

    1988-06-01

    This study tests three hypotheses regarding mechanisms that produce rapid shallow breathing during a severe inspiratory resistive load (IRL): 1) an intact vagal afferent pathway is necessary; 2) diaphragm fatigue contributes to tachypnea; and 3) hypoxia may alter the pattern of respiration. We imposed a severe IRL on pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized dogs, followed by bilateral vagotomy, then by supplemental O2. IRL alone produced rapid shallow breathing associated with hypercapnia and hypoxia. After the vagotomy, the breathing pattern became slow and deep, restoring arterial PCO2 but not arterial PO2 toward the control values. Relief of hypoxia had no effect, and at no time was there any evidence of fatigue of the diaphragm as measured by the response to phrenic nerve stimulation. We conclude that an intact afferent vagal pathway is necessary for the tachypnea resulting from a severe IRL, neither hypoxia nor diaphragm fatigue played a role, and, although we cannot rule out stimulation of vagal afferents, the simplest explanation for the increased frequency in our experiments is increased respiratory drive due to hypercapnia. PMID:3136122

  15. Subcortical afferent connections of the amygdala in the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The cells of origin of the afferent connections of the amygdala in the rhesus and squirrel monkeys are determined according to the retrograde axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase injected into various quadrants of the amygdala. Analysis of the distribution of enzyme-labeled cells reveals afferent amygdalar connections with the ipsilateral halves of the midline nucleus paraventricularis thalami and both the parvo- and magnocellular parts of the nucleus subparafascicularis in the dorsal thalamus, all the subdivisions of the midline nucleus centralis complex, the nucleus reuniens ventralis and the nucleus interventralis. The largest populations of enzyme-labeled cells in the hypothalamus are found to lie in the middle and posterior parts of the ipsilateral, lateral hypothalamus and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, with scattered cells in the supramammillary and dorsomedial nuclei and the posterior hypothalamic area, Tsai's ventral tegmental area, the rostral and caudal subdivisions of the nucleus linearis in the midbrain and the dorsal raphe nucleus. The most conspicuous subdiencephalic source of amygdalar afferent connections is observed to be the pars lateralis of the nucleus parabrachialis in the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum, with a few labeled cells differentiated from pigmented cells in the locus coeruleus.

  16. Neck afferent involvement in cardiovascular control during movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that labyrinth and neck afferent information contributes to the regulation of somatomotor function during movement and changes in posture. There is also convincing evidence that the vestibular system participates in the modulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function during changes in posture, presumably to prevent orthostatic hypotension. However, the labyrinth organs do not provide any signals concerning body movements with respect to the head. In contrast, the neck receptors, particularly muscle spindles, are well located and suited to provide information about changes in body position with respect to the head and vestibular signals. Studies in the cat suggest that neck afferent information may modulate the vestibulosympathetic reflex responses to head-neck movements. There is some evidence in the cat to suggest involvement of low threshold mechanoreceptors. However, human studies do not indicate that low threshold mechanoreceptors in the neck modulate cardiovascular responses. The human studies are consistent with the studies in the cat in that they demonstrate the importance of otolith activation in mediating cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to changes in posture. This paper briefly reviews the current experimental evidence concerning the involvement of neck afferent information in the modulation of cardiovascular control during movement and changes in posture.

  17. High Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Leads to Presynaptic GABA(B)-Dependent Depression of Subthalamo-Nigral Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Dvorzhak, Anton; Gertler, Christoph; Harnack, Daniel; Grantyn, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Patients with akinesia benefit from chronic high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Among the mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic success of HFS-STN might be a suppression of activity in the output region of the basal ganglia. Indeed, recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) of fully adult mice revealed that HFS-STN consistently produced a reduction of compound glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents at a time when the tetrodotoxin-sensitive components of the local field potentials had already recovered after the high frequency activation. These observations suggest that HFS-STN not only alters action potential conduction on the way towards the SNr but also modifies synaptic transmission within the SNr. A classical conditioning-test paradigm was then designed to better separate the causes from the indicators of synaptic depression. A bipolar platinum-iridium macroelectrode delivered conditioning HFS trains to a larger group of fibers in the STN, while a separate high-ohmic glass micropipette in the rostral SNr provided test stimuli at minimal intensity to single fibers. The conditioning-test interval was set to 100 ms, i.e. the time required to recover the excitability of subthalamo-nigral axons after HFS-STN. The continuity of STN axons passing from the conditioning to the test sites was examined by an action potential occlusion test. About two thirds of the subthalamo-nigral afferents were occlusion-negative, i.e. they were not among the fibers directly activated by the conditioning STN stimulation. Nonetheless, occlusion-negative afferents exhibited signs of presynaptic depression that could be eliminated by blocking GABA(B) receptors with CGP55845 (1 µM). Further analysis of single fiber-activated responses supported the proposal that the heterosynaptic depression of synaptic glutamate release during and after HFS-STN is mainly caused by the tonic release of GABA from co-activated striato

  18. Vestibular afferent responses to linear accelerations in the alert squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somps, Christopher J.; Schor, Robert H.; Tomko, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of 40 otolith afferents and 44 canal afferents was recorded in 4 alert, intact squirrel monkeys. Polarization vectors and response properties of otolith afferents were determined during static re-orientations relative to gravity and during Earth-horizontal, sinusoidal, linear oscillations. Canal afferents were tested for sensitivity to linear accelerations. For regular otolith afferents, a significant correlation between upright discharge rate and sensitivity to dynamic acceleration in the horizontal plane was observed. This correlation was not present in irregular units. The sensitivity of otolith afferents to both static tilts and dynamic linear acceleration was much greater in irregularly discharging units than in regularly discharging units. The spontaneous activity and static and dynamic response properties of regularly discharging otolith afferents were similar to those reported in barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Irregular afferents also had similar dynamic response properties when compared to anesthetized monkeys. However, this sample of irregular afferents in alert animals had higher resting discharge rates and greater sensitivity to static tilts. The majority of otolith polarization vectors were oriented near the horizontal in the plane of the utricular maculae; however, directions of maximum sensitivity were different during dynamic and static testing. Canal afferents were not sensitive to static tilts or linear oscillations of the head.

  19. Impaired intestinal afferent nerve satiety signalling and vagal afferent excitability in diet induced obesity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donna M; Park, Sung Jin; Valinsky, William C; Beyak, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Gastrointestinal vagal afferents transmit satiety signals to the brain via both chemical and mechanical mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these signals may be attenuated in obesity. We hypothesized that responses to satiety mediators and distension of the gut would be attenuated after induction of diet induced obesity. Obesity was induced by feeding a high fat diet (60% kcal from fat). Low fat fed mice (10% kcal from fat) served as a control. High fat fed mice were obese, with increased visceral fat, but were not hyperglycaemic. Recordings from jejunal afferents demonstrated attenuated responses to the satiety mediators cholecystokinin (CCK, 100 nm) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10 μm), as was the response to low intensity jejunal distension, while responses to higher distension pressures were preserved. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings on nodose ganglion neurons, both unlabelled, and those labelled by fast blue injection into the wall of the jejunum. The cell membrane of both labelled and unlabelled nodose ganglion neurons was less excitable in HFF mice, with an elevated rheobase and decreased number of action potentials at twice rheobase. Input resistance of HFF neurons was also significantly decreased. Calcium imaging experiments revealed reduced proportion of nodose ganglion neurons responding to CCK and 5-HT in obese mice. These results demonstrate a marked reduction in afferent sensitivity to satiety related stimuli after a chronic high fat diet. A major mechanism underlying this change is reduced excitability of the neuronal cell membrane. This may explain the development of hyperphagia when a high fat diet is consumed. Improving sensitivity of gastrointestinal afferent nerves may prove useful to limit food intake in obesity. PMID:21486762

  20. Inner ear hair cells deteriorate in mice engineered to have no or diminished innervation

    PubMed Central

    Kersigo, Jennifer; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The innervation of the inner ear critically depends on the two neurotrophins Ntf3 and Bdnf. In contrast to this molecularly well-established dependency, evidence regarding the need of innervation for long-term maintenance of inner ear hair cells is inconclusive, due to experimental variability. Mutant mice that lack both neurotrophins could shed light on the long-term consequences of innervation loss on hair cells without introducing experimental variability, but do not survive after birth. Mutant mice with conditional deletion of both neurotrophins lose almost all innervation by postnatal day 10 and show an initially normal development of hair cells by this stage. No innervation remains after 3 weeks and complete loss of all innervation results in near complete loss of outer and many inner hair cells of the organ of Corti within 4 months. Mutants that retain one allele of either neurotrophin have only partial loss of innervation of the organ of Corti and show a longer viability of cochlear hair cells with more profound loss of inner hair cells. By 10 months, hair cells disappear with a base to apex progression, proportional to the residual density of innervation and similar to carboplatin ototoxicity. Similar to reports of hair cell loss after aminoglycoside treatment, blobbing of stereocilia of apparently dying hair cells protrude into the cochlear duct. Denervation of vestibular sensory epithelia for several months also resulted in variable results, ranging from unusual hair cells resembling the aberrations found in the organ of Corti, to near normal hair cells in the canal cristae. Fusion and/or resorption of stereocilia and loss of hair cells follows a pattern reminiscent of Myo6 and Cdc42 null mice. Our data support a role of innervation for long-term maintenance but with a remarkable local variation that needs to be taken into account when attempting regeneration of the organ of Corti. PMID:25852547

  1. Ontogeny of the serotonergic projection to rat neocortex: transient expression of a dense innervation to primary sensory areas

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amato, R.J.; Blue, M.E.; Largent, B.L.; Lynch, D.R.; Ledbetter, D.J.; Molliver, M.E.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    The development of serotonergic innervation to rat cerebral cortex was characterized by immunohistochemical localization of serotonin combined with autoradiographic imaging of serotonin-uptake sites. In neonatal rat, a transient, dense, serotonergic innervation appears in all primary sensory areas of cortex. In somatosensory cortex, dense patches of serotonergic innervation are aligned with specialized cellular aggregates called barrels. The dense patches are not apparent after 3 weeks of age, and the serotonergic innervation becomes more uniform in adult neocortex. This precocious neonatal serotonergic innervation may play a transient physiologic role in sensory areas of cortex or may exert a trophic influence on the development of cortical circuitry and thalamocortical connections.

  2. Positron emission tomographic imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation and function

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D.S.; Chang, P.C.; Eisenhofer, G.; Miletich, R.; Finn, R.; Bacher, J.; Kirk, K.L.; Bacharach, S.; Kopin, I.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Sites of uptake, storage, and metabolism of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and excretion of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and its metabolites were visualized using positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning after intravenous injection of the tracer into anesthetized dogs. Radioactivity was concentrated in the renal pelvis, heart, liver, spleen, salivary glands, and gall bladder. Uptake of 18F by the heart resulted in striking delineation of the left ventricular myocardium. Pretreatment with desipramine markedly decreased cardiac positron emission, consistent with dependence of the heart on neuronal uptake (uptake-1) for removal of circulating catecholamines. In reserpinized animals, cardiac positron emission was absent within 30 minutes after injection of ({sup 18}F)-6-fluorodopamine, demonstrating that the emission in untreated animals was from radioactive labeling of the sympathetic storage vesicles. Decreased positron emission from denervated salivary glands confirmed that the tracer was concentrated in sympathetic neurons. Radioactivity in the gall bladder and urinary system depicted the hepatic and renal excretion of the tracer and its metabolites. Administration of tyramine or nitroprusside increased and ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan decreased the rate of loss of myocardial radioactivity. The results show that PET scanning after administration of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine can be used to visualize sites of sympathetic innervation, follow the metabolism and renal and hepatic excretion of catecholamines, and examine cardiac sympathetic function.

  3. Innervation of sinoatrial nodal cells in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Inokaitis, Hermanas; Pauziene, Neringa; Rysevaite-Kyguoliene, Kristina; Pauza, Dainius H

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the fact that the rabbit is being widely used as a laboratory animal in experimental neurocardiology, neural control of SAN cells in the rabbit heart has been insufficiently examined thus far. This study analyzes the distribution of SAN cells and their innervation pattern employing fluorescent immunohistochemistry on rabbit whole mount atrial preparations. A dense network of adrenergic (positive for TH), cholinergic (positive for ChAT), nitrergic (positive for nNOS) and possibly sensory (positive for SP) NFs together with numerous neuronal somata were identified on the RRCV where the main mass of SAN cells positive for HCN4 were distributed as well. In general, the area occupied by SAN cells comprised nearly the entire RRCV and possessed a three to four times denser network of NFs compared with adjacent atrial walls. Adrenergic NFs predominated noticeably in-between SAN cells. Solitary neuronal somata or somata gathered into small clusters were positive solely for ChAT or nNOS, respectively or simultaneously for both neuronal markers (ChAT and nNOS). Neuronal somata positive for nNOS were more frequent than those positive for ChAT. In conclusion, findings of the present study demonstrate a dense and complex ganglionated neural network of both autonomic and sensory NFs, closely related to SAN cells which spread widely on the RRCV and extend as sleeves of these cells toward the walls of the rabbit RA. PMID:27045595

  4. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome. PMID:25578519

  5. From innervation density to tactile acuity: 1. Spatial representation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul B; Koerber, H Richard; Millecchia, Ronald

    2004-06-11

    We tested the hypothesis that the population receptive field representation (a superposition of the excitatory receptive field areas of cells responding to a tactile stimulus) provides spatial information sufficient to mediate one measure of static tactile acuity. In psychophysical tests, two-point discrimination thresholds on the hindlimbs of adult cats varied as a function of stimulus location and orientation, as they do in humans. A statistical model of the excitatory low threshold mechanoreceptive fields of spinocervical, postsynaptic dorsal column and spinothalamic tract neurons was used to simulate the population receptive field representations in this neural population of the one- and two-point stimuli used in the psychophysical experiments. The simulated and observed thresholds were highly correlated. Simulated and observed thresholds' relations to physiological and anatomical variables such as stimulus location and orientation, receptive field size and shape, map scale, and innervation density were strikingly similar. Simulated and observed threshold variations with receptive field size and map scale obeyed simple relationships predicted by the signal detection model, and were statistically indistinguishable from each other. The population receptive field representation therefore contains information sufficient for this discrimination. PMID:15140641

  6. Dopamine Innervation in the Thalamus: Monkey versus Rat

    PubMed Central

    García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-González, Miguel Ángel; Garzón, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified the thalamic dopaminergic system in the human and macaque monkey brains, and, based on earlier reports on the paucity of dopamine in the rat thalamus, hypothesized that this dopaminergic system was particularly developed in primates. Here we test this hypothesis using immunohistochemistry against the dopamine transporter (DAT) in adult macaque and rat brains. The extent and density of DAT-immunoreactive (-ir) axons were remarkably greater in the macaque dorsal thalamus, where the mediodorsal association nucleus and the ventral motor nuclei held the densest immunolabeling. In contrast, sparse DAT immunolabeling was present in the rat dorsal thalamus; it was mainly located in the mediodorsal, paraventricular, ventral medial, and ventral lateral nuclei. The reticular nucleus, zona incerta, and lateral habenular nucleus held numerous DAT-ir axons in both species. Ultrastructural analysis in the macaque mediodorsal nucleus revealed that thalamic interneurons are a main postsynaptic target of DAT-ir axons; this suggests that the marked expansion of the dopamine innervation in the primate in comparison to the rodent thalamus may be related to the presence of a sizable interneuron population in primates. We remark that it is important to be aware of brain species differences when using animal models of human brain disease. PMID:18550594

  7. Anatomical study on the innervation of the elbow capsule☆

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Cristina Schmitt; Filho, Mauro Razuk; Rozas, João; Wey, João; de Andrade, Antonio Marcos; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To put forward an anatomical description of the innervation of the elbow capsule, illustrated through morphological analysis on dissections. Methods Thirty elbows from fresh fixed adult cadavers aged 32–74 years, of both sexes, were dissected. Results Among the dissected arms, we observed that the median nerve did not have any branches in two arms, while it had one branch in five arms, two branches in two arms, three branches in ten arms, four branches in nine arms and five branches in two arms. The radial nerve did not have any branches in two arms, while it had one branch in two arms, two branches in nine arms, three branches in ten arms, four branches in five arms and five branches in two arms. The ulnar nerve did not have any branches in three arms, while it had one branch in six arms, two branches in four arms, three branches in five arms, four branches in seven arms, five branches in four arms and six branches in one arm. Conclusions We observed branches of the radial, ulnar and medial nerves in the elbow joint, and a close relationship between their capsular and motor branches. PMID:27218079

  8. Role of GPR55 during Axon Growth and Target Innervation.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Hosni; Argaw, Anteneh; Cécyre, Bruno; Bouchard, Alex; Gagnon, Jonathan; Javadi, Pasha; Desgent, Sébastien; Mackie, Ken; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Guidance molecules regulate the navigation of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) projections toward targets in the visual thalamus. In this study, we demonstrate that the G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is expressed in the retina during development, and regulates growth cone (GC) morphology and axon growth. In vitro, neurons obtained from gpr55 knock-out (gpr55(-/-) ) mouse embryos have smaller GCs, less GC filopodia, and have a decreased outgrowth compared with gpr55(+/+) neurons. When gpr55(+/+) neurons were treated with GPR55 agonists, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) and O-1602, we observed a chemo-attractive effect and an increase in GC size and filopodia number. In contrast, cannabidiol (CBD) decreased the GC size and filopodia number inducing chemo-repulsion. In absence of the receptor (gpr55(-/-) ), no pharmacologic effects of the GPR55 ligands were observed. In vivo, compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates, gpr55(-/-) mice revealed a decreased branching in the dorsal terminal nucleus (DTN) and a lower level of eye-specific segregation of retinal projections in the superior colliculus (SC) and in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Moreover, a single intraocular injection of LPI increased branching in the DTN, whereas treatment with CBD, an antagonist of GPR55, decreased it. These results indicate that GPR55 modulates the growth rate and the targets innervation of retinal projections and highlight, for the first time, an important role of GPR55 in axon refinement during development. PMID:26730399

  9. Role of GPR55 during Axon Growth and Target Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Hosni; Argaw, Anteneh; Cécyre, Bruno; Bouchard, Alex; Gagnon, Jonathan; Javadi, Pasha; Desgent, Sébastien; Mackie, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Guidance molecules regulate the navigation of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) projections toward targets in the visual thalamus. In this study, we demonstrate that the G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is expressed in the retina during development, and regulates growth cone (GC) morphology and axon growth. In vitro, neurons obtained from gpr55 knock-out (gpr55-/-) mouse embryos have smaller GCs, less GC filopodia, and have a decreased outgrowth compared with gpr55+/+ neurons. When gpr55+/+ neurons were treated with GPR55 agonists, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) and O-1602, we observed a chemo-attractive effect and an increase in GC size and filopodia number. In contrast, cannabidiol (CBD) decreased the GC size and filopodia number inducing chemo-repulsion. In absence of the receptor (gpr55-/-), no pharmacologic effects of the GPR55 ligands were observed. In vivo, compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates, gpr55-/- mice revealed a decreased branching in the dorsal terminal nucleus (DTN) and a lower level of eye-specific segregation of retinal projections in the superior colliculus (SC) and in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Moreover, a single intraocular injection of LPI increased branching in the DTN, whereas treatment with CBD, an antagonist of GPR55, decreased it. These results indicate that GPR55 modulates the growth rate and the targets innervation of retinal projections and highlight, for the first time, an important role of GPR55 in axon refinement during development. PMID:26730399

  10. Neuroepithelial circuit formed by innervation of sensory enteroendocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Bohórquez, Diego V.; Shahid, Rafiq A.; Erdmann, Alan; Kreger, Alex M.; Wang, Yu; Calakos, Nicole; Wang, Fan; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2015-01-01

    Satiety and other core physiological functions are modulated by sensory signals arising from the surface of the gut. Luminal nutrients and bacteria stimulate epithelial biosensors called enteroendocrine cells. Despite being electrically excitable, enteroendocrine cells are generally thought to communicate indirectly with nerves through hormone secretion and not through direct cell-nerve contact. However, we recently uncovered in intestinal enteroendocrine cells a cytoplasmic process that we named neuropod. Here, we determined that neuropods provide a direct connection between enteroendocrine cells and neurons innervating the small intestine and colon. Using cell-specific transgenic mice to study neural circuits, we found that enteroendocrine cells have the necessary elements for neurotransmission, including expression of genes that encode pre-, post-, and transsynaptic proteins. This neuroepithelial circuit was reconstituted in vitro by coculturing single enteroendocrine cells with sensory neurons. We used a monosynaptic rabies virus to define the circuit’s functional connectivity in vivo and determined that delivery of this neurotropic virus into the colon lumen resulted in the infection of mucosal nerves through enteroendocrine cells. This neuroepithelial circuit can serve as both a sensory conduit for food and gut microbes to interact with the nervous system and a portal for viruses to enter the enteric and central nervous systems. PMID:25555217

  11. Neuroepithelial circuit formed by innervation of sensory enteroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Diego V; Shahid, Rafiq A; Erdmann, Alan; Kreger, Alex M; Wang, Yu; Calakos, Nicole; Wang, Fan; Liddle, Rodger A

    2015-02-01

    Satiety and other core physiological functions are modulated by sensory signals arising from the surface of the gut. Luminal nutrients and bacteria stimulate epithelial biosensors called enteroendocrine cells. Despite being electrically excitable, enteroendocrine cells are generally thought to communicate indirectly with nerves through hormone secretion and not through direct cell-nerve contact. However, we recently uncovered in intestinal enteroendocrine cells a cytoplasmic process that we named neuropod. Here, we determined that neuropods provide a direct connection between enteroendocrine cells and neurons innervating the small intestine and colon. Using cell-specific transgenic mice to study neural circuits, we found that enteroendocrine cells have the necessary elements for neurotransmission, including expression of genes that encode pre-, post-, and transsynaptic proteins. This neuroepithelial circuit was reconstituted in vitro by coculturing single enteroendocrine cells with sensory neurons. We used a monosynaptic rabies virus to define the circuit's functional connectivity in vivo and determined that delivery of this neurotropic virus into the colon lumen resulted in the infection of mucosal nerves through enteroendocrine cells. This neuroepithelial circuit can serve as both a sensory conduit for food and gut microbes to interact with the nervous system and a portal for viruses to enter the enteric and central nervous systems. PMID:25555217

  12. Corneal afferents differentially target thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Sue A.; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal horn neurons send ascending projections to both thalamic nuclei and parabrachial nuclei; these pathways are thought to be critical pathways for central processing of nociceptive information. Afferents from the corneal surface of the eye mediate nociception from this tissue which is susceptible to clinically important pain syndromes. This study examined corneal afferents to the trigeminal dorsal horn and compared inputs to thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons. We used anterograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit to identify corneal afferent projections to trigeminal dorsal horn, and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold to identify projection neurons. Studies were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our analysis was conducted at two distinct levels of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) which receive corneal afferent projections. We found that corneal afferents project more densely to the rostral pole of Vc than the caudal pole. We also quantified the number of thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in the regions of Vc that receive corneal afferents. Corneal afferent inputs to both groups of projection neurons were also more abundant in the rostral pole of Vc. Finally, by comparing the frequency of corneal afferent appositions to thalamic- versus parabrachial-projecting neurons, we found that corneal afferents preferentially target parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal dorsal horn. These results suggest that nociceptive pain from the cornea may be primarily mediated by a non-thalamic ascending pathway. PMID:23201828

  13. Correlation between automated writing movements and striatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Wieland; Eggers, Birk; Barthel, Henryk; Clark, Daniel; Villmann, Thomas; Hesse, Swen; Grahmann, Friedrich; Kühn, Hans-Jürgen; Sabri, Osama; Wagner, Armin

    2002-08-01

    Handwriting defects are an early sign of motor impairment in patients with Wilson's disease. The basal ganglia being the primary site of copper accumulation in the brain suggests a correlation with lesions in the nigrostiatal dopaminergic system. We have analysed and correlated striatal dopaminergic innervation using [(123)I]beta-CIT-SPECT and automated handwriting movements in 37 patients with Wilson's disease. There was a significant correlation of putaminal dopaminergic innervation with fine motor ability (p < 0,05 for NIV [number of inversion in velocity], NIA [number of inversion in acceleration], frequency). These data suggest that loss of dorsolateral striatal dopaminergic innervation has a pathophysiological function for decreased automated motor control in Wilson's disease. Furthermore analysis of automated handwriting movements could be useful for therapy monitoring and evaluation of striatal dopaminergic innervation. PMID:12195459

  14. Salmon fibrin treatment of spinal cord injury promotes functional recovery and density of serotonergic innervation.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Kelli G; Dickson, Amanda R; Marchenko, Steve A; Yee, Kelly M; Emery, Pauline N; Laidmåe, Ivo; Uibo, Raivo; Sawyer, Evelyn S; Steward, Oswald; Flanagan, Lisa A

    2012-05-01

    The neural degeneration caused by spinal cord injury leaves a cavity at the injury site that greatly inhibits repair. One approach to promoting repair is to fill the cavity with a scaffold to limit further damage and encourage regrowth. Injectable materials are advantageous scaffolds because they can be placed as a liquid in the lesion site then form a solid in vivo that precisely matches the contours of the lesion. Fibrin is one type of injectable scaffold, but risk of infection from blood borne pathogens has limited its use. We investigated the potential utility of salmon fibrin as an injectable scaffold to treat spinal cord injury since it lacks mammalian infectious agents and encourages greater neuronal extension in vitro than mammalian fibrin or Matrigel®, another injectable material. Female rats received a T9 dorsal hemisection injury and were treated with either salmon or human fibrin at the time of injury while a third group served as untreated controls. Locomotor function was assessed using the BBB scale, bladder function was analyzed by measuring residual urine, and sensory responses were tested by mechanical stimulation (von Frey hairs). Histological analyses quantified the glial scar, lesion volume, and serotonergic fiber density. Rats that received salmon fibrin exhibited significantly improved recovery of both locomotor and bladder function and a greater density of serotonergic innervation caudal to the lesion site without exacerbation of pain. Rats treated with salmon fibrin also exhibited less autophagia than those treated with human fibrin, potentially pointing to amelioration of sensory dysfunction. Glial scar formation and lesion size did not differ significantly among groups. The pattern and timing of salmon fibrin's effects suggest that it acts on neuronal populations but not by stimulating long tract regeneration. Salmon fibrin clearly has properties distinct from those of mammalian fibrin and is a beneficial injectable scaffold for treatment

  15. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Kirk, Matthew E; Rennie, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K(+) channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K(+) channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  16. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Frances L.; Kirk, Matthew E.; Rennie, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  17. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at -68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at -60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  18. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  19. Defects in myelination, paranode organization and Purkinje cell innervation in the ether lipid-deficient mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Teigler, Andre; Komljenovic, Dorde; Draguhn, Andreas; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W.

    2009-01-01

    Ether lipids (ELs), particularly plasmalogens, are essential constituents of the mammalian central nervous system. The physiological role of ELs, in vivo, however is still enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized a mouse model carrying a targeted deletion of the peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene that results in the complete lack of ELs. Investigating the cerebellum of these mice, we observed: (i) defects in foliation patterning and delay in precursor granule cell migration, (ii) defects in myelination and concomitant reduction in the level of myelin basic protein, (iii) disturbances in paranode organization by extending the Caspr distribution and disrupting axo-glial septate-like junctions, (iv) impaired innervation of Purkinje cells by both parallel fibers and climbing fibers and (v) formation of axon swellings by the accumulation of inositol-tris-phosphate receptor 1 containing smooth ER-like tubuli. Functionally, conduction velocity of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum was significantly reduced. Most of these phenotypes were already apparent at P20 but still persisted in 1-year-old animals. In summary, these data show that EL deficiency results in severe developmental and lasting structural alterations at the cellular and network level of the cerebellum, and reveal an important role of ELs for proper brain function. Common molecular mechanisms that may underlie these phenotypes are discussed. PMID:19270340

  20. Defects in myelination, paranode organization and Purkinje cell innervation in the ether lipid-deficient mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Teigler, Andre; Komljenovic, Dorde; Draguhn, Andreas; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W

    2009-06-01

    Ether lipids (ELs), particularly plasmalogens, are essential constituents of the mammalian central nervous system. The physiological role of ELs, in vivo, however is still enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized a mouse model carrying a targeted deletion of the peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene that results in the complete lack of ELs. Investigating the cerebellum of these mice, we observed: (i) defects in foliation patterning and delay in precursor granule cell migration, (ii) defects in myelination and concomitant reduction in the level of myelin basic protein, (iii) disturbances in paranode organization by extending the Caspr distribution and disrupting axo-glial septate-like junctions, (iv) impaired innervation of Purkinje cells by both parallel fibers and climbing fibers and (v) formation of axon swellings by the accumulation of inositol-tris-phosphate receptor 1 containing smooth ER-like tubuli. Functionally, conduction velocity of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum was significantly reduced. Most of these phenotypes were already apparent at P20 but still persisted in 1-year-old animals. In summary, these data show that EL deficiency results in severe developmental and lasting structural alterations at the cellular and network level of the cerebellum, and reveal an important role of ELs for proper brain function. Common molecular mechanisms that may underlie these phenotypes are discussed. PMID:19270340

  1. Stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates glutamatergic neurons in the parabrachial nucleus: relation to neurons containing nNOS.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Moazzami, Ali R; Longhurst, John C

    2005-08-16

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates neurons in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), a region known to play a role in central integration of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes. However, phenotypes of these activated neurons have not been well identified. Glutamate, an important excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is involved in PBN-mediated cardiovascular responses. Recent identification of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) has provided a novel and unique marker to locate distinctive perikarya of neurons that use glutamate as a neurotransmitter. The action of glutamate in the brain is influenced by nitric oxide. Thus, using triple immunofluorescent labeling, the present study examined expression of c-Fos, an immediate early gene, in the neurons containing VGLUT3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the PBN following stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. In anesthetized cats with bilateral barodenervation and cervical vagotomy, topical application of bradykinin (BK, 1-10 microg/ml, 50 microl, n = 6) on the left ventricle was performed six times, every 20 min. Repeated administration of BK elicited consistent increases in blood pressure over a 100 min period while no changes were noted in the animals treated with the vehicle for BK (0.9% saline, n=5). Compared to control cats, c-Fos expression was increased significantly in the cell bodies containing VGLUT3 as well as both VGLUT3 and nNOS in the external lateral PBN (elPBN) in BK-treated animals (all P < 0.01). In addition, using similar triple-staining method, we noted that fibers of activated neurons containing nNOS in the elPBN co-localized with vesicular glutamate transporter 2 following BK stimulation. These data suggest that glutamatergic neurons represent a cell type in the PBN that is activated by stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. Nitric oxide has the potential to influence the action of glutamatergic neurons in

  2. Directional sensitivity of human periodontal mechanoreceptive afferents to forces applied to the teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Trulsson, M; Johansson, R S; Olsson, K A

    1992-01-01

    1. Single-unit impulse activity from thirty-eight mechanoreceptive afferent fibres was recorded in the human inferior alveolar nerve using tungsten microelectrodes. All afferents responded to mechanical stimulation of the teeth and most likely supplied periodontal mechanoreceptors. 2. All afferents showed their highest sensitivity to forces applied to a particular tooth (the lower incisors, the canine or the first premolar). Forces with 'ramp-and-hold' shaped profiles of similar magnitudes were applied to that tooth in the following six directions: lingual, labial, mesial and distal in the horizontal plane, and up and down in the axial direction of the tooth. Both static and dynamic response components were analysed. 3. All afferents were 'slowly adapting' since they discharged continuously in response to static forces in at least one stimulation direction. Twenty-five afferents (66%) were spontaneously active in the sense that they showed an on-going discharge in the absence of external stimulation. 4. Diverse receptive fields were observed. Most afferents (74%) responded to static forces in two or three of the four horizontal directions. Likewise, all units showed excitatory responses to axial loading with a majority (74%) responding in one of the two axial directions and the remainder in both axial directions. Spontaneously active afferents generally decreased their discharge rate when stimulated in directions opposite to the directions exciting the afferent. With regard to population responses, approximately half of the afferents showed excitatory responses to each stimulus direction except for downwards, in which 86% responded. 5. Twenty-three afferents (61%) exhibited the strongest response to forces in one of the horizontal directions. Of those, a majority were most responsive to the lingual direction (52%) and some to the labial direction (30%). Accordingly, the discharge rates during force application averaged over the whole afferent sample were highest in

  3. Nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Pose, Ines; Fung, Simon; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H; Morales, Francisco R

    2005-04-11

    The present study was undertaken to determine the location of trigeminal and hypoglossal premotor neurons that express neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the cat. Cholera toxin subunit b (CTb) was injected into the trigeminal (mV) or the hypoglossal (mXII) motor nuclei in order to label the corresponding premotor neurons. CTb immunocytochemistry was combined with NADPH-d histochemistry or nNOS immunocytochemistry to identify premotor nitrergic (NADPH-d(+)/CTb(+) or nNOS(+)/ CTb(+) double-labeled) neurons. Premotor trigeminal as well as premotor hypoglossal neurons were located in the ventro-medial medullary reticular formation in a region corresponding to the nucleus magnocellularis (Mc) and the ventral aspect of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc). Following the injection of CTb into the mV, this region was found to contain a total of 60 +/- 15 double-labeled neurons on the ipsilateral side and 33 +/- 14 on the contralateral side. CTb injections into the mXII resulted in 40 +/- 17 double-labeled neurons in this region on the ipsilateral side and 16 +/- 5 on the contralateral side. Thus, we conclude that premotor trigeminal and premotor hypoglossal nitrergic cells coexist in the same medullary region. They are colocalized with a larger population of nitrergic cells (7200 +/- 23). Premotor neurons in other locations did not express nNOS. The present data demonstrate that a population of neurons within the Mc and the NRGc are the source of the nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons. Based on the characteristics of nitric oxide actions and its diffusibility, we postulate that these neurons may serve to synchronize the activity of mV and mXII motoneurons. PMID:15804497

  4. Vagal postganglionic innervation of the canine sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Randall, W C; Ardell, J L; Wurster, R D; Milosavljevic, M

    1987-07-01

    Differential, selective distribution of parasympathetic, postganglionic innervation to the atrioventricular nodal (AVN) region of the canine heart was recently described. Ablation of parasympathetic pathways to the AVN by disruption of the epicardial fat pad at the junction of the inferior vena cava and inferior left atrium did not interfere with normal vagal control of the sinoatrial node (SAN) function. In sharp contrast, surgical dissection of the fat pad overlying the right pulmonary vein-left atrial junction interrupted the major right and left vagal inputs to the SAN region. The pulmonary vein fat pad (PVFP) in the dog heart is triangular in shape with roughly equilateral dimensions of approximately 1 cm, its base extending from superior to inferior veins, and its apex extending nearly to the sinus nodal artery as it courses rostrally in the sulcus terminalis. Careful dissection of smaller fat pads around the circumference of the pulmonary veins and particularly over the rostral-dorsal surfaces of the right superior pulmonary vein and adjacent right atrium, completed SAN parasympathetic denervation. Care in making these dissections left the vagal supply to the AVN region essentially intact, and preserved the sympathetic supplies to both SAN and AVN regions. Autonomic ganglia, varying in size from 1 or 2 cells to 80-100 cells, were found scattered throughout the ventral PVFP (overlying and surrounding the right pulmonary vein-left atrial junction). The ganglia were generally imbedded in fatty connective tissue, although they commonly rested very close to, or were loosely surrounded by epicardial muscle. Ganglia were also found in smaller fat pads on the dorsal surfaces of the atrium between the azygos and the right superior pulmonary vein. PMID:3655182

  5. Innervation pattern of a pool of nine excitatory motor neurons in the flexor tibiae muscle of a locust hind leg

    PubMed

    Sasaki; Burrows

    1998-05-21

    The flexor tibiae muscle of a locust hind leg consists of 10-11 pairs of fibre bundles in the main body of the muscle and a distal pair of bundles that form the accessory flexor muscle, all of which insert onto a common tendon. It is much smaller than the antagonistic extensor tibiae muscle and yet it is innervated by nine excitatory motor neurons, compared with only two for the extensor. To determine the pattern of innervation within the muscle by individual motor neurons, branches of the nerve (N5B2) that supplies the different muscle bundles were backfilled to reveal somata in the metathoracic ganglion. This showed that different muscle bundles are innervated by different numbers of excitatory motor neurons. Physiological mapping of the innervation was then carried out by intracellular recordings from the somata of flexor motor neurons in the metathoracic ganglion using microelectrodes. Spikes were evoked in these neurons by the injection of current, and matching junctional potentials were sought in fibres throughout the muscle using a second intracellular electrode. Each motor neuron innervates only a restricted array of muscle fibres and, although some innervate a larger array than others, none innervates fibres throughout the muscle. Some motor neurons innervate only proximal fibres and others only more distal fibres, so that the most proximal and most distal bundles of muscle fibres are innervated by non-overlapping sets of motor neurons. More motor neurons innervate proximal bundles than distal ones, and there are some asymmetries in the number of motor neurons innervating corresponding bundles on either side of the tendon. Individual motor neurons cause slow, fast or intermediate movements of the tibia, but their patterns of innervation overlap in the different muscle bundles. Furthermore, individual muscle fibres may also be innervated by motor neurons with different properties. PMID:9600870

  6. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  7. Interactions between visceral afferent signaling and stimulus processing

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Hugo D.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral afferent signals to the brain influence thoughts, feelings and behavior. Here we highlight the findings of a set of empirical investigations in humans concerning body-mind interaction that focus on how feedback from states of autonomic arousal shapes cognition and emotion. There is a longstanding debate regarding the contribution of the body to mental processes. Recent theoretical models broadly acknowledge the role of (autonomically-mediated) physiological arousal to emotional, social and motivational behaviors, yet the underlying mechanisms are only partially characterized. Neuroimaging is overcoming this shortfall; first, by demonstrating correlations between autonomic change and discrete patterns of evoked, and task-independent, neural activity; second, by mapping the central consequences of clinical perturbations in autonomic response and; third, by probing how dynamic fluctuations in peripheral autonomic state are integrated with perceptual, cognitive and emotional processes. Building on the notion that an important source of the brain's representation of physiological arousal is derived from afferent information from arterial baroreceptors, we have exploited the phasic nature of these signals to show their differential contribution to the processing of emotionally-salient stimuli. This recent work highlights the facilitation at neural and behavioral levels of fear and threat processing that contrasts with the more established observations of the inhibition of central pain processing during baroreceptors activation. The implications of this body-brain-mind axis are discussed. PMID:26379481

  8. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E; Law, Tammy C. Y.; Fitzpatrick, Richard C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8) stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion) was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance. PMID:25894558

  9. Microsecond-Scale Timing Precision in Rodent Trigeminal Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Campagner, Dario; Erskine, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the nervous system occurs by spikes: the timing precision with which spikes are fired is a fundamental limit on neural information processing. In sensory systems, spike-timing precision is constrained by first-order neurons. We found that spike-timing precision of trigeminal primary afferents in rats and mice is limited both by stimulus speed and by electrophysiological sampling rate. High-speed video of behaving mice revealed whisker velocities of at least 17,000°/s, so we delivered an ultrafast “ping” (>50,000°/s) to single whiskers and sampled primary afferent activity at 500 kHz. Median spike jitter was 17.4 μs; 29% of neurons had spike jitter < 10 μs. These results indicate that the input stage of the trigeminal pathway has extraordinary spike-timing precision and very high potential information capacity. This timing precision ranks among the highest in biology. PMID:25878266

  10. Afferent and efferent projections of the mesopallium in the pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro; Wild, J Martin

    2012-03-01

    The mesopallium is a thick cell plate occupying a substantial portion of the avian dorsal pallium, but its hodology is incompletely known. In pigeons we examined fiber connections of the frontodorsal (MFD) and frontoventral mesopallium (MFV), the ventrolateral mesopallium (MVL), the lateral (MIVl) and medial (MIVm) parts of the intermediate ventral mesopallium, and the caudal mesopallium (MC). MFV, MIVl, and MC connect reciprocally with secondary centers of the trigeminal, tectofugal, and auditory systems, respectively. MVL forms reciprocal connections with both the entopallial core and belt. MFV, MIVl, MVL, and MC receive thalamic inputs different from those of primary sensory pallial regions and have reciprocal connections with the caudolateral nidopallium (NCL) or arcopallium. MIVm has a strong reciprocal connection with the intermediate medial nidopallium. It receives afferents from the visual Wulst, rostral MC, posterior dorsointermediate thalamic nucleus, and caudal part of the posterior dorsolateral thalamic nucleus, is connected reciprocally with the arcopallium, and projects to NCL. MFD has reciprocal connections with the medial frontal nidopallium, arcopallium, posterior pallial amygdala, dorsolateral corticoid area, and projects to the medial part of medial striatum and hypothalamus. These results indicate that six subdivisions of the mesopallium have strong connections with corresponding portions of the nidopallium. In particular, the sensory mesopallial components of MFV, MIVl, MVL, and MC form parallel pathways to the one-way sensory streams in the nidopallium and make either feedback or feedforward circuits to the secondary centers of the nidopallium. PMID:21935938

  11. Quantification of sudomotor innervation: a comparison of three methods.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Christopher H; Illigens, Ben M W; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2010-07-01

    Peripheral sudomotor dysfunction is present in many peripheral neuropathies, but structural assessments of sudomotor fibers rarely occur. We evaluated 36 diabetic and 72 healthy control subjects who underwent detailed neurologic examinations and punch skin biopsies. Physical exam findings were quantified by neuropathy impairment score in the lower limb. Skin biopsies quantified intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) and sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) by a manual, automated, and semiquantitative method. The automated and manual SGNFD correlated with the IENFD at the same site (r = 0.62, P < 0.05 automated method, r = 0.67, P < 0.05 manual method). As neuropathy worsened, the SGNFD at the distal leg declined (automated counting r = -0.81, P < 0.001; manual counting r = -0.88, P < 0.001). The semiquantitative method displayed poor inter- and intrareviewer reliability and correlated poorly with standard neuropathy evaluation scores. Our results suggest that sudomotor fibers can be rapidly and reproducibly quantified, and results correlate well with physical exam findings. PMID:20544913

  12. Rapid Regulation of Microtubule-Associated Proteins 2 (MAP2) in Dendrites of N. Laminaris of the Chick Following Deprivation of Afferent Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Rubel, Edwin W

    2009-01-01

    Differential innervation of segregated dendritic domains in the chick nucleus laminaris (NL), composed of third-order auditory neurons, provides a unique model to study synaptic regulation of dendritic structure. Altering the synaptic input to one dendritic domain affects the structure and length of the manipulated dendrites while leaving the other set of unmanipulated dendrites largely unchanged. Little is known about the effects of neuronal input on the cytoskeletal structure of NL dendrites and whether changes in the cytoskeleton are responsible for dendritic remodeling following manipulations of synaptic inputs. In this study, we investigate changes in the immunoreactivity of high-molecular weight microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) in NL dendrites following two different manipulations of their afferent input. Unilateral cochlea removal eliminates excitatory synaptic input to the ventral dendrites of the contralateral NL and the dorsal dendrites of the ipsilateral NL. This manipulation produced a dramatic decrease in MAP2 immunoreactivity in the deafferented dendrites. This decrease was detected as early as three hours following the surgery, well before any degeneration of afferent axons. A similar decrease in MAP2 immunoreactivity in deafferented NL dendrites was detected following a midline transection that silences the excitatory synaptic input to the ventral dendrites on both sides of the brain. These changes were most distinct in the caudal portion of the nucleus where individual deafferented dendritic branches contained less immunoreactivity than intact dendrites. Our results suggest that the cytoskeletal protein MAP2, which is distributed in dendrites, perikarya, and postsynaptic densities, may play a role in deafferentation-induced dendritic remodeling. PMID:18440716

  13. Catecholaminergic and serotoninergic fibres innervate the ventricular system of the hedgehog CNS.

    PubMed Central

    Michaloudi, H C; Papadopoulos, G C

    1996-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry with antisera against serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) was used to detect monoaminergic (MA) fibres in the ventricular system of the hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus. Light microscopic examination of immunocytochemically stained sections revealed that the ventricular system of the hedgehog is unique among mammals in that the choroid plexuses receive CA axons and that the supraependyma and subependyma of the cerebral ventricles and the spinal central canal are innervated both by serotoninergic and catecholaminergic (CA) fibres. Supraependymal 5-HT axons were generally more abundant and created at places a large number of interconnected basket-like structures, whereas CA fibres were usually directed towards the ventricular lumen. In the lateral ventricles, CA fibres were more numerous in the ependyma lining grey matter, whereas a higher 5-HT innervation density was observed in the area between the corpus callosum and the caudate nucleus or the septum. In the 3rd ventricle, the ependyma of its dorsal part exhibited a higher 5-HT and NA innervation density, whereas DA fibres were preferentially distributed in the ventral half of the basal region. The ependyma lining the cerebral aqueduct displayed a higher MA innervation density in its ventral part. The ependymal wall of the 4th ventricle exhibited an extremely dense 5-HT innervation, mainly in the floor of the ventricle, relatively fewer NA fibres and only sparse DA ones. Few NA and relatively more 5-HT fibres were detected in the ependyma of the central canal. Finally, the circumventricular organs were unevenly innervated by the 3 types of MA fibres. The extensive monoaminergic innervation of the hedgehog ventricular system described here probably reflects a transitory evolutionary stage in the phylogeny of the MA systems with presently unknown functional implications. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Figs 3-8 Figs 9-14 Figs 15-20 PMID:8886949

  14. On the pulpal nerve supply in primary human teeth: evidence for the innervation of primary dentine.

    PubMed

    Egan, C A; Hector, M P; Bishop, M A

    1999-03-01

    The presence of nerves in human tooth pulp has been recognized for over a hundred years, and the innervation of dentine for about 40 years. These observations have been made in permanent teeth. Very few studies have reported on the innervation of the primary pulp and dentine. The purpose of this study was to describe the innervation of the primary tooth pulp-dentine complex. Ten mature primary teeth (one incisor, six canines and three molars) were used. Immediately following extraction they were divided into three sections using a diamond disc and saline coolant. They were then immersion fixed in a solution of formaldehyde and picric acid dissolved in a phosphate buffer pH 7.4). The teeth were then demineralized for 1-3 weeks in formic acid. Following complete demineralization, 30 microns sections were cut on a freezing microtome. Neural tissue was stained using a specific antibody to calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Sections were mounted on glass slides and examined using light microscopy. No individual nerve fibres were seen in the control sections, suggesting that the method used was specific for CGRP-containing nerve fibres. The primary teeth appeared to be well innervated. Myelinated and unmyelinated nerves were seen. There was a dense but variable subodontoblastic plexus of nerves (plexus of Raschkow) and nerve fibres were seen to leave this to travel towards the odontoblast layer. Most terminated here, but a few penetrated the odontoblast layer to enter predentine and the dentine tubules. The maximum penetration was 125 microns but most terminated within 30 microns of the dentinopulpal junction. The coronal region was more densely innervated than the root. Within the crown the cervical third was the most densely innervated region, followed by the pulp horn and the middle third. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that mature primary tooth contains a pulp which is well innervated and has many nerve endings terminating in or near the odontoblast

  15. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  16. Miniature EPSPs and sensory encoding in the primary afferents of the vestibular lagena of the toadfish, Opsanus tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R.; Vautrin, J.; Highstein, S.

    1999-01-01

    The synaptic activity transmitted from vestibular hair cells of the lagena to primary afferent neurons was recorded in vitro using sharp, intracellular microelectrodes. At rest, the activity was composed of miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSPs) at frequencies from 5 to 20/s and action potentials (APs) at frequencies betwen 0 and 10/s. mEPSPs recorded from a single fiber displayed a large variability. For mEPSPs not triggering APs, amplitudes exhibited an average coefficient of variance (CV) of 0.323 and rise times an average CV of 0.516. APs were only triggered by mEPSPs with larger amplitudes (estimated 4-6 mV) and/or steeper maximum rate of rise (10.9 mV/ms, +/- 3.7 SD, n=4 experiments) compared to (3.50 mV/ms, +/-0.07 SD, n=6 experiments) for nontriggering mEPSPs. The smallest mEPSPs showed a fast rise time (0.99 ms between 10% and 90% of peak amplitude) and limited variability across fibers (CV:0.18) confirming that they were not attenuated signals, but rather represented single-transmitter discharges (TDs). The mEPSP amplitude and rise-time relationship suggests that many mEPSPs represented several, rather than a single pulse of secretion of TDs. According to the estimated overall TD frequency, the coincidence of TDs contributing to the same mEPSP were not statistically independent, indicating a positive interaction between TDs that is reminiscent of the way subminiature signals group to form miniature signals at the neuromuscular junction. Depending on the duration and intensity of efferent stimulation, a complete block of AP initiation occurred either immediately or after a delay of a few seconds. Efferent stimulation did not significantly change AP threshold level, but abruptly decreased mEPSP frequency to a near-complete block that followed the block of APs. Maximum mEPSP rate of rise decreased during, and recovered progressively after, efferent stimulation. After termination of efferent stimulation, mEPSP amplitude did not recover

  17. Transient contractions of urinary bladder smooth muscle are drivers of afferent nerve activity during filling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Hill-Eubanks, David; Nelson, Mark T

    2016-04-01

    Activation of afferent nerves during urinary bladder (UB) filling conveys the sensation of UB fullness to the central nervous system (CNS). Although this sensory outflow is presumed to reflect graded increases in pressure associated with filling, UBs also exhibit nonvoiding, transient contractions (TCs) that cause small, rapid increases in intravesical pressure. Here, using an ex vivo mouse bladder preparation, we explored the relative contributions of filling pressure and TC-induced pressure transients to sensory nerve stimulation. Continuous UB filling caused an increase in afferent nerve activity composed of a graded increase in baseline activity and activity associated with increases in intravesical pressure produced by TCs. For each ∼4-mmHg pressure increase, filling pressure increased baseline afferent activity by ∼60 action potentials per second. In contrast, a similar pressure elevation induced by a TC evoked an ∼10-fold greater increase in afferent activity. Filling pressure did not affect TC frequency but did increase the TC rate of rise, reflecting a change in the length-tension relationship of detrusor smooth muscle. The frequency of afferent bursts depended on the TC rate of rise and peaked before maximum pressure. Inhibition of small- and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+)(SK and BK) channels increased TC amplitude and afferent nerve activity. After inhibiting detrusor muscle contractility, simulating the waveform of a TC by gently compressing the bladder evoked similar increases in afferent activity. Notably, afferent activity elicited by simulated TCs was augmented by SK channel inhibition. Our results show that afferent nerve activity evoked by TCs represents the majority of afferent outflow conveyed to the CNS during UB filling and suggest that the maximum TC rate of rise corresponds to an optimal length-tension relationship for efficient UB contraction. Furthermore, our findings implicate SK channels in controlling the gain of sensory

  18. Heart failure induces changes in acid-sensing ion channels in sensory neurons innervating skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, David D; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-10-15

    Heart failure is associated with diminished exercise capacity, which is driven, in part, by alterations in exercise-induced autonomic reflexes triggered by skeletal muscle sensory neurons (afferents). These overactive reflexes may also contribute to the chronic state of sympathetic excitation, which is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are highly expressed in muscle afferents where they sense metabolic changes associated with ischaemia and exercise, and contribute to the metabolic component of these reflexes. Therefore, we tested if ASICs within muscle afferents are altered in heart failure. We used whole-cell patch clamp to study the electrophysiological properties of acid-evoked currents in isolated, labelled muscle afferent neurons from control and heart failure (induced by myocardial infarction) mice. We found that the percentage of muscle afferents that displayed ASIC-like currents, the current amplitudes, and the pH dose-response relationships were not altered in mice with heart failure. On the other hand, the biophysical properties of ASIC-like currents were significantly different in a subpopulation of cells (40%) from heart failure mice. This population displayed diminished pH sensitivity, altered desensitization kinetics, and very fast recovery from desensitization. These unique properties define these channels within this subpopulation of muscle afferents as being heteromeric channels composed of ASIC2a and -3 subunits. Heart failure induced a shift in the subunit composition of ASICs within muscle afferents, which significantly altered their pH sensing characteristics. These results might, in part, contribute to the changes in exercise-mediated reflexes that are associated with heart failure. PMID:26314284

  19. Potential role of estrogen in maintaining the imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanchun; Yao, Shuzhong

    2016-03-15

    Endometriosis, one of the most common benign gynecological diseases, affects millions of women of childbearing age. Endometriosis-associated pain is a major cause of disability and compromised quality of life in women. Neuropathic mechanisms are believed to play an important role. An imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation (reduced sympathetic innervation, with unchanged or increased sensory innervation in endometriotic lesions) has been demonstrated in endometriosis in recent studies. And it is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis-associated pain. It is primarily considered to be a natural adaptive program to endometriosis-associated inflammation. However, it is important to further clarify whether other potential modulating factors are involved in this dysregulation. It is generally accepted that endometriosis is an estrogen dependent disease. Higher estrogen biosynthesis and lower estrogen inactivation in endometriosis can lead to an excess of local estrogen in endometriotic lesions. In addition to its proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions, local estrogen in endometriosis also exerts potential neuromodulatory effects on the innervation in endometriosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the role of estrogen in mediating this imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation in endometriosis, through direct and indirect mechanisms on sympathetic and sensory nerves. Theoretical elaboration of the underlying mechanisms provides new insights in supporting the therapeutic role of estrogen in endometriosis-associated pain. PMID:26777300

  20. Analysis and Measurement of the Sympathetic and Sensory Innervation of White and Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cheryl H.; Zarebidaki, Eleen; Ehlen, J. Christopher; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we provide a detailed account of how to denervate white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT) and how to measure sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity to these and other tissues neurochemically. The brain controls many of the functions of WAT and BAT via the SNS innervation of the tissues, especially lipolysis and thermogenesis, respectively. There is no clearly demonstrated parasympathetic innervation of WAT or the major interscapular BAT (IBAT) depot. WAT and BAT communicate with the brain neurally via sensory nerves. We detail the surgical denervation (eliminating both innervations) of several WAT pads and IBAT. We also detail more selective chemical denervation of the SNS innervation via intra-WAT/IBAT 6-hydroxy-dopamine (a catecholaminergic neurotoxin) injections and selective chemical sensory denervation via intra-WAT/IBAT capsaicin (a sensory nerve neurotoxin) injections. Verifications of the denervations are provided (HPLC-EC detection for SNS, ELIA for calcitonin gene-related peptide (proven sensory nerve marker)). Finally, assessment of the SNS drive to WAT/BAT or other tissues is described using the alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine method combined with HPLC-EC, a direct neurochemical measure of SNS activity. These methods have proven useful for us and for other investigators interested in innervation of adipose tissues. The chemical denervation approach has been extended to nonadipose tissues as well. PMID:24480348

  1. Cortical serotonin and norepinephrine denervation in parkinsonism: Preferential loss of the beaded serotonin innervation

    PubMed Central

    Nayyar, Tultul; Bubser, Michael; Ferguson, Marcus C.; Neely, M. Diana; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Montine, Thomas J.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Ansah, Twum A.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is marked by prominent motor symptoms that reflect striatal dopamine insufficiency. However, non-motor symptoms, including depression, are common in PD. These changes have been suggested to reflect pathological involvement of non-dopaminergic systems. We examined regional changes in serotonin and norepinephrine systems in mice treated with two different 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment paradigms and that survived for 3 or 16 weeks after the last MPTP injection. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine concentration, the magnitude of which depended on the treatment regimen and survival interval after MPTP treatment. There was significant involvement of other subcortical areas receiving a dopamine innervation, but no consistent changes in serotonin or norepinephrine levels in subcortical sites. In contrast, we observed an enduring decrease in serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations in both the somatosensory and medial prefrontal (PFC) cortex. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed a decrease in the density of PFC norepinephrine and serotonin axons. The decrease in the cortical serotonergic innervation preferentially involved the thick beaded but not smooth fine serotonin axons. Similar changes in the serotonin innervation of postmortem samples of the prefrontal cortex from idiopathic PD cases were seen. Our findings point to a major loss of the serotonin and norepinephrine innervations of the cortex in MPTP-induced parkinsonism, and suggest that loss of the beaded cortical serotonin innervation is associated with a predisposition to the development of depression in PD. PMID:19659923

  2. The Influence of Dopaminergic Striatal Innervation on Upper Limb Locomotor Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis U.; Volkmann, Jens; Marzegan, Alberto; Marotta, Giorgio; Cavallari, Paolo; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of striatal dopaminergic innervation on upper limb synergies during walking, we measured arm kinematics in 13 subjects with Parkinson disease. Patients were recruited according to several inclusion criteria to represent the best possible in vivo model of dopaminergic denervation. Of relevance, we included only subjects with normal spatio-temporal parameters of the stride and gait speed to avoid an impairment of upper limbs locomotor synergies as a consequence of gait impairment per se. Dopaminergic innervation of the striatum was measured by FP-CIT and SPECT. All patients showed a reduction of gait-associated arms movement. No linear correlation was found between arm ROM reduction and contralateral dopaminergic putaminal innervation loss. Still, a partition analysis revealed a 80% chance of reduced arm ROM when putaminal dopamine content loss was >47%. A significant correlation was described between the asymmetry indices of the swinging of the two arms and dopaminergic striatal innervation. When arm ROM was reduced, we found a positive correlation between upper-lower limb phase shift modulation (at different gait velocities) and striatal dopaminergic innervation. These findings are preliminary evidence that dopaminergic striatal tone plays a modulatory role in upper-limb locomotor synergies and upper-lower limb coupling while walking at different velocities. PMID:23236504

  3. Langerhans Cells Regulate Cutaneous Innervation Density and Mechanical Sensitivity in Mouse Footpad

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Argenia L. N.; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells are epidermal dendritic cells responsible for antigen presentation during an immune response. Langerhans cells associate intimately with epidermal sensory axons. While there is evidence that Langerhans cells may produce neurotrophic factors, a role in regulating cutaneous innervation has not been established. We used genetically engineered mice in which the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor is targeted to Langerhans cells (Lang-DTR mice) to assess sensory axon-dendritic cell interactions. Diphtheria toxin administration to wild type mice did not affect epidermal structure, Langerhans cell content, or innervation density. A DT administration regimen supramaximal for completely ablating epidermal Langerhans cells in Lang-DTR mice reduced PGP 9.5–immunoreactive total innervation and calcitonin gene related peptide–immunoreactive peptidergic nociceptor innervation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that epidermal gene expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor was unchanged, but nerve growth factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs were reduced. Behavioral testing showed that, while thermal sensitivity was unaffected, mice depleted of Langerhans cells displayed mechanical hypersensitivity. These findings provide evidence that Langerhans cells play an important role in determining cutaneous sensory innervation density and mechanical sensitivity. This may involve alterations in neurotrophin production by Langerhans or other epidermal cells, which in turn may affect mechanical sensitivity directly or as a result of neuropathic changes. PMID:24970748

  4. Regulation of Autocrine Signaling in Subsets of Sympathetic Neurons Has Regional Effects on Tissue Innervation

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Thomas G.; Howard, Laura; Wyatt, Sean; Davies, Alun M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The regulation of innervation by target-derived factors like nerve growth factor (NGF) is the cornerstone of neurotrophic theory. Whereas autocrine signaling in neurons affecting survival and axon growth has been described, it is difficult to reconcile autocrine signaling with the idea that targets control their innervation. Here, we report that an autocrine signaling loop in developing mouse sympathetic neurons involving CD40L (TNFSF5) and CD40 (TNFRSF5) selectively enhances NGF-promoted axon growth and branching, but not survival, via CD40L reverse signaling. Because NGF negatively regulates CD40L and CD40 expression, this signaling loop operates only in neurons exposed to low levels of NGF. Consequently, the sympathetic innervation density of tissues expressing low NGF is significantly reduced in CD40-deficient mice, whereas the innervation density of tissues expressing high levels of NGF is unaffected. Our findings reveal how differential regulation of autocrine signaling in neurons has region-specific effects on axon growth and tissue innervation. PMID:25753410

  5. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  6. Interleukin-1β sensitizes abdominal visceral afferents of cats to ischaemia and histamine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    1999-01-01

    Activation of abdominal splanchnic visceral afferents during mesenteric ischaemia induces visceral pain and evokes excitatory cardiovascular responses. Previous studies have shown that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentration is increased locally in tissues during ischaemia and reperfusion. Local administration of IL-1β sensitizes somatic afferents to mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-1β stimulates or sensitizes splanchnic visceral afferents to ischaemia and to the action of chemical stimuli such as histamine. The concentration of IL-1β in mesenteric lymph and portal venous plasma in anaesthetized cats was measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before, during and after 10 min of abdominal ischaemia. The level of IL-1β was significantly increased during ischaemia in lymph, but not in plasma. Discharge activity of single-unit abdominal visceral C fibre afferents was measured from the right thoracic sympathetic chain. Ischaemically sensitive C fibre afferents were identified according to their response to 5–10 min of abdominal ischaemia. Intra-arterial (i.a.) injection of a high dose of IL-1β (500 ng kg−1), but not of a lower dose (i.e. 15, 50 or 150 ng kg−1), stimulated most (six of seven) abdominal visceral afferents. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly enhanced the increased activity of 11 of 13 C fibre afferents during 10 min of ischaemia. Conversely, an IL-1 type I receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, 1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the increased activity in six of seven other C fibre afferents during ischaemia. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly augmented the responses of 13 of 16 ischaemically sensitive abdominal afferents to histamine (5–10 μg kg−1, i.a.). Conversely, IL-1ra (1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the responses of five of six other C fibre afferents to histamine. These data strongly suggest that stimulation of IL-1 type I receptors by IL-1

  7. Functional dopamine D2 receptors on rat vagal afferent neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A J; Krstew, E; Jarrott, B

    1995-01-01

    1. In the present study in vitro electrophysiology and receptor autoradiography were used to determine whether rat vagal afferent neurones possess dopamine D2 receptors. 2. Dopamine (10-300 microM) elicited a temperature- and concentration-dependent depolarization of the rat isolated nodose ganglion preparation. When applied to the tissue 15 min prior to agonist, raclopride (10 microM), clozapine (10 microM) or a mixture of raclopride and clozapine (10 microM each) all produced a threefold parallel shift to the right of the dopamine concentration-response curve. In contrast, SCH 23390 (100 nM), phentolamine and propranolol (1 microM each) failed to antagonize the dopamine-mediated depolarization. 3. [125I]-NCQ 298 (0.5 nM), a D2 selective radioligand, bound topographically to sections of rat brainstem. Densitometric quantification of autoradiograms revealed 93.8 +/- 0.5% specific binding of this salicylamide radioligand, as determined by raclopride (10 microM, n = 10 animals). Binding was highest in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), particularly the medial and gelatinous subnuclei. In addition, specific binding was also observed in the interpolar spinal trigeminal nucleus and the inferior olive. 4. Unilateral nodose ganglionectomy caused a 36.6 +/- 3.0% reduction in specific binding in the denervated NTS compared to the contralateral NTS. Furthermore, the loss of binding was confined to the dorsal aspect of the medial subnucleus of the NTS. Sham surgery had no effect on the binding of [125I]-NCQ 298 in rat brainstem. 5. The present data provide evidence for the presence of functionally relevant dopamine D2 receptors on both the soma and central terminals of rat vagal afferent neurones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 PMID:7606337

  8. 3-D Reconstruction of Macular Type II Cell Innervation Patterns in Space-Flight and Control Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel Dorothy; Montgomery, K.; Linton, S.; Cheng, R.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A semiautomated method for reconstructing objects from serial thin sections has been developed in the Biocomputation Center. The method is being used to completely, for the first time, type II hair cells and their innervations. The purposes are to learn more about the fundamental circuitry of the macula on Earth and to determine whether changes in connectivities occur under space flight conditions. Data captured directly from a transmission electron microscope via a video camera are sent to a graphics workstation. There, the digitized micrographs are mosaicked into sections and contours are traced, registered and displayed by semiautomated methods. Current reconstructions are of type II cells from the medial part of rat maculas collected in-flight on the Space Life Sciences-2 mission, 4.5 hrs post-flight, and from a ground control. Results show that typical type II cells receive processes from tip to six nearby calyces or afferents. Nearly all processes are elongated and have bouton-like enlargements; some have numerous vesicles. Multiple (2 to 4) processes from a single calyx to a type II cell are common, and approximately 1/3 of the processes innervale 2 or 3 type II cells or a neighboring cluster. From 2% to 6% of the cells resemble type I cells morphologically but have demi-calyces. Thus far, increments in synaptic number in type II cells of flight rats are prominent along processes that supply two hair cells. It is clear that reconstruction methods provide insights into details of macular circuitry not obtainable by other techniques. The results demonstrate a morphological basis for interactions between adjacent receptive fields through feed back-feed forward connections, and for dynamic alterations in receptive field range and activity during preprocessing of linear acceleratory information by the maculas. The reconstruction method we have developed will find further applications in the study of the details of neuronal architecture of more complex systems, to

  9. Differential ATF3 expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons reveals the profile of primary afferents engaged by diverse noxious chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, João M.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    Although transgenic and knockout mice have helped delineate the mechanisms of action of diverse noxious compounds, it is still difficult to determine unequivocally the subpopulations of primary afferent nociceptor that these molecules engage. As most noxious stimuli lead to tissue and/or nerve injury, here we used induction of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a reliable marker of nerve injury, to assess the populations of primary afferent fibers that are activated after peripheral administration of noxious chemical stimuli. In wild-type mice, hindpaw injections of capsaicin, formalin, mustard oil or menthol induce expression of ATF3 in distinct subpopulations of sensory neurons. Interestingly, even though these noxious chemicals are thought to act through subtypes of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, all compounds also induced ATF3 in neurons that appear not to express the expected TRP channel subtypes. On the other hand, capsaicin failed to induce ATF3 in mice lacking TRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 is required for both the direct and indirect induction of ATF3 in sensory neurons. By contrast, only low doses of formalin or mustard oil failed to induce ATF3 in TRPA1 null mice, indicating that injections of high doses (>0.5%) of formalin or mustard oil recruit both TRPA1 and non-TRPA1 expressing primary afferent fibers. Finally, peripheral injection of menthol, a TRPM8 receptor agonist, induced ATF3 in a wide variety of sensory neurons, but in a TRPM8-independent manner. We conclude that purportedly selective agonists can activate a heterogeneous population of sensory neurons, which ultimately could contribute to the behavioral responses evoked. PMID:20605331

  10. Technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning in evaluation of afferent loop syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sivelli, R.; Farinon, A.M.; Sianesi, M.; Percudani, M.; Ugolotti, G.; Calbiani, B.

    1984-08-01

    A study of 118 patients, operated on with Billroth II gastrectomy for peptic disease and affected by postgastrectomy syndromes, was carried out. Fifty patients were investigated by means of technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning. In 18 patients, in whom an afferent loop syndrome was clinically suspected, hepatobiliary scanning demonstrated an altered afferent loop emptying in 8 and atonic distension of the gallbladder without afferent loop motility changes in 10. Among the patients in the first group, four were treated with a biliary diversion surgical procedure and in the second group, two patients underwent cholecystectomy. Our findings indicate that biliary vomiting, right upper abdominal pain pyrosis, and biliary diarrhea in Billroth II gastrectomized patients are not always pathognomonic symptoms of afferent loop syndrome. Technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning represents the only diagnostic means of afferent loop syndrome definition. A differential diagnosis of abnormal afferent loop emptying and gallbladder dyskinesia is necessary for the management planning of these patients, and furthermore, when a surgical treatment is required, biliary diversion with Roux-Y anastomosis or Braun's biliary diversion seems the treatment of choice for afferent loop syndrome, whereas cholecystectomy represents the best procedure for atonic distension of the gallbladder.

  11. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander; Liao, James C

    2015-01-15

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  12. Novel Afferent Terminal Structure in the Crista Ampullaris of the Goldfish, Carassius auratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, Pamela J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1996-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we have identified a new type of afferent terminal structure in the crista ampullaris of the goldfish Carassius auratus. In addition to the bouton-type afferent terminals previously described in the ear of this species, the crista also contained enlarged afferent terminals that enveloped a portion of the basolateral hair cell membrane. The hair cell membrane was evaginated and protruded into the afferent terminal in a glove-and-finger configuration. The membranes of the two cells were regularly aligned in the protruded region of the contact and had a distinct symmetrical electron density. The electron-dense profiles of these contacts were easily identified and were present in every crista sampled. In some cases, efferent terminals synapsed onto the afferents at a point where the hair cell protruded into the terminal. The ultrastructural similarities of the goldfish crista afferents to calyx afferents found in amniotes (birds, reptiles, and mammals) are discussed. The results of the study support the hypothesis that structural variation in the vertebrate inner ear may have evolved much earlier in evolution than previously supposed.

  13. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  14. Differential innervation of direct- and indirect-pathway striatal projection neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Nicholas R.; De La Parra, Mauricio; Callaway, Edward M.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The striatum integrates information from multiple brain regions to shape motor learning. The two major projection cell types in striatum target different downstream basal ganglia targets and have opposing effects on motivated behavior, yet differential innervation of these neuronal subtypes is not well understood. To examine whether input specificity provides a substrate for information segregation in these circuits, we used a monosynaptic rabies virus system to generate brain-wide maps of neurons that form synapses with direct- or indirect-pathway striatal projection neurons. We discovered that sensory cortical and limbic structures preferentially innervated the direct pathway, whereas motor cortex preferentially targeted the indirect pathway. Thalamostriatal input, dopaminergic input, as well as input from specific cortical layers, was similar onto both pathways. We also confirm synaptic innervation of striatal projection neurons by the raphe and pedunculopontine nuclei. Together, these findings provide a framework for guiding future studies of basal ganglia circuit function. PMID:23810541

  15. Innervation of human tooth pulp in relation to caries and dentition type.

    PubMed

    Rodd, H D; Boissonade, F M

    2001-01-01

    The neural status of carious teeth, particularly those associated with a painful pulpitis, is largely unknown. This study sought to determine differences in the innervation density of human primary and permanent teeth and whether caries or painful pulpitis was associated with anatomical changes in pulpal innervation. Coronal pulps were removed from 120 primary and permanent molars with a known pain history. Teeth were categorized as intact, moderately carious, or grossly carious. Using indirect immunofluorescence, we labeled sections for the general neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5. Using image analysis, we found permanent teeth to be significantly more densely innervated than primary teeth. While there was no significant correlation with reported pain experience, neural density in both dentitions increased significantly with caries. Analysis of these data suggests that caries-induced changes in neural density may be functionally more important in the regulation of pulpal inflammation and healing than in the processing and perception of dental pain. PMID:11269734

  16. Functional and morphological assessment of diaphragm innervation by phrenic motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Martin, Melanie; Li, Ke; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-01-01

    This protocol specifically focuses on tools for assessing phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) innervation of the diaphragm at both the electrophysiological and morphological levels. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recording following phrenic nerve stimulation can be used to quantitatively assess functional diaphragm innervation by PhMNs of the cervical spinal cord in vivo in anesthetized rats and mice. Because CMAPs represent simultaneous recording of all myofibers of the whole hemi-diaphragm, it is useful to also examine the phenotypes of individual motor axons and myofibers at the diaphragm NMJ in order to track disease- and therapy-relevant morphological changes such as partial and complete denervation, regenerative sprouting and reinnervation. This can be accomplished via whole-mount immunohistochemistry (IHC) of the diaphragm, followed by detailed morphological assessment of individual NMJs throughout the muscle. Combining CMAPs and NMJ analysis provides a powerful approach for quantitatively studying diaphragmatic innervation in rodent models of CNS and PNS disease. PMID:26066371

  17. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Wainford, Richard D.; Engeland, William C.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats. PMID:25411365

  18. Independent development of sensory and motor innervation patterns in embryonic chick hindlimbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Scott, S A

    1999-04-15

    Previous studies suggest that sensory axon outgrowth is guided by motoneurons, which are specified to innervate particular target muscles. Here we present evidence that questions this conclusion. We have used a new approach to assess the pathfinding abilities of bona fide sensory neurons, first by eliminating motoneurons after neural crest cells have coalesced into dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and second by challenging sensory neurons to innervate muscles in a novel environment created by shifting a limb bud rostrally. The resulting sensory innervation patterns mapped with the lipophilic dyes DiI and DiA showed that sensory axons projected robustly to muscles in the absence of motoneurons, if motoneurons were eliminated after DRG formation. Moreover, sensory neurons projected appropriately to their usual target muscles under these conditions. In contrast, following limb shifts, muscle sensory innervation was often derived from inappropriate segments. In this novel environment, sensory neurons tended to make more "mistakes" than motoneurons. Whereas motoneurons tended to innervate their embryologically correct muscles, sensory innervation was more widespread and was generally from more rostral segments than normal. Similar results were obtained when motoneurons were eliminated in embryos with limb shifts. These findings show that sensory neurons are capable of navigating through their usual terrain without guidance from motor axons. However, unlike motor axons, sensory axons do not appear to actively seek out appropriate target muscles when confronted with a novel terrain. These findings suggest that sensory neuron identity with regard to pathway and target choice may be unspecified or quite plastic at the time of initial axon outgrowth. PMID:10191048

  19. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Megumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ito, Hajime; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uchiyama, Eiichi

    2014-07-01

    The hip adductor group, innervated predominantly by the obturator nerve, occupies a large volume of the lower limb. However, case reports of patients with obturator nerve palsy or denervation have described no more than minimal gait disturbance. Those facts are surprising, given the architectural characteristics of the hip adductors. Our aim was to investigate which regions of the adductor magnus are innervated by the obturator nerve and by which sciatic nerve and to consider the clinical implications. Twenty-one lower limbs were examined from 21 formalin-fixed cadavers, 18 males and 3 females. The adductor magnus was dissected and was divided into four parts (AM1-AM4) based on the locations of the perforating arteries and the adductor hiatus. AM1 was supplied solely by the obturator nerve. AM2, AM3, and AM4 received innervation from both the posterior branch of the obturator nerve and the tibial nerve portion of the sciatic nerve in 2 (9.5%), 20 (95.2%), and 6 (28.6%) of the cadavers, respectively. The double innervation in more than 90% of the AM3s is especially noteworthy. Generally, AM1-AM3 corresponds to the adductor part, traditionally characterized as innervated by the obturator nerve, and AM4 corresponds to the hamstrings part, innervated by the sciatic nerve. Here, we showed that the sciatic nerve supplies not only the hamstrings part but also the adductor part. These two nerves spread more widely than has generally been believed, which could have practical implications for the assessment and treatment of motor disability. PMID:23813615

  20. Quantified distribution of the noradrenaline innervation in the hippocampus of adult rat

    SciTech Connect

    Oleskevich, S.; Descarries, L.; Lacaille, J.C. )

    1989-11-01

    A recently developed radioautographic technique, based on the uptake labeling of monoamine terminals in vitro, was used to quantify the noradrenaline (NA) innervation in adult rat hippocampus. After incubation of brain slices with 1 microM 3H-NA, the NA varicosities were visualized as small aggregates of silver grains, in light microscope radioautographs prepared at 3 equidistant horizontal levels across the ventral 2/3 of the hippocampus. Using a computer-assisted image analyzer, counts were obtained from the subiculum (SUB), 3 sectors of Ammon's horn (CA1, CA3-a, CA3-b) and 3 sectors of the dentate gyrus (DG-medial blade, crest, and lateral blade), every lamina being sampled in each region. After a double correction for duration of radioautographic exposure and section thickness, and following measurement of varicosity diameter in electron microscope radioautographs, it was possible to express these results in number of terminals per volumetric unit of tissue. It was thus found that the overall density of hippocampal NA innervation averages 2.1 million varicosities/mm3 of tissue, a value almost twice as high as that in cerebral cortex. This innervation is 20% denser ventrally than dorsally and is heterogeneous both in terms of regional and laminar distribution. SUB and DG are more strongly innervated than Ammon's horn, wherein CA1 has the lowest overall density. In SUB and CA1, there is a clear predilection of NA varicosities for the stratum moleculare. In CA3, there is a narrow band of even stronger innervation in the stratum radiatum, near the apical border of the stratum pyramidale, contrasting with a 3 times lower density in this cell layer and the stratum oriens. In DG, the NA innervation is again the weakest in the cell body layer and exhibits an almost 3-fold greater density in the polymorph layer, the highest of all hippocampus.

  1. β3GnT2 null mice exhibit defective accessory olfactory bulb innervation.

    PubMed

    Henion, Timothy R; Madany, Pasil A; Faden, Ashley A; Schwarting, Gerald A

    2013-01-01

    Vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) extend axons to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) where they form synaptic connections that relay pheromone signals to the brain. The projections of apical and basal VSNs segregate in the AOB into anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB) compartments. Although some aspects of this organization exhibit fundamental similarities with the main olfactory system, the mechanisms that regulate mammalian vomeronasal targeting are not as well understood. In the olfactory epithelium (OE), the glycosyltransferase β3GnT2 maintains expression of axon guidance cues required for proper glomerular positioning and neuronal survival. We show here that β3GnT2 also regulates guidance and adhesion molecule expression in the vomeronasal system in ways that are partially distinct from the OE. In wildtype mice, ephrinA5(+) axons project to stereotypic subdomains in both the aAOB and pAOB compartments. This pattern is dramatically altered in β3GnT2(-/-) mice, where ephrinA5 is upregulated exclusively on aAOB axons. Despite this, apical and basal VSN projections remain strictly segregated in the null AOB, although some V2r1b axons that normally project to the pAOB inappropriately innervate the anterior compartment. These fibers appear to arise from ectopic expression of V2r1b receptors in a subset of apical VSNs. The homotypic adhesion molecules Kirrel2 and OCAM that facilitate axon segregation and glomerular compartmentalization in the main olfactory bulb are ablated in the β3GnT2(-/-) aAOB. This loss is accompanied by a two-fold increase in the total number of V2r1b glomeruli and a failure to form morphologically distinct glomeruli in the anterior compartment. These results identify a novel function for β3GnT2 glycosylation in maintaining expression of layer-specific vomeronasal receptors, as well as adhesion molecules required for proper AOB glomerular formation. PMID:23006775

  2. Optogenetic inhibition of cortical afferents in the nucleus accumbens simultaneously prevents cue-induced transient synaptic potentiation and cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Stefanik, Michael T; Kupchik, Yonatan M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Animal models of relapse reveal that the motivation to seek drug is regulated by enduring morphological and physiological changes in the nucleus accumbens, as well as transient synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core (NAcore) that parallels drug-seeking behavior. The current study sought to examine the link between the behavioral and synaptic consequences of cue-induced cocaine seeking by optically silencing glutamatergic afferents to the NAcore from the prelimbic cortex (PL). Adeno-associated virus coding for the inhibitory opsin archaerhodopsin was microinjected into PL, and optical fibers were targeted to NAcore. Animals were trained to self-administer cocaine followed by extinction training, and then underwent cue-induced reinstatement in the presence or absence of 15 min of optically induced inhibition of PL fibers in NAcore. Inhibiting the PL-to-NAcore projection blocked reinstated behavior and was paralleled by decreased dendritic spine head diameter and AMPA/NMDA ratio relative to sham-laser control rats. Interestingly, while spine density was elevated after extinction training, no further effects were observed by cued reinstatement or optical inhibition. These findings validate the critical role for PL afferents to the NAcore in simultaneously regulating both reinstated behavior and the associated transient synaptic potentiation. PMID:25663648

  3. Epidermal innervation morphometry by immunofluorescence and bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nolano, Maria; Biasiotta, Antonella; Lombardi, Raffaella; Provitera, Vincenzo; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Santoro, Lucio; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Truini, Andrea; Porretta-Serapiglia, Carla; Cazzato, Daniele; Dacci, Patrizia; Vitale, Dino F; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the agreement between simple indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and bright-field immunohistochemistry (BFI) on free-floating sections for intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) quantification. Fifty-five healthy subjects and 63 patients with probable small fiber neuropathy (SFN) underwent two adjacent skin biopsies at the distal leg processed by IF and BFI technique. Agreement between IENFD pairs obtained by each method was assessed by Bland-Altman testing. The area under the curve of the receiving operating characteristics (ROC) curves was used to compare the discrimination ability. The diagnostic judgment was based on sex and age-adjusted normative values. IF and BFI showed good correlation (r = 0.81), with a ratio of about 2:1 and a mean difference of 5.5 ± 3.0 IENF per millimeter between paired measures, as demonstrated by linear regression and Bland-Altman test analyses. The square root transformation confirmed a Poisson distribution of the data and a fixed bias between IF and BFI measurements. The ROC curves analysis demonstrated a striking overlap between IF and BFI (0.83 and 0.82; p = 0.72). The diagnosis of SFN disagreed in only 6.7% of cases when the judgment was based on a difference of >1 IENF from 5% cut-off value. IF and BFI showed comparable diagnostic efficiency when referred to appropriate normative reference values. PMID:26309146

  4. Enterolith Causing Afferent Loop Obstruction: A Case Report and Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Michael C.; Bui, James T.; Knuttinen, M-Grace; Gaba, Ron C.; Scott Helton, W.; Owens, Charles A.

    2009-09-15

    Enterolith formation is a rare cause of afferent limb obstruction following Billroth II gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy surgery. A case of ascending cholangitis caused by an enterolith incarcerated in the afferent loop of a 15-year-old Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was emergently decompressed under direct ultrasound guidance prior to surgery. This is the thirteenth reported case of an enterolith causing afferent loop obstruction. A discussion of our management approach and a review of the relevant literature are presented.

  5. Percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Han, Yoon Hee

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of afferent loop syndrome, jejunostomy or Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy have tended to represent the preferred procedures. In patients who are not good candidates for surgery, palliative treatment-i.e., percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or percutaneous direct transperitoneal jejunostomy techniques-have been applied. Transhepatic biliary drainage confers a risk of ascending cholangitis. Direct percutaneous transperitoneal drainage may be impractical when overlying bowel loops prevent access to deeply located afferent loops. In the present case, percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma was performed successfully for palliation of afferent loop syndrome. PMID:25433418

  6. Ventral tegmental area afferents to the prefrontal cortex maintain membrane potential 'up' states in pyramidal neurons via D(1) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B L; O'Donnell, P

    2000-12-01

    The electrophysiological nature of dopamine actions has been controversial for years, with data supporting both inhibitory and excitatory actions. In this study, we tested whether stimulation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the source of the dopamine innervation of the prefrontal cortex, would exert different responses depending on the membrane potential states that pyramidal neurons exhibit when recorded in vivo, and whether VTA stimulation would have a role in controlling transitions between these states. Prefrontal cortical neurons have a very negative resting membrane potential (down state) interrupted by plateau depolarizations (up state). Although the up state had been shown to be dependent on hippocampal afferents in nucleus accumbens neurons, our results indicate that neither hippocampal nor thalamic inputs are sufficient to drive up events in prefrontal cortical neurons. Electrical VTA stimulation resulted in a variety of actions, in many cases depending on the neuron membrane potential state. Trains of stimuli resembling burst firing evoked a long-lasting transition to the up state, an effect blocked by a D(1) antagonist and mimicked by chemical VTA stimulation. These results indicate that projections from the VTA to the prefrontal cortex may be involved in controlling membrane potential states that define assemblies of activable pyramidal neurons in this region. PMID:11073866

  7. GluA2-Containing AMPA Receptors Distinguish Ribbon-Associated from Ribbonless Afferent Contacts on Rat Cochlear Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo; Liu, Chang; Weisz, Catherine; Vyas, Pankhuri; Fuchs, Paul Albert; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells release glutamate at ribbon synapses to excite postsynaptic afferent neurons, via AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs). However, type II afferent neurons contacting outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea were thought to differ in this respect, failing to show GluA immunolabeling and with many "ribbonless" afferent contacts. Here it is shown that antibodies to the AMPAR subunit GluA2 labeled afferent contacts below inner and outer hair cells in the rat cochlea, and that synaptic currents in type II afferents had AMPAR-specific pharmacology. Only half the postsynaptic densities of type II afferents that labeled for PSD-95, Shank, or Homer were associated with GluA2 immunopuncta or presynaptic ribbons, the "empty slots" corresponding to ribbonless contacts described previously. These results extend the universality of AMPAergic transmission by hair cells, and support the existence of silent afferent contacts. PMID:27257620

  8. The Regulation of Corticofugal Fiber Targeting by Retinal Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Eleanor; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Molnár, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Corticothalamic projection systems arise from 2 main cortical layers. Layer V neurons project exclusively to higher-order thalamic nuclei, while layer VIa fibers project to both first-order and higher-order thalamic nuclei. During early postnatal development, layer VIa and VIb fibers accumulate at the borders of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) before they innervate it. After neonatal monocular enucleation or silencing of the early retinal activity, there is premature entry of layer VIa and VIb fibers into the dLGN contralateral to the manipulation. Layer V fibers do not innervate the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus during the first postnatal week, but also demonstrate premature entry to the contralateral superficial gray layer following neonatal enucleation. Normally, layer V driver projections to the thalamus only innervate higher-order nuclei. Our results demonstrate that removal of retinal input from the dLGN induces cortical layer V projections to aberrantly enter, arborize, and synapse within the first-order dLGN. These results suggest that there is cross-hierarchical corticothalamic plasticity after monocular enucleation. Cross-hierarchical rewiring has been previously demonstrated in the thalamocortical system (Pouchelon et al. 2014), and now we provide evidence for cross-hierarchical corticothalamic rewiring after loss of the peripheral sensory input. PMID:26744542

  9. Innervation in women with uterine myoma and adenomyosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ye Jin; Chang, Ji-Ae; Chang, Sun Hee; Chun, Kyoung Chul; Koh, Jae Whoan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if neurofilament (NF) is expressed in the endometrium and the lesions of myomas and adenomyosis, and to determine their correlation. Methods Histologic sections were prepared from hysterectomies performed on women with adenomyosis (n=21), uterine myoma (n=31), and carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix. Full-thickness uterine paraffin blocks, which included the endometrium and myometrium histologic sections, were stained immunohistochemically using the antibodies for monoclonal mouse antihuman NF protein. Results NF-positive cells were found in the endometrium and myometrium in 11 women with myoma and in 7 with adenomyosis, but not in patients with carcinoma in situ of uterine cervix, although the difference was statistically not significant. There was no significant difference between the existence of NF-positive cells and menstrual pain or phases. The NF-positive nerve fibers were in direct contact with the lesions in nine cases (29.0%) of myoma and in five cases (23.8%) of adenomyosis. It was analyzed if there was a statistical significance between the existence of NF positive cells in the endometrium and the expression of NF-positive cells in the uterine myoma/adenomyosis lesions. When NF-positive cell were detected in the myoma lesions, the incidence of NF-positive nerve cells in the eutopic endometrium was significantly high. When NF-positive cell were detected in the basal layer, the incidence of NF-positive nerve cells in the myoma lesions and adenomyosis lesions was significantly high. Conclusion We assume that NF-positive cells in the endometrium and the myoma and adenomyosis lesions might play a role in pathogenesis. Therefore, more studies may be needed on the mechanisms of nerve fiber growth in estrogen-dependent diseases. PMID:25798429

  10. Compartmentalization of the deep cerebellar nuclei based on afferent projections and aldolase C expression.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Izumi

    2011-09-01

    The distribution of aldolase C (zebrin II)-positive and -negative Purkinje cells (PCs) can be used to define about 20 longitudinally extended compartments in the cerebellar cortex of the rat, which may correspond to certain aspects of cerebellar functional localization. An equivalent compartmental organization may exist in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). This DCN compartmentalization is primarily represented by the afferent projection pattern in the DCN. PC projections and collateral nuclear projections of olivocerebellar climbing fiber axons have a relatively localized terminal arbor in the DCN. Projections of these axons make a closed olivo-cortico-nuclear circuit to connect a longitudinal stripe-shaped cortical compartment to a small subarea in the DCN, which can be defined as a DCN compartment. The actual DCN compartmentalization, which has been revealed by systematically mapping these projections, is quite different from the cortical compartmentalization. The stripe-shaped alternation of aldolase C-positive and -negative narrow longitudinal compartments in the cerebellar cortex is transformed to the separate clustering of positive and negative compartments in the caudoventral and rostrodorsal DCN, respectively. The distinctive projection of aldolase C-positive and -negative PCs to the caudoventral and rostrodorsal DCN underlies this transformation. Accordingly, the medial cerebellar nucleus is divided into the rostrodorsal aldolase C-negative and caudoventral aldolase C-positive parts. The anterior and posterior interposed nuclei generally correspond to the aldolase C-negative and -positive parts, respectively. DCN compartmentalization is important for understanding functional localization in the DCN since it is speculated that aldolase C-positive and -negative compartments are generally associated with somatosensory and other functions, respectively. PMID:20981512

  11. The striatum in the hedgehog tenrec: histochemical organization and cortical afferents.

    PubMed

    Künzle, Heinz

    2005-02-01

    In order to get insight into the striopallidal organization in mammals with little differentiated brain the striatum of the lesser hedgehog tenrec (Afrotheria) was characterized histochemically and analysed with regard to its cortical afferents using axonal tracer substances. The majority of neocortical cells projecting to the striatum were found bilaterally in the layers 2 and 3 of the frontal hemisphere; caudalwards the relative number of cells increased somewhat in the upper layer 5. There was a topographical organization as far as the allocortical projections appeared confined to the ventral striatum, and the efferents from hippocampal, posterior paleocortical, somatosensory and audiovisual areas were distributed in largely different striatal territories. Projections from the anterior frontal cortex, on the other hand, terminated extensively upon the caudate-putamen and also involved the nucleus accumbens and the olfactory tubercle. In the latter region the molecular layer was especially involved. The entorhinal cortex also projected heavily to the olfactory tubercle but unlike other species it scarcely involved the nucleus accumbens. The cortical fibers were distributed in a relatively homogenous fashion within their striatal territory and there was little evidence for patches of high density terminations. Islands of low density labeling, however, were noted occasionally in the caudate-putamen. These islands were partly similar in size as the patches of neuropil staining obtained with anti-calretinin and anti-substance P. There were also hints for the presence of a shell-like region in the nucleus accumbens stained with anti-dopamine transporter and NADPh-diaphorase. The classical striosome-matrix markers such as calbindin, acetylcholinesterase and enkephalin, however, failed to reveal any compartmental organization. PMID:15713262

  12. Microstimulation of the lumbar DRG recruits primary afferent neurons in localized regions of lower limb.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Christopher A; Fisher, Lee E; Gaunt, Robert A; Weber, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Patterned microstimulation of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) has been proposed as a method for delivering tactile and proprioceptive feedback to amputees. Previous studies demonstrated that large- and medium-diameter afferent neurons could be recruited separately, even several months after implantation. However, those studies did not examine the anatomical localization of sensory fibers recruited by microstimulation in the DRG. Achieving precise recruitment with respect to both modality and receptive field locations will likely be crucial to create a viable sensory neuroprosthesis. In this study, penetrating microelectrode arrays were implanted in the L5, L6, and L7 DRG of four isoflurane-anesthetized cats instrumented with nerve cuff electrodes around the proximal and distal branches of the sciatic and femoral nerves. A binary search was used to find the recruitment threshold for evoking a response in each nerve cuff. The selectivity of DRG stimulation was characterized by the ability to recruit individual distal branches to the exclusion of all others at threshold; 84.7% (n = 201) of the stimulation electrodes recruited a single nerve branch, with 9 of the 15 instrumented nerves recruited selectively. The median stimulation threshold was 0.68 nC/phase, and the median dynamic range (increase in charge while stimulation remained selective) was 0.36 nC/phase. These results demonstrate the ability of DRG microstimulation to achieve selective recruitment of the major nerve branches of the hindlimb, suggesting that this approach could be used to drive sensory input from localized regions of the limb. This sensory input might be useful for restoring tactile and proprioceptive feedback to a lower-limb amputee. PMID:27052583

  13. Estimation of Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss in Glaucomatous Eyes With a Relative Afferent Pupillary Defect

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Andrew J.; Meira-Freitas, Daniel; Weinreb, Robert N.; Marvasti, Amir H.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) losses associated with a relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) in glaucoma. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted including both eyes of 103 participants from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study. A total of 77 subjects had glaucoma in at least one eye and 26 were healthy. Pupil responses were assessed using an automated pupillometer that records the magnitude of RAPD as an “RAPD score.” Standard automated perimetry (SAP) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) also were performed. Retinal ganglion cell counts were estimated using empirical formulas that combine estimates from SAP and OCT. The estimated percentage RGC loss was calculated using the combined structure function index (CSFI). Results. There was good correlation between RAPD magnitude and intereye differences in estimated RGCs (R2 = 0.492, P < 0.001), mean deviation (R2 = 0.546, P < 0.001), retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (R2 = 0.362, P < 0.001), and CSFI (R2 = 0.484, P < 0.001). Therefore, a high RAPD score is likely to indicate large asymmetric RGC losses. The relationship between intereye difference in RGC counts and RAPD score was described best by the formula; RGC difference = 21,896 + 353,272 * RAPD score. No healthy subjects had an absolute RAPD score > 0.3, which was associated with asymmetry of 105,982 cells (or 12%). Conclusions. Good correlation between the magnitude of RAPD and intereye differences in mean deviation and estimated RGC counts suggests pupillometry may be useful for quantifying asymmetric damage in glaucoma. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00221897.) PMID:24282221

  14. Vagal afferents are not necessary for the satiety effect of the gut lipid messenger oleoylethanolamide.

    PubMed

    Azari, Elnaz Karimian; Ramachandran, Deepti; Weibel, Sandra; Arnold, Myrtha; Romano, Adele; Gaetani, Silvana; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2014-07-15

    The endogenous lipid messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) inhibits eating and modulates fat metabolism supposedly through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and vagal sensory fibers. We tested in adult male rats whether OEA stimulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and ketogenesis and whether it increases plasma levels of the satiating gut peptides glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY). We also explored whether OEA still inhibits eating after subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA). We found that intraperitoneally injected OEA (10 mg/kg body wt) reduced (P < 0.05) food intake mainly by increasing meal latency and that this effect was stronger in rats fed a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) than in chow-fed rats. OEA increased (P < 0.05) postprandial plasma nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) in the hepatic portal vein (HPV) and vena cava (VC) 30 min after injection, which was more pronounced in HFD- than in chow-fed rats. OEA also increased the protein expression of the key ketogenetic enzyme, mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, in the jejunum of HFD-fed rats, but not in the liver or duodenum of either diet group. Furthermore, OEA decreased GLP-1 and PYY concentrations (P < 0.05) in the HPV and VC 30 min after administration. Finally, OEA reduced food intake in SDA and sham-operated rats similarly. Our findings indicate that neither intact abdominal vagal afferents nor prandial increases in GLP-1 or PMID:24829501

  15. Rescue of NGF-deficient mice II: basal forebrain cholinergic projections require NGF for target innervation but not guidance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Heidi S; Nishimura, Merry; Armanini, Mark P; Chen, Karen; Albers, Kathryn M; Davis, Brian M

    2004-04-29

    Basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons are an important substrate of cognitive function and are hypothesized to require the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF) for survival and target innervation. NGF-deficient mice develop BFC neurons that extend projections into telencephalic targets, but the mice perish before innervation is fully established. Rescue of NGF-deficient mice by transgenic expression of NGF under the keratin promoter yields viable mice with disrupted CNS expression of NGF. In the current study, rescued NGF-deficient mice contain normal numbers of septal cholinergic neurons yet reveal severe compromise of cholinergic innervation of both cortex and hippocampus. Surprisingly, intracerebroventricular infusion of NGF into juvenile mice can induce an essentially normal pattern of cholinergic innervation of the hippocampus. These results indicate that NGF is required for induction of proper innervation by BFC neurons, but that the cellular pattern of expression of this factor is not critical for specifying the distribution of axon terminals. PMID:15093680

  16. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Deletion in Efferent Olivocochlear Neurons Perturbs Afferent Synaptic Maturation and Reduces the Dynamic Range of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Tyler T.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Normal hearing requires proper differentiation of afferent ribbon synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) that carry acoustic information to the brain. Within individual IHCs, presynaptic ribbons show a size gradient with larger ribbons on the modiolar face and smaller ribbons on the pillar face. This structural gradient is associated with a gradient of spontaneous rates and threshold sensitivity, which is essential for a wide dynamic range of hearing. Despite their importance for hearing, mechanisms that direct ribbon differentiation are poorly defined. We recently identified adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) as a key regulator of interneuronal synapse maturation. Here, we show that APC is required for ribbon size heterogeneity and normal cochlear function. Compared with wild-type littermates, APC conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit decreased auditory brainstem responses. The IHC ribbon size gradient is also perturbed. Whereas the normal-developing IHCs display ribbon size gradients before hearing onset, ribbon sizes are aberrant in APC cKOs from neonatal ages on. Reporter expression studies show that the CaMKII-Cre used to delete the floxed APC gene is present in efferent olivocochlear (OC) neurons, not IHCs or SGNs. APC loss led to increased volumes and numbers of OC inhibitory dopaminergic boutons on neonatal SGN fibers. Our findings identify APC in efferent OC neurons as essential for regulating ribbon heterogeneity, dopaminergic terminal differentiation, and cochlear sensitivity. This APC effect on auditory epithelial cell synapses resembles interneuronal and nerve–muscle synapses, thereby defining a global role for APC in synaptic maturation in diverse cell types. Significance Statement This study identifies novel molecules and cellular interactions that are essential for the proper maturation of afferent ribbon synapses in sensory cells of the inner ear, and for normal hearing. PMID:26085645

  17. Functional specializations of primary auditory afferents on the Mauthner cells: interactions between membrane and synaptic properties.

    PubMed

    Curti, Sebastian; Pereda, Alberto E

    2010-01-01

    Primary auditory afferents are usually perceived as passive, timing-preserving, lines of communication. Contrasting this view, a special class of auditory afferents to teleost Mauthner cells, a command neuron that organizes tail-flip escape responses, undergoes potentiation of their mixed (electrical and chemical) synapses in response to high frequency cellular activity. This property is likely to represent a mechanism of input sensitization as these neurons provide the Mauthner cell with essential information for the initiation of an escape response. We review here the anatomical and physiological specializations of these identifiable auditory afferents. In particular, we discuss how their membrane and synaptic properties act in concert to more efficaciously activate the Mauthner cells. The striking functional specializations of these neurons suggest that primary auditory afferents might be capable of more sophisticated contributions to auditory processing than has been generally recognized. PMID:19941953

  18. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  19. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c—interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  20. Genetic and pharmacological evidence for low-abundance TRPV3 expression in primary vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaw-Wen; Lindberg, Jonathan E M; Peters, James H

    2016-05-01

    Primary vagal afferent neurons express a multitude of thermosensitive ion channels. Within this family of ion channels, the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) greatly influences vagal afferent signaling by determining the threshold for action-potential initiation at the peripheral endings, while controlling temperature-sensitive forms of glutamate release at central vagal terminals. Genetic deletion of TRPV1 does not completely eliminate these temperature-dependent effects, suggesting involvement of additional thermosensitive ion channels. The warm-sensitive, calcium-permeable, ion channel TRPV3 is commonly expressed with TRPV1; however, the extent to which TRPV3 is found in vagal afferent neurons is unknown. Here, we begin to characterize the genetic and functional expression of TRPV3 in vagal afferent neurons using molecular biology (RT-PCR and RT-quantitative PCR) in whole nodose and isolated neurons and fluorescent calcium imaging on primary cultures of nodose ganglia neurons. We confirmed low-level TRPV3 expression in vagal afferent neurons and observed direct activation with putative TRPV3 agonists eugenol, ethyl vanillin (EVA), and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Agonist activation stimulated neurons also containing TRPV1 and was blocked by ruthenium red. FPP sensitivity overlapped with EVA and eugenol but represented the smallest percentage of vagal afferent neurons, and it was the only agonist that did not stimulate neurons from TRPV3(-/-1) mice, suggesting FPP has the highest selectivity. Further, FPP was predictive of enhanced responses to capsaicin, EVA, and eugenol in rats. From our results, we conclude TRPV3 is expressed in a discrete subpopulation of vagal afferent neurons and may contribute to vagal afferent signaling either directly or in combination with TRPV1. PMID:26843581

  1. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  2. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  3. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  4. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Fawley, Jessica A.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1− ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1− inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  5. Estrogen and female reproductive tract innervation: cellular and molecular mechanisms of autonomic neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, M. Mónica; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The female reproductive tract undergoes remarkable functional and structural changes associated with cycling, conception and pregnancy, and it is likely advantageous to both individual and species to alter relationships between reproductive tissues and innervation. For several decades, it has been appreciated that the mammalian uterus undergoes massive sympathetic axon depletion in late pregnancy, possibly representing an adaptation to promote smooth muscle quiescence and sustained blood flow. Innervation to other structures such as cervix and vagina also undergo pregnancy-related changes in innervation that may facilitate parturition. These tissues provide highly tractable models for examining cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying peripheral nervous system plasticity. Studies show that estrogen elicits rapid degeneration of sympathetic terminal axons in myometrium, which regenerate under low-estrogen conditions. Degeneration is mediated by the target tissue: under estrogen's influence, the myometrium produces proteins repulsive to sympathetic axons including BDNF, neurotrimin, semaphorins, and pro-NGF, and extracellular matrix components are remodeled. Interestingly, nerve depletion does not involve diminished levels of classical sympathetic neurotrophins that promote axon growth. Estrogen also affects sympathetic neuron neurotrophin receptor expression in ways that appear to favor pro-degenerative effects of the target tissue. In contrast to the uterus, estrogen depletes vaginal autonomic and nociceptive axons, with the latter driven in part by estrogen-induced suppression BMP4 synthesis. These findings illustrate that hormonally mediated physiological plasticity is a highly complex phenomenon involving multiple, predominantly repulsive target-derived factors acting in concert to achieve rapid and selective reductions in innervation. PMID:25530517

  6. Innervation of vasculature and microvasculature of the human vagina by NOS and neuropeptide-containing nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, C H; Stones, R W; Robson, T; Whitley, K; Burnstock, G

    1996-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine whether nerves that contain nitric oxide synthase (NOS), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or substance P (SP) are present in the human vagina and, if so, to determine the pattern of innervation relative to that of other neurotransmitters, particularly vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Surgical specimens of vaginal tissue (n = 10) from pre- and postmenopausal women were fixed and processed for immunohistochemistry of peptides and NOS and for histochemistry of NADPH-diaphorase. SP-immunoreactive nerves were very sparse, being absent from 9 of the 10 tissue samples. For other peptides and NOS, the innervation of the deep arteries and veins was greater than that of blood vessels in the propria. Capillaries in the epithelial papillae also appeared to be innervated by nerves containing NOS, CGRP, NPY and VIP. Beneath the epithelium nerve fibres formed a subepithelial plexus; no nerve cell bodies were seen. The relative density of innervation by immunoreactive fibres was PGP-9.5 > NPY > VIP >> NOS > CGRP > SP. These results imply that nerves that utilise nitric oxide or NPY, VIP or CGRP as a neurotransmitter may play a role in controlling blood flow and capillary permeability in the human vagina. The origin and function of all these nerves is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8763480

  7. Innervation patterns of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) mystacial follicle-sinus complexes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher D; Rozas, Kelly; Kot, Brian; Gill, Verena A

    2014-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are the most recent group of mammals to return to the sea, and may exemplify divergent somatosensory tactile systems among mammals. Therefore, we quantified the mystacial vibrissal array of sea otters and histologically processed follicle-sinus complexes (F - SCs) to test the hypotheses that the number of myelinated axons per F - SC is greater than that found for terrestrial mammalian vibrissae and that their organization and microstructure converge with those of pinniped vibrissae. A mean of 120.5 vibrissae were arranged rostrally on a broad, blunt muzzle in 7-8 rows and 9-13 columns. The F-SCs of sea otters are tripartite in their organization and similar in microstructure to pinnipeds rather than terrestrial species. Each F-SC was innervated by a mean 1339 ± 408.3 axons. Innervation to the entire mystacial vibrissal array was estimated at 161,313 axons. Our data support the hypothesis that the disproportionate expansion of the coronal gyrus in somatosensory cortex of sea otters is related to the high innervation investment of the mystacial vibrissal array, and that quantifying innervation investment is a good proxy for tactile sensitivity. We predict that the tactile performance of sea otter mystacial vibrissae is comparable to that of harbor seals, sea lions and walruses. PMID:25400554

  8. GAD67-mediated GABA Synthesis and Signaling Regulate Inhibitory Synaptic Innervation in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

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