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Sample records for afferent fibers innervating

  1. Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakir, M.; Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.

  2. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  3. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  4. Sensations evoked by microstimulation of single mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the human face and mouth.

    PubMed

    Trulsson, M; Essick, G K

    2010-04-01

    Intraneural microneurography and microstimulation were performed on single afferent axons in the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves innervating the face, teeth, labial, or oral mucosa. Using natural mechanical stimuli, 35 single mechanoreceptive afferents were characterized with respect to unit type [fast adapting type I (FA I), FA hair, slowly adapting type I and II (SA I and SA II), periodontal, and deep tongue units] as well as size and shape of the receptive field. All afferents were subsequently microstimulated with pulse trains at 30 Hz lasting 1.0 s. Afferents recordings whose were stable thereafter were also tested with single pulses and pulse trains at 5 and 60 Hz. The results revealed that electrical stimulation of single FA I, FA hair, and SA I afferents from the orofacial region can evoke a percept that is spatially matched to the afferent's receptive field and consistent with the afferent's response properties as observed on natural mechanical stimulation. Stimulation of FA afferents typically evoked sensations that were vibratory in nature; whereas those of SA I afferents were felt as constant pressure. These afferents terminate superficially in the orofacial tissues and seem to have a particularly powerful access to perceptual levels. In contrast, microstimulation of single periodontal, SA II, and deep tongue afferents failed to evoke a sensation that matched the receptive field of the afferent. These afferents terminate more deeply in the tissues, are often active in the absence of external stimulation, and probably access perceptual levels only when multiple afferents are stimulated. It is suggested that the spontaneously active afferents that monitor tension in collagen fibers (SA II and periodontal afferents) may have the role to register the mechanical state of the soft tissues, which has been hypothesized to help maintain the body's representation in the central somatosensory system.

  5. Using vertebral movement and intact paraspinal muscles to determine the distribution of intrafusal fiber innervation of muscle spindle afferents in the anesthetized cat.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Ge, Weiqing; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-03-01

    Increasing our knowledge regarding intrafusal fiber distribution and physiology of paraspinal proprioceptors may provide key insights regarding proprioceptive deficits in trunk control associated with low back pain and lead to more effective clinical intervention. The use of vertebral movement as a means to reliably stretch paraspinal muscles would greatly facilitate physiological study of paraspinal muscle proprioceptors where muscle tendon isolation is either very difficult or impossible. The effects of succinylcholine (SCh) on 194 muscle spindle afferents from lumbar longissimus or multifidus muscles in response to computer-controlled, ramp-and-hold movements of the L(6) vertebra were investigated in anesthetized cats. Paraspinal muscles were stretched by moving the L(6) vertebra 1.5-1.7 mm in the dorsal-ventral direction. Initial frequency (IF), dynamic difference (DD), their changes (∆) following SCh injection (100-400 μg kg(-1)), and post-SCh dynamic difference (SChDD) were measured. Muscle spindle intrafusal fiber terminations were classified as primary or secondary fibers as well as bag(1) (b(1)c), bag(2) (b(2)c), b(1)b(2)c, or chain (c) fibers. Intrafusal fiber subpopulations were distinguished using logarithmic transformation of SChDD and ∆IF distributions as established by previous investigators. Increases in DD indicate strength of b(1)c influence while increases in IF indicate strength of b(2)c influence. Out of 194 afferents, 46.9 % of afferents terminated on b(2)c fibers, 46.4 % on b(1)b(2)c fibers, 1 % on b(1)c fibers, and 5.7 % terminated on c fibers. Based on these intrafusal fiber subpopulation distributions, controlled vertebral movement can effectively substitute for direct tendon stretch and allow further investigation of paraspinal proprioceptors in this anatomically complex body region.

  6. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  7. Vagal innervation of intestines: afferent pathways mapped with new en bloc horseradish peroxidase adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Bin; Powley, Terry L

    2007-08-01

    Neural tracers have not typically been employed to determine the pathways followed by axons between their perikarya and target tissues. We have adapted the tetramethylbenzidine method for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to stain fibers en bloc in organs and thus to delineate axonal trajectories. We have also applied this protocol to characterize the pathways that vagal afferents follow to the intestines. The protocol confirms that the proximal segment of the duodenum receives afferents carried in the vagal hepatic branch and demonstrates that vagal afferents innervating the remainder of the small and large intestines course through multiple fascicles derived from the celiac branches of the abdominal vagus. These fascicles divide, intermingle, and reorganize along the abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), but not along the inferior mesenteric artery, and then project to the intestines with secondary arteries that branch from the SMA. The inferior pancreaticoduodenal, jejunal, middle colic, right colic, and ileocecocolic arteries all carry vagal afferents to segments of the intestines. As the arteries derived from the SMA divide repeatedly into successively finer branches and course to the intestines, the vagal afferent fascicles (typically a pair) running with each arterial branch also divide. These divisions generate sets/pairs of finer fascicles coursing with even the highest order arterial radicles. The vagal fascicles enter the intestinal wall with the vessels and appear to innervate the organ near the point of entry. The results verify the practicality and sensitivity of the en bloc HRP technique and suggest that the protocol could delineate other peripheral pathways.

  8. Primary sensory afferent innervation of the developing superficial dorsal horn in the South American opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Kitchener, Peter D; Hutton, Elspeth J; Knott, Graham W

    2006-03-01

    The development of the primary sensory innervation of the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) was studied in postnatal opossums Monodelphis domestica by using DiI labelling of primary afferents and with GSA-IB(4) lectin binding and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity to label primary afferent subpopulations. We also compared the timing of SDH innervation in the cervical and lumbar regions of the spinal cord. The first primary afferent projections to SDH emerge from the most lateral part of the dorsal root entry zone at postnatal day 5 and project around the lateral edge of the SDH toward lamina V. Innervation of the SDH occurs slowly over the second and third postnatal weeks, with the most dorsal aspect becoming populated by mediolaterally oriented varicose fibers before the rest of the dorsoventral thickness of the SDH becomes innervated by fine branching varicose fibers. Labelling with GSA-IB(4) lectin also labelled fibers at the lateral edge of the dorsal horn and SDH at P5, indicating that the GSA-IB(4) is expressed on SDH/lamina V primary afferents at the time when they are making their projections into the spinal cord. In contrast, CGRP-immunoreactive afferents were not evident until postnatal day 7, when a few short projections into the lateral dorsal horn were observed. These afferents then followed a pattern similar to the development of GSA-IB(4) projects but with a latency of several days. The adult pattern of labelling by GSA-IB(4) is achieved by about postnatal day 20, whereas the adult pattern of CGRP labelling was not seen until postnatal day 30. Electron microscopy revealed a few immature synapses in the region of the developing SDH at postnatal day 10, and processes considered to be precursors of glomerular synapses (and thus of primary afferent origin) were first seen at postnatal day 16 and adopted their definitive appearance between postnatal days 28 and 55. Although structural and functional development of forelimbs of neonatal

  9. Physiological identification of morphologically distinct afferent classes innervating the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysakowski, A.; Minor, L. B.; Fernandez, C.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. Semicircular-canal afferents in the squirrel monkey were characterized by their resting discharge, discharge regularity, sensitivity to galvanic currents delivered to the ear (beta *), the gain (g2Hz), and phase lead (phi 2Hz) of their response to 2-Hz sinusoidal head rotations, and their antidromic conduction velocity. Discharge regularity was measured by a normalized coefficient of variation (CV*); the higher the CV*, the more irregular the discharge. g2Hz and phi 2Hz were expressed relative to angular head velocity. 2. These physiological measures were used in an attempt to discern the discharge properties of the three morphological classes of afferents innervating the crista. Presumed bouton (B) fibers were identified as slowly conducting afferents. Presumed calyx (C) fibers were recognized by their irregular discharge and low rotational gains. The remaining fibers were considered to be dimorphic (D) units. Single letters (B, C, and D) are used to emphasize that the classification is based on circumstantial evidence and may be wrong for individual fibers. Of the 125 identified fibers, 13 (10%) were B units, 36 (29%) were C units, and 76 (61%) were D units. 3. B units were regularly discharging D units ranged from regularly to irregularly discharging. C units were the most irregularly discharging afferents encountered. The mean resting discharge for the entire sample was 74 spikes/s. Resting rates were similar for regularly discharging B and D units and higher than those for irregularly discharging C and D units. 4. Except for their lower conduction velocities, the discharge properties of B units are indistinguishable from those of regularly discharging D units. Many of the discharge properties of B and D units vary with discharge regularity. There is a strong, positive relation when beta *, g2Hz, or phi 2Hz is plotted against CV*. For beta * or phi 2Hz, C units conform to the relation for B and D units. In contrast, values of g2Hz for C units are three to

  10. Egr3-dependent muscle spindle stretch receptor intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Fernandes, Michelle; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2015-04-08

    Muscle stretch proprioceptors (muscle spindles) are required for stretch reflexes and locomotor control. Proprioception abnormalities are observed in many human neuropathies, but the mechanisms involved in establishing and maintaining muscle spindle innervation and function are still poorly understood. During skeletal muscle development, sensory (Ia-afferent) innervation induces contacted myotubes to transform into intrafusal muscle fibers that form the stretch receptor core. The transcriptional regulator Egr3 is induced in Ia-afferent contacted myotubes by Neuregulin1 (Nrg1)/ErbB receptor signaling and it has an essential role in spindle morphogenesis and function. Because Egr3 is widely expressed during development and has a pleiotropic function, whether Egr3 functions primarily in skeletal muscle, Ia-afferent neurons, or in Schwann cells that myelinate Ia-afferent axons remains unresolved. In the present studies, cell-specific ablation of Egr3 in mice showed that it has a skeletal muscle autonomous function in stretch receptor development. Moreover, using genetic tracing, we found that Ia-afferent contacted Egr3-deficient myotubes were induced in normal numbers, but their development was blocked to generate one to two shortened fibers that failed to express some characteristic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins. These "spindle remnants" persisted into adulthood, remained innervated by Ia-afferents, and expressed neurotrophin3 (NT3), which is required for Ia-afferent neuron survival. However, they were not innervated by fusimotor axons and they did not express glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is essential for fusimotor neuron survival. These results demonstrate that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating gene expression that promotes normal intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

  11. Age-Related Changes in Vagal Afferents Innervating the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Walter, Gary C.; Powley, Terry L.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding visceral afferents, some of it reviewed in the present issue, serves to underscore how little is known about the aging of the visceral afferents in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In spite of the clinical importance of the issue--with age, GI function often becomes severely compromised--only a few initial observations on age-related structural changes of visceral afferents are available. Primary afferent cell bodies in both the nodose ganglia and dorsal root ganglia lose Nissl material and accumulate lipofucsin, inclusions, aggregates, and tangles. Additionally, in changes that we focus on in the present review, vagal visceral afferent terminals in both the muscle wall and the mucosa of the GI tract exhibit age-related structural changes. In aged animals, both of the vagal terminal types examined, namely intraganglionic laminar endings and villus afferents, exhibit dystrophic or regressive morphological changes. These neuropathies are associated with age-related changes in the structural integrity of the target organs of the affected afferents, suggesting that local changes in trophic environment may give rise to the aging of GI innervation. Given the clinical relevance of GI tract aging, a more complete understanding both of how aging alters the innervation of the gut and of how such changes might be mitigated should be made research priorities. PMID:19665435

  12. Encoding of tangential torque in responses of tactile afferent fibres innervating the fingerpad of the monkey

    PubMed Central

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Wheat, Heather E; Redmond, Stephen J; Salo, Lauren M; Lovell, Nigel H; Goodwin, Antony W

    2010-01-01

    Torsional loads are ubiquitous during everyday dextrous manipulations. We examined how information about torque is provided to the sensorimotor control system by populations of tactile afferents. Torsional loads of different magnitudes were applied in clockwise and anticlockwise directions to a standard central site on the fingertip. Three different background levels of contact (grip) force were used. The median nerve was exposed in anaesthetized monkeys and single unit responses recorded from 66 slowly adapting type-I (SA-I) and 31 fast adapting type-I (FA-I) afferents innervating the distal segments of the fingertips. Most afferents were excited by torque but some were suppressed. Responses of the majority of both afferent types were scaled by torque magnitude applied in one or other direction, with the majority of FA-I afferent responses and about half of SA-I afferent responses scaled in both directions. Torque direction affected responses in both afferent types, but more so for the SA-I afferents. Latencies of the first spike in FA-I afferent responses depended on the parameters of the torque. We used a Parzen window classifier to assess the capacity of the SA-I and FA-I afferent populations to discriminate, concurrently and in real-time, the three stimulus parameters, namely background normal force, torque magnitude and direction. Despite the potentially confounding interactions between stimulus parameters, both the SA-I and the FA-I populations could extract torque magnitude accurately. The FA-I afferents signalled torque magnitude earlier than did the SA-I afferents, but torque direction was extracted more rapidly and more accurately by the SA-I afferent population. PMID:20142274

  13. Classification of muscle spindle afferents innervating the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Dessem, Dean; Capra, Norman

    2006-09-01

    Taylor et al. [Taylor, A., Durbaba, R., Rodgers, J.F., 1992a. The classification of afferents from muscle spindles of the jaw-closing muscles of the cat. J Physiol 456, 609-628] developed a method to classify muscle spindle afferents using succinylcholine (Sch) and ramp and hold stretches. They demonstrated that cat jaw muscle spindle afferents show high proportion of intermediate responses to ramp and hold jaw stretch. Together with observations on the responses to Sch their data suggests that the majority of jaw muscle spindle afferents are influenced by a combination of nuclear bag(2) and nuclear chain fibres. Relatively few are influenced solely by nuclear bag(1) fibres. The purpose of this study was to categorize jaw muscle spindle afferent in rodents in response to ramp and hold stretches. Several measures were used to classify spindle afferents including (1) conduction velocity, (2) coefficient of variation (C.V.) of the interspike interval during jaw opening, and (3) the dynamic sensitivity and the initial discharge of spindle afferents before and after succinylcholine infusion (Sch, 100mg/kg, i.v.). Consistent with observations in the cat jaw muscles, the distribution of the conduction velocity and the C.V. of Vmes masseter afferents were unimodal. Therefore, these parameters were of little value in functional classification of spindle innervation. Succinylcholine injection either markedly increased the dynamic sensitivity or produced no change in Vmes afferents. Unlike cat jaw muscle spindle afferents, the effect of Sch on the initial discharge was not clearly separable from those responding or not responding to Sch. These results suggest that rat jaw muscle spindle afferents, have physiological properties that are primarily intermediate in nature and are likely to reflect a predominance of influence from nuclear bag(2) and chain fibres. However, the distinction between bag(2) and chain fibres influences is not as clearly defined in the rat compared to

  14. Distinct afferent innervation patterns within the human proximal and distal esophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Philip; Aktar, Rubina; Mthunzi, Engelbert; Lee, Chung; Peiris, Madusha; Preston, Sean L; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    Little is known about the mucosal phenotype of the proximal human esophagus. There is evidence to suggest that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to chemical and mechanical stimulation compared with the distal. This may have physiological relevance (e.g., in prevention of aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate), but also pathological relevance (e.g., in reflux perception or dysphagia). Reasons for this increased sensitivity are unclear but may include impairment in mucosal barrier integrity or changes in sensory innervation. We assessed mucosal barrier integrity and afferent nerve distribution in the proximal and distal esophagus of healthy human volunteers. In 10 healthy volunteers baseline proximal and distal esophageal impedance was measured in vivo. Esophageal mucosal biopsies from the distal and proximal esophagus were taken, and baseline transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured in Ussing chambers. Biopsies were examined immunohistochemically for presence and location of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers. In a further four healthy volunteers we investigated for colocalization of CGRP and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 immunoreactivity in nerve fibers. Baseline impedance was higher in the proximal than in the distal esophagus [2,936 Ω (SD578) vs. 2,229 Ω (SD821); P = 0.03], however, baseline TER was not significantly different between them. Mucosal CGRP-immunoreactive nerves were found in the epithelium of both proximal and distal esophagus, but were located more superficially in the proximal mucosa compared with the distal [11.5 (SD7) vs. 21.7 (SD5) cell layers from lumen, P = 0.002] 19% of proximal, and 10% of distal mucosal PGP-immunoreactive fibers colocalized with CGRP. PGP-immunoreactive fibers were also significantly closer to the luminal surface in the proximal compared with the distal esophagus (P < 0.001). We conclude that mucosal barrier integrity is similar in proximal and distal esophagus

  15. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  16. Electrophysiological property and chemical sensitivity of primary afferent neurons that innervate rat whisker hair follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Whisker hair follicles are sensory organs that sense touch and perform tactile discrimination in animals, and they are sites where sensory impulses are initiated when whisker hairs touch an object. The sensory signals are then conveyed by whisker afferent fibers to the brain for sensory perception. Electrophysiological property and chemical sensitivity of whisker afferent fibers, important factors affecting whisker sensory processing, are largely not known. In the present study, we performed patch-clamp recordings from pre-identified whisker afferent neurons in whole-mount trigeminal ganglion preparations and characterized their electrophysiological property and sensitivity to ATP, serotonin and glutamate. Of 97 whisker afferent neurons examined, 67% of them are found to be large-sized (diameter ≥45 µm) cells and 33% of them are medium- to small-sized (diameter <45 µm) cells. Almost every large-sized whisker afferent neuron fires a single action potential but many (40%) small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons fire multiple action potentials in response to prolonged stepwise depolarization. Other electrophysiological properties including resting membrane potential, action potential threshold, and membrane input resistance are also significantly different between large-sized and small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons. Most large-sized and many small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons are sensitive to ATP and/or serotonin, and ATP and/or serotonin could evoke strong inward currents in these cells. In contrast, few whisker afferent neurons are sensitive to glutamate. Our results raise a possibility that ATP and/or serotonin may be chemical messengers involving sensory signaling for different types of rat whisker afferent fibers. PMID:27927797

  17. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  18. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca2+ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals. PMID:25147231

  19. Characterization of the primary spinal afferent innervation of the mouse colon using retrograde labelling.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D R; McNaughton, P A; Evans, M L; Hicks, G A

    2004-02-01

    Visceral pain is the most common form of pain produced by disease and is thus of interest in the study of gastrointestinal (GI) complaints such as irritable bowel syndrome, in which sensory signals perceived as GI pain travel in extrinsic afferent neurones with cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The DRG from which the primary spinal afferent innervation of the mouse descending colon arises are not well defined. This study has combined retrograde labelling and immunohistochemistry to identify and characterize these neurones. Small to medium-sized retrogradely labelled cell bodies were found in the DRG at levels T8-L1 and L6-S1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)- and P2X3-like immunoreactivity (LI) was seen in 81 and 32%, respectively, of retrogradely labelled cells, and 20% bound the Griffonia simplicifolia-derived isolectin IB4. CGRP-LI and IB4 were co-localized in 22% of retrogradely labelled cells, whilst P2X3-LI and IB4 were co-localized in 7% (vs 34% seen in the whole DRG population). Eighty-two per cent of retrogradely labelled cells exhibited vanilloid receptor 1-like immunoreactivity (VR1-LI). These data suggest that mouse colonic spinal primary afferent neurones are mostly peptidergic CGRP-containing, VR1-LI, C fibre afferents. In contrast to the general DRG population, a subset of neurones exist that are P2X3 receptor-LI but do not bind IB4.

  20. Hair-cell counts and afferent innervation patterns in the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey with a comparison to the chinchilla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, C.; Lysakowski, A.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The numbers of type I and type II hair cells were estimated by dissector techniques applied to semithin, stained sections of the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae in the squirrel monkey and the chinchilla. 2. The crista in each species was divided into concentrically arranged central, intermediate, and peripheral zones of equal areas. The three zones can be distinguished by the sizes of individual hair cells and calyx endings, by the density of hair cells, and by the relative frequency of calyx endings innervating single or multiple type I hair cells. 3. In the monkey crista, type I hair cells outnumber type II hair cells by a ratio of almost 3:1. The ratio decreases from 4-5:1 in the central and intermediate zones to under 2:1 in the peripheral zone. For the chinchilla, the ratio is near 1:1 for the entire crista and decreases only slightly between the central and peripheral zones. 4. Nerve fibers supplying the cristae in the squirrel monkey were labeled by extracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve. Peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the zones of the cristae they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. Results were similar for the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae. 5. Axons seldom bifurcate below the neuroepithelium. Most fibers begin branching shortly after crossing the basement membrane. Their terminal arbors are compact, usually extending no more than 50-100 microns from the parent exon. A small number of long intraepithelial fibers enter the intermediate and peripheral zones of the cristae near its base, then run unbranched for long distances through the neuroepithelium to reach the central zone. 6. There are three classes of afferent fibers innervating the monkey crista. Calyx fibers terminate exclusively on type I hair cells, and bouton fibers end only on type II hair cells. Dimorphic fibers provide a mixed innervation, including calyx

  1. [Effects of pulpal inflammation on the activities of periodontal mechanoreceptive afferent fibers].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2010-06-01

    Response properties of periodontal single afferents were investigated in cats with inflammatory irritant-induced pulpitis. A deep dentin cavity was prepared on the right mandibular canine in order to apply an inflammatory agent and small fiber excitant, allyl-isothiocyanate (mustard oil: MO), and single afferents innervating the canine periodontal mechanoreceptor were dissected from the mandibular nerve bundle by examining impulse responses while applying mechanical stimuli to the tip of the crown. Evoked impulses by mechanical stimuli were increased in number for 15 minutes with MO application to the pulp when compared with those with mineral oil. The mechanoreceptive thresholds of single nerve fibers were decreased after the MO application to the pulp when compared with those with mineral oil. These results suggest that the alteration of responses in the periodontal afferent fiber, or the peripheral sensitization, can be produced by MO-induced pulpal inflammation probably due to the axon reflex mechanism in the furcating branches of nerve fibers innervating both the tooth pulp and periodontal ligament.

  2. Expression and function of the ion channel TRPA1 in vagal afferent nerves innervating mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Christina; Kwong, Kevin; Taylor-Clark, Thomas; Kollarik, Marian; Macglashan, Donald M; Braun, Armin; Undem, Bradley J

    2008-03-15

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 and TRPM8 are ion channels that have been localized to afferent nociceptive nerves. These TRP channels may be of particular relevance to respiratory nociceptors in that they can be activated by various inhaled irritants and/or cold air. We addressed the hypothesis that mouse vagal sensory nerves projecting to the airways express TRPA1 and TRPM8 and that they can be activated via these receptors. Single cell RT-PCR analysis revealed that TRPA1 mRNA, but not TRPM8, is uniformly expressed in lung-labelled TRPV1-expressing vagal sensory neurons. Neither TRPA1 nor TRPM8 mRNA was expressed in TRPV1-negative neurons. Capsaicin-sensitive, but not capsaicin-insensitive, lung-specific neurons responded to cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist, with increases in intracellular calcium. Menthol, a TRPM8 agonist, was ineffective at increasing cellular calcium in lung-specific vagal sensory neurons. Cinnamaldehyde also induced TRPA1-like inward currents (as measured by means of whole cell patch clamp recordings) in capsaicin-sensitive neurons. In an ex vivo vagal innervated mouse lung preparation, cinnamaldehyde evoked action potential discharge in mouse vagal C-fibres with a peak frequency similar to that observed with capsaicin. Cinnamaldehyde inhalation in vivo mimicked capsaicin in eliciting strong central-reflex changes in breathing pattern. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that TRPA1, but not TRPM8, is expressed in vagal sensory nerves innervating the airways. TRPA1 activation provides a mechanism by which certain environmental stimuli may elicit action potential discharge in airway afferent C-fibres and the consequent nocifensor reflexes.

  3. Evidence that antidromically stimulated vagal afferents activate inhibitory neurones innervating guinea-pig trachealis.

    PubMed Central

    Canning, B J; Undem, B J

    1994-01-01

    1. We recently described a capsaicin-sensitive vagal pathway mediating non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxations of an isolated, innervated rostral guinea-pig tracheal preparation. These afferent fibres are carried by the superior laryngeal nerves and relaxations elicited by their activation are insensitive to autonomic ganglion blockers such as hexamethonium. In the present study this vagal relaxant pathway was further characterized. 2. Relaxations of the trachealis elicited by electrical stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents were mimicked by bath application of capsaicin. Relaxations elicited by both methods were abolished when the tissue between the trachea and the adjacent oesophagus was disrupted. Indeed, separating the trachea from the oesophagus uncovered a contractile effect of capsaicin administration on the trachealis. 3. Capsaicin-induced, oesophagus-dependent relaxations of the trachealis were blocked by pretreatment with the fast sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX). By contrast, capsaicin-induced contractions of the trachealis (obtained in the absence of the oesophagus) were unaffected by tetrodotoxin. 4. Substance P, neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) also elicited NANC relaxations of precontracted trachealis that were abolished by separating the trachea from the oesophagus or by TTX pretreatment. Like capsaicin, the tachykinins elicited only contractions of the trachealis following TTX pretreatment or separation of the trachea from the adjacent oesophagus. 5. Relaxations elicited by stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive nerves were unaffected by a concentration of the tachykinin NK2 receptor-selective antagonist, SR 48968, that is selective for NK2 receptor blockade and were not mimicked by the NK2 receptor-selective agonist [beta-Ala8]-NKA(4-10). This suggests that NK2 receptors are not responsible for these relaxations. By contrast, the NK3 receptor-selective agonist, senktide analogue, and the NK1 receptor

  4. Single low-threshold afferents innervating the skin of the human foot modulate ongoing muscle activity in the upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Bent, Leah R; Lowrey, Catherine R

    2013-03-01

    We have shown for the first time that single cutaneous afferents in the foot dorsum have significant reflex coupling to motoneurons supplying muscles in the upper limb, particularly posterior deltoid and triceps brachii. These observations strengthen what we know from whole nerve stimulation, that skin on the foot and ankle can contribute to the modulation of interlimb muscles in distant innervation territories. The current work provides evidence of the mechanism behind the reflex, where one single skin afferent can evoke a reflex response, rather than a population. Nineteen of forty-one (46%) single cutaneous afferents isolated in the dorsum or plantar surface of the foot elicited a significant modulation of muscle activity in the upper limb. Identification of single afferents in this reflex indicates the strength of the connection and, ultimately, the importance of foot skin in interlimb coordination. The median response magnitude was 2.29% of background EMG, and the size of the evoked response did not significantly differ among the four mechanoreceptor classes (P > 0.1). Interestingly, although the distribution of afferents types did not differ across the foot dorsum, there was a significantly greater coupling response from receptors located on the medial aspect of the foot dorsum (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the most consistent coupling with upper limb muscles was demonstrated by type I afferents (fast and slowly adapting). This work contributes to the current literature on receptor specificity, supporting the view that individual classes of cutaneous afferents may subserve specific roles in kinesthesia, reflexes, and tactile perception.

  5. Afferent-specific innervation of two distinct AMPA receptor subtypes on single hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tóth, K; McBain, C J

    1998-11-01

    Using the polyamine toxin philanthotoxin, which selectively blocks calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, we show that synaptic transmission onto single hippocampal interneurons occurs by afferent-specific activation of philanthotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive AMPA receptors. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors are found exclusively at synapses from mossy fibers. In contrast, synaptic responses evoked by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons are mediated by calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors. Both pathways converge onto single interneurons and can be discriminated with Group II mGluR agonists. Thus, single interneurons target AMPA receptors of different subunit composition to specific postsynaptic sites, providing a mechanism to increase the synapse-specific computational properties of hippocampal interneurons.

  6. Mechano- and thermosensitivity of regenerating cutaneous afferent nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid; Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    Crush lesion of a skin nerve is followed by sprouting of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers into the distal nerve stump. Here, we investigate quantitatively both ongoing activity and activity evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the nerve in 43 A- and 135 C-fibers after crush lesion of the sural nerve using neurophysiological recordings in anesthetized rats. The discharge patterns in the injured afferent nerve fibers and in intact (control) afferent nerve fibers were compared. (1) Almost all (98%) A-fibers were mechanosensitive, some of them exhibited additionally weak cold/heat sensitivity; 7% had ongoing activity. (2) Three patterns of physiologically evoked activity were present in the lesioned C-fibers: (a) C-fibers with type 1 cold sensitivity (low cold threshold, inhibition on heating, high level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%): almost all of them were mechanoinsensitive and 40% of them were additionally heat-sensitive; (b) C-fibers with type 2 cold sensitivity (high cold threshold, low level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%). All of them were excited by mechanical and/or heat stimuli; (c) cold-insensitive C-fibers (54%), which were heat- and/or mechanosensitive. (3) The proportions of C-fibers exhibiting these three patterns of discharge to physiological stimuli were almost identical in the population of injured C-fibers and in a population of 91 intact cutaneous C-fibers. 4. Ongoing activity was present in 56% of the lesioned C-fibers. Incidence and rate of ongoing activity were the same in the populations of lesioned and intact type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers. The incidence (but not rate) of ongoing activity was significantly higher in lesioned type 2 cold-sensitive and cold insensitive C-fibers than in the corresponding populations of intact C-fibers (42/93 fibers vs. 11/72 fibers).

  7. Reconstruction of atonic bladder innervation after spinal cord injury: A bladder reflex arc with afferent and efferent pathways

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun; Li, Guitao; Luo, Dixin; Sun, Hongtao; Qi, Yong; Li, Yiyi

    2015-01-01

    Background Establishing bladder reflex arcs only with the efferent pathway to induce micturition after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been successful. However, the absence of sensory function and micturition desires can lead to serious complications. Objectives To reconstruct a bladder reflex arc with both afferent and efferent pathways to achieve atonic bladder innervation after SCI. Methods A reflex arc was established by microanastomosis of the S2 dorsal root to the peripheral process of the L5 dorsal ganglion and the L5 ventral root to the S2 ventral root. The functions of the reflex arc were evaluated using electrophysiology, wheat germ agglutinin–horseradish peroxidase (WGA–HRP) tracing, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunocytochemistry analysis. Hind-paw motion was evaluated by CatWalk gait. Results Compound action potentials and compound muscle action potentials were recorded at the right L5 dorsal root following electrical stimulation of right S2 dorsal root. Similar to the control side, these were not significantly different before or after the spinal cord destruction between L6 and S4. WGA–HRP tracing and CGRP immunocytochemistry showed that construction of the afferent and efferent pathways of the bladder reflex arc encouraged axonal regeneration of motor and sensory nerves, which then made contact with the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, ultimately reestablishing axoplasmic transportation. Gait analysis showed that at 3 months following the operation, only the regularity index was significantly different as compared with 1 day before the operation, other parameters showing no difference. Conclusion Bladder reflex arc with the afferent and efferent pathways reconstructs the micturition function without great influence on the motion of leg. PMID:25582052

  8. Reconstruction of atonic bladder innervation after spinal cord injury: A bladder reflex arc with afferent and efferent pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Li, Guitao; Luo, Dixin; Sun, Hongtao; Qi, Yong; Li, Yiyi; Jin, Xunjie

    2015-11-01

    Background Establishing bladder reflex arcs only with the efferent pathway to induce micturition after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been successful. However, the absence of sensory function and micturition desires can lead to serious complications. Objectives To reconstruct a bladder reflex arc with both afferent and efferent pathways to achieve atonic bladder innervation after SCI. Methods A reflex arc was established by microanastomosis of the S2 dorsal root to the peripheral process of the L5 dorsal ganglion and the L5 ventral root to the S2 ventral root. The functions of the reflex arc were evaluated using electrophysiology, wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) tracing, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunocytochemistry analysis. Hind-paw motion was evaluated by CatWalk gait. Results Compound action potentials and compound muscle action potentials were recorded at the right L5 dorsal root following electrical stimulation of right S2 dorsal root. Similar to the control side, these were not significantly different before or after the spinal cord destruction between L6 and S4. WGA-HRP tracing and CGRP immunocytochemistry showed that construction of the afferent and efferent pathways of the bladder reflex arc encouraged axonal regeneration of motor and sensory nerves, which then made contact with the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, ultimately reestablishing axoplasmic transportation. Gait analysis showed that at 3 months following the operation, only the regularity index was significantly different as compared with 1 day before the operation, other parameters showing no difference. Conclusion Bladder reflex arc with the afferent and efferent pathways reconstructs the micturition function without great influence on the motion of leg.

  9. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  10. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE2 induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE2 effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE2 itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE2-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type 4 (EP4) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE2 effects. PGE2 induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE2 potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors by selectively targeting EP4 receptor/PKA pathway without interrupt prostaglandin synthesis.

  11. Melittin selectively activates capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong Kee; Kim, Jin Hyuk

    2004-08-06

    Whole bee venom (WBV)-induced pain model has been reported to be very useful for the study of pain. However, the major constituent responsible for the production of pain by WBV is not apparent. Intraplantar injection of WBV and melittin dramatically reduced mechanical threshold, and increased flinchings and paw thickness. In behavioral experiments, capsaicin pretreatment almost completely prevented WBV- and melittin-induced reduction of mechanical threshold and flinchings. Intraplantar injection of melittin increased discharge rate of dorsal horn neurons only with C fiber input from peripheral receptive field, which was completely blocked by topical application of capsaicin to sciatic nerve. These results suggest that both melittin and WBV induce nociceptive responses by selective activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibers.

  12. Thalamic territories innervated by cerebellar nuclear afferents in the hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1998-12-21

    To gain more insight into the evolution and functional significance of cerebrocerebellar circuits, the cerebellothalamic projections were studied with anterograde tracer substances in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog, tenrec. This insectivore shows one of the lowest size indices among mammals for both the cerebellar nuclei and the neocortex. Almost all cerebellodiencephalic target areas found in the tenrec have been described in other mammals. The intensity and extent of particular projections, however, vary considerably in the tenrec compared with the other mammals investigated so far. The most remarkable finding may be the tenrec's cerebellar projection to the nucleus ventralis medialis. This projection is the most prominent cerebellothalamic projection and originates in predominantly the lateral portion of the cerebellar nuclear complex. The projection to the caudolateral portion of the ventralis anterior complex (VAC) is located immediately rostral to the area receiving ascending somatosensory afferents and appears to originate, in particular, from the intermediate cerebellar nuclear complex. Another cerebellothalamic focus of terminations lies in the paralamellar region of the VAC, whereas the proper intralaminar nuclei, at best, receive a sparse cerebellar input. A faint-to-moderate projection, on the other hand, has been traced consistently to the ventral portion of the lateralis posterior-pulvinar complex and the adjacent dorsal geniculate nucleus. In addition, there are prominent cerebellosubthalamic projections to the zona incerta and the ventral geniculate nucleus. The latter projection is confined mainly to the ventralmost subdivision, which has been shown previously to receive ascending somatosensory, but not retinal, afferents. With the exception of the nucleus ventralis medialis, the projections were essentially confined to the contralateral side.

  13. Effect of hypergravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.

    Gravity is a critical factor in the normal development of the vestibular system, as prolonged prenatal exposures to either micro- or hypergravity will alter the pattern of projections from specific vestibular organs to specific targets in the vestibular nuclei. This study addresses the effect of gravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar projections. In adult rats the semicircular canal afferents project mainly to the cerebellar nodulus whereas the otolith maculae project mainly to the ventral uvula of the cerebellum. To determine if the distribution pattern of these afferents is altered by exposures to altered gravity, 10 pregnant rats were exposed to hypergravity (1.5g) from embryonic day 12 (before vestibular ganglion neurons contact vestibular nuclei) to embryonic day 21 (near the time when the vestibular system becomes functional). Controls were exposed to Earth's gravity but otherwise received the same treatment. At the end of the exposure the embryos were deeply anesthetized and fixed by transcardiac perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH7.4). Filter strips coated with DiI and PTIR were implanted into the saccule (gravistatic vestibular receptor) or into the posterior vertical canal (angular acceleration receptor), and allowed to diffuse for 2 weeks at 37°C. Then the brains were dissected and sectioned for fluorescent confocal imaging. Examination of the control cerebella revealed that the canal and otolith afferents have reached the nodulus and uvula, and axons extend into the internal granular, Purkinje, and molecular layers. Projections from the saccule and posterior vertical canal were partially segregated into their respective domains, the uvula and nodulus. In contrast, in hypergravity-exposed rat fetuses the saccule and posterior vertical canal projections were poorly segregated, and both organs contributed labeled fibers to all layers of the nodulus and uvula. This contrasts with the increased afferent segregation

  14. Excessive activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces apoptotic hair-cell death independent of afferent and efferent innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of excess glutamate plays a central role in eliciting the pathological events that follow intensely loud noise exposures and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been characterized in cochlear nerve terminals, but much less is known about whether excess glutamate signaling also contributes to pathological changes in sensory hair cells. I therefore examined whether glutamate excitotoxicity damages hair cells in zebrafish larvae exposed to drugs that mimic excitotoxic trauma. Exposure to ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) agonists, kainic acid (KA) or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), contributed to significant, progressive hair cell loss in zebrafish lateral-line organs. To examine whether hair-cell loss was a secondary effect of excitotoxic damage to innervating neurons, I exposed neurog1a morphants—fish whose hair-cell organs are devoid of afferent and efferent innervation—to KA or NMDA. Significant, dose-dependent hair-cell loss occurred in neurog1a morphants exposed to either agonist, and the loss was comparable to wild-type siblings. A survey of iGluR gene expression revealed AMPA-, Kainate-, and NMDA-type subunits are expressed in zebrafish hair cells. Finally, hair cells exposed to KA or NMDA appear to undergo apoptotic cell death. Cumulatively, these data reveal that excess glutamate signaling through iGluRs induces hair-cell death independent of damage to postsynaptic terminals. PMID:28112265

  15. Selective cortical control of information flow through different intraspinal collaterals of the same muscle afferent fiber.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, J R; Quevedo, J; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1994-04-18

    We have analyzed in the anesthetized cat the effects of electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex on the intraspinal threshold of two collaterals belonging to the same muscle spindle or tendon organ afferent fiber. The results obtained provide, for the first time, direct evidence showing that the motor cortex is able to modify, in a highly selective manner, the synaptic effectiveness of individual collaterals of the same primary afferent fiber. This presynaptic control could function as a mechanism that allows funneling of information to specific groups of spinal neurons in the presence of extensive intraspinal branching of the afferent fibers.

  16. Dual innervation of neonatal Merkel cells in mouse touch domes.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jingwen; Vysochan, Anna; Luo, Wenqin

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell-neurite complexes are specialized mechanosensory end organs that mediate discriminative touch sensation. It is well established that type I slowly adapting (SAI) mechanoreceptors, which express neural filament heavy chain (NFH), innervate Merkel cells. It was previously shown that neurotrophic factor NT3 and its receptor TrkC play crucial roles in controlling touch dome Merkel cell innervation of NFH+ fibers. In addition, nerve fibers expressing another neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase (NTRK), Ret, innervate touch dome Merkel cells as well. However, the relationship between afferents responsive to NT3/TrkC signaling and those expressing Ret is unclear. It is also controversial if these Ret+ fibers belong to the early or late Ret+ DRG neurons, which are defined based on the co-expression and developmental dependence of TrkA. To address these questions, we genetically traced Ret+ and TrkC+ fibers and analyzed their developmental dependence on TrkA. We found that Merkel cells in neonatal mouse touch domes receive innervation of two types of fibers: one group is Ret+, while the other subset expresses TrkC and NFH. In addition, Ret+ fibers depend on TrkA for their survival and normal innervation whereas NFH+ Merkel cell innervating fibers are almost unaltered in TrkA mutant mice, supporting that Ret+ and NFH+/TrkC+ afferents are two distinct groups. Ret signaling, on the other hand, plays a minor role for the innervation of neonatal touch domes. In contrast, Merkel cells in the glabrous skin are mainly contacted by NFH+/TrkC+ afferents. Taken together, our results suggest that neonatal Merkel cells around hair follicles receive dual innervation while Merkel cells in the glabrous skin are mainly innervated by only SAI mechanoreceptors. In addition, our results suggest that neonatal Ret+ Merkel cell innervating fibers most likely belong to the late but not early Ret+ DRG neurons.

  17. Central distribution of nociceptive intradental afferent nerve fibers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bombardi, C; Chiocchetti, R; Brunetti, O; Grandis, A; Lucchi, M L; Bortolami, R

    2006-08-01

    The central distribution of intradental afferent nerve fibers was investigated by combining electron microscopic observations with a selective method for inducing degeneration of the A delta- and C-type afferent fibers. Degenerating terminals were found on the proprioceptive mesencephalic trigeminal neurons and on dendrites in the neuropil of the trigeminal motor nucleus after application of capsaicin to the rat's lower incisor tooth pulp. The results give anatomical evidence of new sites of central projection of intradental A delta- and C-type fibers whereby the nociceptive information from the tooth pulp can affect jaw muscle activity.

  18. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  19. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lindsea C; May, Clive N; Yao, Song T

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF.

  20. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  1. Ectopic activity in cutaneous regenerating afferent nerve fibers following nerve lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gorodetskaya, Natalia; Constantin, Cristina; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2003-11-01

    Spontaneous activity, and mechanical and thermal sensitivity were investigated in regenerating afferent nerve fibers within 4-21 days post sural nerve lesion (crush or transection and resuturing) in anaesthetized rats. About 33-40% of the myelinated (A) and 22-27% of the unmyelinated (C) fibers excited by electrical nerve stimulation exhibited at least one of these ectopic discharge properties. In total 177 A- and 169 C-fibers with ectopic activity were analysed. Most A-fibers (161/177) were mechanosensitive. Spontaneous activity (median 1 imp/s) was present in 23/177 and thermosensitivity in 14/177 A-fibers (13 of them being activated by heat stimuli). Almost all A-fibers (159/177) exhibited only one type of ectopic discharge property. Most C-fibers (94/169) were thermosensitive responding either to cold (n = 45) or to heat stimuli (n = 33) or to both (n = 16). Eighty-four of 169 C-fibers were spontaneously active (median 0.3 imp/s) and 75/169 C-fibers were mechanosensitive. Both the proportion and the discharge rate of spontaneously active C-fibers were significantly higher after crush than after section and resuturing of the nerve. About 60% of the C-fibers (101/169) had only one ectopic discharge property and 40% two or three. In conclusion, regenerating cutaneous afferent A- and C-fibers may develop mechano- and/or thermosensitivity as well as spontaneous activity. We suggest that spontaneous and evoked ectopic activity in regenerating cutaneous afferents are a function of the intrinsic functional properties of these neurons and of the interaction between the regenerating nerve fibers and non-neural cells during Wallerian degeneration in the nerve distal to the nerve lesion.

  2. Electron microscopic observations of terminals of functionally identified afferent fibers in cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Egger, M D; Freeman, N C; Malamed, S; Masarachia, P; Proshansky, E

    1981-02-23

    Using the method of intra-axonal injection of horseradish peroxidase, functionally identified afferent fibers from three slowly adapting (Type I) receptors and one Pacinian corpuscle in the glabrous skin of the hind paw of the cat were stained. Electron microscopic observation of the terminals of these fibers revealed predominantly axodendritic asymmetric synapses containing round, clear vesicles. Multiple synapses on a single dendrite were observed, separated by as little as 900 mm from one another.

  3. Regenerating sprouts of axotomized cat muscle afferents express characteristic firing patterns to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R D; Munson, J B

    1991-12-01

    1. In cats, we studied the physiological properties of regenerating sprouts of muscle afferent fibers and compared them with sprouts from cutaneous afferent fibers. 2. Muscle nerves to the triceps surae and cutaneous sural nerves were axotomized in the popliteal fossa, and the proximal ends were inserted into nerve cuffs. Six days later, we recorded action potentials from single Groups I and II muscle and mostly Group II cutaneous afferents driven by mechanostimulation of the cuff. 3. Most muscle afferent sprouts (91%) had a regular slowly adapting discharge in response to sustained mechanical displacement of the cuff, particularly to sustained stretch stimuli, whereas most cutaneous afferents (92%) did not. Muscle afferents were more likely to have a spontaneous discharge and afterdischarge. 4. Group II muscle afferent sprouts had lower stretch thresholds and a higher incidence of spontaneous discharge compared with Group I fiber sprouts, whereas Group I fibers had a higher incidence of high-frequency afterdischarge to mechanical stimuli. 5. We conclude that, 6 days after axotomy, regenerating sprouts of muscle afferents, particularly Group II afferents, have become mechanosensitive in the absence of a receptor target and exhibit physiological properties similar to those found when innervating their native muscle but significantly different from sprouts of cutaneous afferents. Expression of these native muscle afferent firing patterns after the inappropriate reinnervation of hairy skin may be due to inherent properties of the muscle afferent fiber.

  4. Afferent fibers involved in the bradykinin-induced cardiovascular reflexes from the ovary in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Hotta, Harumi

    2015-12-01

    Bleeding or rupture of the ovary often accompanies ovarian cysts and causes severe pain and autonomic responses such as hypotension. It would be expected that ovarian afferents contribute to cardiovascular responses induced by ovarian failure. The present study examined cardiovascular responses to noxious chemical stimulation of the ovary by bradykinin, an algesic substance released by tissue damage, and explored the role of ovarian afferents in the ovarian-cardiovascular responses in anesthetized rats. Non-pregnant adult rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital and artificially ventilated. The carotid artery was cannulated to monitor blood pressure and heart rate. Noxious chemical stimulation was achieved by applying a small piece of cotton soaked with bradykinin to the surface of the ovary for 30s. Application of bradykinin (10(-4) M) to the ovary decreased heart rate and blood pressure. These cardiovascular responses were not significantly influenced by severance of the vagal nerves or the superior ovarian nerve, but were abolished by severance of the ovarian nerve plexus (ONP). Application of bradykinin (10(-4) M) to the ovary evoked afferent activity of the ONP both in vivo and in vitro preparations. These results indicate that the decreases in heart rate and blood pressure following chemical noxious stimulation of the ovary with bradykinin are reflex responses, whose afferent nerve pathway is mainly through afferent fibers in the ONP.

  5. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  6. Vasodilatation in hyperalgesic rat skin evoked by stimulation of afferent A beta-fibers: further evidence for a role of dorsal root reflexes in allodynia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Nicas, E; Laird, J M; Cervero, F

    2001-12-01

    In areas of secondary hyperalgesia, innocuous mechanical stimuli evoke pain (allodynia). We have proposed that this is produced by a central pre-synaptic interaction whereby A beta-fibers evoke spike activity (dorsal root reflexes) in nociceptive afferents (Pain, 68 (1996) 13). This activity should conduct centrally, evoking allodynia, and peripherally, evoking neurogenic vasodilatation. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of electrical stimulation of A beta-fibers on cutaneous blood flow before and after producing secondary hyperalgesia in anesthetized rats. Cutaneous blood flow was recorded in the hind paw skin innervated by the sural nerve using a laser Doppler flowmeter. The sural nerve was prepared for electrical stimulation, and the evoked activity was recorded from the sciatic nerve in continuity. Electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 4 x 0.2 ms pulses, 20 s) was applied to the sural nerve at 2T (A beta-fibers only) and 4T and 6T (A beta + A delta-fibers). Flux was recorded at baseline and after capsaicin or mustard oil application outside the sural nerve territory. The effects of intravenous administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, alpha-CGRP(8-37), or of section of the sciatic nerve or of the L4-L6 dorsal roots were examined. Selective activation of the sural nerve A beta-fibers reliably evoked increases in cutaneous blood flow close to areas of chemical irritation or skin damage. A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation was abolished by sciatic nerve or dorsal root section and had a spatial arrangement and optimal stimulation pattern suggesting a central synaptic interaction similar to that responsible for dorsal root reflexes. The flux increases were dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited by alpha-CGRP(8-37), indicating that the A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation resulted from the antidromic activation of nociceptive cutaneous afferent fibers. These results support our hypothesis by showing activation of

  7. Electrophysiological and pharmacological validation of vagal afferent fiber type of neurons enzymatically isolated from rat nodose ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bai-Yan; Schild, John H

    2007-01-01

    An unavoidable consequence of enzymatic dispersion of sensory neurons from intact ganglia is loss of the axon and thus the ability to classify afferent fiber type based upon conduction velocity (CV). An intact rat nodose ganglion preparation was used to randomly sample neurons (n = 76) using the patch clamp technique. Reliable electrophysiological and chemophysiological correlates of afferent fiber type were established for use with isolated neuron preparations. Myelinated afferents (~25%) formed two groups exhibiting strikingly different functional profiles. One group (n = 10) exhibited CVs in excess of 10 m/s and narrow (< 1 ms) action potentials (APs) while the other (n = 9) had CVs as low as 4 m/s and broad (> 2 ms) APs that closely approximated those identified as unmyelinated afferents (n = 57) with CVs less than 1 m/s. A cluster analysis of select measures from the AP waveforms strongly correlated with CV, producing three statistically unique populations (p < 0.05). These groupings aligned with our earlier hypothesis (Jin et al., 2004) that a differential sensitivity to the selective purinergic and vanilloid receptor agonists can be used as reliable pharmacological indicators of vagal afferent fiber type. These metrics were further validated using an even larger population of isolated (n = 240) nodose neurons. Collectively, these indicators of afferent fiber type can be used to provide valuable insight concerning the relavence of isolated cellular observations to integrated afferent function of visceral organ systems. PMID:17512602

  8. Local Translation in Primary Afferent Fibers Regulates Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Gayle M.; Leith, J. Lianne; Fisher, Amy S.; Berliocchi, Laura; Sivasubramaniam, Anantha K.; Sheasby, Anne; Lumb, Bridget M.; Hunt, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of local protein synthesis for neuronal plasticity. In particular, local mRNA translation through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been shown to play a key role in regulating dendrite excitability and modulating long-term synaptic plasticity associated with learning and memory. There is also increased evidence to suggest that intact adult mammalian axons have a functional requirement for local protein synthesis in vivo. Here we show that the translational machinery is present in some myelinated sensory fibers and that active mTOR-dependent pathways participate in maintaining the sensitivity of a subpopulation of fast-conducting nociceptors in vivo. Phosphorylated mTOR together with other downstream components of the translational machinery were localized to a subset of myelinated sensory fibers in rat cutaneous tissue. We then showed with electromyographic studies that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduced the sensitivity of a population of myelinated nociceptors known to be important for the increased mechanical sensitivity that follows injury. Behavioural studies confirmed that local treatment with rapamycin significantly attenuated persistent pain that follows tissue injury, but not acute pain. Specifically, we found that rapamycin blunted the heightened response to mechanical stimulation that develops around a site of injury and reduced the long-term mechanical hypersensitivity that follows partial peripheral nerve damage - a widely used model of chronic pain. Our results show that the sensitivity of a subset of sensory fibers is maintained by ongoing mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis and uncover a novel target for the control of long-term pain states. PMID:18398477

  9. Distribution of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) and hyperpolarization-activated (HCN) channels in sensory afferent fibers in the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Buniel, Maria; Glazebrook, Patricia A.; Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Kunze, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    The chemosensory glomus cells of the carotid body (CB) detect changes in O2-tension. Carotid sinus nerve fibers, which originate from peripheral sensory neurons located within the petrosal ganglion, innervate the CB. Release of transmitter from glomus cells activates the sensory afferent fibers to transmit information to the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. The ion channels expressed within the sensory nerve terminals play an essential role in the ability of the terminal to initiate action potentials in response to transmitter-evoked depolarization. However, with a few exceptions, the identity of ion channels expressed in these peripheral nerve fibers is unknown. This study addresses the expression of voltage-gated channels in the sensory fibers with a focus on channels that set the resting membrane potential and regulate discharge patterns. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence confocal microscopy, potassium channel subunits and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated) family members were localized both in petrosal neurons that expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, and the CSN axons within the carotid body. Channels contributing to resting membrane potential including HCN2, responsible in part for Ih current, and the KCNQ2 and KCNQ5 subunits thought to underlie the neuronal “M current” were identified in the sensory neurons and their axons innervating the carotid body. In addition, the results presented here demonstrate expression of several potassium channels that shape the action potential and the frequency of discharge including Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv4.3, KCa (BK). The role of these channels should be considered in interpretation of the fiber discharge in response to perturbation of the carotid body environment. PMID:18668683

  10. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  11. THE MAJORITY OF MYELINATED AND UNMYELINATED SENSORY NERVE FIBERS THAT INNERVATE BONE EXPRESS THE TROPOMYOSIN RECEPTOR KINASE A

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Taylor, Reid N.; Mantyh, William G.; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Although skeletal pain is a leading cause of chronic pain and disability, relatively little is known about the specific populations of nerve fibers that innervate the skeleton. Recent studies have reported that therapies blocking nerve growth factor (NGF) or its cognate receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) are efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. A potential factor to consider when assessing the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling in a pain state is the fraction of NGF-responsive TrkA+ nociceptors that innervate the tissue from which the pain is arising, as this innervation and the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling may vary considerably from tissue to tissue. To explore this in the skeleton, tissue slices and whole mount preparations of the normal, adult mouse femur were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Analysis of these preparations revealed that 80% of the unmyelinated/thinly myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also express TrkA. Similarly, the majority of myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) which innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also co-express TrkA. In the normal femur, the relative density of CGRP+, NF200+ and TrkA+ sensory nerve fibers per unit volume is: periosteum > bone marrow > mineralized bone > cartilage with the respective relative densities being 100: 2: 0.1: 0. The observation that the majority of sensory nerve fibers innervating the skeleton express TrkA+, may in part explain why therapies that block NGF/TrkA pathway are highly efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. PMID:21277945

  12. Presynaptic depolarization of unmyelinated primary afferent fibers in the spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed

    Calvillo, O; Madrid, J; Rudomín, P

    1982-06-01

    Low intensity (1-20 micro A) intraspinal stimulation produces in the sural nerve of the anesthetized cat short latency responses (3-4 ms) due to antidromic activation of fibers conducting in the A range (43-65 m/s). With higher stimulus intensities (up to 400 micro A) late responses (120-250 ms latency) may also be recorded. Simultaneous recording from two sites in the sural nerve shows that the peripheral processes of the fibers generating the late responses have a conduction velocity between 0.8-1.3 m/s. Collision between antidromic and orthodromic responses further indicates that these fibers have a peripheral threshold 20-25 times that of the A fibers. The late responses were largest when the intraspinal stimulating electrode was located in the dorsal horn, in the region corresponding to Laminae II and III of Rexed. The above observations suggest that the late responses are due to population responses of C fibers which are antidromically activated in the dorsal horn. The excitability of the C fiber terminals is increased by conditioning stimuli applied to other cutaneous afferents with a time course resembling that of the excitability increase of the A fibers on the same nerve. It is suggested that the effectiveness of synaptic transmission from C fibers to second order cells may be modulated presynaptically. In the decerebrate cat the antidromic responses of C fibers are reduced, but not abolished, by reversible spinalization produced by cooling or by sectioning the thoracic spinal cord. This suggests in addition that in the decerebrate preparation the presynaptic effectiveness of the C fiber (presumably nociceptive) input may be tonically decreased by supraspinal influences.

  13. An electron microscopic study of terminals of rapidly adapting mechanoreceptive afferent fibers in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Semba, K; Masarachia, P; Malamed, S; Jacquin, M; Harris, S; Yang, G; Egger, M D

    1985-02-08

    The intra-axonal horseradish peroxidase technique was used to examine the central terminals of 7 A beta primary afferent fibers from rapidly adapting (RA) mechanoreceptors in the glabrous skin of the cat's hindpaw. At the light microscopic level, labelled collaterals were seen to bear occasional boutonlike swellings, mostly (75-82%) of the en passant type. These swellings were distributed more or less uniformly from lamina III to a dorsal part of lamina VI in the dorsal horn, over a maximum longitudinal extent of about 4 mm. At the electron microscopic level, we observed that labelled boutons of RA afferent fibers were 1.0 to 3.3 micrometers in longest sectional dimension, and contained clear, round synaptic vesicles. They frequently formed asymmetric axospinous and axodendritic synapses and commonly appeared to receive contacts from unlabelled structures containing flattened or pleomorphic vesicles plus occasional large dense-cored vesicles. The examination of synaptic connectivity over the entire surface of individual boutons indicated that RA afferent boutons each made contacts with an average of one spine and one dendrite and, in addition, appeared to be postsynaptic to an average of two unlabelled vesicle-containing structures. This synaptic organization was, in general, more complex than that we had seen previously in Pacinian corpuscle (PC) and slowly adapting (SA) type I mechanoreceptive afferent fibers. Our findings indicate that RA, SA, and PC afferent terminals, while displaying some differential synaptic organizations, have many morphological and synaptological characteristics in common. These afferent terminals, in turn, seem to be generally distinguishable from the terminals of muscle spindle Ia afferents or unmyelinated primary afferents.

  14. Relationship between innervation zone width and mean muscle fiber conduction velocity during a sustained isometric contraction

    PubMed Central

    Ye, X.; Beck, T.W.; Wages, N.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between the biceps brachii muscle innervation zone (IZ) width and the mean muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during a sustained isometric contraction. Methods: Fifteen healthy men performed a sustained isometric elbow flexion exercise at their 60% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) until they could not maintain the target force. Mean MFCV was estimated through multichannel surface electromyographic recordings from a linear electrode array. Before exercise, IZ width was quantified. Separate non-parametric one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to examine whether there was a difference in each mean MFCV variable among groups with different IZ width. In addition, separate bivariate correlations were also performed to examine the relationships between the IZ width and the mean MFCV variables during the fatiguing exercise. Results: There was a significant difference in the percent decline of mean MFCV (%ΔMFCV) among groups with different IZ width (χ2 (3)=11.571, p=0.009). In addition, there was also a significant positive relationship between the IZ width and the %ΔMFCV (Kendall’s tau= 0.807; p<0.001). Conclusions: We believe that such relationship is likely influenced by both muscle fiber size and the muscle fiber type composition. PMID:25730657

  15. Development of rat tibia innervation: colocalization of autonomic nerve fiber markers with growth-associated protein 43.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Mariusz; Litwin, Jan A; Tabarowski, Zbigniew; Zagólski, Olaf; Cichocki, Tadeusz; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Development of autonomic innervation of the tibia was investigated in rat fetuses on gestational days (GD) 17-21 and in juvenile animals on postnatal days (PD) 1-28. Double immunofluorescence combined with confocal microscopy was applied to study colocalization of neuronal growth- associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and panneuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP) with markers of the autonomic nervous system: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) for adrenergic, as well as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) for cholinergic fibers. The first GAP-43-immunoreactive (GAP-IR) nerve fibers were seen on GD17 in the perichondrium of the proximal epiphysis. Further GAP- and PGP-IR innervation appeared in the perichondrium/periosteum of the diaphysis and in the distal epiphysis (GD19), then in the bone marrow and in the intercondylar eminence (GD21). On PD1, NPY-IR and DbetaH-IR fibers appeared within the diaphyseal periosteum and on PD4 within the bone marrow. From PD14, GAP-43 immunoreactivity of NPY-positive fibers decreased. From PD7 on, NPY-IR fibers were observed in cartilage canals of both epiphyses and in the intercondylar eminence. In secondary ossification centers, NPY-IR fibers were seen from PD10, and in the bone marrow of the epiphyses from PD14. First VIP-IR and VAChT-IR fibers were observed on PD4 within the periosteum, bone marrow and patellar ligament. From PD10 on, VIP-positive fibers were seen in the intercondylar eminence, and from PD14 in secondary ossification centers. GAP-43 proved to be superior to PGP 9.5 as marker of growing nerve fibers, mostly due to its earlier appearance. The presence of specific nerve fibers may suggest possible involvement of autonomic innervation in regulation of bone development.

  16. Effects of hypergravity on the prenatal development of peripheral vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.; Burke, J. M.; Dobrowolska, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between vestibular stimulation and the distribution of peripheral vestibulocerebellar sensory fibers was studied in embryonic rats that developed in normal gravity (1G), 1.75G, 2.0G, or rotational environments from 10 to 20 days of gestation. Subsequently a fluorescent neuronal tracer was applied to the cerebellum, and allowed to diffuse retrogradely to the vestibular periphery. The distribution of labeled fibers and terminals in the posterior vertical canal and the utricle was analyzed. Sensory fibers in the rotation- and hypergravity-exposed embryos of the posterior semicircular canal and utricle displayed fewer long extending fibers and more terminal fields, suggesting faster rates of maturation as compared to the synchronous controls. Hypergravity exposures in the posterior canal caused increased terminal formation in the central zone of the cristae, and in the utricle caused increased terminal formation, including calyces, in the medial extrastriolar zone. These results show the importance of the vestibular environment in the development of peripheral vestibular innervation.

  17. Innervation of TRPV1-, PGP-, and CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the subepithelial layer of a whole mount preparation of the rat cornea.

    PubMed

    Hiura, Akio; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The pattern of innervation of capsaicin receptor, TRPV1-(transient receptor protein vanilloid 1), PGP 9.5-(protein gene product, a marker of peripheral nerve fibers)-, and CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide)-immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers was examined by immunohistological staining of whole mount preparations of the adult rat cornea. The outer corneoscleral limbus toward the central cornea in the subepithelial (stromal) layer was richly innervated by a meshwork of PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers. Sparse innervation was observed in the central cornea, presumably owing to insufficient staining. Dense innervation of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers were demonstrated in addition to innervation of PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers, running from the corneoscleral margin to the central cornea. Although the density of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers appeared to gradually diminish, immunostaining of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers was not as clear as that of PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers. The TRPV1-IR nerve fibers appeared to be thinner than the PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers. The TRPV1-IR leash fibers were observed in the basal epithelial layer, presumably ensuring effective corneal reflex, response to noxious stimuli, and repair of cornea injury.

  18. Vagal nerve stimulation activates vagal afferent fibers that reduce cardiac efferent parasympathetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Kentaro; Rajendran, Pradeep S.; Takamiya, Tatsuo; Yagishita, Daigo; So, Eileen L.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has been shown to have antiarrhythmic effects, but many of these benefits were demonstrated in the setting of vagal nerve decentralization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of afferent fiber activation during VNS on efferent control of cardiac hemodynamic and electrophysiological parameters. In 37 pigs a 56-electrode sock was placed over the ventricles to record local activation recovery intervals (ARIs), a surrogate of action potential duration. In 12 of 37 animals atropine was given systemically. Right and left VNS were performed under six conditions: both vagal trunks intact (n = 25), ipsilateral right (n = 11), ipsilateral left (n = 14), contralateral right (n = 7), contralateral left (n = 10), and bilateral (n = 25) vagal nerve transection (VNTx). Unilateral VNTx significantly affected heart rate, PR interval, Tau, and global ARIs. Right VNS after ipsilateral VNTx had augmented effects on hemodynamic parameters and increase in ARI, while subsequent bilateral VNTx did not significantly modify this effect (%change in ARI in intact condition 2.2 ± 0.9% vs. ipsilateral VNTx 5.3 ± 1.7% and bilateral VNTx 5.3 ± 0.8%, P < 0.05). Left VNS after left VNTx tended to increase its effects on hemodynamics and ARI response (P = 0.07), but only after bilateral VNTx did these changes reach significance (intact 1.1 ± 0.5% vs. ipsilateral VNTx 3.6 ± 0.7% and bilateral VNTx 6.6 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05 vs. intact). Contralateral VNTx did not modify VNS response. The effect of atropine on ventricular ARI was similar to bilateral VNTx. We found that VNS activates afferent fibers in the ipsilateral vagal nerve, which reflexively inhibit cardiac parasympathetic efferent electrophysiological and hemodynamic effects. PMID:26371172

  19. Central anatomy of individual rapidly adapting low-threshold mechanoreceptors innervating the "hairy" skin of newborn mice: early maturation of hair follicle afferents.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, C J; Ritter, A M; Koerber, H R

    2001-07-30

    Adult skin sensory neurons exhibit characteristic projection patterns in the dorsal horn of the spinal gray matter that are tightly correlated with modality. However, little is known about how these patterns come about during the ontogeny of the distinct subclasses of skin sensory neurons. To this end, we have developed an intact ex vivo somatosensory system preparation in neonatal mice, allowing single, physiologically identified cutaneous afferents to be iontophoretically injected with Neurobiotin for subsequent histological analyses. The present report, centered on rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors, represents the first study of the central projections of identified skin sensory neurons in neonatal animals. Cutaneous afferents exhibiting rapidly adapting responses to sustained natural stimuli were encountered as early as recordings were made. Well-stained representatives of coarse (tylotrich and guard) and fine-diameter (down) hair follicle afferents, along with a putative Pacinian corpuscle afferent, were recovered from 2-7-day-old neonates. All were characterized by narrow, uninflected somal action potentials and generally low mechanical thresholds, and many could be activated via deflection of recently erupted hairs. The central collaterals of hair follicle afferents formed recurrent, flame-shaped arbors that were essentially miniaturized replicas of their adult counterparts, with identical laminar terminations. The terminal arbors of down hair afferents, previously undescribed in rodents, were distinct and consistently occupied a more superficial position than tylotrich and guard hair afferents. Nevertheless, the former extended no higher than the middle of the incipient substantia gelatinosa, leaving a clear gap more dorsally. In all major respects, therefore, hair follicle afferents display the same laminar specificity in neonates as they do in adults. The widely held misperception that their collaterals extend exuberant projections into pain

  20. A computational model for estimating recruitment of primary afferent fibers by intraneural stimulation in the dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, D. J.; Hokanson, J. A.; Rubin, J. E.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Primary afferent microstimulation has been proposed as a method for activating cutaneous and muscle afferent fibers to restore tactile and proprioceptive feedback after limb loss or peripheral neuropathy. Large populations of primary afferent fibers can be accessed directly by implanting microelectrode arrays in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which provide a compact and stable target for stimulating a diverse group of sensory fibers. To gain insight into factors affecting the number and types of primary afferents activated, we developed a computational model that simulates the recruitment of fibers in the feline L7 DRG. The model comprises two parts. The first part is a single-fiber model used to describe the current-distance relation and was based on the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill model for excitability. The second part uses the results of the singe-fiber model and published data on fiber size distributions to predict the probability of recruiting a given number of fibers as a function of stimulus intensity. The range of intensities over which exactly one fiber was recruited was approximately 0.5-5 µA (0.1-1 nC per phase); the stimulus intensity at which the probability of recruiting exactly one fiber was maximized was 2.3 µA. However, at 2.3 µA, it was also possible to recruit up to three fibers, albeit with a lower probability. Stimulation amplitudes up to 6 µA were tested with the population model, which showed that as the amplitude increased, the number of fibers recruited increased exponentially. The distribution of threshold amplitudes predicted by the model was similar to that previously reported by in vivo experimentation. Finally, the model suggested that medium diameter fibers (7.3-11.5 µm) may be recruited with much greater probability than large diameter fibers (12.8-16 µm). This model may be used to efficiently test a range of stimulation parameters and nerve morphologies to complement results from electrophysiology experiments and to aid in the

  1. Cutaneous afferent C-fibers regenerating along the distal nerve stump after crush lesion show two types of cold sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia; Teliban, Alina; Baron, Ralf; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2009-08-01

    Cutaneous C-fiber afferents show two distinct types of cold sensitivity corresponding to non-noxious and noxious cold sensations. Here, responses to cold stimulation of afferent fibers regenerating in the rat sural nerve were studied in vivo 7-14 days after nerve crush and compared with responses to mechanical and heat stimulation. The physiological stimuli were applied to the sural nerve at or distal to the lesion site. Ectopic activity was evoked in 43% of 98 A-fibers (all mechanosensitive; a few additionally weakly thermosensitive). Ectopic activity was evoked in 127 (49.2%) of 258 electrically identified C-fibers by the physiological stimuli. Eight C-fibers were spontaneously active only. Of the 127 C-fibers, 46% had one of two distinct response patterns to cooling: (1) type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers (n=29) had a high rate of activity at 28 degrees C on the nerve surface and showed graded responses to cooling with maximal discharge rates of 11.5+/-1.1 imp/s. This activity was completely inhibited by heating, while 12/29 fibers were also excited at high threshold (median 48 degrees C) by heating. Only one type 1 cold-sensitive C-fiber was mechanosensitive. (2) Type 2 cold-sensitive C-fibers (n=29) were silent or showed a low rate of activity at 28 degrees C, had a high threshold (median 5 degrees C) and low maximal discharge rates (2.4+/-0.4 imp/s) to cooling. They were also heat-sensitive (n=25) and/or mechanosensitive (n=20). These C-fibers were, apart from their cold sensitivity, functionally indistinguishable from C-fibers with mechano- and/or heat sensitivity only. Thus regenerating cutaneous C-fibers show two types of cold sensitivity similar to those observed in intact skin: fibers of one group are predominantly sensitive to cooling, whereas the others are polymodal.

  2. Cationic influences upon synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse of the frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of inorganic cations (K+, Na+, and Ca2+) bathing the isolated frog labyrinth were varied in order to assess their role in influencing and mediating synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse. Experiments employed intracellular recordings of synaptic activity from VIIIth nerve afferents. Recordings were digitized continuously at 50 kHz, and excitatory postsynaptic potentials were detected and parameters quantified by computer algorithms. Particular attention was focused on cationic effects upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence and excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude, in order to discriminate between pre- and postsynaptic actions. Because the small size of afferents preclude long term stable recordings, alterations in cationic concentrations were applied transiently and their peak effects on synaptic activity were assessed. Increases in extracellular K+ concentration of a few millimolar produced a large increase in the frequency of occurrence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials with little change in amplitude, indicating that release of transmitter from the hair cell is tightly coupled to its membrane potential. Increasing extracellular Na+ concentration resulted in an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude with no significant change in excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence, suggesting that the transmitter-gated subsynaptic channel conducts Na+ ions. Decreases in extracellular Ca2+ concentration had little effect upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency, but increased excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency and amplitude. These findings suggest that at higher concentrations Ca2+ act presynaptically to prevent transmitter release and postsynaptically to prevent Na+ influx during the generation of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. The influences of these ions on synaptic activity at this synapse are remarkably similar to those reported at the

  3. Excitability changes of terminal arborizations of single Ia and Ib afferent fibers produced by muscle and cutaneous conditioning volleys.

    PubMed

    Willis, W D; Núnez, R; Rudomín, P

    1976-11-01

    1. In cats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital, recordings were made from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells having a peripheral process in the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) nerve. The GS nerve was left in continuity with the muscle to allow identification of group Ia and Ib fibers by responses of the receptors to muscle stretch and contraction. The central processes of the DRG cells were activated antidromically by stimulation within the spinal cord so that changes in the excitability of the fibers could be examined following conditioning volleys in muscle and cutaneous nerves. 2. Recordings were made from 44 DRG cells. Of these, 15 were group Ia and 9 group Ib afferents of the GS nerve. 3. Of 15 Ia fibers, 12 were activated antidromically by stimulation in the motor nucleus, but no Ib fibers were discharged by such stimulation. Ib fibers could be antidromically activated by stimulation in the intermediate nucleus. 4. The central processes of the Ia DRG cells had slower conduction velocities than did the peripheral processes. 5. The thresholds to electrical stimulation of the peripheral processes of Ia and Ib fibers of the GS nerve showed considerable overlap. 6. All of the Ia DRG cells tested showed an increased excitability following conditioning volleys in the biceps-semitendinosus (BST) nerve. The increase in excitability was produced by the largest fibers of the BST nerve. 7. Stimulation of the sural (SU) or superficial peroneal (SP) cutaneous nerves also increased the excitability of some Ia fibers. However, other Ia fibers were unaffected, and in two cases the excitability was reduced. 8. The excitability of group Ib fibers was increased by conditioning volleys in the BST, SU, or SP nerves. 9. It is concluded that cutaneous volleys produce a mixture of primary afferent depolarization and primary afferent hyperpolarization in Ia fibers of anesthetized cats. Such converse actions probably cancel in excitability tests using population responses. 10. The

  4. Catecholaminergic Fiber Innervation of the Vocal Motor System Is Intrasexually Dimorphic in a Teleost with Alternative Reproductive Tactics.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Zachary N; Timothy, Miky; Kaur, Gurpreet; Gorbonosov, Michelle; Chernenko, Alena; Forlano, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines, which include the neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline, are known modulators of sensorimotor function, reproduction, and sexually motivated behaviors across vertebrates, including vocal-acoustic communication. Recently, we demonstrated robust catecholaminergic (CA) innervation throughout the vocal motor system in the plainfin midshipman fish Porichthys notatus, a seasonal breeding marine teleost that produces vocal signals for social communication. There are 2 distinct male reproductive morphs in this species: type I males establish nests and court females with a long-duration advertisement call, while type II males sneak spawn to steal fertilizations from type I males. Like females, type II males can only produce brief, agonistic, grunt type vocalizations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that intrasexual differences in the number of CA neurons and their fiber innervation patterns throughout the vocal motor pathway may provide neural substrates underlying divergence in reproductive behavior between morphs. We employed immunofluorescence (-ir) histochemistry to measure tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; a rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis) neuron numbers in several forebrain and hindbrain nuclei as well as TH-ir fiber innervation throughout the vocal pathway in type I and type II males collected from nests during the summer reproductive season. After controlling for differences in body size, only one group of CA neurons displayed an unequivocal difference between male morphs: the extraventricular vagal-associated TH-ir neurons, located just lateral to the dimorphic vocal motor nucleus (VMN), were significantly greater in number in type II males. In addition, type II males exhibited greater TH-ir fiber density within the VMN and greater numbers of TH-ir varicosities with putative contacts on vocal motor neurons. This strong inverse relationship between the predominant vocal morphotype and the CA innervation of vocal motor neurons suggests

  5. A new technique for the direct demonstration of overlapping cutaneous innervation territories of peptidergic C-fibre afferents of rat hindlimb nerves.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Jancsó, G

    1994-11-01

    A new technique based on the phenomenon of vascular labelling has been devised for the direct visualisation of overlapping innervation territories of cutaneous nerves. The saphenous, peroneal and sural nerves on one side in anaesthetised rats were exposed, cut centrally and successively stimulated antidromically to induce a neurogenic inflammatory response after an intravenous injection of either a 1% colloidal silver solution or a suspension of 3% Monastral Blue B. Light microscopic examination of transparent preparations of the dorsal hindpaw skin revealed labelled blood vessels of different colours which represented cutaneous territories served by different nerves. Blood vessels labelled with both substances were regarded as areas of overlapping innervation. Such areas were typically localised along the border of adjacent innervation territories. In addition, distinct areas exhibiting double-labelled blood vessels were regularly encountered in regions separate from this border zone. Areas of interest were drawn with the aid of a camera lucida and measured by means of a computerised system. The results indicate a significant, although topographically variable, degree of overlap of these cutaneous innervation areas. This new technique offers a possibility to explore the importance of normally existing overlap in the reinnervation of a denervated skin area by collateral nerve sprouting.

  6. Musings on the wanderer: what's new in our understanding of vago-vagal reflexes? I. Morphology and topography of vagal afferents innervating the GI tract.

    PubMed

    Powley, Terry L; Phillips, Robert J

    2002-12-01

    An understanding of the events initiating vago-vagal reflexes requires knowledge of mechanisms of transduction by vagal afferents. Such information presumes an understanding of receptor morphology and location. Anatomic studies have recently characterized two types of vagal afferents, both putative mechanoreceptors distributed in gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle. These two receptors are highly specialized in that they 1) are morphologically distinct, 2) have different smooth muscle targets, 3) form complexes with dissimilar accessory cells, and 4) vary in their regional distributions throughout the GI tract. By comparison, information on the architecture and regional distributions of other classes of vagal afferents, notably chemoreceptors, has only begun to accumulate. Progress on the study of the two mechanoreceptors, however, illustrates general principles and delineates experimental issues that may apply to other submodalities of vagal afferents. By extension from morphological and physiological observations on the two species of smooth muscle endings, it is reasonable to hypothesize that additional classes of vagal receptors are also differentiated morphologically and that they vary in structure, accessory cells, regional distributions, and other features. A full appreciation of vago-vagal reflexes will require thorough structural and regional analyses of each of the types of vagal receptors within the GI tract.

  7. The effect of aging on the density of the sensory nerve fiber innervation of bone and acute skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Freeman, Katie T.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    As humans age there is a decline in most sensory systems including vision, hearing, taste, smell, and tactile acuity. In contrast, the frequency and severity of musculoskeletal pain generally increases with age. To determine whether the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce skeletal pain changes with age, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) sensory nerve fibers that innervate the femur were examined in the femurs of young (4 month old), middle-aged (13 month) and old (36 month) male F344/BNF1 rats. Whereas the bone quality showed a significant age-related decline, the density of CGRP+ and NF200+ nerve fibers that innervate the bone remained remarkably unchanged as well as the severity of acute skeletal fracture pain. Thus, while bone mass, quality and strength undergo a significant decline with age, the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce noxious stimuli remain largely intact. These data may in part explain why musculoskeletal pain increases with age. PMID:20947214

  8. A synergistic effect of simultaneous TRPA1 and TRPV1 activations on vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Ruan, Ting; Khosravi, Mehdi; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors are coexpressed in vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. Because both these receptors are sensitive to a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators, it is conceivable that they can be activated simultaneously during airway inflammation. This study aimed to determine whether there is an interaction between these two polymodal transducers upon simultaneous activation, and how it modulates the activity of vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. In anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats, the reflex-mediated apneic response to intravenous injection of a combined dose of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, a TRPA1 activator) and capsaicin (Cap, a TRPV1 activator) was ∼202% greater than the mathematical sum of the responses to AITC and Cap when they were administered individually. Similar results were also observed in anesthetized mice. In addition, the synergistic effect was clearly demonstrated when the afferent activity of single vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents were recorded in anesthetized, artificially ventilated rats; C-fiber responses to AITC, Cap and AITC + Cap (in combination) were 0.6 ± 0.1, 0.8 ± 0.1, and 4.8 ± 0.6 impulses/s (n = 24), respectively. This synergism was absent when either AITC or Cap was replaced by other chemical activators of pulmonary C-fiber afferents. The pronounced potentiating effect was further demonstrated in isolated vagal pulmonary sensory neurons using the Ca(2+) imaging technique. In summary, this study showed a distinct positive interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1 when they were activated simultaneously in pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves.

  9. Cystitis increases colorectal afferent sensitivity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brumovsky, Pablo Rodolfo; Feng, Bin; Xu, Linjing; McCarthy, Carly Jane; Gebhart, G F

    2009-12-01

    Studies in humans and rodents suggest that colon inflammation promotes urinary bladder hypersensitivity and, conversely, that cystitis contributes to colon hypersensitivity, events referred to as cross-organ sensitization. To investigate a potential peripheral mechanism, we examined whether cystitis alters the sensitivity of pelvic nerve colorectal afferents. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP) or saline, and the mechanosensitive properties of single afferent fibers innervating the colorectum were studied with an in vitro preparation. In addition, mechanosensitive receptive endings were exposed to an inflammatory soup (IS) to study sensitization. Urinary bladder mechanosensitive afferents were also tested. We found that baseline responses of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents did not differ between treatment groups. Whereas IS excited a proportion of colorectal afferents CYP treatment did not alter the magnitude of this response. However, the number of stretch-sensitive fibers excited by IS was increased relative to saline-treated mice. Responses to IS were not altered by CYP treatment, but the proportion of IS-responsive fibers was increased relative to saline-treated mice. In bladder, IS application increased responses of muscular afferents to stretch, although no differences were detected between saline- and CYP-treated mice. In contrast, their chemosensitivity to IS was decreased in the CYP-treated group. Histological examination revealed no changes in colorectum and modest edema and infiltration in the urinary bladder of CYP-treated mice. In conclusion, CYP treatment increased mechanical sensitivity of colorectal muscular afferents and increased the proportion of chemosensitive colorectal afferents. These data support a peripheral contribution to cross-organ sensitization of pelvic organs.

  10. Recurrent mossy fibers preferentially innervate parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the granule cell layer of the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Ibáñez, J M; Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Freund, T F

    2000-09-28

    Detection of vesicular zinc and immunohistochemistry against markers for different interneuron subsets were combined to study the postsynaptic target selection of zinc-containing recurrent mossy fiber collaterals in the dentate gyrus. Mossy fiber collaterals in the granule cell layer selectively innervated parvalbumin-containing cells, with numerous contacts per cell, whereas the granule cells were avoided. Under the electron microscope, those boutons made asymmetrical contacts on dendrites and somata. These findings suggest that, in addition to the hilar perforant path-associated (HIPP) interneurons, the basket and chandelier cells also receive a powerful feed-back drive from the granule cells, and thereby are able to control population synchrony in the dentate gyrus. On the other hand, the amount of monosynaptic excitatory feed-back among granule cells is shown to be negligible.

  11. Maternal care effects on SNB motoneuron development: the mediating role of sensory afferent distribution and activity.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Kathryn M; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2009-08-01

    Maternal licking in rats affects the development of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB), a sexually dimorphic motor nucleus that controls penile reflexes involved with copulation. Reduced maternal licking produces decreased motoneuron number, size, and dendritic length in the rostral portion of the adult SNB as well as deficits in adult male copulatory behavior. Previous research suggests that decreases in perineal tactile stimulation may be responsible for these effects. To determine whether the regional effects of maternal licking on SNB morphology are driven by sensory afferent innervation of the lumbosacral spinal cord, we used WGA-HRP to reconstruct the location of sensory afferent fibers from the perineal skin. We found that these fibers are caudally concentrated relative to the area of the SNB dendritic field, with the rostral dendritic arbor receiving little perineal afferent innervation. We also assessed Fos expression following perineal tactile stimulation to determine whether it increased local spinal cord activity in the SNB dendritic field. Sixty seconds of licking-like perineal stimulation produced a transient 115% increase in Fos expression in the area of the SNB dendritic field. This effect was driven by a significant increase in Fos in the caudal portion of the SNB dendritic field, matching the pattern of perineal afferent fiber labeling. Perineal tactile stimulation also produced significantly greater Fos expression in male pups than in female pups. Together, these results suggest that perineal sensory afferent activity mediates the effects of early maternal care on the masculinization of the SNB and resultant male copulatory behavior.

  12. Experimental colitis in rats induces de novo synthesis of cytokines at distant intestinal sites: role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Hamdi, Tamim; Barada, Kassem A; Saadé, Nayef E

    2016-06-01

    Increased levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were observed in various segments of histologically-intact small intestine in animal models of acute and chronic colitis. Whether these cytokines are produced locally or spread from the inflamed colon is not known. In addition, the role of gut innervation in this upregulation is not fully understood. To examine whether cytokines are produced de novo in the small intestine in two rat models of colitis; and to investigate the role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents in the synthesis of these inflammatory cytokines. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of iodoacetamide (IA) or trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Using reverse transcriptase (RT) and real-time PCR, TNF-α, and IL-10 mRNA expression was measured in mucosal scrapings of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon at different time intervals after induction of colitis. Capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents (CSPA) were ablated using subcutaneous injections of capsaicin at time 0, 8 and 32 h, and the experiment was repeated at specific time intervals to detect any effect on cytokines expression. TNF-α mRNA expression increased by 3-40 times in the different intestinal segments (p<0.05 to p<0.001), 48h after IA-induced colitis. CSPA ablation completely inhibited this upregulation in the small intestine, but not in the colon. Similar results were obtained in TNBS-induced colitis at 24 h. Intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression significantly decreased at 12 h and then increased by 6-43 times (p<0.05 to p<0.001) 48h after IA administration. This increase was abolished in rats subjected to CSPA ablation except in the colon, where IL-10 further increased by twice (p<0.05). In the TNBS group, there was 4-12- and 4-7-fold increases in small intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression at 1 and 21 days after colitis induction, respectively (both p<0.01). This increase was not observed in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Capsaicin-treated and

  13. Retinal input regulates the timing of corticogeniculate innervation.

    PubMed

    Seabrook, Tania A; El-Danaf, Rana N; Krahe, Thomas E; Fox, Michael A; Guido, William

    2013-06-12

    Neurons in layer VI of visual cortex represent one of the largest sources of nonretinal input to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and play a major role in modulating the gain of thalamic signal transmission. However, little is known about how and when these descending projections arrive and make functional connections with dLGN cells. Here we used a transgenic mouse to visualize corticogeniculate projections to examine the timing of cortical innervation in dLGN. Corticogeniculate innervation occurred at postnatal ages and was delayed compared with the arrival of retinal afferents. Cortical fibers began to enter dLGN at postnatal day 3 (P3) to P4, a time when retinogeniculate innervation is complete. However, cortical projections did not fully innervate dLGN until eye opening (P12), well after the time when retinal inputs from the two eyes segregate to form nonoverlapping eye-specific domains. In vitro thalamic slice recordings revealed that newly arriving cortical axons form functional connections with dLGN cells. However, adult-like responses that exhibited paired pulse facilitation did not fully emerge until 2 weeks of age. Finally, surgical or genetic elimination of retinal input greatly accelerated the rate of corticogeniculate innervation, with axons invading between P2 and P3 and fully innervating dLGN by P8 to P10. However, recordings in genetically deafferented mice showed that corticogeniculate synapses continued to mature at the same rate as controls. These studies suggest that retinal and cortical innervation of dLGN is highly coordinated and that input from retina plays an important role in regulating the rate of corticogeniculate innervation.

  14. Synaptic potentials of primary afferent fibers and motoneurons evoked by single intermediate nucleus interneurons in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Solodkin, M; Jiménez, I

    1987-05-01

    Spike-triggered averaging of dorsal and ventral root potentials was used in anesthetized cats to disclose possible synaptic connections of spinal interneurons in the intermediate nucleus with afferent fibers and/or motoneurons. With this method we have been able to document the existence of a distinct group of interneurons whose activity was associated with the recording of inhibitory potentials in the ventral roots (iVRPs), but not with negative dorsal root potentials (nDRPs). The iVRPs had mean durations of 60.8 +/- 22.1 ms and latencies between 1.7 and 5.1 ms relative to the onset of the interneuronal spikes. Within this group of neurons it was possible to characterize two categories depending on their responses to segmental inputs. Most type A interneurons were mono- or disynaptically activated by group I muscle afferents and polysynaptically by low threshold (1.08-1.69 X T) cutaneous fibers. Type B interneurons were instead polysynaptically activated by group II muscle and by cutaneous fibers with thresholds ranging from 1.02 to 3.1 X T. Whenever tested, both type A and B interneurons could be antidromically activated from Clarke's columns. There was a second group of interneurons whose activity was associated with the generation of both iVRPs and nDRPs. These potentials had mean durations of 107.5 +/- 35.6 and 131.5 +/- 32 ms, respectively, and onset latencies between 1.7 and 6.1 ms. The interneurons belonging to this group, which appear not to send axonal projections to Clarke's column, could be classified in three categories depending on their responses to peripheral inputs. Type C interneurons responded mono- or disynaptically to group I muscle volleys and polysynaptically to intermediate threshold (1.22-2.7 X T) cutaneous afferents. Type D interneurons were polysynaptically activated by group II muscle afferents (2.3-8.5 X T) and by intermediate threshold (1.4-3 X T) cutaneous fibers and type E interneurons only by group I muscle afferents with mono- or

  15. Functional depletion of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers attenuates rat pain-related behaviors and paw edema induced by the venom of scorpion Buthus martensi Karch.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhan-Tao; Liu, Tong; Pang, Xue-Yan; Jiang, Feng; Cheng, Ming; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2008-10-01

    The role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers in rat pain-related behaviors and paw edema induced by scorpion Buthus martensi Karch (BmK) venom was investigated in this study. It was found that functional depletion of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers with a single systemic injection of resiniferatoxin (RTX) dramatically decreased spontaneous nociceptive behaviors, prevented the development of primary mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as mirror-image mechanical hyperalgesia. RTX treatment significantly attenuated BmK venom-induced c-Fos expression in all laminaes of bilateral L4-L5 lumbar spinal cord, especially in superficial laminaes. Moreover, RTX treatment markedly reduced the early paw edema induced by BmK venom. Thus, the results indicate that capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers play a critical role in various pain-related behaviors and paw edema induced by BmK venom in rats.

  16. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain.

  17. Innocuous, Not Noxious, Input Activates PKCγ Interneurons of the Spinal Dorsal Horn via Myelinated Afferent Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Braz, Joao M.; Skinner, Kate; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase C γ (PKCγ), which is concentrated in interneurons of the inner part of lamina II of the dorsal horn, has been implicated in injury-induced allodynia, a condition wherein pain is produced by innocuous stimuli. Although it is generally assumed that these interneurons receive input from the nonpeptidergic, IB4-positive subset of nociceptors, the fact that PKCγ cells do not express Fos in response to noxious stimulation suggests otherwise. Here, we demonstrate that the terminal field of the nonpeptidergic population of nociceptors, in fact, lies dorsal to that of PKCγ interneurons. There was also no overlap between the PKCγ-expressing interneurons and the transganglionic tracer wheat germ agglutinin which, after sciatic nerve injection, labels all unmyelinated nociceptors. However, transganglionic transport of the β-subunit of cholera toxin, which marks the medium-diameter and large-diameter myelinated afferents that transmit non-noxious information, revealed extensive overlap with the layer of PKCγ interneurons. Furthermore, expression of a transneuronal tracer in myelinated afferents resulted in labeling of PKCγ interneurons. Light and electron microscopic double labeling further showed that the VGLUT1 subtype of vesicular glutamate transmitter, which is expressed in myelinated afferents, marks synapses that are presynaptic to the PKCγ interneurons. Finally, we demonstrate that a continuous non-noxious input, generated by walking on a rotarod, induces Fos in the PKCγ interneurons. These results establish that PKCγ interneurons are activated by myelinated afferents that respond to innocuous stimuli, which suggests that injury-induced mechanical allodynia is transmitted through a circuit that involves PKCγ interneurons and non-nociceptive, VGLUT1-expressing myelinated primary afferents. PMID:18685019

  18. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Li, Xingde; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE.

  19. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C.; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Li, Xingde

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE. PMID:25591867

  20. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Type II Cochlear Afferents in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pankhuri; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; Zimmerman, Amanda; Fuchs, Paul; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase. The present study was designed to determine whether TH-driven Cre recombinase (TH-2A-CreER) provides a selective and reliable tool for identification and genetic manipulation of type II rather than type I cochlear afferents. The "TH-2A-CreER neurons" radiated from the spiral lamina, crossed the tunnel of Corti, turned towards the base of the cochlea, and traveled beneath the rows of outer hair cells. Neither the processes nor the somata of TH-2A-CreER neurons were labeled by antibodies that specifically labeled type I afferents and medial efferents. TH-2A-CreER-positive processes partially co-labeled with antibodies to peripherin, a known marker of type II afferents. Individual TH-2A-CreER neurons gave off short branches contacting 7-25 outer hair cells (OHCs). Only a fraction of TH-2A-CreER boutons were associated with CtBP2-immunopositive ribbons. These results show that TH-2A-CreER provides a selective marker for type II versus type I afferents and can be used to describe the morphology and arborization pattern of type II cochlear afferents in the mouse cochlea.

  1. Spatiotemporal dynamics of re-innervation and hyperinnervation patterns by uninjured CGRP fibers in the rat foot sole epidermis after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Duraku, Liron S; Hossaini, Mehdi; Hoendervangers, Sieske; Falke, Lukas L; Kambiz, Shoista; Mudera, Vivek C; Holstege, Joan C; Walbeehm, Erik T; Ruigrok, Tom J H

    2012-08-30

    The epidermis is innervated by fine nerve endings that are important in mediating nociceptive stimuli. However, their precise role in neuropathic pain is still controversial. Here, we have studied the role of epidermal peptidergic nociceptive fibers that are located adjacent to injured fibers in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Using the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model, which involves complete transections of the tibial and common peroneal nerve while sparing the sural and saphenous branches, mechanical hypersensitivity was induced of the uninjured lateral (sural) and medial (saphenous) area of the foot sole. At different time points, a complete foot sole biopsy was taken from the injured paw and processed for Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, a novel 2D-reconstruction model depicting the density of CGRP fibers was made to evaluate the course of denervation and re-innervation by uninjured CGRP fibers. The results show an increased density of uninjured CGRP-IR epidermal fibers on the lateral and medial side after a SNI procedure at 5 and 10 weeks. Furthermore, although in control animals the density of epidermal CGRP-IR fibers in the footpads was lower compared to the surrounding skin of the foot, 10 weeks after the SNI procedure, the initially denervated footpads displayed a hyper-innervation. These data support the idea that uninjured fibers may play a considerable role in development and maintenance of neuropathic pain and that it is important to take larger biopsies to test the relationship between innervation of injured and uninjured nerve areas.

  2. Innervation regulates synaptic ribbons in lateral line mechanosensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Suli, Arminda; Pujol, Remy; Cunningham, Dale E; Hailey, Dale W; Prendergast, Andrew; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-06-01

    Failure to form proper synapses in mechanosensory hair cells, the sensory cells responsible for hearing and balance, leads to deafness and balance disorders. Ribbons are electron-dense structures that tether synaptic vesicles to the presynaptic zone of mechanosensory hair cells where they are juxtaposed with the post-synaptic endings of afferent fibers. They are initially formed throughout the cytoplasm, and, as cells mature, ribbons translocate to the basolateral membrane of hair cells to form functional synapses. We have examined the effect of post-synaptic elements on ribbon formation and maintenance in the zebrafish lateral line system by observing mutants that lack hair cell innervation, wild-type larvae whose nerves have been transected and ribbons in regenerating hair cells. Our results demonstrate that innervation is not required for initial ribbon formation but suggest that it is crucial for regulating the number, size and localization of ribbons in maturing hair cells, and for ribbon maintenance at the mature synapse.

  3. Spatial orientation of semicircular canals and afferent sensitivity vectors in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Rotational head motion in vertebrates is detected by the semicircular canal system, whose innervating primary afferent fibers carry information about movement in specific head planes. The semicircular canals have been qualitatively examined over a number of years, and the canal planes have been quantitatively characterized in several animal species. The present study first determined the geometric relationship between individual semicircular canals and between the canals and the stereotactic head planes in pigeons. Stereotactic measurements of multiple points along the circumference of the bony canals were taken, and the measured points fitted with a three-dimensional planar surface. Direction normals to the plane's surface were calculated and used to define angles between semicircular canal pairs. Because of the unusual shape of the anterior semicircular canals in pigeons, two planes, a major and a minor, were fitted to the canal's course. Calculated angle values for all canals indicated that the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals are nearly orthogonal, but the anterior canals have substantial deviations from orthogonality with other canal planes. Next, the responses of the afferent fibers that innervate each of the semicircular canals to 0.5 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth-vertical axis were obtained. The head orientation relative to the rotation axis was systematically varied so that directions of maximum sensitivity for each canal afferent could be determined. These sensitivity vectors were then compared with the canal plane direction normals. The afferents that innervated specific semicircular canals formed homogeneous clusters of sensitivity vectors in different head planes. The horizontal and posterior afferents had average sensitivity vectors that were largely co-incident with the innervated canal plane direction normals. Anterior canal afferents, however, appeared to synthesize contributions from the major and minor plane components of the

  4. Afferent control mechanisms involved in the development of soleus fiber alterations in simulated hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, B. S.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.; Shapovalova, K. B.; Podlubnaya, Z. A.; Vikhliantsev, I. M.; Moukhina, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-02-01

    It was recently established that support withdrawal (withdrawal of support reaction force) in microgravity provokes a sequence of functional shifts in the activity of motor units (inactivation of slow ones) and peripheral muscle apparatus which lead to the decline of postural muscle contractility and alterations in fiber characteristics. However, mechanisms involved in inactivation of the slow motor units and appropriate slow-twitch muscle fiber disuse under the supportless conditions remained unknown. We show here that artificial inactivation of muscles-antagonists (which are known to be hyperactive during unloading) counteracts some of the unloading-induced events in the rat soleus (fiber size reduction, slow-to-fast fiber-type transition and decline of titin and nebulin content). It was also demonstrated that direct activation of the muscarinic receptors of the neostriatum neurons prevented slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation in soleus of hindlimb suspended rats.

  5. [Pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain caused by injury to the afferent nerve fibers].

    PubMed

    Weber, W E

    2001-04-28

    Phantom pain, a form of neuropathic pain, is caused by damage to somatosensible afferent nerve fibres in the peripheral or central nervous system. Often, the pain cannot be satisfactorily treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Dependent on the underlying mechanism the pain is treated with either antidepressants (for more or less continuous pain) or anti-epileptics (for paroxysmal pain). Of the antidepressants, the tricyclic antidepressants are the best studied and most prescribed. The activity of new drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine as well as venlafaxine, has yet to be clearly shown. Of the anti-epileptics, carbamazepine and phenytoin are the most prescribed. New drugs which provide greater pain relief than the placebo are oxcarbazepine, gabapentine and lamotrigine. Other effective drugs for phantom pain are: gamma-butyric acid agonists (baclofen), opiates (morphine preparations with a regulated release; phentanyl patch), the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist amantadine, transdermally administered clonidine and locally applied lidocaine.

  6. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Axel J; Wu, Shaw-Wen; Peters, James H

    2014-01-01

    Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST) contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33 to 37°C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  7. Response properties from turtle auditory hair cell afferent fibers suggest spike generation is driven by synchronized release both between and within synapses

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, M. E.; Castellano-Muñoz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear hair cell afferent fiber synapses are capable of transferring information at high rates for long periods of time with extraordinary fidelity. As at other sensory synapses, hair cells rely on graded receptor potentials and unique vesicle trafficking and release properties of ribbon synapses to relay intensity information. Postsynaptic recordings from afferent fibers of the turtle auditory papilla identified excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that were fast AMPA receptor-based responses with rapid onset and decay times. EPSCs varied in amplitude by ∼15× per fiber, with kinetics that showed a tendency to slow at larger amplitudes. Complex EPSCs were produced by temporal summation of single events, likely across synapses. Complex EPSCs were more efficient at generating action potentials than single EPSCs. Potassium-evoked release increased the frequency of EPSCs, in particular complex events, but did not increase EPSC amplitudes. Temporal summation of EPSCs across synapses may underlie action potential generation at these synapses. Broad amplitude histograms were probed for mechanisms of multivesicular release with reduced external Ca2+ or the introduction of Cd2+ or Sr2+ to uncouple release. The results are consistent with broad amplitude histograms being generated by a combination of the variability in synaptic vesicle size and coordinated release of these vesicles. It is posited that multivesicular release plays less of a role in multisynaptic ribbon synapses than in single synaptic afferent fibers. PMID:23596330

  8. Response properties from turtle auditory hair cell afferent fibers suggest spike generation is driven by synchronized release both between and within synapses.

    PubMed

    Schnee, M E; Castellano-Muñoz, M; Ricci, A J

    2013-07-01

    Inner ear hair cell afferent fiber synapses are capable of transferring information at high rates for long periods of time with extraordinary fidelity. As at other sensory synapses, hair cells rely on graded receptor potentials and unique vesicle trafficking and release properties of ribbon synapses to relay intensity information. Postsynaptic recordings from afferent fibers of the turtle auditory papilla identified excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that were fast AMPA receptor-based responses with rapid onset and decay times. EPSCs varied in amplitude by ≈ 15× per fiber, with kinetics that showed a tendency to slow at larger amplitudes. Complex EPSCs were produced by temporal summation of single events, likely across synapses. Complex EPSCs were more efficient at generating action potentials than single EPSCs. Potassium-evoked release increased the frequency of EPSCs, in particular complex events, but did not increase EPSC amplitudes. Temporal summation of EPSCs across synapses may underlie action potential generation at these synapses. Broad amplitude histograms were probed for mechanisms of multivesicular release with reduced external Ca(2+) or the introduction of Cd(2+) or Sr(2+) to uncouple release. The results are consistent with broad amplitude histograms being generated by a combination of the variability in synaptic vesicle size and coordinated release of these vesicles. It is posited that multivesicular release plays less of a role in multisynaptic ribbon synapses than in single synaptic afferent fibers.

  9. Recordings of human polymodal single C-fiber afferents following mechanical and argon-laser heat stimulation of inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Olausson, B

    1998-09-01

    Activity in single C-fiber afferents, whose cutaneous receptive fields were on the dorsal side of the foot (n=10), were recorded in the peroneal nerve of healthy voluntary subjects. Characterization of the fibers with respect to thresholds and field areas were made before and after cutaneous inflammation, which was induced with mustard oil. To test the nociceptive heat modality, a high-intensity argon laser was used and single 200-ms light pulses were focused onto the skin. The mechanical properties were tested with von Frey-type filaments. In the uninflamed skin, heat and mechanical stimulation activated single C-fibers in matching skin areas. The areas were all within the receptive field borders defined by electrical cutaneous stimulation. The mustard-oil-induced cutaneous inflammation was subjectively reported by the subjects as being moderately painful. In six of the units, a spontaneous activity was induced in the sample of ten previously non-active units. Before the inflammation, the 200-ms argon-laser pulse evoked a highly reproducible pattern of spike-trains. Following inflammation, this pattern was reproducible, but appeared with a significantly reduced activation rate despite the same energy being delivered to the skin both before and after the inflammation. A reduction in slope of the stimulus-response relationship was also observed after inflammation. Following inflammation, changes occurred with expansion both of the mechanical- and heat-receptive fields. The expansion was delineated by the areas defined by electrical stimulation. Following inflammation, the threshold to heat was decreased, but that to mechanical stimuli was not. No relation was detected between the threshold change and the degree of receptive-field expansion. The subjective pain reported changed following inflammation with an increase in the perceived pain in relation to the recorded action potentials, which emphasizes the importance of either an increase in sensitivity in the central

  10. Assessment of Corneal Sensation, Innervation and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients Treated with Multiple Intravitreal Ranibizumab Injections

    PubMed Central

    Belviranli, Selman; Malik, Rayaz A.; Kerimoglu, Hurkan; Satirtav, Gunhal; Zengin, Nazmi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of repeated intravitreal ranibizumab injections on corneal sensitivity, corneal sub-basal nerve plexus (SBNP) and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Sixty-six eyes of 33 patients who had received unilateral repeated intravitreal ranibizumab injections (0.5 mg/0.05 ml) for the treatment of AMD and 25 eyes of 25 healthy subjects were included in the study. Central corneal sensation was measured using the contact Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. The laser scanning in vivo corneal confocal microscope was used to determine corneal SBNP parameters. The peripapillary RNFL thickness was assessed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Data obtained from the ranibizumab-injected eyes were compared with those of the fellow non-treated eyes and the eyes of the healthy control subjects. Results The mean number of ranibizumab injections per eye was 8.9±5.0 (range 3–20). There were no statistically significant differences in the central corneal sensitivity threshold and corneal SBNP parameters between the ranibizumab-injected eyes and the fellow untreated eyes or between those with neovascular AMD and the healthy control group (P>0.05 for all). The average peripapillary RNFL thickness of the treated eyes did not differ significantly to the fellow eyes (P = 0.237), and the eyes of healthy control subjects (P = 0.918). There were no significant correlations between the number of ranibizumab injections and any of the study parameters. Conclusions Multiple intravitreal injections of ranibizumab seem to have no harmful effects on corneal sensitivity, innervation and peripapillary RNFL thickness in patients with AMD. PMID:28085965

  11. Characterization of the autonomic innervation of mammary gland in lactating rats studied by retrograde transynaptic virus labeling and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Köves, Katalin; Györgyi, Z; Szabó, F K; Boldogkői, Zs

    2012-06-01

    The aim of experiments was to characterize the neurons of the autonomic chain that innervates the nipple and the mammary gland of lactating rats using retrograde transynaptic virus labeling and neurotransmitter and neuropeptide immunohistochemistry. Two days after injection of green fluorescence protein labeled virus in two nipples and underlying mammary glands, labeling was observed in the ipsilateral paravertebral sympathetic trunk and the lateral horn. Three days after inoculation the labeling appeared in the brain stem and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Above the spinal cord the labeling was bilateral. A subpopulation of virus labeled cells in the paraventricular nuclei synthesized oxytocin. Labeled neurons in the lateral horn showed cholinergic immunoreactivity. These cholinergic neurons innervated the paravertebral ganglia where the virus labeled neurons were partially noradrenergic. The noradrenergic fibers in the mammary gland innervate the smooth muscle wall of vessels, but not the mammary gland in rats. The neurons in the lateral horn receive afferents from the brain stem, and paraventricular nucleus and these afferents are noradrenergic and oxytocinergic. New findings in our work: Some oxytocinergic fibers may descend to the neurons of the lateral horn which innervate noradrenergic neurons in the paravertebral sympathetic trunk, and in turn these noradrenergic neurons reach the vessels of the mammary gland.

  12. Sites of action of segmental and descending control of transmission on pathways mediating PAD of Ia- and Ib-afferent fibers in cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomín, P; Jiménez, I; Solodkin, M; Dueñas, S

    1983-10-01

    The present series of investigations was aimed to disclose the possible sites of action of excitatory and inhibitory inputs on tho-interneuron pathway mediating the primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of group I afferents of extensor muscles in the cat spinal cord. To this end we compared the effects produced by stimulation of segmental and descending pathways on the PAD generated either by stimulation of group I fibers of flexor muscles or by intraspinal microstimulation. It was assumed that under the appropriate conditions the PAD produced by intraspinal microstimulation results from the activation of the last-order interneurons in the PAD pathway and may, therefore, allow detection pathway. The PAD of single group I afferent fibers was determined in barbiturate-anesthetized preparations by measuring the test stimulus current required to maintain a constant probability of antidromic firing. This was achieved by means of a feedback system that continuously adjusted the test stimulus current to the required values. The PAD of individual group Ia gastrocnemius soleus (GS) fibers that is produced by activation of the low-threshold afferents of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus nerve was found to be inhibited by conditioning stimulation of the relatively low-threshold cutaneous fibers and also by stimulation of supraspinal structures such as the ipsilateral brain stem reticular formation, the contralateral red nucleus, and the contralateral pyramidal tract. In contrast, the PAD of group Ia fibers produced by microstimulation applied in the intermediate nucleus could be inhibited only by stimulation of the brain stem reticular formation but not by stimulation of the other descending inputs presently tested or by stimulation of cutaneous nerves. PAD of group Ia fibers was produced also by microstimulation applied within the motor nucleus. However, in most fibers the resulting PAD could not be inhibited either by stimulation of the brain stem reticular formation

  13. The Role of the Paratrigeminal Nucleus in Vagal Afferent Evoked Respiratory Reflexes: A Neuroanatomical and Functional Study in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Alexandria K.; Farrell, Michael J.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; McGovern, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory tree receives sensory innervation from the jugular and nodose vagal sensory ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia are derived from embryologically distinct origins and as such demonstrate differing molecular, neurochemical and physiological phenotypes. Furthermore, whereas nodose afferent neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS), recent neuroanatomical studies in rats suggest that jugular neurons have their central terminations in the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5). In the present study we confirm that guinea pigs demonstrate a comparable distinction between the brainstem terminations of nodose and jugular ganglia afferents. Thus, microinjection of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CT-B) neural tracers into the caudal nTS and Pa5 resulted in highly specific retrograde labeling of neurons in the nodose and jugular ganglia, respectively. Whereas, nodose neurons more often expressed 160 KD neurofilament proteins and the alpha3 subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase, significantly more jugular neurons expressed the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and, especially, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP). Indeed, terminal fibers in the Pa5 compared to the nTS were characterized by their significantly greater expression of CGRP, further supporting the notion that jugular afferents project to trigeminal-related brainstem regions. Electrical stimulation of the guinea pig larynx following selective surgical denervation of the nodose afferent innervation to the larynx (leaving intact the jugular innervation) resulted in stimulus dependent respiratory slowing and eventual apnea. This jugular ganglia neuron mediated response was unaffected by bilateral microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the nTS, but was abolished by muscimol injected into the Pa5. Taken together these data confirm that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia afferent neurons innervate distinct central circuits and support the notion that multiple peripheral and central pathways

  14. Examination of the afferent fiber responsible for the suppression of jaw-opening reflex in heat, cold, and manual acupuncture stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Oshima, M; Kawakita, K

    1996-11-18

    The possible afferent fibers that participate in the inhibition of jaw-opening reflex (JOR) were examined using selective conduction blockade by topically applied capsaicin. Blood pressure, heart rate, and rectal temperature were monitored, and bilateral femoral nerves were denervated in thiamylal anesthetized Wistar rats. The sciatic nerves were exposed bilaterally and two cotton balls, one soaked with 1.5% capsaicin and the other with saline, were directly applied to the nerve trunk on the respective sides. We verified the conduction blockade of the compound action potentials A delta and C fibers by 1.5% capsaicin. The evoked activity of the digastric electromyography elicited by electrical stimulation of the tongue (1.5 x T, duration 200 microseconds, interval 2 ms, twin pulse, 0.2 Hz) was monitored. On the saline-treated side, the JOR was gradually inhibited by manual acupuncture stimulation of the ipsilateral hindpaw (80 s), and the effect continued after the cessation of the stimulus. This response was not obtained with the manual acupuncture stimulation on the capsaicin-treated side. Immersion of the hindpaw in hot water (53 degrees C, 40 s) induced a rapid and potent inhibition of the JOR on the saline-treated side, but not on the capsaicin-treated side. Cold water immersion (10 degrees C, 40 s) had no apparent suppressive effect on either side, but it had a rather facilitative effect on the JOR on the saline-treated side. The inhibition of the JOR was elicited by manual acupuncture stimulation of various segmental areas such as the nose, auricle, forepaw, abdomen, hindleg and hindpaw. These results suggest that the capsaicin-sensitive thin afferent fibers (A delta and C afferent fibers) mediated by receptors such as polymodal receptors are activated by manual acupuncture stimulation and that they participate in the peripheral processes that of inhibition of the JOR by diffuse noxious inhibitory controls.

  15. Primary afferent neurons express functional delta opioid receptors in inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Brederson, Jill-Desiree; Honda, Christopher N

    2015-07-21

    Peripherally-restricted opiate compounds attenuate hyperalgesia in experimental models of inflammatory pain, but have little discernable effect on nociceptive behavior in normal animals. This suggests that activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory axons contributes to decreased afferent activity after injury. Previously, we reported that direct application of morphine to cutaneous receptive fields decreased mechanical and heat-evoked responses in a population of C-fiber nociceptors in inflamed skin. Consistent with reported behavioral studies, direct application of morphine had no effect on fiber activity in control skin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether mechanical responsiveness of nociceptors innervating inflamed skin was attenuated by direct activation of delta opioid receptors (DORs) on peripheral terminals. An ex vivo preparation of rat plantar skin and tibial nerve was used to examine effects of a selective DOR agonist, deltorphin II, on responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin. Electrical recordings were made eighteen hours after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the hindpaw. Deltorphin II produced an inhibition of the mechanical responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin; an effect blocked by the DOR-selective antagonist, naltrindole. The population of units responsive to deltorphin II was identified as consisting of C fiber mechanical nociceptors.

  16. Primary Afferent Neurons Express Functional Delta Opioid Receptors in Inflamed Skin

    PubMed Central

    Brederson, Jill-Desiree; Honda, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally-restricted opiate compounds attenuate hyperalgesia in experimental models of inflammatory pain, but have little discernable effect on nociceptive behavior in normal animals. This suggests that activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory axons contributes to decreased afferent activity after injury. Previously, we reported that direct application of morphine to cutaneous receptive fields decreased mechanical and heat-evoked responses in a population of C-fiber nociceptors in inflamed skin. Consistent with reported behavioral studies, direct application of morphine had no effect on fiber activity in control skin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether mechanical responsiveness of nociceptors innervating inflamed skin was attenuated by direct activation of delta opioid receptors (DOR) on peripheral terminals. An ex vivo preparation of rat plantar skin and tibial nerve was used to examine effects of a selective DOR agonist, deltorphin II, on responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin. Electrical recordings were made eighteen hours after injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the hindpaw. Deltorphin II produced an inhibition of the mechanical responsiveness of single fibers innervating inflamed skin; an effect blocked by the DOR-selective antagonist, naltrindole. The population of units responsive to deltorphin II was identified as consisting of C fiber mechanical nociceptors. PMID:25911583

  17. Formation of eye-specific retinogeniculate projections occurs prior to the innervation of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus by cholinergic fibers.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Jose M; VAN DER List, Deborah A; Chalupa, Leo M

    2005-01-01

    We compared the developmental periods in the mouse when projections from the two eyes become segregated in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus with the time when this nucleus becomes innervated by cholinergic fibers from the brainstem. Changes in labeling patterns of different tracers injected into each eye revealed that segregation of retinogeniculate inputs commences at postnatal day five (P5) and is largely complete by P8. Immunocytochemical staining showed that cholinergic neurons are present in the parabrachial region of the brain stem on the day of birth. However, cholinergic fibers are not evident in the geniculate until P5, and these are sparse at this age, increasing in density to form well-defined clusters by P12. These results indicate that segregation of eye-specific projections during normal development is unlikely to be regulated by cholinergic inputs from the brainstem.

  18. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    PubMed

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  19. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity. PMID:26485650

  20. Inflammatory mediators and nociception in the joint: excitation and sensitization of slowly conducting afferent fibers of cat's knee by prostaglandin I2.

    PubMed

    Schepelmann, K; Messlinger, K; Schaible, H G; Schmidt, R F

    1992-09-01

    The effects of prostaglandin I2 on the discharge properties of fine articular afferents (group III and group IV fibers) in the cat were examined by extracellular recordings from single units dissected from the medial articular nerve of the knee joint. Prostaglandin I2 was applied intra-arterially close to the joint in doses of 0.3-30 micrograms per 0.3 ml bolus injection, and its effects on the spontaneous activity as well as on discharges evoked by mechanical and chemical stimulation (bradykinin) were monitored. Prostaglandin E2 was also applied and the effects of prostaglandins I2 and E2 on particular units were compared. An excitatory effect of prostaglandin I2 was observed in 49% of 37 group III and in 37% of 27 group IV units. A sensitization to passive movements of the joint occurred in 71% of 31 group III and 48% of 21 group IV units. Sixty-seven per cent of 32 units (groups III and IV) were both excited and sensitized by prostaglandin I2 to movements of 27% were sensitized but not excited. In 64% of 11 group III and 63% of eight group IV units studied the responses to bradykinin were enhanced by prostaglandin I2. Prostaglandin E2 had qualitatively similar effects as prostaglandin I2 but excited and sensitized a lower proportion of articular afferents. Forty-one per cent of the units were sensitive to both prostaglandins but 26% of the fibers were only sensitive to prostaglandin I2. None of the units was exclusively sensitive to prostaglandin E2. In general, the excitatory and sensitizing effects of prostaglandin E2 had a longer duration than those exerted by prostaglandin I2. We conclude that prostaglandin I2 increases the sensitivity to mechanical stimuli as well as to chemical stimulation by bradykinin in the majority of articular group III and group IV fibers. Moreover, in a large proportion of articular afferents, prostaglandin I2 had an excitatory effect. Thus, prostaglandin I2 may be an inflammatory mediator which is important for inflammation

  1. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Paivi M; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C

    2015-06-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models used by our laboratory. Here we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to use these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of red-eared turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide. Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed.

  2. Efferent innervation of turtle semicircular canal cristae: comparisons with bird and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Paivi M.; Fettis, Margaret; Holt, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery of nearly every vertebrate, cholinergic vestibular efferent neurons give rise to numerous presynaptic varicosities that target hair cells and afferent processes in the sensory neuroepithelium. Although pharmacological studies have described the postsynaptic actions of vestibular efferent stimulation in several species, characterization of efferent innervation patterns and the relative distribution of efferent varicosities among hair cells and afferents are also integral to understanding how efferent synapses operate. Vestibular efferent markers, however, have not been well characterized in the turtle, one of the animal models utilized by our laboratory. Here, we sought to identify reliable efferent neuronal markers in the vestibular periphery of turtle, to utilize these markers to understand how efferent synapses are organized, and to compare efferent neuronal labeling patterns in turtle with two other amniotes using some of the same markers. Efferent fibers and varicosities were visualized in the semicircular canal of Red-Eared Turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans), Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and mice (Mus musculus) utilizing fluorescent immunohistochemistry with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Vestibular hair cells and afferents were counterstained using antibodies to myosin VIIa and calretinin. In all species, ChAT labeled a population of small diameter fibers giving rise to numerous spherical varicosities abutting type II hair cells and afferent processes. That these ChAT-positive varicosities represent presynaptic release sites were demonstrated by colabeling with antibodies against the synaptic vesicle proteins synapsin I, SV2, or syntaxin and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Comparisons of efferent innervation patterns among the three species are discussed. PMID:25560461

  3. Substantial role of locus coeruleus-noradrenergic activation and capsaicin-insensitive primary afferent fibers in bee venom's anti-inflammatory effect.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Bae; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Roh, Dae Hyun; Kang, Seuk Yun; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Choi, Sun Mi; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Hye Jung; Kim, Kee Won; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang Hern

    2006-06-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate significant interactions between the immune and nervous systems. Our recent study reveals that 'bee venom (BV) induced anti-inflammatory effect' (BVAI) was produced by sympathetic preganglionic neuronal activation and subsequent adrenomedullary catecholamine release in a zymosan-induced inflammation model. However, the specific peripheral input and the supraspinal neuronal systems that are involved in this BVAI remain to be defined. Here we show that subcutaneous BV injection into left hind limb significantly reduces zymosan-induced leukocyte migration and that this effect is completely inhibited by denervation of the left sciatic nerve. This BVAI was not affected by the destruction of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers using either neonatal capsaicin or resiniferatoxin (RTX) pretreatment. BV injection into the left hind limb significantly increased Fos expression in the contralateral locus coeruleus (LC) in non-inflamed mice. In zymosan-inflamed mice, BV injection produced a further increase in LC Fos expression as compared with non-inflamed mice. This BV-induced Fos increase in the LC was not affected by RTX pretreatment. Pharmacological blockage of central noradrenergic activity by either central chemical sympathectomy (i.c.v. 6-hydroxydopamine) or alpha2 adrenoceptor antagonism (i.c.v. idazoxan) completely blocked BVAI. Taken together, these results suggest that BVAI is mediated by peripheral activation of capsaicin-insensitive primary afferent fibers and subsequent central noradrenergic activation including the LC.

  4. The correlated blanching of synaptic bodies and reduction in afferent firing rates caused by transmitter-depleting agents in the frog semicircular canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guth, P.; Norris, C.; Fermin, C. D.; Pantoja, M.

    1993-01-01

    Synaptic bodies (SBs) associated with rings of synaptic vesicles and well-defined, pre- and post-synaptic membrane structures are indicators of maturity in most hair cell-afferent nerve junctions. The role of the SBs remains elusive despite several experiments showing that they may be involved in storage of neurotransmitter. Our results demonstrate that SBs of the adult posterior semicircular canal (SCC) cristae hair cells become less electron dense following incubation of the SCC with the transmitter-depleting drug tetrabenazine (TBZ). Objective quantification and comparison of the densities of the SBs in untreated and TBZ-treated frog SCC demonstrated that TBZ significantly decreased the electron density of SBs. This reduction in electron density was accompanied by a reduction in firing rates of afferent fibers innervating the posterior SCC. A second transmitter-depleting drug, guanethidine, previously shown to reduce the electron density of hair cell SBs, also reduced the firing rates of afferent fibers innervating the posterior SCC. In contrast, the electron density of dense granules (DG), similar in size and shape to synaptic bodies (SB) in hair cells, did not change after incubation in TBZ, thus indicating that granules and SBs are not similar in regard to their electron density. The role of SBs in synaptic transmission and the transmitter, if any, stored in the SBs remain unknown. Nonetheless, the association of the lessening of electron density with a reduction in afferent firing rate provides impetus for the further investigation of the SB's role in neurotransmission.

  5. Retrograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit, wheatgerm agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I in primary afferent neurons innervating the rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Wang, H F; Shortland, P; Park, M J; Grant, G

    1998-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated and compared the ability of the cholera toxin B subunit, wheat germ agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, to retrogradely and transganglionically label visceral primary afferents after unilateral injections into the rat urinary bladder wall. Horseradish peroxidase histochemical or lectin-immunofluorescence histochemical labelling of bladder afferents was seen in the L6-S1 spinal cord segments and in the T13-L2 and L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia. In the lumbosacral spinal cord, the most intense and extensive labelling of bladder afferents was seen when cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase was injected. Cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres were found in Lissauer's tract, its lateral and medial collateral projections, and laminae I and IV-VI of the spinal gray matter. Labelled fibres were numerous in the lateral collateral projection and extended into the spinal parasympathetic nucleus. Labelling from both the lateral and medial projections extended into the dorsal grey commissural region. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase labelling produced a similar pattern but was not as dense and extensive as that of cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase. The isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres, on the other hand, were fewer and only observed in the lateral collateral projection and occasionally in lamina I. Cell profile counts showed that a larger number of dorsal root ganglion cells were labelled with cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase than with wheat germ agglutinin- or isolectin B4-horseradish peroxidase. In the L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia, the majority (81%) of the cholera toxin B subunit-, and almost all of the wheat germ agglutinin- and isolectin B4-immunoreactive cells were RT97-negative (an anti-neurofilament antibody that labels dorsal root ganglion neurons with

  6. Heterogeneity of group Ia synapses on homonymous alpha-motoneurons as revealed by high-frequency stimulation of Ia afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Collins, W F; Honig, M G; Mendell, L M

    1984-11-01

    Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded in medial gastrocnemius (MG) motoneurons following intraaxonal electrical stimulation of single spindle afferent fibers in anesthetized cats. High-frequency bursts of 32 shocks were delivered to the afferent axon and the EPSPs were averaged in the motoneuron. EPSP amplitude generally changed during the burst, in some cases increasing and in other cases decreasing, depending on the connection. Interpretation of these changes was complicated by potentiation of the initial EPSPs in the burst that occurred with the repeated bursts. The extent of the potentiation varied from connection to connection. The magnitude of facilitation or depression during a burst of standard frequency (167 Hz) was determined by comparison of EPSPs at the end of the burst with the mean EPSP obtained during low-frequency stimulation (18 Hz). Large amplitude EPSPs tended to depress, whereas the small amplitude EPSPs facilitated. Facilitation was more prevalent in motoneurons with large rheobases and depression was more often observed in small rheobase motoneurons. The use of partial correlations, which was necessary because of the inverse correlation between EPSP amplitude and motoneuron rheobase, revealed that facilitation-depression behavior during repetitive stimulation is correlated primarily with EPSP amplitude rather than with motoneuron rheobase. Acute transection of the spinal cord resulted in no change in motoneuron rheobase but considerable enlargement of mean EPSP amplitude at low frequencies of stimulation. A significant increase in the amount of depression during repetitive stimulation was noted under these conditions. These results indicate considerable heterogeneity in the response of individual connections to repetitive stimulation. We suggest that this heterogeneity results from differences in transmitter release at different connections. This heterogeneity must also have functional consequences related to susceptibility

  7. EphA7 regulates spiral ganglion innervation of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young J; Ibrahim, Leena A; Wang, Sheng-Zhi; Yuan, Wei; Evgrafov, Oleg V; Knowles, James A; Wang, Kai; Tao, Huizhong W; Zhang, Li I

    2016-04-01

    During the development of periphery auditory circuitry, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) form a spatially precise pattern of innervation of cochlear hair cells (HCs), which is an essential structural foundation for central auditory processing. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the developmental formation of this precise innervation pattern remain not well understood. Here, we specifically examined the involvement of Eph family members in cochlear development. By performing RNA-sequencing for different types of cochlear cell, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, we found that EphA7 was strongly expressed in a large subset of SGNs. In EphA7 deletion mice, there was a reduction in the number of inner radial bundles originating from SGNs and projecting to HCs as well as in the number of ribbon synapses on inner hair cells (IHCs), as compared with wild-type or heterozygous mutant mice, attributable to fewer type I afferent fibers. The overall activity of the auditory nerve in EphA7 deletion mice was also reduced, although there was no significant change in the hearing intensity threshold. In vitro analysis further suggested that the reduced innervation of HCs by SGNs could be attributed to a role of EphA7 in regulating outgrowth of SGN neurites as knocking down EphA7 in SGNs resulted in diminished SGN fibers. In addition, suppressing the activity of ERK1/2, a potential downstream target of EphA7 signaling, either with specific inhibitors in cultured explants or by knocking out Prkg1, also resulted in reduced SGN fibers. Together, our results suggest that EphA7 plays an important role in the developmental formation of cochlear innervation pattern through controlling SGN fiber ontogeny. Such regulation may contribute to the salience level of auditory signals presented to the central auditory system.

  8. Sympathetic innervation of human muscle spindles

    PubMed Central

    Radovanovic, Dina; Peikert, Kevin; Lindström, Mona; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of sympathetic innervation in human muscle spindles, using antibodies against neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A total of 232 muscle spindles were immunohistochemically examined. NPY and NPY receptors were found on the intrafusal fibers, on the blood vessels supplying muscle spindles and on free nerve endings in the periaxial space. TH-immunoreactivity was present mainly in the spindle nerve and vessel. This is, to our knowledge, the first morphological study concerning the sympathetic innervation of the human muscle spindles. The results provide anatomical evidence for direct sympathetic innervation of the intrafusal fibers and show that sympathetic innervation is not restricted to the blood vessels supplying spindles. Knowledge about direct sympathetic innervation of the muscle spindle might expand our understanding of motor and proprioceptive dysfunction under stress conditions, for example, chronic muscle pain syndromes. PMID:25994126

  9. Sympathetic innervation of human muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Radovanovic, Dina; Peikert, Kevin; Lindström, Mona; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of sympathetic innervation in human muscle spindles, using antibodies against neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A total of 232 muscle spindles were immunohistochemically examined. NPY and NPY receptors were found on the intrafusal fibers, on the blood vessels supplying muscle spindles and on free nerve endings in the periaxial space. TH-immunoreactivity was present mainly in the spindle nerve and vessel. This is, to our knowledge, the first morphological study concerning the sympathetic innervation of the human muscle spindles. The results provide anatomical evidence for direct sympathetic innervation of the intrafusal fibers and show that sympathetic innervation is not restricted to the blood vessels supplying spindles. Knowledge about direct sympathetic innervation of the muscle spindle might expand our understanding of motor and proprioceptive dysfunction under stress conditions, for example, chronic muscle pain syndromes.

  10. Stimulation of renal afferent fibers leads to activation of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Erika E; Martins, Beatriz S; Milanez, Maycon I O; Lopes, Nathalia R; de Melo, Jose F; Pontes, Roberto B; Girardi, Adriana C; Campos, Ruy R; Bergamaschi, Cássia T

    2017-01-19

    Presympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) including the adrenergic cell groups play a major role in the modulation of several reflexes required for the control of sympathetic vasomotor tone and blood pressure (BP). Moreover, sympathetic vasomotor drive to the kidneys influence natriuresis and diuresis by inhibiting the cAMP/PKA pathway and redistributing the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) to the body of the microvilli in the proximal tubules. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effects of renal afferents stimulation on (1) the neurochemical phenotype of Fos expressing neurons in the medulla oblongata and (2) the level of abundance and phosphorylation of NHE3 in the renal cortex. We found that electrical stimulation of renal afferents increased heart rate and BP transiently and caused activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons in the RVLM and non-TH neurons in the NTS. Additionally, activation of the inhibitory renorenal reflex over a 30-min period resulted in increased natriuresis and diuresis associated with increased phosphorylation of NHE3 at serine 552, a surrogate for reduced activity of this exchanger, in the contralateral kidney. This effect was not dependent of BP changes considering that no effects on natriuresis or diuresis were found in the ipsilateral-stimulated kidney. Therefore, our data show that renal afferents leads to activation of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata. When renorenal reflex is induced, NHE3 exchanger activity appears to be decreased, resulting in decreased sodium and water reabsorption in the contralateral kidney.

  11. Afferent Fiber Remodeling in the Somatosensory Thalamus of Mice as a Neural Basis of Somatotopic Reorganization in the Brain and Ectopic Mechanical Hypersensitivity after Peripheral Sensory Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yagasaki, Yuki; Katayama, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Plastic changes in the CNS in response to peripheral sensory nerve injury are a series of complex processes, ranging from local circuit remodeling to somatotopic reorganization. However, the link between circuit remodeling and somatotopic reorganization remains unclear. We have previously reported that transection of the primary whisker sensory nerve causes the abnormal rewiring of lemniscal fibers (sensory afferents) on a neuron in the mouse whisker sensory thalamus (V2 VPM). In the present study, using transgenic mice whose lemniscal fibers originate from the whisker sensory principle trigeminal nucleus (PrV2) are specifically labeled, we identified that the transection induced retraction of PrV2-originating lemniscal fibers and invasion of those not originating from PrV2 in the V2 VPM. This anatomical remodeling with somatotopic reorganization was highly correlated with the rewiring of lemniscal fibers. Origins of the non-PrV2-origin lemniscal fibers in the V2 VPM included the mandibular subregion of trigeminal nuclei and the dorsal column nuclei (DCNs), which normally represent body parts other than whiskers. The transection also resulted in ectopic receptive fields of V2 VPM neurons and extraterritorial pain behavior on the uninjured mandibular region of the face. The anatomical remodeling, emergence of ectopic receptive fields, and extraterritorial pain behavior all concomitantly developed within a week and lasted more than three months after the transection. Our findings, thus, indicate a strong linkage between these plastic changes after peripheral sensory nerve injury, which may provide a neural circuit basis underlying large-scale reorganization of somatotopic representation and abnormal ectopic sensations.

  12. TRPA1 in mast cell activation-induced long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal afferent C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z; Ouyang, Ann

    2009-07-01

    Sensitization of esophageal sensory afferents by inflammatory mediators plays an important role in esophageal nociception. We have shown esophageal mast cell activation induces long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity in vagal nodose C-fibers. However, the roles of mast cell mediators and downstream ion channels in this process are unclear. Mast cell tryptase via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)-mediated pathways sensitizes sensory nerves and induces hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) plays an important role in mechanosensory transduction and nociception. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cell activation via a PAR2-dependent mechanism sensitizes TRPA1 to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in esophageal vagal C-fibers. The expression profiles of PAR2 and TRPA1 in vagal nodose ganglia were determined by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings from esophageal nodose neurons were performed in ex vivo guinea pig esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distention and chemical perfusion were compared. Both PAR2 and TRPA1 expressions were identified in vagal nodose neurons by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Ninety-one percent of TRPA1-positive neurons were of small and medium diameters, and 80% coexpressed PAR2. Esophageal mast cell activation significantly enhanced the response of nodose C-fibers to esophageal distension (mechanical hypersensitivity). This was mimicked by PAR2-activating peptide, which sustained for 90 min after wash, but not by PAR2 reverse peptide. TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 pretreatment significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity induced by either mast cell activation or PAR2 agonist. Collectively, our data provide new evidence that sensitizing TRPA1 via a PAR2-dependent mechanism plays an important role in mast cell activation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal nodose C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

  13. Nociceptive primary afferents: they have a mind of their own

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Nociceptive primary afferents have three surprising properties: they are highly complex in their expression of neurotransmitters and receptors and most probably participate in autocrine and paracrine interactions; they are capable of exerting tonic and activity-dependent inhibitory control over incoming nociceptive input; they can generate signals in the form of dorsal root reflexes that are transmitted antidromically out to the periphery and these signals can result in neurogenic inflammation in the innervated tissue. Thus, nociceptive primary afferents are highly complicated structures, capable of modifying input before it is ever transmitted to the central nervous system and capable of altering the tissue they innervate. PMID:24879874

  14. Effect of extracellular calcium on excitability of guinea pig airway vagal afferent nerves.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Oh, Eun Joo; Lancaster, Eric; Weinreich, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    The effect of reducing extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) on vagal afferent excitability was analyzed in a guinea pig isolated vagally innervated trachea-bronchus preparation. Afferent fibers were characterized as either having low-threshold, rapidly adapting mechanosensors (Adelta fibers) or nociceptive-like phenotypes (Adelta and C fibers). The nociceptors were derived from neurons within the jugular ganglia, whereas the low-threshold mechanosensors were derived from neurons within the nodose ganglia. Reducing [Ca(2+)](o) did not affect the excitability of the low-threshold mechanosensors in the airway. By contrast, reducing [Ca(2+)](o) selectively increased the excitability of airway nociceptors as manifested by a substantive increase in action potential discharge in response to mechanical stimulation, and in a subset of fibers, by overtly evoking action potential discharge. This increase in the excitability of nociceptors was not mimicked by a combination of omega-conotoxin and nifedipine or tetraethylammonium. Whole cell patch recordings from airway-labeled and unlabeled neurons in the vagal jugular ganglia support the hypothesis that [Ca(2+)](o) inhibits a nonselective cation conductance in vagal nociceptors that may serve to regulate excitability of the nerve terminals within the airways.

  15. Systemic morphine treatment induces changes in firing patterns and responses of nociceptive afferent fibers in mouse glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Dale; Baker, Alyssa L; Morón, Jose A; Carlton, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    Patients receiving opioids for pain may experience decreased effectiveness of the drug and even abnormal pain sensitivity-hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. We hypothesized that peripheral nociceptor hyperexcitability contributes to opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tested this using an in vitro mouse glabrous skin-nerve preparation. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of morphine (5, 8, 10, 15 mg/kg) or saline every 12 hours for 48 hours and killed approximately 12 hours after the last injection. Receptive fields of nociceptors were tested for mechanical, heat, and cold sensitivity. Activity was also measured during an initial 2-minute period and during 5-minute periods between stimuli. Aberrant activity was common in fibers from morphine-treated mice but rare in saline-treated mice. Resting background activity was elevated in C-fibers from morphine-treated mice. Both C- and Aδ-fibers had afterdischarge in response to mechanical, heat, and/or cold stimulation of the skin as well as spontaneous, unevoked activity. Compared to saline, morphine treatment increased the proportion of fibers displaying polymodal rather than mechanical-only responses. A significant increase in Aδ-mechanoreceptive fibers responding to cold accounted for most of this change. In agreement with this, morphine-treated mice showed increased sensitivity in the cold tail flick test. In morphine-treated mice, aberrant activity and hyperexcitability of nociceptors could contribute to increased pain sensitivity. Importantly, this activity is likely driving central sensitization, a phenomenon contributing to abnormal sensory processing and chronic pain. If similar changes occur in human patients, aberrant nociceptor activity is likely to be interpreted as pain and could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  16. Monosynaptic convergence of somatic and visceral C-fiber afferents on projection and local circuit neurons in lamina I: a substrate for referred pain.

    PubMed

    Luz, Liliana L; Fernandes, Elisabete C; Sivado, Miklos; Kokai, Eva; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V

    2015-10-01

    Referred pain is a phenomenon of feeling pain at a site other than the site of the painful stimulus origin. It arises from a pathological mixing of nociceptive processing pathways for visceral and somatic inputs. Despite numerous studies based on unit recordings from spinal and supraspinal neurons, the exact mechanism and site of this mixing within the central nervous system are not known. Here, we selectively recorded from lamina I neurons, using a visually guided patch-clamp technique, in thoracic spinal cord preparation with preserved intercostal (somatic) and splanchnic (visceral) nerves. We show that somatic and visceral C fibers converge monosynaptically onto a group of lamina I neurons, which includes both projection and local circuit neurons. Other groups of lamina I neurons received inputs from either somatic or visceral afferents. We have also identified a population of lamina I local circuit neurons showing overall inhibitory responses upon stimulation of both nerves. Thus, the present data allow us to draw two major conclusions. First, lamina I of the spinal cord is the first site in the central nervous system where somatic and visceral pathways directly converge onto individual projection and local circuit neurons. Second, the mechanism of somatovisceral convergence is complex and based on functional integration of monosynaptic and polysynaptic excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs in specific groups of neurons. This complex pattern of convergence provides a substrate for alterations in the balance between visceral and somatic inputs causing referred pain.

  17. The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the intrathecal noradrenaline-induced facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers (group II flexor reflex) in anesthetized intact rats and on the intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex in anesthetized spinal rats were investigated. In anesthetized intact rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen inhibited the group II flexor reflex dose-dependently, whereas the inhibitory effect of tizanidine-HCl was bell-shaped. The effect of diazepam tended to be saturated. In anesthetized spinal rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl, diazepam and baclofen also depressed the group II flexor reflex, but tizanidine-HCl slightly increased it. The intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex was not affected by mephenesin or diazepam, but was inhibited by tizanidine-HCl, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen. These results suggest that compounds with centrally acting muscle relaxant activity depress the group II flexor reflex in different manners, and the inhibition of descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord participates in the depressant action of the group II flexor reflex produced by tolperisone-HCl, tizanidine-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen.

  18. Monosynaptic convergence of chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal afferents onto ascending relay neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract: A high-resolution confocal and correlative electron microscopy approach

    PubMed Central

    Corson, James A.; Erisir, Alev

    2014-01-01

    While physiological studies suggested convergence of chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal afferent axons onto single neurons of the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNTS), anatomical evidence has been elusive. The current study uses high-magnification confocal microscopy to identify putative synaptic contacts from afferent fibers of the two nerves onto individual projection neurons. Imaged tissue is re-visualized with electron microscopy, confirming that overlapping fluorescent signals in confocal z-stacks accurately identify appositions between labeled terminal and dendrite pairs. Monte Carlo modeling reveals that the probability of overlapping fluorophores is stochastically unrelated to the density of afferent label suggesting that convergent innervation in the rNTS is selective rather than opportunistic. Putative synaptic contacts from each nerve are often compartmentalized onto dendrite segments of convergently innervated neurons. These results have important implications for orosensory processing in the rNTS, and the techniques presented here have applications in investigations of neural microcircuitry with an emphasis on innervation patterning. PMID:23640852

  19. Neuroanatomical evidence for segregation of nerve fibers conveying light touch and pain sensation in Eimer's organ of the mole.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Paul D; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Bautista, Diana M; Julius, David; Catania, Kenneth C

    2006-06-13

    Talpid moles are small insectivores that live in dark underground tunnels. They depend heavily on touch to navigate and find food. Most species have an array of complex epidermal sensory structures called Eimer's organs that cover the tip of the nose. In this study, the anatomy of Eimer's organ was examined in the coast mole and star-nosed mole by using the fluorescent styryl pyridinium dye AM1-43 and immunocytochemical staining for neurofilament 200 and substance P. In addition, DiI was used to label neural components of Eimer's organ. AM1-43 labeled all of the Eimer's organ receptors after systemic injection, suggesting a role in mechanotransduction. Immunostaining with neurofilament 200 and substance P labeled distinct subtypes of sensory fibers. Substance P labeled a group of free nerve endings along the outer edge of Eimer's organ, indicating a nociceptive role for these fibers. In contrast, neurofilament 200 labeled a more central set of nerve endings, suggesting that these fibers function as low-threshold mechanoreceptors. By labeling subsets of trigeminal afferents distant from the receptor array with DiI, we revealed innervation patterns indicating that one afferent supplies the outer, substance P-positive set of free nerve endings, whereas several afferents differentially innervate the central free nerve endings. Our results suggest that the free nerve endings innervating Eimer's organ are largely mechanosensitive and may play an important role in the rapid sensory discrimination observed in these species.

  20. Nerve injury induces a new profile of tactile and mechanical nociceptor input from undamaged peripheral afferents.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo; Gutierrez, Silvia; Aschenbrenner, Carol A; Houle, Timothy T; Hayashida, Ken-Ichiro; Ririe, Douglas G; Eisenach, James C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain after nerve injury is often accompanied by hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli, yet whether this reflects altered input, altered processing, or both remains unclear. Spinal nerve ligation or transection results in hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in skin innervated by adjacent dorsal root ganglia, but no previous study has quantified the changes in receptive field properties of these neurons in vivo. To address this, we recorded intracellularly from L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons of anesthetized young adult rats, 1 wk after L5 partial spinal nerve ligation (pSNL) or sham surgery. One week after pSNL, hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold in awake, freely behaving animals was decreased in the L4 distribution on the nerve-injured side compared with sham controls. Electrophysiology revealed that high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells of A-fiber conduction velocity in L4 were sensitized, with a seven-fold reduction in mechanical threshold, a seven-fold increase in receptive field area, and doubling of maximum instantaneous frequency in response to peripheral stimuli, accompanied by reductions in after-hyperpolarization amplitude and duration. Only a reduction in mechanical threshold (minimum von Frey hair producing neuronal activity) was observed in C-fiber conduction velocity high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells. In contrast, low-threshold mechanoreceptive cells were desensitized, with a 13-fold increase in mechanical threshold, a 60% reduction in receptive field area, and a 40% reduction in instantaneous frequency to stimulation. No spontaneous activity was observed in L4 ganglia, and the likelihood of recording from neurons without a mechanical receptive field was increased after pSNL. These data suggest massively altered input from undamaged sensory afferents innervating areas of hypersensitivity after nerve injury, with reduced tactile and increased nociceptive afferent response. These findings differ importantly from previous preclinical

  1. Nerve injury induces a new profile of tactile and mechanical nociceptor input from undamaged peripheral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Aschenbrenner, Carol A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Ririe, Douglas G.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain after nerve injury is often accompanied by hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli, yet whether this reflects altered input, altered processing, or both remains unclear. Spinal nerve ligation or transection results in hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in skin innervated by adjacent dorsal root ganglia, but no previous study has quantified the changes in receptive field properties of these neurons in vivo. To address this, we recorded intracellularly from L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons of anesthetized young adult rats, 1 wk after L5 partial spinal nerve ligation (pSNL) or sham surgery. One week after pSNL, hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold in awake, freely behaving animals was decreased in the L4 distribution on the nerve-injured side compared with sham controls. Electrophysiology revealed that high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells of A-fiber conduction velocity in L4 were sensitized, with a seven-fold reduction in mechanical threshold, a seven-fold increase in receptive field area, and doubling of maximum instantaneous frequency in response to peripheral stimuli, accompanied by reductions in after-hyperpolarization amplitude and duration. Only a reduction in mechanical threshold (minimum von Frey hair producing neuronal activity) was observed in C-fiber conduction velocity high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells. In contrast, low-threshold mechanoreceptive cells were desensitized, with a 13-fold increase in mechanical threshold, a 60% reduction in receptive field area, and a 40% reduction in instantaneous frequency to stimulation. No spontaneous activity was observed in L4 ganglia, and the likelihood of recording from neurons without a mechanical receptive field was increased after pSNL. These data suggest massively altered input from undamaged sensory afferents innervating areas of hypersensitivity after nerve injury, with reduced tactile and increased nociceptive afferent response. These findings differ importantly from previous preclinical

  2. The innervation of the muscle spindle: a personal history.

    PubMed

    Banks, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    I present a brief review of current understanding of the innervation of the mammalian muscle spindle, from a personal historical perspective. The review begins with comparative studies on the numbers of spindle afferents and considers how their relative abundance may best be assessed. This is followed by an examination of the distribution and some functional properties of the motor innervation. The primary ending is the subject of the final section, in particular, I look at what can be learned from serial sectioning and volumetric reconstruction, and present new results on a model and simulations concerning sensory terminal deformation during stretch.

  3. Primary afferent response to signals in the intestinal lumen.

    PubMed

    Raybould, H

    2001-02-01

    The first recordings of vagal afferent nerve fibre activity were performed by Paintal in the early 1950s. In these experiments, he showed that phenyldiguanide (later recognized as a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) stimulated the firing of C-fibres innervating the intestine. In the following years, ample physiological and psychological studies have demonstrated the importance of afferent information arising from the gut in the regulation of gastrointestinal function and behaviour. Many stimuli are capable of eliciting these functional effects and of stimulating afferent fibre discharge, including mechanical, chemical, nutrient- and immune-derived stimuli. Studies in the last 10 years have begun to focus on the precise sensory transduction mechanisms by which these visceral primary afferent nerve terminals are activated and, like the contribution by Zhu et al. in this issue of The Journal of Physiology, are revealing some novel and exciting findings.

  4. Innervation of eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V E; Shabadash, S A; Zelikina, T I

    1980-01-01

    In recent years it has been shown on the example of primate skin that in addition to abundant cholinergic innervation, the eccrine glands are also supplied by adrenergic fibers, containing catecholamines. The presence of an adrenergic component of the innervation is demonstrated on the plantar eccrine sweat glands of a number of rodents and the cat by the detection of monoamine oxidase in it. The myelin nerve trunks, the short unmyelinated varicose terminals in direct contact with the secretory cells, as well as the mitochondria of cells of the eccrine sweat glands are rich in monoamine oxidase. Specific and nonspecific cholinesterases are localized in the dense network of nerves in lacing the secretory portions of the glands; individual fibers accompany the excretory ducts. The acetylcholinesterase concentration is lower than the concentration of nonspecific cholinesterase. In rats with chemical sympathectomy, induced by four-week administration of 25 mg/kg guanethidine from the first day of birth, in which 99% of the neurons in the stellate ganglia die, the monoamine oxidase concentration in the myelin nerves and in the mitochondria of the secretory cells drops very sharply, and acetylcholinesterase disappears from the nerves surrounding the glands.

  5. Reticulospinal actions on primary afferent depolarization of cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated frog neuraxis.

    PubMed

    González, H; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the brainstem reticular formation on the intraspinal excitability of low threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents were studied in the frog neuraxis isolated together with the right hindlimb nerves. Stimulation of low threshold fibers (less than two times threshold) in cutaneous nerves produced short latency, negative field potentials in the ipsilateral dorsal neuropil (200-400 microns depth) that reversed to positivity at deeper regions (500-700 microns). Stimulation of low threshold fibers (less than two times threshold) in muscle nerves produced, instead, negative response that acquired their maximum amplitude in the ventral neuropil (700-900 microns depth). These electrophysiological findings suggest, in agreement with observations in the cat, that low threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents end at different sites in the spinal cord. Intraspinal microstimulation applied within the dorsal neuropil produced antidromic responses in low threshold cutaneous afferents that were increased in size following stimulation of the dorsal or ventral roots, as well as of the brainstem reticular formation. This increase in excitability is interpreted as being due to primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of the intraspinal terminals of cutaneous fibers. Antidromic responses recorded in muscle nerves following intraspinal stimulation within the ventral neuropil were also increased following conditioning stimulation of adjacent dorsal or ventral roots. However, stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation produced practically no changes in the antidromic responses, but was able to inhibit the PAD of low threshold muscle afferents elicited by stimulation of the dorsal or ventral roots. It is suggested that the PAD of low threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents is mediated by independent sets of interneurons. Reticulospinal fibers would have excitatory connections with the interneurons mediating the PAD of cutaneous fibers and inhibitory connections with the

  6. [Alternative tactile system: C-fibers coding the affective aspect].

    PubMed

    Hua, Qing-Ping; Luo, Fei

    2007-10-01

    It has been accepted that human tactile sensation is mediated exclusively by large myelinated (Abeta) fibres. Nevertheless, recent studies indicated a dual mechanoceptive innervation of the skin in various mammals. Besides the known A fibers, the skin is also innervated by slow-conducting, low-threshold, small unmyelinated (C) afferents. These unmyelinated fibers respond vigorously to innocuous skin deformation, but poorly to rapid skin movement. They project to outer lamina II of spinal cord, and form synapse with the secondary sensory neurons. The latter then project to insular cortex via spinothalamic tracts. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies showed that a slowly moving tactile stimulus along hairy skin produced a strong activation of the insular cortex. Pleasant touch has also been demonstrated to activate orbitofrontal cortex adjacent to areas responding to pleasant taste and smell. Overall, the response characteristics and activated brain regions suggest that they are related with the limbic system and affective aspect rather than tactile discriminative function.

  7. Changes in synaptic effectiveness of myelinated joint afferents during capsaicin-induced inflammation of the footpad in the anesthetized cat.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Hernández, E

    2008-05-01

    The present series of experiments was designed to examine, in the anesthetized cat, the extent to which the synaptic efficacy of knee joint afferents is modified during the state of central sensitization produced by the injection of capsaicin into the hindlimb plantar cushion. We found that the intradermic injection of capsaicin increased the N2 and N3 components of the focal potentials produced by stimulation of intermediate and high threshold myelinated fibers in the posterior articular nerve (PAN), respectively. This facilitation lasted several hours, had about the same time course as the paw inflammation and was more evident for the N2 and N3 potentials recorded within the intermediate zone in the L6 than in the L7 spinal segments. The capsaicin-induced facilitation of the N2 focal potentials, which are assumed to be generated by activation of fibers signaling joint position, suggests that nociception may affect the processing of proprioceptive and somato-sensory information and, probably also, movement. In addition, the increased effectiveness of these afferents could activate, besides neurons in the intermediate region, neurons located in the more superficial layers of the dorsal horn. As a consequence, normal joint movements could produce pain representing a secondary hyperalgesia. The capsaicin-induced increased efficacy of the PAN afferents producing the N3 focal potentials, together with the reduced post-activation depression that follows high frequency autogenetic stimulation of these afferents, could further contribute to the pain sensation from non-inflamed joints during skin inflammation in humans. The persistence, after capsaicin, of the inhibitory effects produced by stimulation of cutaneous nerves innervating non-inflamed skin regions may account for the reported reduction of the articular pain sensations produced by trans-cutaneous stimulation.

  8. C-tactile afferent stimulating touch carries a positive affective value

    PubMed Central

    Pawling, Ralph; Cannon, Peter R.; McGlone, Francis P.; Walker, Susannah C.

    2017-01-01

    The rewarding sensation of touch in affiliative interactions is hypothesized to be underpinned by a specialized system of nerve fibers called C-Tactile afferents (CTs), which respond optimally to slowly moving, gentle touch, typical of a caress. However, empirical evidence to support the theory that CTs encode socially relevant, rewarding tactile information in humans is currently limited. While in healthy participants, touch applied at CT optimal velocities (1-10cm/sec) is reliably rated as subjectively pleasant, neuronopathy patients lacking large myelinated afferents, but with intact C-fibres, report that the conscious sensation elicited by stimulation of CTs is rather vague. Given this weak perceptual impact the value of self-report measures for assessing the specific affective value of CT activating touch appears limited. Therefore, we combined subjective ratings of touch pleasantness with implicit measures of affective state (facial electromyography) and autonomic arousal (heart rate) to determine whether CT activation carries a positive affective value. We recorded the activity of two key emotion-relevant facial muscle sites (zygomaticus major—smile muscle, positive affect & corrugator supercilii—frown muscle, negative affect) while participants evaluated the pleasantness of experimenter administered stroking touch, delivered using a soft brush, at two velocities (CT optimal 3cm/sec & CT non-optimal 30cm/sec), on two skin sites (CT innervated forearm & non-CT innervated palm). On both sites, 3cm/sec stroking touch was rated as more pleasant and produced greater heart rate deceleration than 30cm/sec stimulation. However, neither self-report ratings nor heart rate responses discriminated stimulation on the CT innervated arm from stroking of the non-CT innervated palm. In contrast, significantly greater activation of the zygomaticus major (smiling muscle) was seen specifically to CT optimal, 3cm/sec, stroking on the forearm in comparison to all other

  9. Extrinsic and local glutamatergic inputs of the rat hippocampal CA1 area differentially innervate pyramidal cells and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Takács, Virág T; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter; Freund, Tamás F; Gulyás, Attila I

    2012-06-01

    The two main glutamatergic pathways to the CA1 area, the Schaffer collateral/commissural input and the entorhinal fibers, as well as the local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells innervate both pyramidal cells and interneurons. To determine whether these inputs differ in their weights of activating GABAergic circuits, we have studied the relative proportion of pyramidal cells and interneurons among their postsynaptic targets in serial electron microscopic sections. Local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells, intracellularly labeled in vitro or in vivo, innervated a relatively high proportion of interneuronal postsynaptic targets (65.9 and 53.8%, in vitro and in vivo, respectively) in stratum (str.) oriens and alveus. In contrast, axons of in vitro labeled CA3 pyramidal cells in str. oriens and str. radiatum of the CA1 area made synaptic junctions predominantly with pyramidal cell spines (92.9%). The postsynaptic targets of anterogradely labeled medial entorhinal cortical boutons in CA1 str. lacunosum-moleculare were primarily pyramidal neuron dendritic spines and shafts (90.8%). The alvear group of the entorhinal afferents, traversing str. oriens, str. pyramidale, and str. radiatum showed a higher preference for innervating GABAergic cells (21.3%), particularly in str. oriens/alveus. These data demonstrate that different glutamatergic pathways innervate CA1 GABAergic cells to different extents. The results suggest that the numerically smaller CA1 local axonal inputs together with the alvear part of the entorhinal input preferentially act on GABAergic interneurons in contrast to the CA3, or the entorhinal input in str. lacunosum-moleculare. The results highlight differences in the postsynaptic target selection of the feed-forward versus recurrent glutamatergic inputs to the CA1 and CA3 areas.

  10. Unmyelinated visceral afferents exhibit frequency dependent action potential broadening while myelinated visceral afferents do not.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai-Yan; Feng, Bin; Tsu, Hwa Y; Schild, John H

    2007-06-21

    Sensory information arising from visceral organ systems is encoded into action potential trains that propagate along afferent fibers to target nuclei in the central nervous system. These information streams range from tight patterns of action potentials that are well synchronized with the sensory transduction event to irregular, patternless discharge with no clear correlation to the sensory input. In general terms these afferent pathways can be divided into unmyelinated and myelinated fiber types. Our laboratory has a long standing interest in the functional differences between these two types of afferents in terms of the preprocessing of sensory information into action potential trains (synchrony, frequency, duration, etc.), the reflexogenic consequences of this sensory input to the central nervous system and the ionic channels that give rise to the electrophysiological properties of these unique cell types. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were any functional differences in the somatic action potential characteristics of unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in response to different rates of sensory nerve stimulation. Our results showed that activity and frequency-dependent widening of the somatic action potential was quite prominent in unmyelinated but not myelinated vagal afferents. Spike broadening often leads to increased influx of Ca(2+) ions that has been associated with a diverse range of modulatory mechanisms both at the cell body and central synaptic terminations (e.g. increased neurotransmitter release.) We conclude that our observations are indicative of fundamentally different mechanisms for neural integration of sensory information arising from unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents.

  11. Innervation changes induced by inflammation of the rat thoracolumbar fascia.

    PubMed

    Hoheisel, U; Rosner, J; Mense, S

    2015-08-06

    Recently, the fascia innervation has become an important issue, particularly the existence of nociceptive fibers. Fascia can be a source of pain in several disorders such as fasciitis and non-specific low back pain. However, nothing is known about possible changes of the fascia innervation under pathological circumstances. This question is important, because theoretically pain from the fascia cannot only be due to increased nociceptor discharges, but also to a denser innervation of the fascia by nociceptive endings. In this histological study, an inflammation was induced in the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) of rats and the innervation by various fiber types compared between the inflamed and intact TLF. Although the TLF is generally considered to have proprioceptive functions, no corpuscular proprioceptors (Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles) were found. To obtain quantitative data, the length of fibers and free nerve endings were determined in the three layers of the rat TLF: inner layer (IL, adjacent to the multifidus muscle), middle layer (ML) and outer layer (OL). The main results were that the overall innervation density showed little change; however, there were significant changes in some of the layers. The innervation density was significantly decreased in the OL, but this change was partly compensated for by an increase in the IL. The density of substance P (SP)-positive - presumably nociceptive - fibers was significantly increased. In contrast, the postganglionic sympathetic fibers were significantly decreased. In conclusion, the inflamed TLF showed an increase of presumably nociceptive fibers, which may explain the pain from a pathologically altered fascia. The meaning of the decreased innervation by sympathetic fibers is obscure at present. The lack of proprioceptive corpuscular receptors within the TLF does not preclude its role as a proprioceptive structure, because some of the free nerve endings may function as proprioceptors.

  12. Analysis of motor fibers in the communicating branch between the cervical nerves and the spinal accessory nerve to innervate trapezius in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Hitomi, Jiro

    2006-11-01

    The communicating branch between the ventral rami of cervical nerves and the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) has been reported to also send motor fibers to supply the trapezius. However, the motor fiber type of the communicating branch and its peripheral distribution are still unclear. To determine the fiber elements within the branch and its peripheral distribution of the motor fibers in the trapezius, the anterograde tracing method was used in this study. The results show that a few a motor end plates from the communicating branch were observed on the extrafusal fibers, while in the muscle spindle the motor elements from the communicating branch were distributed to the polar portions of the intrafusal fibers. These results indicated that the motor fibers passing through the communicating branch to supply the trapezius are mainly y motor fibers, with some a motor fibers. Moreover, the a and y motor fibers from the communicating branch were observed in the clavotrapezius, acromiotrapezius and the rostral part of spinotrapezius. These findings also correlate with the clinical observation indicating that even when the spinal accessory nerve is injured, the trapezius is still capable of slight movement.

  13. Patterns of primary afferent depolarization of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of single joint afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Lomelí, J

    2007-01-01

    We have examined in the anesthetized cat the threshold changes produced by sensory and supraspinal stimuli on intraspinal collaterals of single afferents from the posterior articular nerve (PAN). Forty-eight fibers were tested in the L3 segment, in or close to Clarke's column, and 70 fibers in the L6-L7 segments within the intermediate zone. Of these, 15 pairs of L3 and L6-L7 collaterals were from the same afferent. Antidromically activated fibers had conduction velocities between 23 and 74 m/s and peripheral thresholds between 1.1 and 4.7 times the threshold of the most excitable fibers (xT), most of them below 3 xT. PAN afferents were strongly depolarized by stimulation of muscle afferents and by cutaneous afferents, as well as by stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation and the midline raphe nuclei. Stimulation of muscle nerves (posterior biceps and semitendinosus, quadriceps) produced a larger PAD (primary afferent depolarization) in the L6-L7 than in the L3 terminations. Group II were more effective than group I muscle afferents. As with group I muscle afferents, the PAD elicited in PAN afferents by stimulation of muscle nerves could be inhibited by conditioning stimulation of cutaneous afferents. Stimulation of the cutaneous sural and superficial peroneal nerves increased the threshold of few terminations (i.e., produced primary afferent hyperpolarization, PAH) and reduced the threshold of many others, particularly of those tested in the L6-L7 segments. Yet, there was a substantial number of terminals where these conditioning stimuli had minor or no effects. Autogenetic stimulation of the PAN with trains of pulses increased the intraspinal threshold in 46% and reduced the threshold in 26% of fibers tested in the L6-L7 segments (no tests were made with trains of pulses on fibers ending in L3). These observations indicate that PAN afferents have a rather small autogenetic PAD, particularly if this is compared with the effects of heterogenetic stimulation

  14. Hair-Cell Versus Afferent Adaptation in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Holstein, G. R.; Highstein, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    The time course and extent of adaptation in semicircular canal hair cells was compared to adaptation in primary afferent neurons for physiological stimuli in vivo to study the origins of the neural code transmitted to the brain. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Afferent firing-rate adaptation followed a double-exponential time course in response to step cupula displacements. The dominant adaptation time constant varied considerably among afferent fibers and spanned six orders of magnitude for the population (~1 ms to >1,000 s). For sinusoidal stimuli (0.1–20 Hz), the rapidly adapting afferents exhibited a 90° phase lead and frequency-dependent gain, whereas slowly adapting afferents exhibited a flat gain and no phase lead. Hair-cell voltage and current modulations were similar to the slowly adapting afferents and exhibited a relatively flat gain with very little phase lead over the physiological bandwidth and dynamic range tested. Semicircular canal microphonics also showed responses consistent with the slowly adapting subset of afferents and with hair cells. The relatively broad diversity of afferent adaptation time constants and frequency-dependent discharge modulations relative to hair-cell voltage implicate a subsequent site of adaptation that plays a major role in further shaping the temporal characteristics of semicircular canal afferent neural signals. PMID:15306633

  15. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Sam M.; Andresen, Michael C.; Aicher, Sue A.

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  16. Correlation between afferent rearrangements and behavioral deficits after local excitotoxic insult in the mammalian vestibule: a rat model of vertigo symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Travo, Cécile; Saleur, Aurélie; Broussy, Audrey; Brugeaud, Aurore; Chabbert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Damage to inner ear afferent terminals is believed to result in many auditory and vestibular dysfunctions. The sequence of afferent injuries and repair, as well as their correlation with vertigo symptoms, remains poorly documented. In particular, information on the changes that take place at the primary vestibular endings during the first hours following a selective insult is lacking. In the present study, we combined histological analysis with behavioral assessments of vestibular function in a rat model of unilateral vestibular excitotoxic insult. Excitotoxicity resulted in an immediate but transient alteration of the balance function that was resolved within a week. Concomitantly, vestibular primary afferents underwent a sequence of structural changes followed by spontaneous repair. Within the first two hours after the insult, a first phase of pronounced vestibular dysfunction coincided with extensive swelling of afferent terminals. In the next 24 h, a second phase of significant but incomplete reduction of the vestibular dysfunction was accompanied by a resorption of swollen terminals and fiber retraction. Eventually, within 1 week, a third phase of complete balance restoration occurred. The slow and progressive withdrawal of the balance dysfunction correlated with full reconstitution of nerve terminals. Competitive re-innervation by afferent and efferent terminals that mimicked developmental synaptogenesis resulted in full re-afferentation of the sensory epithelia. By deciphering the sequence of structural alterations that occur in the vestibule during selective excitotoxic impairment, this study offers new understanding of how a vestibular insult develops in the vestibule and how it governs the heterogeneity of vertigo symptoms. PMID:27483344

  17. Overexpression of artemin in the tongue increases expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal afferents and causes oral sensitivity to capsaicin and mustard oil.

    PubMed

    Elitt, Christopher M; Malin, Sacha A; Koerber, H Richard; Davis, Brian M; Albers, Kathryn M

    2008-09-16

    Artemin, a member of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family, supports a subpopulation of trigeminal sensory neurons through activation of the Ret/GFRalpha3 receptor tyrosine kinase complex. In a previous study we showed that artemin is increased in inflamed skin of wildtype mice and that transgenic overexpression of artemin in skin increases TRPV1 and TRPA1 expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons. In this study we examined how transgenic overexpression of artemin in tongue epithelium affects the anatomy, gene expression and calcium handling properties of trigeminal sensory afferents. At the RNA level, trigeminal ganglia of artemin overexpresser mice (ART-OEs) had an 81% increase in GFRalpha3, a 190% increase in TRPV1 and a 403% increase in TRPA1 compared to wildtype (WT) controls. Myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of the lingual nerve were increased in diameter, as was the density of GFRalpha3 and TRPV1-positive innervation to the dorsal anterior tongue and fungiform papilla. Retrograde labeling of trigeminal afferents by WGA injection into the tip of the tongue showed an increased percentage of GFRalpha3, TRPV1 and isolectin B4 afferents in ART-OE mice. ART-OE afferents had larger calcium transients in response to ligands of TRPV1 (capsaicin) and TRPA1 (mustard oil). Behavioral sensitivity was also exhibited by ART-OE mice to capsaicin and mustard oil, measured using a two-choice drinking test. These results suggest a potential role for artemin-responsive GFRalpha3/TRPV1/TRPA1 sensory afferents in mediating sensitivity associated with tissue injury, chemical sensitivity or disease states such as burning mouth syndrome.

  18. Brain imaging signatures of the relationship between epidermal nerve fibers and heat pain perception.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-11-15

    Although the small-diameter primary afferent fibers in the skin promptly respond to nociceptive stimuli and convey sensory inputs to the central nervous system, the neural signatures that underpin the relationship between cutaneous afferent fibers and pain perception remain elusive. We combined skin biopsy at the lateral aspect of the distal leg, which is used to quantify cutaneous afferent fibers, with fMRI, which is used to assess brain responses and functional connectivity, to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensory nerves and the corresponding pain perception in the brain after applying heat pain stimulation to the dorsum of the right foot in healthy subjects. During painful stimulation, the degree of cutaneous innervation, as measured by epidermal nerve fiber density, was correlated with individual blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the posterior insular cortex and of the thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and rostral ventromedial medulla. Pain perception was associated with the activation of the anterior insular cortex and with the functional connectivity from the anterior insular cortex to the primary somatosensory cortex during painful stimulation. Most importantly, both epidermal nerve fiber density and activity in the posterior insular cortex showed a positive correlation with the strength of coupling under pain between the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex. Thus, our findings support the notion that the neural circuitry subserving pain perception interacts with the cerebral correlates of peripheral nociceptive fibers, which implicates an indirect role for skin nerves in human pain perception.

  19. Selective innervation of fast and slow muscle regions during early chick neuromuscular development.

    PubMed

    Rafuse, V F; Milner, L D; Landmesser, L T

    1996-11-01

    The electrical properties of adult motoneurons are well matched to the contractile properties of the fast or slow muscle fibers that they innervate. How this precise matching occurs developmentally is not known. To investigate whether motoneurons exhibit selectivity in innervating discrete muscle regions, containing either fast or slow muscle fibers during early neuromuscular development, we caused embryonic chick hindlimb muscles to become innervated by segmentally inappropriate motoneurons. We used the in vitro spinal cord-hindlimb preparation to identify electrophysiologically the pools of foreign motoneurons innervating the posterior iliotibialis (pITIB), an all-fast muscle, and the iliofibularis (IFIB), a partitioned muscle containing discrete fast and slow regions. The results showed that the pITIB and the fast region of the IFIB were exclusively innervated by motoneurons that normally supply fast muscles. In contrast, the slow region of the IFIB was always innervated by motoneuron pools that normally supply slow muscles. Some experimental IFIB muscles lacked a fast region and were innervated solely by "slow" motoneurons. In addition, the intramuscular nerve branching patterns were always appropriate to the fast-slow nature of the muscle (region) innervated. The selective innervation was found early in the motoneuron death period, and we found no evidence that motoneurons grew into appropriate muscle regions, but failed to form functional contacts. Together, these results support the hypothesis that different classes of motoneurons exhibit molecular differences that allow them to project selectively to, and innervate, muscle fibers of the appropriate type during early neuromuscular development.

  20. Development, plasticity and modulation of visceral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Julie A.; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Altier, Christophe; Cenac, Nicolas; Davis, Brian M.; Gebhart, Gerald F.; High, Karin W.; Kollarik, Marian; Randich, Alan; Undem, Brad; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Visceral pain is the most common reason for doctor visits in the US. Like somatic pain, virtually all visceral pain sensations begin with the activation of primary sensory neurons innervating the viscera and/or the blood vessels associated with these structures. Visceral afferents also play a central role in tissue homeostasis. Recent studies show that in addition to monitoring the state of the viscera, they perform efferent functions through the release of small molecules (e.g. peptides like CGRP) that can drive inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of visceral pathologies (e.g. diabetes Razavi, R., Chan, Y., Afifiyan, F.N., Liu, X.J., Wan, X., Yantha, J., Tsui, H., Tang, L., Tsai, S., Santamaria, P., Driver, J.P., Serreze, D., Salter, M.W., Dosch, H.M., 2006. TRPV1+ sensory neurons control beta cell stress and islet inflammation in autoimmune diabetes, Cell 127 1123–1135). Visceral afferents are heterogeneous with respect to their anatomy, neurochemistry and function. They are also highly plastic in that their cellular environment continuously influences their response properties. This plasticity makes them susceptible to long-term changes that may contribute significantly to the development of persistent pain states such as those associated with irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, and visceral cancers. This review examines recent insights into visceral afferent anatomy and neurochemistry and how neonatal insults can affect the function of these neurons in the adult. New approaches to the treatment of visceral pain, which focus on primary afferents, will also be discussed. PMID:19150371

  1. Tissue engineering the mechanosensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc with human stem cells: Sensory neuron innervation of intrafusal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiufang; Colon, Alisha; Akanda, Nesar; Spradling, Severo; Stancescu, Maria; Martin, Candace; Hickman, James J

    2017-04-01

    Muscle spindles are sensory organs embedded in the belly of skeletal muscles that serve as mechanoreceptors detecting static and dynamic information about muscle length and stretch. Through their connection with proprioceptive sensory neurons, sensation of axial body position and muscle movement are transmitted to the central nervous system. Impairment of this sensory circuit causes motor deficits and has been linked to a wide range of diseases. To date, no defined human-based in vitro model of the proprioceptive sensory circuit has been developed. The goal of this study was to develop a human-based in vitro muscle sensory circuit utilizing human stem cells. A serum-free medium was developed to drive the induction of intrafusal fibers from human satellite cells by actuation of a neuregulin signaling pathway. Both bag and chain intrafusal fibers were generated and subsequently validated by phase microscopy and immunocytochemistry. When co-cultured with proprioceptive sensory neurons derived from human neuroprogenitors, mechanosensory nerve terminal structural features with intrafusal fibers were demonstrated. Most importantly, patch-clamp electrophysiological analysis of the intrafusal fibers indicated repetitive firing of human intrafusal fibers, which has not been observed in human extrafusal fibers.

  2. Effects of methylmercury on the motor and sensory innervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, R.K.; Riley, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    The histochemical study examined the effects of chronic methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication on the motor and sensory innervation of extensor digitorum longus muscles. Light microscopic examination of silver-stained axons in the intramuscular nerve bundles of MeHg-treated rats showed Wallerian-like degeneration and a reduction in the number of nerve fibers. Disrupted axons were predominantly sensory because 22.2% of spindle afferents (I/sub a/) and 90.0% of Golgi tendon organ (I/sub b/) sensory fibers were completely degenerated whereas less than 1% of motor ending were totally destroyed. Partial disruption occurred in the cholinesterase and motor terminals of 13.7% of endplates. Their results demonstrated greater vulnerability of sensory nerves than of motor nerves to MeHg-induced degeneration. Thus, the abnormal reflexes, ataxia, and muscle weakness following MeHg poisoning appear related to reduction of proprioceptive feedback from muscles and tendons irradiation to the documented lesions in the central nervous system.

  3. Vagal Intramuscular Arrays: The Specialized Mechanoreceptor Arbors That Innervate the Smooth Muscle Layers of the Stomach Examined in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Powley, Terry L; Hudson, Cherie N; McAdams, Jennifer L; Baronowsky, Elizabeth A; Phillips, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental roles that the stomach plays in ingestion and digestion notwithstanding, little morphological information is available on vagal intramuscular arrays (IMAs), the afferents that innervate gastric smooth muscle. To characterize IMAs better, rats were given injections of dextran biotin in the nodose ganglia, and, after tracer transport, stomach whole mounts were collected. Specimens were processed for avidin-biotin permanent labeling, and subsets of the whole mounts were immunohistochemically processed for c-Kit or stained with cuprolinic blue. IMAs (n = 184) were digitized for morphometry and mapping. Throughout the gastric muscle wall, IMAs possessed common phenotypic features. Each IMA was generated by a parent neurite arborizing extensively, forming an array of multiple (mean = 212) branches averaging 193 µm in length. These branches paralleled, and coursed in apposition with, bundles of muscle fibers and interstitial cells of Cajal. Individual arrays averaged 4.3 mm in length and innervated volumes of muscle sheet, presumptive receptive fields, averaging 0.1 mm(3) . Evaluated by region and by muscle sheet, IMAs displayed architectural adaptations to the different loci. A subset (32%) of circular muscle IMAs issued specialized polymorphic collaterals to myenteric ganglia, and a subset (41%) of antral longitudinal muscle IMAs formed specialized net endings associated with the serosal boundary. IMAs were concentrated in regional patterns that correlated with the unique biomechanical adaptations of the stomach, specifically proximal stomach reservoir functions and antral emptying operations. Overall, the structural adaptations and distributions of the IMAs were consonant with the hypothesized stretch receptor roles of the afferents.

  4. Vagal Intramuscular Arrays: The Specialized Mechanoreceptor Arbors That Innervate the Smooth Muscle Layers of the Stomach Examined in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Terry L.; Hudson, Cherie N.; McAdams, Jennifer L.; Baronowsky, Elizabeth A.; Phillips, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental roles that the stomach plays in ingestion and digestion notwithstanding, little morphological information is available on vagal intramuscular arrays (IMAs), the afferents that innervate gastric smooth muscle. To characterize IMAs better, rats were given injections of dextran biotin in the nodose ganglia, and, after tracer transport, stomach whole mounts were collected. Specimens were processed for avidin–biotin permanent labeling, and subsets of the whole mounts were immunohistochemically processed for c-Kit or stained with cuprolinic blue. IMAs (n = 184) were digitized for morphometry and mapping. Throughout the gastric muscle wall, IMAs possessed common phenotypic features. Each IMA was generated by a parent neurite arborizing extensively, forming an array of multiple (mean = 212) branches averaging 193 μm in length. These branches paralleled, and coursed in apposition with, bundles of muscle fibers and interstitial cells of Cajal. Individual arrays averaged 4.3 mm in length and innervated volumes of muscle sheet, presumptive receptive fields, averaging 0.1 mm3. Evaluated by region and by muscle sheet, IMAs displayed architectural adaptations to the different loci. A subset (32%) of circular muscle IMAs issued specialized polymorphic collaterals to myenteric ganglia, and a subset (41%) of antral longitudinal muscle IMAs formed specialized net endings associated with the serosal boundary. IMAs were concentrated in regional patterns that correlated with the unique biomechanical adaptations of the stomach, specifically proximal stomach reservoir functions and antral emptying operations. Overall, the structural adaptations and distributions of the IMAs were consonant with the hypothesized stretch receptor roles of the afferents. PMID:26355387

  5. Presynaptic selection of afferent inflow in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P

    1999-01-01

    The synaptic effectiveness of sensory fibers ending in the spinal cord of vertebrates can be centrally controlled by means of specific sets of GABAergic interneurons that make axo-axonic synapses with the terminal arborizations of the afferent fibers. In the steady state, the intracellular concentration of chloride ions in these terminals is higher than that predicted from a passive distribution, because of an active transport mechanism. Following the release of GABA by spinal interneurons and activation of GABA(A) receptors in the afferent terminals, there is an outwardly directed efflux of chloride ions that produces primary afferent depolarization (PAD) and reduces transmitter release (presynaptic inhibition). Studies made by intrafiber recording of PAD, or by measuring changes in the intraspinal threshold of single afferent terminals (which is reduced during PAD), have further indicated that muscle and cutaneous afferents have distinctive, but modifiable PAD patterns in response to segmental and descending stimuli. This has suggested that PAD and presynaptic inhibition in the various types of afferents is mediated by separate sets of last-order GABAergic interneurons. Direct activation, by means of intraspinal microstimulation, of single or small groups of last-order PAD-mediating interneurons shows that the monosynaptic PAD elicited in Ia and Ib afferents can remain confined to some sets of the intraspinal collaterals and not spread to nearby collaterals. The local character of PAD allows cutaneous and descending inputs to selectively inhibit the PAD of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of individual muscle spindle afferents. It thus seems that the intraspinal branches of the sensory fibers are not hard wired routes that diverge excitation to spinal neurons, but are instead dynamic pathways that can be centrally controlled to address information to selected neuronal targets. This feature appears to play an important role in the selection of

  6. The Lesser Palatine Nerve Innervates the Levator Veli Palatini Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yoshitaka; Kawai, Katsuya; Yamada, Shigehito; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: When the lesser palatine nerve (LPN) is supposed to be a branch of the trigeminal nerve and innervate sensation of the soft palate, whether the LPN contains motor fibers is unclear. In this study, we monitored the electromyogram of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle on stimulating the LPN during palatoplasty in 3 patients. The electromyogram of the muscles showed the myogenic potential induced by electrostimulation of the LPN. Taken together with the finding from our previous anatomical study that the motor fibers come from the facial nerve, this result supports the double innervation theory of the LVP, which posits that both the pharyngeal plexus and the facial nerve innervate it. Identifying and preserving the LPN during palatoplasty might improve postoperative speech results. PMID:27757354

  7. Rapid development of Purkinje cell excitability, functional cerebellar circuit, and afferent sensory input to cerebellum in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Yi; Ulrich, Brittany; Issa, Fadi A; Wan, Jijun; Papazian, Diane M

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has significant advantages for studying the morphological development of the brain. However, little is known about the functional development of the zebrafish brain. We used patch clamp electrophysiology in live animals to investigate the emergence of excitability in cerebellar Purkinje cells, functional maturation of the cerebellar circuit, and establishment of sensory input to the cerebellum. Purkinje cells are born at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf). By 4 dpf, Purkinje cells spontaneously fired action potentials in an irregular pattern. By 5 dpf, the frequency and regularity of tonic firing had increased significantly and most cells fired complex spikes in response to climbing fiber activation. Our data suggest that, as in mammals, Purkinje cells are initially innervated by multiple climbing fibers that are winnowed to a single input. To probe the development of functional sensory input to the cerebellum, we investigated the response of Purkinje cells to a visual stimulus consisting of a rapid change in light intensity. At 4 dpf, sudden darkness increased the rate of tonic firing, suggesting that afferent pathways carrying visual information are already active by this stage. By 5 dpf, visual stimuli also activated climbing fibers, increasing the frequency of complex spiking. Our results indicate that the electrical properties of zebrafish and mammalian Purkinje cells are highly conserved and suggest that the same ion channels, Nav1.6 and Kv3.3, underlie spontaneous pacemaking activity. Interestingly, functional development of the cerebellum is temporally correlated with the emergence of complex, visually-guided behaviors such as prey capture. Because of the rapid formation of an electrically-active cerebellum, optical transparency, and ease of genetic manipulation, the zebrafish has great potential for functionally mapping cerebellar afferent and efferent pathways and for investigating cerebellar control of motor behavior.

  8. Social temperament and lymph node innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Erica K.; Capitanio, John P.; Tarara, Ross P.; Cole, Steve W.

    2008-01-01

    Socially inhibited individuals show increased vulnerability to viral infections, and this has been linked to increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To determine whether structural alterations in SNS innervation of lymphoid tissue might contribute to these effects, we assayed the density of catecholaminergic nerve fibers in 13 lymph nodes from 7 healthy adult rhesus macaques that showed stable individual differences in propensity to socially affiliate (Sociability). Tissues from Low Sociable animals showed a 2.8-fold greater density of catecholaminergic innervation relative to tissues from High Sociable animals, and this was associated with a 2.3-fold greater expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNA, suggesting a molecular mechanism for observed differences. Low Sociable animals also showed alterations in lymph node expression of the immunoregulatory cytokine genes IFNG and IL4, and lower secondary IgG responses to tetanus vaccination. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that structural differences in lymphoid tissue innervation might potentially contribute to relationships between social temperament and immunobiology. PMID:18068331

  9. Patterns of connectivity of spinal interneurons with single muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Lomeli, J; Rudomin, P

    1997-07-01

    A technique was developed to measure, in the anesthetized and paralyzed cat under artificial ventilation, changes of excitability to intraspinal stimulation simultaneously in two different afferent fibers or in two collaterals of the same afferent fiber. Intraspinal stimulation reduced the threshold of single muscle afferent fibers ending in the intermediate nucleus. This effect was seen with strengths below those required to activate the afferent fiber tested (1.5-12 microA), occurred at a short latency (1.5-2.0 ms), reached a maximum between 15 and 30 ms, and lasted up to 100 ms. The effects produced by graded stimulation applied at the shortest conditioning-testing stimulus time intervals increased by fixed steps, suggesting recruitment of discrete elements, most likely of last-order interneurons mediating primary afferent depolarization (PAD). The short-latency increases in excitability produced by the weakest effective intraspinal stimuli were usually detected only in the collateral closest to the stimulating micropipette, indicating that the stimulated interneurons mediating PAD have spatially restricted actions. The short-latency PAD produced by intraspinal stimuli, as well as the PAD produced by stimulation of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve or by stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation (RF), was depressed 19-30 min after the i.v. injection of 0.5 mg/kg of picrotoxin, suggesting that all these effects were mediated by GABAergic mechanisms. The PAD elicited by stimulation of muscle and/or cutaneous nerves was depressed following the i.v. injection of (-)-baclofen, whereas the PAD elicited in the same collateral by stimulation of the RF was baclofen-resistant. The short-latency PAD produced by intraspinal stimulation was not always depressed by i.v. injections of (-)-baclofen. Baclofen-sensitive and baclofen-resistant monosynaptic PADs could be produced in different collaterals of the same afferent fiber. The results suggest that

  10. Organization of hindlimb muscle afferent projections to lumbosacral motoneurons in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Lee, M T; O'Donovan, M J

    1991-08-01

    We have examined the organization of muscle afferent projections to motoneurons in the lumbosacral spinal cord of chick embryos between stage 37, when muscle afferents first reach the motor nucleus, and stage 44, which is just before hatching. Connectivity between afferents and motoneurons was assessed by stimulating individual muscle nerves and recording the resulting motoneuron synaptic potentials intracellularly or electrotonically from other muscle nerves. Most of the recordings were made in the presence of DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), picrotoxin, and strychnine to block long-latency excitatory and inhibitory pathways. Activation of muscle afferents evoked slow, positive potentials in muscle nerves but not in cutaneous nerves. These potentials were abolished in 0 mM Ca2+, 2mM Mn2+ solutions, indicating that they were generated by the action of chemical synapses. The muscle nerve recordings revealed a wide-spread pattern of excitatory connections between afferents and motoneurons innervating six different thigh muscles, which were not organized according to synergist-antagonist relationships. This pattern of connectivity was confirmed using intracellular recording from identified motoneurons, which allowed the latency of the responses to be determined. Short-latency potentials in motoneurons were produced by activation of homonymous afferents and the heteronymous afferents innervating the hip flexors sartorius and anterior iliotibialis. Stimulation of anterior iliotibialis afferents also resulted in some short-latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in motoneurons innervating the knee extensor femorotibialis, though other connections were of longer latency. Afferents from the adductor, a hip extensor, did not evoke short-latency EPSPs in any of these three types of motoneurons. Short-latency, but not long-latency EPSPs, persisted during repetitive stimulation at 5 Hz, suggesting that they were mediated monosynaptically. Long

  11. Neuronal pathways from foot pad afferents to hindlimb motoneurons in the low spinalized cats.

    PubMed

    Wada, N; Kanda, Y; Takayama, R

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were performed on 16 adult spinalized (L2) cats. Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) produced by electrical stimulation of afferent nerves innervating foot pads were recorded from hindlimb motoneurons innervating the following hindlimb muscles: the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt), anterior biceps and semimembranosus (ABSm), lateral gastrocnemius and soleus (LGS), medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (P1), tibialis anterior (TA), popliteus (Pop), flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus (FDHL) and peroneus longus (Per.l). The rate of occurrence of different types of PSPs (EPSPs, IPSPs and mixed PSPs), the size of the PSPs and their central latencies were analyzed for each group of motoneurons to identify the neural pathways from the afferents innervating foot pads to hindlimb motoneurons. The rates of occurrence of different types of PSPs did not depend on the foot pad stimulated in PBSt, ABSm and LGS motoneurons, but for other groups of motoneurons their rates of occurrence depended on the foot pad stimulated. It was often noted that the size of PSPs in the same motoneurons differed according to the foot pad stimulated. Measurements of the central latencies of the PSPs indicated that the shortest neural pathways for EPSPs and IPSPs were disynaptic (central latencies < 1.8 ms). The functional role of neuronal pathways from afferent nerves innervating foot pads to hindlimb motoneurons could be to maintain stability of the foot during different postural and motor activities.

  12. Analysis of Proprioceptive Sensory Innervation of the Mouse Soleus: A Whole-Mount Muscle Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sonner, Martha J.; Walters, Marie C.; Ladle, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle proprioceptive afferents provide feedback critical for successful execution of motor tasks via specialized mechanoreceptors housed within skeletal muscles: muscle spindles, supplied by group Ia and group II afferents, and Golgi tendon organs, supplied by group Ib afferents. The morphology of these proprioceptors and their associated afferents has been studied extensively in the cat soleus, and to a lesser degree, in the rat; however, quantitative analyses of proprioceptive innervation in the mouse soleus are comparatively limited. The present study employed genetically-encoded fluorescent reporting systems to label and analyze muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs, and the proprioceptive sensory neuron subpopulations supplying them within the intact mouse soleus muscle using high magnification confocal microscopy. Total proprioceptive receptors numbered 11.3 ± 0.4 and 5.2 ± 0.2 for muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs, respectively, and these receptor counts varied independently (n = 27 muscles). Analogous to findings in the rat, muscle spindles analyzed were most frequently supplied by two proprioceptive afferents, and in the majority of instances, both were classified as primary endings using established morphological criteria. Secondary endings were most frequently observed when spindle associated afferents totaled three or more. The mean diameter of primary and secondary afferent axons differed significantly, but the distributions overlap more than previously observed in cat and rat studies. PMID:28122055

  13. Dopamine D1/D5, But not D2/D3, Receptor Dependency of Synaptic Plasticity at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses that Is Enabled by Patterned Afferent Stimulation, or Spatial Learning.

    PubMed

    Hagena, Hardy; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Although the mossy fiber (MF) synapses of the hippocampal CA3 region display quite distinct properties in terms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie synaptic plasticity, they nonetheless exhibit persistent (>24 h) synaptic plasticity that is akin to that observed at the Schaffer collateral (SCH)-CA1 and perforant path (PP)-dentate gyrus (DG) synapses of freely behaving rats. In addition, they also respond to novel spatial learning with very enduring forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). These latter forms of synaptic plasticity are directly related to the learning behavior: novel exploration of generalized changes in space facilitates the expression of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses, whereas exploration of novel configurations of large environmental features facilitates the expression of LTD. In the absence of spatial novelty, synaptic plasticity is not expressed. Motivation is a potent determinant of whether learning about the spatial experience effectively occurs and the neuromodulator dopamine (DA) plays a key role in motivation-based learning. Prior research on the regulation by DA receptors of long-term synaptic plasticity in CA1 and DG synapses in vivo suggests that whereas D2/D3 receptors may modulate a general predisposition toward expressing plasticity, D1/D5 receptors may directly regulate the direction of change in synaptic strength that occurs during learning. Although the CA3 region is believed to play a pivotal role in many forms of learning, the role of dopamine receptors in persistent (>24 h) forms of synaptic plasticity at MF-CA3 synapses is unknown. Here, we report that whereas pharmacological antagonism of D2/D3 receptors had no impact on LTP or LTD, antagonism of D1/D5 receptors significantly impaired LTP and LTD that were induced by solely by means of patterned afferent stimulation, or LTP/LTD that are typically enhanced by the conjunction of afferent stimulation and novel spatial learning. These data indicate an

  14. Dopamine D1/D5, But not D2/D3, Receptor Dependency of Synaptic Plasticity at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses that Is Enabled by Patterned Afferent Stimulation, or Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    Hagena, Hardy; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Although the mossy fiber (MF) synapses of the hippocampal CA3 region display quite distinct properties in terms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie synaptic plasticity, they nonetheless exhibit persistent (>24 h) synaptic plasticity that is akin to that observed at the Schaffer collateral (SCH)-CA1 and perforant path (PP)-dentate gyrus (DG) synapses of freely behaving rats. In addition, they also respond to novel spatial learning with very enduring forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). These latter forms of synaptic plasticity are directly related to the learning behavior: novel exploration of generalized changes in space facilitates the expression of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses, whereas exploration of novel configurations of large environmental features facilitates the expression of LTD. In the absence of spatial novelty, synaptic plasticity is not expressed. Motivation is a potent determinant of whether learning about the spatial experience effectively occurs and the neuromodulator dopamine (DA) plays a key role in motivation-based learning. Prior research on the regulation by DA receptors of long-term synaptic plasticity in CA1 and DG synapses in vivo suggests that whereas D2/D3 receptors may modulate a general predisposition toward expressing plasticity, D1/D5 receptors may directly regulate the direction of change in synaptic strength that occurs during learning. Although the CA3 region is believed to play a pivotal role in many forms of learning, the role of dopamine receptors in persistent (>24 h) forms of synaptic plasticity at MF-CA3 synapses is unknown. Here, we report that whereas pharmacological antagonism of D2/D3 receptors had no impact on LTP or LTD, antagonism of D1/D5 receptors significantly impaired LTP and LTD that were induced by solely by means of patterned afferent stimulation, or LTP/LTD that are typically enhanced by the conjunction of afferent stimulation and novel spatial learning. These data indicate an

  15. Trpv1 mediates spontaneous firing and heat sensitization of cutaneous primary afferents after plantar incision.

    PubMed

    Banik, Ratan K; Brennan, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    TrpV1, the receptor for capsaicin, contributes to nociception in animals but appears to be much more important for signaling increased behavioral sensitivity in the injured state. The current study examined the relationship between the marked reduction in heat hyperalgesia after incision in TrpV1 knockout (KO) mice and the activity of the nociceptors in these same mice. Also, the role of TrpV1 in spontaneous activity (SA) of afferents after incision was examined. Standard teased-fiber techniques were used to record from glabrous skin afferents from incised and control TrpV1 KO and C57Bl6 mice. The loss of TrpV1 had minimal effect on the responses of mechano-heat-sensitive C-fiber afferents in the normal and incised states. However, a different group of heat sensitive afferents, termed unclassified afferents, was sensitized to heat by incision and had markedly reduced sensitization in the TrpV1 KO mice. These unclassified afferents also developed SA after incision, and generally had a lower threshold temperature compared to unclassified afferents without SA. The rate of SA was inversely correlated to the threshold temperature for heat; afferents that exhibited a higher rate of SA had a lower heat threshold. The proportion of unclassified afferents with SA was also reduced in incised TrpV1 KO mice compared to incised C57Bl6 mice. We conclude that a distinct class of afferents outside the mechano-heat-sensitive afferent population likely contributes to heat hypersensitivity after plantar incision. KO of TrpV1 influences SA in these unclassified afferents in incised skin. SA in these afferents is perhaps a manifestation of heat sensitization.

  16. The naris muscles in tiger salamander. II. Innervation as revealed by enzyme histochemistry and immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R; Ebadifar, Bahareh

    2002-06-01

    The naris muscles control the aperature of the external naris in tiger salamanders, Ambystoma tigrinum, and may contribute to glandular secretion. Autonomic neurons of the palatine ganglion and possibly neurons associated with the nervus terminalis innervate these muscles. To elucidate the neural control of the naris muscles, neurotransmitters in nerve fibers supplying the naris muscles and in neurons of the palatine ganglion were examined using acetylcholinesterase enzyme histochemistry and immunocytochemistry to visualize possible peptide candidates for muscle innervation. The naris muscles, autonomic neurons, and associated nerve fascicles demonstrated strong acetylcholinesterase labeling, and the muscles were innervated by substance P fibers passing through the palatine ganglion from the trigeminal ganglion. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone and molluscan cardioexcitatory peptide-like immunoreactivities were found in secretory cell bodies and/or fibers in the palatine ganglion, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone was found in fiber projection pathways into the muscles. Vasoactive intestinal peptide was found in cell bodies and fibers of the palatine ganglion but appeared to provide a sparse innervation to the naris dilator muscle only. These findings suggest a typical autonomic cholinergic and sensory innervation of the naris muscles with some variations in peptide innervation. The presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in palatine ganglion and naris constrictor muscle suggests a potential modulation of autonomic neurons and perhaps even muscle fibers by this neuropeptide. We hypothesize that this reproductive hormone may modulate the activity of the naris constrictor muscle during reproductively appropriate events in order to provide access of pheromones to the vomeronasal organ.

  17. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  18. Immunomodulation Stimulates the Innervation of Engineered Tooth Organ

    PubMed Central

    Kökten, Tunay; Bécavin, Thibault; Keller, Laetitia; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine; Lesot, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The sensory innervation of the dental mesenchyme is essential for tooth function and protection. Sensory innervation of the dental pulp is mediated by axons originating from the trigeminal ganglia and is strictly regulated in time. Teeth can develop from cultured re-associations between dissociated dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells from Embryonic Day 14 mouse molars, after implantation under the skin of adult ICR mice. In these conditions however, the innervation of the dental mesenchyme did not occur spontaneously. In order to go further with this question, complementary experimental approaches were designed. Cultured cell re-associations were implanted together with trigeminal ganglia for one or two weeks. Although axonal growth was regularly observed extending from the trigeminal ganglia to all around the forming teeth, the presence of axons in the dental mesenchyme was detected in less than 2.5% of samples after two weeks, demonstrating a specific impairment of their entering the dental mesenchyme. In clinical context, immunosuppressive therapy using cyclosporin A was found to accelerate the innervation of transplanted tissues. Indeed, when cultured cell re-associations and trigeminal ganglia were co-implanted in cyclosporin A-treated ICR mice, nerve fibers were detected in the dental pulp, even reaching odontoblasts after one week. However, cyclosporin A shows multiple effects, including direct ones on nerve growth. To test whether there may be a direct functional relationship between immunomodulation and innervation, cell re-associations and trigeminal ganglia were co-implanted in immunocompromised Nude mice. In these conditions as well, the innervation of the dental mesenchyme was observed already after one week of implantation, but axons reached the odontoblast layer after two weeks only. This study demonstrated that immunodepression per se does stimulate the innervation of the dental mesenchyme. PMID:24465840

  19. Persistence of PAD and presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle afferents after peripheral nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Denton, M; Manjarrez, E; Rudomin, P

    2004-11-19

    Two to twelve weeks after crushing a muscle nerve, still before the damaged afferents reinnervate the muscle receptors, conditioning stimulation of group I fibers from flexor muscles depolarizes the damaged afferents [M. Enriquez, I. Jimenez, P. Rudomin, Changes in PAD patterns of group I muscle afferents after a peripheral nerve crush. Exp. Brain Res., 107 (1996), 405-420]. It is not known, however, if this primary afferent depolarization (PAD) is indeed related to presynaptic inhibition. We now show in the cat that 2-12 weeks after crushing the medial gastrocnemius nerve (MG), conditioning stimulation of group I fibers from flexors increases the excitability of the intraspinal terminals of both the intact lateral gastrocnemius plus soleus (LGS) and of the previously damaged MG fibers ending in the motor pool, because of PAD. The PAD is associated with the depression of the pre- and postsynaptic components of the extracellular field potentials (EFPs) evoked in the motor pool by stimulation of either the intact LGS or of the previously damaged MG nerves. These observations indicate, in contrast to what has been reported for crushed cutaneous afferents [K.W. Horch, J.W. Lisney, Changes in primary afferent depolarization of sensory neurones during peripheral nerve regeneration in the cat, J. Physiol., 313 (1981), 287-299], that shortly after damaging their peripheral axons, the synaptic efficacy of group I spindle afferents remains under central control. Presynaptic inhibitory mechanisms could be utilized to adjust the central actions of muscle afferents not fully recovered from peripheral lesions.

  20. Primary afferent depolarization and inhibory interactions in spinal cord of the stingray, Dasyatis sabina.

    PubMed

    Rudomín, P; Leonard, R B; Willis, W D

    1978-01-01

    1. Excitability changes in primary afferents and inhibitory interactions in evoked spinal cord activity were investigated in unanesthetized stingrays (Dasyatis subina) with high cervical spinal transections. 2. Primary afferent excitability increases following a conditioning stimulus to an adjacent segmental nerve were demonstrated with the Wall (31) technique. 3. Stimulation of A-alpha,beta and A-delta afferent fibers produced excitability increases in both A-alpha,beta and delta-fibers of the adjacent segment. 4. The excitability increase had a latency of about 10 ms, it peaked around 25 ms, and the change lasted more than 100 ms. 5. The central afferent volley in A-alpha,beta fibers and the N1- and late negative waves due to postsynaptic activity of dorsal horn interneurons were reduced by conditioning volleys in adjacent afferent nerves. The time course of the inhibition paralleled that of the excitability increases in afferent terminal arborizations, suggesting that the depression of postsynaptic activity is, at least in part, due to presynaptic inhibition. 6. Reduction of evoked discharges and excitatory postsynaptic potentials was observed in recordings from interneurons with a time course similar to that of the primary afferent depolarization (PAD). 7. Conditioning volleys in afferents of adjacent peripheral nerves produced facilitation or inhibition of segmental reflexes.

  1. Three-dimensional analysis of vestibular efferent neurons innervating semicircular canals of the gerbil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, I. M.; Perachio, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Anterograde labeling techniques were used to examine peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular efferent neurons in the crista ampullares of the gerbil. Vestibular efferent neurons were labeled by extracellular injections of biocytin or biotinylated dextran amine into the contralateral or ipsilateral dorsal subgroup of efferent cell bodies (group e) located dorsolateral to the facial nerve genu. Anterogradely labeled efferent terminal field varicosities consist mainly of boutons en passant with fewer of the terminal type. The bouton swellings are located predominately in apposition to the basolateral borders of the afferent calyces and type II hair cells, but several boutons were identified close to the hair cell apical border on both types. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphological analysis of the terminal fields from these cells located in the sensory neuroepithelium of the anterior, horizontal, and posterior cristae were performed. We show that efferent neurons densely innervate each end organ in widespread terminal fields. Subepithelial bifurcations of parent axons were minimal, with extensive collateralization occurring after the axons penetrated the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium. Axonal branching ranged between the 6th and 27th orders and terminal field collecting area far exceeds that of the peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. The terminal fields of the efferent neurons display three morphologically heterogeneous types: central, peripheral, and planum. All cell types possess terminal fields displaying a high degree of anisotropy with orientations typically parallel to or within +/-45 degrees of the longitudinal axis if the crista. Terminal fields of the central and planum zones predominately project medially toward the transverse axis from the more laterally located penetration of the basement membrane by the parent axon. Peripheral zone terminal fields extend predominately toward the planum semilunatum. The innervation

  2. Postnatal Excitability Development and Innervation by Functional Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Terminals in Neurons of the Rat Spinal Sacral Dorsal Commissural Nucleus: an Electrophysiological Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun

    2016-11-01

    The sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) in the spinal cord receives both somatic and visceral primary afferents. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels are preferentially expressed in certain fine primary afferents. However, knowledge of the SDCN neurons postnatal excitability development and their contacts with TRPV1 fibers remains elusive. Here, whole-cell recordings were conducted in spinal cord slices to evaluate the postnatal development of SDCN neurons and their possible contacts with functional TRPV1-expressing terminals. SDCN neurons in neonatal (postnatal day (P) 1-2), young (P8-10), and adult rats (P35-40) have different electrophysiological properties. SDCN neurons in neonatal rats have higher frequency of spontaneous firing, higher resting membrane potential, and lower presynaptic glutamate release probability. However, no difference in quantal release was found. At all developmental stages, TRPV1 activation with the selective agonist capsaicin increases glutamate release in the presence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks action potential-dependent and polysynaptic neurotransmission, indicating that functional TRPV1 fibers innervate SDCN neurons directly. Capsaicin-induced presynaptic glutamate release onto SDCN neurons depends on external Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels; voltage-dependent calcium channels had a slighter impact. In contrast, capsaicin blocked C fiber-evoked synaptic transmission, indicating that TRPV1 activation has opposite effects on spontaneous asynchronous and action potential-dependent synchronous glutamate release. These data indicate that excitability of SDCN neurons undergoes a developmental shift, and these neurons receive functional TRPV1 terminals from early postnatal stage. The opposite action of capsaicin on asynchronous and synchronous glutamate release should be taken into account when TRPV1 channels are considered as therapeutic targets.

  3. Determinants of Spatial and Temporal Coding by Semicircular Canal Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Stephen M.; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Holstein, Gay R.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular semicircular canals are internal sensors that signal the magnitude, direction, and temporal properties of angular head motion. Fluid mechanics within the 3-canal labyrinth code the direction of movement and integrate angular acceleration stimuli over time. Directional coding is accomplished by decomposition of complex angular accelerations into 3 biomechanical components—one component exciting each of the 3 ampullary organs and associated afferent nerve bundles separately. For low-frequency angular motion stimuli, fluid displacement within each canal is proportional to angular acceleration. At higher frequencies, above the lower corner frequency, real-time integration is accomplished by viscous forces arising from the movement of fluid within the slender lumen of each canal. This results in angular velocity sensitive fluid displacements. Reflecting this, a subset of afferent fibers indeed report angular acceleration to the brain for low frequencies of head movement and report angular velocity for higher frequencies. However, a substantial number of afferent fibers also report angular acceleration, or a signal between acceleration and velocity, even at frequencies where the endolymph displacement is known to follow angular head velocity. These non-velocity-sensitive afferent signals cannot be attributed to canal biomechanics alone. The responses of non-velocity-sensitive cells include a mathematical differentiation (first-order or fractional) imparted by hair-cell and/or afferent complexes. This mathematical differentiation from velocity to acceleration cannot be attributed to hair cell ionic currents, but occurs as a result of the dynamics of synaptic transmission between hair cells and their primary afferent fibers. The evidence for this conclusion is reviewed below. PMID:15845995

  4. Identification of different types of spinal afferent nerve endings that encode noxious and innocuous stimuli in the large intestine using a novel anterograde tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  5. Estradiol alters the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex in female rats by augmenting sympathoinhibition and attenuating sympathoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-06-01

    The chemosensitive cardiac vagal and sympathetic afferent reflexes are implicated in driving pathophysiological changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in cardiovascular disease states. This study investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex. Experiments were performed in anaesthetized, sinoaortic baroreceptor denervated male, female and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats with either intact cardiac innervation or bilateral vagotomy. To investigate the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflexes renal SNA, heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure (AP) were recorded before and following application of capsaicin onto the epicardial surface of the left ventricle. Compared to males, ovary-intact females displayed similar cardiac afferent reflex mediated changes in renal SNA albeit with a reduced maximum sympathetic reflex driven increase in renal SNA. In females, ovariectomy significantly attenuated the cardiac vagal afferent reflex mediated inhibition of renal SNA (renal SNA decreased 2 ± 17% in OVX versus -50 ± 4% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) and augmented cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex mediated sympathoexcitation (renal SNA increased 91 ± 11% in OVX vs 62 ± 9% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) so that overall increases in reflex driven sympathoexcitation were significantly enhanced. Chronic estradiol replacement, but not progesterone replacement, begun at time of ovariectomy restored cardiac afferent reflex responses to be similar as ovary-intact females. Vagal denervation eliminated all group differences. The current findings show ovariectomy in female rats, mimicking menopause in women, results in greater chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex driven sympathoexcitation and does so, at least partly, via the loss of estradiols actions on the cardiac vagal afferent reflex pathway.

  6. Glutamate and capsaicin effects on trigeminal nociception I: Activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Lam, David K; Sessle, Barry J; Hu, James W

    2009-01-28

    We have examined the effect of the peripheral application of glutamate and capsaicin to deep craniofacial tissues in influencing the activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents. The activity of single trigeminal nociceptive afferents with receptive fields in deep craniofacial tissues were recorded extracellularly in 55 halothane-anesthetized rats. The mechanical activation threshold (MAT) of each afferent was assessed before and after injection of 0.5 M glutamate (or vehicle) and 1% capsaicin (or vehicle) into the receptive field. A total of 68 afferents that could be activated by blunt noxious mechanical stimulation of the deep craniofacial tissues (23 masseter, 5 temporalis, 40 temporomandibular joint) were studied. When injected alone, glutamate and capsaicin activated and induced peripheral sensitization reflected as MAT reduction in many afferents. Following glutamate injection, capsaicin-evoked activity was greater than that evoked by capsaicin alone, whereas following capsaicin injection, glutamate-evoked responses were similar to glutamate alone. These findings indicate that peripheral application of glutamate or capsaicin may activate or induce peripheral sensitization in a subpopulation of trigeminal nociceptive afferents innervating deep craniofacial tissues, as reflected in changes in MAT and other afferent response properties. The data further suggest that peripheral glutamate and capsaicin receptor mechanisms may interact to modulate the activation and peripheral sensitization in some deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

  7. FMRFamide-related peptide expression in the vestibular-afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Francisco; López, Iván; Ortega, Aida; Almanza, Angélica; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2012-03-28

    Vestibular-afferent neurons innervate hair cells from the sensory epithelia of vestibular end-organs and their action-potential discharge dynamics are driven by linear and angular accelerations of the head. The electrical activity of the vestibular-afferent neurons depends on their intrinsic properties and on the synaptic input from hair cells and from the terminals of the efferent system. Here we report that vestibular-afferent neurons of the rat are immunoreactive to RFamide-related peptides, and that the stronger signal comes from calyx-shaped neuron dendrites, with no signal detected in hair cells or supporting cells. The whole-cell voltage clamp recording of isolated afferent neurons showed that they express robust acid-sensing ionic currents (ASICs). Extracellular multiunit recordings of the vestibular nerve in a preparation in vitro of the rat inner ear showed that the perfusion of FMRFamide (a snail ortholog of this family of neuropeptides) exerts an excitatory effect on the afferent-neurons spike-discharge rate. Because the FMRFamide cannot activate the ASIC but reduces its desensitization generating a more robust current, its effect indicates that the ASIC are tonically active in the vestibular-afferent neurons and modulated by RFamide-like peptides.

  8. Morphology and neurochemistry of rabbit iris innervation.

    PubMed

    He, Jiucheng; Bazan, Haydee E P

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to map the entire nerve architecture and sensory neuropeptide content of the rabbit iris. Irises from New Zealand rabbits were stained with antibodies against neuronal-class βIII-tubulin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP), and whole-mount images were acquired to build a two-dimensional view of the iridal nerve architecture. After taking images in time-lapse mode, we observed thick nerves running in the iris stroma close to the anterior epithelia, forming four to five stromal nerve rings from the iris periphery to the pupillary margin and sub-branches that connected with each other, constituting the stromal nerve plexus. In the anterior side, fine divisions derivated from the stromal nerves, forming a nerve network-like structure to innervate the superficial anterior border layer, with the pupillary margin having the densest innervation. In the posterior side, the nerve bundles ran along with the pupil dilator muscle in a radial pattern. The morphology of the iris nerves on both sides changed with pupil size. To obtain the relative content of the neuropeptides in the iris, the specimens were double stained with βIII-tubulin and CGRP or SP antibodies. Relative nerve fiber densities for each fiber population were assessed quantitatively by computer-assisted analysis. On the anterior side, CGRP-positive nerve fibers constituted about 61%, while SP-positive nerves constitute about 30.5%, of the total nerve content, which was expressed as βIII tubulin-positive fibers. In addition, in the anterior stroma of the collarette region, there were non-neuronal cells that were positive for SP. On the posterior side, CGRP-positive nerve fibers were about 69% of total nerve content, while SP constituted only up to 20%. Similarly, in the trigeminal ganglia (TG), the number of CGRP-positive neurons significantly outnumbered those that were positive for SP. Also, all the SP-positive neurons were labeled with CGRP. This is the

  9. Postsynaptic effects of long-range afferents in distant segments caudal to their entry point in rat spinal cord under the influence of picrotoxin or strychnine.

    PubMed

    Wall, P D; Bennett, D L

    1994-12-01

    1. Previous work has shown that substantial numbers of arriving myelinated afferent nerve fibers travel for many segments caudal to their entry point and terminate in the gray matter of distant segments. This fact is surprising because no monosynaptic post-synaptic responses attributable to these long-range afferents are observable in the distant segments. Evidence has been produced to explain this paradox by showing that impulse transmission is normally blocked in these long-range afferents by the tonic operation of a primary afferent depolarization (PAD) mechanism. Impulse transmission is restored if the PAD mechanism is disabled with gamma-aminobutyric acid antagonists. In this paper we examine the postsynaptic consequence of restoring conduction in the long-range afferents with picrotoxin. Because picrotoxin blocks PAD and increases the excitability of cells, we here contrast its action with that of the glycine antagonist strychnine, which increases the excitability of dorsal horn cells but does not affect PAD. 2. The preparation used throughout these experiments was decerebrate and spinal at T11. On one side dorsal roots T12, T13, and L1 were intact but all more caudal roots on that side were cut. Recordings of single units were made in the L6 segment with a rigid search pattern. The innervated area of skin on the flank was repeatedly stimulated with pressure in a repeated pattern. In the control state, few cells were detected responding in the L6 segment, which was five to seven segments caudal to the intact dorsal roots. After picrotoxin, the number of cells with excitatory receptive fields rose by a factor of 8, whereas there was no change in the number of inhibited cells. By contrast, after strychnine there was no change in the number of excited cells but the number of inhibited cells rose by a factor of 10. Details of the size of receptive fields, adequate stimuli, and location of the responding cells are provided. 3. To determine the number of synapses

  10. Changes in PAD patterns of group I muscle afferents after a peripheral nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, M; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1996-01-01

    In the anesthetized cat we have analyzed the changes in primary afferent depolarization (PAD) evoked in single muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents at different times after their axons were crushed in the periphery and allowed to regenerate. Medial gastrocnemius (MG) afferents were depolarized by stimulation of group I fibers in the posterior biceps and semitendinosus nerve (PBSt), as soon as 2 weeks after crushing their axons in the periphery, in some cases before they could be activated by physiological stimulation of muscle receptors. Two to twelve weeks after crushing the MG nerve, stimulation of the PBSt produced PAD in all MG fibers reconnected with presumed muscle spindles and tendon organs. The mean amplitude of the PAD elicited in afferent fibers reconnected with muscle spindles was increased relative to values obtained from Ia fibers in intact (control) preparations, but remained essentially the same in fibers reconnected with tendon organs. Quite unexpectedly, we found that, between 2 and 12 weeks after crushing the MG nerve, stimulation of the bulbar reticular formation (RF) produced PAD in most afferent fibers reconnected with muscle spindle afferents. The mean amplitude of the PAD elicited in these fibers was significantly increased relative to the PAD elicited in muscle spindle afferents from intact preparations (from 0.08 +/- 0.4 to 0.47 +/- 0.34 mV). A substantial recovery was observed between 6 months and 2.5 years after the peripheral nerve injury. Stimulation of the sural (SU) nerve produced practically no PAD in muscle spindles from intact preparations, and this remained so in those afferents reconnected with muscle spindles impaled 2-12 weeks after the nerve crush. The mean amplitude of the PAD produced in afferent fibers reconnected with tendon organs by stimulation of the PBSt nerve and of the bulbar RF remained essentially the same as the PAD elicited in intact afferents. However, SU nerve stimulation produced a larger PAD in afferents

  11. Local Loperamide Injection Reduces Mechanosensitivity of Rat Cutaneous, Nociceptive C-Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ringkamp, Matthias; Tal, Michael; Hartke, Timothy V.; Wooten, Matthew; McKelvy, Alvin; Turnquist, Brian P.; Guan, Yun; Meyer, Richard A.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2012-01-01

    Loperamide reverses signs of mechanical hypersensitivity in an animal model of neuropathic pain suggesting that peripheral opioid receptors may be suitable targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Since little is known about loperamide effects on the responsiveness of primary afferent nerve fibers, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from unmyelinated afferents innervating the glabrous skin of the hind paw were performed in rats with an L5 spinal nerve lesion or sham surgery. Mechanical threshold and responsiveness to suprathreshold stimulation were tested before and after loperamide (1.25, 2.5 and 5 µg in 10 µl) or vehicle injection into the cutaneous receptive field. Loperamide dose-dependently decreased mechanosensitivity in unmyelinated afferents of nerve-injured and sham animals, and this effect was not blocked by naloxone pretreatment. We then investigated loperamide effects on nerve conduction by recording compound action potentials in vitro during incubation of the sciatic nerve with increasing loperamide concentrations. Loperamide dose-dependently decreased compound action potentials of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers (ED50 = 8 and 4 µg/10 µl, respectively). This blockade was not prevented by pre-incubation with naloxone. These results suggest that loperamide reversal of behavioral signs of neuropathic pain may be mediated, at least in part, by mechanisms independent of opioid receptors, most probably by local anesthetic actions. PMID:22848720

  12. Specific and potassium components in the depolarization of the la afferents in the spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P; Solodkin, M; Vyklicky, L

    1983-08-01

    In the cat spinal cord, primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of group Ia fibers of extensor muscles is produced by high-frequency stimulation (100 Hz) of group I muscle flexor afferents without significant increases in extracellular potassium. On the other hand, the PAD produced by stimulation of mixed and pure cutaneous nerves correlates well with increases in potassium ions. We conclude that the PAD produced by group I muscle afferents results from the activation of specific pathways making axo-axonic synapses with the Ia fiber terminals. The PAD of Ia fibers resulting from activation of cutaneous nerves involves instead unspecific accumulation of potassium ions.

  13. Innervation is required for sense organ development in the lateral line system of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hironori; Dambly-Chaudière, Christine; Kawakami, Koichi; Ghysen, Alain

    2013-04-02

    Superficial mechanosensory organs (neuromasts) distributed over the head and body of fishes and amphibians form the "lateral line" system. During zebrafish adulthood, each neuromast of the body (posterior lateral line system, or PLL) produces "accessory" neuromasts that remain tightly clustered, thereby increasing the total number of PLL neuromasts by a factor of more than 10. This expansion is achieved by a budding process and is accompanied by branches of the afferent nerve that innervates the founder neuromast. Here we show that innervation is essential for the budding process, in complete contrast with the development of the embryonic PLL, where innervation is entirely dispensable. To obtain insight into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the budding process, we focused on the terminal system that develops at the posterior tip of the body and on the caudal fin. In this subset of PLL neuromasts, bud neuromasts form in a reproducible sequence over a few days, much faster than for other PLL neuromasts. We show that wingless/int (Wnt) signaling takes place during, and is required for, the budding process. We also show that the Wnt activator R-spondin is expressed by the axons that innervate budding neuromasts. We propose that the axon triggers Wnt signaling, which itself is involved in the proliferative phase that leads to bud formation. Finally, we show that innervation is required not only for budding, but also for long-term maintenance of all PLL neuromasts.

  14. Influences of neck afferents on sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P S; Kerman, I A; Woodring, S F; Yates, B J

    1998-11-15

    It is well established that the vestibular system influences the sympathetic nervous system and the respiratory system; presumably, vestibulosympathetic and vestibulorespiratory responses participate in maintaining stable blood pressure and blood oxygenation during movement and changes in posture. Many brainstem neurons that generate vestibulospinal reflexes integrate signals from the labyrinth and neck muscles to distinguish between head movements on a stable body and whole body movements. In the present study, responses were recorded from the splanchnic (sympathetic), hypoglossal (inspiratory) and abdominal (expiratory) nerves during stimulation of the C2 dorsal root ganglion or C2 or C3 nerve branches innervating dorsal neck muscles. Stimulation of neck afferents using low current intensities, in many cases less than twice the threshold for producing an afferent volley recordable from the cord dorsum, elicited changes in sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity. These data suggest that head rotation on a stable body would elicit both cervical and vestibular inputs to respiratory motoneurons and sympathetic preganglionic neurons. The effects of cervical afferent stimulation on abdominal, splanchnic and hypoglossal nerve activity were not abolished by transection of the brainstem caudal to the vestibular nuclei; thus, pathways in addition to those involving the vestibular nuclei are involved in relaying cervical inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons and respiratory motoneurons. Transection of the C1-3 dorsal roots enhanced responses of the splanchnic and abdominal nerves to pitch head rotations on a fixed body but diminished responses of the hypoglossal nerve. Thus, neck and vestibular afferent influences on activity of respiratory pump muscles and sympathetic outflow appear to be antagonistic, so that responses will occur during whole body movements but not head movements on a stationary trunk. In contrast, neck and vestibular influences on tongue

  15. Fusimotor reflexes in relaxed forearm muscles produced by cutaneous afferents from the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, S C; Wilson, L; Cordo, P J; Burke, D

    1994-01-01

    1. This study was designed to determine whether cutaneous receptors in the hand exert reflex effects on fusimotor neurones innervating relaxed muscles. Recordings were made from fifty-four muscle spindle afferents in the radial nerve while the arm was held relaxed in a supporting frame. Cutaneous afferents were activated by trains of stimuli at non-noxious levels to the superficial radial nerve or to the palmar surface of the fingers. 2. For the population of muscle spindle afferents, the mean discharge rate was 7.1 +/- 6.4 Hz (range 0-24 Hz). Thirty-three per cent had no background discharge, and this occurred significantly more often in finger extensors than wrist extensors. 3. Trains of cutaneous stimuli produced no change in the discharge rates of the majority of spindle endings irrespective of whether the spindle afferent had a background discharge or was given one by muscle stretch. However, with two of forty afferents, the stimuli produced an increase in discharge at latencies of 135 and 155 ms. 4. With a further fourteen muscle spindle endings, the dynamic responses to stretch were measured 100-400 ms after the trains of cutaneous stimuli. For four spindle afferents there was a statistically significant change in the dynamic response to stretch occurring at conditioned-stretch intervals of 100-200 ms. For two afferents the dynamic response decreased by 17 and 26% and for two others it increased by about 24 and 37%. 5. While these results support the view that the level of background fusimotor drive is low in the relaxed state, they suggest that there is some dynamic fusimotor drive to completely relaxed muscles operating on the human hand, and that this drive can be altered reflexly by cutaneous afferent inputs from the hand. Images Figure 4 PMID:7837105

  16. Segmental and supraspinal control of synaptic effectiveness of functionally identified muscle afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, M; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1996-01-01

    The present investigation documents the patterns of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of single, functionally identified muscle afferents from the medial gastrocnemius nerve in the intact, anesthetized cat. Classification of the impaled muscle afferents as from muscle spindles or from tendon organs was made according to several criteria, which comprised measurement of conduction velocity and electrical threshold of the peripheral axons, and the maximal frequency followed by the afferent fibers during vibration, as well as the changes in discharge frequency during longitudinal stretch, the projection of the afferent fiber to the motor pool, and, in unparalyzed preparations, the changes in afferent activity during a muscle twitch. In confirmation of a previous study, we found that most muscle spindle afferents (46.1-66.6%, depending on the combination of criteria utilized for receptor classification) had a type A PAD pattern. That is, they were depolarized by stimulation of group I fibers of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve, but not by stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural and superficial peroneus) or the bulbar reticular formation (RF), which in many cases inhibited the PBSt-induced PAD. In addition, we found a significant fraction of muscle spindle primaries that were depolarized by stimulation of group I PBSt fibers and also by stimulation of the bulbar RF. Stimulation of cutaneous nerves produced PAD in 9.1-31.2% of these fibers (type B PAD pattern) and no PAD in 8.2-15.4% (type C PAD pattern). In contrast to muscle spindle afferents, only the 7.7-15.4% of fibers from tendon organs had a type A PAD pattern, 23-46.1% had a type B and 50-61.5% a type C PAD pattern. These observations suggest that the neuronal circuitry involved in the control of the synaptic effectiveness of muscle spindles and tendon organs is subjected to excitatory as well as to inhibitory influences from cutaneous and reticulospinal fibers. As shown in the accompanying

  17. Expression of muscle-gene-specific isozymes of phosphorylase and creatine kinase in innervated cultured human muscle

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Isozymes of creatine kinase and glycogen phosphorylase are excellent markers of skeletal muscle maturation. In adult innervated muscle only the muscle-gene-specific isozymes are present, whereas aneurally cultured human muscle has predominantly the fetal pattern of isozymes. We have studied the isozyme pattern of human muscle cultured in monolayer and innervated by rat embryo spinal cord explants for 20-42 d. In this culture system, large groups of innervated muscle fibers close to the ventral part of the spinal cord explant continuously contracted. The contractions were reversibly blocked by 1 mM d- tubocurarine. In those innervated fibers, the total activity and the muscle-gene-specific isozymes of both enzymes increased significantly. The amount of muscle-gene-specific isozymes directly correlated with the duration of innervation. Control noninnervated muscle fibers from the same dishes as the innervated fibers remained biochemically immature. This study demonstrated that de novo innervation of human muscle cultured in monolayer exerts a time-related maturational influence that is not mediated by a diffusable neural factor. PMID:3771644

  18. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  19. Expression of 5-HT3 receptors by extrinsic duodenal afferents contribute to intestinal inhibition of gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Helen E; Glatzle, Jorg; Robin, Carla; Meyer, James H; Phan, Thomas; Wong, Helen; Sternini, Catia

    2003-03-01

    Intestinal perfusion with carbohydrates inhibits gastric emptying via vagal and spinal capsaicin-sensitive afferent pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of 1) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(3) receptors (5-HT(3)R) in mediating glucose-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and 2) 5-HT(3)R expression in vagal and spinal afferents in innervating the duodenum. In awake rats fitted with gastric and duodenal cannulas, perfusion of the duodenum with glucose (50 and 100 mg) inhibited gastric emptying. Intestinal perfusion of mannitol inhibited gastric emptying only at the highest concentration (990 mosm/kgH(2)O). Pretreatment with the 5-HT(3)R antagonist tropisetron abolished both glucose- and mannitol-induced inhibition of gastric emptying. Retrograde labeling of visceral afferents by injection of dextran-conjugated Texas Red into the duodenal wall was used to identify extrinsic primary afferents. Immunoreactivity for 5-HT(3)R, visualized with an antibody directed to the COOH terminus of the rat 5-HT(3)R, was found in >80% of duodenal vagal and spinal afferents. These results show that duodenal extrinsic afferents express 5-HT(3)R and that the receptor mediates specific glucose-induced inhibition of gastric emptying. These findings support the hypothesis that enterochromaffin cells in the intestinal mucosa release 5-HT in response to glucose, which activates 5-HT(3)R on afferent nerve terminals to evoke reflex changes in gastric motility. The primary glucose sensors of the intestine may be mucosal enterochromaffin cells.

  20. Response properties of gerbil otolith afferents to small angle pitch and roll tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Angelaki, D. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The responses from isolated single otolith afferent fibers were obtained to small angle sinusoidal pitch and roll tilts in anesthetized gerbils. The stimulus directions that produced the maximum (response vector) and minimum response sensitivities were determined for each otolith afferent, with response vectors for the units being spread throughout the horizontal plane, similar to those reported for other species. A breadth of tuning measure was derived, with narrowly tuned neurons responding maximally to stimulation in one direction and minimally along an orthogonal ('null') direction. Most (approximately 80%) otolith afferents are narrowly tuned, however, some fibers were broadly tuned responding significantly to stimulations in any direction in the horizontal plane. The number of broadly tuned otolith afferents (approximately 20%) differs significantly from the more substantial number of broadly tuned vestibular nuclei neurons (88%) recently reported in rats.

  1. Afferent and Efferent Connections of the Cortex-Amygdala Transition Zone in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cádiz-Moretti, Bernardita; Abellán-Álvaro, María; Pardo-Bellver, Cecília; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The transitional zone between the ventral part of the piriform cortex and the anterior cortical nucleus of the amygdala, named the cortex-amygdala transition zone (CxA), shows two differential features that allow its identification as a particular structure. First, it receives dense cholinergic and dopaminergic innervations as compared to the adjacent piriform cortex and amygdala, and second, it receives projections from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs. In this work we have studied the pattern of afferent and efferent projections of the CxA, which are mainly unknown, by using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold and the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextranamine. The results show that the CxA receives a relatively restricted set of intratelencephalic connections, originated mainly by the olfactory system and basal forebrain, with minor afferents from the amygdala. The only relevant extratelencephalic afference originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The efferent projections of the CxA reciprocate the inputs from the piriform cortex and olfactory amygdala. In addition, the CxA projects densely to the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus and the olfactory tubercle. The extratelencephalic projections of the CxA are very scarce, and target mainly hypothalamic structures. The pattern of connections of the CxA suggests that it is indeed a transitional area between the piriform cortex and the cortical amygdala. Double labeling with choline acetyltransferase indicates that the afferent projection from the basal forebrain is the origin of its distinctive cholinergic innervation, and double labeling with dopamine transporter shows that the projection from the VTA is the source of dopaminergic innervation. These connectivity and neurochemical features, together with the fact that it receives vomeronasal in addition to olfactory information, suggest that the CxA may be involved in processing olfactory information endowed with relevant biological meaning, such as odors

  2. Afferent and Efferent Connections of the Cortex-Amygdala Transition Zone in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cádiz-Moretti, Bernardita; Abellán-Álvaro, María; Pardo-Bellver, Cecília; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The transitional zone between the ventral part of the piriform cortex and the anterior cortical nucleus of the amygdala, named the cortex-amygdala transition zone (CxA), shows two differential features that allow its identification as a particular structure. First, it receives dense cholinergic and dopaminergic innervations as compared to the adjacent piriform cortex and amygdala, and second, it receives projections from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs. In this work we have studied the pattern of afferent and efferent projections of the CxA, which are mainly unknown, by using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold and the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextranamine. The results show that the CxA receives a relatively restricted set of intratelencephalic connections, originated mainly by the olfactory system and basal forebrain, with minor afferents from the amygdala. The only relevant extratelencephalic afference originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The efferent projections of the CxA reciprocate the inputs from the piriform cortex and olfactory amygdala. In addition, the CxA projects densely to the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus and the olfactory tubercle. The extratelencephalic projections of the CxA are very scarce, and target mainly hypothalamic structures. The pattern of connections of the CxA suggests that it is indeed a transitional area between the piriform cortex and the cortical amygdala. Double labeling with choline acetyltransferase indicates that the afferent projection from the basal forebrain is the origin of its distinctive cholinergic innervation, and double labeling with dopamine transporter shows that the projection from the VTA is the source of dopaminergic innervation. These connectivity and neurochemical features, together with the fact that it receives vomeronasal in addition to olfactory information, suggest that the CxA may be involved in processing olfactory information endowed with relevant biological meaning, such as odors

  3. Variation in response dynamics of regular and irregular vestibular-nerve afferents during sinusoidal head rotations and currents in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Sung; Minor, Lloyd B; Della Santina, Charles C; Lasker, David M

    2011-05-01

    In mammals, vestibular-nerve afferents that innervate only type I hair cells (calyx-only afferents) respond nearly in phase with head acceleration for high-frequency motion, whereas afferents that innervate both type I and type II (dimorphic) or only type II (bouton-only) hair cells respond more in phase with head velocity. Afferents that exhibit irregular background discharge rates have a larger phase lead re-head velocity than those that fire more regularly. The goal of this study was to investigate the cause of the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents at high-frequency head rotations. Under the assumption that externally applied galvanic currents act directly on the nerve, we derived a transfer function describing the dynamics of a semicircular canal and its hair cells through comparison of responses to sinusoidally modulated head velocity and currents. Responses of all afferents were fit well with a transfer function with one zero (lead term). Best-fit lead terms describing responses to current for each group of afferents were similar to the lead term describing responses to head velocity for regular afferents (0.006 s + 1). This finding indicated that the pre-synaptic and synaptic inputs to regular afferents were likely to be pure velocity transducers. However, the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents could not be explained solely by the ratio of type I to II hair cells (Baird et al 1988), suggesting that the variation was caused by a combination of pre- (type of hair cell) and post-synaptic properties.

  4. Ovarian innervation develops before initiation of folliculogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Gibney, J A; Ojeda, S R

    1992-10-01

    Sympathetic neurotransmitters have been shown to be present in the ovary of the rat during early postnatal development and to affect steroidogenesis before the ovary becomes responsive to gonadotropins, and before the first primordial follicles are formed. This study was undertaken to determine if development of the ovarian innervation is an event that antedates the initiation of folliculogenesis in the rat, Rattus norvegicus. Serial sections of postnatal ovaries revealed a negligible frequency of follicles 24 h after birth (about 1 primordial follicle per ovary). Twelve hours later there were about 500 follicles per ovary, a number that more than doubled to about 1300 during the subsequent 12 h, indicating that an explosive period of follicular differentiation occurs between the end of postnatal days 1 and 2. Electron microscopy demonstrated that before birth the ovaries are already innervated by fibers containing clear and dense-core vesicles. Immunohistochemistry performed on either fetal (day 19) or newborn (less than 15h after birth) ovaries showed the presence of catecholaminergic nerves, identified by their content of immunoreactive tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. While some of these fibers innervate blood vessels, others are associated with primordial ovarian cells, thereby suggesting their participation in non-vascular functions. Since prefollicular ovaries are insensitive to gonadotropins, the results suggest that the developing ovary becomes subjected to direct neurogenic influences before it acquires responsiveness to gonadotropins.

  5. Eph/ephrin interactions modulate vascular sympathetic innervation.

    PubMed

    Damon, Deborah H; teRiele, Jaclyn A; Marko, Stephen B

    2010-12-08

    Ephs and ephrins are membrane-bound proteins that interact to modulate axon growth and neuronal function. We tested the hypothesis that eph/ephrin interactions affected the growth and function of vascular sympathetic innervation. Using RT-PCR analyses, we detected both classes of ephs (A and B) and both classes of ephrins (A and B) in sympathetic ganglia from neonatal and adult rats. Both classes of ephs (A and B) and both classes of ephrins (A and B) bound to the cell bodies and neurites of dissociated postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Messenger RNAs encoding for both classes of ephs (A and B) and both classes of ephrins (A and B) were also detected in sympathetically innervated arteries from neonatal and adult rats. These data suggest that ephrins/ephs on nerve fibers of postganglionic sympathetic neurons could interact with ephs/ephrins on cells in innervated arteries. We found that ephA4 reduced reinnervation of denervated femoral arteries. Reinnervation in the presence of ephA4-Fc (38.9±6.6%) was significantly less than that in the presence of IgG-Fc (62±10%; n=5; p<0.05; one-tailed unpaired t-test). These data indicate that eph/ephrin interactions modulated the growth of vascular sympathetic innervation. We also found that ephA4 increased basal release of norepinephrine from nerve terminals of isolated tail arteries. These data indicate that eph/ephrin interactions affect the growth and function of vascular sympathetic innervation.

  6. Pharmacologically Distinct Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Drive Efferent-Mediated Excitation in Calyx-Bearing Vestibular Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Kewin, Kevin; Jordan, Paivi M.; Cameron, Peter; Klapczynski, Marcin; McIntosh, J. Michael; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Lysakowski, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of vestibular efferent neurons rapidly excites the resting discharge of calyx/dimorphic (CD) afferents. In turtle, this excitation arises when acetylcholine (ACh), released from efferent terminals, directly depolarizes calyceal endings by activating nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs). Although molecular biological data from the peripheral vestibular system implicate most of the known nAChR subunits, specific information about those contributing to efferent-mediated excitation of CD afferents is lacking. We sought to identify the nAChR subunits that underlie the rapid excitation of CD afferents and whether they differ from α9α10 nAChRs on type II hair cells that drive efferent-mediated inhibition in adjacent bouton afferents. We recorded from CD and bouton afferents innervating the turtle posterior crista during electrical stimulation of vestibular efferents while applying several subtype-selective nAChR agonists and antagonists. The α9α10 nAChR antagonists, α-bungarotoxin and α-conotoxin RgIA, blocked efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents while leaving efferent-mediated excitation in CD units largely intact. Conversely, 5-iodo-A-85380, sazetidine-A, varenicline, α-conotoxin MII, and bPiDDB (N,N-dodecane-1,12-diyl-bis-3-picolinium dibromide) blocked efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents without affecting efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents. This pharmacological profile suggested that calyceal nAChRs contain α6 and β2, but not α9, nAChR subunits. Selective blockade of efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents distinguished dimorphic from calyx afferents by revealing type II hair cell input. Dimorphic afferents differed in having higher mean discharge rates and a mean efferent-mediated excitation that was smaller in amplitude yet longer in duration. Molecular biological data demonstrated the expression of α9 in turtle hair cells and α4 and β2 in associated vestibular ganglia. PMID:25716861

  7. Serotonergic innervation of the auditory brainstem of the Mexican free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Hurley, L M; Thompson, A M

    2001-06-18

    Anatomical and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin alters the processing of sound in the auditory brainstem of many mammalian species. The Mexican free-tailed bat is a hearing specialist, like other microchiropteran bats. At the same time, many aspects of its auditory brainstem are similar to those in other mammals. This dichotomy raises an interesting question regarding the serotonergic innervation of the bat auditory brainstem: Is the serotonergic input to the auditory brainstem similar in bats and other mammals, or are there specializations in the serotonergic innervation of bats that may be related to their exceptional hearing capabilities? To address this question, we immunocytochemically labeled serotonergic fibers in the brainstem of the Mexican free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis. We found many similarities in the pattern of serotonergic innervation of the auditory brainstem in Tadarida compared with other mammals, but we also found two striking differences. Similarities to staining patterns in other mammals included a higher density of serotonergic fibers in the dorsal cochlear nucleus and in granule cell regions than in the ventral cochlear nucleus, a high density of fibers in some periolivary nuclei of the superior olive, and a higher density of fibers in peripheral regions of the inferior colliculus compared with its core. The two novel features of serotonergic innervation in Tadarida were a high density of fibers in the fusiform layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus relative to surrounding layers and a relatively high density of serotonergic fibers in the low-frequency regions of the lateral and medial superior olive.

  8. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  9. Roles of isolectin B4-binding afferents in colorectal mechanical nociception

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Feng, Bin; Kaji, Kaori; Schwartz, Erica S.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Isolectin B4-binding (IB4+) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are distinct from peptidergic DRG neurons in their terminal location in the spinal cord and respective contributions to various classes and modalities of nociception. In DRG neurons innervating the mouse colon (c-DRG neurons), the reported proportion of IB4+ population is inconsistent across studies, and little is known regarding their role in colorectal mechano-nociception. To address these issues, in C57BL/6J mice, we quantified IB4-binding (IB4+) after labeling c-DRG neurons with Fast Blue (FB) and examined functional consequences of ablating these neurons by IB4-conjugated saporin (IB4-sap). Sixty one percent of FB-labeled neurons in the L6 DRG were IB4+, and 95% of these IB4+ c-DRG neurons were peptidergic. Intrathecal administration of IB4-sap reduced the proportion of IB4+ c-DRG neurons to 37%, which was due to the loss of c-DRG neurons showing strong to medium IB4+ intensity; c-DRG neurons with weak IB4+ intensity were spared. However, this loss altered neither nociceptive behaviors to colorectal distension nor the relative proportions of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent classes characterized by single-fiber recordings. These findings demonstrate that more than one half of viscerosensory L6 c-DRG neurons in C57BL/6J mouse are IB4+ and suggest, in contrast to the reported roles of IB4+/non-peptidergic neurons in cutaneous mechano-nociception, c-DRG neurons with strong to medium IB4+ intensity do not play a significant role in colorectal mechano-nociception. PMID:26447707

  10. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood.

  11. Sympathetic innervation of the ileocecal junction in horses.

    PubMed

    Russo, D; Bombardi, C; Grandis, A; Furness, J B; Spadari, A; Bernardini, C; Chiocchetti, R

    2010-10-01

    The distribution and chemical phenotypes of sympathetic and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons innervating the equine ileocecal junction (ICJ) were studied by combining retrograde tracing and immunohistochemistry. Immunoreactivity (IR) for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) was investigated. Sympathetic neurons projecting to the ICJ were distributed within the celiac (CG), cranial mesenteric (CranMG), and caudal mesenteric (CaudMG) ganglia, as well as in the last ganglia of the thoracic sympathetic chain and in the splanchnic ganglia. In the CG and CranMG 91 +/- 8% and 93 +/- 12% of the neurons innervating the ICJ expressed TH- and DBH-IR, respectively. In the CaudMG 90 +/- 15% and 94 +/- 5% of ICJ innervating neurons were TH- and DBH-IR, respectively. Sympathetic (TH-IR) fibers innervated the myenteric and submucosal ganglia, ileal blood vessels, and the muscle layers. They were more concentrated at the ICJ level and were also seen encircling myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal plexus (SMP) descending neurons that were retrogradely labeled from the ICJ. Among the few retrogradely labeled DRG neurons, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-IR nerve cells were observed. Dense networks of CGRP-, nNOS-, and SP-IR varicosities were seen around retrogradely labeled prevertebral ganglia neurons. The CGRP-IR fibers are probably the endings of neurons projecting from the intestine to the prevertebral ganglia. These findings indicate that this crucial region of the intestinal tract is strongly influenced by the sympathetic system and that sensory information of visceral origin influences the sympathetic control of the ICJ.

  12. The action of knee joint afferents and the concomitant influence of cutaneous (sural) afferents on the discharge of triceps surae gamma-motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, P H; Davey, N J; Ferrell, W R; Baxendale, R H

    1996-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of group II joint afferents of the posterior articular nerve (PAN) to the knee evoked short-latency facilitation and/or inhibition of the background discharge of gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) gamma-motoneurones in decerebrated spinal cats. The latencies of these responses were consistent with mediation via segmental oligosynaptic spinal pathways. In addition, a longer-latency facilitation was frequently observed. Mechanical non-noxious stimulation of the skin within the field of innervation of the sural nerve, on the lateral aspect of the heel, suppressed the short-latency facilitation, but not the inhibition or long-latency facilitation. Brief mechanical indentation of the posterior aspect of the knee joint capsule could elicit facilitation or inhibition of gamma-motoneurones. Facilitation, but not inhibition, was blocked by anaesthesia or section of the PAN. Both actions could be suppressed by mechanical stimulation of the heel. We conclude that GS gamma-motoneurones receive both facilitatory and inhibitory segmental inputs from group II articular afferents arising in the knee joint. Cutaneous afferents from the sural field exert a selective inhibitory influence over the facilitation of fusimotor discharge by articular afferents.

  13. Primary afferent depolarization of muscle afferents elicited by stimulation of joint afferents in cats with intact neuraxis and during reversible spinalization.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Jiménez, I; Schmidt, R F; Rudomin, P

    1993-11-01

    1. In the anesthetized and artificially ventilated cat, stimulation of the posterior articular nerve (PAN) with low strengths (1.2-1.4 x T) produced a small negative response (N1) in the cord dorsum of the lumbosacral spinal cord with a mean onset latency of 5.2 ms. Stronger stimuli (> 1.4 x T) produced two additional components (N2 and N3) with longer latencies (mean latencies 7.5 and 15.7 ms, respectively), usually followed by a slow positivity lasting 100-150 ms. With stimulus strengths above 10 x T there was in some experiments a delayed response (N4; mean latency 32 ms). 2. Activation of posterior knee joint nerve with single pulses and intensities producing N1 responses only, usually produced no dorsal root potentials (DRPs), or these were rather small. Stimulation with strengths producing N2 and N3 responses produced distinct DRPs. Trains of pulses were clearly more effective than single pulses in producing DRPs, even in the low-intensity range. 3. Cooling the thoracic spinal cord to block impulse conduction, increased the DRPs and the N3 responses produced by PAN stimulation without significantly affecting the N2 responses. Reversible spinalization also increased the DRPs produced by stimulation of cutaneous nerves. In contrast, the DRPs produced by stimulation of group I afferents from flexors were reduced. 4. Conditioning electrical stimulation of intermediate and high-threshold myelinated fibers in the PAN depressed the DRPs produced by stimulation of group I muscle and of cutaneous nerves. 5. Analysis of the intraspinal threshold changes of single Ia and Ib fibers has provided evidence that stimulation of intermediate and high threshold myelinated fibers in the posterior knee joint nerve inhibits the primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of Ia fibers, and may either produce PAD or inhibit the PAD in Ib fibers, in the same manner as stimulation of cutaneous nerves. In 7/16 group I fibers the inhibition of the PAD was increased during reversible

  14. Firing patterns and functional roles of different classes of spinal afferents in rectal nerves during colonic migrating motor complexes in mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Zagorodnyuk, Vladimir P; Kyloh, Melinda; Brookes, Simon J; Nicholas, Sarah J; Spencer, Nick J

    2012-08-01

    The functional role of the different classes of visceral afferents that innervate the large intestine is poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range rectal afferents play an important role in the detection and transmission of visceral pain induced by noxious colorectal distension in mice. However, it is not clear which classes of spinal afferents are activated during naturally occurring colonic motor patterns or during intense contractions of the gut smooth muscle. We developed an in vitro colorectum preparation to test how the major classes of rectal afferents are activated during spontaneous colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC) or pharmacologically induced contraction. During CMMCs, circular muscle contractions increased firing in low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range muscular afferents and muscular-mucosal afferents, which generated a mean firing rate of 1.53 ± 0.23 Hz (n = 8) under isotonic conditions and 2.52 ± 0.36 Hz (n = 17) under isometric conditions. These low-threshold rectal afferents were reliably activated by low levels of circumferential stretch induced by increases in length (1-2 mm) or load (1-3 g). In a small proportion of cases (5 of 34 units), some low-threshold muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents decreased their firing rate during the peak of the CMMC contractions. High-threshold afferents were never activated during spontaneous CMMC contractions or tonic contractions induced by bethanechol (100 μM). High-threshold rectal afferents were only activated by intense levels of circumferential stretch (10-20 g). These results show that, in the rectal nerves of mice, low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents are excited during contraction of the circular muscle that occurs during spontaneous CMMCs. No activation of high-threshold rectal afferents was detected during CMMCs or intense contractile activity in naïve mouse colorectum.

  15. Innervation pattern of polycystic ovaries in the women.

    PubMed

    Wojtkiewicz, Joanna; Jana, Barbara; Kozłowska, Anna; Crayton, Robert; Majewski, Mariusz; Zalecki, Michał; Baranowski, Włodzimierz; Radziszewski, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the changes in both the distribution pattern and density of nerve fibers containing dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), galanin (GAL) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the human polycystic ovaries. In the polycystic ovaries, when compared to the immunoreactions pattern observed in the control gonads, following changes were revealed: (1) an increase in the number of DβH-, VAChT-, VIP- or GAL-immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers within the stroma as well as in the number of DβH-IR fibers near primordial follicles and medullar veins and venules; (2) a reduction in the number of nerve fibers containing nNOS, CGRP, SOM, PACAP within the stroma and in the numbers of CGRP-IR fibers around arteries; (3) an appearance of SP- and GAL-IR fibers around medullar and cortical arteries, arterioles, veins and venules, with except of GAL-IR fibers supplying medullar veins; and (4) the lack of nNOS-IR nerve fibers near primordial follicles and VIP-IR nerves around medullar arteries and arterioles. In conclusion, our results suggest that the changes in the innervation pattern of the polycystic ovaries in human may play an important role in the pathogenesis and/or course of this disorder.

  16. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  17. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  18. Quantitative analysis of the sympathetic innervation of the rat knee joint

    PubMed Central

    CATRE, MEL G.; SALO, PAUL T.

    1999-01-01

    Retrograde tracing with Fluoro-Gold (FG) was used to identify the complete population of knee joint sympathetic postganglionic efferents in the lumbar sympathetic chain of adult female Wistar rats. In 6 rats, the total number and distribution of FG-labelled neurons in the lumbar sympathetic chain was determined. The rat knee joint is supplied by an average of 187±57 sympathetic afferents with the majority at the L3 and L4 levels. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), somatostatin (SS) or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) revealed that 33% of knee joint sympathetic afferents contained TH, 42% contained VIP, and none contained somatostatin. Retrograde tracing with FG provided accurate and reproducible labelling of the joint-innervating subpopulation of sympathetic efferent neurons. This model lends itself to the further study of the molecular responses of this neuronal population in the various disorders and conditions affecting joints. PMID:10337955

  19. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    DOE PAGES

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; ...

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spikemore » due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.« less

  20. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.

  1. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons.

    PubMed

    Dieni, Cristina V; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B; Kuo, Chay T; Wadiche, Jacques I; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.

  2. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2001-01-01

    Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens) and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology. PMID:11686889

  3. The optimal neural strategy for a stable motor task requires a compromise between level of muscle cocontraction and synaptic gain of afferent feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Negro, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Increasing joint stiffness by cocontraction of antagonist muscles and compensatory reflexes are neural strategies to minimize the impact of unexpected perturbations on movement. Combining these strategies, however, may compromise steadiness, as elements of the afferent input to motor pools innervating antagonist muscles are inherently negatively correlated. Consequently, a high afferent gain and active contractions of both muscles may imply negatively correlated neural drives to the muscles and thus an unstable limb position. This hypothesis was systematically explored with a novel computational model of the peripheral nervous system and the mechanics of one limb. Two populations of motor neurons received synaptic input from descending drive, spinal interneurons, and afferent feedback. Muscle force, simulated based on motor unit activity, determined limb movement that gave rise to afferent feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. The results indicated that optimal steadiness was achieved with low synaptic gain of the afferent feedback. High afferent gains during cocontraction implied increased levels of common drive in the motor neuron outputs, which were negatively correlated across the two populations, constraining instability of the limb. Increasing the force acting on the joint and the afferent gain both effectively minimized the impact of an external perturbation, and suboptimal adjustment of the afferent gain could be compensated by muscle cocontraction. These observations show that selection of the strategy for a given contraction implies a compromise between steadiness and effectiveness of compensations to perturbations. This indicates that a task-dependent selection of neural strategy for steadiness is necessary when acting in different environments. PMID:26203102

  4. Patterns of innervation of the lacrimal gland with clinical application.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gabriel; Balsiger, Heather; Kluckman, Matthew; Fan, Jerry; Gest, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Parasympathetic stimulation of the lacrimal gland is responsible for tear production, and this innervation originates from fibers conveyed in the facial nerve. After synapse in the pterygopalatine ganglion, postsynaptic parasympathetic fibers travel within the zygomatic and zygomaticotemporal nerves (ZTN) into the orbit. As described in most anatomy texts, ZTN communicates with the lacrimal nerve (LN) posterior to the gland and then secretomotor fibers enter the gland. This study was performed to gain a better understanding of the innervation of the lacrimal gland. Seventeen cadaver heads were bisected for a total of 34 sides, which then underwent dissection of the superolateral orbital region to observe the course for the LN and ZTN. Three variations of the course of the LN and ZTN were found. In 20 (60.6%) dissections it was documented that the ZTN entered directly into the lacrimal gland with no communication with the LN. In 12 (36.4%) of the bisected heads, ZTN had both a direct connection into the gland and a communicating branch with the LN. In only one (3.0%) bisected head, ZTN communicated with the LN before entering the gland as it is commonly described in anatomy texts. Our study reveals that the ZTN usually takes a different course than is classically described in most anatomy textbooks. A greater understanding of the typical course these nerves take may help surgeons identify them more easily and avoid damaging them.

  5. Selective cortical and segmental control of primary afferent depolarization of single muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, J R; Quevedo, J; Rudomin, P

    1997-03-01

    This study was primarily aimed at investigating the selectivity of the cortico-spinal actions exerted on the pathways mediating primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents ending within the intermediate nucleus at the L6-L7 segmental level. To this end we analyzed, in the anesthetized cat, the effects produced by electrical stimulation of sensory nerves and of the cerebral cortex on (a) the intraspinal threshold of pairs of single group I afferent fibers belonging to the same or to different hindlimb muscles and (b) the intraspinal threshold of two collaterals of the same muscle afferent fiber. Afferent fibers were classified in three categories, according to the effects produced by stimulation of segmental nerves and of the cerebral cortex. Twenty-five of 40 fibers (62.5%) were depolarized by stimulation of group I posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) or tibialis (Tib) fibers, but not by stimulation of the cerebral cortex or of cutaneous and joint nerves, which instead inhibited the PBSt- or Tib-induced PAD (type A PAD pattern, usually seen in Ia fibers). The remaining 15 fibers (37.5%) were all depolarized by stimulation of the PBSt or Tib nerves and the cerebral cortex. Stimulation of cutaneous and joint nerves produced PAD in 10 of those 15 fibers (type B PAD pattern) and inhibited the PBSt- or Tib-induced PAD in the 5 remaining fibers (type C PAD pattern). Fibers with a type B or C PAD pattern are likely to be Ib. Not all sites in the cerebral cortex inhibited with the same effectiveness the segmentally induced PAD of group I fibers with a type A PAD pattern. With the weakest stimulation of the cortical surface, the most effective sites that inhibited the PAD of individual fibers were surrounded by less effective sites, scattered all along the motor cortex (area 4gamma and 6) and sensory cortex (areas 3, 2 and 1), far beyond the area of projection of group I fibers from the hindlimb. With higher strengths of

  6. Multiple innervation of normal and re-innervated parasympathetic neurones in the frog cardiac ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, M J; Sargent, P B

    1978-01-01

    1. Multiple innervation of parasympathetic neurones was examined in normal and re-innervated frog cardiac ganglia. The number of synaptic inputs impinging upon individual ganglion cells was determined by recording intracellularly and stimulating the vagosympathetic nerves. 2. In unoperated cardiac ganglia most neurones (93%) received a large, suprathreshold synaptic input. Some ganglion cells received additional, small synaptic inputs. Roughly equal numbers of cells encountered were singly and doubly innervated, and only 8% received more than two inputs. 3. Re-innervation of cardiac ganglion cells began three weeks after bilateral crush of the vagosympathetic nerves. By 7 weeks more than 90% of the ganglion cells were re-innervated. At this stage the pattern of multiple innervation was significantly different than normal: doubly innervated neurones outnumbered singly innervated ones, and 31% of the cells encountered received more than two inputs. This pattern was stable for at least a year. 4. These results indicate that polyneuronal innervation of cardiac ganglion cells is more widespread after re-innervation than it is normally and, furthermore, that synapse elimination does not occur during re-innervation of these cells. Images Plate 1 PMID:212557

  7. Type II spiral ganglion afferent neurons drive medial olivocochlear reflex suppression of the cochlear amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Froud, Kristina E.; Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Cederholm, Jennie M. E.; Klugmann, Matthias; Sandow, Shaun L.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F.; Housley, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic adjustment of hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity is mediated by the medial olivocochlear efferent reflex, which suppresses the gain of the ‘cochlear amplifier' in each ear. Such efferent feedback is important for promoting discrimination of sounds in background noise, sound localization and protecting the cochleae from acoustic overstimulation. However, the sensory driver for the olivocochlear reflex is unknown. Here, we resolve this longstanding question using a mouse model null for the gene encoding the type III intermediate filament peripherin (Prph). Prph(−/−) mice lacked type II spiral ganglion neuron innervation of the outer hair cells, whereas innervation of the inner hair cells by type I spiral ganglion neurons was normal. Compared with Prph(+/+) controls, both contralateral and ipsilateral olivocochlear efferent-mediated suppression of the cochlear amplifier were absent in Prph(−/−) mice, demonstrating that outer hair cells and their type II afferents constitute the sensory drive for the olivocochlear efferent reflex. PMID:25965946

  8. Afferent connections of the cerebellum in various types of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Bangma, G C; ten Donkelaar, H

    1982-05-20

    The origin of cerebellar afferents was studied in various types of reptiles, viz., the turtles Pseudemys scripta elegans and Testudo hermanni, the lizard Varanus exanthematicus, and the snake Python regius, with retrograde tracers (the enzyme horseradish peroxidase and the fluorescent tracer "Fast Blue"). Projections to the cerebellum were demonstrated from the nucleus of the basal optic root, the interstitial nucleus of the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, the vestibular ganglion, and the vestibular nuclear complex, two somatosensory nuclei, viz., the descending nucleus of the trigeminal nerve and the nucleus of the dorsal funiculus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the reticular formation, and throughout the spinal cord. A distinct bilateral projection to the cerebellum was found to arise in a nucleus previously called nucleus parvocellularis medialis (Ebbesson, '67). In the present study this cell mass is termed the perihypoglossal nuclear complex, considering its comparable position and fiber connections to the perihypoglossal nuclei in mammals. In all reptilian species studied a contralateral cerebellar projection of a cell mass located in the caudal brainstem adjacent to the nucleus raphes inferior was observed. It seems likely that this cell mass represents the reptilian homologue of the mammalian inferior olive. Most of the spinocerebellar fibers appeared to arise in neurons located in area VII-VIII of the gray matter. In this respect the origin of the spinocerebellar projection in reptiles resembles the origin of the rostral and ventral spinocerebellar tracts in mammals. No indications for the existence of a column of Clarke or a central cervical nucleus in the reptilian spinal cord were obtained. On comparison of the cerebellum afferents in reptiles with the known connections of the cerebellum in amphibians, birds, and mammals, a basic pattern of cerebellar afferent projections appears to exist in these vertebrate classes, including retinal

  9. Botulinum toxin in Migraine: Role of transport in trigemino-somatic and trigemino-vascular afferents

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, Ramachandran; Carmen, Lam; Yaksh Tony, L

    2015-01-01

    Migraine secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Reported efficacy of extracranial botulinum toxin (BoNT) in treating migraine is surprising since a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for its effect upon meningeal input. We hypothesize that intradermal BoNT acts through central transport in somatic afferents. Anesthetized C57Bl/6 mice (male) received unilateral supraorbital (SO) injections of BoNT-B (1.5 U/40 μl) or saline. 3 days later, mice received ipsilateral (ipsi) -SO capsaicin (2.5 μg/30 μl) or meningeal capsaicin (4 μl of 1mg/ml). Pre-treatment with ipsi-SO BONT-B i) decreased nocicsponsive ipsilateral wiping behavior following ipsi-SO capsaicin; ii) produced cleavage of VAMP in the V1 region of ipsi-TG and in TG neurons showing WGA after SO injection; iii) reduced expression of c-fos in ipsi-TNC following ipsi-SO capsaicin; iv) reduced c-fos activation and NK-1 internalization in ipsi-TNC secondary to ipsi-meningeal capsaicin; vi) SO WGA did not label dural afferents. We conclude that BoNT-B is taken up by peripheral afferents and transported to central terminals where it inhibits transmitter release resulting in decreased activation of second order neurons. Further, this study supports the hypothesis that SO BoNT exerts a trans-synaptic action on either the second order neuron (which receives convergent input from the meningeal afferent) or the terminal/TG of the converging meningeal afferent. PMID:25958249

  10. Botulinum toxin in migraine: Role of transport in trigemino-somatic and trigemino-vascular afferents.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Lam, Carmen; Yaksh, Tony L

    2015-07-01

    Migraine secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Reported efficacy of extracranial botulinum toxin (BoNT) in treating migraine is surprising since a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for its effect upon meningeal input. We hypothesize that intradermal BoNT acts through central transport in somatic afferents. Anesthetized C57Bl/6 mice (male) received unilateral supraorbital (SO) injections of BoNT-B (1.5 U/40 μl) or saline. 3 days later, mice received ipsilateral (ipsi)-SO capsaicin (20 μl of 0.5mM solution) or meningeal capsaicin (4 μl of 0.35 μM). Pre-treatment with ipsi-SO BoNT-B i) decreased nocicsponsive ipsilateral wiping behavior following ipsi-SO capsaicin; ii) produced cleavage of VAMP in the V1 region of ipsi-TG and in TG neurons showing WGA after SO injection; iii) reduced expression of c-fos in ipsi-TNC following ipsi-SO capsaicin; iv) reduced c-fos activation and NK-1 internalization in ipsi-TNC secondary to ipsi-meningeal capsaicin; and vi) SO WGA did not label dural afferents. We conclude that BoNT-B is taken up by peripheral afferents and transported to central terminals where it inhibits transmitter release resulting in decreased activation of second order neurons. Further, this study supports the hypothesis that SO BoNT exerts a trans-synaptic action on either the second order neuron (which receives convergent input from the meningeal afferent) or the terminal/TG of the converging meningeal afferent.

  11. Unmyelinated afferents constitute a second system coding tactile stimuli of the human hairy skin.

    PubMed

    Vallbo, A B; Olausson, H; Wessberg, J

    1999-06-01

    Impulses were recorded from unmyelinated afferents innervating the forearm skin of human subjects using the technique of microneurography. Units responding to innocuous skin deformation were selected. The sample (n = 38) was split into low-threshold units (n = 27) and high-threshold units (n = 11) on the basis of three distinctive features, i.e., thresholds to skin deformation, size of response to innocuous skin deformation, and differential response to sharp and blunt stimuli. The low-threshold units provisionally were denoted tactile afferents on the basis of their response properties, which strongly suggest that they are coding some feature of tactile stimuli. They exhibited, in many respects, similar functional properties as described for low-threshold C-mechanoreceptive units in other mammals. However, a delayed acceleration, not previously demonstrated, was observed in response to long-lasting innocuous indentations. It was concluded that human hairy skin is innervated by a system of highly sensitive mechanoreceptive units with unmyelinated afferents akin to the system previously described in other mammals. The confirmation that the system is present in the forearm skin and not only in the face area where it first was identified suggests a largely general distribution although there are indications that the tactile C afferents may be lacking in the very distal parts of the limbs. The functional role of the system remains to be assessed although physiological properties of the sense organs invite to speculations that the slow tactile system might have closer relations to limbic functions than to cognitive and motor functions.

  12. Cutaneous innervation of the human face as assessed by skin biopsy.

    PubMed

    Nolano, Maria; Provitera, Vincenzo; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Leandri, Massimo; Biasiotta, Antonella; Cruccu, Giorgio; Santoro, Lucio; Truini, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The morphology of cutaneous sensory and autonomic innervation in human trigeminal territory is still unknown. The aim of this study is to describe facial cutaneous innervation using skin biopsy. This new tool could be useful in understanding the mechanisms underlying several facial pain conditions. In 30 healthy subjects, we quantified epidermal nerve fibers (ENFs) and dermal myelinated fibers (MFs) in V1, V2 and V3, using indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy applied to 2-mm punch skin biopsies from areas adjacent to the eyebrow, upper and lower lip. Using selective markers, we also evaluated the distribution of peptidergic, cholinergic and noradrenergic fibers. Facial skin appeared abundantly innervated and rich in annexes. The ENF density decreased and the MF density increased, moving from the supraorbital to the perioral skin. Noradrenergic sudomotor fibers were particularly and constantly expressed compared with other body sites. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive (VIP-ir) fibers appeared peculiar for their constant presence in the subepidermal neural plexus - in close contact, but without colocalization with calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (Sub-P)-ir fibers. Finally, in perioral skin samples, we observed striated muscle fibers with their motor nerves and motor endplates. Our work provides the first morphological study of human facial cutaneous innervation, highlighting some unique features of this territory. Quantification of unmyelinated and myelinated fibers on 2-mm punch biopsies appeared to be feasible and reliable. Facial skin biopsy may be a new approach with which to study and to better characterize facial pain syndromes.

  13. Cortical Presynaptic Control of Dorsal Horn C–Afferents in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Lamina 5 sensorimotor cortex pyramidal neurons project to the spinal cord, participating in the modulation of several modalities of information transmission. A well-studied mechanism by which the corticospinal projection modulates sensory information is primary afferent depolarization, which has been characterized in fast muscular and cutaneous, but not in slow-conducting nociceptive skin afferents. Here we investigated whether the inhibition of nociceptive sensory information, produced by activation of the sensorimotor cortex, involves a direct presynaptic modulation of C primary afferents. In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of sensorimotor cortex activation on post tetanic potentiation (PTP) and the paired pulse ratio (PPR) of dorsal horn field potentials evoked by C–fiber stimulation in the sural (SU) and sciatic (SC) nerves. We also explored the time course of the excitability changes in nociceptive afferents produced by cortical stimulation. We observed that the development of PTP was completely blocked when C-fiber tetanic stimulation was paired with cortex stimulation. In addition, sensorimotor cortex activation by topical administration of bicuculline (BIC) produced a reduction in the amplitude of C–fiber responses, as well as an increase in the PPR. Furthermore, increases in the intraspinal excitability of slow-conducting fiber terminals, produced by sensorimotor cortex stimulation, were indicative of primary afferent depolarization. Topical administration of BIC in the spinal cord blocked the inhibition of C–fiber neuronal responses produced by cortical stimulation. Dorsal horn neurons responding to sensorimotor cortex stimulation also exhibited a peripheral receptive field and responded to stimulation of fast cutaneous myelinated fibers. Our results suggest that corticospinal inhibition of nociceptive responses is due in part to a modulation of the excitability of primary C–fibers by means of GABAergic inhibitory

  14. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

    PubMed

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Soellner, Heidi; Bianchi, Elisa; Novitch, Bennett G; Huber, Andrea B

    2011-02-01

    The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  15. Intrafusal motor innervation: a quantitative histological analysis of tenuissimus muscle spindles in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Banks, R W

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the motor innervation of intrafusal muscle fibres is described, based on teased silver-impregnated spindles of the tenuissimus muscle of the cat. Included in the analysis are the number and distribution of intrafusal branches of both skeletofusimotor (beta) and purely fusimotor (gamma) axons, and the form of their endings. The number of axonal branches per spindle was found to follow binomial probability distributions, as had previously been shown for the afferent axons. There was a strong correlation between the numbers of gamma intrafusal branches and afferent axons, but none for the intrafusal branches of beta axons. The degree of segregation of gamma input to bag2 and chain fibres was assessed and was found, among other things, to be related to the presence of secondary sensory endings in the same pole. In this and other respects it did not appear to have the properties that would be expected if independent activation of the bag2 and chain fibres were to be functionally important. Morphometric analysis of the motor endings supplied to bag2 or chain fibres by gamma axons revealed some differences between those of intrafusal branches with segregated as opposed to unsegregated distributions, but this cannot be taken as evidence of more than one type of static gamma motoneuron because of the likely contribution of other influential factors such as fibre size. Finally, the relevance of studies on intrafusal motor innervation to the concept of the motor unit and its development are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7559110

  16. [Microscopic innervation and vascularization of the tongue. General study].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, A; Sanchiz, O

    1992-01-01

    Our study deals with 23 prenatal human tongues, and a comparative study was carried out on one neonatal tongue and a few human and animal postnatal tongues. Sagittal and coronal sections were stained with various techniques. After the 7th week, the development of the nerves and their relationships with the neighboring structures can be observed. There are very few capillaries making up the superficial vascular network under the epithelium. The vessels whose walls are beginning to develop include the future red blood cells with their basophilic nuclei. During the whole process of evolution, there is a tight correlation between the collagen fibers and the neighboring structures. The innervation and vascularization--the latter with changes in the vascular walls--progressively increase. A short time before birth, the nerve fibers include their characteristic components, except for the Schmidt-Lantermann fissures. A considerable innervation advances towards the papillae, and anterior and posterior nerve networks enter the papillae, whose connective tissue includes groups of corpuscles on serial sections.

  17. Deficient Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Innervation in the Sweat Glands of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz-Erian, Peter; Dey, Richard D.; Flux, Marinus; Said, Sami I.

    1985-09-01

    The innervation of acini and ducts of eccrine sweat glands by immunoreactive, vasoactive intestinal peptide--containing nerve fibers was sharply reduced in seven patients with cystic fibrosis compared to eight normal subjects. The decrease in innervation by this neuropeptide, which has been shown to promote blood flow and the movement of water and chloride across epithelial surfaces in other systems, may be a basic mechanism for the decreased water content and relative impermeability of the epithelium to chloride and other ions that characterize cystic fibrosis.

  18. Dynamic Expression of Serotonin Receptor 5-HT3A in Developing Sensory Innervation of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, K. Elaine; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Sensory afferent signaling is required for normal function of the lower urinary tract (LUT). Despite the wide prevalence of bladder dysfunction and pelvic pain syndromes, few effective treatment options are available. Serotonin receptor 5-HT3A is a known mediator of visceral afferent signaling and has been implicated in bladder function. However, basic expression patterns for this gene and others among developing bladder sensory afferents that could be used to inform regenerative efforts aimed at treating deficiencies in pelvic innervation are lacking. To gain greater insight into the molecular characteristics of bladder sensory innervation, we conducted a thorough characterization of Htr3a expression in developing and adult bladder-projecting lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Using a transgenic Htr3a-EGFP reporter mouse line, we identified 5-HT3A expression at 10 days post coitus (dpc) in neural crest derivatives and in 12 dpc lumbosacral DRG. Using immunohistochemical co-localization we observed Htr3a-EGFP expression in developing lumbosacral DRG that partially coincides with neuropeptides CGRP and Substance P and capsaicin receptor TRPV1. A majority of Htr3a-EGFP+ DRG neurons also express a marker of myelinated Aδ neurons, NF200. There was no co-localization of 5-HT3A with the TRPV4 receptor. We employed retrograde tracing in adult Htr3a-EGFP mice to quantify the contribution of 5-HT3A+ DRG neurons to bladder afferent innervation. We found that 5-HT3A is expressed in a substantial proportion of retrograde traced DRG neurons in both rostral (L1, L2) and caudal (L6, S1) axial levels that supply bladder innervation. Most bladder-projecting Htr3a-EGFP+ neurons that co-express CGRP, Substance P, or TRPV1 are found in L1, L2 DRG, whereas Htr3a-EGFP+, NF200+ bladder-projecting neurons are from the L6, S1 axial levels. Our findings contribute much needed information regarding the development of LUT innervation and highlight the 5-HT3A serotonin receptor as

  19. Differential action of (-)-baclofen on the primary afferent depolarization produced by segmental and descending inputs.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present series of experiments was to analyze, in anesthetized and paralyzed cats, the effects of (-)-baclofen and picrotoxin on the primary afferent depolarization (PAD) generated in single Ib afferent fibers by either intraspinal microstimulation or stimulation of the segmental and descending pathways. PAD was estimated by recording dorsal root potentials and by measuring the changes in the intraspinal activation threshold of single Ib muscle afferent fibers. The PAD elicited by stimulation of group I muscle or cutaneous afferents was readily depressed and often abolished 20-40 min after the intravenous injection of 1-2 mg/kg (-)-baclofen. In contrast, the same amounts of (-)-baclofen produced a relatively small depression of the PAD elicited by stimulation of the brainstem reticular formation (RF). The monosynaptic PAD produced in single Ib fibers by intraspinal microstimulation within the intermediate nucleus was depressed and sometimes abolished following the i.v. injections of 1-2 mg/kg (-)-baclofen. Twenty to forty minutes after the i.v. injection of picrotoxin (0.5-1 mg/kg), there was a strong depression of the PAD elicited by stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents as well as of the PAD produced by stimulation of the RF and the PAD produced by intraspinal microstimulation. The results obtained suggest that, in addition to its action on primary afferents, (-)-baclofen may depress impulse activity and/or transmitter release in a population of last-order GABAergic interneurons that mediate the PAD of Ib fibers. The existence of GABAb autoreceptors in last-order interneurons mediating the PAD may function as a self-limiting mechanism controlling the synaptic efficacy of these interneurons.

  20. Rescue of neuronal function by cross-regeneration of cutaneous afferents into muscle in cats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, H; Johnson, R D; Munson, J B

    1993-07-01

    1. This study investigates the relation between the peripheral innervation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents and the postsynaptic potentials elicited by electrical stimulation of those afferents. 2. In cats deeply anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) and postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in spinal motoneurons were elicited by stimulation of the caudal cutaneous sural nerve (CCS), the lateral cutaneous sural nerve (LCS), and the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle nerve. We tested 1) unoperated cats, and cats in which CCS has been 2) chronically axotomized and ligated, 3) cut and self-reunited, 4) cut and cross-united with LCS, or 5) cut and cross-united with the MG. Terminal experiments were performed 3-36 mo after initial surgery. 3. In cats in which the CCS had been self-reunited or cross-united distally with LCS, tactile stimulation of the hairy skin normally innervated by the distal nerve activated afferents in the CCS central to the coaptation, indicating that former CCS afferents had regenerated into native or foreign skin, respectively. 4. In cats in which the CCS had been cross-united distally with the MG, both stretch and contraction of the MG muscle activated the former CCS afferents. 5. In unoperated cats, CDPs elicited by stimulation of CCS and of LCS exhibited a low-threshold N1 wave and a higher-threshold N2 wave. These waves were greatly delayed and appeared to merge after chronic axotomy of CCS. Regeneration of CCS into itself, into LCS, or into MG restored the normal latencies and configurations of these potentials. 6. In unoperated cats, stimulation of CCS, of LCS, and of MG each produced PSPs of characteristic configurations in the various subpopulations of motoneurons of the triceps surae. CDPs and PSPs elicited by the CCS cross-regenerated into LCS or MG were typical of those generated by the normal CCS, i.e., there was no evidence of respecification of central synaptic connections to bring accord between center

  1. Analysis of afferent responses from isolated semicircular canal of the guitarfish using rotational acceleration white-noise inputs. II. Estimation of linear system parameters and gain and phase spectra.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, D P; Honrubia, V

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative estimates were computed for exponential coefficients and rate constants contributing to afferent unit impulse responses obtained from bundles innervating specific regions of the semicircular canal. The grouping of these estimates into specific response classes provided quantitative correlations with specific anatomical regions of innervation of the crista. Linear system gain and phase spectra were computed also, by applying Fourier transformations to unit impulse responses, for purposes of comparison with previous studies employing frequency domain analyses. Responses fitted by third-order linear system equations were specific to afferents innervating the crest and transition regions of the crista; whereas those fitted by overdamped, second-order equations were specific to afferents innervating the slopes and transition crista regions. It was concluded that strictly mechanical models of the transduction process are inadequate to account for the diverse and spatially distributed classes of observed responses and, moreover, structural features such as different hair cell types or efferent innervation effects could be excluded as inoperative in this preparation. The alternative hypothesis was suggested that certain of the observed subcomponents could be direct reflections of the initial mechanical stimulus, but that other subcomponents were reflections of more complex filtering mechanisms operating at the cellular or synaptic levels.

  2. Development of Cortical GABAergic Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Jasmina N.; Thomson, Alex M.

    2011-01-01

    The mature neocortex contains many different classes of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, distributed, with some degree of selectivity, through six layers, and through many different regions. Some of the events in the early lives of these neurones that may determine their ultimate destination, their maturation and their selective innervation of targets appropriate for each subtype, are discussed. Both time and place of birth influence the class of interneuron that an early post-mitotic interneuronal precursor will become, driven by the selective expression of different combinations of transcription factors in different regions of their birth places in the ganglionic eminence and ventricular zone. The long distance migration of these precursors along tangential routes in marginal, subventricular, and intermediate zones and their final radial movement, into the developing cortex, is regulated by chemical cues, both attractant and repellent. Once they arrive at their final destination, they must integrate into the developing circuitry. As they mature within the cortex, their axons grow and branch in highly specific patterns that may be partially determined by the genetic blueprint for each interneuronal class and partly by the environment in which they find themselves. Finally, as each interneuron class begins to form synapses with only certain postsynaptic targets, cell–cell recognition, most probably via protein–protein interactions across the synaptic cleft, facilitate the formation of appropriate synapses. PMID:21808605

  3. Excitatory and inhibitory innervation of the mouse orofacial motor nuclei: A stereological study.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Oñate-Ponce, Alejandro; Fernández-Collemann, Sara; Henny, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Neurons in the trigeminal (Mo5), facial (Mo7), ambiguus (Amb), and hypoglossal (Mo12) motor nuclei innervate jaw, facial, pharynx/larynx/esophagus, and tongue muscles, respectively. They are essential for movements subserving feeding, exploration of the environment, and social communication. These neurons are largely controlled by sensory afferents and premotor neurons of the reticular formation, where central pattern generator circuits controlling orofacial movements are located. To provide a description of the orofacial nuclei of the adult mouse and to ascertain the influence of excitatory and inhibitory afferents upon them, we used stereology to estimate the number of motoneurons as well as of varicosities immunopositive for glutamate (VGluT1+, VGluT2+) and GABA/glycine (known as VIAAT+ or VGAT+) vesicular transporters in the Mo5, Mo7, Amb, and Mo12. Mo5, Mo7, Amb, and Mo12 contain ∼1,000, ∼3,000, ∼600, and ∼1,700 cells, respectively. VGluT1+, VGluT2+, and VIAAT+ varicosities respectively represent: 28%, 41%, and 31% in Mo5; 2%, 49%, and 49% in Mo7; 12%, 42%, and 46% in Amb; and 4%, 54%, and 42% in Mo12. The Mo5 jaw-closing subdivision shows the highest VGluT1+ innervation. Noticeably, the VGluT2+ and VIAAT+ varicosity density in Mo7 is 5-fold higher than in Mo5 and 10-fold higher than in Amb and Mo12. The high density of terminals in Mo7 likely reflects the convergence and integration of numerous inputs to motoneurons subserving the wide range of complex behaviors to which this nucleus contributes. Also, somatic versus neuropil location of varicosities suggests that most of these afferents are integrated in the dendritic trees of Mo7 neurons.

  4. Functional expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by muscle afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, James C.; Ramachandra, Renuka; Mayne, Dustin R.

    2014-01-01

    The exercise pressor reflex (EPR) is generated by group III and IV muscle afferents during exercise to increase cardiovascular function. Muscle contraction is triggered by ACh, which is metabolized into choline that could serve as a signal of exercise-induced activity. We demonstrate that ACh can induce current in muscle afferents neurons isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) appear to be expressed by some group III-IV neurons since capsaicin (TRPV1) and/or ATP (P2X) induced current in 56% of ACh-responsive neurons. α7- And α4β2-nAChRs have been shown to be expressed in sensory neurons. An α7-nAChR antibody stained 83% of muscle afferent neurons. Functional expression was demonstrated by using the specific α7-nAChR blockers α-conotoxin ImI (IMI) and methyllycaconitine (MLA). MLA inhibited ACh responses in 100% of muscle afferent neurons, whereas IMI inhibited ACh responses in 54% of neurons. Dihydro-β-erythroidine, an α4β2-nAChR blocker, inhibited ACh responses in 50% of muscle afferent neurons, but recovery from block was not observed. Choline, an α7-nAChR agonist, elicited a response in 60% of ACh-responsive neurons. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of α7-nAChR by peripherin labeled (group IV) afferent fibers within gastrocnemius muscles. Some of these α7-nAChR-positive fibers were also positive for P2X3 receptors. Thus choline could serve as an activator of the EPR by opening α7-nAChR expressed by group IV (and possible group III) afferents. nAChRs could become pharmacological targets for suppressing the excessive EPR activation in patients with peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24966300

  5. Involvement of catecholaminergic neurons in motor innervation of striated muscle in the mouse esophagus.

    PubMed

    van der Keylen, Piet; Garreis, Fabian; Steigleder, Ruth; Sommer, Daniel; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Enteric co-innervation is a peculiar innervation pattern of striated esophageal musculature. Both anatomical and functional data on enteric co-innervation related to various transmitters have been collected in different species, although its function remains enigmatic. However, it is unclear whether catecholaminergic components are involved in such a co-innervation. Thus, we examined to identify catecholaminergic neuronal elements and clarify their relationship to other innervation components in the esophagus, using immunohistochemistry with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), α-bungarotoxin (α-BT) and PCR with primers for amplification of cDNA encoding TH and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH). TH-positive nerve fibers were abundant throughout the myenteric plexus and localized on about 14% of α-BT-labelled motor endplates differing from VAChT-positive vagal nerve terminals. TH-positive perikarya represented a subpopulation of only about 2.8% of all PGP 9.5-positive myenteric neurons. Analysis of mRNA showed both TH and DBH transcripts in the mouse esophagus. As ChAT-positive neurons in the compact formation of the nucleus ambiguus were negative for TH, the TH-positive nerve varicosities on motor endplates are presumably of enteric origin, although a sympathetic origin cannot be excluded. In the medulla oblongata, the cholinergic ambiguus neurons were densely supplied with TH-positive varicosities. Thus, catecholamines may modulate vagal motor innervation of esophageal-striated muscles not only at the peripheral level via enteric co-innervation but also at the central level via projections to the nucleus ambiguus. As Parkinson's disease, with a loss of central dopaminergic neurons, also affects the enteric nervous system and dysphagia is prevalent in patients with this disease, investigation of intrinsic catecholamines in the esophagus may

  6. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Improves Decreased Oxidative Capacity of Spinal Motoneurons Innervating the Soleus Muscle of Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Ai; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Rats with type 2 diabetes exhibit decreased oxidative capacity, such as reduced oxidative enzyme activity, low-intensity staining for oxidative enzymes in fibers, and no high-oxidative type IIA fibers, in the skeletal muscle, especially in the soleus muscle. In contrast, there are no data available concerning the oxidative capacity of spinal motoneurons innervating skeletal muscle of rats with type 2 diabetes. This study examined the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle of non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. In addition, this study examined the effects of mild hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with 36 % oxygen for 10 weeks on the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle because mild hyperbaric oxygen improves the decreased oxidative capacity of the soleus muscle in non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. Spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle were identified using nuclear yellow, a retrograde fluorescent neuronal tracer. Thereafter, the cell body sizes and succinate dehydrogenase activity of identified motoneurons were analyzed. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized alpha motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle was observed in rats with type 2 diabetes. The decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of these motoneurons was improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen. Therefore, we concluded that rats with type 2 diabetes have decreased oxidative capacity in motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle and this decreased oxidative capacity is improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen.

  7. Sympathetic and sensory innervations are heterogeneously distributed in relation to the blood vessels at the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle origin of man.

    PubMed

    Ljung, B O; Forsgren, S; Fridén, J

    1999-01-01

    By using immunohistochemistry and antibodies to a general nerve marker, protein gene product (PGP) 9.5, the overall innervation at the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscle origin was investigated in patients with tennis elbow and in healthy controls. The autonomic innervation was studied by using antibodies to neuropeptide Y (NPY), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The sensory innervation was visualized by using antibodies to substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. PGP 9.5 immunoreactions were detected in association with small blood vessels and arteries and within nerve bundles. There was, however, heterogeneity in the perivascular nerve fiber distribution since some blood vessels exhibited a high degree of PGP 9.5 innervation and some negligible or no such innervation at all. There was marked TH/NPY innervation in the walls of a subpopulation of the arteries, basically no VIP-containing nerves, and sensory innervation restricted to the small blood vessels. These observations show that the ECRB muscle origin is supplied with heterogeneously distributed sympathetic and sensory innervations and, furthermore, that there appears to be an imbalance between the vasoconstrictor and vasodilator innervations along the vascular tree in this region.

  8. Group I extensor afferents evoke disynaptic EPSPs in cat hindlimb extensor motorneurones during fictive locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, M J; Guertin, P; Jiménez, T; McCrea, D A

    1996-01-01

    1. Intracellular recording from extensor motoneurones in paralysed decerebrate cats was used to examine the distribution of short-latency non-monosynaptic excitation by group I afferents during fictive locomotion produced by stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR). 2. During the extension but not the flexion phase of fictive locomotion, stimulation of ankle extensor nerves at 1.2-2.0 times threshold evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in motoneurones innervating hip, knee and ankle extensors. Disynaptic EPSPs were also evoked by selective activation of group Ia muscle spindle afferents by muscle stretch. 3. The central latencies of these group I-evoked EPSPs (mean, 1.55 ms) suggest their mediation by a disynaptic pathway with a single interneurone interposed between extensor group I afferents and extensor motoneurones. Disynaptic EPSPs were also evoked during periods of spontaneous locomotion following the cessation of MLR stimulation. 4. Hip extensor motoneurones received disynaptic EPSPs during extension following stimulation of both homonymous and ankle extensor nerves. Stimulation of hip extensor nerves did not evoke disynaptic EPSPs in ankle extensor motoneurones. 5. The appearance of disynaptic EPSPs during extension appears to result from cyclic disinhibition of an unidentified population of excitatory spinal interneurones and not postsynaptic voltage-dependent conductances in motoneurones or phasic presynaptic inhibition of group I afferents during flexion. 6. The reorganization of group I reflexes during fictive locomotion includes the appearance of disynaptic excitation of hip, knee and ankle extensor motoneurones. This excitatory reflex is one of the mechanisms by which group I afferents can enhance extensor activity and increase force production during stance. PMID:8865080

  9. Activation of intestinal spinal afferent endings by changes in intra-mesenteric arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Humenick, A; Chen, B N; Wiklendt, L; Spencer, N J; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Dinning, P G; Costa, M; Brookes, S J H

    2015-01-01

    Spinal sensory neurons innervate many large blood vessels throughout the body. Their activation causes the hallmarks of neurogenic inflammation: vasodilatation through the release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide and plasma extravasation via tachykinins. The same vasodilator afferent neurons show mechanical sensitivity, responding to crushing, compression or axial stretch of blood vessels – responses which activate pain pathways and which can be modified by cell damage and inflammation. In the present study, we tested whether spinal afferent axons ending on branching mesenteric arteries (‘vascular afferents’) are sensitive to increased intravascular pressure. From a holding pressure of 5 mmHg, distension to 20, 40, 60 or 80 mmHg caused graded, slowly adapting increases in firing of vascular afferents. Many of the same afferent units showed responses to axial stretch, which summed with responses evoked by raised pressure. Many vascular afferents were also sensitive to raised temperature, capsaicin and/or local compression with von Frey hairs. However, responses to raised pressure in single, isolated vessels were negligible, suggesting that the adequate stimulus is distortion of the arterial arcade rather than distension per se. Increasing arterial pressure often triggered peristaltic contractions in the neighbouring segment of intestine, an effect that was mimicked by acute exposure to capsaicin (1 μm) and which was reduced after desensitisation to capsaicin. These results indicate that sensory fibres with perivascular endings are sensitive to pressure-induced distortion of branched arteries, in addition to compression and axial stretch, and that they contribute functional inputs to enteric motor circuits. PMID:26010893

  10. Loss of neurotrophin-3 from smooth muscle disrupts vagal gastrointestinal afferent signaling and satiation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward A; Biddinger, Jessica E; Baquet, Zachary C; Jones, Kevin R; McAdams, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    A large proportion of vagal afferents are dependent on neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) for survival. NT-3 is expressed in developing gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle, a tissue densely innervated by vagal mechanoreceptors, and thus could regulate their survival. We genetically ablated NT-3 from developing GI smooth muscle and examined the pattern of loss of NT-3 expression in the GI tract and whether this loss altered vagal afferent signaling or feeding behavior. Meal-induced c-Fos activation was reduced in the solitary tract nucleus and area postrema in mice with a smooth muscle-specific NT-3 knockout (SM-NT-3(KO)) compared with controls, suggesting a decrease in vagal afferent signaling. Daily food intake and body weight of SM-NT-3(KO) mice and controls were similar. Meal pattern analysis revealed that mutants, however, had increases in average and total daily meal duration compared with controls. Mutants maintained normal meal size by decreasing eating rate compared with controls. Although microstructural analysis did not reveal a decrease in the rate of decay of eating in SM-NT-3(KO) mice, they ate continuously during the 30-min meal, whereas controls terminated feeding after 22 min. This led to a 74% increase in first daily meal size of SM-NT-3(KO) mice compared with controls. The increases in meal duration and first meal size of SM-NT-3(KO) mice are consistent with reduced satiation signaling by vagal afferents. This is the first demonstration of a role for GI NT-3 in short-term controls of feeding, most likely involving effects on development of vagal GI afferents that regulate satiation.

  11. Cortical Spreading Depression Promotes Persistent Mechanical Sensitization of Intracranial Meningeal Afferents: Implications for the Intracranial Mechanosensitivity of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine is one of the most common and disabling diseases in the world. A major feature of migraine headache is its aggravation by maneuvers that momentarily increase intracranial pressure. A key hypothesis implicates mechanical sensitization of trigeminal afferents that innervate the intracranial meninges in mediating this feature of migraine. However, whether such pain-related neural response actually develops under endogenous conditions that are linked specifically to migraine remains to be established. Single-unit recordings in the trigeminal ganglion of anesthetized male rats were combined with quantitative mechanical stimulation of the cranial dura mater to determine whether cortical spreading depression (CSD), an endogenous migraine-triggering event, affects the mechanosensitivity of meningeal afferents. CSD gave rise to an almost threefold increase in the magnitude of the responses to mechanical stimuli in 17 of 23 of the afferents tested. CSD-evoked meningeal afferent mechanosensitization occurred with a delay of 23.1 ± 2.2 min and lasted 64.1 ± 6.8 min in recording sessions that lasted for 90 min and for 177.5 ± 22.1 min in recording sessions that were extended for 240 min. Some of the sensitized afferents also developed a shorter-lasting increase in their ongoing discharge rate that was not correlated with the increase in their mechanosensitivity, suggesting that CSD-evoked meningeal afferent sensitization and increase in ongoing activity are independent phenomena. These novel findings support the notion that mechanical sensitization of meningeal afferents serves as a key nociceptive process that underlies the worsening of migraine headache during conditions that momentarily increase intracranial pressure. PMID:28127585

  12. The morphology of hair follicle afferent fibre collaterals in the spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed

    Brown, A G; Rose, P K; Snow, P J

    1977-11-01

    1. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into single axons that innervated hair follicle receptors to study the morphology of their collaterals in the dorsal horn of the cord. The axons were impaled near the dorsal root entrance zone in the lumbosacral spinal cord of anaesthetized cats and HRP injected by passing current through the intra-axonal micro-electrode. The morphology was revealed by subsequent histochemistry.2. Thirteen hair-follicle afferent fibres were stained including six that innervated tylotrichs (type T hair follicle afferent units) and one that innervated guard hairs (type G unit). The remaining six axons were not classified according to hair type, but, on the basis of their axonal conduction velocities, would have been either type G or T.3. Eleven axons could be traced back into the dorsal roots. Eight of these, upon entering the cord, turned and ran towards the brain. They did not divide into rostral and caudal branches. Three of the eleven did divide and gave rise to both rostral and caudal branches.4. Sixty-three collaterals were given off the thirteen stained axons. All well-filled collaterals had a strikingly similar morphology. They descended through laminae I-III of the dorsal horn into the deeper parts of lamina IV or into lamina V, before turning and ascending back into superficial lamina IV and lamina III where they branched profusely to give rise to their terminal arborizations. Terminal boutons, most commonly of the ;en passant' type, were numerous in lamina III, but were also seen in the dorsal part of lamina IV and in ventral lamina II. None were observed in dorsal lamina II or near the junction of the grey and white matter (lamina I) or in lamina V.5. The terminal arborizations of collaterals from a single hair follicle afferent fibre were in line with one another in the longitudinal axis of the cord. In the better-stained preparations the terminal arborizations of adjacent collaterals from a single axon formed a

  13. Vagal intramuscular array afferents form complexes with interstitial cells of Cajal in gastrointestinal smooth muscle: analogues of muscle spindle organs?

    PubMed

    Powley, T L; Phillips, R J

    2011-07-14

    Intramuscular arrays (IMAs), vagal mechanoreceptors that innervate gastrointestinal smooth muscle, have not been completely described structurally or functionally. To delineate more fully the architecture of IMAs and to consider the structure-function implications of the observations, the present experiment examined the organization of the IMA terminal arbors and the accessory tissue elements of those arbors. IMA terminal fields, labeled by injection of biotinylated dextran into the nodose ganglia, were examined in whole mounts of rat gastric smooth muscle double-labeled with immunohistochemistry for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs; c-Kit) and/or inputs of different neuronal efferent transmitter (markers: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)) or afferent neuropeptidergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)) phenotypes. IMAs make extensive varicose and lamellar contacts with ICCs. In addition, axons of the multiple efferent and afferent phenotypes examined converge and articulate with IMA terminal arbors innervating ICCs. This architecture is consistent with the hypothesis that IMAs, or the multiply innervated IMA-ICC complexes they form, can function as stretch receptors. The tissue organization is also consonant with the proposal that those units can operate as functional analogues of muscle spindle organs. For electrophysiological assessments of IMA functions, experiments will need protocols that preserve both the complex architecture and the dynamic operations of IMA-ICC complexes.

  14. Somatostatin inhibits activation of dorsal cutaneous primary afferents induced by antidromic stimulation of primary afferents from an adjacent thoracic segment in the rat.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Pickar, Joel G; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Zhao, Yan

    2008-09-10

    To investigate the effect of somatostatin on the cross-excitation between adjacent primary afferent terminals in the rats, we recorded single unit activity from distal cut ends of dorsal cutaneous branches of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in response to antidromic stimulation of the distal cut end of the T11 dorsal root in the presence and absence of somatostatin and its receptor antagonist applied to the receptive field of the recorded nerve. Afferent fibers were classified based upon their conduction velocity. Mean mechanical thresholds decreased and spontaneous discharge rates increased significantly in C and Adelta but not Abeta fibers of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in both male and female rats following antidromic electrical stimulation (ADES) of the dorsal root from adjacent spinal segment (DRASS) indicating cross-excitation of thin fiber afferents. The cross-excitation was not significantly different between male and female rats. Microinjection of somatostatin into the receptive field of recorded units inhibited the cross-excitation. This inhibitory effect, in turn, was reversed by the somatostation receptor antagonist cyclo-somatostatin (c-SOM). Application of c-SOM alone followed by ADES of DRASS significantly decreased the mechanical thresholds and increased the discharge rates of C and Adelta fibers, indicating that endogenous release of somatostatin plays a tonic inhibitory role on the cross-excitation between peripheral nerves. These results suggest that somatostatin could inhibit the cross-excitation involved in peripheral hyperalgesia and have a peripheral analgesic effect.

  15. Acute effect of an incision on mechanosensitive afferents in the plantar rat hindpaw.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Minna M; Gebhart, G F; Brennan, Timothy J

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine which primary afferent fibers are sensitized to mechanical stimuli after an experimental surgical incision to the glabrous skin of the rat hindpaw. Afferent fibers teased from the L(5) dorsal root or the tibial nerve were recorded in anesthetized rats. The mechanical response properties of each fiber were characterized before and 45 min after an incision (or sham procedure) within the mechanical receptive field. Sensitization is characterized by an expansion of the mechanical receptive field, an increase in background activity, an increase in response magnitude, or a decrease in response threshold. After incision, the background activity and response properties of Abeta-fibers (n = 9) to mechanical stimuli were unchanged. Four of 13 mechanosensitive Adelta-fibers exhibited sensitization after the incision; response threshold decreased, response magnitude increased, or receptive field size increased. Background activity of Adelta-fibers was not increased by the incision. Sensitization was observed in 4 of 18 mechanosensitive C-fibers 45 min after the incision. Background activity of C-fibers was not increased by the incision. In a group of mechanically insensitive afferent fibers (MIAs), 3 of 7 Adelta-fibers and 4 of 10 C-fibers sensitized 45 min after incision. Response threshold was decreased in only 2 of 17 MIAs; receptive field size increased in 7 of 17 MIAs. Abeta-fibers did not sensitize after the incision, and only 8 of 31 (26%) mechanosensitive Adelta- and C-fibers gave evidence of sensitization. In a group of MIA Adelta- and C-fibers, a greater percentage of 17 fibers studied (41%) were sensitized after incision. In this model, the principal effect of an incision, when examined 45 min after the insult, is an increase in receptive field size of the afferents, particularly those characterized as MIAs. To the extent that the mechanical hyperalgesia characterized in the same model is initiated in the periphery, it would

  16. Specificity of afferent synapses onto plane-polarized hair cells in the posterior lateral line of the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nagiel, Aaron; Andor-Ardó, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The proper wiring of the vertebrate brain represents an extraordinary developmental challenge, requiring billions of neurons to select their appropriate synaptic targets. In view of this complexity, simple vertebrate systems provide necessary models for understanding how synaptic specificity arises. The posterior lateral-line organ of larval zebrafish consists of polarized hair cells organized in discrete clusters known as neuromasts. Here we show that each afferent neuron of the posterior lateral line establishes specific contacts with hair cells of the same hair-bundle polarity. We quantify this specificity by modeling the neuron as a biased selector of hair-cell polarity and find evidence for bias from as early as 2.5 days post-fertilization. More than half of the neurons form contacts on multiple neuromasts, but the innervated organs are spatially consecutive and the polarity preference is consistent. Using a novel reagent for correlative electron microscopy, HRP-mCherry, we show that these contacts are indeed afferent synapses bearing vesicle-loaded synaptic ribbons. Moreover, afferent neurons reassume their biased innervation pattern after hair-cell ablation and regeneration. By documenting specificity in the pattern of neuronal connectivity during development and in the context of organ regeneration, these results establish the posterior lateral-line organ as a vertebrate system for the in vivo study of synaptic target selection. PMID:18716202

  17. Serotonergic innervation and serotonin receptor expression of NPY-producing neurons in the rat lateral and basolateral amygdaloid nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bonn, M; Schmitt, A; Lesch, K-P; Van Bockstaele, E J; Asan, E

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacobehavioral studies in experimental animals, and imaging studies in humans, indicate that serotonergic transmission in the amygdala plays a key role in emotional processing, especially for anxiety-related stimuli. The lateral and basolateral amygdaloid nuclei receive a dense serotonergic innervation in all species studied to date. We investigated interrelations between serotonergic afferents and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-producing neurons, which are a subpopulation of inhibitory interneurons in the rat lateral and basolateral nuclei with particularly strong anxiolytic properties. Dual light microscopic immunolabeling showed numerous appositions of serotonergic afferents on NPY-immunoreactive somata. Using electron microscopy, direct membrane appositions and synaptic contacts between serotonin-containing axon terminals and NPY-immunoreactive cellular profiles were unequivocally established. Double in situ hybridization documented that more than 50 %, and about 30-40 % of NPY mRNA-producing neurons, co-expressed inhibitory 5-HT1A and excitatory 5-HT2C mRNA receptor subtype mRNA, respectively, in both nuclei with no gender differences. Triple in situ hybridization showed that individual NPY mRNA-producing interneurons co-express both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2C mRNAs. Co-expression of NPY and 5-HT3 mRNA was not observed. The results demonstrate that serotonergic afferents provide substantial innervation of NPY-producing neurons in the rat lateral and basolateral amygdaloid nuclei. Studies of serotonin receptor subtype co-expression indicate a differential impact of the serotonergic innervation on this small, but important, population of anxiolytic interneurons, and provide the basis for future studies of the circuitry underlying serotonergic modulation of emotional stimulus processing in the amygdala.

  18. Light and electron microscopic analysis of the somata and parent axons innervating the rat upper molar and lower incisor pulp.

    PubMed

    Paik, S K; Park, K P; Lee, S K; Ma, S K; Cho, Y S; Kim, Y K; Rhyu, I J; Ahn, D K; Yoshida, A; Bae, Y C

    2009-09-15

    The morphology of intradental nerve fibers of permanent teeth and of continuously growing rodent incisors has been studied in detail but little information is available on the parent axons that give rise to these fibers. Here we examined the axons and somata of trigeminal neurons that innervate the rat upper molar and lower incisor pulp using tracing with horseradish peroxidase and light and electron microscopic analysis. The majority (approximately 80%) of the parent axons in the proximal root of the trigeminal ganglion that innervated either molar or incisor pulp were small myelinated fibers (<20 microm(2) cross-sectional area). The remaining approximately 20% of the fibers were almost exclusively large myelinated for the molar pulp and unmyelinated for the incisor pulp. The majority of neuronal somata in the trigeminal ganglion that innervated either molar (48%) or incisor pulp (62%) were medium in size (300-600 microm(2) cross-sectional area). Large somata (>600 microm(2)) constituted 34% and 20% of the trigeminal neurons innervating molar and incisor pulp, respectively, while small somata (<300 microm(2)) constituted 17% of the molar and 18% of the incisor neurons. The present study revealed that the morphology of parent axons of dental primary sensory neurons may differ from that of their intradental branches, and also suggests that the nerve fiber function may be carried out differently in the molar and incisor pulp in the rat.

  19. Semaphorin 3A controls timing and patterning of the dental pulp innervation.

    PubMed

    Moe, Kyaw; Sijaona, Angelina; Shrestha, Anjana; Kettunen, Paivi; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Luukko, Keijo

    2012-12-01

    Timing and patterning of dental pulp innervation are strictly spatio-temporally regulated but it is still not known how they are controlled at molecular level. We analyzed postnatal innervation of the dental pulp in the mandibular first molar of mice deficient for Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) axon repellant molecule. Immunohistochemical localization of nerve fibers on serial sections covering the whole tooth germs using anti-peripherin antibody revealed that nerve fibers were prematurely present within the preodontoblast layer next to the inner enamel epithelium already at PN0 in Sema3A(-/-) mice. In contrast, in the wild-type (Sema3A(+/+)) mice nerve fibers were seen in the pulp only after enamel formation at PN3. The nerves in Sema3A(-/-) pulp were notably defasciculated and thinner compared to that of Sema3A(+/+) mice. A premature formation of an abnormal, enlarged nerve plexus with a high number of arborizations was apparent in the pulp-dentin border target area in Sema3A(-/-) already at PN2 whereas in the wild-type mice the first sign of plexus formation was seen at PN7. The expression of mRNAs for Ngf, Gdnf and Ncam neuroregulatory molecules in mandibular molar as well as receptors for neurotrophic factors and class 3 semaphorins including Sema3A (TrkA, p75, TrkB, TrkC, Ret, Npn1, Npn2, PlxA4) in trigeminal ganglia were not altered in the Sema3A(-/-) mice. Collectively, this data show that Sema3A serves an essential role in molar tooth pulp innervation controlling the timing of nerve fiber penetration into the pulp, their patterning and the formation of nerve plexus at pulp-dentin border area, and provide further support for the hypothesis that tooth innervation is regulated by the coordinated activity of locally expressed neuroregulatory molecules exerting positive and negative influences on growing dental nerve fibers.

  20. Ephrin-B/EphB signaling is required for normal innervation of lingual gustatory papillae

    PubMed Central

    Treffy, Randall William; Collins, David; Hoshino, Natalia; Ton, Son; Katsevman, Gennadiy Aleksandrovich; Oleksiak, Michael; Runge, Elizabeth Marie; Cho, David; Russo, Matthew; Spec, Andrej; Gomulka, Jennifer; Henkemeyer, Mark; Rochlin, Michael William

    2016-01-01

    The innervation of taste buds is an excellent model system for studying the guidance of axons during targeting because of their discrete nature and the high fidelity of innervation. The pre-gustatory epithelium of fungiform papillae is known to secrete diffusible axon guidance cues such as BDNF and Sema3A that attract and repel, respectively, geniculate ganglion axons during targeting, but diffusible factors alone are unlikely to explain how taste axon terminals are restricted to their territories within the taste bud. Non-diffusible cell surface proteins such as Ephs and ephrins can act as receptors and/or ligands for one another and are known to control axon terminal positioning in several parts of the nervous system, but they have not been studied in the gustatory system. We report that ephrin-B2 linked β-galactosidase staining and immunostaining was present along the dorsal epithelium of the mouse tongue as early as E15.5, but was not detected at E14.5, when axons first enter the epithelium. Ephrin-B1 immunolabeling was barely detected in the epithelium and found at a somewhat higher concentration in the mesenchyme subjacent to the epithelium. EphB1 and EphB2 were detected in lingual sensory afferents in vivo and geniculate neurites in vitro. Ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 were similarly effective in repelling or suppressing outgrowth by geniculate neurites in vitro. These in vitro effects were independent of the neurotrophin used to promote outgrowth, but were reduced by elevated levels of laminin. In vivo, mice null for EphB1 and EphB2 exhibited decreased gustatory innervation of fungiform papillae. These data provide evidence that ephrin-B forward signaling is necessary for normal gustatory innervation of the mammalian tongue. PMID:27035151

  1. Central and peripheral anatomy of slowly adapting type I low-threshold mechanoreceptors innervating trunk skin of neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, C Jeffery; Koerber, H Richard

    2007-12-10

    Despite intensive study, our understanding of the neuronal structures responsible for transducing the broad spectrum of environmental energies that impinge upon the skin has rested on inference and conjecture. This major shortcoming motivated the development of ex vivo somatosensory system preparations in neonatal mice in the hope that their small size might allow the peripheral terminals of physiologically identified sensory neurons to be labeled intracellularly for direct study. The present report describes the first such study of the peripheral terminals of four slowly adapting type I low-threshold mechanoreceptors (SAIs) that innervated the back skin of neonatal mice. In addition, this report includes information on the central anatomy of the same SAI afferents that were identified peripherally with both physiological and anatomical means, providing an essentially complete view of the central and peripheral morphology of individual SAI afferents in situ. Our findings reveal that SAIs in neonates are strikingly adult-like in all major respects. Afferents were exquisitely sensitive to mechanical stimuli and exhibited a distinctly irregular, slowly adapting discharge to stimulation of 1-4 punctate receptive fields in the skin. Their central collaterals formed transversely oriented and largely nonoverlapping arborizations limited to regions of the dorsal horn corresponding to laminae III-V. Their peripheral arborizations were restricted entirely within miniaturized touch domes, where they gave rise to expanded disc-like endings in close apposition to putative Merkel cells in basal epidermis. These findings therefore provide the first direct confirmation of the functional morphology of this physiologically unique afferent class.

  2. The innervation of the kidney in renal injury and inflammation: A cause and consequence of deranged cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Johns, Edward J

    2017-02-09

    Extensive investigations have revealed that renal sympathetic nerves regulate renin secretion, tubular fluid reabsorption and renal haemodynamics which can impact on cardiovascular homoeostasis normally and in pathophysiological states. The significance of the renal afferent innervation and its role in determining the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system is uncertain. The transduction pathways at the renal afferent nerves have been shown to require pro-inflammatory mediators and TRPV1 channels. Reno-renal reflexes have been described, both inhibitory and excitatory, demonstrating that a neural link exists between kidneys and may determine the distribution of excretory and haemodynamic function between the two kidneys. The impact of renal afferent nerve activity on basal and reflex regulation of global sympathetic drive remains opaque. There is clinical and experimental evidence that in states of chronic kidney disease and renal injury there is infiltration of T-helper cells with a sympatho-excitation and blunting of the high and low pressure baroreceptor reflexes regulating renal sympathetic nerve activity. The baroreceptor deficits are renal nerve-dependent as the dysregulation can be relieved by renal denervation. There is also experimental evidence that in obese states there is a sympatho-excitation and disrupted baroreflex regulation of renal sympathetic nerve activity which is mediated by the renal innervation. This body of information provides an important basis for directing greater attention to the role of renal injury/inflammation causing an inappropriate activation of the renal afferent nerves as an important initiator of aberrant autonomic cardiovascular control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A; Nelson, Mark T

    2015-09-15

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms.

  4. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Thomas J.; Tykocki, Nathan R.; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Nelson, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms. PMID:26224686

  5. The unsilent majority-TRPV1 drives "spontaneous" transmission of unmyelinated primary afferents within cardiorespiratory NTS.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Michael C; Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Fawley, Jessica A

    2012-12-15

    Cranial primary afferent sensory neurons figure importantly in homeostatic control of visceral organ systems. Of the two broad classes of visceral afferents, the role of unmyelinated or C-type class remains poorly understood. This review contrasts key aspects of peripheral discharge properties of C-fiber afferents and their glutamate transmission mechanisms within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS). During normal prevailing conditions, most information arrives at the NTS through myelinated A-type nerves. However, most of visceral afferent axons (75-90%) in NTS are unmyelinated, C-type axons. Centrally, C-type solitary tract (ST) afferent terminals have presynaptic transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors. Capsaicin activation of TRPV1 blocks phasic or synchronous release of glutamate but facilitates release of glutamate from a separate pool of vesicles. This TRPV1-operated pool of vesicles is active at normal temperatures and is responsible for actively driving a 10-fold higher release of glutamate at TRPV1 compared with TRPV1- terminals even in the absence of afferent action potentials. This novel TRPV1 mechanism is responsible for an additional asynchronous release of glutamate that is not present in myelinated terminals. The NTS is rich with presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors, and the implications of TRPV1-operated glutamate offer unique targets for signaling in C-type sensory afferent terminals from neuropeptides, inflammatory mediators, lipid metabolites, cytokines, and cannabinoids. From a homeostatic view, this combination could have broad implications for integration in chronic pathological disturbances in which the numeric dominance of C-type endings and TRPV1 would broadly disturb multisystem control mechanisms.

  6. Musings on the wanderer: what's new in our understanding of vago-vagal reflexes?: II. Integration of afferent signaling from the viscera by the nodose ganglia.

    PubMed

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Mendelowitz, David

    2003-01-01

    To understand vago-vagal reflexes, one must have an appreciation of the events surrounding the encoding, integration, and central transfer of peripheral sensations by vagal afferent neurons. A large body of work has shown that vagal afferent neurons have nonuniform properties and that distinct subpopulations of neurons exist within the nodose ganglia. These sensory neurons display a considerable degree of plasticity; electrophysiological, pharmacological, and neurochemical properties have all been shown to alter after peripheral tissue injury. The validity of claims of selective recordings from populations of neurons activated by peripheral stimuli may be diminished, however, by the recent demonstration that stimulation of a subpopulation of nodose neurons can enhance the activity of unstimulated neuronal neighbors. To better understand the neurophysiological processes occurring after vagal afferent stimulation, it is essential that the electrophysiological, pharmacological, and neurochemical properties of nodose neurons are correlated with their sensory function or, at the very least, with their specific innervation target.

  7. Alterations in mystacial pad innervation in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Fundin, B T; Bergman, E; Ulfhake, B

    1997-11-01

    It is well established that sensory perception becomes impaired with advancing age and that, in parallel, dystrophy and degeneration of axons occur in sensory pathways. In this study, the impact of aging was examined in the mystacial pad, which receives a large variety of sensory nerve endings organized in a highly predictable pattern. Mystacial pad specimens from aged (30 months old) and young adult (2-3 months old) female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed, in parallel, for immunohistochemical analyses with antibodies against human neuronal cytoplasmic protein (protein gene product 9.5), transmitter enzymes, and several neuropeptides. Several changes in cutaneous innervation including both degenerative and regenerative processes were evident in the aged rat: (1) the Merkel endings and lanceolate endings that emanate from large-caliber afferents in the whisker follicles were reduced and showed signs of degeneration. Furthermore, a reduction of piloneural complexes at the intervibrissal hairs were evident, but only in aged rats that showed more severe behavioral sensorimotor disturbances. In contrast, Ruffini endings as well as mechanoreceptors emanating from medium-caliber axons, i.e., transverse lanceolate and reticular endings, appeared normal. (2) A reduction was evident among two sets of unmyelinated epidermal endings; however, the epidermal innervation affiliated with the intervibrissal hairs appeared normal in the aged rat. (3) A loss of sympathetic neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) or tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (IR) and somatosensory Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-IR perivascular axons was paralleled by an increase in presumed parasympathetic NPY/CGRP-IR axons. (4) Two "novel" networks of fine-caliber axons were observed in the outer and inner root sheaths of the whisker follicles in the aged rat. (5) NPY was present in a population of small-caliber, somatosensory CGRP-IR axons in the aged rat. This may represent a de novo synthesis, since

  8. Differential modulation of primary afferent depolarization of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of single muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Lomelí, J; Quevedo, J

    2004-06-01

    We examined primary afferent depolarization (PAD) in the anesthetized cat elicited in 109 pairs of intraspinal collaterals of single group I afferents from the gastrocnemius nerve, one of the pair ending in the L3 segment, around the Clarke's column nuclei, and the other in the L6 segment within the intermediate zone. Tests for refractoriness were made to assess whether the responses produced by intraspinal stimulation in the L3 and L6 segments were due to activation of collaterals of the same afferent fiber. PAD in each collateral was estimated by independent computer-controlled measurement of the intraspinal current required to maintain a constant probability of antidromic firing. In most fibers, stimulation of the ipsilateral posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve with trains of pulses maximal for group I afferents had a qualitatively similar effect but produced a larger PAD in the L6 than in the L3 collaterals. Stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural and superficial peroneus) with single pulses and of the posterior articular nerve, the ipsilateral reticular formation, nucleus raphe magnus and contralateral motor cortex with trains of pulses often had qualitatively different effects. They could produce PAD and/or facilitate the PBSt-induced PAD in one collateral, and produce PAH and/or inhibit the PAD in the other collateral. These patterns could be changed in a differential manner by sensory or supraspinal conditioning stimulation. In summary, the present investigation suggests that the segmental and ascending collaterals of individual afferents are not fixed routes for information transmission, but parts of dynamic systems in which information transmitted to segmental reflex pathways and to Clarke's column neurons by common sources can be decoupled by sensory and descending inputs and funneled to specific targets according to the motor tasks to be performed.

  9. Morphophysiology of synaptic transmission between type I hair cells and vestibular primary afferents. An intracellular study employing horseradish peroxidase in the lizard, Calotes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Schessel, D A; Ginzberg, R; Highstein, S M

    1991-03-22

    Intracellular records with glass microelectrodes filled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were taken from primary afferents of the horizontal semicircular canal in the lizard, Calotes versicolor. A coefficient of variation (CV) of the interspike intervals of spontaneous action potentials (APs) was calculated and correlated with the terminal morphologies of afferents within the canal crista. Irregular fibers with CV greater than 0.4 always correlated with a nerve chalice or calyx afferent terminal expansion surrounding one or more type I hair cells; more regular fibers with CV less than 0.4 always correlated with a dimorphic or bouton only terminal expansion of afferents. Afferents with a CV greater than 0.4 demonstrated miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSPs) that summated to initiate APs. APs were blocked by tetrodotoxin and mEPSP frequency was modulated by caloric stimulation. Cobalt application reversibly blocked mEPSPs. Electron microscopic examination of physiologically studied afferents with CV greater than 0.4 revealed synaptic profiles consisting of typical synaptic bodies and synaptic vesicles in the type I hair cell presynaptic to the nerve chalice. Examples of the interspike baseline in regular and irregular afferents suggest differential modes of impulse initiation in these two fiber types.

  10. A geometric analysis of semicircular canals and induced activity in their peripheral afferents in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisine, H.; Simpson, J. I.; Henn, V.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine anatomically the planes of the semicircular canals of two juvenile rhesus monkeys, using plastic casts of the semicircular canals, and the anatomical measurements were related to the directional coding of neural signals transmitted by primary afferents innervating the same simicircular canals. In the experiments, animals were prepared for monitoring the eye position by the implantation of silver-silver chloride electrodes into the bony orbit. Following the recording of semicircular canal afferent activity, the animals were sacrificed; plastic casting resin was injected into the bony canals; and, when the temporal bone was demineralized and removed, the coordinates of points spaced along the circumference of the canal casts were measured. A comparison of the sensitivity vectors determined in these experiments and the anatomical measures showed that the average difference between a sensitivity vector and its respective normal vector was 6.3 deg.

  11. [Efferent innervation of the arteries of human leptomeninx in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Chertok, V M; Kotsiuba, A E; Babich, E V

    2009-01-01

    Structure of the efferent nerve plexuses (adrenergic, acetylcholinestherase- and cholinacetyltranspherase-positive, NO-dependent), was studied in the arteries of human leptomeninx with different diameters. Material was obtained from the corpses of the healthy people and of the patients with initial stages of arterial hypertension (AH). It was shown that the concentrations of cholinergic and adrenergic nerve fibers and varicosities in axon terminal part, innervating the arteries with the diameters ranging from 450 till 100 microm, were not significantly different. In these arteries, NO-ergic plexuses were also detected. In patients with AH, regardless the arterial diameters, the significant increase (up to 15-20%) of adrenergic nerve fiber and varicosity concentrations was found. The changes in cholinergic nerve fiber concentration were found to depend on the vessel diameter: the significant decrease of these parameter was observed only in arteries with the diameter of 100-200 microm. No significant changes in nerve plexus concentration was noticed in the arteries with greater or smaller diameter. In NO-ergic neural conductors, the enzyme activity decreased only in the large arteries, and remained almost unchanged in the small vascular branches. The changes in the vasomotor innervation described in AH, are interpreted as a vasomotor innervation dysfunction of the leptomeninx arteries that may result in the hemodynamic disturbances.

  12. Vasopressin Innervation of the Mouse (Mus musculus) Brain and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Benjamin D.; De Vries, Geert J.

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide vasopressin (AVP) has been implicated in the regulation of numerous physiological and behavioral processes. Although mice have become an important model for studying this regulation, there is no comprehensive description of AVP distribution in the mouse brain and spinal cord. With C57BL/6 mice, we used immunohistochemistry to corroborate the location of AVP-containing cells and to define the location of AVP-containing fibers throughout the mouse central nervous system. We describe AVP-immunoreactive (-ir) fibers in midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord areas, which have not previously been reported in mice, including innervation of the ventral tegmental area, dorsal and median raphe, lateral and medial parabrachial, solitary, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, and interfascicular nuclei. We also provide a detailed description of AVP-ir innervation in heterogenous regions such as the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and ventral forebrain. In general, our results suggest that, compared with other species, the mouse has a particularly robust and widespread distribution of AVP-ir fibers, which, as in other species, originates from a number of different cell groups in the telencephalon and diencephalon. Our data also highlight the robust nature of AVP innervation in specific regulatory nuclei, such as the ventral tegmental area and dorsal raphe nucleus among others, that are implicated in the regulation of many behaviors. PMID:21456024

  13. Estrogen Replacement Regulates Vaginal Innervations in Ovariectomized Adult Virgin Rats: A Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Ma, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hong; Yan, Ping; Huo, Lili; Hu, Yongyan; Chen, Xi; Li, Ting; Liu, Zhaohui

    2017-01-01

    Background. Our previous Gräfenberg spot findings confirmed that the distal-third areas of the anterior vaginal wall bore a significantly greater number of nerves and sexual hormone may have certain degree of influence on these significant differences. However, the role of estrogen in vaginal innervations remains controversial. Methods. To investigate whether hormonal-neural interactions occur in the vagina, sixty rats were randomly divided into six groups: Sham-operated, ovariectomy, and 4 treatment groups. After 2 weeks of treatment, vaginal biopsies were prepared with hematoxylin and eosin and PGP9.5 using immunohistochemistry. Results. The density of small nerve fibers was significantly higher in the distal-half areas of intact vaginal walls than the proximal-half areas (P = 0.001). In contrast, the overall PGP 9.5-ir fiber innervation density was significantly decreased in the OVX rats subjected to surgical menopause. Sustained estrogen administration for 2 weeks resulted in nerve fiber proliferation, with values reaching normal levels in the low-dose estradiol valerate group. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that systemic hormonal therapy with low-dose estradiol valerate is effective and safe for treating deficient vaginal innervation caused by low level of estrogen activity in menopausal women and may aid studies to identify an optimal estradiol dose to provide relief from vaginal discomfort.

  14. Ephrin-A5/EphA4 signalling controls specific afferent targeting to cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Defourny, Jean; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Lallemend, François; Mateo Sánchez, Susana; Neef, Jakob; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Soriano, Eduardo; Peuckert, Christiane; Kullander, Klas; Fritzsch, Bernd; Nguyen, Laurent; Moonen, Gustave; Moser, Tobias; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Hearing requires an optimal afferent innervation of sensory hair cells by spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea. Here we report that complementary expression of ephrin-A5 in hair cells and EphA4 receptor among spiral ganglion neuron populations controls the targeting of type I and type II afferent fibres to inner and outer hair cells, respectively. In the absence of ephrin-A5 or EphA4 forward signalling, a subset of type I projections aberrantly overshoot the inner hair cell layer and invade the outer hair cell area. Lack of type I afferent synapses impairs neurotransmission from inner hair cells to the auditory nerve. By contrast, radial shift of type I projections coincides with a gain of presynaptic ribbons that could enhance the afferent signalling from outer hair cells. Ephexin-1, cofilin and myosin light chain kinase act downstream of EphA4 to induce type I spiral ganglion neuron growth cone collapse. Our findings constitute the first identification of an Eph/ephrin-mediated mutual repulsion mechanism responsible for specific sorting of auditory projections in the cochlea.

  15. Excitatory actions of mushroom poison (acromelic acid) on unmyelinated muscular afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Toru; Tomotoshi, Kimihiko; Mizumura, Kazue

    2009-06-05

    Ingestion of a poisonous mushroom, Clitocybe acromelalga, results in strong and long-lasting allodynia, burning pain, redness and swelling in the periphery of the body. Acromelic acid (ACRO), a kainate analogue isolated from the mushroom, is assumed to be involved in the poisoning. ACRO has two isomers, ACRO-A and ACRO-B. The potency of ACRO-A is a million times higher than that of ACRO-B for induction of allodynia when intrathecally administered in mice. The effect of ACRO on the primary afferents of somatic tissues remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ACRO-A on the response behavior of unmyelinated afferents in the skeletal muscle. For this purpose single fiber recordings of C-afferents were made from rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle-common peroneal nerve preparations in vitro. Intramuscular injections of ACRO-A at three different concentrations (10(-12), 10(-10) and 10(-8)M, 5 microl over 5s) near the receptive field in the EDL muscle elicited excitation of C-afferents (12%, 50% and 44%, respectively). ACRO-A at the concentration of 10(-10)M induced the strongest excitation. The incidence of ACRO-A responsive fibers at the concentration of 10(-10) and 10(-8)M was significantly higher than that at 10(-12)M. The responses to mechanical and heat stimulations did not differ between ACRO-A sensitive and insensitive fibers. These results clearly demonstrated the powerful excitatory action of ACRO-A on mechanosensitive unmyelinated afferents in the rat skeletal muscle.

  16. Intrinsic innervation of the rat knee joint articular capsule and ligaments.

    PubMed

    Marinozzi, G; Ferrante, F; Gaudio, E; Ricci, A; Amenta, F

    1991-01-01

    In spite of the practical importance of having a detailed knowledge of knee joint innervation to understand the pathophysiologic aspects, little information is now available concerning the density and pattern of the nerve fibres which are distributed to it. The present study has been designed to investigate the density and distribution of nerve fibres and receptor corpuscles in the knee joint articular capsule, cruciate and collateral ligaments in the rat, using the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemical in toto staining technique. The investigation was performed on male Wistar rats of 3 months of age, some of which had been treated with capsaicin to deplete their afferent 'C' fibres of their content of neuropeptides. AChE-positive nerve fibres and different types of receptor corpuscle endings were found within articular capsule and ligaments. The highest density of AChE-positive nerve fibres was noticeable in the fibular collateral ligament followed by the tibial collateral ligament, the posterior cruciate ligament, the anterior cruciate ligament and the articular capsule. In the articular capsule the number of type I endings was higher than in the ligaments. The opposite is true for the other type of receptor corpuscles found as well as for nerve endings. Capsaicin treatment significantly reduced the density of AChE-positive nerve fibres in knee joint ligaments but did not affect nerve fibres in the articular capsule. Moreover, it caused the disappearance of some kind of receptor corpuscles within the collateral and cruciate ligaments. The above data collectively suggest that the AChE in toto staining technique may represent a good method for investigating joint innervation and that a significant percentage of nerve fibres supplying knee joint ligaments is represented by C fibre afferents.

  17. Patterns of peripheral innervation of the tongue and hyobranchial apparatus in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Wake, M H

    1992-04-01

    The innervation of the musculature of the tongue and the hyobranchial apparatus of caecilians has long been assumed to be simple and to exhibit little interspecific variation. A study of 14 genera representing all six families of caecilians demonstrates that general patterns of innervation by the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves are similar across taxa but that the composition of the "hypoglossal" nerve is highly variable. Probably in all caecilians, spinal nerves 1 and 2 contribute to the hypoglossal. In addition, in certain taxa, an "occipital," the vagus, and/or spinal 3 appear to contribute fibers to the composition of the hypoglossal nerve. These patterns, the lengths of fusion of the contributing elements, and the branching patterns of the hypoglossal are assessed according to the currently accepted hypothesis of phylogenetic relationships of caecilians, and of amphibians. An hypothesis is proposed that limblessness and a simple tongue, with concomitant reduced complexity of innervation of muscles associated with limbs and the tongue, has released a constraint on pattern of innervation. As a consequence, a greater diversity and, in several taxa, greater complexity of neuroanatomical associations of nerve roots to form the hypoglossal are expressed.

  18. Reduced intestinal brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vagal sensory innervation of the intestine and enhances satiation.

    PubMed

    Biddinger, Jessica E; Fox, Edward A

    2014-07-30

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is produced by developing and mature gastrointestinal (GI) tissues that are heavily innervated by autonomic neurons and may therefore control their development or function. To begin investigating this hypothesis, we compared the morphology, distribution, and density of intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs), the predominant vagal GI afferent, in mice with reduced intestinal BDNF (INT-BDNF(-/-)) and controls. Contrary to expectations of reduced development, IGLE density and longitudinal axon bundle number in the intestine of INT-BDNF(-/-) mice were increased, but stomach IGLEs were normal. INT-BDNF(-/-) mice also exhibited increased vagal sensory neuron numbers, suggesting that their survival was enhanced. To determine whether increased intestinal IGLE density or other changes to gut innervation in INT-BDNF(-/-) mice altered feeding behavior, meal pattern and microstructural analyses were performed. INT-BDNF(-/-) mice ate meals of much shorter duration than controls, resulting in reduced meal size. Increased suppression of feeding in INT-BDNF(-/-) mice during the late phase of a scheduled meal suggested that increased satiation signaling contributed to reduced meal duration and size. Furthermore, INT-BDNF(-/-) mice demonstrated increases in total daily intermeal interval and satiety ratio, suggesting that satiety signaling was augmented. Compensatory responses maintained normal daily food intake and body weight in INT-BDNF(-/-) mice. These findings suggest a target organ-derived neurotrophin suppresses development of that organ's sensory innervation and sensory neuron survival and demonstrate a role for BDNF produced by peripheral tissues in short-term controls of feeding, likely through its regulation of development or function of gut innervation, possibly including augmented intestinal IGLE innervation.

  19. Tonic and phasic differential GABAergic inhibition of synaptic actions of joint afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Hernández, E; Lomelí, J

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the functional organization of the spinal neuronal networks activated by myelinated afferent fibers in the posterior articular nerve (PAN) of the anesthetized cat. Particular attention was given to the tonic and phasic GABAa inhibitory modulation of these networks. Changes in the synaptic effectiveness of the joint afferents were inferred from changes in the intraspinal focal potentials produced by electrical stimulation of the PAN. We found that conditioning stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural, superficial peroneus and saphenous) and of the nucleus raphe magnus often inhibited, in a differential manner, the early and late components of the intraspinal focal potentials produced by stimulation of low and high threshold myelinated PAN afferents, respectively. The degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of both the conditioning and test stimuli and on the segmental level of recording. Conditioning stimulation of group I muscle afferents was less effective, but marked depression of the early and late focal potentials was produced by stimuli exceeding 5 xT. The i.v. injection of 1-2.5 mg/kg of picrotoxin, a GABAa blocker, had relatively minor effects on the early components of the PAN focal potentials, but was able to induce a significant increase of the late components. It also reduced the inhibitory effects of cutaneous and joint nerve conditioning on PAN focal responses. Conditioning autogenetic stimulation with high-frequency trains depressed the PAN focal potentials. The late components of the PAN responses remained depressed several minutes after discontinuing the conditioning train, even after picrotoxin administration. The present observations indicate that the neuronal networks activated by the low threshold PAN afferents show a relatively small post-activation depression and appear to be subjected to a minor tonic inhibitory GABAa control. In contrast, the pathways activated by stimulation of high threshold

  20. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  1. Effects of PAD on conduction of action potentials within segmental and ascending branches of single muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Lomelí, J; Castillo, L; Linares, P; Rudomin, P

    2000-11-01

    In anesthetized and paralyzed cats under artificial respiration, we examined the extent to which primary afferent depolarization (PAD) might affect invasion of action potentials in intraspinal axonal and/or terminal branches of single muscle afferents. To this end, one stimulating micropipette was placed at the L6 spinal level within the intermediate or motor nucleus, and another one at the L3 level, in or close to Clarke's column. Antidromically conducted responses produced in single muscle afferents by stimulation at these two spinal levels were recorded from fine lateral gastrocnemius nerve filaments. In all fibers examined, stimulation of one branch, with strengths producing action potentials, increased the intraspinal threshold of the other branch when applied at short conditioning testing stimulus intervals (<1.5-2.0 ms), because of the refractoriness produced by the action potentials invading the tested branch. Similar increases in the intraspinal threshold were found in branches showing tonic PAD and also during the PAD evoked by stimulation of group I afferent fibers in muscle nerves. It is concluded that during tonic or evoked PAD, axonal branches in the dorsal columns and myelinated terminals of muscle afferents ending deep in the L6 and L3 segmental levels continue to be invaded by action potentials. These findings strengthen the view that presynaptic inhibition of muscle afferents produced by activation of GABAergic mechanisms is more likely to result from changes in the synaptic effectiveness of the afferent terminals than from conduction failure because of PAD.

  2. Development of neuropeptide Y-mediated heart innervation in rats.

    PubMed

    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin; Emanuilov, Andrey I; Anikina, Tatyana A; Zverev, Alexey A; Nozdrachev, Alexandr D

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a trophic role in the nervous and vascular systems and in cardiac hypertrophy. However, there is no report concerning the expression of NPY and its receptors in the heart during postnatal development. In the current study, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis was used to label NPY, and Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R receptors in the heart tissue and intramural cardiac ganglia from rats of different ages (newborn, 10 days old, 20 days old, 30 days old, 60 days old, 1 year old, and 2 years old).The obtained data suggest age-dependent changes of NPY-mediated heart innervation. The density of NPY-immunoreactive (IR) fibers was the least in newborn animals and increased in the first 20 days of life. In the atria of newborn and 10-day-old rats, NPY-IR fibers were more abundant compared with the ventricles. The vast majority of NPY-IR fibers also contained tyrosine hydroxylase, a key enzyme in catecholamine synthesis.The expression of Y1R increased between 10 and 20 days of life. Faint Y2R immunoreactivity was observed in the atria and ventricles of 20-day-old and older rats. In contrast, the highest level of the expression of Y5R was found in newborn pups comparing with more adult rats. All intramural ganglionic neurons were also Y1R-IR and Y5R-IR and Y2R-negative in all studied animals.Thus, the increasing of density of NPY-containing nerve fibers accompanies changes in relation of different subtypes of NPY receptors in the heart during development.

  3. Electrophysiological characterization of human rectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kheng-Seong; Brookes, Simon J.; Montes-Adrian, Noemi A.; Mahns, David A.

    2016-01-01

    It is presumed that extrinsic afferent nerves link the rectum to the central nervous system. However, the anatomical/functional existence of such nerves has never previously been demonstrated in humans. Therefore, we aimed to identify and make electrophysiological recordings in vitro from extrinsic afferents, comparing human rectum to colon. Sections of normal rectum and colon were procured from anterior resection and right hemicolectomy specimens, respectively. Sections were pinned and extrinsic nerves dissected. Extracellular visceral afferent nerve activity was recorded. Neuronal responses to chemical [capsaicin and “inflammatory soup” (IS)] and mechanical (Von Frey probing) stimuli were recorded and quantified as peak firing rate (range) in 1-s intervals. Twenty-eight separate nerve trunks from eight rectums were studied. Of these, spontaneous multiunit afferent activity was recorded in 24 nerves. Peak firing rates increased significantly following capsaicin [median 6 (range 3–25) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001] and IS [median 5 (range 2–18) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001]. Mechanosensitive “hot spots” were identified in 16 nerves [median threshold 2.0 g (range 1.4–6.0 g)]. In eight of these, the threshold decreased after IS [1.0 g (0.4–1.4 g)]. By comparison, spontaneous activity was recorded in only 3/30 nerves studied from 10 colons, and only one hot spot (threshold 60 g) was identified. This study confirms the anatomical/functional existence of extrinsic rectal afferent nerves and characterizes their chemo- and mechanosensitivity for the first time in humans. They have different electrophysiological properties to colonic afferents and warrant further investigation in disease states. PMID:27789454

  4. Capsaicin-responsive corneal afferents do not contain TRPV1 at their central terminals in trigeminal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Deborah M; Hermes, Sam M; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Aicher, Sue A

    2014-11-01

    We examined the substrates for ocular nociception in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Capsaicin application to the ocular surface in awake rats evoked nocifensive responses and suppressed spontaneous grooming responses. Thus, peripheral capsaicin was able to activate the central pathways encoding ocular nociception. Our capsaicin stimulus evoked c-Fos expression in a select population of neurons within rostral trigeminal nucleus caudalis in anesthetized rats. These activated neurons also received direct contacts from corneal afferent fibers traced with cholera toxin B from the corneal surface. However, the central terminals of the corneal afferents that contacted capsaicin-activated trigeminal neurons did not contain TRPV1. To determine if TRPV1 expression had been altered by capsaicin stimulation, we examined TRPV1 content of corneal afferents in animals that did not receive capsaicin stimulation. These studies confirmed that while TRPV1 was present in 30% of CTb-labeled corneal afferent neurons within the trigeminal ganglion, TRPV1 was only detected in 2% of the central terminals of these corneal afferents within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Other TRP channels were also present in low proportions of central corneal afferent terminals in unstimulated animals (TRPM8, 2%; TRPA1, 10%). These findings indicate that a pathway from the cornea to rostral trigeminal nucleus caudalis is involved in corneal nociceptive transmission, but that central TRP channel expression is unrelated to the type of stimulus transduced by the peripheral nociceptive endings.

  5. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  6. Serotonin and dopamine striatal innervation in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Wallman, Marie-Josée; Pourcher, Emmanuelle; Gould, Peter V; Parent, André; Parent, Martin

    2011-09-01

    In contrast to our vast knowledge of the dopamine (DA) system, much less is known about the involvement of serotonin (5-HT) in neurodegenerative diseases affecting the basal ganglia. Therefore, we designed a study that aimed at characterizing the status of the striatal DA and 5-HT systems in patients who suffered from either Parkinson's (PD) or Huntington's disease (HD), compared to age-matched controls. Antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and 5-HT transporter (SERT) were used as markers of DA and 5-HT axonal profiles, respectively. The density and pattern of TH+ and SERT + innervation were determined by optical density measurements as well as by direct stereological estimates of labeled axon varicosities. The results reveal a significant decrease in TH immunoreactivity and TH + axon terminals throughout the striatum in both PD and HD, whereas the intensity of SERT immunostaining and the density of SERT + axon varicosities were found to be slightly increased in the striatum of PD and HD patients compared to controls. These findings reveal that the nigrostriatal DA system is significantly impaired in both PD and HD compared to the striatal 5-HT innervation, which is slightly increased in these two conditions. The striatal 5-HT augmentation observed in PD might be the result of a neural mechanism designed to compensate for DA denervation, whereas the marked atrophy of the striatum might explain the increase in the 5-HT innervation noted in HD. These findings underline the importance of the complex interplay between DA and 5-HT striatal afferents in the elaboration of appropriate motor behaviour.

  7. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Duncan B; Catania, Kenneth C

    2012-12-01

    Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (<0.1 mm(2)) receptive fields, often from a single ISO, were recorded from the premaxilla, the rostral dentary, the gingivae and the distal digits. These responded to a median threshold of 0.08 mN. The less densely innervated caudal margins of the jaws had larger receptive fields (>100 mm(2)) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20-35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws.

  8. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Duncan B.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (<0.1 mm2) receptive fields, often from a single ISO, were recorded from the premaxilla, the rostral dentary, the gingivae and the distal digits. These responded to a median threshold of 0.08 mN. The less densely innervated caudal margins of the jaws had larger receptive fields (>100 mm2) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20–35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws. PMID:23136155

  9. Identification of autonomic neuronal chains innervating gingiva and lip.

    PubMed

    Szabó, E; Csáki, Á; Boldogkői, Zs; Tóth, Zs; Köves, K

    2015-07-01

    The major goals of this present study were 1) to further clarify which parasympathetic ganglion sends postganglionic fibers to the lower gingiva and lip that may be involved in the inflammatory processes besides the local factors; 2) to separately examine the central pathways regulating sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation; and 3) to examine the distribution of central premotor neurons on both sides. A retrogradely transported green fluorescent protein conjugated pseudorabies virus was injected into the lower gingiva and lip of intact and sympathectomized adult female rats. Some animals received virus in the adrenal medulla which receive only preganglionic sympathetic fibers to separately clarify the sympathetic nature of premotor neurons. After 72-120h of survival and perfusion, the corresponding thoracic part of the spinal cord, brainstem, hypothalamus, cervical, otic, submandibular and trigeminal ganglia were harvested. Frozen sections were investigated under a confocal microscope. Green fluorescence indicated the presence of the virus. The postganglionic sympathetic neurons related to both organs are located in the three cervical ganglia, the preganglionic neurons in the lateral horn of the spinal cord on ipsilateral side; premotor neurons were found in the ventrolateral medulla, locus ceruleus, gigantocellular and paraventricular nucleus and perifornical region in nearly the same number on both sides. The parasympathetic postganglionic neurons related to the gingiva are present in the otic and related to the lip are present in the otic and submandibular ganglia and the preganglionic neurons are in the salivatory nuclei. Third order neurons were found in the gigantocellular reticular and hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei and perifornical area.

  10. Differential impact of hypergravity on maturating innervation in vestibular epithelia during rat development.

    PubMed

    Gaboyard, Sophie; Sans, Alain; Lehouelleur, Jacques

    2003-06-12

    Over the past decades, the new opportunity of space flights has revealed the importance of gravity as a mechanical constraint for terrestrial organisms as well as its influence on the somatosensory system. The lack of gravitational reference in orbital flight induces changes in equilibrium, with major modifications involving neuromorphological and physiological adaptations. However, few data have illustrated the putative effect of gravity on sensory vestibular epithelial development. We asked if gravity, the primary stimulus of utricles could act as an epigenetic factor. As sensorial deprivation linked to weightlessness is technically difficult, we used a ground-based centrifuge to increase the gravitational vector, in order to hyperstimulate the vestibule. In this study, 3 days after mating, pregnant females were submitted to hypergravity, 2 g (HG). Their embryos were raised, born and postnatally developed under HG. The establishment of connections between primary vestibular afferent neurons and hair cells in the utricle of these young rats was followed from birth to postnatal day 6 (PN6) and compared to embryos developed in normogravity (NG): Immunocytochemistry for neurofilaments and microvesicles revealed the differential effects of gravity on the late neuritogenic and synaptogenic processes in utricles. Taking type I hair cell innervation as a criterion of maturation, we found that primary afferent fibres reached the vestibular epithelium and enveloped hair cells in the same way, both under NG and HG. Thus, this phenomenon of leading growth cones to their epithelial target appears to be dependent on intrinsic genetic properties and not on an external stimulus. In contrast, the maturation of connection processes between type 1 hair cells and the afferent calyx, concerning specifically the microvesicles at their apex, was delayed under HG. Therefore, gravity appears to be an epigenetic factor influencing the late maturation of utricles. These differential

  11. SA1 and RA afferent responses to static and vibrating gratings.

    PubMed

    Bensmaïa, S J; Craig, J C; Yoshioka, T; Johnson, K O

    2006-03-01

    SA1 and RA afferent fibers differ both in their ability to convey information about the fine spatial structure of tactile stimuli and in their frequency sensitivity profiles. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which the spatial resolution of the signal conveyed by SA1 and RA fibers depends on the temporal properties of the stimulus. To that end, we recorded the responses evoked in SA1 and RA fibers of macaques by static and vibrating gratings that varied in spatial period, vibratory frequency, and amplitude. Gratings were oriented either parallel to the long axis of the finger (vertical) or perpendicular to it (horizontal). We examined the degree to which afferent responses were dependent on the spatial period, vibratory frequency, amplitude, and orientation of the gratings. We found that the spatial modulation of the afferent responses increased as the spatial period of the gratings increased; the spatial modulation was the same for static and vibrating gratings, despite large differences in evoked spike rates; the spatial modulation in SA1 responses was independent of stimulus amplitude over the range of amplitudes tested, whereas RA modulation decreased slightly as the stimulus amplitude increased; vertical gratings evoked stronger and more highly modulated responses than horizontal gratings; the modulation in SA1 responses was higher than that in RA responses at all frequencies and amplitudes. The behavioral consequences of these neurophysiological findings are examined in a companion paper.

  12. Sympathetic innervation promotes vascular smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Damon, Deborah H

    2005-06-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is an important modulator of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) growth and function. Several lines of evidence suggest that the SNS also promotes VSM differentiation. The present study tests this hypothesis. Expression of smooth muscle myosin (SM2) and alpha-actin were assessed by Western analysis as indexes of VSM differentiation. SM2 expression (normalized to alpha-actin) in adult innervated rat femoral and tail arteries was 479 +/- 115% of that in noninnervated carotid arteries. Expression of alpha-actin (normalized to GAPDH or total protein) in 30-day-innervated rat femoral arteries was greater than in corresponding noninnervated femoral arteries from guanethidine-sympathectomized rats. SM2 expression (normalized to alpha-actin) in neonatal femoral arteries grown in vitro for 7 days in the presence of sympathetic ganglia was greater than SM2 expression in corresponding arteries grown in the absence of sympathetic ganglia. In VSM-endothelial cell cultures grown in the presence of dissociated sympathetic neurons, alpha-actin (normalized to GAPDH) was 300 +/- 66% of that in corresponding cultures grown in the absence of neurons. This effect was inhibited by an antibody that neutralized the activity of transforming growth factor-beta2. All of these data indicate that sympathetic innervation increased VSM contractile protein expression and thereby suggest that the SNS promotes and/or maintains VSM differentiation.

  13. Scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation

    SciTech Connect

    Dae, M.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Botvinick, E.H.; Ahearn, T.; Yee, E.; Huberty, J.P.; Mori, H.; Chin, M.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Herre, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of noninvasively imaging the regional distribution of myocardial sympathetic innervation, we evaluated the distribution of sympathetic nerve endings, using 123I metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), and compared this with the distribution of myocardial perfusion, using 201Tl. Twenty dogs were studied: 11 after regional denervation, and nine as controls. Regional denervation was done by left stellate ganglion removal, right stellate ganglion removal, and application of phenol to the epicardial surface. Computer-processed functional maps displayed the relative distribution of MIBG and thallium in multiple projections in vivo and excised heart slices in all animals. In six animals, dual isotope emission computed tomograms were acquired in vivo. Tissue samples taken from innervated and denervated regions of the MIBG images were analyzed for norepinephrine content to validate image findings. Normal controls showed homogeneous and parallel distributions of MIBG and thallium in the major left ventricular mass. In the left stellectomized hearts, MIBG was reduced relative to thallium in the posterior left ventricle; whereas in right stellectomized hearts, reduced MIBG was in the anterior left ventricle. Phenol-painted hearts showed a broad area of decreased MIBG extending beyond the area of phenol application. In both stellectomized and phenol-painted hearts, thallium distribution remained homogeneous and normal. Norepinephrine content was greater in regions showing normal MIBG (550 +/- 223 ng/g) compared with regions showing reduced MIBG (39 +/- 44 ng/g) (p less than 0.001), confirming regional denervation. Combined MIBG-thallium functional maps display the regional distribution of sympathetic innervation.

  14. Doublecortin is expressed in trigeminal motoneurons that innervate the velar musculature of lampreys: considerations on the evolution and development of the trigeminal system.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Romaus-Sanjurjo, Daniel; Senra-Martínez, Pablo; Anadón, Ramón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2011-01-01

    Studies in lampreys have revealed interesting aspects of the evolution of the trigeminal system and the jaw. In the present study, we found a marker that distinguishes subpopulations of trigeminal motoneurons innervating two different kinds of oropharyngeal muscles. Immunofluorescence with an antibody against doublecortin (DCX; a neuron-specific phosphoprotein) enabled identification of the trigeminal motoneurons that innervate the velar musculature of larval and recently transformed sea lampreys. DCX-immunoreactive (-ir) motoneurons were observed in the rostro-lateral part of the trigeminal motor nucleus of these animals, but not in lampreys 1 month or more after metamorphosis. Combined double DCX/tubulin and serotonin/tubulin immunofluorescence and tract-tracing experiments with neurobiotin (NB) were also performed in larvae for further characterization of this system. Rich innervation by DCX-ir fibers was observed on the muscle fibers of the velum but not on the upper lip or lower lip muscles, which were innervated by tubulin-ir/DCX-negative fibers. No double-labelled DCX-ir motoneurons were observed in experiments in which the tracer NB was applied to the upper lip. Innervation of velar muscles by serotonergic fibers is also reported. The present results indicate that development of the trigeminal motoneurons innervating the velum differs from that of the trigeminal motoneurons innervating the lips, which is probably related to the dramatic regression of the velum during metamorphosis. The absence of data on a similar subsystem in the trigeminal motor nucleus of gnathostomes suggests that they may be lamprey-specific motoneurons. These results provide support for the "heterotopic theory" of jaw evolution and are inconsistent with the theories of a velar origin for the gnathostome jaw.

  15. Substance P and opioid peptidergic innervation of the anterior eye segment of the rat: an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Selbach, J Michael; Buschnack, Samia H; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Kremmer, Stephan; Muth-Selbach, Uta

    2005-01-01

    Recently discovered endogenous opioid peptides such as nociceptin are known to modulate neurotransmitter release of primary afferent neurons (especially substance P, SP) and they have also been demonstrated in peripheral nerve fibres. The aim of this study was to investigate the opioid peptidergic innervation of the anterior eye segment and to compare it with the innervation pattern of SP in order to shed light on the functional relationship between these peptides. Anterior eye segments of 20 rat eyes were cut in a tangential plane and the sections stained with antibodies against SP, nociceptin, nocistatin, endomorphin 1 and 2, leu-enkephalin and met-enkephalin. Sections of the spinal cord or brain were used as positive controls. Numerous SP-immunoreactive nerve fibres were found in the conjunctiva, cornea, episclera, trabecular meshwork, iris and ciliary body. A weak staining for met-enkephalin and leu-enkephalin could only be found in the iris and anteriormost ciliary body. Nerve fibres immunoreactive for nociceptin, nocistatin, and endomorphin 1 or 2 could not be detected in any part of the anterior eye segment. It is tempting to speculate that the opioid peptidergic innervation of the anterior ciliary body may play a role in the modulation of intraocular inflammation. PMID:15733295

  16. Decoding tactile afferent activity to obtain an estimate of instantaneous force and torque applied to the fingerpad.

    PubMed

    Khamis, Heba; Birznieks, Ingvars; Redmond, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Dexterous manipulation is not possible without sensory information about object properties and manipulative forces. Fundamental neuroscience has been unable to demonstrate how information about multiple stimulus parameters may be continuously extracted, concurrently, from a population of tactile afferents. This is the first study to demonstrate this, using spike trains recorded from tactile afferents innervating the monkey fingerpad. A multiple-regression model, requiring no a priori knowledge of stimulus-onset times or stimulus combination, was developed to obtain continuous estimates of instantaneous force and torque. The stimuli consisted of a normal-force ramp (to a plateau of 1.8, 2.2, or 2.5 N), on top of which -3.5, -2.0, 0, +2.0, or +3.5 mNm torque was applied about the normal to the skin surface. The model inputs were sliding windows of binned spike counts recorded from each afferent. Models were trained and tested by 15-fold cross-validation to estimate instantaneous normal force and torque over the entire stimulation period. With the use of the spike trains from 58 slow-adapting type I and 25 fast-adapting type I afferents, the instantaneous normal force and torque could be estimated with small error. This study demonstrated that instantaneous force and torque parameters could be reliably extracted from a small number of tactile afferent responses in a real-time fashion with stimulus combinations that the model had not been exposed to during training. Analysis of the model weights may reveal how interactions between stimulus parameters could be disentangled for complex population responses and could be used to test neurophysiologically relevant hypotheses about encoding mechanisms.

  17. Two-photon microscopy of dermal innervation in a human re-innervated model of skin.

    PubMed

    Sevrain, David; Le Grand, Yann; Buhé, Virginie; Jeanmaire, Christine; Pauly, Gilles; Carré, Jean-Luc; Misery, Laurent; Lebonvallet, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    When skin is injured, innervation can be severely disrupted. The subsequent re-innervation processes are poorly understood notably because of the inability to image the full meandering course of nerves with their ramifications and endings from histological slices. In this letter, we report on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy of entire human skin explants re-innervated by rodent sensory neurons labelled with the styryl dye FM1-43. TPEF imaging of nerve fibres to a depth up to roughly 300 μm within the dermis was demonstrated, allowing three-dimensional reconstruction of the neural tree structure. Endogenous second-harmonic imaging of type I fibrillar collagen was performed in parallel to TPEF imaging using the same nonlinear microscope, revealing the path of the nerves through the dermis.

  18. Afferent and efferent connections of the nucleus sphericus in the snake Thamnophis sirtalis: convergence of olfactory and vomeronasal information in the lateral cortex and the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Lanuza, E; Halpern, M

    1997-09-08

    This paper is an account of the afferent and efferent projections of the nucleus sphericus (NS), which is the major secondary vomeronasal structure in the brain of the snake Thamnophis sirtalis. There are four major efferent pathways from the NS: 1) a bilateral projection that courses, surrounding the accessory olfactory tract, and innervates several amygdaloid nuclei (nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract, dorsolateral amygdala, external amygdala, and ventral anterior amygdala), the rostral parts of the dorsal and lateral cortices, and the accessory olfactory bulb; 2) a bilateral projection that courses through the medial forebrain bundle and innervates the olfactostriatum (rostral and ventral striatum); 3) a commissural projection that courses through the anterior commissure and innervates mainly the contralateral NS; and 4) a meager bilateral projection to the lateral hypothalamus. On the other hand, important afferent projections to the NS arise solely in the accessory olfactory bulb, the nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract, and the contralateral NS. This pattern of connections has three important implications: first, the lateral cortex probably integrates olfactory and vomeronasal information. Second, because the NS projection to the hypothalamus is meager and does not reach the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, vomeronasal information from the NS is not relayed directly to that nucleus, as previously reported. Finally, a structure located in the rostral and ventral telencephalon, the olfactostriatum, stands as the major tertiary vomeronasal center in the snake brain. These three conclusions change to an important extent our previous picture of how vomeronasal information is processed in the brain of reptiles.

  19. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing.

  20. Characterization of sacral interneurons that mediate activation of locomotor pattern generators by sacrocaudal afferent input.

    PubMed

    Etlin, Alex; Finkel, Eran; Mor, Yoav; O'Donovan, Michael J; Anglister, Lili; Lev-Tov, Aharon

    2013-01-09

    Identification of the neural pathways involved in retraining the spinal central pattern generators (CPGs) by afferent input in the absence of descending supraspinal control is feasible in isolated rodent spinal cords where the locomotor CPGs are potently activated by sacrocaudal afferent (SCA) input. Here we study the involvement of sacral neurons projecting rostrally through the ventral funiculi (VF) in activation of the CPGs by sensory stimulation. Fluorescent labeling and immunostaining showed that VF neurons are innervated by primary afferents immunoreactive for vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 and by intraspinal neurons. Calcium imaging revealed that 55% of the VF neurons were activated by SCA stimulation. The activity of VF neurons and the sacral and lumbar CPGs was abolished when non-NMDA receptors in the sacral segments were blocked by the antagonist CNQX. When sacral NMDA receptors were blocked by APV, the sacral CPGs were suppressed, VF neurons with nonrhythmic activity were recruited and a moderate-drive locomotor rhythm developed during SCA stimulation. In contrast, when the sacral CPGs were activated by SCA stimulation, rhythmic and nonrhythmic VF neurons were recruited and the locomotor rhythm was most powerful. The activity of 73 and 27% of the rhythmic VF neurons was in-phase with the ipsilateral and contralateral motor output, respectively. Collectively, our studies indicate that sacral VF neurons serve as a major link between SCA and the hindlimb CPGs and that the ability of SCA to induce stepping can be enhanced by the sacral CPGs. The nature of the ascending drive to lumbar CPGs, the identity of subpopulations of VF neurons, and their potential role in activating the locomotor rhythm are discussed.

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of vagal afferents relevant to mucosal nociception in the rat upper oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Lennerz, J K M; Dentsch, C; Bernardini, N; Hummel, T; Neuhuber, W L; Reeh, P W

    2007-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates a nociceptive role of vagal afferents. A distinct oesophageal innervation in the rat, with muscular and mucosal afferents travelling predominantly in the recurrent (RLN) and superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), respectively, enabled characterization of mucosal afferents with nociceptive properties, using novel isolated oesophagus–nerve preparations. SLN and RLN single-fibre recordings identified 55 and 14 units, respectively, with none conducting faster than 8.7 m s−1. Mucosal response characteristics in the SLN distinguished mechanosensors (n= 13), mechanosensors with heat sensitivity (18) from those with cold sensitivity (19) and a mechanoinsensitive group (5). The mechanosensitive fibres, all slowly adapting, showed a unimodal distribution of mechanical thresholds (1.4–128 mN, peak ∼5.7 mN). No difference in response characteristics of C and Aδ fibres was encountered. Mucosal proton stimulation (pH 5.4 for 3 min), mimicking gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), revealed in 31% of units a desensitizing response that peaked around 20 s and faded within 60 s. Cold stimulation (15°C) was proportionally encoded but the response showed slow adaptation. In contrast, the noxious heat (48°C) response showed no obvious adaptation with discharge rates reflecting the temperature's time course. Polymodal (69%) mucosal units, > 30% proton sensitive, were found in each fibre category and were considered nociceptors; they are tentatively attributed to vagal nerve endings type I, IV and V, previously morphologically described. All receptive fields were mapped and the distribution indicates that the posterior upper oesophagus may serve as a ‘cutbank’, detecting noxious matters, ingested or regurgitated, and triggering nocifensive reflexes such as bronchoconstriction in GORD. PMID:17478536

  2. Targeting primary afferent nerves for novel antitussive therapy.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The best available data support the hypothesis that there are at least two types of vagal nerves responsible for initiating coughing reflexes. One type of nerve conducts action potentials in the A-range and is characterized by rapidly adapting responses to mechanical probing or acidification of the large airway epithelium. Stimulation of these nerves can evoke cough in unconscious experimental animals and humans. These nerves are important in immediate cough evoked by aspiration and as such perform a critical role in airway defense. The other type of primary afferent nerve involved in cough is the vagal C-fiber. Inhalation of selective C-fiber stimulants leads to cough only in conscious animals. In clinical studies, inhalation of a low concentration of a C-fiber stimulant causes an irritating, itchy urge-to-cough sensation that mimics the urge-to-cough sensations associated with respiratory tract infection, post-infection, gastroesophageal reflux disorders, and inflammatory airway diseases. Here we discuss the recent advances in sensory neurobiology that allow for the targeting of vagal C-fibers for novel antitussive therapy. No attempts are made to be all-inclusive with respect to the numerous possible molecular targets being considered to accomplish this goal. Rather, two general strategies are discussed: decreasing generator potential amplitude and decreasing the efficiency by which a generator potential evokes action-potential discharge. For the first category we focus on two targets, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and transient receptor potential A1. For the latter category we focus on recent advances in voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channel biology.

  3. Chemoarchitecture and afferent connections of the "olfactostriatum": a specialized vomeronasal structure within the basal ganglia of snakes.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Marcos, Alino; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Lanuza, Enrique; Halpern, Mimi

    2005-01-01

    The olfactostriatum, a portion of the striatal complex of snakes, is the major tertiary vomeronasal structure in the ophidian brain, receiving substantial afferents from the nucleus sphericus, the primary target of accessory olfactory bulb efferents. In the present study, we have characterized the olfactostriatum of garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) on the basis of chemoarchitecture (distribution of serotonin, neuropeptide Y and tyrosine hydroxylase) and hodology (afferent connections). The olfactostriatum is densely immunoreactive for serotonin and neuropeptide Y and shows moderate-to-weak immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase. In addition to afferents from the nucleus sphericus, the olfactostriatum receives inputs from the dorsal and lateral cortices, nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract, external and dorsolateral amygdalae, dorsomedial thalamic nucleus, ventral tegmental area and raphe nuclei. Double labeling experiments demonstrated that the distribution of serotonin and neuropeptide Y in this area almost completely overlaps the terminal field of projections from the nucleus sphericus. Also, serotonergic and dopaminergic innervation of the olfactostriatum likely arise, respectively, from the raphe nuclei and the ventral tegmental area, whereas local circuit neurons originate the neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity. These results indicate that the olfactostriatum of snakes could be a portion of the nucleus accumbens, with features characteristic of the accumbens shell, devoted to processing vomeronasal information. Comparative data suggest that a similar structure is present in the ventral striatum of amphibians and mammals.

  4. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  5. Dextrans as markers for endocytosis in innervated and denervated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Elmquist, S; Libelius, R; Lawoko, G; Tågerud, S

    1992-08-01

    Fluorescence-labeled dextrans were evaluated as markers for endocytosis in skeletal muscle. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextrans (average molecular weight 3900 to 71200) showed a higher uptake in denervated than in innervated muscle both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro uptake of FITC-dextran (35.600) increased linearly with time at 37 degrees C, and was almost completely inhibited by low temperature (4 degrees C). The uptake was not a pure bulk uptake, because a saturable component was evident from the concentration dependence and from competition experiments with unlabeled dextran. The uptake of FITC-labeled or rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC)-labeled dextrans in denervated muscle occurred mainly in small segments of the fibers centered around the denervated endplate region. However, not all denervated fibers showed such segments. Periodic acid Schiff's base staining for carbohydrates stained dextrans in denervated muscle fibers. Some staining, probably of lysosomes, was also observed in denervated muscle not exposed to dextran.

  6. Cartography of human diaphragmatic innervation: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Verin, Eric; Marie, Jean-Paul; Similowski, Thomas

    2011-04-30

    In humans, anatomy indicates that the phrenic nerve mainly arises from the C4 cervical root, with variable C3 and C5 contributions. How this translates into functional innervation is unknown. The diaphragm response to electrical stimulation of C3, C4 and C5 was described in three patients undergoing surgical laryngeal reinnervation with an upper phrenic root (surface chest electrodes at anterior, lateral and posterior sites; oesophageal and gastric pressures (Pes and Pga) to derive transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi)). Anatomically, the phrenic nerve predominantly originated from C4. Phrenic stimulation elicited motor responses at the three sites in the three patients, as did C4 stimulation. It produced Pdi values of 9, 11, and 14cmH(2)O in the three patients, respectively, vs. 9, 9, and 7cmH(2)O for C4. C3 stimulation produced modest Pdi responses, whereas C5 stimulation could produce Pdi responses close to those observed with C4 stimulation. These singular observations confirm the dominance of C4 in diaphragm innervation but suggest than C5 can be of importance.

  7. Visceral nerves: vagal and sympathetic innervation.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L

    2008-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system is the primary neural mediator of physiological responses to internal and external stimuli. It is composed of 2 branches: the sympathetic nervous system, which mediates catabolic responses, and the parasympathetic nervous system, composed of the vagus nerve, which regulates anabolic responses. As the vagus nerve innervates most tissues involved in nutrient metabolism, including the stomach, pancreas, and liver, activation of vagal efferent activity has the potential to influence how nutrients are absorbed and metabolized. Vagal efferent activity is initially activated at the onset of food intake by receptors in the oropharyngeal cavity and then during food intake postprandially. Vagal efferent innervation of the pancreas contributes to early-phase insulin release as well as to optimizing postprandial insulin release. In the absence of vagal activation, which occurs when glucose is administered intragastrically, postprandial glucose levels are higher and insulin levels blunted compared with when there is activation of oropharyngeal receptors by food. An induction of vagal efferent activity also occurs during chronic pancreatic B-cell challenge with 48-hour glucose infusions. Under these conditions, the compensatory increase in insulin secretion is partially mediated by an increase in vagal efferent activity. In conclusion, the vagus nerve, part of the parasympathetic nervous system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood glucose levels and is an often overlooked factor contributing to glucose homeostasis.

  8. Cytoarchitecture and saccular innervation of nucleus y in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, C J; Trune, D R

    1986-10-15

    The cytoarchitecture and saccular innervation of the mouse nucleus y were investigated by using Golgi, Nissl, and myelin stains and anterograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase. Nucleus y was found to be a compact group of cells in a small fiber-free region dorsal to the restiform body. Qualitative and morphometric analyses showed that most (75%) of the nucleus y neurons could not be reliably subdivided into morphologic subgroups, but varied continuously in soma size (15-25 microns), shape (fusiform to stellate), and number of dendrites (two to four), and had sparsely branched dendrites with an average of 3 to 4 spines per 10 microns of length. Three groups of cells that were identified morphometrically accounted for 10% (type I: large stellate cells), 9% (type II: long-dendrite cells), and 6% (type III: elongated soma cells) of the y neurons. Vestibular nerve axons transporting horseradish peroxidase after injury at their origin in the saccular neuroepithelium were found to form a dense terminal meshwork that was virtually co-extensive with the cytoarchitectonic boundaries of nucleus y. Nucleus y was distinguished from the overlying infracerebellar nucleus on the basis of anatomical, cytoarchitectural, and hodological features.

  9. Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 immunoreactivity in extrinsic and intrinsic innervation of the rat esophagus.

    PubMed

    Ewald, P; Neuhuber, W L; Raab, M

    2006-04-01

    Encouraged by the recent finding of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) immunoreactivity (-ir) in intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) of the rat esophagus, we investigated also the distribution and co-localization patterns of VGLUT1. Confocal imaging revealed substantial co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with selective markers of IGLEs, i.e., calretinin and VGLUT2, indicating that IGLEs contain both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 within their synaptic vesicles. Besides IGLEs, we found VGLUT1-ir in both cholinergic and nitrergic myenteric neuronal cell bodies, in fibers of the muscularis mucosae, and in esophageal motor endplates. Skeletal neuromuscular junctions, in contrast, showed no VGLUT1-ir. We also tested for probable co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with markers of extrinsic and intrinsic esophageal innervation and glia. Within the myenteric neuropil we found, besides co-localization of VGLUT1 and substance P, no further co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with any of these markers. In the muscularis mucosae some VGLUT1-ir fibers were shown to contain neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-ir. VGLUT1-ir in esophageal motor endplates was partly co-localized with vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)/choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-ir, but VGLUT1-ir was also demonstrated in separately terminating fibers at motor endplates co-localized neither with ChAT/VAChT-ir nor with nNOS-ir, suggesting a hitherto unknown glutamatergic enteric co-innervation. Thus, VGLUT1-ir was found in extrinsic as well as intrinsic innervation of the rat esophagus.

  10. Activation of kinetically distinct synaptic conductances on inhibitory interneurons by electrotonically overlapping afferents.

    PubMed

    Walker, Harrison C; Lawrence, J Josh; McBain, Chris J

    2002-07-03

    Mossy fiber (MF) and CA3 collateral (CL) axons activate common interneurons via synapses comprised of different AMPA receptors to provide feedforward and feedback inhibitory control of the CA3 hippocampal network. Because synapses potentially occur over variable electrotonic distances that distort somatically recorded synaptic currents, it is not known whether the underlying afferent-specific synaptic conductances are associated with different time courses. Using a somatic voltage jump technique to alter the driving force at the site of the synapse, we demonstrate that MF and CL synapses overlap in electrotonic location yet differ in conductance time course. Thus, afferent-specific conductance time courses allow single interneurons to differentially integrate feedforward and feedback information without the need to segregate distinct AMPA receptor subunits to different electrotonic domains.

  11. The vestibular nerve of the chinchilla. III. Peripheral innervation patterns in the utricular macula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, C.; Goldberg, J. M.; Baird, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Nerve fibers supplying the utricular macula of the chinchilla were labeled by extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase into the vestibular nerve. The peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the regions of the end organ they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. 2. The macula is divided into medial and lateral parts by the striola, a narrow zone that runs for almost the entire length of the sensory epithelium. The striola can be distinguished from the extrastriolar regions to either side of it by the wider spacing of its hair cells. Calyx endings in the striola have especially thick walls, and, unlike similar endings in the extrastriola, many of them innervate more than one hair cell. The striola occupies 10% of the sensory epithelium; the lateral extrastriola, 50%; and the medial extrastriola, 40%. 3. The utricular nerve penetrates the bony labyrinth anterior to the end organ. Axons reaching the anterior part of the sensory epithelium run directly through the connective tissue stroma. Those supplying more posterior regions first enter a fiber layer located at the bottom of the stroma. Approximately one-third of the axons bifurcate below the epithelium, usually within 5-20 microns of the basement membrane. Bifurcations are more common in fibers destined for the extrastriola than for the striola. 4. Both calyx and bouton endings were labeled. Calyces can be simple or complex. Simple calyces innervate individual hair cells, whereas complex calyces supply 2-4 adjacent hair cells. Complex endings are more heavily concentrated in the striola than in the extrastriola. Simple calyces and boutons are found in all parts of the epithelium. Calyces emerge from the parent axon or one of its thick branches. Boutons, whether en passant or terminal, are located on thin collaterals. 5. Fibers can be classified into calyx, bouton, or dimorphic categories. The first type only has calyx endings; the second, only bouton

  12. Symptoms of notalgia paresthetica may be explained by increased dermal innervation.

    PubMed

    Springall, D R; Karanth, S S; Kirkham, N; Darley, C R; Polak, J M

    1991-09-01

    Notalgia paresthetica is a sensory neuropathy characterized by infrascapular pruritus, burning pain, hyperalgesia, or tenderness. To assess whether the symptoms may be caused by alterations in the cutaneous innervation, skin from the affected area of patients (n = 5) was compared with controls (n = 10) comprising the contralateral unaffected area from the same patients and site-matched biopsies of normals, using immunohistochemistry. Frozen sections were immunostained with antisera to the neuropeptides substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and neuropeptide with tyrosine, and to the general neural marker PGP 9.5 and the glial marker S-100 to show the overall innervation and glial cells, respectively. No discernible change in the distribution of neuropeptide-immunoreactive axons was found, but all of the specimens from the affected areas had a significant increase in the number of intradermal PGP 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibers compared with unaffected areas from the same patients and normal controls. Epidermal dendritic cells immunoreactive for S-100, possibly Langerhans cells, were substantially increased. It is concluded that there is an increase in the sensory epidermal innervation in the affected skin areas in notalgia paresthetica, which could contribute to the symptoms, and that neural immunohistochemistry of skin biopsies could be helpful in the diagnosis of the disease.

  13. Dynamic modification of oral innervation during metamorphosis in Branchiostoma belcheri, the oriental lancelet.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Takao; Shimizu, Keiji; Artinger, Kristin Bruk; Yasui, Kinya

    2009-10-01

    The oral apparatus in lancelets undergoes a remarkable modification during larval development, especially during metamorphosis, when the oral innervation is radically altered. The larval mouth opens on the left side at the early larval stage, and a peripheral nerve network, the oral nerve ring (ONR), develops around it. The ONR enlarges as the mouth expands caudally, eventually receiving fibers from nerves as far back as the tenth on the left side. The mouth shrinks during metamorphosis, and with this change the ONR regresses; the posterior sixth to tenth nerves become freed from the connection with the ONR, whereas the fourth and fifth nerves retain their connections. This modification is the basis for the asymmetric innervation to the velum. There is no mesodermal or mesenchymal restriction for guiding nerve patterning as typically found in vertebrate cranial nerves. Rather, it seems to be the ONR, which has no counterpart in vertebrates, that plays pivotal roles for patterning the nervous system in the oral region. The oral innervation pattern in lancelets represents a derived character state that may be related to the asymmetry of the ancestral body and head.

  14. Reduced innervation in the human pharynx in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    de Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Macías, Emilio; Feito, Jorge; González, Mónica; Cobo, Teresa; Fernández-Mondragón, María P; García-Suárez, Olivia; Vega, José A

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a disease characterized by repetitive breathing during sleep that lead to reduced oxygen saturation and sleep disturbance among other symptoms. Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by blockade of the upper respiratory airway, although the pathogenic mechanism underlying this occlusion remains unknown. In these studies we explored the hypothesis that alterations in the innervation, especially mechanosensory innervation, of the pharynx may contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the innervation of the human pharynx in normal individuals and in subjects clinically diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. Using immunohistochemistry for axon and Schwann cells, as well as for two putative mechanoproteins (ASIC2 and TRPV4), we observed a significant reduction in the density of nerve fibers in the submucosa of patients with obstructive sleep apnea as well as morphological abnormalities in mechanosensory corpuscles. Importantly, while ASIC2 and TRPV4 expression was regularly found in the axons of mechanosensory corpuscles distributed throughout the muscular layer in the control subjects, it was absent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. These findings support that neurological alterations are important contributors to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea.

  15. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, P; López, M; Larraya, I; Chamorro, J; Cobo, J L; Ordóñez, S; Vega, J A

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  16. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, P.; López, M.; Larraya, I.; Chamorro, J.; Cobo, J. L.; Ordóñez, S.

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  17. Peripheral Afferent Mechanisms Underlying Acupuncture Inhibition of Cocaine Behavioral Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong Hyo; Bae, Jong Han; Kim, Kwang Joong; Steffensen, Scott C.; Leem, Joong Woo; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Hee Young

    2013-01-01

    Administration of cocaine increases locomotor activity by enhancing dopamine transmission. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying acupuncture treatment for drug addiction, we developed a novel mechanical acupuncture instrument (MAI) for objective mechanical stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether acupuncture inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated through specific peripheral nerves, the afferents from superficial or deep tissues, or specific groups of nerve fibers. Mechanical stimulation of acupuncture point HT7 with MAI suppressed cocaine-induced locomotor activity in a stimulus time-dependent manner, which was blocked by severing the ulnar nerve or by local anesthesia. Suppression of cocaine-induced locomotor activity was elicited after HT7 stimulation at frequencies of either 50 (for Meissner corpuscles) or 200 (for Pacinian corpuscles) Hz and was not affected by block of C/Aδ-fibers in the ulnar nerve with resiniferatoxin, nor generated by direct stimulation of C/Aδ-fiber afferents with capsaicin. These findings suggest that HT7 inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated by A-fiber activation of ulnar nerve that originates in superficial and deep tissue. PMID:24260531

  18. Vagal cardiac efferent innervation in F344 rats: Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2017-03-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), which is a physiological consequence of obstructive sleep apnea, reduces baroreflex control of heart rate (HR). Previously, we showed that the heart rate (HR) response to electrical stimulation of the vagal efferent nerve was significantly increased following CIH in F344 rats. Since vagal cardiac efferent from the nucleus ambiguus (NA) project to cardiac ganglia and regulate HR, we hypothesized that vagal cardiac efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia is reorganized. Young adult F344 rats were exposed either to room air (RA) or to intermittent hypoxia for 35-50days. Fluorescent tracer DiI was injected into the NA to label vagal efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia which had been counterstained by Fluoro-Gold (FG) injections (i.p). Confocal microscopy was used to examine vagal cardiac efferent axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia. NA axons entered cardiac ganglia and innervated principal neurons (PNs) with robust basket endings in both RA control and CIH animals. In addition, the percentage of PNs which were innervated by DiI-labeled fibers in ganglia was similar. In CIH rats, abnormally large swollen cardiac axon segments and disorganized terminals as well as leaky endings were observed. In general, vagal efferent terminal varicosities around PNs appeared larger and the number of varicosities was significantly increased. Interestingly, some cardiac axons had sprouting-like terminal structures in the cardiac ganglia as well as in cardiac muscle, which had not been found in RA control. Finally, CIH increased the size of PNs and reduced the ratio of nucleus to PN somata. Thus, CIH significantly remodeled the structure of vagal cardiac axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia as well as cardiac PNs.

  19. Catecholaminergic innervation of central and peripheral auditory circuitry varies with reproductive state in female midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus.

    PubMed

    Forlano, Paul M; Ghahramani, Zachary N; Monestime, Camillia M; Kurochkin, Philip; Chernenko, Alena; Milkis, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    In seasonal breeding vertebrates, hormone regulation of catecholamines, which include dopamine and noradrenaline, may function, in part, to modulate behavioral responses to conspecific vocalizations. However, natural seasonal changes in catecholamine innervation of auditory nuclei is largely unexplored, especially in the peripheral auditory system, where encoding of social acoustic stimuli is initiated. The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, has proven to be an excellent model to explore mechanisms underlying seasonal peripheral auditory plasticity related to reproductive social behavior. Recently, we demonstrated robust catecholaminergic (CA) innervation throughout the auditory system in midshipman. Most notably, dopaminergic neurons in the diencephalon have widespread projections to auditory circuitry including direct innervation of the saccule, the main endorgan of hearing, and the cholinergic octavolateralis efferent nucleus (OE) which also projects to the inner ear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that gravid, reproductive summer females show differential CA innervation of the auditory system compared to non-reproductive winter females. We utilized quantitative immunofluorescence to measure tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir) fiber density throughout central auditory nuclei and the sensory epithelium of the saccule. Reproductive females exhibited greater density of TH-ir innervation in two forebrain areas including the auditory thalamus and greater density of TH-ir on somata and dendrites of the OE. In contrast, non-reproductive females had greater numbers of TH-ir terminals in the saccule and greater TH-ir fiber density in a region of the auditory hindbrain as well as greater numbers of TH-ir neurons in the preoptic area. These data provide evidence that catecholamines may function, in part, to seasonally modulate the sensitivity of the inner ear and, in turn, the appropriate behavioral response to reproductive acoustic signals.

  20. Catecholaminergic Innervation of Central and Peripheral Auditory Circuitry Varies with Reproductive State in Female Midshipman Fish, Porichthys notatus

    PubMed Central

    Forlano, Paul M.; Ghahramani, Zachary N.; Monestime, Camillia M.; Kurochkin, Philip; Chernenko, Alena; Milkis, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    In seasonal breeding vertebrates, hormone regulation of catecholamines, which include dopamine and noradrenaline, may function, in part, to modulate behavioral responses to conspecific vocalizations. However, natural seasonal changes in catecholamine innervation of auditory nuclei is largely unexplored, especially in the peripheral auditory system, where encoding of social acoustic stimuli is initiated. The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, has proven to be an excellent model to explore mechanisms underlying seasonal peripheral auditory plasticity related to reproductive social behavior. Recently, we demonstrated robust catecholaminergic (CA) innervation throughout the auditory system in midshipman. Most notably, dopaminergic neurons in the diencephalon have widespread projections to auditory circuitry including direct innervation of the saccule, the main endorgan of hearing, and the cholinergic octavolateralis efferent nucleus (OE) which also projects to the inner ear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that gravid, reproductive summer females show differential CA innervation of the auditory system compared to non-reproductive winter females. We utilized quantitative immunofluorescence to measure tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir) fiber density throughout central auditory nuclei and the sensory epithelium of the saccule. Reproductive females exhibited greater density of TH-ir innervation in two forebrain areas including the auditory thalamus and greater density of TH-ir on somata and dendrites of the OE. In contrast, non-reproductive females had greater numbers of TH-ir terminals in the saccule and greater TH-ir fiber density in a region of the auditory hindbrain as well as greater numbers of TH-ir neurons in the preoptic area. These data provide evidence that catecholamines may function, in part, to seasonally modulate the sensitivity of the inner ear and, in turn, the appropriate behavioral response to reproductive acoustic signals. PMID

  1. Transgene expression and effective gene silencing in vagal afferent neurons in vivo using recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Kollarik, M; Carr, M J; Ru, F; Ring, C J A; Hart, V J; Murdock, P; Myers, A C; Muroi, Y; Undem, B J

    2010-01-01

    Vagal afferent fibres innervating thoracic structures such as the respiratory tract and oesophagus are diverse, comprising several subtypes of functionally distinct C-fibres and A-fibres. Both morphological and functional studies of these nerve subtypes would be advanced by selective, effective and long-term transduction of vagal afferent neurons with viral vectors. Here we addressed the hypothesis that vagal sensory neurons can be transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in vivo, in a manner that would be useful for morphological assessment of nerve terminals, using enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as well as for the selective knock-down of specific genes of interest in a tissue-selective manner. We found that a direct microinjection of AAV vectors into the vagal nodose ganglia in vivo leads to selective, effective and long-lasting transduction of the vast majority of primary sensory vagal neurons without transduction of parasympathetic efferent neurons. The transduction of vagal neurons by pseudoserotype AAV2/8 vectors in vivo is sufficiently efficient such that it can be used to functionally silence TRPV1 gene expression using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The eGFP encoded by AAV vectors is robustly transported to both the central and peripheral terminals of transduced vagal afferent neurons allowing for bright imaging of the nerve endings in living tissues and suitable for structure–function studies of vagal afferent nerve endings. Finally, the AAV2/8 vectors are efficiently taken up by the vagal nerve terminals in the visceral tissue and retrogradely transported to the cell body, allowing for tissue-specific transduction. PMID:20736420

  2. Serotonergic innervation of the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Campos, M B; Vitale, M L; Calandra, R S; Chiocchio, S R

    1990-03-01

    The presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was determined by h.p.l.c. in perchloric extracts of each isolated compartment of the adult rat testis. The testicular capsule, interstitial cells and interstitial fluid contained 5-HT, but 5-HT was not detected in the tubular compartment. In a group of adult rats, one testis was unilaterally denervated, and the contralateral testis used as control. The superior spermatic nerve, arising from the renal plexus, was excised and 1 week after surgery 5-HT content was measured in the capsule and interstitial fluid of both testes. Denervation caused a significant fall (34%) in 5-HT content. These results indicate that at least part of the testicular 5-HT derives from a serotonergic innervation of the gonad.

  3. Autonomic cardiac innervation: development and adult plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these "non-classical" cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  4. Differential innervation patterns of three divisions of frog auditory midbrain (torus semicircularis).

    PubMed

    Feng, A S; Lin, W Y

    1991-04-22

    The connectivity pattern of the laminar, principal, and magnocellular nuclei of the frog torus semicircularis (TS) was investigated. A small amount of horseradish peroxidase was injected focally into individual divisions of the TS and anterograde and retrograde transport patterns were observed. Results of our tracing study showed that these divisions of the TS possessed distinct innervation patterns. The principal nucleus appeared to be the primary input port of the TS receiving extensive inputs from all caudal brainstem auditory nuclei bilaterally, but especially from the contralateral dorsal medullary nucleus and the ipsilateral superior olivary and lateral lemniscus nuclei. Descending projection to this nucleus was limited to that from the posterior thalamic nucleus. In contrast, the laminar nucleus, but even more markedly the magnocellular nucleus, received extensive descending inputs from numerous structures in the dorsal thalamus and less pronounced ascending afferents from caudal brainstem auditory nuclei. Similar to the afferent connection patterns, the efferent projections originating from these three toral divisions differed substantially. The principal nucleus gave restricted ascending projections, limited mainly to the caudal region of the posterior thalamic nucleus, a region important in processing spectral information of complex sounds, and the pretectal gray. Its descending projection was also somewhat restricted, being limited to the superior olivary and lateral lemniscus nuclei. The laminar nucleus and especially the magnocellular nucleus gave robust descending as well as ascending projections; these nuclei serve as the main output paths for the TS and provide the main routes by which auditory input reaches the central thalamic nucleus, a structure previously shown to be involved in temporal information processing.

  5. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI) before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm), mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is observed in afferent

  6. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  7. Protocadherin-alpha family is required for serotonergic projections to appropriately innervate target brain areas.

    PubMed

    Katori, Shota; Hamada, Shun; Noguchi, Yukiko; Fukuda, Emi; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Yamamoto, Hideko; Hasegawa, Sonoko; Yagi, Takeshi

    2009-07-22

    Serotonergic axons from the raphe nuclei in the brainstem project to every region of the brain, where they make connections through their extensive terminal arborizations. This serotonergic innervation contributes to various normal behaviors and psychiatric disorders. The protocadherin-alpha (Pcdha) family of clustered protocadherins consists of 14 cadherin-related molecules generated from a single gene cluster. We found that the Pcdhas were strongly expressed in the serotonergic neurons. To elucidate their roles, we examined serotonergic fibers in a mouse mutant (Pcdha(Delta CR/Delta CR)) lacking the Pcdha cytoplasmic region-encoding exons, which are common to the gene cluster. In the first week after birth, the distribution pattern of serotonergic fibers in Pcdha(Delta CR/Delta CR) mice was similar to wild-type, but by 3 weeks of age, when the serotonergic axonal termini complete their arborizations, the distribution of the projections was abnormal. In some target regions, notably the globus pallidus and substantia nigra, the normally even distribution of serotonin axonal terminals was, in the mutants, dense at the periphery of each region, but sparse in the center. In the stratum lacunosum-molecular of the hippocampus, the mutants showed denser serotonergic innervation than in wild-type, and in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the caudate-putamen, the innervation was sparser. Together, the abnormalities suggested that Pcdha proteins are important in the late-stage maturation of serotonergic projections. Further examination of alternatively spliced exons encoding the cytoplasmic tail showed that the A-type (but not the B-type) cytoplasmic tail was essential for the normal development of serotonergic projections.

  8. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  9. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion.

  10. Vagal afferent activation decreases brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity and BAT thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J.; Santos da Conceicao, Ellen Paula; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In urethane/α-chloralose anesthetized rats, electrical stimulation of cervical vagal afferent fibers inhibited the increases in brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis evoked by cold exposure, by nanoinjection of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, in the dorsomedial hypothalamus, and by nanoinjection of N-methyl-D-aspartate in the rostral raphe pallidus. Vagus nerve stimulation-evoked inhibition of brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity was prevented by blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the termination site of vagal afferents in the nucleus of the solitary tract, and by nanoinjection of GABAA receptor antagonists in the rostral raphe pallidus. In conclusion, the brown adipose tissue sympathoinhibitory effect of cervical afferent vagal nerve stimulation is mediated by glutamatergic activation of second-order sensory neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and by a GABAergic inhibition of brown adipose tissue sympathetic premotor neurons in the rostral raphe pallidus, but does not require GABAergic inhibition of the brown adipose tissue sympathoexcitatory neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. PMID:28349097

  11. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated.

  12. Can intestinal innervation be preserved in pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer? Results of an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Nano, M; Dal Corso, H; Ferronato, M; Solej, M; Hornung, J P

    2003-04-01

    Twenty dissections were carried out, in all of which the splanchnic nerves, celiac plexuses, capital pancreatic plexus and superior mesenteric plexus were identified and traced. The capital pancreatic plexus was formed from two bundles, the first taking its origin from the right celiac plexus, the second from the superior mesenteric plexus. These two bundles joined together just behind the head of the pancreas. Two preganglionic bundles, a ganglion and two postganglionic bundles composed the superior mesenteric plexus. Postganglionic bundles received fibers from both right and left celiac plexuses. In small cancers a thin layer of nervous tissue around the superior mesenteric artery might be spared in order to avoid diarrhea from intestinal denervation. This study has provided anatomical evidence that a part of the mesenteric plexus, which receives fibers from both left and right celiac plexuses, maintains a sufficient intestinal innervation.

  13. Cutaneous neurturin overexpression alters mechanical, thermal, and cold responsiveness in physiologically identified primary afferents.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Michael P; Baumbauer, Kyle M; Wang, Ting; Albers, Kathryn M; Davis, Brian M; Koerber, H Richard

    2017-03-01

    Neurotrophic factors play an important role in the regulation of functional properties of sensory neurons under normal and pathological conditions. The GDNF family member neurturin is one such factor that has been linked to modulating responsiveness to peripheral stimuli. Neurturin binds to the GFRα2 receptor, a receptor found primarily in isolectin B4-expressing polymodal cutaneous nociceptors. Previous work has shown that knockout of GFRα2 alters heat, but not mechanical, responses in dissociated sensory neurons and reduces pain-related behaviors during the second phase of the formalin test. Research has also shown that overexpression of neurturin in basal keratinocytes increases behavioral responsiveness to mechanical stimulation and innocuous cooling of the skin without affecting noxious heat responses. Here we directly examined the impact of neurturin overexpression on cutaneous afferent function. We compared physiological responses of individual sensory neurons to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the skin, using an ex vivo skin-nerve-dorsal root ganglion-spinal cord preparation produced from neurturin-overexpressing (NRTN/OE) mice and wild-type littermate controls. We found that neurturin overexpression increases responsiveness to innocuous mechanical stimuli in A-fiber nociceptors, alters thermal responses in the polymodal subpopulation of C-fiber sensory neurons, and changes the relative numbers of mechanically sensitive but thermally insensitive C-fiber afferents. These results demonstrate the potential roles of different functional groups of sensory neurons in the behavioral changes observed in mice overexpressing cutaneous neurturin and highlight the importance of neurturin in regulating cutaneous afferent response properties.NEW & NOTEWORTHY GDNF family neurotrophic factors regulate the development and function of primary sensory neurons. Of these, neurturin has been shown to modulate mechanical and cooling sensitivity behaviorally. Here we show

  14. Tonic differential supraspinal modulation of PAD and PAH of segmental and ascending intraspinal collaterals of single group I muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Lomelí, J; Quevedo, J

    2004-11-01

    We compared in the anesthetized cat the effects of reversible spinalization by cold block on primary afferent depolarization (PAD) and primary afferent hyperpolarization (PAH) elicited in pairs of intraspinal collaterals of single group I afferents from the gastrocnemius nerve, one of the pairs ending in the L3 segment, around the Clarke's column nuclei, and the other in the L6 segment within the intermediate zone. PAD in each collateral was estimated by independent computer-controlled measurement of the intraspinal current required to maintain a constant probability of antidromic firing. The results indicate that the segmental and ascending collaterals of individual afferents are subjected to a tonic PAD of descending origin affecting in a differential manner the excitatory and inhibitory actions of cutaneous and joint afferents on the pathways mediating the PAD of group I fibers. The PAD-mediating networks appear to function as distributed systems whose output will be determined by the balance of the segmental and supraspinal influences received at that moment. It is suggested that the descending differential modulation of PAD enables the intraspinal arborizations of the muscle afferents to function as dynamic systems, in which information transmitted to segmental reflex pathways and to Clarke's column neurons by common sources can be decoupled by sensory and descending inputs, and funneled to specific targets according to the motor tasks to be performed.

  15. Axonal fluorescence quantitation provides a new approach to assess cutaneous innervation.

    PubMed

    Casanova-Molla, Jordi; Morales, Merche; Solà-Valls, Núria; Bosch, Anna; Calvo, Maria; Grau-Junyent, Josep Maria; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2011-09-15

    We present a novel approach to quantify skin innervation by measuring the PGP 9.5 immunoreactive (PGP-ir) fluorescence corresponding to axons within the epidermis and dermis. The skin biopsies from 35 controls and 45 small fiber neuropathy (SFN) patients were included. In 50-μm free-floating sections, we determined the intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) by direct fluorescence visualization and captured 2-μm thick individual optical sections using the same confocal microscope and magnification. We measured the fluorescence of the PGP-ir axons in both, epidermal and dermal area by using the ImageJ software. There was good interobserver and intraobserver reliability of PGP-ir measures, similar than for IENFD. The PGP-ir axons were found decreased in patients with SFN (1.1‰ and 9.0‰ respectively for epidermal and dermal area in contrast to 2.2‰ and 16.0‰, respectively to controls). The area under the ROC curve was 0.90 for the IENFD, 0.84 for epidermal PGP-ir axons and 0.70 for dermal PGP-ir axons. There was a positive correlation between the IENFD and the PGP-ir axons at epidermis (Spearman Rho=0.66, p<0.001) as well as for the dermal nerve length and the PGP-ir axons at dermis (Spearman Rho=0.45, p<0.05). This method is also particularly adequate for the quantitation of dermal nerve fibers. We conclude that quantifying the fluorescent PGP-ir axons could help to assess skin innervation (dermal and epidermal nerve fibers) in patients with SFN.

  16. Effects of electrical stimulation of olivocochlear fibers in cochlear potentials in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H; Robles, Luis

    2011-06-01

    The mammalian cochlea has two types of sensory cells; inner hair cells, which receive auditory-nerve afferent innervation, and outer hair cells, innervated by efferent axons of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) system. The role of the MOC system in hearing is still controversial. Recently, by recording cochlear potentials in behaving chinchillas, we suggested that one of the possible functions of the efferent system is to reduce cochlear sensitivity during attention to other sensory modalities (Delano et al. in J Neurosci 27:4146-4153, 2007). However, in spite of these compelling results, the physiological effects of electrical MOC activation on cochlear potentials have not been described in detail in chinchillas. The main objective of the present work was to describe these efferent effects in the chinchilla, comparing them with those in other species and in behavioral experiments. We activated the MOC efferent axons in chinchillas with sectioned middle-ear muscles by applying current pulses at the fourth-ventricle floor. Auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP) and cochlear microphonics (CM) were acquired in response to clicks and tones of several frequencies, using a round-window electrode. Electrical efferent stimulation produced CAP amplitude suppressions reaching up to 11 dB. They were higher for low to moderate sound levels. Additionally, CM amplitude increments were found, the largest (≤ 2.5 dB) for low intensity tones. CAP suppression was present at all stimulus frequencies, but was greatest for 2 kHz. CM increments were highest for low-frequency tones, and almost absent at high frequencies. We conclude that the effect obtained in chinchilla is similar to but smaller than that observed in cats, and that the effects seen in awake chinchillas, albeit different in magnitude, are consistent with the activation of efferent fibers.

  17. Different tonotopic regions of the lateral superior olive receive a similar combination of afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Álvarez, Marcelo; Saldaña, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian lateral superior olive (LSO) codes disparities in the intensity of the sound that reaches the two ears by integrating ipsilateral excitation and contralateral inhibition, but it remains unclear what particular neuron types convey acoustic information to the nucleus. It is also uncertain whether the known conspicuous morphofunctional differences and gradients along the tonotopic axis of the LSO relate to qualitative and/or quantitative regional differences in its afferents. To clarify these issues, we made small, single injections of the neuroanatomical tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into different tonotopic regions of the LSO of albino rats and analyzed the neurons labeled retrogradely in brainstem auditory nuclei. We demonstrate that the LSO is innervated tonotopically by four brainstem neuron types: spherical bushy cells and planar multipolar neurons of the ipsilateral ventral cochlear nucleus, principal neurons of the ipsilateral medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, and small multipolar neurons of the contralateral ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body. Unexpectedly, the proportion of labeled neurons of each type was virtually identical in all cases, thus indicating that all tonotopic regions of the LSO receive a similar combination of inputs. Even more surprisingly, our data also suggest that the representation of frequencies in the LSO differs from that of the nuclei that innervate it: compared to the latter nuclei, the LSO seems to possess a relatively larger portion of its volume devoted to processing frequencies in the lower-middle part of the spectrum, and a relative smaller portion devoted to higher frequencies. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2230-2250, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical study on the innervation of the pineal gland of the tree shrew (Tupaia glis), with special reference to peptidergic synaptic junctions with pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Kado, M; Yoshida, A; Hira, Y; Sakai, Y; Matsushima, S

    1999-09-25

    Conventional and immunocytochemical, light- and electron-microscopic studies on the innervation of the pineal gland of the tree shrew (Tupaia glis) were made. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive fibers, which were abundantly distributed in the gland, disappeared almost completely after superior cervical ganglionectomy, suggesting that these fibers are mostly postganglionic sympathetic fibers. By contrast, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive fibers, which were less numerous than NPY-fibers, remained in considerable numbers in ganglionectomized animals, indicating the innervation of TH-positive fibers from extrasympathetic sources. Bundles of substance P (SP)- or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive fibers, entering the gland at its distal end, were left intact after ganglionectomy. SP-fibers were numerous, but CGRP-fibers were scarce in the gland. SP-immunoreactive fibers were myelinated and nonmyelinated, and were regarded as peripheral fibers because of the presence of a Schwann cell sheath. NPY- and SP-immunoreactive fibers and endings were mainly localized in the pineal parenchyma. NPY-immunoreactive endings synapsed frequently, and SP-positive ones did less frequently, with the cell bodies of pinealocytes. The results suggest that NPY and SP directly control the activity of pinealocytes. Sections stained for myelin showed that thick and less thick bundles of myelinated fibers entered the gland by way of the habenular and posterior commissures, respectively. Under the electron microscope, the bundles were found to contain also unmyelinated fibers. A considerable number of nerve endings synapsing with the cell bodies of pinealocytes remained in ganglionectomized animals; these endings were not immunoreactive for TH or SP. Such synaptic endings may be the terminals of commissural fibers.

  19. Selective innervation of NK1 receptor–lacking lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons by presumed nonpeptidergic Aδ nociceptors in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Baseer, Najma; Al-Baloushi, Abdullah S.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shehab, Safa A.S.; Todd, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Fine myelinated (Aδ) nociceptors are responsible for fast, well-localised pain, but relatively little is known about their postsynaptic targets in the spinal cord, and therefore about their roles in the neuronal circuits that process nociceptive information. Here we show that transganglionically transported cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) labels a distinct set of afferents in lamina I that are likely to correspond to Aδ nociceptors, and that most of these lack neuropeptides. The vast majority of lamina I projection neurons can be retrogradely labelled from the lateral parabrachial area, and these can be divided into 2 major groups based on expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r). We show that CTb-labelled afferents form contacts on 43% of the spinoparabrachial lamina I neurons that lack the NK1r, but on a significantly smaller proportion (26%) of those that express the receptor. We also confirm with electron microscopy that these contacts are associated with synapses. Among the spinoparabrachial neurons that received contacts from CTb-labelled axons, contact density was considerably higher on NK1r-lacking cells than on those with the NK1r. By comparing the density of CTb contacts with those from other types of glutamatergic bouton, we estimate that nonpeptidergic Aδ nociceptors may provide over half of the excitatory synapses on some NK1r-lacking spinoparabrachial cells. These results provide further evidence that synaptic inputs to dorsal horn projection neurons are organised in a specific way. Taken together with previous studies, they suggest that both NK1r+ and NK1r-lacking lamina I projection neurons are directly innervated by Aδ nociceptive afferents. PMID:25168670

  20. Caudal Nuclei Of The Rat Nucleus Of The Solitary Tract Differentially Innervate Respiratory Compartments Within The Ventrolateral Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Alheid, George F.; Jiao, Weijie; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial array of respiratory, cardiovascular, visceral and somatic afferents are relayed via the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to the brainstem (and forebrain). Despite some degree of overlap within the NTS, specificity is maintained in central respiratory reflexes driven by 2nd order afferent relay neurons in the NTS. While the topographical arrangement of respiratory-related afferents targeting the NTS has been extensively investigated, their higher order brainstem targets beyond the NTS has only rarely been defined with any precision. Nonetheless, the various brainstem circuits serving blood gas homeostasis and airway protective reflexes must clearly receive a differential innervation from the NTS in order to evoke stimulus appropriate behavioral responses. Accordingly, we have examined the question of which specific NTS nuclei project to particular compartments within the ventral respiratory column (VRC) of the ventrolateral medulla. Our analyses of NTS labeling after retrograde tracer injections in the VRC and the nearby neuronal groups controlling autonomic function indicate a significant distinction between projections to the Bötzinger complex and preBötzinger complex compared to the remainder of the VRC. Specifically, the caudomedial NTS, including caudal portions of the medial solitary nucleus and the commissural division of NTS project relatively densely to the region of the retrotrapezoid nucleus and rostral ventrolateral medullary nucleus as well as to the rostral ventral respiratory group while avoiding the intervening Bötzinger and preBötzinger complexes. Area postrema appears to demonstrate a pattern of projections similar to that of caudal medial and commissural NTS nuclei. Other, less pronounced differential projections of lateral NTS nuclei to the various VRC compartments are additionally noted. PMID:21704133

  1. Central projections of antennular chemosensory and mechanosensory afferents in the brain of the terrestrial hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus; Coenobitidae, Anomura)

    PubMed Central

    Tuchina, Oksana; Koczan, Stefan; Harzsch, Steffen; Rybak, Jürgen; Wolff, Gabriella; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    The Coenobitidae (Decapoda, Anomura, Paguroidea) is a taxon of hermit crabs that includes two genera with a fully terrestrial life style as adults. Previous studies have shown that Coenobitidae have evolved a sense of spatial odor localization that is behaviorally highly relevant. Here, we examined the central olfactory pathway of these animals by analyzing central projections of the antennular nerve of Coenobita clypeatus, combining backfilling of the nerve with dextran-coupled dye, Golgi impregnations and three-dimensional reconstruction of the primary olfactory center, the antennular lobe. The principal pattern of putative olfactory sensory afferents in C. clypeatus is in many aspects similar to what have been established for aquatic decapod crustaceans, such as the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. However, there are also obvious differences that may, or may not represent adaptations related to a terrestrial lifestyle. In C. clypeatus, the antennular lobe dominates the deutocerebrum, having more than one thousand allantoid-shaped subunits. We observed two distinct patterns of sensory neuron innervation: putative olfactory afferents from the aesthetascs either supply the cap/subcap region of the subunits or they extend through its full depth. Our data also demonstrate that any one sensory axon can supply input to several subunits. Putative chemosensory (non-aesthetasc) and mechanosensory axons represent a different pathway and innervate the lateral and median antennular neuropils. Hence, we suggest that the chemosensory input in C. clypeatus might be represented via a dual pathway: aesthetascs target the antennular lobe, and bimodal sensilla target the lateral antennular neuropil and median antennular neuropil. The present data is compared to related findings in other decapod crustaceans. PMID:26236202

  2. Adaptations in the structure and innervation of follicle-sinus complexes to an aquatic environment as seen in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Sarko, Diana K; Reep, Roger L; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Rice, Frank L

    2007-09-20

    Florida manatees are large-bodied aquatic herbivores that use large tactile vibrissae for several purposes. Facial vibrissae are used to forage in a turbid water environment, and the largest perioral vibrissae can also grasp and manipulate objects. Other vibrissae distributed over the entire postfacial body appear to function as a lateral line system. All manatee vibrissae emanate from densely innervated follicle-sinus complexes (FSCs) like those in other mammals, although proportionately larger commensurate with the caliber of the vibrissae. As revealed by immunofluorescence, all manatee FSCs have many types of C, Adelta and Abeta innervation including Merkel, club, and longitudinal lanceolate endings at the level of the ring sinus, but they lack other types such as reticular and spiny endings at the level of the cavernous sinus. As in non-whisking terrestrial species, the inner conical bodies of facial FSCs are well innervated but lack Abeta-fiber terminals. Importantly, manatee FSCs have two unique types of Abeta-fiber endings. First, all of the FSCs have exceptionally large-caliber axons that branch to terminate as novel, gigantic spindle-like endings located at the upper ring sinus. Second, facial FSCs have smaller caliber Abeta fibers that terminate in the trabeculae of the cavernous sinus as an ending that resembles a Golgi tendon organ. In addition, the largest perioral vibrissae, which are used for grasping, have exceptionally well-developed medullary cores that have a structure and dense small-fiber innervation resembling that of tooth pulp. Other features of the epidermis and upper dermis structure and innervation differ from that seen in terrestrial mammals.

  3. Dopaminergic neurons in the brain and dopaminergic innervation of the albumen gland in mated and virgin helisoma duryi (mollusca: pulmonata)

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, Lana; Saleuddin, Saber; Lange, Angela

    2001-01-01

    Background Dopamine was shown to stimulate the perivitelline fluid secretion by the albumen gland. Even though the albumen gland has been shown to contain catecholaminergic fibers and its innervation has been studied, the type of catecholamines, distribution of fibers and the precise source of this neural innervation has not yet been deduced. This study was designed to address these issues and examine the correlation between dopamine concentration and the sexual status of snails. Results Dopaminergic neurons were found in all ganglia except the pleural and right parietal, and their axons in all ganglia and major nerves of the brain. In the albumen gland dopaminergic axons formed a nerve tract in the central region, and a uniform net in other areas. Neuronal cell bodies were present in the vicinity of the axons. Dopamine was a major catecholamine in the brain and the albumen gland. No significant difference in dopamine quantity was found when the brain and the albumen gland of randomly mating, virgin and first time mated snails were compared. Conclusions Our results represent the first detailed studies regarding the catecholamine innervation and quantitation of neurotransmitters in the albumen gland. In this study we localized catecholaminergic neurons and axons in the albumen gland and the brain, identified these neurons and axons as dopaminergic, reported monoamines present in the albumen gland and the brain, and compared the dopamine content in the brain and the albumen gland of randomly mating, virgin and first time mated snails. PMID:11513757

  4. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley-Day syndrome?

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-11-01

    The Riley-Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10-30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  5. Intestinal Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells Are Controlled by Mucosal Afferent Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Ove; Jodal, Mats; Jansson, Madeleine; Ryberg, Anders T.; Svensson, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Background The maintenance of the intestinal epithelium is of great importance for the survival of the organism. A possible nervous control of epithelial cell renewal was studied in rats and mice. Methods Mucosal afferent nerves were stimulated by exposing the intestinal mucosa to capsaicin (1.6 mM), which stimulates intestinal external axons. Epithelial cell renewal was investigated in the jejunum by measuring intestinal thymidine kinase (TK) activity, intestinal 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA, and the number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU. The influence of the external gut innervation was minimized by severing the periarterial nerves. Principal Findings Luminal capsaicin increased all the studied variables, an effect nervously mediated to judge from inhibitory effects on TK activity or 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA by exposing the mucosa to lidocaine (a local anesthetic) or by giving four different neurotransmitter receptor antagonists i.v. (muscarinic, nicotinic, neurokinin1 (NK1) or calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) receptors). After degeneration of the intestinal external nerves capsaicin did not increase TK activity, suggesting the involvement of an axon reflex. Intra-arterial infusion of Substance P (SP) or CGRP increased intestinal TK activity, a response abolished by muscarinic receptor blockade. Immunohistochemistry suggested presence of M3 and M5 muscarinic receptors on the intestinal stem/progenitor cells. We propose that the stem/progenitor cells are controlled by cholinergic nerves, which, in turn, are influenced by mucosal afferent neuron(s) releasing acetylcholine and/or SP and/or CGRP. In mice lacking the capsaicin receptor, thymidine incorporation into DNA and number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU was lower than in wild type animals suggesting that nerves are important also in the absence of luminal capsaicin, a conclusion also supported by the observation that atropine lowered thymidine incorporation into DNA by 60% in control

  6. Re-utilization of Schwann cells during ingrowth of ventral root afferents in perinatal kittens.

    PubMed

    Nilsson Remahl, A Ingela M; Masterman, Thomas; Risling, Mårten

    2008-08-01

    Ventral roots in all mammalian species, including humans, contain significant numbers of unmyelinated axons, many of them afferents transmitting nociceptive signals from receptive fields in skin, viscera, muscles and joints. Observations in cats indicate that these afferents do not enter the spinal cord via the ventral root, but rather turn distally and enter the dorsal root. Some unmyelinated axons are postganglionic autonomic efferents that innervate blood vessels of the root and the pia mater. In the feline L7 segment, a substantial proportion of unmyelinated axons are not detectable until late in perinatal development. The mechanisms inducing this late ingrowth, and the recruitment of Schwann cells (indispensable, at this stage, for axonal survival and sustenance), are unknown. We have counted axons and Schwann cells in both ends of the L7 ventral root in young kittens and made the following observations. (1) The total number of axons detectable in the root increased throughout the range of investigated ages. (2) The number of myelinated axons was similar in the root's proximal and distal ends. The increased number of unmyelinated axons with age is thus due to increased numbers of small unmyelinated axons. (3) The number of separated large probably promyelin axons was about the same in the proximal and distal ends of the root. (4) Schwann cells appeared to undergo redistribution, from myelinated to unmyelinated axons. (5) During redistribution of Schwann cells they first appear as aberrant Schwann cells and then become endoneurial X-cells temporarily free of axonal contact. We hypothesize that unmyelinated axons invade the ventral root from its distal end, that this ingrowth is particularly intense during the first postnatal month and that disengaged Schwann cells, eliminated from myelinated motoneuron axons, provide the ingrowing axons with structural and trophic support.

  7. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger to the Site of Persistent Inflammation in Nociceptive Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Scheff, Nicole N.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca2+ currents and recruitment of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca2+ transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ implicating the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX), a major Ca2+ extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca2+ loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca2+ transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation. PMID:26041911

  8. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger to the site of persistent inflammation in nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Nicole N; Gold, Michael S

    2015-06-03

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and recruitment of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) implicating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a major Ca(2+) extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca(2+) loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca(2+) transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation.

  9. Spinal organization and steroid sensitivity of motoneurons innervating the pubococcygeus muscle in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Manzo, J; Nicolas, L; Hernandez, M E; Cruz, M R; Carrillo, P; Pacheco, P

    1999-07-05

    Male rat motoneurons innervating the pubococcygeus muscle were located in the ventral nucleus of lamina IX at the sixth lumbar (L6) and first sacral (S1) spinal cord segments. Retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase-wheat germ agglutinin was transported up to second-order dendrites and revealed that these motoneurons have a "U-shaped arborization" of dendrites toward the intermediolateral and intermediomedial nuclei area of lamina VII. This dendritic organization makes a wide "final common path" that probably integrates afferent information from several sources, accounting for the participation of the pubococcygeus muscle in autonomic and somatic processes, such as those related to micturition and reproduction. Castration produced a decrement in the morphometry of these motoneurons. A main effect was a decrement in dendritic length. Steroid replacement indicated that testosterone and estradiol, but not dihydrotestosterone, are able to induce a recovery of morphometric alterations. However, estrogen induced recovery after 2 weeks of treatment, whereas testosterone took 4 weeks. Thus, it is proposed that supraspinal aromatization of testosterone in the male central nervous system might be an important process for the appropriate organization of the pubococcygeus muscle motoneurons and that estradiol seems to need a shorter time of action than testosterone because of differential up-regulation and down-regulation of steroid receptors.

  10. Resistance Training Enhances Skeletal Muscle Innervation Without Modifying the Number of Satellite Cells or their Myofiber Association in Obese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Messi, María Laura; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhong-Min; Marsh, Anthony P; Nicklas, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-10-01

    Studies in humans and animal models provide compelling evidence for age-related skeletal muscle denervation, which may contribute to muscle fiber atrophy and loss. Skeletal muscle denervation seems relentless; however, long-term, high-intensity physical activity appears to promote muscle reinnervation. Whether 5-month resistance training (RT) enhances skeletal muscle innervation in obese older adults is unknown. This study found that neural cell-adhesion molecule, NCAM+ muscle area decreased with RT and was inversely correlated with muscle strength. NCAM1 and RUNX1 gene transcripts significantly decreased with the intervention. Type I and type II fiber grouping in the vastus lateralis did not change significantly but increases in leg press and knee extensor strength inversely correlated with type I, but not with type II, fiber grouping. RT did not modify the total number of satellite cells, their number per area, or the number associated with specific fiber subtypes or innervated/denervated fibers. Our results suggest that RT has a beneficial impact on skeletal innervation, even when started late in life by sedentary obese older adults.

  11. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  12. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  13. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24-72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia.

  14. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  15. Vicarious ratings of social touch reflect the anatomical distribution & velocity tuning of C-tactile afferents: A hedonic homunculus?

    PubMed

    Walker, Susannah C; Trotter, Paula D; Woods, Andy; McGlone, Francis

    2017-03-01

    A subclass of C-fibres, C-tactile afferents (CTs), have been discovered which respond preferentially to low force/velocity stroking touch, that is typically perceived as pleasant. Molecular genetic visualization of these low-threshold mechanosensitive C-fibres (CLTMs) in mice revealed a denser distribution in dorsal than ventral thoracic sites, scattered distal limb innervation and a complete absence from glabrous paw skin (Liu et al., 2007). Here we used third-party ratings to examine whether affective responses to social touch reflect the anatomical distribution and velocity tuning of CTs. Participants viewed and rated a sequence of video clips depicting one individual being touched by another at different skin sites and at 3 different velocities (static, 3cm/s, 30cm/s). Immediately after viewing each clip participants were asked to rate how pleasant they perceived the touch to be. Vicarious preferences matched the previously reported anatomical innervation density of rodent CLTMs, with touch on the back being rated significantly more pleasant than any other location. Furthermore, in contrast to all other skin sites, CT optimal (3cm/s) touch on the palm of the hand was not preferred to static touch, consistent with the anatomical absence of CTs in glabrous skin. Our findings demonstrate that humans recognise the specific rewarding value of CT optimal caressing touch and their preferences reflect the hypothesised anatomical distribution of CTs.

  16. The sympathetic skin response: normal values, elucidation of afferent components and application limits.

    PubMed

    Uncini, A; Pullman, S L; Lovelace, R E; Gambi, D

    1988-11-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR), recorded at the hand and foot, was elicited using different classes of stimuli in 20 normal controls and 10 patients with peripheral neuropathy. We found that SSR latencies changed significantly with different recording sites, but not with different stimulation sites. Additionally, after ischemic conduction block of the arm in 3 normal controls, the previously obtainable SSR recorded at the hand became unobtainable with median nerve stimulation. Also, in one patient with subacute ganglionitis and 3 patients with demyelinating neuropathies, the SSR could not be elicited by electrical stimulation, but it could with deep inspiration. These results suggest that large diameter myelinated fibers may serve as afferents for the SSR. Furthermore, these findings imply that an unobtainable SSR by electrical stimulation may be due not only to dysfunction of the autonomic efferent nerve fibers, but also to abnormalities of the sensory afferents of the reflex. Therefore, investigations of autonomic dysfunction utilizing the SSR must be interpreted with caution in patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  17. Spatial distribution of neurons innervated by chandelier cells.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Woodruff, Alan; Inan, Melis; Anderson, Stewart A; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-09-01

    Chandelier (or axo-axonic) cells are a distinct group of GABAergic interneurons that innervate the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells and are thus thought to have an important role in controlling the activity of cortical circuits. To examine the circuit connectivity of chandelier cells (ChCs), we made use of a genetic targeting strategy to label neocortical ChCs in upper layers of juvenile mouse neocortex. We filled individual ChCs with biocytin in living brain slices and reconstructed their axonal arbors from serial semi-thin sections. We also reconstructed the cell somata of pyramidal neurons that were located inside the ChC axonal trees and determined the percentage of pyramidal neurons whose axon initial segments were innervated by ChC terminals. We found that the total percentage of pyramidal neurons that were innervated by a single labeled ChC was 18-22 %. Sholl analysis showed that this percentage peaked at 22-35 % for distances between 30 and 60 µm from the ChC soma, decreasing to lower percentages with increasing distances. We also studied the three-dimensional spatial distribution of the innervated neurons inside the ChC axonal arbor using spatial statistical analysis tools. We found that innervated pyramidal neurons are not distributed at random, but show a clustered distribution, with pockets where almost all cells are innervated and other regions within the ChC axonal tree that receive little or no innervation. Thus, individual ChCs may exert a strong, widespread influence on their local pyramidal neighbors in a spatially heterogeneous fashion.

  18. FMRFamide-like immunoreactive nervus terminalis innervation to the pituitary in the catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linn.): demonstration by lesion and immunocytochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna, N. S.; Subhedar, N.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    Certain thick FMRFamide-like immunoreactive fibers arising from the ganglion cells of nervus terminalis in the olfactory bulb of Clarias batrachus can be traced centripetally through the medial olfactory tract, telencephalon, lateral preoptic area, tuberal area, and hypothalamohypophysial tract to the pituitary. Following 6 days of bilateral olfactory tract transection, the immunoreactivity in the thick fibers, caudal to the lesion site, was partially eliminated, whereas after 10 and 14 days, it was totally abolished in the processes en route to the pituitary. The results indicate a direct innervation of the pituitary gland by the FMRFamide-like peptide containing fibers of the nervus terminalis.

  19. Promoting bioengineered tooth innervation using nanostructured and hybrid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kuchler-Bopp, S; Larrea, A; Petry, L; Idoux-Gillet, Y; Sebastian, V; Ferrandon, A; Schwinté, P; Arruebo, M; Benkirane-Jessel, N

    2017-03-01

    The innervation of teeth mediated by axons originating from the trigeminal ganglia is essential for their function and protection. Immunosuppressive therapy using Cyclosporine A (CsA) was found to accelerate the innervation of transplanted tissues and particularly that of bioengineered teeth. To avoid the CsA side effects, we report in this study the preparation of CsA loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, their embedding on polycaprolactone (PCL)-based scaffolds and their possible use as templates for the innervation of bioengineered teeth. This PCL scaffold, approved by the FDA and capable of mimicking the extracellular matrix, was obtained by electrospinning and decorated with CsA-loaded PLGA nanoparticles to allow a local sustained action of this immunosuppressive drug. Dental re-associations were co-implanted with a trigeminal ganglion on functionalized scaffolds containing PLGA and PLGA/cyclosporine in adult ICR mice during 2weeks. Histological analyses showed that the designed scaffolds did not alter the teeth development after in vivo implantation. The study of the innervation of the dental re-associations by indirect immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), showed that 88.4% of the regenerated teeth were innervated when using the CsA-loaded PLGA scaffold. The development of active implants thus allows their potential use in the context of dental engineering.

  20. Target-derived trophic effect on skeletal muscle innervation in senescent mice.

    PubMed

    Messi, Maria Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2003-02-15

    In the present work, we tested the hypothesis that target-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) prevents alterations in neuromuscular innervation in aging mammals. To explore this hypothesis, we studied senescent wild-type mice as a model of deficient IGF-1 secretion and signaling and S1S2 transgenic mice as a tool to investigate the role of sustained overexpression of IGF-1 in striated muscle in neuromuscular innervation. The analysis of the nerve terminal in extensor digitorum longus muscles from senescent mice showed that the decrease in the percentage of cholinesterase-stained zones (CSZ) exhibiting nerve terminal branching, number of nerve branches at the CSZ, and nerve branch points was partially or completely reversed by sustained overexpression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle. Target-derived IGF-1 also prevented age-related decreases in the postterminal alpha-bungarotoxin immunostained area, as well as the reduction in the number and length of postsynaptic folds, and area and density of postsynaptic folds studied with electron microscopy. Overexpression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle may account for the lack of age-dependent switch in muscle fiber type composition recorded in senescent mice. In summary, the use of the S1S2 IGF-1 transgenic mouse model allowed us to provide morphological evidence for the role of target-derived IGF-1 in spinal cord motor neurons in senescent mice.

  1. VEGF-B promotes recovery of corneal innervations and trophic functions in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Di, Guohu; Zhao, Xiaowen; Qi, Xia; Zhang, Songmei; Feng, Lu; Shi, Weiyun; Zhou, Qingjun

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-B possesses the capacity of promoting injured peripheral nerve regeneration and restore their sensory and trophic functions. However, the contribution and mechanism of VEGF-B in diabetic peripheral neuropathy remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression and role of VEGF-B in diabetic corneal neuropathy by using type 1 diabetic mice and cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. Hyperglycemia attenuated the endogenous expression of VEGF-B in regenerated diabetic corneal epithelium, but not that of VEGF receptors in diabetic TG neurons and axons. Exogenous VEGF-B promoted diabetic corneal nerve fiber regeneration through the reactivation of PI-3K/Akt-GSK3β-mTOR signaling and the attenuation of neuronal mitochondria dysfunction via the VEGF receptor-1 and neuropilin-1. Moreover, VEGF-B improved corneal sensation and epithelial regeneration in both normal and diabetic mice, accompanied with the elevated corneal content of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF). PEDF blockade partially abolished trophic function of VEGF-B in diabetic corneal re-innervation. In conclusion, hyperglycemia suppressed endogenous VEGF-B expression in regenerated corneal epithelium of diabetic mice, while exogenous VEGF-B promoted recovery of corneal innervations and trophic functions through reactivating PI-3K/Akt-GSK-3β-mTOR signaling, attenuating neuronal oxidative stress and elevating PEDF expression. PMID:28091556

  2. Dendritic HCN channels shape excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the inner hair cell afferent synapse in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunyoung; Roux, Isabelle; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic transmission at the inner hair cell (IHC) afferent synapse, the first synapse in the auditory pathway, is specialized for rapid and reliable signaling. Here we investigated the properties of a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)), expressed in the afferent dendrite of auditory nerve fibers, and its role in shaping postsynaptic activity. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from afferent dendrites directly where they contact the IHC in excised postnatal rat cochlear turns. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of variable amplitude (1-35 mV) were found with 10-90% rise times of about 1 ms and time constants of decay of about 5 ms at room temperature. Current-voltage relations recorded in afferent dendrites revealed I(h). The pharmacological profile and reversal potential (-45 mV) indicated that I(h) is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels. The HCN channel subunits HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 were found to be expressed in afferent dendrites using immunolabeling. Raising intracellular cAMP levels sped up the activation kinetics, increased the magnitude of I(h) and shifted the half activation voltage (V(half)) to more positive values (-104 +/- 3 to -91 +/- 2 mV). Blocking I(h) with 50 microM ZD7288 resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (approximately 4 mV) and slowing the decay of the EPSP by 47%, suggesting that I(h) is active at rest and shortens EPSPs, thereby potentially improving rapid and reliable signaling at this first synapse in the auditory pathway.

  3. Cytoarchitecture, neuronal composition, and entorhinal afferents of the flying fox hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Buhl, E H; Dann, J F

    1991-04-01

    In a comparative approach, the anatomical organization of the hippocampus was investigated in two species of megachiropteran bats, the grey-headed flying fox, Pteropus poliocephalus, and the little red flying fox, Pteropus scapulatus. In general, the cytoarchitectonic appearance of the flying fox hippocampus corresponded well with that of other mammals, revealing all major subdivisions. While the dentate fascia was trilaminated with a molecular layer, a granule cell layer, and a distinct polymorphic layer, the ammonic subfields were subdivided into stratum lacunosum molecular, stratum radiatum, stratum lucidum or mossy fiber layer (restricted to the CA3 region), pyramidal cell layer, and stratum oriens. In Ammon's horn, only subfields CA1, CA3, and CA3c were clearly discernible, whereas the CA2 region remained indistinct. In some cytoarchitectonic features, such as the dispersion of the pyramidal layer in CA1, the megachiropteran hippocampus resembled the corresponding region in primates. Five characteristic neuronal cell types of the megachiropteran hippocampus were studied in fixed slice preparations after intracellular injection with Lucifer Yellow. While the morphological appearance of CA3 pyramidal cells, horizontal stratum oriens cells, aspiny stellate cells, and mossy cells strongly resembled their counterparts in rodents, primates, and carnivores, granule cells showed an interesting variation from the nonprimate pattern. Like a subset of granule cells in the primate dentate gyrus, 75% of flying fox granule cells revealed 1-2 basal dendrites that ramified in the polymorphic layer. These processes are presumed to form the morphological substrate for recurrent excitation. Entorhinal afferents to Ammon's horn and the dentate fascia were revealed by employing the method of tract tracing in fixed tissue with the carbocyanine dye DiI. Similar to the rat and cat, but unlike the monkey, the entorhino-dentate projection in the flying fox is bilaminate, with medial

  4. Afferent control of human stance and gait: evidence for blocking of group I afferents during gait.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V; Quintern, J; Berger, W

    1985-01-01

    The cerebral potentials (c.p.) evoked by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve during stance and in the various phases of gait of normal subjects were compared with the c.p. and leg muscle e.m.g. responses evoked by perturbations of stance and gait. Over the whole step cycle of gait the c.p. evoked by an electrical stimulus were of smaller amplitude (3 microV and 9 microV, respectively) than that seen in the stance condition, and appeared with a longer latency (mean times to first positive peak: 63 and 43 ms, respectively). When the electrical stimulus was applied during stance after ischaemic blockade of group I afferents, the c.p. were similar to those evoked during gait. The c.p. evoked by perturbations were larger in amplitude than those produced by the electrical stimulus, but similar in latencies in both gait and stance (mean 26 microV and 40 microV; 65 ms and 42 ms, respectively) and configurations. The large gastrocnemius e.m.g. responses evoked by the stance and gait perturbations arose with a latency of 65 to 70 ms. Only in the stance condition was a smaller, shorter latency (40 ms) response seen. It is concluded that during gait the signals of group I afferents are blocked at both segmental and supraspinal levels which was tested by tibial nerve stimulation. It is suggested that the e.m.g. responses induced in the leg by gait perturbations are evoked by group II afferents and mediated via a spinal pathway. The c.p. evoked during gait most probably reflect the processing of this group II input by supraspinal motor centres for the coordination of widespread arm and trunk muscle activation, necessary to restablish body equilibrium.

  5. Visceral perception: sensory transduction in visceral afferents and nutrients.

    PubMed

    Raybould, H E

    2002-07-01

    The possible mechanisms that may be involved in nutrient detection in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract are reviewed. There is strong functional and electrophysiological evidence that both intrinsic and extrinsic primary afferent neurones mediate mechano- and chemosensitive responses in the gastrointestinal tract. This review focuses on the extrinsic afferent pathways as these are the ones that convey information to the central nervous system which is clearly necessary for perception to occur.

  6. The influence of pain on masseter spindle afferent discharge.

    PubMed

    Capra, Norman F; Hisley, Calvin K; Masri, Radi M

    2007-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide proprioceptive feedback supporting normal patterns of motor activity and kinesthetic sensibility. During mastication, jaw muscle spindles play an important role in monitoring and regulating the chewing cycle and the bite forces generated during mastication. Both acute and chronic orofacial pain disorders are associated with changes in proprioceptive feedback and motor function. Experimental jaw muscle pain also alters the normal response of masseter spindle afferents to ramp and hold jaw movements. It has been proposed that altered motor function and proprioceptive input results from group III muscle afferent modulation of the fusimotor system which alters spindle afferent sensitivity in limb muscles. The response to nociceptive stimuli may enhance or reduce the response of spindle afferents to proprioceptive stimuli. Several experimental observations suggesting the possibility that a similar mechanism also functions in jaw muscles are presented in this report. First, evidence is provided to show that nociceptive stimulation of the masseter muscle primarily influences the amplitude sensitivity of spindle afferents with relatively little effect on the dynamic sensitivity. Second, reversible inactivation of the caudal trigeminal nuclei attenuates the nociceptive modulation of spindle afferents. Finally, functionally identified gamma-motoneurons in the trigeminal motor nucleus are modulated by intramuscular injection with algesic substances. Taken together, these results suggest that pain-induced modulation of spindle afferent responses are mediated by small diameter muscle afferents and that this modulation is dependent, in part, on the relay of muscle nociceptive information from trigeminal subnucleus caudalis onto trigeminal gamma-motoneurons. The implication of these results will be considered in light of current theories on the relationship between jaw muscle pain and oral motor function.

  7. Release of acetylcholine by chick embryo heart before innervation

    PubMed Central

    Coraboeuf, E.; Le Douarin, G.; Obrecht-Coutris, G.

    1970-01-01

    1. In chick embryo hearts, 3-day-old and not yet innervated, repetitive direct stimulation causes a transitory inhibition of the spontaneous rhythm. 2. The degree of post-stimulation inhibition depends on the frequency and duration of the artificial stimulation and on the concentration of K and Ca ions in the extracellular solution. 3. After treatment with atropine (10-5 g/ml.) post-stimulation inhibition is no longer observed. The spontaneous rhythm is accelerated by atropine. The findings therefore suggest that an ACh-like substance is released from the non-innervated embryonic heart during activity. 4. By use of the dorsal muscle of the leech for biological assay the liberation of an ACh-like substance from the non-innervated embryonic heart was confirmed. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:5498489

  8. Degeneration and regeneration of perivascular innervation in arterial grafts.

    PubMed

    Heikki, Penttilä; Timo, Waris; Nureddin, Ashammakhi; Sampsa, Vanhatalo

    2004-07-01

    Because the understanding of postoperative changes in arterial graft innervation is limited, this study was performed to characterize neuronal degeneration and regeneration events immunohistochemically in femoral arterial grafts transplanted to carotid arteries in rats. Specimens taken 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 1 month, 3 months, and 5 months after surgery were assessed for vasoactive intestinal peptide, neurofilaments, growth-associated protein 43, tyrosine hydroxylase, and nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes. During neuronal degeneration, vasoactive intestinal peptide disappeared within 1 day, transmitter-synthesizing enzymes (nitric oxide synthase and tyrosine hydroxylase) had vanished by day 7, and neurofilaments (cytoskeletal markers) had essentially disappeared after 1 week. In the regeneration phase, the most robust axonal growth, as visualized by growth-associated protein 43, was observed at 1 month, followed by a gradual increase in neurotransmitter markers at 1 and 3 months, whereas the neurofilaments increased gradually up to the end of the 5-month observation period. Reinnervation proceeded from the proximal carotid (host) trunk distally to the graft. Axonal re-growth occurred mainly in arterial adventitia. Innervation density, as visually assessed, was denser in the graft than in the host. These findings suggest that 1) the main sequence of degeneration and regeneration follows that reported in other models of neuronal degeneration; 2) reinnervation of the arterial grafts comes mainly from the host arteries; and 3) the innervation density in the graft may differ from that in the host, which may suggest target-derived regulation of innervation. The latter finding may have clinical implications. It suggests that for a good outcome it would be beneficial to choose a sparsely innervated graft rather than a densely innervated one.

  9. Sympathetic innervation controls homeostasis of neuromuscular junctions in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muzamil Majid; Lustrino, Danilo; Silveira, Willian A.; Wild, Franziska; Straka, Tatjana; Issop, Yasmin; O’Connor, Emily; Cox, Dan; Reischl, Markus; Marquardt, Till; Labeit, Dittmar; Labeit, Siegfried; Benoit, Evelyne; Molgó, Jordi; Lochmüller, Hanns; Witzemann, Veit; Kettelhut, Isis C.; Navegantes, Luiz C. C.; Pozzan, Tullio; Rudolf, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    The distribution and function of sympathetic innervation in skeletal muscle have largely remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that sympathetic neurons make close contact with neuromuscular junctions and form a network in skeletal muscle that may functionally couple different targets including blood vessels, motor neurons, and muscle fibers. Direct stimulation of sympathetic neurons led to activation of muscle postsynaptic β2-adrenoreceptor (ADRB2), cAMP production, and import of the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A) into myonuclei. Electrophysiological and morphological deficits of neuromuscular junctions upon sympathectomy and in myasthenic mice were rescued by sympathicomimetic treatment. In conclusion, this study identifies the neuromuscular junction as a target of the sympathetic nervous system and shows that sympathetic input is crucial for synapse maintenance and function. PMID:26733679

  10. Innervation zones of fasciculating motor units: observations by a linear electrode array.

    PubMed

    Jahanmiri-Nezhad, Faezeh; Barkhaus, Paul E; Rymer, William Z; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the innervation zone (IZ) in the biceps brachii muscle in healthy subjects and those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using a 20-channel linear electromyogram (EMG) electrode array. Raster plots of individual waveform potentials were studied to estimate the motor unit IZ. While this work mainly focused on fasciculation potentials (FPs), a limited number of motor unit potentials (MUPs) from voluntary activity of 12 healthy and seven ALS subjects were also examined. Abnormal propagation of MUPs and scattered IZs were observed in fasciculating units, compared with voluntarily activated MUPs in healthy and ALS subjects. These findings can be related to muscle fiber reinnervation following motor neuron degeneration in ALS and the different origin sites of FPs compared with voluntary MUPs.

  11. Central GABAergic innervation of the pituitary in goldfish: a radioautographic and immunocytochemical study at the electron microscope level

    SciTech Connect

    Kah, O.; Dubourg, P.; Martinoli, M.G.; Rabhi, M.; Gonnet, F.; Geffard, M.; Calas, A.

    1987-09-01

    The GABAergic innervation of the goldfish pituitary was studied at the light and electron microscope levels by means of radioautography after in vitro incubation in tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and immunocytochemistry using antibodies against GABA. Following incubation of pituitary fragments in a medium containing tritiated GABA, a selective uptake of the tracer was observed within the digitations of the neurohypophysis. Silver grain clusters were also observed in the adenohypophyseal tissue. At the electron microscope level, this uptake was found to correspond to nerve endings containing small clear and dense-core vesicles. These labeled profiles were located mainly in neurohypophyseal digitations in close apposition with the basement membrane separating the neurohypophysis from the adenohypophysis. However, they were also encountered in direct contact with most adenohypophyseal cell types in the different lobes. These results were confirmed by immunocytochemical data demonstrating the presence of numerous GABA immunoreactive fibers in both anterior and neurointermediate lobes. They were found either in the digitations of the neurohypophysis or in the adenohypophysis in direct contact with the glandular cells with a distribution and an ultrastructural aspect similar to those observed by radioautography. These data demonstrate that the pituitary of teleosts receives a massive GABAergic innervation. Although physiological data providing a functional significance for such an innervation are lacking, the present study suggests that, as already documented in mammals, GABA may be involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of pituitary functions in teleosts.

  12. Role of afferent input in load-dependent plasticity of rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, F.; Umemoto, S.; Higo, Y.; Kawabe, N.; Wang, X. D.; Lan, Y. B.; Ohira, Y.

    We have been studying the role of afferent input in the plasticity of skeletal muscles. The present study was performed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the deafferentation-related inhibition of the compensatory hypertrophy in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the control, functionally overloaded (FO), and functionally overloaded + deafferentation (FO+DA) group. The tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were additionally transected in the FO+DA rats. The sampling of the soleus was performed 2 weeks after the surgery and ambulation recovery. The single muscle fibers were isolated in low-calcium relaxing solution. Further, the myonuclei or argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were stained. Significant increase of the fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was seen in the FO, but not in the FO+DA, rats. The myonuclear number in fiber was significantly decreased by FO. Addition of DA to FO further promoted the reduction of myonuclear number. The mean nucleus size and DNA content in single nucleus in all groups were identical. Although a single or double AgNORs were seen in ~90% of myonuclei in the control rats, their distributions were 72 and 76% in the FO and FO+DA rats, respectively (p<0.05). More myonuclei containing 3-5 AgNORs were noted in the FO and FO+DA rats. The mean number of the AgNORs per myonucleus was 1.7 in the control, 2.1 in both FO and FO+DA rats (p<0.05). It was suggested that the FO-related increase of the number of AgNORs may be responsible for the induction of compensatory hypertrophy. It was also indicated that intact afferent input plays an essential role in these phenomena.

  13. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-08-01

    Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping theme senteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation of

  14. Micromotional studies of utricular and canal afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Edwin R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-range goal of this research was to refine our understanding of the sensitivity of the vestibular components of the ear to very-low-amplitude motion, especially, the role of gravity in this sensitivity. We focused on the American bullfrog--a common animal subject for vestibular sensory research. Our principal experimental method was to apply precise, sinusoidal microrotational stimuli to an anesthetized animal subject, to record the resulting responses in an individual vestibular nerve fiber from the intact ear, and to use intracellular dye to trace the fiber and thus identify the vestibular sensor that gave rise to it. In this way, we were able to identify specific micromotional sensitivities and to associate those sensitivities definitely with specific sensors. Furthermore, by recording from nerve fibers after they leave the intact inner-ear cavity, we were able to achieve these identifications without interrupting the delicate micromechanics of the inner ear. We were especially concerned with the relative roles of the utricle and the anterior semicircular canal in the sensing of microrotational motion of the head about horizontal axes, and with the role of gravity in mediating that sensing process in the utricle. The functional characterization of individual nerve fibers was accomplished with a conventional analytical tool, the cycle histogram, in which the nerve impulse rate was plotted against the phase of the sinusoidal stimulus.

  15. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input.

    PubMed

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-08-15

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino-supraspinal-spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin.

  16. Site of origin of and sex differences in the vasopressin innervation of the mouse (Mus musculus) brain.

    PubMed

    Rood, Benjamin D; Stott, Ryan T; You, Samantha; Smith, Caroline J W; Woodbury, Maya E; De Vries, Geert J

    2013-07-01

    Defining how arginine vasopressin (AVP) acts centrally to regulate homeostasis and behavior is problematic, as AVP is made in multiple nuclei in the hypothalamus (i.e., paraventricular [PVN], supraoptic [SON], and suprachiasmatic [SCN]) and extended amygdala (i.e., bed nucleus of the stria terminalis [BNST] and medial amygdala [MeA]), and these groups of neurons have extensive projections throughout the brain. To understand the function of AVP, it is essential to know the site of origin of various projections. In mice, we used gonadectomy to eliminate gonadal steroid hormone-dependent expression of AVP in the BNST and MeA and electrolytic lesions to eliminate the SCN, effectively eliminating those AVP-immunoreactive projections; we also quantified AVP-immunoreactive fiber density in gonadectomized and sham-operated male and female mice to examine sex differences in AVP innervation. Our results suggest that the BNST/MeA AVP system innervates regions containing major modulatory neurotransmitters (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) and thus may be involved in regulating behavioral state. Furthermore, this system may be biased toward the regulation of male behavior, given the numerous regions in which males have a denser AVP-immunoreactive innervation than females. AVP from the SCN is found in regions important for the regulation of hormone output and behavior. Innervation from the PVN and SON is found in brain regions that likely work in concert with the well-known peripheral AVP actions of controlling homeostasis and stress response; female-biased sex differences in this system may be related to the heightened stress response observed in females.

  17. Effects of stimulation of group I afferents from flexor muscles on heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes produced by Ia and descending inputs: a test for presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Jiménez, I; Enriquez, M

    1991-01-01

    1. In the chloralose anesthetized cat, conditioning stimulation of group I flexor afferents depresses the monosynaptic potentials generated by Ia afferents in single spinal motoneurons or in populations of motoneurons without affecting the monosynaptic potentials produced by stimulation of descending fibers in the ipsilateral ventromedial fasciculus (VMF). 2. Heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes was used to test changes in the presynaptic effectiveness of excitatory inputs with direct connections with motoneurons. We found that the heterosynaptic facilitation of Ia origin was reduced by conditioning stimulation of group I afferents from flexors, without affecting the heterosynaptic facilitation produced by stimulation of the VMF. 3. These results confirm and expand previous observations showing that the synaptic effectiveness of descending fibers synapsing with motoneurons is not subjected to a presynaptic control mechanism of the type acting on Ia fiber terminals, and provide further basis for the use of changes in heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes of Ia origin as an estimate of changes in presynaptic inhibition of Ia fibers (Hultborn et al. 1987a).

  18. Functional Reconstruction of Sarcoma Defects Utilising Innervated Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Grinsell, Damien; Di Bella, Claudia; Choong, Peter F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction following preoperative radiotherapy and wide resection of soft tissue sarcoma remains a challenge. Pedicled and free tissue transfers are an essential part of limb sparing surgery. We report 22 cases of sarcoma treated with radiotherapy and wide excision followed by one-stage innervated free or pedicled musculocutaneous flap transfers. The resection involved the upper limb in 3 cases, the lower limb in 17, and the abdominal wall in 2. The flaps used for the reconstruction were mainly latissimus dorsi and gracilis. The range of motion was restored fully in 14 patients. The muscle strength of the compartment reconstructed was of grades 4 and 5 in all patients except one. The overall function was excellent in all the cases with functional scores of 71.2% in the upper limb and 84% in the lower limb. The only 2 major complications were flap necrosis, both revised with another flap, one of which was innervated with restoration of function. Innervated flaps are valuable alternatives for reconstruction after sarcoma resection in the extremity and in the abdominal wall. The excellent functional results are encouraging, and we believe that innervated muscle reconstruction should be encouraged in the treatment of sarcoma after radiotherapy and wide resection. PMID:22969309

  19. The EGFR Is Required for Proper Innervation to the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Maklad, Adel; Nicolai, Jodi R.; Bichsel, Kyle J.; Evenson, Jackie E.; Lee, Tang-Cheng; Threadgill, David W.; Hansen, Laura A.

    2008-01-01

    EGFR family members are essential for proper peripheral nervous system development. A role for EGFR itself in peripheral nervous system development in vivo, however, has not been reported. We investigated whether EGFR is required for cutaneous innervation using Egfr null and skin-targeted Egfr mutant mice. Neuronal markers; including PGP9.5, GAP-43, acetylated tubulin, and neurofilaments; revealed that Egfr null dorsal skin was hyperinnervated with a disorganized pattern of innervation. In addition, receptor subtypes such as lanceolate endings were disorganized and immature. To determine whether the hyperinnervation phenotype resulted from a target-derived effect of loss of EGFR, mice lacking EGFR expression in the cutaneous epithelium were examined. These mice retained other aspects of the cutaneous Egfr null phenotype but exhibited normal innervation. The sensory deficits in Egfr null dorsal skin were not associated with any abnormality in the morphology or density of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons or Schwann cells. However, explant and dissociated cell cultures of DRG revealed more extensive branching in Egfr null cultures. These data demonstrate that EGFR is required for proper cutaneous innervation during development and suggest that it limits axonal outgrowth and branching in a DRG-autonomous manner. PMID:18830272

  20. Chronic recruitment of primary afferent neurons by microstimulation in the feline dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lee E.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Ciollaro, Mattia; Ventura, Valérie; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. This study describes results of primary afferent neural microstimulation experiments using microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of four cats. The goal was to test the stability and selectivity of these microelectrode arrays as a potential interface for restoration of somatosensory feedback after damage to the nervous system such as amputation. Approach. A five-contact nerve-cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve was used to record the antidromic compound action potential response to DRG microstimulation (2-15 µA biphasic pulses, 200 µs cathodal pulse width), and the threshold for eliciting a response was tracked over time. Recorded responses were segregated based on conduction velocity to determine thresholds for recruiting Group I and Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers. Main results. Thresholds were initially low (5.1 ± 2.3 µA for Group I and 6.3 ± 2.0 µA for Group II/Aβ) and increased over time. Additionally the number of electrodes with thresholds less than or equal to 15 µA decreased over time. Approximately 12% of tested electrodes continued to elicit responses at 15 µA up to 26 weeks after implantation. Higher stimulation intensities (up to 30 µA) were tested in one cat at 23 weeks post-implantation yielding responses on over 20 additional electrodes. Within the first six weeks after implantation, approximately equal numbers of electrodes elicited only Group I or Group II/Aβ responses at threshold, but the relative proportion of Group II/Aβ responses decreased over time. Significance. These results suggest that it is possible to activate Group I or Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers in isolation with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in the DRG, and that those responses can be elicited up to 26 weeks after implantation, although it may be difficult to achieve a consistent response day-to-day with currently available electrode technology. The DRG are compelling targets

  1. Progressive deafness and altered cochlear innervation in knock-out mice lacking prosaposin.

    PubMed

    Akil, Omar; Chang, Jolie; Hiel, Hakim; Kong, Jee-Hyun; Yi, Eunyoung; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Lustig, Lawrence R

    2006-12-13

    After a yeast two-hybrid screen identified prosaposin as a potential interacting protein with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit alpha10, studies were performed to characterize prosaposin in the normal rodent inner ear. Prosaposin demonstrates diffuse organ of Corti expression at birth, with gradual localization to the inner hair cells (IHCs) and its supporting cells, inner pillar cells, and synaptic region of the outer hair cells (OHCs) and Deiters' cells (DCs) by postnatal day 21 (P21). Microdissected OHC and DC quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunohistology localizes prosaposin mRNA to DCs and OHCs, and protein predominantly to the apex of the DCs. Subsequent studies in a prosaposin knock-out (KO) (-/-) mouse showed intact but slightly reduced hearing through P19, but deafness by P25 and reduced distortion product otoacoustic emissions from P15 onward. Beginning at P12, the prosaposin KO mice showed histologic organ of Corti changes including cellular hypertrophy in the region of the IHC and greater epithelial ridge, a loss of OHCs from cochlear apex, and vacuolization of OHCs. Immunofluorescence revealed exuberant overgrowth of auditory afferent neurites in the region of the IHCs and proliferation of auditory efferent neurites in the region of the tunnel of Corti. IHC recordings from these KO mice showed normal I-V curves and responses to applied acetylcholine. Together, these results suggest that prosaposin helps maintain normal innervation patterns to the organ of Corti. Furthermore, prosaposin's overlapping developmental expression pattern and binding capacity toward the nAChR alpha10 suggest that alpha10 may also play a role in this function.

  2. Phase relation changes between the firings of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions in brain-dead human and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    1. Single-nerve fibre action potentials (APs) were recorded with 2 pairs of wire electrodes from lower sacral nerve roots during surgery in patients with spinal cord injury and in a brain-dead human. Conduction velocity distribution histograms were constructed for afferent and efferent fibres, nerve fibre groups were identified and simultaneous impulse patterns of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) were constructed. Temporal relations between afferent and efferent APs were analyzed by interspike interval (II) and phase relation changes to explore the coordinated self-organization of somatic and parasympathetic neuronal networks in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions under physiologic (brain-dead) and pathophysiologic conditions (spinal cord injury). 2. In a paraplegic with hyperreflexia of the bladder, urinary bladder stretch (S1) and tension receptor afferents (ST) fired already when the bladder was empty, and showed a several times higher bladder afferent activity increase upon retrograde bladder filling than observed in the brain-dead individual. Two alpha2-motoneurons (FR) innervating the external bladder sphincter were already oscillatory firing to generate high activity levels when the bladder was empty. They showed activity levels with no bladder filling, comparable to those measured at a bladder filling of 600 ml in the brain-dead individual. A bladder storage volume of 600 ml was thus lost in the paraplegic, due to a too high bladder afferent input to the sacral micturition center, secondary to inflammation and hypertrophy of the detrusor. 3. In a brain-dead human, 2 phase relations existed per oscillation period of 160 ms between the APs of a sphincteric oscillatory firing alpha2-motoneuron, a dynamic fusimotor and a secondary muscle spindle afferent fibre. Following stimulation of mainly somatic afferent fibres, the phase relations changed only little. 4. In a paraplegic with dyssynergia of the

  3. A role for nociceptive, myelinated nerve fibers in itch sensation.

    PubMed

    Ringkamp, Matthias; Schepers, Raf J; Shimada, Steven G; Johanek, Lisa M; Hartke, Timothy V; Borzan, Jasenka; Shim, Beom; LaMotte, Robert H; Meyer, Richard A

    2011-10-19

    Despite its clinical importance, the underlying neural mechanisms of itch sensation are poorly understood. In many diseases, pruritus is not effectively treated with antihistamines, indicating the involvement of nonhistaminergic mechanisms. To investigate the role of small myelinated afferents in nonhistaminergic itch, we tested, in psychophysical studies in humans, the effect of a differential nerve block on itch produced by intradermal insertion of spicules from the pods of a cowhage plant (Mucuna pruriens). Electrophysiological experiments in anesthetized monkey were used to investigate the responsiveness of cutaneous, nociceptive, myelinated afferents to different chemical stimuli (cowhage spicules, histamine, capsaicin). Our results provide several lines of evidence for an important role of myelinated fibers in cowhage-induced itch: (1) a selective conduction block in myelinated fibers substantially reduces itch in a subgroup of subjects with A-fiber-dominated itch, (2) the time course of itch sensation differs between subjects with A-fiber- versus C-fiber-dominated itch, (3) cowhage activates a subpopulation of myelinated and unmyelinated afferents in monkey, (4) the time course of the response to cowhage is different in myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, (5) the time of peak itch sensation for subjects with A-fiber-dominated itch matches the time for peak response in myelinated fibers, and (6) the time for peak itch sensation for subjects with C-fiber-dominated itch matches the time for the peak response in unmyelinated fibers. These findings demonstrate that activity in nociceptive, myelinated afferents contributes to cowhage-induced sensations, and that nonhistaminergic itch is mediated through activity in both unmyelinated and myelinated afferents.

  4. Physiological recruitment of motor units by high-frequency electrical stimulation of afferent pathways.

    PubMed

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Muceli, Silvia; Dosen, Strahinja; Laine, Christopher M; Farina, Dario

    2015-02-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in rehabilitation, but electrically evoked muscle activation is in several ways different from voluntary muscle contractions. These differences lead to challenges in the use of NMES for restoring muscle function. We investigated the use of low-current, high-frequency nerve stimulation to activate the muscle via the spinal motoneuron (MN) pool to achieve more natural activation patterns. Using a novel stimulation protocol, the H-reflex responses to individual stimuli in a train of stimulation pulses at 100 Hz were reliably estimated with surface EMG during low-level contractions. Furthermore, single motor unit recruitment by afferent stimulation was analyzed with intramuscular EMG. The results showed that substantially elevated H-reflex responses were obtained during 100-Hz stimulation with respect to a lower stimulation frequency. Furthermore, motor unit recruitment using 100-Hz stimulation was not fully synchronized, as it occurs in classic NMES, and the discharge rates differed among motor units because each unit was activated only after a specific number of stimuli. The most likely mechanism behind these observations is the temporal summation of subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials from Ia fibers to the MNs. These findings and their interpretation were also verified by a realistic simulation model of afferent stimulation of a MN population. These results suggest that the proposed stimulation strategy may allow generation of considerable levels of muscle activation by motor unit recruitment that resembles the physiological conditions.

  5. Roles of innervation in developing and regenerating orofacial tissues.

    PubMed

    Pagella, Pierfrancesco; Jiménez-Rojo, Lucia; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2014-06-01

    The head is innervated by 12 cranial nerves (I-XII) that regulate its sensory and motor functions. Cranial nerves are composed of sensory, motor, or mixed neuronal populations. Sensory neurons perceive generally somatic sensations such as pressure, pain, and temperature. These neurons are also involved in smell, vision, taste, and hearing. Motor neurons ensure the motility of all muscles and glands. Innervation plays an essential role in the development of the various orofacial structures during embryogenesis. Hypoplastic cranial nerves often lead to abnormal development of their target organs and tissues. For example, Möbius syndrome is a congenital disease characterized by defective innervation (i.e., abducens (VI) and facial (VII) nerves), deafness, tooth anomalies, and cleft palate. Hence, it is obvious that the peripheral nervous system is needed for both development and function of orofacial structures. Nerves have a limited capacity to regenerate. However, neural stem cells, which could be used as sources for neural tissue maintenance and repair, have been found in adult neuronal tissues. Similarly, various adult stem cell populations have been isolated from almost all organs of the human body. Stem cells are tightly regulated by their microenvironment, the stem cell niche. Deregulation of adult stem cell behavior results in the development of pathologies such as tumor formation or early tissue senescence. It is thus essential to understand the factors that regulate the functions and maintenance of stem cells. Yet, the potential importance of innervation in the regulation of stem cells and/or their niches in most organs and tissues is largely unexplored. This review focuses on the potential role of innervation in the development and homeostasis of orofacial structures and discusses its possible association with stem cell populations during tissue repair.

  6. Gut vagal afferents differentially modulate innate anxiety and learned fear.

    PubMed

    Klarer, Melanie; Arnold, Myrtha; Günther, Lydia; Winter, Christine; Langhans, Wolfgang; Meyer, Urs

    2014-05-21

    Vagal afferents are an important neuronal component of the gut-brain axis allowing bottom-up information flow from the viscera to the CNS. In addition to its role in ingestive behavior, vagal afferent signaling has been implicated modulating mood and affect, including distinct forms of anxiety and fear. Here, we used a rat model of subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA), the most complete and selective vagal deafferentation method existing to date, to study the consequences of complete disconnection of abdominal vagal afferents on innate anxiety, conditioned fear, and neurochemical parameters in the limbic system. We found that compared with Sham controls, SDA rats consistently displayed reduced innate anxiety-like behavior in three procedures commonly used in preclinical rodent models of anxiety, namely the elevated plus maze test, open field test, and food neophobia test. On the other hand, SDA rats exhibited increased expression of auditory-cued fear conditioning, which specifically emerged as attenuated extinction of conditioned fear during the tone re-exposure test. The behavioral manifestations in SDA rats were associated with region-dependent changes in noradrenaline and GABA levels in key areas of the limbic system, but not with functional alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal grand stress. Our study demonstrates that innate anxiety and learned fear are both subjected to visceral modulation through abdominal vagal afferents, possibly via changing limbic neurotransmitter systems. These data add further weight to theories emphasizing an important role of afferent visceral signals in the regulation of emotional behavior.

  7. Convergence in Reflex Pathways from Multiple Cutaneous Nerves Innervating the Foot Depends upon the Number of Rhythmically Active Limbs during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Hundza, Sandra R.; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  8. Convergence in reflex pathways from multiple cutaneous nerves innervating the foot depends upon the number of rhythmically active limbs during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  9. Decreased afferent excitability contributes to synaptic depression during high-frequency stimulation in hippocampal area CA1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunyoung; Owen, Benjamin; Holmes, William R; Grover, Lawrence M

    2012-10-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is often induced experimentally by continuous high-frequency afferent stimulation (HFS), typically at 100 Hz for 1 s. Induction of LTP requires postsynaptic depolarization and voltage-dependent calcium influx. Induction is more effective if the same number of stimuli are given as a series of short bursts rather than as continuous HFS, in part because excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) become strongly depressed during HFS, reducing postsynaptic depolarization. In this study, we examined mechanisms of EPSP depression during HFS in area CA1 of rat hippocampal brain slices. We tested for presynaptic terminal vesicle depletion by examining minimal stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) during 100-Hz HFS. While transmission failures increased, consistent with vesicle depletion, EPSC latencies also increased during HFS, suggesting a decrease in afferent excitability. Extracellular recordings of Schaffer collateral fiber volleys confirmed a decrease in afferent excitability, with decreased fiber volley amplitudes and increased latencies during HFS. To determine the mechanism responsible for fiber volley changes, we recorded antidromic action potentials in single CA3 pyramidal neurons evoked by stimulating Schaffer collateral axons. During HFS, individual action potentials decreased in amplitude and increased in latency, and these changes were accompanied by a large increase in the probability of action potential failure. Time derivative and phase-plane analyses indicated decreases in both axon initial segment and somato-dendritic components of CA3 neuron action potentials. Our results indicate that decreased presynaptic axon excitability contributes to depression of excitatory synaptic transmission during HFS at synapses between Schaffer collaterals and CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  10. Mechanical sensibility of nociceptive and non-nociceptive fast-conducting afferents is modulated by skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo; Eisenach, James C; Ririe, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish mechanical from thermal input is a critical component of peripheral somatosensory function. Polymodal C fibers respond to both stimuli. However, mechanosensitive, modality-specific fast-conducting tactile and nociceptor afferents theoretically carry information only about mechanical forces independent of the thermal environment. We hypothesize that the thermal environment can nonetheless modulate mechanical force sensibility in fibers that do not respond directly to change in temperature. To study this, fast-conducting mechanosensitive peripheral sensory fibers in male Sprague-Dawley rats were accessed at the soma in the dorsal root ganglia from T11 or L4/L5. Neuronal identification was performed using receptive field characteristics and passive and active electrical properties. Neurons responded to mechanical stimuli but failed to generate action potentials in response to changes in temperature alone, except for the tactile mechanical and cold sensitive neurons. Heat and cold ramps were utilized to determine temperature-induced modulation of response to mechanical stimuli. Mechanically evoked electrical activity in non-nociceptive, low-threshold mechanoreceptors (tactile afferents) decreased in response to changes in temperature while mechanically induced activity was increased in nociceptive, fast-conducting, high-threshold mechanoreceptors in response to the same changes in temperature. These data suggest that mechanical activation does not occur in isolation but rather that temperature changes appear to alter mechanical afferent activity and input to the central nervous system in a dynamic fashion. Further studies to understand the psychophysiological implications of thermal modulation of fast-conducting mechanical input to the spinal cord will provide greater insight into the implications of these findings.

  11. Primary afferent terminals acting as excitatory interneurons contribute to spontaneous motor activities in the immature spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bos, Rémi; Brocard, Frédéric; Vinay, Laurent

    2011-07-13

    Patterned, spontaneous activity plays a critical role in the development of neuronal networks. A robust spontaneous activity is observed in vitro in spinal cord preparations isolated from immature rats. The rhythmic ventral root discharges rely mainly on the depolarizing/excitatory action of GABA and glycine early during development, whereas at later stages glutamate drive is primarily responsible for the rhythmic activity and GABA/glycine are thought to play an inhibitory role. However, rhythmic discharges mediated by the activation of GABA(A) receptors are recorded from dorsal roots (DRs). In the present study, we used the in vitro spinal cord preparation of neonatal rats to identify the relationship between discharges that are conducted antidromically along DRs and the spontaneous activity recorded from lumbar motoneurons. We show that discharges in DRs precede those in ventral roots and that primary afferent depolarizations (PADs) start earlier than EPSPs in motoneurons. EPSP-triggered averaging revealed that the action potentials propagate not only antidromically in the DR but also centrally and trigger EPSPs in motoneurons. Potentiating GABAergic antidromic discharges by diazepam increased the EPSPs recorded from motoneurons; conversely, blocking DR bursts markedly reduced these EPSPs. High intracellular concentrations of chloride are maintained in primary afferent terminals by the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC1. Blocking these cotransporters by bumetanide decreased both dorsal and ventral root discharges. We conclude that primary afferent fibers act as excitatory interneurons and that GABA, through PADs reaching firing threshold, is still playing a key role in promoting spontaneous activity in neonates.

  12. An Exploration of the Interaction Between Touch Avoidance and the Pleasant Touch (C-Tactile Afferent) System.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Emily; Mahar, Doug

    2016-08-09

    C-tactile (CT) afferent fibers are optimally stimulated by slow gentle stroking, and an inverted U-shaped relationship exists between stroking velocity and pleasantness ratings of this type of touch. This study investigated whether an additional and potentially important variable, touch avoidance, interacts with this relationship. While a typical U-shaped velocity-pleasantness relationship was expected, those high in touch avoidance were expected to rate CT-targeted touch (1-10 cm/s) as less pleasant than those low in touch avoidance. Thirty-five participants rated the pleasantness of a brush stroked across their forearm at five velocities (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 cm/s) administered by a custom-built touch stimulator ("the touch device"). Participants also completed two self-report measures of touch avoidance. There was an inverted U-shaped relationship between velocity and pleasantness ratings, and high touch avoidance resulted in a downward shift of this curve. The downward shift was across all velocities, including those that do not maximally engage CT afferents. It appears that touch avoidance reduces the pleasantness of all kinds of touch in a similar way, and it is unlikely to be specifically related to CT afferent functioning. Other potential mechanisms leading to touch avoidance are discussed.

  13. Sensitization of Primary Afferent Nociceptors Induced by Intradermal Capsaicin Involves the Peripheral Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Driven by Dorsal Root Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dingge; Ren, Yong; Xu, Xijin; Zou, Xiaoju; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides released from axons of primary afferent nociceptive neurons are the key elements for the incidence of neurogenic inflammation and their release is associated with dorsal root reflexes (DRRs). However, whether the release is due to the triggering of DRRs and plays a role in inflammation-induced pain still remain to be determined. The present study assessed the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) following intradermal injection of capsaicin and determined if this release is due to activation of primary afferent neurons antidromically by triggering of DRRs. Under dorsal root intact conditions, primary afferent nociceptive fibers recorded in anesthetized rats could be sensitized by capsaicin injection, as shown by an increase in afferent responses and lowering of the response threshold to mechanical stimuli. After DRRs were removed by dorsal rhizotomy, the capsaicin-evoked sensitization was significantly reduced. In dorsal root intact rats, peripheral pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist could dose-dependently reduce the capsaicin-induced sensitization. Peripheral post-treatment with CGRP could dose-dependently restore the capsaicin-induced sensitization under dorsal rhizotomized conditions. Capsaicin injection evoked increases in numbers of single and double labeled TRPV1 and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). After dorsal rhizotomy, these evoked expressions were significantly inhibited. Perspective These data indicate that the DRR-mediated neurogenic inflammation enhances sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by capsaicin injection. The underlying mechanism involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors whereby CGRP is released peripherally. PMID:18701354

  14. [Readjustment of the efferent activity of the scratching generator in response to stimulation of muscle afferents of the hindlimb of the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    PubMed

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    Rebuildings of the scratching generator activity caused by phasic electrical stimulation of ipsilateral hindlimb muscle nerves during different hindlimb positions were studied in decerebrated immobilized cats. Strong dependence of these rebuildings on the stimulation phase was observed. The character of the "scratch" cycle duration rebuilding was formed by the scratching generator tendency to bring efferent activity into such correlation with the stimulus that the stimulation moment coincided with the moment of efferent activity phase triggering. Phasic altering of the efferent activity intensity rebuilding was observed against a background of "aiming" and "scratching" activity correlation shift in the direction of strengthening activation of muscles innervated by the stimulated nerve. This rebuilding was intensified when the hindlimb deflects from the aimed position in the direction of corresponding muscles stretching. Physiological sense of "rebuilding absence phases" is discussed. It is postulated that absence of the duration and intensity changes can be achieved simultaneously only with definite correlation between phase and intensity of the afferent impulsation burst.

  15. Synaptic depression in the CA1 region of freely behaving mice is highly dependent on afferent stimulation parameters

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Jinzhong J.; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Persistent synaptic plasticity has been subjected to intense study in the decades since it was first described. Occurring in the form of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), it shares many cellular and molecular properties with hippocampus-dependent forms of persistent memory. Recent reports of both LTP and LTD occurring endogenously under specific learning conditions provide further support that these forms of synaptic plasticity may comprise the cellular correlates of memory. Most studies of synaptic plasticity are performed using in vitro or in vivo preparations where patterned electrical stimulation of afferent fibers is implemented to induce changes in synaptic strength. This strategy has proven very effective in inducing LTP, even under in vivo conditions. LTD in vivo has proven more elusive: although LTD occurs endogenously under specific learning conditions in both rats and mice, its induction has not been successfully demonstrated with afferent electrical stimulation alone. In this study we screened a large spectrum of protocols that are known to induce LTD either in hippocampal slices or in the intact rat hippocampus, to clarify if LTD can be induced by sole afferent stimulation in the mouse CA1 region in vivo. Low frequency stimulation at 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, or 10 Hz given in the range of 100 through 1800 pulses produced, at best, short-term depression (STD) that lasted for up to 60 min. Varying the administration pattern of the stimuli (e.g., 900 pulses given twice at 5 min intervals), or changing the stimulation intensity did not improve the persistency of synaptic depression. LTD that lasts for at least 24 h occurs under learning conditions in mice. We conclude that a coincidence of factors, such as afferent activity together with neuromodulatory inputs, play a decisive role in the enablement of LTD under more naturalistic (e.g., learning) conditions. PMID:23355815

  16. Competition with Primary Sensory Afferents Drives Remodeling of Corticospinal Axons in Mature Spinal Motor Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Zaaimi, Boubker

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the mature motor system drives significant spontaneous axonal sprouting instead of axon regeneration. Knowing the circuit-level determinants of axonal sprouting is important for repairing motor circuits after injury to achieve functional rehabilitation. Competitive interactions are known to shape corticospinal tract axon outgrowth and withdrawal during development. Whether and how competition contributes to reorganization of mature spinal motor circuits is unclear. To study this question, we examined plastic changes in corticospinal axons in response to two complementary proprioceptive afferent manipulations: (1) enhancing proprioceptive afferents activity by electrical stimulation; or (2) diminishing their input by dorsal rootlet rhizotomy. Experiments were conducted in adult rats. Electrical stimulation produced proprioceptive afferent sprouting that was accompanied by significant corticospinal axon withdrawal and a decrease in corticospinal connections on cholinergic interneurons in the medial intermediate zone and C boutons on motoneurons. In contrast, dorsal rootlet rhizotomy led to a significant increase in corticospinal connections, including those on cholinergic interneurons; C bouton density increased correspondingly. Motor cortex-evoked muscle potentials showed parallel changes to those of corticospinal axons, suggesting that reciprocal corticospinal axon changes are functional. Using the two complementary models, we showed that competitive interactions between proprioceptive and corticospinal axons are an important determinant in the organization of mature corticospinal axons and spinal motor circuits. The activity- and synaptic space-dependent properties of the competition enables prediction of the remodeling of spared corticospinal connection and spinal motor circuits after injury and informs the target-specific control of corticospinal connections to promote functional recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroplasticity is limited in maturity

  17. Role for NGF in augmented sympathetic nerve response to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Xing, Jihong; Li, Jianhua

    2012-10-15

    Arterial blood pressure and heart rate responses to static contraction of the hindlimb muscles are greater in rats whose femoral arteries were previously ligated than in control rats. Also, the prior findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor (NGF) is increased in sensory neurons-dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of occluded rats. However, the role for endogenous NGF in engagement of the augmented sympathetic and pressor responses to stimulation of mechanically and/or metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction after femoral artery ligation has not been specifically determined. In the present study, both afferent nerves and either of them were activated by muscle contraction, passive tendon stretch, and arterial injection of lactic acid into the hindlimb muscles. Data showed that femoral occlusion-augmented blood pressure response to contraction was significantly attenuated by a prior administration of the NGF antibody (NGF-Ab) into the hindlimb muscles. The effects of NGF neutralization were not seen when the sympathetic nerve and pressor responses were evoked by stimulation of mechanically sensitive muscle afferent nerves with tendon stretch in occluded rats. In addition, chemically sensitive muscle afferent nerves were stimulated by lactic acid injected into arterial blood supply of the hindlimb muscles after the prior NGF-Ab, demonstrating that the reflex muscle responses to lactic acid were significantly attenuated. The results of this study further showed that NGF-Ab attenuated an increase in acid-sensing ion channel subtype 3 (ASIC3) of DRG in occluded rats. Moreover, immunohistochemistry was employed to examine the number of C-fiber and A-fiber DRG neurons. The data showed that distribution of DRG neurons with different thin fiber phenotypes was not notably altered when NGF was infused into the hindlimb muscles. However, NGF increased expression of ASIC3 in DRG neurons with C-fiber but not A-fiber. Overall, these data

  18. Structure and innervation of extraocular muscles of Carassius.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, D F; Mark, R F; Marotte, L R; Proske, U

    1975-01-01

    The extraocular muscles of the carp Carassius contain two types of muscle fibre. Large white fibres have ribbon-shaped peripheral myofibrils and triads located at the Z line. Small red fibres, rich in mitochondria, have polygonal-shaped myofibrils and triads at the A-I junction. Silver- and cholinesterase-stained preparations show that the large fibres are innervated by axons which spiral around them and exhibit intense cholinesterase activity over long distances. Axons supplying small muscle fibres run across bundles of fibres, making one contact with each fibre. By electron microscopy the nerve endings on each fibre type appear identical, both having a smooth post-junctional muscle membrane. The differences in structure and innervation pattern of the two fibre types are discussed in relation to their possible functional roles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:1184453

  19. The ischiourethralis muscle of the rat: anatomy, innervation, and function.

    PubMed

    Dail, W G; Sachs, B D

    1991-02-01

    The ischiourethralis (IU), a striated perineal muscle presumed to be involved in sexual reflexes, was studied in the rat. The paired muscle arises from the penile crus and the penile bulb and unites in a raphe over the deep dorsal vein of the penis. Retrograde tracing studies show that the muscle is innervated by neurons in the dorsolateral nucleus of the lumbar spinal cord, a pudendal nerve motor nucleus which also innervates the ischiocavernosus muscle. Excision of the IU muscle did not interfere with the ability of males to display normal copulatory behavior, nor did it affect significantly the number and intensity of reflexive erections. It nevertheless remains possible that the IU may contribute to intense glans erection by compressing the deep dorsal vein.

  20. TNFα reverse signaling promotes sympathetic axon growth and target innervation

    PubMed Central

    Kisiswa, Lilian; Osório, Catarina; Erice, Clara; Vizard, Thomas; Wyatt, Sean; Davies, Alun M

    2013-01-01

    Reverse signaling via members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily is increasingly recognized among cells of the immune system where it controls multiple aspects of immune function. Here we document TNFα reverse signaling in the nervous system for the first time and show that it plays a crucial role in establishing sympathetic innervation. During postnatal development, sympathetic axons express TNFα as they grow and branch in their target tissues which in turn express TNFR1. In culture, soluble forms of TNFR1 act directly on postnatal sympathetic axons to promote growth and branching by a mechanism that depends on membrane integrated TNFα and downstream MEK/ERK activation. Sympathetic innervation density is significantly reduced in several tissues in postnatal and adult mice lacking either TNFα or TNFR1. These findings reveal that target-derived TNFR1 acts as a reverse signaling ligand for membrane-integrated TNFα to promote sympathetic axon growth and branching. PMID:23749144

  1. Dry eye modifies the thermal and menthol responses in rat corneal primary afferent cool cells.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Masayuki; Meng, Ian D

    2013-07-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a painful condition caused by inadequate or altered tear film on the ocular surface. Primary afferent cool cells innervating the cornea regulate the ocular fluid status by increasing reflex tearing in response to evaporative cooling and hyperosmicity. It has been proposed that activation of corneal cool cells via a transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel agonist may represent a potential therapeutic intervention to treat dry eye. This study examined the effect of dry eye on the response properties of corneal cool cells and the ability of the TRPM8 agonist menthol to modify these properties. A unilateral dry eye condition was created in rats by removing the left lacrimal gland. Lacrimal gland removal reduced tears in the dry eye to 35% compared with the contralateral eye and increased the number of spontaneous blinks in the dry eye by over 300%. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed 8-10 wk following surgery in the trigeminal ganglion of dry eye animals and age-matched controls. Responses of corneal cool cells to cooling were examined after the application of menthol (10 μM-1.0 mM) to the ocular surface. The peak frequency of discharge to cooling was higher and the cooling threshold was warmer in dry eye animals compared with controls. The dry condition also altered the neuronal sensitivity to menthol, causing desensitization to cold-evoked responses at concentrations that produced facilitation in control animals. The menthol-induced desensitization of corneal cool cells would likely result in reduced tearing, a deleterious effect in individuals with dry eye.

  2. Distinct subclassification of DRG neurons innervating the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra based on the electrophysiological current signature.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Cooper, Brian Y; Johnson, Richard D

    2014-09-15

    Spinal sensory neurons innervating visceral and mucocutaneous tissues have unique microanatomic distribution, peripheral modality, and physiological, pharmacological, and biophysical characteristics compared with those neurons that innervate muscle and cutaneous tissues. In previous patch-clamp electrophysiological studies, we have demonstrated that small- and medium-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can be subclassified on the basis of their patterns of voltage-activated currents (VAC). These VAC-based subclasses were highly consistent in their action potential characteristics, responses to algesic compounds, immunocytochemical expression patterns, and responses to thermal stimuli. For this study, we examined the VAC of neurons retrogradely traced from the distal colon and the glans penis/distal urethra in the adult male rat. The afferent population from the distal colon contained at least two previously characterized cell types observed in somatic tissues (types 5 and 8), as well as four novel cell types (types 15, 16, 17, and 18). In the glans penis/distal urethra, two previously described cell types (types 6 and 8) and three novel cell types (types 7, 14, and 15) were identified. Other characteristics, including action potential profiles, responses to algesic compounds (acetylcholine, capsaicin, ATP, and pH 5.0 solution), and neurochemistry (expression of substance P, CGRP, neurofilament, TRPV1, TRPV2, and isolectin B4 binding) were consistent for each VAC-defined subgroup. With identification of distinct DRG cell types that innervate the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra, future in vitro studies related to the gastrointestinal and urogenital sensory function in normal as well as abnormal/pathological conditions may be benefitted.

  3. Distinct subclassification of DRG neurons innervating the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra based on the electrophysiological current signature

    PubMed Central

    Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Cooper, Brian Y.; Johnson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal sensory neurons innervating visceral and mucocutaneous tissues have unique microanatomic distribution, peripheral modality, and physiological, pharmacological, and biophysical characteristics compared with those neurons that innervate muscle and cutaneous tissues. In previous patch-clamp electrophysiological studies, we have demonstrated that small- and medium-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can be subclassified on the basis of their patterns of voltage-activated currents (VAC). These VAC-based subclasses were highly consistent in their action potential characteristics, responses to algesic compounds, immunocytochemical expression patterns, and responses to thermal stimuli. For this study, we examined the VAC of neurons retrogradely traced from the distal colon and the glans penis/distal urethra in the adult male rat. The afferent population from the distal colon contained at least two previously characterized cell types observed in somatic tissues (types 5 and 8), as well as four novel cell types (types 15, 16, 17, and 18). In the glans penis/distal urethra, two previously described cell types (types 6 and 8) and three novel cell types (types 7, 14, and 15) were identified. Other characteristics, including action potential profiles, responses to algesic compounds (acetylcholine, capsaicin, ATP, and pH 5.0 solution), and neurochemistry (expression of substance P, CGRP, neurofilament, TRPV1, TRPV2, and isolectin B4 binding) were consistent for each VAC-defined subgroup. With identification of distinct DRG cell types that innervate the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra, future in vitro studies related to the gastrointestinal and urogenital sensory function in normal as well as abnormal/pathological conditions may be benefitted. PMID:24872531

  4. Motor and sensory re-innervation of the lung and heart after re-anastomosis of the cervical vagus nerve in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bregeon, Fabienne; Alliez, Jean Roch; Héry, Géraldine; Marqueste, Tanguy; Ravailhe, Sylvie; Jammes, Yves

    2007-01-01

    There is no study in the literature dealing with re-innervation of the cardiopulmonary vagus nerve after its transection followed by re-anastomosis. In the present study, we explored the bronchomotor, heart rate and respiratory responses in rats at 2, 3 and 6 months after re-anastomosis of one cervical vagus trunk. The conduction velocity of A, B and C waves was calculated in the compound vagal action potential. We searched for afferent vagal activities in phase with pulmonary inflation to assess the persistence of pulmonary stretch receptor (PSR) discharge in re-innervated lungs. In each animal, data from the stimulation or recording of one re-anastomosed vagus nerve were compared with those obtained in the contra-lateral intact one. Two and three months after surgery, the conduction velocities of A and B waves decreased, but recovery of conduction velocity was complete at 6 months. By contrast, the conduction velocity of the C wave did not change until 6 months, when it was doubled. The PSR activity was present in 50% of re-anastomosed vagus nerves at 2 and 3 months and in 75% at 6 months. Respiratory inhibition evoked by vagal stimulation was significantly weaker from the re-anastomosed than intact nerve at 2 but not 3 months. Vagal stimulation did not elicit cardiac slowing or bronchoconstriction 6 months after re-anastomosis. Our study demonstrates the capacity of pulmonary vagal sensory neurones to regenerate after axotomy followed by re-anastomosis, and the failure of the vagal efferents to re-innervate both the lungs and heart. PMID:17430986

  5. Peripheral Innervation in Children With Global Developmental Delay: Biomarker for Risk for Self-Injurious Behavior?

    PubMed

    Symons, Frank J; Tervo, Raymond C; Barney, Chantel C; Damerow, John; Selim, Mona; McAdams, Brian; Foster, Shawn; Wendelschafer Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William

    2015-11-01

    The relation between somatosensory mechanisms and self-injury among children with neurologic impairments associated with developmental delay is not well understood. We evaluated the feasibility of procuring skin biopsies to examine epidermal nerve fiber density and reported self-injury. Following informed parental consent, epidermal skin biopsies were obtained from a distal leg site with no pre-existing skin damage from 11 children with global developmental delay (55% male; mean age = 36.8 months, 17-63 months). Visual microscopic examination and quantitative analyses showed extremely high epidermal nerve fiber density values for some children. Children with reported self-injury (5/11) had significantly (P < .02) greater density values (138.8, standard deviation = 45.5) than children without self-injury (80.5, standard deviation = 17.5). Results from this novel immunohistologic analysis of skin in very young children with neurodevelopmental delays suggest it may be a useful tool to study peripheral innervation as a possible sensory risk factor for self-injury.

  6. Improved functional recovery of denervated skeletal muscle after temporary sensory nerve innervation.

    PubMed

    Bain, J R; Veltri, K L; Chamberlain, D; Fahnestock, M

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged muscle denervation results in poor functional recovery after nerve repair. The possible protective effect of temporary sensory innervation of denervated muscle, prior to motor nerve repair, has been examined in the rat. Soleus and gastrocnemius muscles were denervated by cutting the tibial nerve, and the peroneal nerve was then sutured to the transected distal tibial nerve stump either immediately or after two, four or six months. In half of the animals with delayed repair, the saphenous (sensory) nerve was temporarily attached to the distal nerve stump. Muscles were evaluated three months after the peroneal-to-tibial union, and were compared with each other, with unoperated control muscles and with untreated denervated muscles. After four to six months of sensory "protection", gastrocnemius muscles weighed significantly more than unprotected muscles, and both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited better preservation of their structure, with less fiber atrophy and connective tissue hyperplasia. The maximum compound action potentials were significantly larger in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles following sensory protection, irrespective of the delay in motor nerve union. Isometric force, although less than in control animals and in those with immediate nerve repair, remained reasonably constant after sensory protection, while in unprotected muscles there was a progressive and significant decline as the period of denervation lengthened. We interpret these results as showing that, although incapable of forming excitable neuromuscular junctions, sensory nerves can nevertheless exert powerful trophic effects on denervated muscle fibers. We propose that these findings indicate a useful strategy for improving the outcome of peripheral nerve surgery.

  7. Whole-brain mapping of afferent projections to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rong-Jun; Luo, Peng-Hao; Shu, Yu-Mian; Chen, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-10-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) plays an important role in integrating and relaying input information to other brain regions in response to stress. The cytoarchitecture of the BST in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) has been comprehensively described in our previous publications. However, the inputs to the BST have not been described in previous reports. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sources of afferent projections to the BST throughout the brain of tree shrews using the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). The present results provide the first detailed whole-brain mapping of BST-projecting neurons in the tree shrew brain. The BST was densely innervated by the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, ventral subiculum, amygdala, ventral tegmental area, and parabrachial nucleus. Moreover, moderate projections to the BST originated from the medial preoptic area, supramammillary nucleus, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, locus coeruleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract. Afferent projections to the BST are identified in the ventral pallidum, nucleus of the diagonal band, ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus, posterior complex of the thalamus, interfascicular nucleus, retrorubral field, rhabdoid nucleus, intermediate reticular nucleus, and parvicellular reticular nucleus. In addition, the different densities of BST-projecting neurons in various regions were analyzed in the tree shrew brains. In summary, whole-brain mapping of direct inputs to the BST is delineated in tree shrews. These brain circuits are implicated in the regulation of numerous physiological and behavioral processes including stress, reward, food intake, and arousal.

  8. Postnatal development of limb motor innervation in the opossum Monodelphis domestica: immunohistochemical localization of acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Cabana, Thérèse

    2005-03-31

    The development of limb motor innervation was studied in the opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial born with immature mobile forelimbs and immobile hindlimbs. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the synthesis enzyme of acetylcholine, was evidenced on sections of the spinal enlargements, and the protein that transports acetylcholine (VAChT) on limb sections. In newborn, ChAT immunolabeling occurred in small, undifferentiated neurons of the ventral horn, presumably motoneurons, and intermediate and dorsal gray matter, and in the presumptive white matter, all less abundant at lumbosacral than brachial levels. Scant immunolabeling for VAChT marked small terminal-looking profiles, presumably growth cones or immature neuromuscular junctions, decreasing proximodistally in each limb and being less abundant in hindlimbs than forelimbs; it was absent distally in the foot where no muscle tissue was formed. ChAT labeling disappeared from the white matter within 1 week while cholinergic neurons increased in number and size. Motoneurons segregated in a medial and lateral group by 4-5 weeks. VAChT-labeled profiles increased in number and size and they flattened along a proximodistal gradient within each limb, but later in the hindlimbs than in the forelimbs. Labeling appeared in distal foot muscle at 1 week. The density, size, and shape of terminals became comparable in all segments of a given limb by 3-4 weeks. Their number and size increased, and by 8 weeks, they clustered in 3 or 4 along muscle fibers. Thus, limb motor innervation develops largely postnatally in the opossum, along rostrocaudal and proximodistal gradients. Its timecourse is compared to the development of motor behaviors.

  9. Differences in the expression of transient receptor potential channel V1, transient receptor potential channel A1 and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K+ channels between the lumbar splanchnic and pelvic nerve innervations of mouse urinary bladder and colon.

    PubMed

    La, J H; Schwartz, E S; Gebhart, G F

    2011-07-14

    The bladder and distal colon are innervated by lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and pelvic nerves (PN) whose axons arise from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons at thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) spinal levels, respectively. In an attempt to understand the molecular basis of differences between LSN and PN mechanosensitive afferents, we analyzed the gene expression of two potentially counteracting ion channel groups involved in mechanosensation, transient receptor potential channels (TRPV1 and TRPA1) and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels (TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK), in TL and LS DRG neurons innervating mouse bladder or distal colon. The proportion of TRPV1-expressing cells (41∼61%) did not differ between TL and LS neurons innervating bladder or colon. TRPA1 was seldom detected in bladder LS neurons whereas it was expressed in 64∼66% of bladder TL, colon TL and colon LS neurons. Coexpression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was frequent. TREK-1-expressing cells were more prevalent in LS than TL ganglia in both bladder- and colon-DRG neurons. All three K(2P) channels were detected more frequently in TRPV1-positive neurons in TL ganglia. More than half of TL neurons expressing only TRPA1 were devoid of any of the three K(2P) channels, whereas all TL neurons expressing both TRPA1 and TRPV1 expressed at least one of the K(2P) channels. These results reveal clear differences between LSN and PN sensory pathways in TRPA1 and TREK-1 gene expression and in the gene expression of K(2P) channels in TRPV1-expressing neurons. This study further documents heterogeneity of visceral afferents based on combinations of the five channels examined.

  10. The all-or-none role of innervation in expression of apamin receptor and of apamin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ channel in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Antomarchi, H; Renaud, J F; Romey, G; Hugues, M; Schmid, A; Lazdunski, M

    1985-04-01

    The long-lasting after-hyperpolarization(s) (AHP) that follows the action potential in rat myotubes differentiated in culture is due to Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These channels have the property to be specifically blocked by the bee venom toxin apamin at low concentrations. Apamin has been used in this work to analyze, by electrophysiological and biochemical techniques, the role of innervation in expression of these important channels. The main results are as follows: (i) Long-lasting AHP that follows the action potential in rat myotubes in culture disappears when myotubes are cocultured with nerve cells from the spinal cord under the conditions of in vitro innervation. (ii) Extensor digitorum longus muscles from adult rats have action potentials that are not followed by AHP but AHP are systematically recorded after muscle denervation and they are blocked by apamin. (iii) Specific 125I-labeled apamin binding is undetectable in innervated muscle fibers but it becomes detectable 2-4 days after muscle denervation to be maximal 10 days after denervation. (iv) Apamin receptors detected with 125I-labeled apamin are present at fetal stages with biochemical characteristics identical to those found in myotubes in culture. The receptor number decreases as maturation proceeds and 125I-labeled apamin receptors completely disappear after the first week of postnatal life, in parallel with the disappearance of multi-innervation. All these results taken together strongly suggest an all-or-none effect of innervation on the expression of apamin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ channels.

  11. Tactile afferents encode grip safety before slip for different frictions.

    PubMed

    Khamis, Heba A; Redmond, Stephen J; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2014-01-01

    Adjustments to frictional forces are crucial to maintain a safe grip during precision object handling in both humans and robotic manipulators. The aim of this work was to investigate whether a population of human tactile afferents can provide information about the current tangential/normal force ratio expressed as the percentage of the critical load capacity - the tangential/normal force ratio at which the object would slip. A smooth stimulation surface was tested on the fingertip under three frictional conditions, with a 4 N normal force and a tangential force generated by motion in the ulnar or distal direction at a fixed speed. During stimulation, the responses of 29 afferents (12 SA-I, 2 SA-II, 12 FA-I, 3 FA-II) were recorded. A multiple regression model was trained and tested using cross-validation to estimate the percentage of the critical load capacity in real-time as the tangential force increased. The features for the model were the number of spikes from each afferent in windows of fixed length (50, 100 or 200 ms) around points spanning the range from 50% to 100% of the critical load capacity, in 5% increments. The mean regression estimate error was less than 1% of the critical load capacity with a standard deviation between 5% and 10%. A larger number of afferents is expected to improve the estimate error. This work is important for understanding human dexterous manipulation and inspiring improvements in robotic grippers and prostheses.

  12. Gut chemosensing: interactions between gut endocrine cells and visceral afferents.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Helen E

    2010-02-16

    Chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract is less well understood than many aspects of gut mechanosensitivity; however, it is important in the overall function of the GI tract and indeed the organism as a whole. Chemosensing in the gut represents a complex interplay between the function of enteroendocrine (EEC) cells and visceral (primarily vagal) afferent neurons. In this brief review, I will concentrate on a new data on endocrine cells in chemosensing in the GI tract, in particular on new findings on glucose-sensing by gut EEC cells and the importance of incretin peptides and vagal afferents in glucose homeostasis, on the role of G protein coupled receptors in gut chemosensing, and on the possibility that gut endocrine cells may be involved in the detection of a luminal constituent other than nutrients, the microbiota. The role of vagal afferent pathways as a downstream target of EEC cell products will be considered and, in particular, exciting new data on the plasticity of the vagal afferent pathway with respect to expression of receptors for GI hormones and how this may play a role in energy homeostasis will also be discussed.

  13. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Idaira; Wanat, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review, we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders. PMID:27014097

  14. Changes in monkey horizontal semicircular canal afferent responses after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.; Perachio, A. A.; Dickman, J. D.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.; Sirota, M. G.; Iakushin, S. B.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular responses from single horizontal semicircular canal afferents in two rhesus monkeys were studied after recovery from a 14-day biosatellite (Cosmos 2044) orbital spaceflight. On the 1st postflight day, the mean gain for 9 different horizontal canal afferents, tested using one or several different passive yaw rotation waveforms, was nearly twice that for 20 horizontal canal afferents similarly tested during preflight and postflight control studies. Adaptation of the afferent response to passive yaw rotation on the 1st postflight day was also greater. These results suggest that at least one component of the vestibular end organ (the semicircular canals) is transiently modified after exposure to 14 days of microgravity. It is unclear whether the changes are secondary to other effects of microgravity, such as calcium loss, or an adaptive response. If the response is adaptive, then this report is the first evidence that the response of the vestibular end organ may be modified (presumably by the central nervous system via efferent connections) after prolonged unusual vestibular stimulation. If this is the case, the sites of plasticity of vestibular responses may not be exclusively within central nervous system vestibular structures, as previously believed.

  15. Effects of antidromic discharges in crayfish primary afferents.

    PubMed

    Cattaert, Daniel; Bévengut, Michelle

    2002-10-01

    Contrary to orthodromic spikes that are generated in sensory organs and conveyed to CNS, antidromic spikes are generated in the axon terminals of the sensory neurons within the CNS and are conveyed to the peripheral sensory organ. Antidromic discharges are observed in primary afferent neurons of both vertebrates and invertebrates and seem to be related to the rhythmic activity of central neural networks. In this study, we analyzed the effect of antidromic discharges on the sensory activity of a leg proprioceptor in in vitro preparations of the crayfish CNS. Intracellular microelectrodes were used both to record the orthodromic spikes and to elicit antidromic spikes by injecting squares pulses of depolarizing current at various frequencies. Experiments were performed on the three types of identified sensory afferents (tonic, phasotonic, and phasic). The main results showed a reduction of the firing frequency of the orthodromic activity in 82% of the tested afferents. In tonic afferents, during their occurrences and according to their frequency, antidromic spikes or bursts reduced or suppressed the orthodromic activity. Following their terminations, they also induced a silent period and a gradual recovery of the orthodromic activity, both of which increased as the duration and the frequency of the antidromic bursts increased. In phasotonic and phasic afferents, antidromic bursts reduced or suppressed the phasic responses as their frequency and durations increased. In phasotonic afferents, if elicited prior to the movements, long-duration bursts with increasing frequency reduced more rapidly the tonic background activity than the phasic one whereas short-duration bursts at high frequency produced strong decreases of both. The effect of antidromic bursts accumulated when they are repetitively elicited. Antidromic bursts induced a much larger decrease of the sensory activity than adaptation alone. The occurrences of antidromic spikes or bursts may have a functional role

  16. Thalamocortical Innervation Pattern in Mouse Auditory and Visual Cortex: Laminar and Cell-Type Specificity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xu-Ying; Zingg, Brian; Mesik, Lukas; Xiao, Zhongju; Zhang, Li I; Tao, Huizhong W

    2016-06-01

    Despite many previous studies, the functional innervation pattern of thalamic axons and their target specificity remains to be investigated thoroughly. Here, in primary auditory cortical slices, we examined thalamic innervation patterns for excitatory and different types of inhibitory neurons across laminae, by optogenetically stimulating axons from the medial geniculate body. We found that excitatory cells and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing inhibitory neurons across layer 2/3 (L2/3) to L6 are directly innervated by thalamic projections, with the strongest innervation occurring in L4. The innervation of PV neurons is stronger than that of excitatory neurons in the same layer, with a relatively constant ratio between their innervation strengths across layers. For somatostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibitory neurons, essentially only L4 neurons were innervated by thalamic axons and the innervation was much weaker compared with excitatory and PV cells. In addition, more than half of inhibitory neurons in L1 were innervated, relatively strongly, by thalamic axons. Similar innervation patterns were also observed in the primary visual cortex. Thus, thalamic information can be processed independently and differentially by different cortical layers, in addition to the generally thought hierarchical processing starting from L4. This parallel processing is likely shaped by feedforward inhibition from PV neurons in each individual lamina, and may extend the computation power of sensory cortices.

  17. Differential Changes in the Peptidergic and the Non-Peptidergic Skin Innervation in Rat Models for Inflammation, Dry Skin Itch, and Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schüttenhelm, Barthold N; Duraku, Liron S; Dijkstra, Jouke F; Walbeehm, Erik T; Holstege, Jan C

    2015-08-01

    Skin innervation is a dynamic process that may lead to changes in nerve fiber density during pathological conditions. We have investigated changes in epidermal nerve fiber density in three different rat models that selectively produce chronic itch (the dry skin model), or itch and inflammation (the dermatitis model), or chronic inflammation without itch (the CFA model). In the epidermis, we identified peptidergic fibers-that is, immunoreactive (IR) for calcitonin gene-related peptide or substance P—and non-peptidergic fibers—that is, IR for P2X3. The overall density of nerve fibers was determined using IR for the protein gene product 9.5. In all three models, the density of epidermal peptidergic nerve fibers increased up to five times when compared with a sham-treated control group. In contrast, the density of epidermal non-peptidergic fibers was not increased, except for a small but significant increase in the dry skin model. Chronic inflammation showed an increased density of peptidergic fibers without itch, indicating that increased nerve fiber density is not invariably associated with itch. The finding that different types of skin pathology induced differential changes in nerve fiber density may be used as a diagnostic tool in humans, through skin biopsies, to identify different types of pathology and to monitor the effect of therapies.

  18. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD.

  19. Short-latency afferent inhibition in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Aaron Z.; Mi, Yiqun P.; Nelson, Aimee J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) results when somatosensory afferent input inhibits the corticospinal output from primary motor cortex (M1). The present study examined SAI in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and uninjured controls. Methods Short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evoked by stimulating the median nerve at the elbow at intervals of 15, 20 and 25 ms in advance of a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse over M1. SAI was tested with the FCR at rest and also during ~20% of maximum voluntary contraction. Corticospinal output was assessed through measuring both motor thresholds and motor evoked potential (MEP) recruitment curves. The afferent volley was assessed via the N20–P25 amplitude of the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and the amplitude of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) recorded over the median nerve at the elbow. Results SAI is reduced in SCI in both the contracted and non-contracted FCR muscle. MEP recruitment curves and thresholds were decreased in SCI only in the active state and not the resting state. N20–P25 amplitude was similar between groups in both the resting and active states although SNAP was significantly reduced in SCI at rest. Conclusions We conclude that reduced SAI in SCI is likely attributed to neuroplasticity altering the intrinsic M1 circuitry mediating SAI and/or reduced afferent input traversing a direct thalamocortical route to M1. These data provide a new avenue of research aimed at identifying therapeutic approaches to alter SAI to improve upper limb function in individuals with SCI. PMID:28123808

  20. The innervation of the adrenal gland. IV. Innervation of the rat adrenal medulla from birth to old age. A descriptive and quantitative morphometric and biochemical study of the innervation of chromaffin cells and adrenal medullary neurons in Wistar rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, A; Coupland, R E

    1990-01-01

    The innervation of the adrenal medulla has been investigated in normal Wistar rats from birth to old age and ultrastructural findings compared with biochemical markers of the cholinergic innervation of the adrenal gland and catecholamine storage. Morphological evidence of the immaturity of the innervation during the first postnatal week is provided and using quantitative morphometry the innervation of chromaffin cells is shown to reach a mean total of 5.4 synapses per chromaffin cell during the period 26 days to 12 weeks of age. The variation in contents of synaptic profiles is discussed in the light of recent work that demonstrates a major sensory as well as visceral efferent innervation of the gland. Adrenal medullary neurons usually occur in closely packed groups, intimately associated with Schwann cells. Axodendritic and axosomatic synapses on these neurons are described and the likely origin of axonal processes innervating the neurons discussed. In old age the density of innervation remains the same as in young adult animals even though the medulla shows evidence of hyperplasia and hypertrophy of individual chromaffin cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 PMID:2384334

  1. Delayed Exercise Is Ineffective at Reversing Aberrant Nociceptive Afferent Plasticity or Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Quiros-Molina, Daniel; Javia, Amy S; Daggubati, Lekhaj; Nehlsen, Anthony D; Naqvi, Ali; Ninan, Vinu; Vannix, Kirsten N; McMullen, Mary-Katharine; Amin, Sheena; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that correlates with sensory fiber sprouting. Recent data indicate that exercise initiated early after SCI prevents the development of allodynia and modulated nociceptive afferent plasticity. This study determined if delaying exercise intervention until pain is detected would similarly ameliorate established SCI-induced pain. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats with a C5 unilateral contusion were separated into SCI allodynic and SCI non-allodynic cohorts at 14 or 28 days postinjury when half of each group began exercising on automated running wheels. Allodynia, assessed by von Frey testing, was not ameliorated by exercise. Furthermore, rats that began exercise with no allodynia developed paw hypersensitivity within 2 weeks. At the initiation of exercise, the SCI Allodynia group displayed marked overlap of peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptive afferents in the C7 and L5 dorsal horn, while the SCI No Allodynia group had scant overlap. At the end of 5 weeks of exercise both the SCI Allodynia and SCI No Allodynia groups had extensive overlap of the 2 c-fiber types. Our findings show that exercise therapy initiated at early stages of allodynia is ineffective at attenuating neuropathic pain, but rather that it induces allodynia-aberrant afferent plasticity in previously pain-free rats. These data, combined with our previous results, suggest that there is a critical therapeutic window when exercise therapy may be effective at treating SCI-induced allodynia and that there are postinjury periods when exercise can be deleterious.

  2. Testosterone alters genomic responses to song and monoaminergic innervation of auditory areas in a seasonally breeding songbird.

    PubMed

    Matragrano, Lisa L; LeBlanc, Meredith M; Chitrapu, Anjani; Blanton, Zane E; Maney, Donna L

    2013-06-01

    Behavioral responses to social stimuli often vary according to endocrine state. Our previous work has suggested that such changes in behavior may be due in part to hormone-dependent sensory processing. In the auditory forebrain of female white-throated sparrows, expression of the immediate early gene ZENK (egr-1) is higher in response to conspecific song than to a control sound only when plasma estradiol reaches breeding-typical levels. Estradiol also increases the number of detectable noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus and the density of noradrenergic and serotonergic fibers innervating auditory areas. We hypothesize, therefore, that reproductive hormones alter auditory responses by acting on monoaminergic systems. This possibility has not been examined in males. Here, we treated non-breeding male white-throated sparrows with testosterone to mimic breeding-typical levels and then exposed them to conspecific male song or frequency-matched tones. We observed selective ZENK responses in the caudomedial nidopallium only in the testosterone-treated males. Responses in another auditory area, the caudomedial mesopallium, were selective regardless of hormone treatment. Testosterone treatment reduced serotonergic fiber density in the auditory forebrain, thalamus, and midbrain, and although it increased the number of noradrenergic neurons detected in the locus coeruleus, it reduced noradrenergic fiber density in the auditory midbrain. Thus, whereas we previously reported that estradiol enhances monoaminergic innervation of the auditory pathway in females, we show here that testosterone decreases it in males. Mechanisms underlying testosterone-dependent selectivity of the ZENK response may differ from estradiol-dependent ones

  3. Genetic identification of C-fibers that detect massage-like stroking of hairy skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vrontou, Sophia; Wong, Allan M.; Rau, Kristofer K.; Koerber, H. Richard; Anderson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Stroking of the skin produces pleasant sensations that can occur during social interactions with conspecifics, such as grooming1. Despite numerous physiological studies (reviewed in ref. 2), molecularly defined sensory neurons that detect pleasant stroking of hairy skin3,4 in vivo have not been reported. Previously, we identified a rare population of unmyelinated sensory neurons that express the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) MrgprB45,6. These neurons exclusively innervate hairy skin with large terminal arborizations7 that resemble the receptive fields of C-tactile (CT) afferents in humans8. Unlike other molecularly defined mechanosensory C-fiber subtypes9,10, MrgprB4+ neurons could not be detectably activated by sensory stimulation of the skin ex vivo. Therefore, we developed a preparation for calcium imaging in their spinal projections during stimulation of the periphery in intact animals. MrgprB4+ neurons were activated by massage-like stroking of hairy skin, but not by noxious punctate mechanical stimulation. By contrast, a different population of C-fibers expressing MrgprD11 was activated by pinching but not by stroking, consistent with previous physiological and behavioral data10,12. Pharmacogenetic activation of MrgprB4- expressing neurons in freely behaving animals promoted conditioned place preference13, suggesting that such activation is positively reinforcing and/or anxiolytic. These data open the way to understanding the function of MrgprB4 neurons during natural behaviors, and provide a general approach to functionally characterizing genetically identified subsets of somatosensory neurons in vivo. PMID:23364746

  4. Neurosensory Differentiation and Innervation Patterning in the Human Fetal Vestibular End Organs between the Gestational Weeks 8-12.

    PubMed

    Johnson Chacko, Lejo; Pechriggl, Elisabeth J; Fritsch, Helga; Rask-Andersen, Helge; Blumer, Michael J F; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese; Glueckert, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Balance orientation depends on the precise operation of the vestibular end organs and the vestibular ganglion neurons. Previous research on the assemblage of the neuronal network in the developing fetal vestibular organ has been limited to data from animal models. Insights into the molecular expression profiles and signaling moieties involved in embryological development of the human fetal inner ear have been limited. We present an investigation of the cells of the vestibular end organs with specific focus on the hair cell differentiation and innervation pattern using an uninterrupted series of unique specimen