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Sample records for afferent nerve terminals

  1. Cardiovascular effects of afferent renal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stella, A; Weaver, L; Golin, R; Genovesi, S; Zanchetti, A

    1987-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves elicits an increase in arterial pressure and heart rate. The hypertensive response is presumably due to the widespread activation of the sympathetic nervous system leading to peripheral vasoconstriction. Interestingly, the kidney does not appear involved in this reflex excitatory response to afferent renal nerve stimulation since changes in vascular conductances and excretory functions are equal in both the innervated and denervated kidney, and secondary to changes in renal perfusion pressure. In addition, no changes in renin release from either kidneys are observed during afferent renal nerve stimulation. It is likely that the electrical stimulation of afferent renal nerves activates other reflexes exerting an inhibitory influence on efferent renal nerve activity. Indeed, neural renorenal reflexes which tonically inhibit renal functions have clearly been demonstrated. Furthermore, preferential inhibition of efferent renal nerve activity by cardiopulmonary and sinoaortic receptors has recently been shown during activation of other visceral afferents.

  2. Utricular afferents: morphology of peripheral terminals

    PubMed Central

    Huwe, J. A.; Logan, G. J.; Williams, B.; Rowe, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The utricle provides critical information about spatiotemporal properties of head movement. It comprises multiple subdivisions whose functional roles are poorly understood. We previously identified four subdivisions in turtle utricle, based on hair bundle structure and mechanics, otoconial membrane structure and hair bundle coupling, and immunoreactivity to calcium-binding proteins. Here we ask whether these macular subdivisions are innervated by distinctive populations of afferents to help us understand the role each subdivision plays in signaling head movements. We quantified the morphology of 173 afferents and identified six afferent classes, which differ in structure and macular locus. Calyceal and dimorphic afferents innervate one striolar band. Bouton afferents innervate a second striolar band; they have elongated terminals and the thickest processes and axons of all bouton units. Bouton afferents in lateral (LES) and medial (MES) extrastriolae have small-diameter axons but differ in collecting area, bouton number, and hair cell contacts (LES >> MES). A fourth, distinctive population of bouton afferents supplies the juxtastriola. These results, combined with our earlier findings on utricular hair cells and the otoconial membrane, suggest the hypotheses that MES and calyceal afferents encode head movement direction with high spatial resolution and that MES afferents are well suited to signal three-dimensional head orientation and striolar afferents to signal head movement onset. PMID:25632074

  3. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  4. Mechano- and thermosensitivity of regenerating cutaneous afferent nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid; Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    Crush lesion of a skin nerve is followed by sprouting of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers into the distal nerve stump. Here, we investigate quantitatively both ongoing activity and activity evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the nerve in 43 A- and 135 C-fibers after crush lesion of the sural nerve using neurophysiological recordings in anesthetized rats. The discharge patterns in the injured afferent nerve fibers and in intact (control) afferent nerve fibers were compared. (1) Almost all (98%) A-fibers were mechanosensitive, some of them exhibited additionally weak cold/heat sensitivity; 7% had ongoing activity. (2) Three patterns of physiologically evoked activity were present in the lesioned C-fibers: (a) C-fibers with type 1 cold sensitivity (low cold threshold, inhibition on heating, high level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%): almost all of them were mechanoinsensitive and 40% of them were additionally heat-sensitive; (b) C-fibers with type 2 cold sensitivity (high cold threshold, low level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%). All of them were excited by mechanical and/or heat stimuli; (c) cold-insensitive C-fibers (54%), which were heat- and/or mechanosensitive. (3) The proportions of C-fibers exhibiting these three patterns of discharge to physiological stimuli were almost identical in the population of injured C-fibers and in a population of 91 intact cutaneous C-fibers. 4. Ongoing activity was present in 56% of the lesioned C-fibers. Incidence and rate of ongoing activity were the same in the populations of lesioned and intact type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers. The incidence (but not rate) of ongoing activity was significantly higher in lesioned type 2 cold-sensitive and cold insensitive C-fibers than in the corresponding populations of intact C-fibers (42/93 fibers vs. 11/72 fibers). PMID:19139872

  5. Differential presynaptic control of the synaptic effectiveness of cutaneous afferents evidenced by effects produced by acute nerve section

    PubMed Central

    Rudomin, P; Jiménez, I; Chávez, D

    2013-01-01

    In the anaesthetized cat, the acute section of the saphenous (Saph) and/or the superficial peroneal (SP) nerves was found to produce a long-lasting increase of the field potentials generated in the dorsal horn by stimulation of the medial branch of the sural (mSU) nerve. This facilitation was associated with changes in the level of the tonic primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of the mSU intraspinal terminals. The mSU afferent fibres projecting into Rexed's laminae III–IV were subjected to a tonic PAD that was reduced by the acute section of the SP and/or the Saph nerves. The mSU afferents projecting deeper into the dorsal horn (Rexed's laminae V–VI) were instead subjected to a tonic PAD that was increased after Saph and SP acute nerve section. A differential control of the synaptic effectiveness of the low-threshold cutaneous afferents according to their sites of termination within the dorsal horn is envisaged as a mechanism that allows selective processing of sensory information in response to tactile and nociceptive stimulation or during the execution of different motor tasks. PMID:23478136

  6. Targeting primary afferent nerves for novel antitussive therapy.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The best available data support the hypothesis that there are at least two types of vagal nerves responsible for initiating coughing reflexes. One type of nerve conducts action potentials in the A-range and is characterized by rapidly adapting responses to mechanical probing or acidification of the large airway epithelium. Stimulation of these nerves can evoke cough in unconscious experimental animals and humans. These nerves are important in immediate cough evoked by aspiration and as such perform a critical role in airway defense. The other type of primary afferent nerve involved in cough is the vagal C-fiber. Inhalation of selective C-fiber stimulants leads to cough only in conscious animals. In clinical studies, inhalation of a low concentration of a C-fiber stimulant causes an irritating, itchy urge-to-cough sensation that mimics the urge-to-cough sensations associated with respiratory tract infection, post-infection, gastroesophageal reflux disorders, and inflammatory airway diseases. Here we discuss the recent advances in sensory neurobiology that allow for the targeting of vagal C-fibers for novel antitussive therapy. No attempts are made to be all-inclusive with respect to the numerous possible molecular targets being considered to accomplish this goal. Rather, two general strategies are discussed: decreasing generator potential amplitude and decreasing the efficiency by which a generator potential evokes action-potential discharge. For the first category we focus on two targets, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and transient receptor potential A1. For the latter category we focus on recent advances in voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channel biology.

  7. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Wainford, Richard D.; Engeland, William C.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats. PMID:25411365

  8. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  9. Implications for Bidirectional Signaling Between Afferent Nerves and Urothelial Cells—ICI-RS 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Anthony; Fry, Christopher; Ikeda, Youko; Kullmann, Florenta Aura; Parsons, Brian; Birder, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Aims To present a synopsis of the presentations and discussions from Think Tank I, “Implications for afferent–urothelial bidirectional communication” of the 2014 International Consultation on Incontinence-Research Society (ICI-RS) meeting in Bristol, UK. Methods The participants presented what is new, currently understood or still unknown on afferent–urothelial signaling mechanisms. New avenues of research and experimental methodologies that are or could be employed were presented and discussed. Results It is clear that afferent–urothelial interactions are integral to the regulation of normal bladder function and that its disruption can have detrimental consequences. The urothelium is capable of releasing numerous signaling factors that can affect sensory neurons innervating the suburothelium. However, the understanding of how factors released from urothelial cells and afferent nerve terminals regulate one another is incomplete. Utilization of techniques such as viruses that genetically encode Ca2+ sensors, based on calmodulin and green fluorescent protein, has helped to address the cellular mechanisms involved. Additionally, the epithelial–neuronal interactions in the urethra may also play a significant role in lower urinary tract regulation and merit further investigation. Conclusion The signaling capabilities of the urothelium and afferent nerves are well documented, yet how these signals are integrated to regulate bladder function is unclear. There is unquestionably a need for expanded methodologies to further our understanding of lower urinary tract sensory mechanisms and their contribution to various pathologies. PMID:26872567

  10. Characterization of Mouse Lumbar Splanchnic and Pelvic Nerve Urinary Bladder Mechanosensory Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linjing; Gebhart, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory information from the urinary bladder is conveyed via lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and sacral pelvic (PN) nerves to the spinal cord. In the present report we compared the mechanosensitive properties of single afferent fibers in these two pathways using an in vitro mouse bladder preparation. Mechanosensitive primary afferents were recorded from the LSN or PN and distinguished based on their response to receptive field stimulation with different mechanical stimuli: probing (160 mg to 2 g), stretch (1–25 g), and stroking of the urothelium (10–1,000 mg). Four different classes of afferent were recorded from the LSN and PN: serosal, muscular, muscular/urothielial, and urothelial. The LSN contained principally serosal and muscular afferents (97% of the total sample), whereas all four afferent classes of afferent were present in the PN (63% of which were muscular afferents). In addition, the respective proportions and receptive field distributions differed between the two pathways. Both low- and high-threshold stretch-sensitive muscular afferents were present in both pathways, and muscular afferents in the PN were shown to sensitize after exposure to an inflammatory soup cocktail. The LSN and PN pathways contain different populations of mechanosensitive afferents capable of detecting a range of mechanical stimuli and individually tuned to detect the type, magnitude, and duration of the stimulus. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the potential roles these two pathways play in conveying mechanical information from the bladder to the spinal cord. PMID:18003875

  11. Neonatal inflammation and primary afferent terminal plasticity in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M; Meredith-Middleton, Jacqueta; Cooke-Yarborough, Claire; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2003-09-01

    Abnormal or excessive activity related to pain and injury in early life may alter normal synaptic development and lead to changes in somatosensory processing. The aim of the current study was to define the critical factors that determine long-term plasticity in spinal cord afferent terminals following neonatal inflammation. Hindpaw inflammation was produced in neonatal rat pups with 5 or 25 microl 2% carrageenan, and 5 or 25 microl complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). All groups displayed a clear inflammatory response that recovered in 2 weeks in all but the 25 microl CFA group, who had persistent chronic inflammation confirmed by histological examination of the paw at 8 weeks. The 25 microl CFA group was also the only group that displayed a significant expansion of the sciatic and saphenous nerve terminal field in lamina II of the dorsal horn at 8 weeks, using wheat-germ agglutinin-horse radish peroxidase transganglionic labelling. This effect was not accompanied by changes in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cell number, expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), or alterations in calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) or isolectin B4 binding; and was not mimicked by partial nerve damage. No long-term change in mechanical or thermal behavioural sensory thresholds was seen in any group. Lower dose CFA caused an acute, reversible expansion of terminal fields in lamina II in neonatal animals, while CFA did not produce this effect in adults. The duration and effect of neonatal inflammation is therefore dependent on the type and volume of inflammatory agent used. The expansion of afferent terminals in lamina II following neonatal CFA inflammation is maintained into adulthood if the inflammation is also maintained, as seen following 25 microl CFA. This effect is not seen in adult animals, emphasising the plasticity of the nervous system early in development.

  12. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum

    PubMed Central

    Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding characteristics of colorectal afferents. The colorectum with PN attached was dissected, opened longitudinally, and pinned flat in a Sylgard-lined chamber. Action potentials of afferent fibers evoked by circumferential stretch (servo-controlled force actuator) were recorded from the PN. Stretch-sensitive fibers were categorized into the following four groups: colonic muscular, colonic muscular/mucosal, rectal muscular, and rectal muscular/mucosal. Seventy-nine stretch-sensitive PN afferents evenly distributed into the above four groups were studied. Rectal muscular afferents had significantly greater stretch-responses than the other three groups. Virtually all rectal afferents (98%) had low thresholds for response and encoded stimulus intensity into the noxious range without obvious saturation. Most colonic afferents (72%) also had low thresholds (<14 mmHg), but a significant proportion (28%) had high thresholds (>18 mmHg) for response. These high-threshold colonic afferents were sensitized to stretch by inflammatory soup; response threshold was significantly reduced (from 23 to 12 mmHg), and response magnitude significantly increased. These results suggest that the encoding of mechanosensory information differs between colonic and rectal stretch-sensitive PN afferents. Rectal afferents have a wide response range to stretch, whereas high-threshold colonic afferents likely contribute to visceral nociception. PMID:20075141

  13. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Brumovsky, Pablo R; Gebhart, Gerald F

    2010-03-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding characteristics of colorectal afferents. The colorectum with PN attached was dissected, opened longitudinally, and pinned flat in a Sylgard-lined chamber. Action potentials of afferent fibers evoked by circumferential stretch (servo-controlled force actuator) were recorded from the PN. Stretch-sensitive fibers were categorized into the following four groups: colonic muscular, colonic muscular/mucosal, rectal muscular, and rectal muscular/mucosal. Seventy-nine stretch-sensitive PN afferents evenly distributed into the above four groups were studied. Rectal muscular afferents had significantly greater stretch-responses than the other three groups. Virtually all rectal afferents (98%) had low thresholds for response and encoded stimulus intensity into the noxious range without obvious saturation. Most colonic afferents (72%) also had low thresholds (<14 mmHg), but a significant proportion (28%) had high thresholds (>18 mmHg) for response. These high-threshold colonic afferents were sensitized to stretch by inflammatory soup; response threshold was significantly reduced (from 23 to 12 mmHg), and response magnitude significantly increased. These results suggest that the encoding of mechanosensory information differs between colonic and rectal stretch-sensitive PN afferents. Rectal afferents have a wide response range to stretch, whereas high-threshold colonic afferents likely contribute to visceral nociception.

  14. Laryngeal and tracheal afferent nerve stimulation evokes swallowing in anaesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Udemgba, Chioma; Inoue, Makoto; Canning, Brendan J

    2013-09-15

      We describe swallowing reflexes evoked by laryngeal and tracheal vagal afferent nerve stimulation in anaesthetized guinea pigs. The swallowing reflexes evoked by laryngeal citric acid challenges were abolished by recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) transection and mimicked by electrical stimulation of the central cut ends of an RLN. By contrast, the number of swallows evoked by upper airway/pharyngeal distensions was not significantly reduced by RLN transection but they were virtually abolished by superior laryngeal nerve transection. Laryngeal citric acid-evoked swallowing was mimicked by laryngeal capsaicin challenges, implicating transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-expressing laryngeal afferent nerves arising from the jugular ganglia. The swallowing evoked by citric acid and capsaicin and evoked by electrical stimulation of either the tracheal or the laryngeal mucosa occurred at stimulation intensities that were typically subthreshold for evoking cough in these animals. Swallowing evoked by airway afferent nerve stimulation also desensitized at a much slower rate than cough. We speculate that swallowing is an essential component of airway protection from aspiration associated with laryngeal and tracheal afferent nerve activation. PMID:23858010

  15. Evidence for the participation of glutamate in reflexes involving afferent, substance P-containing nerve fibres in the rat.

    PubMed

    Juránek, I; Lembeck, F

    1996-01-01

    1. Responses mediated, either peripherally or centrally, by substance P-containing primary afferent C-fibres were investigated in the rat following impairment of axonal transport by colchicine (120 micrograms kg-1, i.p., daily for 3 days), and after treatment with the tachykinin antagonist SR-140333 (10-100 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) or the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist MK-801 (100 micrograms kg-1). 2. Peripheral effects mediated by afferent C-fibres were measured by plasma protein extravasation (Evans blue method), following antidromic stimulation of the sciatic nerve, topical application of mustard oil and, as control, i.v. injection of substance P. SR-140333 (100 micrograms kg-1) reduced the effects by 86%, 75% and 74%, respectively. Colchicine reduced the effects of the first two stimuli by 31% and 33% and, as expected not the effect of substance P. The increase of paw skin temperature following capsaicin i.v. was inhibited by SR-140333, but not by colchicine. MK-801 had no effect on the plasma protein extravasation following antidromic sciatic nerve stimulation or on the rise of paw skin temperature induced by capsaicin i.v., thus excluding an effect of MK-801 on peripheral terminals of afferent neurones. 3. Depressor reflexes, which are known to be mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferent neuones, such as those elicited (A) by a stimulating dose of 30 ng capsaicin i.a., (B) by distension of the ascending colon or (C) by afferent sciatic nerve stimulation were studied. Colchicine significantly reduced depressor reflexes A and B, but had no effect on reflex C. None of the reflexes was affected by SR-140333. MK-801 significantly inhibited all three reflexes. 4. Capsaicin, injected either i.v. (200 micrograms kg-1) or into the nucleus caudatus/putamen (i.c., 30 micrograms), induced an increase in paw skin temperature and a decrease in colon temperature. The rise in fore paw skin temperature (delta t = 2.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C) evoked by capsaicin i.v. was

  16. Novel Afferent Terminal Structure in the Crista Ampullaris of the Goldfish, Carassius auratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, Pamela J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1996-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we have identified a new type of afferent terminal structure in the crista ampullaris of the goldfish Carassius auratus. In addition to the bouton-type afferent terminals previously described in the ear of this species, the crista also contained enlarged afferent terminals that enveloped a portion of the basolateral hair cell membrane. The hair cell membrane was evaginated and protruded into the afferent terminal in a glove-and-finger configuration. The membranes of the two cells were regularly aligned in the protruded region of the contact and had a distinct symmetrical electron density. The electron-dense profiles of these contacts were easily identified and were present in every crista sampled. In some cases, efferent terminals synapsed onto the afferents at a point where the hair cell protruded into the terminal. The ultrastructural similarities of the goldfish crista afferents to calyx afferents found in amniotes (birds, reptiles, and mammals) are discussed. The results of the study support the hypothesis that structural variation in the vertebrate inner ear may have evolved much earlier in evolution than previously supposed.

  17. The proportions of sympathetic postganglionic and unmyelinated afferent axons in normal and regenerated cat sural nerves.

    PubMed

    Lisney, S J

    1988-03-01

    Electrophysiological experiments have been carried out to see if the proportions of sympathetic postganglionic and unmyelinated afferent axons in a cutaneous nerve were changed after injury and regeneration. It seemed possible that an alteration in the relative numbers of the two groups of axons could contribute to the aetiology of reflex sympathetic dystrophy, but the experiments provided no evidence for such a change. There were, however, signs of a decrease in axon numbers in the regenerated nerves. PMID:3379252

  18. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  19. Electrophysiology of corneal cold receptor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard W; Brock, James A

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms of sensory transduction in the fine nerve terminals of free nerve endings supplied by Adelta and C sensory axons are largely a matter of speculation. This is because the nerve terminals are small and inaccessible, particularly in intact tissues like skin. However, some of the difficulties associated with investigating the physiology of fine nerve terminals have recently been overcome using an in vitro preparation of the guinea-pig cornea that allows nerve terminal impulses (NTIs) to be recorded extracellularly from single polymodal and cold receptor nerve terminals. For cold receptors, the rate of spontaneously occurring NTIs is increased during cooling and decreased during heating. In addition, heating and cooling differentially modulate the shape of the recorded NTI. At the same temperature, NTIs are larger in amplitude and faster in time course during heating than those during cooling. The differential effect of heating and cooling on NTI shape is not considered to result simply from the temperature dependence of voltage-activated conductance kinetics or activity dependent changes in membrane excitability. Instead, changes in NTI shape may reflect changes in nerve terminal membrane potential that underlie the process of thermal transduction.

  20. Influence of map scale on primary afferent terminal field geometry in cat dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R J; Pubols, L M; Sonty, R V; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W E; Brown, P B

    1991-09-01

    1. Thirty-one physiologically identified primary afferent fibers were labeled intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). 2. A computer analysis was used to determine whether the distribution of cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferent terminals varies as a function of location within the dorsal horn somatotopic map. 3. An analysis of the geometry of the projections of these afferents has shown that 1) terminal arbors have a greater mediolateral width within the region of the foot representation than lateral to it, 2) terminal arbors have larger length-to-width ratios outside the foot representation than within it, and 3) the orientation of terminal arbors near the boundary of the foot representation reflects the angle of the boundary. Previous attribution of mediolateral width variations to primary afferent type are probably in error, although there appear to be genuine variations of longitudinal extent as a function of primary afferent type. 4. Nonuniform terminal distributions represent the first of a three-component process underlying assembly of the monosynaptic portions of cell receptive fields (RFs) and the somatotopic map. The other two components consist of the elaboration of cell dendritic trees and the establishment of selective connections. 5. The variation of primary afferent terminal distributions with map location is not an absolute requirement for development of the map; for example, the RFs of postsynaptic cells could be assembled with the use of a uniform terminal distribution for all afferents, everywhere in the map, as long as cell dendrites penetrate the appropriate portions of the presynaptic neuropil and receive connections only from afferent axons contributing to their RFs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1753281

  1. Afferent vagal nerve stimulation resets baroreflex neural arc and inhibits sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Saku, Keita; Kishi, Takuya; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Murayama, Yoshinori; Kakino, Takamori; Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It has been established that vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) benefits patients and/or animals with heart failure. However, the impact of VNS on sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated how vagal afferent stimulation (AVNS) impacts baroreflex control of SNA. In 12 anesthetized Sprague–Dawley rats, we controlled the pressure in isolated bilateral carotid sinuses (CSP), and measured splanchnic SNA and arterial pressure (AP). Under a constant CSP, increasing the voltage of AVNS dose dependently decreased SNA and AP. The averaged maximal inhibition of SNA was ‐28.0 ± 10.3%. To evaluate the dynamic impacts of AVNS on SNA, we performed random AVNS using binary white noise sequences, and identified the transfer function from AVNS to SNA and that from SNA to AP. We also identified transfer functions of the native baroreflex from CSP to SNA (neural arc) and from SNA to AP (peripheral arc). The transfer function from AVNS to SNA strikingly resembled the baroreflex neural arc and the transfer functions of SNA to AP were indistinguishable whether we perturbed ANVS or CSP, indicating that they likely share common central and peripheral neural mechanisms. To examine the impact of AVNS on baroreflex, we changed CSP stepwise and measured SNA and AP responses with or without AVNS. AVNS resets the sigmoidal neural arc downward, but did not affect the linear peripheral arc. In conclusion, AVNS resets the baroreflex neural arc and induces sympathoinhibition in the same manner as the control of SNA and AP by the native baroreflex. PMID:25194023

  2. Facilitation of the swallowing reflex with bilateral afferent input from the superior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kojiro; Shingai, Tomio; Saito, Isao; Yamamura, Kensuke; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2014-03-01

    To determine the cooperative effect of laryngeal afferent signals on the swallowing reflex, we examined whether afferent signals originating from the left and right superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) modulates elicitation of the swallowing reflex in urethane-anesthetized rats. Mylohyoid electromyographic activity was recorded to quantify the swallowing reflex. The onset latency of the swallowing reflex and the time intervals between successive swallows were used to quantify and compare the effects of unilateral and bilateral electrical stimulations of the SLN. The mean latency of the first swallow and the mean time interval between swallows evoked with low frequency stimulation were both significantly different between unilateral and bilateral stimulations of the SLN. These findings suggest that facilitatory effect of afferent signals originating from the SLN bilaterally increase the motoneuronal activity in the medullary swallowing center and enhance the swallowing reflex.

  3. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions.

  4. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  5. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Thomas J.; Tykocki, Nathan R.; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Nelson, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms. PMID:26224686

  6. An in vitro method for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves innervating isolated segments of rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, K A; Cervero, F

    1986-04-01

    A technique has been developed for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves in isolated segments of rat distal ileum in vitro. The preparation consists of a 3-cm segment of ileum, containing a single neurovascular bundle, held horizontally in an organ bath. One end of the segment is attached to a tension transducer to record changes in longitudinal tension of the gut muscle and the other is connected to a pressure transducer to record changes in intra-luminal pressure. Electromyographic activity of the smooth muscle is recorded using glass-insulated tungsten microelectrodes inserted in the wall of the gut. Afferent nerve activity is recorded with a monopolar platinum wire electrode from filaments of the mesenteric nerves that run between the artery and vein supplying the segment. This preparation permits the detailed analysis of the electrical activity of intestinal afferent nerve fibres correlated with mechanical and chemical events occurring naturally in the gut or imposed experimentally on it.

  7. Differential inhibitory control of semicircular canal nerve afferent-evoked inputs in second-order vestibular neurons by glycinergic and GABAergic circuits.

    PubMed

    Biesdorf, Stefan; Malinvaud, David; Reichenberger, Ingrid; Pfanzelt, Sandra; Straka, Hans

    2008-04-01

    Labyrinthine nerve-evoked monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in second-order vestibular neurons (2 degrees VN) sum with disynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) that originate from the thickest afferent fibers of the same nerve branch and are mediated by neurons in the ipsilateral vestibular nucleus. Pharmacological properties of the inhibition and the interaction with the afferent excitation were studied by recording monosynaptic responses of phasic and tonic 2 degrees VN in an isolated frog brain after electrical stimulation of individual semicircular canal nerves. Specific transmitter antagonists revealed glycine and GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSPs with a disynaptic onset only in phasic but not in tonic 2 degrees VN. Compared with GABAergic IPSPs, glycinergic responses in phasic 2 degrees VN have larger amplitudes and a longer duration and reduce early and late components of the afferent nerve-evoked subthreshold activation and spike discharge. The difference in profile of the disynaptic glycinergic and GABAergic inhibition is compatible with the larger number of glycinergic as opposed to GABAergic terminal-like structures on 2 degrees VN. The increase in monosynaptic excitation after a block of the disynaptic inhibition in phasic 2 degrees VN is in part mediated by a N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-activated component. Although inhibitory inputs were superimposed on monosynaptic EPSPs in tonic 2 degrees VN as well, the much longer latency of these IPSPs excludes a control by short-latency inhibitory feed-forward side-loops as observed in phasic 2 degrees VN. The differential synaptic organization of the inhibitory control of labyrinthine afferent signals in phasic and tonic 2 degrees VN is consistent with the different intrinsic signal processing modes of the two neuronal types and suggests a co-adaptation of intrinsic membrane properties and emerging network properties. PMID:18256163

  8. The neural signal of angular head position in primary afferent vestibular nerve axons

    PubMed Central

    Loe, P. R.; Tomko, David L.; Werner, G.

    1973-01-01

    1. The relation between discharge frequency and angular head position was determined for a population of regularly discharging single first-order vestibular neurones in the eighth nerve of the barbiturate anaesthetized cat. 2. Each axon had a characteristic head position which was maximally excitatory to it, and a diametrically opposed head position which was minimally excitatory. 3. After correction for phase shifts introduced by the orientation of preferred excitability, discharge rate in statoreceptor afferents varied as a power function of the sine of angular head position with exponents ranging from 0·9 to 1·6. 4. Experimentally determined discharge rates were compared with the predictions of a computer simulation model incorporating the idea that shearing force acting on morphologically polarized receptors is the adequate stimulus for macular receptor cells. 5. This approach permitted the identification of a population of first-order vestibular afferents whose discharge frequency varied with head position as did the magnitude of shear force computed for individual receptors, each most excited in a particular head position. 6. The majority of the spatial orientations of maximal sensitivity defined a surface which is tilted by approximately 30° with reference to the Horsley—Clarke horizontal plane, implying that most statoreceptor afferents are maximally sensitive to position changes when the cat's head is at or near its normal position. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3 PMID:4702433

  9. Representation of Afferent Signals from Forearm Muscle and Cutaneous Nerves in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of the Macaque Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Tomatsu, Saeka; Takei, Tomohiko; Oya, Tomomichi

    2016-01-01

    Proprioception is one’s overall sense of the relative positions and movements of the various parts of one’s body. The primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is involved in generating the proprioception by receiving peripheral sensory inputs from both cutaneous and muscle afferents. In particular, area 3a receives input from muscle afferents and areas 3b and 1 from cutaneous afferents. However, segregation of two sensory inputs to these cortical areas has not been evaluated quantitatively because of methodological difficulties in distinguishing the incoming signals. To overcome this, we applied electrical stimulation separately to two forearm nerves innervating muscle (deep radial nerve) and skin (superficial radial nerve), and examined the spatiotemporal distribution of sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in SI of anaesthetized macaques. The SEPs arising from the deep radial nerve were observed exclusively at the bottom of central sulcus (CS), which was identified as area 3a using histological reconstruction. In contrast, SEPs evoked by stimulation of the superficial radial nerve were observed in the superficial part of SI, identified as areas 3b and 1. In addition to these earlier, larger potentials, we also found small and slightly delayed SEPs evoked by cutaneous nerve stimulation in area 3a. Coexistence of the SEPs from both deep and superficial radial nerves suggests that area 3a could integrate muscle and cutaneous signals to shape proprioception. PMID:27701434

  10. An In Vitro Adult Mouse Muscle-nerve Preparation for Studying the Firing Properties of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joy A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn; Wilkinson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sensory neurons innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs encode length and force changes essential to proprioception. Additional afferent fibers monitor other characteristics of the muscle environment, including metabolite buildup, temperature, and nociceptive stimuli. Overall, abnormal activation of sensory neurons can lead to movement disorders or chronic pain syndromes. We describe the isolation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and nerve for in vitro study of stretch-evoked afferent responses in the adult mouse. Sensory activity is recorded from the nerve with a suction electrode and individual afferents can be analyzed using spike sorting software. In vitro preparations allow for well controlled studies on sensory afferents without the potential confounds of anesthesia or altered muscle perfusion. Here we describe a protocol to identify and test the response of muscle spindle afferents to stretch. Importantly, this preparation also supports the study of other subtypes of muscle afferents, response properties following drug application and the incorporation of powerful genetic approaches and disease models in mice. PMID:25285602

  11. Peripheral patterns of terminal innervation of vestibular primary afferent neurons projecting to the vestibulocerebellum in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Purcell, I M; Perachio, A A

    2001-04-23

    Retrograde transganglionic labeling techniques with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) were used to examine the terminal field structure and topographical patterns of innervation within the vestibular sensory end organs of vestibular primary afferent neurons projecting to the cerebellar uvula/nodulus and flocculus lobules in the gerbil. Robust, dark labeling in the cristae ampullares suggested that the vast majority of the terminals of afferent neurons were of the dimorphic type. The majority (94% to the uvula/nodulus and 100% to the flocculus) innervates the peripheral zones of each of the three semicircular canal cristae. Comparison of the type and distribution of terminals across the canalicular sensory neuroepithelium with morphophysiological studies in chinchilla suggests that the labeled population consists predominantly of peripheral terminal fields of lower-to-intermediate gain, more regularly firing, tonic afferents. For otolith organ-related afferents, the uvula/nodulus receives strong inputs from primary otolith afferent neurons identified as dimorphic in type that predominately innervate the peristriolar zones of the utricular and saccular maculae. No direct otolith organ-related inputs to the flocculus were observed. In contrast to the canal afferents, the types and locations of labeled otolith afferent terminals suggest that they largely consist of irregularly firing, high-gain, phasic neurons. PMID:11283948

  12. Effect of stimulation of afferent renal nerves on plasma levels of vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Caverson, M.M.; Ciriello, J.

    1987-04-01

    Experiments were done in ..cap alpha..-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats with vagus, cervical sympathetic, aortic depressor, and carotid sinus nerves cut bilaterally to investigate the effect of afferent renal nerve (ARN) stimulation on circulating levels of vasopressin (AVP). Electrical stimulation of ARN elicited a pressor response that had two components, a primary (1/sup 0/) component locked in time with the stimulus and a secondary (2/sup 0/) component that had a long onset latency and that outlasted the stimulation period. The 1/sup 0/ and 2/sup 0/ components of the pressor response were largest at stimulation frequencies of 30 and 40 Hz, respectively. Autonomic blockage with hexamethonium bromide and atropine methylbromide abolished the 1/sup 0/ component. Administration of the vasopressin V/sub 1/-vascular receptor antagonist d(CH/sub 2/)/sub 5/ VAVP during autonomic blockade abolished the 2/sup 0/C component. Plasma concentrations of AVP measured by radioimmunoassay increased from control levels of 5.2 +/- 0.9 to 53.6 +/- 18.6 pg/ml during a 5-min period of stimulation of ARN. Plasma AVP levels measured 20-40 min after simulation were not significantly different from control values. These data demonstrate that sensory information originating in the kidney alters the release of vasopressin from the neurohypophysis and suggest that ARN are an important component of the neural circuitry involved in homeostatic mechanisms controlling arterial pressure.

  13. Effect of synthetic cationic protein on mechanoexcitability of vagal afferent nerve subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Ouyang, Ann

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by increased infiltration and degranulation of eosinophils in the esophagus. Whether eosinophil-derived cationic proteins regulate esophageal sensory nerve function is still unknown. Using synthetic cationic protein to investigate such effect, we performed extracellular recordings from vagal nodose or jugular neurons in ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Nerve excitabilities were determined by comparing action potentials evoked by esophageal distensions before and after perfusion of synthetic cationic protein poly-L-lysine (PLL) with or without pretreatment with poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA), which neutralized cationic charges of PLL. Perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials in esophageal nodose C fibers but increased their responses to esophageal distension. This potentiation effect lasted for 30 min after washing out of PLL. Pretreatment with PLGA significantly inhibited PLL-induced mechanohyperexcitability of esophageal nodose C fibers. In esophageal nodose Aδ fibers, perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials. In contrast to nodose C fibers, both the spontaneous discharges and the responses to esophageal distension in nodose Aδ fibers were decreased by perfusion with PLL, which can be restored after washing out PLL for 30-60 min. Pretreatment with PLGA attenuated PLL-induced decrease in spontaneous discharge and mechanoexcitability of esophageal nodose Aδ fibers. In esophageal jugular C fibers, PLL neither evoked action potentials nor changed their responses to esophageal distension. Collectively, these data demonstrated that synthetic cationic protein did not evoke action potential discharges of esophageal vagal afferents but had distinctive sensitization effects on their responses to esophageal distension.

  14. Peripheral μ-opioid receptor mediated inhibition of calcium signaling and action potential-evoked calcium fluorescent transients in primary afferent CGRP nociceptive terminals.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Landon D; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Mulligan, Sean J

    2015-06-01

    While μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists remain the most powerful analgesics for the treatment of severe pain, serious adverse side effects that are secondary to their central nervous system actions pose substantial barriers to therapeutic use. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggest that peripheral MORs play an important role in opioid analgesia, particularly under inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms of peripheral MOR signaling in primary afferent pain fibres remain to be established. We have recently introduced a novel ex vivo optical imaging approach that, for the first time, allows the study of physiological functioning within individual peripheral nociceptive fibre free nerve endings in mice. In the present study, we found that MOR activation in selectively identified, primary afferent CGRP nociceptive terminals caused inhibition of N-type Ca(2+) channel signaling and suppression of action potential-evoked Ca(2+) fluorescent transients mediated by 'big conductance' Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa). In the live animal, we showed that the peripherally acting MOR agonist HS-731 produced analgesia and that BKCa channels were the major effectors of the peripheral MOR signaling. We have identified two key molecular transducers of MOR activation that mediate significant inhibition of nociceptive signaling in primary afferent terminals. Understanding the mechanisms of peripheral MOR signaling may promote the development of pathway selective μ-opioid drugs that offer improved therapeutic profiles for achieving potent analgesia while avoiding serious adverse central side effects. PMID:25721395

  15. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception.

  16. Activation of afferent renal nerves modulates RVLM-projecting PVN neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P

    2015-05-01

    Renal denervation for the treatment of hypertension has proven to be successful; however, the underlying mechanism/s are not entirely clear. To determine if preautonomic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) respond to afferent renal nerve (ARN) stimulation, extracellular single-unit recording was used to investigate the contribution of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM)-projecting PVN (PVN-RVLM) neurons to the response elicited during stimulation of ARN. In 109 spontaneously active neurons recorded in the PVN of anesthetized rats, 25 units were antidromically activated from the RVLM. Among these PVN-RVLM neurons, 84% (21/25) were activated by ARN stimulation. The baseline discharge rate was significantly higher in these neurons than those PVN-RVLM neurons not activated by ARN stimulation (16%, 4/25). The responsiveness of these neurons to baroreflex activation induced by phenylephrine and activation of cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) was also examined. Almost all of the PVN neurons that responded to ARN stimulation were sensitive to baroreflex (95%) and CSAR (100%). The discharge characteristics for nonevoked neurons (not activated by RVLM antidromic stimulation) showed that 23% of these PVN neurons responded to ARN stimulation. All the PVN neurons that responded to ARN stimulation were activated by N-methyl-D-aspartate, and these responses were attenuated by the glutamate receptor blocker AP5. These experiments demonstrated that sensory information originating in the kidney is integrated at the level of preautonomic neurons within the PVN, providing a novel mechanistic insight for use of renal denervation in the modulation of sympathetic outflow in disease states such as hypertension and heart failure.

  17. Identification of Different Types of Spinal Afferent Nerve Endings That Encode Noxious and Innocuous Stimuli in the Large Intestine Using a Novel Anterograde Tracing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  18. Ionic channels and hormone release from peptidergic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Lemos, J R; Nordmann, J J

    1986-09-01

    Although there is considerable evidence that depolarization of nerve cell terminals leads to the entry of Ca2+ and to the secretion of neurohormones and neurotransmitters, the details of how ionic currents control the release of neuroactive substances from nerve terminals are unknown. The small size of most nerve terminals has precluded direct analysis of membrane ionic currents and their influence on secretion. We now report that it is possible, using patch-clamp techniques, to study stimulus--secretion coupling in isolated peptidergic nerve terminals. Sinus gland terminals from Cardisoma are easily isolated following collagenase treatment and appear morphologically and electrically very similar to non-dissociated nerve endings. We have observed two types of single-channel currents not previously described. The first ('f') channel is activated by intracellular Na+ and the second ('s') by intracellular Ca2+. Both show little selectivity between Na+ and K+. In symmetrical K+, these cation channels have mean conductances of 69 and 213 pS, respectively. Furthermore, at least three types of Ca2+ channels can be reconstituted from nerve terminal membranes prepared from sinus glands. Nerve terminals can also be isolated from the rat neural lobe. These neurosecretosomes release oxytocin and vasopressin, in response to membrane depolarization, only in the presence of external Ca2+. The depolarization of the nerve endings is associated with an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration and this increase, measured using a fluorescent indicator, is abolished by Ca2+ channel blockers. Channels similar in their properties to the f and s channels also exist in rat neural lobe endings. Since these channels have not been found in other neurones or neuronal structures they may be unique to peptidergic nerve terminals.

  19. Relation between discharge regularity and responses to externally applied galvanic currents in vestibular nerve afferents of the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J M; Smith, C E; Fernández, C

    1984-06-01

    Most vestibular nerve afferents can be classified as regularly or irregularly discharging. Two factors are theoretically identified as being potentially responsible for differences in discharge regularity. The first, ascribable to synaptic noise, is the variance (sigma v2) characterizing the transmembrane voltage fluctuations of the axon's spike trigger site, i.e., the place where impulses normally arise. The second factor is the slope (dmuv/dt) of the trigger site's postspike recovery function. Were (dmuv/dt) a major determinant of discharge regularity, the theory predicts that the more irregular the discharge of a unit, the greater should be its sensitivity to externally applied galvanic currents and the faster should be the postspike recovery of its electrical excitability. The predictions would not hold if differences in the discharge regularity between units largely reflected variations in sigma v. To test these predictions, the responses of vestibular nerve afferents to externally applied galvanic currents were studied in the barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkey. Current steps of 5-s duration and short (50 microsecond) shocks were delivered by way of the perilymphatic space of the vestibule. Results were similar regardless of which end organ an afferent innervated. The regularity of discharge of each unit was expressed by a normalized coefficient of variation (CV*). The galvanic sensitivity (beta p) of a unit, measured from its response to current steps, was linearly related to discharge regularity (CV*), there being approximately 20-fold variations in both variables across the afferent population. Various geometric factors--including fiber diameter, position of individual axons within the various nerve branches, and the configuration of unmyelinated processes within the sensory epithelium--are unlikely to have made a major contribution to the positive relation between beta P and CV*. The postspike recovery of electrical excitability was measured as

  20. Synaptic vesicle generation from central nerve terminal endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kokotos, Alexandros C; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Central nerve terminals contain a small number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) that must sustain the fidelity of neurotransmission across a wide range of stimulation intensities. For this to be achieved, nerve terminals integrate a number of complementary endocytosis modes whose activation spans the breadth of these neuronal stimulation patterns. Two such modes are ultrafast endocytosis and activity-dependent bulk endocytosis, which are triggered by stimuli at either end of the physiological range. Both endocytosis modes generate endosomes directly from the nerve terminal plasma membrane, before the subsequent production of SVs from these structures. This review will discuss the current knowledge relating to the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of SVs from nerve terminal endosomes, how this relates to other mechanisms of SV production and the functional role of such SVs.

  1. Effect of copper sulphate on the rate of afferent discharge in the gastric branch of the vagus nerve in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niijima, Akira; Jiang, Zheng-Yao; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The afferent nerve activity was recorded from a nerve filament isolated from the peripheral cut end of the gastric branch of the vagus nerve. The gastric perfusion of 4 ml of two different concentrations (0.04 percent and 0.08 percent) of CuSO4 solution provoked an increase in afferent activity. The stimulating effect of the 0.08 percent solution was stronger than that of the 0.04 percent solution, and lasted for a longer period of time. The observations suggest a possible mechanism by which CuSO4 elicits emesis.

  2. Preliminary characterization of voltage-activated whole-cell currents in developing human vestibular hair cells and calyx afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Lim, Rebecca; Drury, Hannah R; Camp, Aaron J; Tadros, Melissa A; Callister, Robert J; Brichta, Alan M

    2014-10-01

    We present preliminary functional data from human vestibular hair cells and primary afferent calyx terminals during fetal development. Whole-cell recordings were obtained from hair cells or calyx terminals in semi-intact cristae prepared from human fetuses aged between 11 and 18 weeks gestation (WG). During early fetal development (11-14 WG), hair cells expressed whole-cell conductances that were qualitatively similar but quantitatively smaller than those observed previously in mature rodent type II hair cells. As development progressed (15-18 WG), peak outward conductances increased in putative type II hair cells but did not reach amplitudes observed in adult human hair cells. Type I hair cells express a specific low-voltage activating conductance, G K,L. A similar current was first observed at 15 WG but remained relatively small, even at 18 WG. The presence of a "collapsing" tail current indicates a maturing type I hair cell phenotype and suggests the presence of a surrounding calyx afferent terminal. We were also able to record from calyx afferent terminals in 15-18 WG cristae. In voltage clamp, these terminals exhibited fast inactivating inward as well as slower outward conductances, and in current clamp, discharged a single action potential during depolarizing steps. Together, these data suggest the major functional characteristics of type I and type II hair cells and calyx terminals are present by 18 WG. Our study also describes a new preparation for the functional investigation of key events that occur during maturation of human vestibular organs.

  3. Central connectivity of the chorda tympani afferent terminals in the rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Kyung; Lee, Dae Seop; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-03-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives gustatory input via chorda tympani (CT) afferents from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and transmits it to higher brain regions. To help understand how the gustatory information is processed at the 1st relay nucleus of the brain stem, we investigated the central connectivity of the CT afferent terminals in the central subdivision of the rat rNST through retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, immunogold staining for GABA, glycine, and glutamate, and quantitative ultrastructural analysis. Most CT afferents were small myelinated fibers (<5 µm(2) in cross-sectional area) and made simple synaptic arrangements with 1-2 postsynaptic dendrites. It suggests that the gustatory signal is relayed to a specific group of neurons with a small degree of synaptic divergence. The volume of the identified synaptic boutons was positively correlated with their mitochondrial volume and active zone area, and also with the number of their postsynaptic dendrites. One-fourth of the boutons received synapses from GABA-immunopositive presynaptic profiles, 27 % of which were also glycine-immunopositive. These results suggest that the gustatory information mediated by CT afferents to the rNST is processed in a simple and specific manner. They also suggest that the minority of CT afferents are presynaptically modulated by GABA- and/or glycine-mediated mechanism.

  4. Variation in response dynamics of regular and irregular vestibular-nerve afferents during sinusoidal head rotations and currents in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Sung; Minor, Lloyd B; Della Santina, Charles C; Lasker, David M

    2011-05-01

    In mammals, vestibular-nerve afferents that innervate only type I hair cells (calyx-only afferents) respond nearly in phase with head acceleration for high-frequency motion, whereas afferents that innervate both type I and type II (dimorphic) or only type II (bouton-only) hair cells respond more in phase with head velocity. Afferents that exhibit irregular background discharge rates have a larger phase lead re-head velocity than those that fire more regularly. The goal of this study was to investigate the cause of the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents at high-frequency head rotations. Under the assumption that externally applied galvanic currents act directly on the nerve, we derived a transfer function describing the dynamics of a semicircular canal and its hair cells through comparison of responses to sinusoidally modulated head velocity and currents. Responses of all afferents were fit well with a transfer function with one zero (lead term). Best-fit lead terms describing responses to current for each group of afferents were similar to the lead term describing responses to head velocity for regular afferents (0.006 s + 1). This finding indicated that the pre-synaptic and synaptic inputs to regular afferents were likely to be pure velocity transducers. However, the variation in phase lead between regular and irregular afferents could not be explained solely by the ratio of type I to II hair cells (Baird et al 1988), suggesting that the variation was caused by a combination of pre- (type of hair cell) and post-synaptic properties.

  5. Rare human nerve growth factor-β mutation reveals relationship between C-afferent density and acute pain evaluation.

    PubMed

    Perini, Irene; Tavakoli, Mitra; Marshall, Andrew; Minde, Jan; Morrison, India

    2016-08-01

    The rare nerve growth factor-β (NGFB) mutation R221W causes a selective loss of thinly myelinated fibers and especially unmyelinated C-fibers. Carriers of this mutation show altered pain sensation. A subset presents with arthropathic symptoms, with the homozygous most severely affected. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between peripheral afferent loss and pain evaluation by performing a quantification of small-fiber density in the cornea of the carriers, relating density to pain evaluation measures. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) was used to quantify C-fiber loss in the cornea of 19 R221W mutation carriers (3 homozygous) and 19 age-matched healthy control subjects. Pain evaluation data via the Situational Pain Questionnaire (SPQ) and the severity of neuropathy based on the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS) were assessed. Homozygotes, heterozygotes, and control groups differed significantly in corneal C-nerve fiber density, with the homozygotes showing a significant afferent reduction. Importantly, peripheral C-fiber loss correlated negatively with pain evaluation, as revealed by SPQ scores. This study is the first to investigate the contribution of small-fiber density to the perceptual evaluation of pain. It demonstrates that the lower the peripheral small-fiber density, the lower the degree of reported pain intensity, indicating a functional relationship between small-fiber density and higher level pain experience. PMID:27146986

  6. Retinal waves regulate afferent terminal targeting in the early visual pathway

    PubMed Central

    Failor, Samuel; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Current models of retinogeniculate development have proposed that connectivity between the retina and the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) is established by gradients of axon guidance molecules, to allow initial coarse connections, and by competitive Hebbian-like processes, to drive eye-specific segregation and refine retinotopy. Here we show that when intereye competition is eliminated by monocular enucleation, blocking cholinergic stage II retinal waves disrupts the intraeye competition-mediated expansion of the retinogeniculate projection and results in the permanent disorganization of its laminae. This disruption of stage II retinal waves also causes long-term impacts on receptive field size and fine-scale retinotopy in the dLGN. Our results reveal a novel role for stage II retinal waves in regulating retinogeniculate afferent terminal targeting by way of intraeye competition, allowing for correct laminar patterning and the even allocation of synaptic territory. These findings should contribute to answering questions regarding the role of neural activity in guiding the establishment of neural circuits. PMID:26038569

  7. Dietary sodium chloride deprivation throughout development selectively influences the terminal field organization of gustatory afferent fibers projecting to the rat nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    King, C T; Hill, D L

    1991-01-01

    In order to determine whether the developing central gustatory system responds to altered sensory experience, terminal fields of the chorda tympani nerve (CT) within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in control, NaCl deprived, and rats in which CT taste responses "recovered" from NaCl deprivation were investigated via anterograde transport of HRP. Rats fed a low sodium diet (0.03% NaCl) from the third day of gestation to at least 35 days postnatal exhibited both abnormally distributed and irregularly shaped CT terminal fields. Specifically, the dorsal zone of the field was the smallest in controls whereas it was the largest in deprived rats, occupying more medial and caudal territory within the nucleus. The portion of the field immediately ventral to the dorsalmost zone was characterized by a compact, oval shape in control rats and an irregular, broad configuration in deprived rats. Although it has been observed that deprivation-induced changes in the neurophysiology of the CT are reversible, the central morphological alterations reported here remain abnormal. Restoration of 1.0% NaCl in the diet at 28 days postnatally, for at least 60 days, did not result in normal CT terminal fields. The pattern of the field in rats "recovered" from NaCl deprivation was comparable to that found in deprived rats, and the size of the field was three times that found in control and deprived rats. The terminal fields of another nerve containing gustatory afferents, the lingual-tonsilar branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve (LT-IX), were studied for comparison. Interestingly, the pattern of the LT-IX field was not altered by sodium deprivation. The relative size and topography of the LT-IX fields in deprived rats were similar to controls. Thus, sodium deprivation appears to alter selectively the anatomical organization of the CT. Differences in vulnerability between the CT and LT-IX terminal fields may derive from differences in the responsiveness of these nerves to NaCl, and

  8. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones.

  9. Morphology of central terminations of intra-axonally stained, large, myelinated primary afferent fibers from facial skin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H

    1985-07-01

    Horseradish peroxidase was intra-axonally injected into functionally identified primary afferent fibers within the rat spinal trigeminal tract in order to study the morphology of their central terminations. They were physiologically determined to be large, myelinated, cutaneous primary afferents by means of electrical and mechanical stimulation of their receptive fields. Ninety-three axons that innervated vibrissa follicles, guard hair follicles, and slowly adapting receptors were stained for distances of 4-12 mm at the levels of the main sensory nucleus, spinal trigeminal nucleus, and rostral cervical spinal cord. The collaterals of single axons from these receptors formed terminal arbors in the outer part of the spinal trigeminal nucleus rostral to and near the level of the obex (rostral type collaterals). In the rostral part of the subnucleus caudalis (Vc) they were confined to lamina V (caudalis type collaterals) and in the caudal part of Vc and in cervical segments they were confined to lamina III/IV (spinal-dorsal-horn-type collaterals). There were no transitional forms between the rostral and caudalis types, but there was a transitional form between the caudalis and spinal dorsal horn types. This transitional form was distributed in laminae III/IV and V. The terminal arbors of the rostral type of collaterals formed an interrupted, rostrocaudally oriented column like those seen in the lumbar dorsal horn, but the column shifted down to lamina V near the obex, and more caudally, gradually shifted upward to lamina III. Major morphological differences were not observed among the three different functional types of collaterals with respect to the rostrocaudal distribution of collaterals, and the shape and location of collaterals. The differential laminar distribution of collateral arbors of single axons along the rostrocaudal axis distinguishes the spinal trigeminal nucleus from the spinal dorsal horn where functional types of mechanoreceptive afferents form

  10. Inputs from regularly and irregularly discharging vestibular nerve afferents to secondary neurons in squirrel monkey vestibular nuclei. III. Correlation with vestibulospinal and vestibuloocular output pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Goldberg, J. M.; Highstein, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. A previous study measured the relative contributions made by regularly and irregularly discharging afferents to the monosynaptic vestibular nerve (Vi) input of individual secondary neurons located in and around the superior vestibular nucleus of barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Here, the analysis is extended to more caudal regions of the vestibular nuclei, which are a major source of both vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways. As in the previous study, antidromic stimulation techniques are used to classify secondary neurons as oculomotor or spinal projecting. In addition, spinal-projecting neurons are distinguished by their descending pathways, their termination levels in the spinal cord, and their collateral projections to the IIIrd nucleus. 2. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded intracellularly from secondary neurons as shocks of increasing strength were applied to Vi. Shocks were normalized in terms of the threshold (T) required to evoke field potentials in the vestibular nuclei. As shown previously, the relative contribution of irregular afferents to the total monosynaptic Vi input of each secondary neuron can be expressed as a %I index, the ratio (x100) of the relative sizes of the EPSPs evoked by shocks of 4 x T and 16 x T. 3. Antidromic stimulation was used to type secondary neurons as 1) medial vestibulospinal tract (MVST) cells projecting to spinal segments C1 or C6; 2) lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST) cells projecting to C1, C6; or L1; 3) vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) cells projecting both to the IIIrd nucleus and by way of the MVST to C1 or C6; and 4) vestibuloocular (VOR) neurons projecting to the IIIrd nucleus but not to the spinal cord. Most of the neurons were located in the lateral vestibular nucleus (LV), including its dorsal (dLV) and ventral (vLV) divisions, and adjacent parts of the medial (MV) and descending nuclei (DV). Cells receiving quite different proportions of their direct inputs

  11. Recovery of the ipsilateral oculotectal projection following nerve crush in the frog: evidence that retinal afferents make synapses at abnormal tectal locations.

    PubMed

    Adamson, J; Burke, J; Grobstein, P

    1984-10-01

    The ipsilateral oculotectal projection in the frog is a topographic mapping of the binocular part of the visual field of one eye on the ipsilateral tectal lobe. The underlying neuronal circuitry consists of the topographic, crossed retinotectal projection and an intertectal pathway which relays information from a given point in one tectal lobe to the visually corresponding point in the other. During optic nerve regeneration, there is a period when the terminals of retinotectal afferents are found at abnormal locations in the opposite tectal lobe. Whether they form functional synapses at this time is not known. If so, one would expect to observe correlated abnormalities in the ipsilateral oculotectal projection. To determine whether such abnormalities exist, we have made parallel electrophysiological studies of the recovery of the retinotectal and ipsilateral oculotectal projections following crush of one optic nerve. The earliest stage of recovery was characterized by a lack of significant topographic order in the retinotectal projection and by the absence of a physiologically observable ipsilateral projection. Within a short time, the retinotectal projection became topographically organized and a similarly organized ipsilateral projection appeared. While topographic, the retinotectal projection at intermediate times was abnormal in that the multiunit receptive fields recorded at individual tectal loci were greatly enlarged. Multiunit receptive fields were similarly enlarged in the ipsilateral projection. In addition, some ipsilateral fields included areas of visual space not normally represented in the projection. The abnormalities in both projections subsequently disappeared over the same time course. Throughout recovery there was a high correlation between multiunit receptive field sizes in the contralateral tectal lobe and those at visually corresponding points in the ipsilateral tectal lobe. Enlarged multiunit receptive fields in the contralateral tectal lobe

  12. 5-HT1B receptors inhibit glutamate release from primary afferent terminals in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Choi, I-S; Cho, J-H; An, C-H; Jung, J-K; Hur, Y-K; Choi, J-K; Jang, I-S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although 5-HT1B receptors are expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons, it is still not known whether these receptors can modulate nociceptive transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique under a voltage-clamp condition. KEY RESULTS CP93129, a selective 5-HT1B receptor agonist, reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, CP93129 reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by GR55562, a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, but not LY310762, a 5-HT1D receptor antagonist. Sumatriptan, an anti-migraine drug, also decreased EPSC amplitude, and this effect was partially blocked by either GR55562 or LY310762. On the other hand, primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were mediated by the Ca2+ influx passing through both presynaptic N-type and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by ω-conotoxin GVIA, an N-type Ca2+ channel blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results suggest that the activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors reduces glutamate release from primary afferent terminals onto medullary dorsal horn neurons, and that 5-HT1B receptors could be, at the very least, a potential target for the treatment of pain from orofacial tissues. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Connor, pp. 353–355 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.01963.x PMID:22462474

  13. High sensitivity recording of afferent nerve activity using ultra-compliant microchannel electrodes: an acute in vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Chew, Daniel J.; Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Fawcett, James W.; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2012-04-01

    Neuroprostheses interfaced with transected peripheral nerves are technological routes to control robotic limbs as well as convey sensory feedback to patients suffering from traumatic neural injuries or degenerative diseases. To maximize the wealth of data obtained in recordings, interfacing devices are required to have intrafascicular resolution and provide high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) recordings. In this paper, we focus on a possible building block of a three-dimensional regenerative implant: a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel electrode capable of highly sensitive recordings in vivo. The PDMS 'micro-cuff' consists of a 3.5 mm long (100 µm × 70 µm cross section) microfluidic channel equipped with five evaporated Ti/Au/Ti electrodes of sub-100 nm thickness. Individual electrodes have average impedance of 640 ± 30 kΩ with a phase angle of -58 ± 1 degrees at 1 kHz and survive demanding mechanical handling such as twisting and bending. In proof-of-principle acute implantation experiments in rats, surgically teased afferent nerve strands from the L5 dorsal root were threaded through the microchannel. Tactile stimulation of the skin was reliably monitored with the three inner electrodes in the device, simultaneously recording signal amplitudes of up to 50 µV under saline immersion. The overall SNR was approximately 4. A small but consistent time lag between the signals arriving at the three electrodes was observed and yields a fibre conduction velocity of 30 m s-1. The fidelity of the recordings was verified by placing the same nerve strand in oil and recording activity with hook electrodes. Our results show that PDMS microchannel electrodes open a promising technological path to 3D regenerative interfaces.

  14. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  15. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Shane M.; Chang, Che-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca2+ as it enters a cell, shaping Ca2+ signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca2+ entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in controlling pituitary Ca2+ signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca2+ after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca2+ increments grew larger as free Ca2+ rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca2+ binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5–4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca2+ signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  16. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  17. Endogenous Prostaglandins and Afferent Sensory Nerves in Gastroprotective Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide against Stress-Induced Gastric Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Magierowski, Marcin; Jasnos, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Drozdowicz, Danuta; Surmiak, Marcin; Strzalka, Malgorzata; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Wallace, John L.; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in human physiology, exerting vasodilatory, neuromodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. H2S has been implicated in the mechanism of gastrointestinal integrity but whether this gaseous mediator can affect hemorrhagic lesions induced by stress has been little elucidated. We studied the effect of the H2S precursor L-cysteine, H2S-donor NaHS, the H2S synthesizing enzyme (CSE) activity inhibitor- D,L-propargylglycine (PAG) and the gastric H2S production by CSE/CBS/3-MST activity in water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) ulcerogenesis and the accompanying changes in gastric blood flow (GBF). The role of endogenous prostaglandins (PGs) and sensory afferent nerves releasing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the mechanism of gastroprotection induced by H2S was examined in capsaicin-denervated rats and those pretreated with capsazepine to inhibit activity of vanilloid receptors (VR-1). Rats were pretreated with vehicle, NaHS, the donor of H2S and or L-cysteine, the H2S precursor, with or without the concurrent treatment with 1) nonselective (indomethacin) and selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 (SC-560) or COX-2 (rofecoxib) inhibitors. The expression of mRNA and protein for COX-1 and COX-2 were analyzed in gastric mucosa pretreated with NaHS with or without PAG. Both NaHS and L-cysteine dose-dependently attenuated severity of WRS-induced gastric lesions and significantly increased GBF. These effects were significantly reduced by pretreatment with PAG and capsaicin denervation. NaHS increased gastric H2S production via CSE/CBS but not 3-MST activity. Inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activity significantly diminished NaHS- and L-cysteine-induced protection and hyperemia. NaHS increased expression of COX-1, COX-2 mRNAs and proteins and raised CGRP mRNA expression. These effects of NaHS on COX-1 and COX-2 protein contents were reversed by PAG and capsaicin denervation. We conclude that H2S exerts gastroprotection against

  18. Contribution of afferent pathways to nerve injury-induced spontaneous pain and evoked hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    King, Tamara; Qu, Chaoling; Okun, Alec; Mercado, Ramon; Ren, Jiyang; Brion, Triza; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank

    2011-09-01

    A predominant complaint in patients with neuropathic pain is spontaneous pain, often described as burning. Recent studies have demonstrated that negative reinforcement can be used to unmask spontaneous neuropathic pain, allowing for mechanistic investigations. Here, ascending pathways that might contribute to evoked and spontaneous components of an experimental neuropathic pain model were explored. Desensitization of TRPV1-positive fibers with systemic resiniferatoxin (RTX) abolished spinal nerve ligation (SNL) injury-induced thermal hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain, but had no effect on tactile hypersensitivity. Ablation of spinal NK-1 receptor-expressing neurons blocked SNL-induced thermal and tactile hypersensitivity as well as spontaneous pain. After nerve injury, upregulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is observed almost exclusively in large-diameter fibers, and inactivation of the brainstem target of these fibers in the nucleus gracilis prevents tactile but not thermal hypersensitivity. Blockade of NPY signaling within the nucleus gracilis failed to block SNL-induced spontaneous pain or thermal hyperalgesia while fully reversing tactile hypersensitivity. Moreover, microinjection of NPY into nucleus gracilis produced robust tactile hypersensitivity, but failed to induce conditioned place aversion. These data suggest that spontaneous neuropathic pain and thermal hyperalgesia are mediated by TRPV1-positive fibers and spinal NK-1-positive ascending projections. In contrast, the large-diameter dorsal column projection can mediate nerve injury-induced tactile hypersensitivity, but does not contribute to spontaneous pain. Because inhibition of tactile hypersensitivity can be achieved either by spinal manipulations or by inactivation of signaling within the nucleus gracilis, the enhanced paw withdrawal response evoked by tactile stimulation does not necessarily reflect allodynia.

  19. Augmented activity of the pelvic nerve afferent mediated by TRP channels in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis of rats.

    PubMed

    Makimura, Yukitoshi; Ito, Koichi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2012-08-01

    Enteritis has been recognized as a major symptom in domestic animals and human patients suffering from feed and food poisonings. The aim of the present study was to clarify the excitatory mechanism of the pelvic nerve afferent which may influence the occurrence of enteritis in response to nociceptive chemical stimuli of the colon in normal and abnormal rats with colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). The pelvic nerve afferent activity was markedly increased by colonic instillation of solution (0.5 ml) of acetic acid (5-25%) and capsaicin (100 μg/ml). The nerve activity was augmented by colonic instillation of capsaicin to a greater extent in rats with DSS-induced colitis than in normal control rats. This augmented activity by capsaicin was more prominent at one day (DSS-1) than at 8 day (DSS-8) after the administration of DSS. The increased nerve activity caused by capsaicin in DSS-1 and DSS-8 was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with ruthenium red, which is a nonselective inhibitor of TRP channels of unmyelinated C-fibers (nociceptors). In conclusion, it was elucidated that the nociceptive function of the pelvic nerve was largely elevated at one day after DSS-induced colitis and such increased function was mostly mediated by TRP channels.

  20. Extension of synaptic extracellular matrix during nerve terminal sprouting in living frog neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Ko, C P

    1994-02-01

    Remodeling of the synaptic extracellular matrix (ECM) and its dynamic relationship with nerve terminal plasticity have been demonstrated in normal frog neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in vivo (Chen et al., 1991). Our previous work has led to a hypothesis that extension of synaptic ECM precedes nerve terminal growth during synaptic remodeling. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the changes of synaptic ECM in frog NMJs that were primarily undergoing nerve terminal growth and sprouting. Frog sartorius muscles were double stained with a fluorescent nerve terminal dye (4-Di-2-Asp) and rhodamine-tagged peanut agglutinin (PNA), which recognizes synaptic ECM. The double-labeled NMJs were visualized in vivo with video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy. Nerve sprouting was then induced in the muscle by grafting segments of the contralateral sciatic nerve. The identified NMJs were restrained and reexamined 2-3 months later. Extensive sprouting was observed in 46% of 167 identified NMJs. At junctional regions that showed extension or formation of new branches, synaptic ECM was commonly seen to have the same shape and distribution as the nerve terminal. However, extension of synaptic ECM beyond the corresponding nerve terminals, often by tens of microns, was observed in 29% of these newly formed junctional regions. This lack of correlation might be transient, as growth of nerve terminals following extended, PNA-stained ECM was seen. Examination with histological staining not only confirmed a lack of nerve terminal at the extended synaptic ECM region but also indicated an absence of AChE and postsynaptic junctional folds. The absence of these postsynaptic specializations at the extended, PNA-stained ECM region makes it unlikely that this region was previously occupied by nerve terminals that had retracted. Thus, the present study provides further findings consistent with the hypothesis that synaptic ECM precedes nerve terminal outgrowth and that the extension of

  1. Strontium, barium, and manganese metabolism in isolated presynaptic nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Rasgado-Flores, H.; Sanchez-Armass, S.; Blaustein, M.P.; Nachshen, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms by which the divalent cations Sr, Ba, and Mn affect neurotransmitter release from presynaptic nerve terminals, the authors examined the sequestration of these cations, ion comparison to Ca, by mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial organelles and the extrusion of these cations from isolated nerve terminals. Sequestration was studied in synaptosomes made leaky to small ions by treatment with saponin; efflux was examined in intact synaptosomes that were preloaded with the divalent cations by incubation in depolarizing (K rich) media. The selectivity sequence for ATP-dependent mitochondrial uptake that they observed was Mn>>Ca>Sr>>Ba, whereas that for the SER was Ca greater than or equal to Mn>Sr>>Ba. When synaptosomes that were preloaded with divalent cations were incubated in Na- and Ca-free media, there was little efflux of /sup 45/Ca, /sup 133/Ba, /sup 85/Sr, or /sup 54/Mn. When the incubation was carried out in media containing Na without Ca, there was substantial stimulation of Ca and Sr efflux, but only slight stimulation of Ba or Mn efflux. In Na-free media, the addition of 1 mM Ca promoted the efflux of all four divalent cations, probably via Ca-divalent cation exchange. In summary, the sequestration and extrusion data suggest that, with equal loads, Mn will be buffered to the greatest extent, whereas Ba will be least well buffered. These results may help to explain why Mn has a very long-lasting effect on transmitter release, while the effect of Sr is much briefer.

  2. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  3. Bipolar spinal cord stimulation attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity at an intensity that activates a small portion of A-fiber afferents in spinal nerve-injured rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Carteret, A F; Wacnik, P W; Chung, C-Y; Xing, L; Dong, X; Meyer, R A; Raja, S N; Guan, Y

    2011-12-29

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is used clinically to treat neuropathic pain states, but the precise mechanism by which it attenuates neuropathic pain remains to be established. The profile of afferent fiber activation during SCS and how it may correlate with the efficacy of SCS-induced analgesia are unclear. After subjecting rats to an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), we implanted a miniature quadripolar electrode similar to that used clinically. Our goal was to determine the population and number of afferent fibers retrogradely activated by SCS in SNL rats by recording the antidromic compound action potential (AP) at the sciatic nerve after examining the ability of bipolar epidural SCS to alleviate mechanical hypersensitivity in this model. Notably, we compared the profiles of afferent fiber activation to SCS between SNL rats that exhibited good SCS-induced analgesia (responders) and those that did not (nonresponders). Additionally, we examined how different contact configurations affect the motor threshold (MoT) and compound AP threshold. Results showed that three consecutive days of SCS treatment (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 30 min, 80-90% of MoT), but not sham stimulation, gradually alleviated mechanical hypersensitivity in SNL rats. The MoT obtained in the animal behavioral study was significantly less than the Aα/β-threshold of the compound AP determined during electrophysiological recording, suggesting that SCS could attenuate mechanical hypersensitivity with a stimulus intensity that recruits only a small fraction of the A-fiber population in SNL rats. Although both the MoT and compound AP threshold were similar between responders and nonresponders, the size of the compound AP waveform at higher stimulation intensities was larger in the responders, indicating a more efficient activation of the dorsal column structure in responders. PMID:22001681

  4. The effects of inorganic particles of lunar soil simulant on brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    The health effects from lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). We revealed that brain nerve terminals were not indifferent to the exposure to LSS inorganic particles. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the synaptosomal size before and after the addition of LSS was measured and the binding of LSS inorganic particles to nerve terminals was demonstrated. Using potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G, we showed that LSS inorganic particles did not influence the potential of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals. Acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals did not change in the presence of LSS inorganic particles that was revealed with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange. However, LSS inorganic particles influenced accumulation of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, by nerve terminals. Thus, we report that inorganic particles of LSS influence accumulation of glutamate in brain nerve terminals and this fact may have harmful consequences to human physiology, in particular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS.

  5. Immunohistochemical study on the distribution and origin of GABAergic nerve terminals in the superior salivatory nucleus.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ayumi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Masako; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Kobashi, Motoi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Matsuo, Ryuji

    2009-01-01

    The superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) is the primary parasympathetic center controlling submandibular salivatory secretion. Our previous electrophysiological study revealed that many SSN neurons receive GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic inputs. In the present study, we examined the distribution of GABAergic and glycinergic nerve terminals, GABA(A) receptors in the SSN, and the origin of GABAergic nerve terminals innervating the SSN. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glycine transporter 2 (GLYT2) were used as markers of GABAergic and glycinergic nerve terminals, respectively. GAD- and GLYT2-positive nerve terminals and GABA(A) receptors were examined immunohistochemically in SSN neurons labeled by the retrograde axonal transport of FastBlue (FB) injected into the chorda-lingual nerve. The SSN neurons abundantly contained GAD-positive nerve terminals and GABA(A) receptors, suggesting that SSN neurons undergo strong GABAergic inhibition. The origin of GABAergic terminals was examined in neurons labeled by the retrograde transport of FluoroGold (FG) injected into the SSN. GAD was used as a marker of GABAergic neurons. Numerous FG-labeled neurons were found in the forebrain and brainstem. However, in FG-labeled neurons, GAD-positive neurons were occasionally observed in the reticular formation of the brainstem. These findings suggest that SSN neurons mainly receive GABAergic projections from the reticular formation.

  6. The organization of primary afferent depolarization in the isolated spinal cord of the frog

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, D. O.; Rudomin, P.

    1973-01-01

    1. The organization of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) produced by excitation of peripheral sensory and motor nerves was studied in the frog cord isolated with hind limb nerves. 2. Dorsal root potentials from sensory fibres (DR-DRPs) were evoked on stimulation of most sensory nerves, but were largest from cutaneous, joint and flexor muscle afferents. With single shock stimulation the largest cutaneous and joint afferent fibres gave DR-DRPs, but potentials from muscle nerves resulted from activation of sensory fibres with thresholds to electrical stimulation higher than 1·2-1·5 times the threshold of the most excitable fibres in the nerve. This suggests that PAD from muscle afferents is probably due to excitation of extrafusal receptors. 3. Dorsal root potentials produced by antidromic activation of motor fibres (VR-DRPs) were larger from extensor muscles and smaller or absent from flexor muscles. The VR-DRPs were produced by activation of the lowest threshold motor fibres. 4. Three types of interactions were found between test and conditioning DRPs from the same or different nerves. With maximal responses occlusion was usually pronounced. At submaximal levels linear summation occurred. Near threshold the conditioning stimulus frequently resulted in a large facilitation of the test DRP. All three types of interactions were found with two DR-DRPs, two VR-DRPs or one DR-DRP and one VR-DRP. 5. The excitability of sensory nerve terminals from most peripheral nerves was increased during the DR-DRP. The magnitude of the excitability increase varied roughly with the magnitude of the DR-DRP evoked by the conditioning stimulus. 6. There was a marked excitability increase of cutaneous and extensor muscle afferent terminals during the VR-DRP. Flexor muscle afferent terminals often showed no excitability changes to ventral root stimulation. In those experiments where afferent terminals from flexor muscles did show an excitability increase, the effects were smaller than

  7. Mechanism of action of ATP on canine pulmonary vagal C fibre nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Pelleg, A; Hurt, C M

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on pulmonary vagal afferent fibres (n = 46) was studied in a canine model in vivo (n = 38). 2. ATP (3-6 mumol kg-1), administered as a rapid bolus into the right atrium, elicited a transient burst of action potentials in cervical vagal fibres, which was not affected by either blockade of ganglionic transmission (hexamethonium) or a drop in arterial blood pressure (nitroglycerine). 3. The fibres with ATP-sensitive terminals were otherwise quiescent with no activity related to either cardiac or respiratory cycles and their conduction velocity was 0.85 +/- 0.13 m s-1 (n = 7). 4. Inflation of the lungs to 2-3 times the tidal volume triggered brief bursts of action potentials in these fibres. 5. Capsaicin (10 micrograms kg-1), given as a rapid bolus into the right atrium, elicited a burst of action potentials in these ATP-sensitive fibres. 6. Smaller amounts of ATP and capsaicin (0.5-3 mumol kg-1 and 1-5 micrograms kg-1, respectively) had similar effects when the two compounds were given into the right pulmonary artery. 7. Adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, or adenosine 5'-diphosphate did not excite these fibres (n = 30). 8. The non-degradable analogue of ATP alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-mATP) was tenfold more potent than ATP while beta,gamma-methylene ATP (beta,gamma-mATP) was in active. 9. The selective P2x-purinoceptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid markedly attenuated the effect of ATP but not of capsaicin. The P2Y-purinoceptor antagonist Reactive Blue 2 was without effect. 10. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) did not affect this action of ATP. 11. In the canine lungs ATP activates vagal C fibre nerve terminals. This action is mediated by P2X-purinoceptors and is independent of a PTX-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein). PMID:8745294

  8. Bladder contractions alter inspiratory termination by superior laryngeal and intercostal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D; Knuth, S L

    1999-08-01

    Gradual distension of the urinary bladder evokes spontaneous bladder contractions (SBCs), which are associated with reduced inspiratory activity in the phrenic and other inspiratory motor nerves. We examined the influence of isovolumetric SBCs on the threshold for termination of phrenic inspiration by electrical stimulation of superior laryngeal and/or mid-thoracic intercostal nerves (ICN) in decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, ventilated cats. Although SBCs reduced phrenic inspiratory activity, the threshold for inspiratory termination by nerve stimulation was increased. The results emphasize the complexity of the synaptic connections among brain stem neurons governing micturition and breathing.

  9. Morphologic Characterization of Nerves in Whole-Mount Airway Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J.; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Woodcock, Ashley A.; Smith, Jaclyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Neuroplasticity of bronchopulmonary afferent neurons that respond to mechanical and chemical stimuli may sensitize the cough reflex. Afferent drive in cough is carried by the vagus nerve, and vagal afferent nerve terminals have been well defined in animals. Yet, both unmyelinated C fibers and particularly the morphologically distinct, myelinated, nodose-derived mechanoreceptors described in animals are poorly characterized in humans. To date there are no distinctive molecular markers or detailed morphologies available for human bronchopulmonary afferent nerves. Objectives: Morphologic and neuromolecular characterization of the afferent nerves that are potentially involved in cough in humans. Methods: A whole-mount immunofluorescence approach, rarely used in human lung tissue, was used with antibodies specific to protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) and, for the first time in human lung tissue, 200-kD neurofilament subunit. Measurements and Main Results: We have developed a robust technique to visualize fibers consistent with autonomic and C fibers and pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. A group of morphologically distinct, 200-kD neurofilament-immunopositive myelinated afferent fibers, a subpopulation of which did not express PGP9.5, was also identified. Conclusions: PGP9.5-immunonegative nerves are strikingly similar to myelinated airway afferents, the cough receptor, and smooth muscle–associated airway receptors described in rodents. These have never been described in humans. Full description of human airway nerves is critical to the translation of animal studies to the clinical setting. PMID:25906337

  10. Different mechanisms of inhibition of nerve terminals by botulinum and snake presynaptic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Cesare; Rossetto, Ornella; Caccin, Paola; Rigoni, Michela; Carli, Luca; Morbiato, Laura; Muraro, Lucia; Paoli, Marco

    2009-10-01

    The different mode of action on peripheral nerve terminals of the botulinum neurotoxins and of the snake presynaptic phospholipase A2 neurotoxins is reviewed here. These two groups of toxins are highly toxic because they are neurospecific and at the same time are enzymes that can modify many substrate molecules before being inactivated. The similarity of symptoms they cause in humans derives from the fact that both botulinum neurotoxins (seven serotypes named A-G) and snake presynaptic PLA2 neurotoxins block the nerve terminals and that peripheral cholinergic terminals are major targets. Given this general similarity of targets and clinical symptoms, the specific molecular and cellular mechanisms at the basis of their action are very different. This difference appears evident from the beginning of intoxication, i.e. neurotoxins binding to peripheral nerve terminals and proceeds with the different site of actions and molecular targets.

  11. Morphology and Functional Anatomy of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve with Extralaryngeal Terminal Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), such as an extralaryngeal terminal bifurcation (ETB), threaten the safety of thyroid surgery. Besides the morphology of the nerve branches, intraoperative evaluation of their functional anatomy may be useful to preserve motor activity. We exposed 67 RLNs in 36 patients. The main trunk, bifurcation point, and terminal branches of bifid nerves were macroscopically determined and exposed during thyroid surgery. The functional anatomy of the nerve branches was evaluated by intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM). Forty-six RLNs with an ETB were intraoperatively exposed. The bifurcation point was located along the prearterial, arterial, and postarterial segments in 11%, 39%, and 50% of bifid RLNs, respectively. Motor activity was determined in all anterior branches. The functional anatomy of terminal branches detected motor activity in 4 (8.7%) posterior branches of 46 bifid RLNs. The motor activity in posterior branches created a wave amplitude at 25–69% of that in the corresponding anterior branches. The functional anatomy of bifid RLNs demonstrated that anterior branches always contained motor fibres while posterior branches seldom contained motor fibres. The motor activity of the posterior branch was weaker than that of the anterior branch. IONM may help to differentiate between motor and sensory functions of nerve branches. The morphology and functional anatomy of all nerve branches must be preserved to ensure a safer surgery. PMID:27493803

  12. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  13. Selective inhibition of vagal afferent nerve pathways regulating cough using Nav 1.7 shRNA silencing in guinea pig nodose ganglia.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Ru, Fei; Chou, Yang-Ling; Carr, Michael J; Undem, Bradley J; Canning, Brendan J

    2013-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus delivery systems and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were used to selectively silence the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.7 in the nodose ganglia of guinea pigs. The cough reflex in these animals was subsequently assessed. NaV 1.7 shRNA was delivered to the majority of nodose ganglia neurons [50-60% transfection rate determined by green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene cotransfection] and action potential conduction in the nodose vagal nerve fibers, as evaluated using an extracellular recording technique, was markedly and significantly reduced. By contrast, <5% of neurons in the jugular vagal ganglia neurons were transfected, and action potential conduction in the jugular vagal nerve fibers was unchanged. The control virus (with GFP expression) was without effect on action potential discharge and conduction in either ganglia. In vivo, NaV 1.7 silencing in the nodose ganglia nearly abolished cough evoked by mechanically probing the tracheal mucosa in anesthetized guinea pigs. Stimuli such as capsaicin and bradykinin that are known to stimulate both nodose and jugular C-fibers evoked coughing in conscious animals was unaffected by NaV 1.7 silencing in the nodose ganglia. Nodose C-fiber selective stimuli including adenosine, 2-methyl-5-HT, and ATP all failed to evoke coughing upon aerosol challenge. These results indicate that cough is independently regulated by two vagal afferent nerve subtypes in guinea pigs, with nodose Aδ fibers regulating cough evoked mechanically from the trachea and bradykinin- and capsaicin-evoked cough regulated by C-fibers arising from the jugular ganglia.

  14. The somatostatin receptor 4 agonist J-2156 reduces mechanosensitivity of peripheral nerve afferents and spinal neurons in an inflammatory pain model.

    PubMed

    Schuelert, Niklas; Just, Stefan; Kuelzer, Raimund; Corradini, Laura; Gorham, Louise C J; Doods, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) is a peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system and affects neurotransmission via interaction with G protein-coupled SST receptors and inhibition of the release of different hormones. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the analgesic properties of the selective SSTR4 agonist J-2156 are mediated via peripheral and/or spinal receptors. Effect on mechanical hyperalgesia in the Complete Freund׳s Adjuvant (CFA) model was measured after intraperitoneal application of J-2156. Electrophysiological neuronal recordings were conducted 24 h after injection of CFA or vehicle into the paw of Wistar rats. Mechanosensitivity of peripheral afferents of the saphenous nerve as well as of spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) and nociceptive-specific (NS) neurons were measured after systemic or spinal application of J-2156. In CFA animals J-2156 dose dependently reduced hyperalgesia in behavioral studies. The minimal effective dose was 0.1 mg/kg. Mechanosensitivity of peripheral afferents and spinal neurons was significantly reduced by J-2156. NS neurons were dose dependently inhibited by J-2156 while in WDR neurons only the highest concentration of 100 µM had an effect. In sham controls, J-2156 had no effect on neuronal activity. We demonstrated that J-2156 dose-dependently reduces peripheral and spinal neuronal excitability in the CFA rat model without affecting physiological pain transmission. Given the high concentration of the compound required to inhibit spinal neurons, it is unlikely that the behavioral effect seen in CFA model is mediated centrally. Overall these data demonstrated that the analgesic effect of J-2156 is mediated mainly via peripheral SST4 receptors.

  15. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels: their expression and modulation of glutamate release from nerve terminals isolated from rat trigeminal caudal nucleus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Samengo, Irene; Currò, Diego; Barrese, Vincenzo; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Martire, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels [big potassium (BK) channel] consist of a tetramer of pore-forming α-subunit and distinct accessory β-subunits (β1-4) that modify the channel's properties. In this study, we analyzed the effects of BK channel activators and blockers on glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from synaptosomes isolated from the cerebral cortices or trigeminal caudal nuclei (TCN) of rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to characterize BK channel α and β(1-4) subunit expression in the cortex and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG), whose neurons project primary terminal afferents into the TCN. Immunocytochemistry was used to localize these subunits on cortical and TCN synaptosomes. The BK channels regulating [(3)H]D-aspartate release from primary afferent nerve terminals projecting into the TCN displayed limited sensitivity to iberiotoxin, whereas those expressed on cortical synaptosomes were highly sensitive to this toxin. BK channels did not appear to be present on GABAergic nerve terminals from the TCN since [(3)H]-γ-aminobutyric acid release in this model was unaffected by BK channel activators or blockers. Gene expression studies revealed expression levels of the α subunit in the TG that were only 31.2 ± 2.1% of those found in cortical tissues. The β4 subunit was the accessory subunit expressed most abundantly in both the cortex and TG. Levels of β1 and β2 were low in both these areas although β2 expression in the TG was higher than that found in the cortex. Immunocytochemistry experiments showed that co-localization of α and β4 subunits (the accessory subunit most abundantly expressed in both brain areas) was more common in TCN synaptosomes than in cortical synaptosomes. On the basis of these findings, it is reasonable to hypothesize that BK channels expressed on glutamatergic terminals in the TCN and cortex have distinct pharmacological profiles, which probably reflect different α and

  16. Calpains participate in nerve terminal degeneration induced by spider and snake presynaptic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Duregotti, Elisa; Tedesco, Erik; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2013-03-15

    α-latrotoxin and snake presynaptic phospholipases A2 neurotoxins target the presynaptic membrane of axon terminals of the neuromuscular junction causing paralysis. These neurotoxins display different biochemical activities, but similarly alter the presynaptic membrane permeability causing Ca(2+) overload within the nerve terminals, which in turn induces nerve degeneration. Using different methods, here we show that the calcium-activated proteases calpains are involved in the cytoskeletal rearrangements that we have previously documented in neurons exposed to α-latrotoxin or to snake presynaptic phospholipases A2 neurotoxins. These results indicate that calpains, activated by the massive calcium influx from the extracellular medium, target fundamental components of neuronal cytoskeleton such as spectrin and neurofilaments, whose cleavage is functional to the ensuing nerve terminal fragmentation.

  17. Primary afferent depolarization and frequency processing in auditory afferents.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Hedwig, Berthold

    2010-11-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is a widespread mechanism modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission and in sensory pathways is coupled to primary afferent depolarizations. Axonal terminals of bush-cricket auditory afferents received 2-5 mV graded depolarizing inputs, which reduced the amplitude of invading spikes and indicated presynaptic inhibition. These inputs were linked to a picrotoxin-sensitive increase of Ca(2+) in the terminals. Electrophysiological recordings and optical imaging showed that in individual afferents the sound frequency tuning based on spike rates was different from the tuning of the graded primary afferent depolarizations. The auditory neuropil of the bush-cricket Mecopoda elongata is tonotopically organized, with low frequencies represented anteriorly and high frequencies represented posteriorly. In contrast graded depolarizing inputs were tuned to high-frequencies anteriorly and to low-frequencies posteriorly. Furthermore anterior and posterior axonal branches of individual afferents received different levels of primary afferent depolarization depending on sound frequency. The presence of primary afferent depolarization in the afferent terminals indicates that presynaptic inhibition may shape the synaptic transmission of frequency-specific activity to auditory interneurons.

  18. Search for a cardiac nociceptor: stimulation by bradykinin of sympathetic afferent nerve endings in the heart of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D G; Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Nerdrum, T

    1980-01-01

    1. We have examined the effect of bradykinin on impulse traffic in sympathetic afferent fibres from the heart, great vessels and pleura, and have attempted to identify cardiac nociceptors that on the basis of their functional characteristics might have a role in the initiation of cardiac pain. 2. In anaesthetized cats, we recorded afferent impulses from 'single-fibre' slips of the left 2nd--5th thoracic rami communicantes and associated chain, and selected fibres arising from endings in the heart, great vessels, pericardium and pleura. We applied bradykinin solution (0 . 1--1 . 0 microgram/ml.) locally to the site of the ending; we also injected bradykinin (0 . 3--1 . 0 microgram/kg) into the left atrium. 3. Afferent endings excited by bradykinin (159 of 191 tested) were of two types. The larger group (140) were primarily mechanoreceptors with A delta of C fibres (mean conduction velocity, 7 . 5 +/- 0 . 6 m/sec). They were very sensitive to light touch. Those located in the heart, great vessels or overlying pleura had a cardiac rhythm of discharge and were stimulated by an increase in blood pressure or cardiac volume. 4. Bradykinin increased mechanoreceptor firing from 0 . 7 +/- to 5 . 0 +/- 0 . 3 (mean +/- S.E. of mean) impulses/sec. Some endings appeared to be stimulated directly by bradykinin, others sensitized by it so that they responded more vigorously to the pulsatile mechanical stimulation associated with the cardiac cycle. 5. The smaller group of eighteen endings, of which ten were in the left ventricle, were primarily chemosensitive. Most had C fibres, a few had A delta fibres (mean conduction velocity, 2 . 3 +/- 0 . 7 m/sec). They were insensitive to light touch. With one exception they never fired with a cardiac rhythm, and even large increases in aortic or left ventricular pressure had little effect on impulse frequency. 6. Chemosensitive endings were stimulated by bradykinin, impulse activity increasing from 0 . 6 to 15 . 6 +/- 1 . 3 impulses/sec and

  19. Molecular Machines Determining the Fate of Endocytosed Synaptic Vesicles in Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Fassio, Anna; Fadda, Manuela; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The cycle of a synaptic vesicle (SV) within the nerve terminal is a step-by-step journey with the final goal of ensuring the proper synaptic strength under changing environmental conditions. The SV cycle is a precisely regulated membrane traffic event in cells and, because of this, a plethora of membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins are devoted to assist SVs in each step of the journey. The cycling fate of endocytosed SVs determines both the availability for subsequent rounds of release and the lifetime of SVs in the terminal and is therefore crucial for synaptic function and plasticity. Molecular players that determine the destiny of SVs in nerve terminals after a round of exo-endocytosis are largely unknown. Here we review the functional role in SV fate of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of SV proteins and of small GTPases acting on membrane trafficking at the synapse, as they are emerging as key molecules in determining the recycling route of SVs within the nerve terminal. In particular, we focus on: (i) the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5) and calcineurin (CN) control of the recycling pool of SVs; (ii) the role of small GTPases of the Rab and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) families in defining the route followed by SV in their nerve terminal cycle. These regulatory proteins together with their synaptic regulators and effectors, are molecular nanomachines mediating homeostatic responses in synaptic plasticity and potential targets of drugs modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission. PMID:27242505

  20. Molecular Machines Determining the Fate of Endocytosed Synaptic Vesicles in Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Fassio, Anna; Fadda, Manuela; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The cycle of a synaptic vesicle (SV) within the nerve terminal is a step-by-step journey with the final goal of ensuring the proper synaptic strength under changing environmental conditions. The SV cycle is a precisely regulated membrane traffic event in cells and, because of this, a plethora of membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins are devoted to assist SVs in each step of the journey. The cycling fate of endocytosed SVs determines both the availability for subsequent rounds of release and the lifetime of SVs in the terminal and is therefore crucial for synaptic function and plasticity. Molecular players that determine the destiny of SVs in nerve terminals after a round of exo-endocytosis are largely unknown. Here we review the functional role in SV fate of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of SV proteins and of small GTPases acting on membrane trafficking at the synapse, as they are emerging as key molecules in determining the recycling route of SVs within the nerve terminal. In particular, we focus on: (i) the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5) and calcineurin (CN) control of the recycling pool of SVs; (ii) the role of small GTPases of the Rab and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) families in defining the route followed by SV in their nerve terminal cycle. These regulatory proteins together with their synaptic regulators and effectors, are molecular nanomachines mediating homeostatic responses in synaptic plasticity and potential targets of drugs modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission.

  1. Molecular Machines Determining the Fate of Endocytosed Synaptic Vesicles in Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Fassio, Anna; Fadda, Manuela; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The cycle of a synaptic vesicle (SV) within the nerve terminal is a step-by-step journey with the final goal of ensuring the proper synaptic strength under changing environmental conditions. The SV cycle is a precisely regulated membrane traffic event in cells and, because of this, a plethora of membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins are devoted to assist SVs in each step of the journey. The cycling fate of endocytosed SVs determines both the availability for subsequent rounds of release and the lifetime of SVs in the terminal and is therefore crucial for synaptic function and plasticity. Molecular players that determine the destiny of SVs in nerve terminals after a round of exo-endocytosis are largely unknown. Here we review the functional role in SV fate of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of SV proteins and of small GTPases acting on membrane trafficking at the synapse, as they are emerging as key molecules in determining the recycling route of SVs within the nerve terminal. In particular, we focus on: (i) the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5) and calcineurin (CN) control of the recycling pool of SVs; (ii) the role of small GTPases of the Rab and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) families in defining the route followed by SV in their nerve terminal cycle. These regulatory proteins together with their synaptic regulators and effectors, are molecular nanomachines mediating homeostatic responses in synaptic plasticity and potential targets of drugs modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission. PMID:27242505

  2. Repetitive nerve stimulation transiently opens the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in motor nerve terminals of symptomatic mutant SOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh T; Barrett, John N; García-Chacón, Luis; David, Gavriel; Barrett, Ellen F

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria in motor nerve terminals temporarily sequester large Ca(2+) loads during repetitive stimulation. In wild-type mice this Ca(2+) uptake produces a small (<5 mV), transient depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψ(m), motor nerve stimulated at 100 Hz for 5s). We demonstrate that this stimulation-induced Ψ(m) depolarization attains much higher amplitudes in motor terminals of symptomatic mice expressing the G93A or G85R mutation of human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). These large Ψ(m) depolarizations decayed slowly and incremented with successive stimulus trains. Additional Ψ(m) depolarizations occurred that were not synchronized with stimulation. These large Ψ(m) depolarizations were reduced (a) by cyclosporin A (CsA, 1-2 μM), which inhibits opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), or (b) by replacing bath Ca(2+) with Sr(2+), which enters motor terminals and mitochondria but does not support mPTP opening. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the large Ψ(m) depolarizations evoked by repetitive stimulation in motor terminals of symptomatic fALS mice result from mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the likelihood of transient mPTP opening during Ca(2+) influx. Such mPTP openings, a sign of mitochondrial stress, would disrupt motor terminal handling of Ca(2+) loads and might thereby contribute to motor terminal degeneration in fALS mice. Ψ(m) depolarizations resembling those in symptomatic fALS mice could be elicited in wild-type mice following a 0.5-1h exposure to diamide (200 μM), which produces an oxidative stress, but these depolarizations were not reduced by CsA. PMID:21310237

  3. Sodium channels in presynaptic nerve terminals. Regulation by neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Regulation of Na+ channels by neurotoxins has been studied in pinched- off nerve endings (synaptosomes) from rat brain. Activation of Na+ channels by the steroid batrachotoxin and by the alkaloid veratridine resulted in an increase in the rate of influx of 22Na into the synaptosomes. In the presence of 145 mM Na+, these agents also depolarized the synaptosomes, as indicated by increased fluorescence in the presence of a voltage-sensitive oxacarbocyanine dye [diO-C5(3)]. Polypeptide neurotoxins from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus and from the sea anemone Anthopleura xanthogrammica potentiated the stimulatory effects of batrachotoxin and veratridine on the influx of 22Na into synaptosomes. Saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin blocked the stimulatory effects of batrachotoxin and veratridine, both in the presence and absence of the polypeptide toxins, but did not affect control 22Na influx or resting membrane potential. A three-state model for Na+ channel operation can account for the effects of these neurotoxins on Na+ channels as determined both by Na+ flux measurements in vitro and by electrophysiological experiments in intact nerve and muscle. PMID:6252277

  4. Species differences in the reflex effects of lingual afferent nerve stimulation on lip blood flow and arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Koeda, S; Yasuda, M; Izumi, H

    2003-11-01

    We evoked changes in lower lip blood flow and systemic arterial blood pressure by electrically stimulating the central cut end of the lingual nerve in artificially ventilated, urethane-anesthetized, cervically vago-sympathectomized cats, rats, rabbits, and guinea pig. The systemic arterial blood pressure changes were species-dependent: increases in rat, consistent decreases in rabbit and guinea pig, and variable among individuals in cat. In cat and rabbit, lip blood flow increases, which occurred only ipsilaterally to the stimulated nerve and showed no statistically significant correlation with the systemic arterial blood pressure changes. In rat, the ipsilateral lip blood flow increase was markedly greater than the contralateral one, and although there was a significant correlation between each of them and the systemic arterial blood pressure changes, the ipsilateral increase presumably included an active vasodilatation. In guinea pig, lip blood flow decreased on both sides in proportion to the systemic arterial blood pressure reductions. Thus, species variability exists in the sympathetic-mediated systemic arterial blood pressure changes and parasympathetic-mediated lip blood flow responses themselves, and in the relationship between them. PMID:12920546

  5. Motor nerve terminals on abdominal muscles in larval flesh flies, Sarcophaga bullata: comparisons with Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Feeney, C J; Karunanithi, S; Pearce, J; Govind, C K; Atwood, H L

    1998-12-14

    Motor nerve terminals on abdominal body-wall muscles 6A and 7A in larval flesh flies were investigated to establish their general structural features with confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and freeze-fracture procedures. As in Drosophila and other dipterans, two motor axons supply these muscles, and two morphologically different terminals were discerned with confocal microscopy: thin terminals with relatively small varicosities (Type Is), and thicker terminals with larger varicosities (Type Ib). In serial electron micrographs, Type Ib terminals were distinguished from Type Is terminals by their larger cross-sectional area, more extensive subsynaptic reticulum, more mitochondrial profiles, and more clear synaptic vesicles. Type Ib terminals possessed larger synapses and more synaptic contact area per unit terminal length. Although presynaptic dense bars of active zones were similar in mean length for the two terminal types, there were almost twice as many dense bars per synapse for Type Ib terminals. Freeze-fractures through the presynaptic membrane showed particle-free areas indicative of synapses on the P-face, within which were localized aggregations of large intramembranous particles indicative of active zones. These particles were similar in number to those found at active zones of several other arthropod neuromuscular junctions. In general, synaptic structural parameters strongly paralleled those of the anatomically homologous muscles in Drosophila melanogaster. In live preparations, simultaneous focal recording from identified varicosities and intracellular recording indicated that the two terminals produced excitatory junction potentials of similar amplitude in a physiological solution similar to that used for Drosophila.

  6. [The Importance of Vagus Nerve Afferent in the Formation of Emotions in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Model Rat].

    PubMed

    Hida, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    It is of interest to know how environmental stimuli contribute to the formation of emotion during development. In a rat model of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, monosodium L- glutamate (MSG), a taste substance of umami, was administered for 5 weeks during developmental period, followed by emotional behavior tests such as open-field test and social interaction test in adulthood. Although no significant change was observed in anxiety-like behavior, MSG intake caused a reduction in aggressive behavior. Vagotomy under the level of diaphragm resulted in eliminating the MSG effect on aggression, indicating the importance of neuronal activity of the vagus nerve in this effect. Futher studies will focus on futher questions regarding the gut-brain axis such as the change of microbiota and the mechanism of the axis in the brain. PMID:27279161

  7. Primary afferent fibers establish dye-coupled connections in the frog central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bácskai, Timea; Matesz, Clara

    Neurobiotin and Lucifer yellow, indicators of gap junctional coupling, were applied to primary afferent fibers of the frog. Following application of tracers to cervical or lumbar dorsal root fibers, a large number of labeled granule cells were detected in the corpus cerebelli, the brainstem, and the spinal cord. The vestibular nerve was found to be in dye-coupled connection with the granule cells of the auricular lobe of the cerebellum. After application of the tracers to the trigeminal nerve, elicited dye-coupled neurons located mainly in the termination area of the descending limb of the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. In control experiments with biotinylated dextrane amine, only primary afferent fibers were labeled. Our results suggest that gap junctional coupling exists between primary afferent fibers and their postsynaptic targets in the frog.

  8. Morphophysiology of synaptic transmission between type I hair cells and vestibular primary afferents. An intracellular study employing horseradish peroxidase in the lizard, Calotes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Schessel, D A; Ginzberg, R; Highstein, S M

    1991-03-22

    Intracellular records with glass microelectrodes filled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were taken from primary afferents of the horizontal semicircular canal in the lizard, Calotes versicolor. A coefficient of variation (CV) of the interspike intervals of spontaneous action potentials (APs) was calculated and correlated with the terminal morphologies of afferents within the canal crista. Irregular fibers with CV greater than 0.4 always correlated with a nerve chalice or calyx afferent terminal expansion surrounding one or more type I hair cells; more regular fibers with CV less than 0.4 always correlated with a dimorphic or bouton only terminal expansion of afferents. Afferents with a CV greater than 0.4 demonstrated miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSPs) that summated to initiate APs. APs were blocked by tetrodotoxin and mEPSP frequency was modulated by caloric stimulation. Cobalt application reversibly blocked mEPSPs. Electron microscopic examination of physiologically studied afferents with CV greater than 0.4 revealed synaptic profiles consisting of typical synaptic bodies and synaptic vesicles in the type I hair cell presynaptic to the nerve chalice. Examples of the interspike baseline in regular and irregular afferents suggest differential modes of impulse initiation in these two fiber types.

  9. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  10. Control and Plasticity of the Presynaptic Action Potential Waveform at Small CNS Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Hoppa, Michael B.; Gouzer, Geraldine; Armbruster, Moritz; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The steep dependence of exocytosis on Ca2+ entry at nerve terminals implies that voltage control of both Ca2+ channel opening and the driving force for Ca2+ entry are powerful levers in sculpting synaptic efficacy. Using fast, genetically encoded voltage indicators in dissociated primary neurons, we show that at small nerve terminals K+ channels constrain the peak voltage of the presynaptic action potential (APSYN) to values much lower than those at cell somas. This key APSYN property additionally shows adaptive plasticity: manipulations that increase presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance and release probability result in a commensurate lowering of the APSYN peak and narrowing of the waveform, while manipulations that decrease presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance do the opposite. This modulation is eliminated upon blockade of Kv3.1 and Kv1 channels. Our studies thus reveal that adaptive plasticity in the APSYN waveform serves as an important regulator of synaptic function. PMID:25447742

  11. Several morphological types of terminal arborizations of primary afferents in laminae I-II of the rat spinal cord, as shown after HRP labeling and Golgi impregnation.

    PubMed

    Cruz, F; Lima, D; Coimbra, A

    1987-07-01

    The morphology of the terminal arborizations in laminae I-II of primary afferent fibers was studied in sections stained by the heavy metal (nickel and cobalt) intensification of diaminobenzidine (DAB) after crushing one dorsal root with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) crystals, and with the mixed Golgi method which duplicated the staining provided by the first method. Besides the flame-shaped arbors located in deep lamina IIi as an extension of the arbors of lamina III, which were derived from 1.7-micron thick stem fibers (probably A alpha beta fibers), six types of terminal arbors, all rostrocaudally oriented, arising from fine stem fibers and having preferential locations, were disclosed. The lateral third of laminae I-II contained a longitudinal plexus of parallel 0.8-micron thick stem fibers (C fibers) with longitudinal side branches generating many boutons en passant. Laminae I and IIo, in their middle third, contained dichotomizing longitudinal fibers with elongated boutons, arising from 1-micron thick stem fibers (C or A delta), and, in the medial third, a dense plexus with terminal networks carrying large boutons, which arose from 1.3-micron thick stem fibers (A delta). Fibers ending in terminal bouquets and issuing from 1-micron thick stem fibers (C or A delta) occupied the dorsal part of middle and medial lamina IIi, while the intermediate part contained clusters (swarms) of ultrafine boutons arising from extremely fine fibers. The whole medial lamina IIi also contained fine undulating fibers arising from 0.3 micron-thick stem fibers (C fibers) with large boutons near their ends. The functional meaning of this multiplicity of morphological types and locations is still unclear. It may be clarified when single unit analysis of HRP-injected fine fibers is made possible, or immunocytochemical stainings disclose the neurotransmitters utilized by each fiber type.

  12. Pharmacological evidence for CGRP uptake into perivascular capsaicin sensitive nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sams-Nielsen, Anette; Orskov, Cathrine; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2001-01-01

    Specific mechanisms, providing reuptake of cathecholamine and amino acid neurotransmitters (e.g. serotonin and glutamate) into cells of the central nervous system are well known, whereas neuronal uptake of neuropeptide transmitters have not previously been reported. In the present study we present evidence for uptake of the 37 amino acid neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) into perivascular terminals of capsaicin sensitive nerve fibres, innervating the guinea-pig basilar artery. Release of CGRP from perivascular nerve terminals was obtained by capsaicin-induced vanilloid receptor-stimulation and detected as CGRP receptor-mediated dilation of isolated segments of the guinea-pig basilar artery. Following three repeated capsaicin challenges, CGRP-depleted segments were incubated with CGRP. This caused significant reappearance of capsaicin-induced vasodilatory responses. These responses were dependent on duration and concentration of the preceding CGRP incubation and were inhibited by the CGRP receptor antagonist, CGRP8–37. The CGRP-re-depletion was significantly reduced when CGRP8–37 was present during the preceding CGRP incubation. Thus, presynaptic CGRP receptors are likely to be involved in neuronal CGRP uptake. Incubating the artery segments with 125I-CGRP allowed subsequent detection of capsaicin-induced 125I-release. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that only terminal CGRP is subject to capsaicin-induced depletion in vitro, whereas CGRP-immunoreactivity endures in the nerve fibres. PMID:11226146

  13. The unsilent majority-TRPV1 drives "spontaneous" transmission of unmyelinated primary afferents within cardiorespiratory NTS.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Michael C; Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Fawley, Jessica A

    2012-12-15

    Cranial primary afferent sensory neurons figure importantly in homeostatic control of visceral organ systems. Of the two broad classes of visceral afferents, the role of unmyelinated or C-type class remains poorly understood. This review contrasts key aspects of peripheral discharge properties of C-fiber afferents and their glutamate transmission mechanisms within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS). During normal prevailing conditions, most information arrives at the NTS through myelinated A-type nerves. However, most of visceral afferent axons (75-90%) in NTS are unmyelinated, C-type axons. Centrally, C-type solitary tract (ST) afferent terminals have presynaptic transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors. Capsaicin activation of TRPV1 blocks phasic or synchronous release of glutamate but facilitates release of glutamate from a separate pool of vesicles. This TRPV1-operated pool of vesicles is active at normal temperatures and is responsible for actively driving a 10-fold higher release of glutamate at TRPV1 compared with TRPV1- terminals even in the absence of afferent action potentials. This novel TRPV1 mechanism is responsible for an additional asynchronous release of glutamate that is not present in myelinated terminals. The NTS is rich with presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors, and the implications of TRPV1-operated glutamate offer unique targets for signaling in C-type sensory afferent terminals from neuropeptides, inflammatory mediators, lipid metabolites, cytokines, and cannabinoids. From a homeostatic view, this combination could have broad implications for integration in chronic pathological disturbances in which the numeric dominance of C-type endings and TRPV1 would broadly disturb multisystem control mechanisms.

  14. Lacosamide diminishes dryness-induced hyperexcitability of corneal cold sensitive nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Illés; Dienes, Lóránt; Perényi, Kristóf; Quirce, Susana; Luna, Carolina; Mizerska, Kamila; Acosta, M Carmen; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2016-09-15

    Lacosamide is an anti-epileptic drug that is also used for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy acting through voltage-gated sodium channels. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of acute application of lacosamide on the electrical activity of corneal cold nerve terminals in lacrimo-deficient guinea pigs. Four weeks after unilateral surgical removal of the main lachrimal gland in guinea pigs, corneas were excised and superfused in vitro at 34°C for extracellular electrophysiological recording of nerve terminal impulse activity of cold thermosensitive nerve terminals. The characteristics of the spontaneous and the stimulus-evoked (cooling ramps from 34°C to 15°C) activity before and in presence of lacosamide 100µM and lidocaine 100µM were compared. Cold nerve terminals (n=34) recorded from dry eye corneas showed significantly enhanced spontaneous activity (8.0±1.1 vs. 5.2±0.7imp/s; P<0.05) and cold response (21.2±1.7 vs. 16.8±1.3imp/s; P<0.05) as well as reduced cold threshold (1.5±0.1 vs. 2.8±0.2 Δ°C; P<0.05) to cooling ramps compared to terminals (n=58) from control animals. Both lacosamide and lidocaine decreased spontaneous activity and peak response to cooling ramps significantly (P<0.05). Temperature threshold was increased by the addition of lidocaine (P<0.05) but not lacosamide (P>0.05) to the irrigation fluid. In summary, the application of lacosamide results in a significant decrease of the augmented spontaneous activity and responsiveness to cold of corneal sensory nerves from tear-deficient animals. Based on these promising results we speculate that lacosamide might be used to reduce the hyperexcitability of corneal cold receptors caused by prolonged ocular surface dryness due to hyposecretory or evaporative dry eye disease. PMID:27263827

  15. Light microscopic image analysis system to quantify immunoreactive terminal area apposed to nerve cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. C.; D'Amelio, F.; Fox, R. A.; Polyakov, I.; Daunton, N. G.

    1997-01-01

    The present report describes a desktop computer-based method for the quantitative assessment of the area occupied by immunoreactive terminals in close apposition to nerve cells in relation to the perimeter of the cell soma. This method is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) routines incorporated in NIH-Image public domain software. Pyramidal cells of layer V of the somatosensory cortex outlined by GABA immunolabeled terminals were chosen for our analysis. A Leitz Diaplan light microscope was employed for the visualization of the sections. A Sierra Scientific Model 4030 CCD camera was used to capture the images into a Macintosh Centris 650 computer. After preprocessing, filtering was performed on the power spectrum in the frequency domain produced by the FFT operation. An inverse FFT with filter procedure was employed to restore the images to the spatial domain. Pasting of the original image to the transformed one using a Boolean logic operation called 'AND'ing produced an image with the terminals enhanced. This procedure allowed the creation of a binary image using a well-defined threshold of 128. Thus, the terminal area appears in black against a white background. This methodology provides an objective means of measurement of area by counting the total number of pixels occupied by immunoreactive terminals in light microscopic sections in which the difficulties of labeling intensity, size, shape and numerical density of terminals are avoided.

  16. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  17. Modulation of presynaptic Ca(2+) currents in frog motor nerve terminals by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Ben; Gradwohl, Gideon; Moore, Homer J; Grossman, Yoram

    2013-09-01

    Presynaptic Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms have already been implicated in depression of evoked synaptic transmission by high pressure (HP). Therefore, pressure effects on terminal Ca(2+) currents were studied in Rana pipiens peripheral motor nerves. The terminal currents, evoked by nerve or direct stimulation, were recorded under the nerve perineurial sheath with a loose macropatch clamp technique. The combined use of Na(+) and K(+) channel blockers, [Ca(2+) ]o changes, voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) blocker treatments and HP perturbations revealed two components of presynaptic Ca(2+) currents: an early fast Ca(2+) current (ICaF ), possibly carried by N-type (CaV 2.2) Ca(2+) channels, and a late slow Ca(2+) current (ICaS ), possibly mediated by L-type (CaV 1) Ca(2+) channels. HP reduced the amplitude and decreased the maximum (saturation level) of the Ca(2+) currents, ICaF being more sensitive to pressure, and may have slightly shifted the voltage dependence. HP also moderately diminished the Na(+) action current, which contributed to the depression of VDCC currents. Computer-based modeling was used to verify the interpretation of the currents and investigate the influence of HP on the presynaptic currents. The direct HP reduction of the VDCC currents and the indirect effect of the action potential decrease are probably the major cause of pressure depression of synaptic release. PMID:23738821

  18. 5,6-EET Is Released upon Neuronal Activity and Induces Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity via TRPA1 on Central Afferent Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Park, Chul-Kyu; Angioni, Carlo; Zhang, Dong Dong; von Hehn, Christian; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kumaran, Vigneswara; Lu, Ruirui; Grant, Andrew; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidtko, Achim; Reeh, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus; Brenneis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450-epoxygenase-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid that act as endogenous signaling molecules in multiple biological systems. Here we have investigated the specific contribution of 5,6-EET to transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation in nociceptor neurons and its consequence for nociceptive processing. We found that, during capsaicin-induced nociception, 5,6-EET levels increased in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the dorsal spinal cord, and 5,6-EET is released from activated sensory neurons in vitro. 5,6-EET potently induced a calcium flux (100 nm) in cultured DRG neurons that was completely abolished when TRPA1 was deleted or inhibited. In spinal cord slices, 5,6-EET dose dependently enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons that also responded to mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate), indicating a presynaptic action. Furthermore, 5,6-EET-induced enhancement of sEPSC frequency was abolished in TRPA1-null mice, suggesting that 5,6-EET presynaptically facilitated spinal cord synaptic transmission by TRPA1. Finally, in vivo intrathecal injection of 5,6-EET caused mechanical allodynia in wild-type but not TRPA1-null mice. We conclude that 5,6-EET is synthesized on the acute activation of nociceptors and can produce mechanical hypersensitivity via TRPA1 at central afferent terminals in the spinal cord. PMID:22553041

  19. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  20. Fangchinoline inhibits glutamate release from rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes).

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Tien, Lu-Tai; Chuang, Shu-Han; Wang, Yu-Ru; Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-07-01

    Fangchinoline, an active component of radix stephaniae tetrandrinea, has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties. It has been reported that excessive glutamate release has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of fangchinoline on glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals and to explore the possible mechanism. Fangchinoline inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in a concentration-dependent manner, and this phenomenon resulted from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis but not from an inhibition of Ca(2+)-independent efflux via glutamate transporter. Fangchinoline did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-AP-mediated depolarization, but significantly reduced depolarization-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](C). Fangchinoline-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was significantly prevented by the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC, and by the PKC inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro318220. In addition, the glutamate release mediated by direct Ca(2+) entry with Ca(2+) ionophore (ionomycin) was unaffected by fangchinoline, which suggests that the inhibitory effect of fangchinoline is not due to directly interfering with the release process at some point subsequent to Ca(2+) influx. These results suggest that fangchinoline inhibits glutamate release from the rat cortical synaptosomes through the suppression of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel activity and subsequent reduces Ca(2+) entry into nerve terminals, rather than any upstream effect on nerve terminal excitability. This inhibition appears to involve the suppression of PKC signal transduction pathway. This finding may explain the neuroprotective effects of fangchinoline against neurotoxicity. PMID:19428795

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Couples Localised Calcium Influx to Activation of Akt in Central Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Nicholson-Fish, Jessica C; Cousin, Michael A; Smillie, Karen J

    2016-03-01

    The efficient retrieval of synaptic vesicle membrane and cargo in central nerve terminals is dependent on the efficient recruitment of a series of endocytosis modes by different patterns of neuronal activity. During intense neuronal activity the dominant endocytosis mode is activity-dependent endocytosis (ADBE). Triggering of ADBE is linked to calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation since the same stimulation intensities trigger both. Dynamin I dephosphorylation is maximised by a simultaneous inhibition of its kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) by the protein kinase Akt, however it is unknown how increased neuronal activity is transduced into Akt activation. To address this question we determined how the activity-dependent increases in intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) control activation of Akt. This was achieved using either trains of high frequency action potentials to evoke localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at active zones, or a calcium ionophore to raise [Ca(2+)]i uniformly across the nerve terminal. Through the use of either non-specific calcium channel antagonists or intracellular calcium chelators we found that Akt phosphorylation (and subsequent GSK3 phosphorylation) was dependent on localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at the active zone. In an attempt to determine mechanism, we antagonised either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or calmodulin. Activity-dependent phosphorylation of both Akt and GSK3 was arrested on inhibition of PI3K, but not calmodulin. Thus localised calcium influx in central nerve terminals activates PI3K via an unknown calcium sensor to trigger the activity-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3.

  2. Increase of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and lysosomes in rat DRG neurons and their transportation to the central nerve terminal in dorsal horn after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Uesugi, N; Jeong, N Y; Park, B S; Konishi, H; Kiyama, H

    2016-01-28

    In the spinal dorsal horn (DH), nerve injury activates microglia and induces neuropathic pain. Several studies clarified an involvement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microglial activation. However, the origin of ATP together with the release mechanism is unclear. Recent in vitro study revealed that an ATP marker, quinacrine, in lysosomes was released from neurite terminal of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to extracellular space via lysosomal exocytosis. Here, we demonstrate a possibility that the lysosomal ingredient including ATP released from DRG neurons by lysosomal-exocytosis is an additional source of the glial activation in DH after nerve injury. After rat L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), mRNA for transcription factor EB (TFEB), a transcription factor controlling lysosomal activation and exocytosis, was induced in the DRG. Simultaneously both lysosomal protein, LAMP1- and vesicular nuclear transporter (VNUT)-positive vesicles were increased in L5 DRG neurons and ipsilateral DH. The quinacrine staining in DH was increased and co-localized with LAMP1 immunoreactivity after nerve injury. In DH, LAMP1-positive vesicles were also co-localized with a peripheral nerve marker, Isolectin B4 (IB4) lectin. Injection of the adenovirus encoding mCherry-LAMP1 into DRG showed that mCherry-positive lysosomes are transported to the central nerve terminal in DH. These findings suggest that activation of lysosome synthesis including ATP packaging in DRG, the central transportation of the lysosome, and subsequent its exocytosis from the central nerve terminal of DRG neurons in response to nerve injury could be a partial mechanism for activation of microglia in DH. This lysosome-mediated microglia activation mechanism may provide another clue to control nociception and pain.

  3. Short-latency afferent inhibition determined by the sensory afferent volley.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Aaron Z; Asmussen, Michael J; Nelson, Aimee J

    2016-08-01

    Short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) is characterized by the suppression of the transcranial magnetic stimulation motor evoked potential (MEP) by the cortical arrival of a somatosensory afferent volley. It remains unknown whether the magnitude of SAI reflects changes in the sensory afferent volley, similar to that observed for somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). The present study investigated stimulus-response relationships between sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs), SAI, and SEPs and their interrelatedness. Experiment 1 (n = 23, age 23 ± 1.5 yr) investigated the stimulus-response profile for SEPs and SAI in the flexor carpi radialis muscle after stimulation of the mixed median nerve at the wrist using ∼25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the maximum SNAP and at 1.2× and 2.4× motor threshold (the latter equated to 100% of the maximum SNAP). Experiment 2 (n = 20, age 23.1 ± 2 yr) probed SEPs and SAI stimulus-response relationships after stimulation of the cutaneous digital nerve at ∼25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the maximum SNAP recorded at the elbow. Results indicate that, for both nerve types, SAI magnitude is dependent on the volume of the sensory afferent volley and ceases to increase once all afferent fibers within the nerve are recruited. Furthermore, for both nerve types, the magnitudes of SAI and SEPs are related such that an increase in excitation within somatosensory cortex is associated with an increase in the magnitude of afferent-induced MEP inhibition. PMID:27226451

  4. Membrane depolarization and carbamoylcholine stimulate phosphatidylinositol turnover in intact nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Audigier, S.M.P.; Wang, J.K.T.; Greengard, P.

    1988-04-01

    Synaptosomes, purified from rat cerebral cortex, were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol to study phosphatidylinositol turnover in nerve terminals. Labeled synaptosomes were either depolarized with 40 mM K/sup +/ or exposed to carbamoylcholine (carbachol). K/sup +/ depolarization increased the level of inositol phosphates in a time-dependent manner. The inositol bisphosphate level also increased rapidly, but its elevated level was sustained during continued depolarization. The elevated level of inositol bisphosphate was reversed upon repolarization of the synaptosomes. The level of inositol monophosphate increased slowly to 120-130% of control. These effects of K/sup +/ depolarization depended on the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Carbachol stimulated the turnover of phosphatidylinositol in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The level of inositol bisphosphate increased to 210% of control, and this maximal response was seen from 15 to 60 min. Accumulation of inositol monophosphate was larger than that of inositol bisphosphate, but its time course was slower. Atropine and pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol effect with high affinities. These data show that both Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and M/sub 1/ muscarinic receptor activation stimulate phospholipase C activity in synaptosomes, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol turnover may be involved in regulating neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals.

  5. The effects of dietary protein restriction on chorda tympani nerve taste responses and terminal field organization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J E; Hill, D L

    2008-11-19

    Prenatal dietary sodium restriction produces profound developmental effects on rat functional taste responses and formation of neural circuits in the brainstem. Converging evidence indicates that the underlying mechanisms for these effects are related to a compromised nutritional state and not to direct stimulus-receptor interactions. We explored whether early malnourishment produces similar functional and structural effects to those seen following dietary sodium restriction by using a protein deficient, sodium replete diet. To determine if early dietary protein-restriction affects the development of the peripheral gustatory system, multi-fiber neurophysiological recordings were made from the chorda tympani nerve and anterograde track tracing of the chorda tympani nerve into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) was accomplished in rats fed a protein-restricted or a control diet (6% and 20%, respectively). The dietary regimens began on embryonic day 7 and continued until rats were used for neurophysiological recordings (postnatal days (P) 35-50) or for chorda tympani terminal field labeling (P40-50). Responses to a concentration series of NaCl, sodium acetate, KCl, and to 0.50 M sucrose, 0.03 M quinine-HCl, and 0.01 N HCl revealed attenuated responses (30-60%) to sodium-specific stimuli in rats fed the 6% protein diet compared with those fed the 20% protein diet. Responses to all other stimuli were similar between groups. Terminal field volumes were nearly twofold larger in protein-restricted rats compared with controls, with the differences located primarily in the dorsal-caudal zone of the terminal field. These results are similar to the results seen previously in rats fed a sodium-restricted diet throughout pre- and postnatal development, suggesting that dietary sodium- and protein-restriction share similar mechanisms in altering gustatory development.

  6. THE EFFECT OF NITRIC OXIDE ON SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTON GRADIENT AND MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL OF BRAIN NERVE TERMINALS.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of nitric oxide on synaptic vesicle proton gradient and membrane potential of rat brain nerve terminals was studied. It has been shown that nitric oxide in the form of S-nitrosothiols at nanomolar concentrations had no effect on the studied parameters, but caused a rapid dissipation of synaptic vesicle proton gradient and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane in the presence of a SH-reducing compound such as dithiothreitol. Both processes were reversible and the rate of H(+)-gradient restoration depended on the redox potential of nerve terminals, namely the molar ratio of reductant/oxidant. This facts, as well as insensitivity of the studied processes to the inhibitor of NO-sensitive guanylate cyclase such as ODQ, allow suggesting that post-translational modification of thiol residues of the mitochondrial and synaptic vesicle proteins underlies the effect of nitric oxide on the key functional parameters ofpresynaptic nerve terminals. PMID:27025060

  7. Early prenatal critical period for chorda tympani nerve terminal field development.

    PubMed

    Krimm, R F; Hill, D L

    1997-02-10

    In order to determine whether the developing central gustatory system responds to dietary manipulation during restricted developmental periods, terminal fields of the chorda tympani nerve within the nucleus of the solitary tract were investigated via anterograde transport of horseradish peroxidase in control rats and in rats in which a low sodium diet was systematically fed during specific periods of development. Rats fed a low sodium diet (0.03% NaCl) from embryonic day 3 (E3) to day E12 and then fed a sodium replete diet to at least 60 days postnatal exhibited enlarged and irregularly shaped chorda tympani terminal fields. Specifically, the dorsal zone of the field was the smallest in controls, whereas it was the largest in restricted rats, occupying more territory within the nucleus. This alteration in the terminal field was apparent in all groups of rats fed the low-NaCl diet beginning at E3, and continuing beyond E12. In contrast, no effects of the dietary manipulation on the developing chorda tympani field was evident when it occurred from E3 to day E9, from E0 to day E9 or when it occurred at adulthood only. Therefore, only 9 days of maternal exposure to a sodium-restricted diet is required for a permanent expansion of the chorda tympani terminal field in the offspring. Moreover, a brief period from E9 to E12 must be included within the 9-day dietary restriction to yield the expanded field. Since this period is before taste receptors appear on the tongue, it is likely that nonactivity-dependent factors determine the formation of the chorda tympani terminal field during later development.

  8. “Late” Macroendosomes and Acidic Endosomes in Vertebrate Motor Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Richard S.; Teng, Haibing; Wilkinson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Activity at the vertebrate nerve—muscle synapse creates large macroendosomes (MEs) via bulk membrane infolding. Visualized with the endocytic probe FM1-43, most (94%) of the ~25 MEs/terminal created by brief (30-Hz, 18-second) stimulation dissipate rapidly (~1 minute) into vesicles. Others, however, remain for hours. Here we study these “ late” MEs by using 4D live imaging over a period of ~1 hour after stimulation. We find that some (51/398 or 13%) disappear spontaneously via exocytosis, releasing their contents into the extracellular milieu. Others (at least 15/1,960 or 1%) fuse or closely associate with a second class of endosomes that take up acidophilic dyes (acidic endosomes [AEs]). AEs are plentiful (~47/terminal) and exist independent of stimulation. Unlike MEs, which exhibit Brownian motion, AEs exhibit directed motion (average, 83 nm/sec) on microtubules within and among terminal boutons. AEs populate the axon as well, where movement is predominantly retrograde. They share biochemical and immunohistochemical markers (e.g., lysosomal-associated membrane protein [LAMP-1]) with lysosomes. Fusion/association of MEs with AEs suggests a sorting/degradation pathway in nerve terminals wherein the role of AEs is similar to that of lysosomes. Based on our data, we propose that MEs serve as sorting endosomes. Thus their contents, which include plasma membrane proteins, vesicle proteins, and extracellular levels of Ca2+, can be targeted either toward the reformation and budding of synaptic vesicles, toward secretion via exocytosis, or toward a degradation process that utilizes AEs either for lysis within the terminal or for transport toward the cell body. PMID:22740045

  9. Lunar and Martian soil stimulants have different effects on L-[14C]glutamate binding to brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Chunihin, Olexander

    Nano-sized particles can be deleterious to human physiology because they may be internalized by lung epithelium and overcome the blood-brain barrier. The health effects from exposure to Lunar and Martian dust are almost completely unknown, whereas they can be deleterious to human physiology. The effects of Lunar and Martian Soil Simulants (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on the conductance of planar lipid membrane, membrane potential, acidification of synaptic vesicles, glutamate uptake, and ambient level of glutamate in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) were studied using photon correlation spectroscopy, Planar Lipid Bilayer technique, spectrofluorimetry, radiolabeled assay, respectively. Lunar and Martian Soil Simulants did not influence the conductance of planar lipid membrane. It was revealed that nerve terminals were not indifferent to the exposure to inorganic particles of Lunar and Martian Soil Simulants. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the synaptosomal size before and after the addition of Lunar and Martian Soil Simulants was measured and the binding of Lunar and Martian Soil Simulants inorganic particles to nerve terminals was demonstrated. Using potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G, we showed that Lunar and Martian Soil particles did not influence the potential of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals. Acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals was not changed in the presence of Lunar and Martian Soil particles that was revealed with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange. Martian Soil Simulant particles did not change binding of L-[14C]glutamate to brain nerve terminals, in contrast, Lunar ones changed this parameter and this fact may have harmful consequences to human physiology, in particular, glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS.

  10. Interaction of /sup 125/I-labeled botulinum neurotoxins with nerve terminals. II. Autoradiographic evidence for its uptake into motor nerves by acceptor-mediated endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.D.; Dolly, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    Using pharmacological and autoradiographic techniques it has been shown that botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is translocated across the motor nerve terminal membrane to reach a postulated intraterminal target. In the present study, the nature of this uptake process was investigated using electron microscopic autoradiography. It was found that internalization is acceptor-mediated and that binding to specific cell surface acceptors involves the heavier chain of the toxin. In addition, uptake was shown to be energy and temperature-dependent and to be accelerated by nerve stimulation, a treatment which also shortens the time course of the toxin-induced neuroparalysis. These results, together with the observation that silver grains were often associated with endocytic structures within the nerve terminal, suggested that acceptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for toxin uptake. Possible recycling of BoNT acceptors (an important aspect of acceptor-mediated endocytosis of toxins) at motor nerve terminals was indicated by comparing the extent of labeling in the presence and absence of metabolic inhibitors. On the basis of these collective results, it is concluded that BoNT is internalized by acceptor-mediated endocytosis and, hence, the data support the proposal that this toxin inhibits release of acetylcholine by interaction with an intracellular target.

  11. Live imaging of bulk endocytosis in frog motor nerve terminals using FM dyes

    PubMed Central

    Gaffield, Michael A.; Romberg, Christin F.

    2011-01-01

    We observed endocytosis in real time in stimulated frog motor nerve terminals by imaging the growth of large membrane infoldings labeled with a low concentration of FM dye. The spatial and temporal information made available by these experiments allowed us to image several new aspects of this synaptic vesicle recycling pathway. Membrane infoldings appeared near synaptic vesicle clusters and grew rapidly during long-duration, high-frequency stimulation. In some cases, we observed large, elongated infoldings growing laterally into the terminal. We used these observations to calculate infolding growth rates. A decrease in stimulation frequency caused a decrease in growth rates, but the overall length of these structures was unaffected by frequency changes. Attempts to wash the dye from these infoldings after stimulation were unsuccessful, demonstrating that the fluorescent structures had been endocytosed. We also used this technique to trigger and image infoldings during repeated, short trains. We found that membrane uptake occurred repeatedly at individual endocytosis sites, but only during a portion of the total number of trains delivered to the terminal. Finally, we showed that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but not actin, was involved in this endocytosis pathway. The ability to monitor many individual bulk endocytosis sites in real time should allow for new types of endocytosis measurements and could reveal novel and unexpected mechanisms for coordinating membrane recovery during synaptic activity. PMID:21543750

  12. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na{sup +}-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  13. Collagen-derived matricryptins promote inhibitory nerve terminal formation in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Chen, Jiang; Lippold, Kumiko; Monavarfeshani, Aboozar; Carrillo, Gabriela Lizana; Jenkins, Rachel; Fox, Michael A

    2016-03-14

    Inhibitory synapses comprise only ∼20% of the total synapses in the mammalian brain but play essential roles in controlling neuronal activity. In fact, perturbing inhibitory synapses is associated with complex brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and epilepsy. Although many types of inhibitory synapses exist, these disorders have been strongly linked to defects in inhibitory synapses formed by Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Here, we discovered a novel role for an unconventional collagen-collagen XIX-in the formation of Parvalbumin(+) inhibitory synapses. Loss of this collagen results not only in decreased inhibitory synapse number, but also in the acquisition of schizophrenia-related behaviors. Mechanistically, these studies reveal that a proteolytically released fragment of this collagen, termed a matricryptin, promotes the assembly of inhibitory nerve terminals through integrin receptors. Collectively, these studies not only identify roles for collagen-derived matricryptins in cortical circuit formation, but they also reveal a novel paracrine mechanism that regulates the assembly of these synapses.

  14. Collagen-derived matricryptins promote inhibitory nerve terminal formation in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmin; Chen, Jiang; Lippold, Kumiko; Monavarfeshani, Aboozar; Carrillo, Gabriela Lizana; Jenkins, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory synapses comprise only ∼20% of the total synapses in the mammalian brain but play essential roles in controlling neuronal activity. In fact, perturbing inhibitory synapses is associated with complex brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and epilepsy. Although many types of inhibitory synapses exist, these disorders have been strongly linked to defects in inhibitory synapses formed by Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Here, we discovered a novel role for an unconventional collagen—collagen XIX—in the formation of Parvalbumin+ inhibitory synapses. Loss of this collagen results not only in decreased inhibitory synapse number, but also in the acquisition of schizophrenia-related behaviors. Mechanistically, these studies reveal that a proteolytically released fragment of this collagen, termed a matricryptin, promotes the assembly of inhibitory nerve terminals through integrin receptors. Collectively, these studies not only identify roles for collagen-derived matricryptins in cortical circuit formation, but they also reveal a novel paracrine mechanism that regulates the assembly of these synapses. PMID:26975851

  15. Allopregnanolone modulates spontaneous GABA release via presynaptic Cl- permeability in rat preoptic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Haage, David; Druzin, Michael; Johansson, Staffan

    2002-12-27

    The endogenous neurosteroid 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnane-20-one (allopregnanolone) affects presynaptic nerve terminals and thereby increases the frequency of spontaneous GABA release. The present study aimed at clarifying the mechanisms underlying this presynaptic neurosteroid action, by recording the frequency of spontaneous GABA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in neurons from the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of rat. Acutely dissociated neurons with functional adhering nerve terminals were studied by perforated-patch recording under voltage-clamp conditions. It was shown that the sIPSC frequency increased with the external K(+) concentration ([K(+)](o)). Further, the effect of allopregnanolone on the sIPSC frequency was strongly dependent on [K(+)](o). In a [K(+)](o) of 5 mM, 2.0 microM allopregnanolone caused a clear increase in sIPSC frequency. However, the effect declined rapidly with increased [K(+)](o) and at high [K(+)](o) allopregnanolone reduced the sIPSC frequency. The effect of allopregnanolone was also strongly dependent on the external Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)](o)). In a reduced [Cl(-)](o) (40 mM, but with a standard [K(+)](o) of 5 mM), the effect on sIPSC frequency was larger than that in the standard [Cl(-)](o) of 146 mM. The dependence of the effect of allopregnanolone on [K(+)](o) and on estimated presynaptic membrane potential was also altered by the reduction in [Cl(-)](o). As in standard [Cl(-)](o), the effect in low [Cl(-)](o) declined when [K(+)](o) was raised, but reversed at a higher [K(+)](o). The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol also potentiated the sIPSC frequency. Altogether, the results suggest that allopregnanolone exerts its presynaptic effect by increasing the presynaptic Cl(-) permeability, most likely via GABA(A) receptors. PMID:12470877

  16. Visualization of endosome dynamics in living nerve terminals with four-dimensional fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Richard S; Kiss, Ilona M; Wilkinson, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) light imaging has been used to study behavior of small structures within motor nerve terminals of the thin transversus abdominis muscle of the garter snake. Raw data comprises time-lapse sequences of 3D z-stacks. Each stack contains 4-20 images acquired with epifluorescence optics at focal planes separated by 400-1,500 nm. Steps in the acquisition of image stacks, such as adjustment of focus, switching of excitation wavelengths, and operation of the digital camera, are automated as much as possible to maximize image rate and minimize tissue damage from light exposure. After acquisition, a set of image stacks is deconvolved to improve spatial resolution, converted to the desired 3D format, and used to create a 4D "movie" that is suitable for variety of computer-based analyses, depending upon the experimental data sought. One application is study of the dynamic behavior of two classes of endosomes found in nerve terminals-macroendosomes (MEs) and acidic endosomes (AEs)-whose sizes (200-800 nm for both types) are at or near the diffraction limit. Access to 3D information at each time point provides several advantages over conventional time-lapse imaging. In particular, size and velocity of movement of structures can be quantified over time without loss of sharp focus. Examples of data from 4D imaging reveal that MEs approach the plasma membrane and disappear, suggesting that they are exocytosed rather than simply moving vertically away from a single plane of focus. Also revealed is putative fusion of MEs and AEs, by visualization of overlap between the two dye-containing structures as viewed in each three orthogonal projections. PMID:24799002

  17. Quantal potential fields around individual active zones of amphibian motor-nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Farnell, L; Gibson, W G; Macleod, G T; Dickens, P

    2000-01-01

    The release of a quantum from a nerve terminal is accompanied by the flow of extracellular current, which creates a field around the site of transmitter action. We provide a solution for the extent of this field for the case of a quantum released from a site on an amphibian motor-nerve terminal branch onto the receptor patch of a muscle fiber and compare this with measurements of the field using three extracellular electrodes. Numerical solution of the equations for the quantal potential field in cylindrical coordinates show that the density of the field at the peak of the quantal current gives rise to a peak extracellular potential, which declines approximately as the inverse of the distance from the source at distances greater than about 4 microm from the source along the length of the fiber. The peak extracellular potential declines to 20% of its initial value in a distance of about 6 microm, both along the length of the fiber and in the circumferential direction around the fiber. Simultaneous recordings of quantal potential fields, made with three electrodes placed in a line at right angles to an FM1-43 visualized branch, gave determinations of the field strengths in accord with the numerical solutions. In addition, the three electrodes were placed so as to straddle the visualized release sites of a branch. The positions of these sites were correctly predicted on the basis of the theory and independently ascertained by FM1-43 staining of the sites. It is concluded that quantal potential fields at the neuromuscular junction that can be measured with available recording techniques are restricted to regions within about 10 microm of the release site. PMID:10692301

  18. The expression profile of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) subunits ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3 in the esophageal vagal afferent nerve subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Dusenkova, Svetlana; Ru, Fei; Surdenikova, Lenka; Nassenstein, Christina; Hatok, Jozef; Dusenka, Robert; Banovcin, Peter; Kliment, Jan; Tatar, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have been implicated in esophageal acid sensing and mechanotransduction. However, insufficient knowledge of ASIC subunit expression profile in esophageal afferent nerves hampers the understanding of their role. This knowledge is essential because ASIC subunits form heteromultimeric channels with distinct functional properties. We hypothesized that the esophageal putative nociceptive C-fiber nerves (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPV1-positive) express multiple ASIC subunits and that the ASIC expression profile differs between the nodose TRPV1-positive subtype developmentally derived from placodes and the jugular TRPV1-positive subtype derived from neural crest. We performed single cell RT-PCR on the vagal afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus. In the guinea pig, nearly all (90%–95%) nodose and jugular esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons expressed ASICs, most often in a combination (65–75%). ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3 were expressed in 65–75%, 55–70%, and 70%, respectively, of both nodose and jugular TRPV1-positive neurons. The ASIC1 splice variants ASIC1a and ASIC1b and the ASIC2 splice variant ASIC2b were similarly expressed in both nodose and jugular TRPV1-positive neurons. However, ASIC2a was found exclusively in the nodose neurons. In contrast to guinea pig, ASIC3 was almost absent from the mouse vagal esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons. However, ASIC3 was similarly expressed in the nonnociceptive TRPV1-negative (tension mechanoreceptors) neurons in both species. We conclude that the majority of esophageal vagal nociceptive neurons express multiple ASIC subunits. The placode-derived nodose neurons selectively express ASIC2a, known to substantially reduce acid sensitivity of ASIC heteromultimers. ASIC3 is expressed in the guinea pig but not in the mouse vagal esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons, indicating species differences in ASIC expression. PMID:25190475

  19. High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals A Mechanical spike Accompanying the Action Potential in mammalian Nerve Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzberg, Brian M.

    2008-03-01

    Information transfer from neuron to neuron within nervous systems occurs when the action potential arrives at a nerve terminal and initiates the release of a chemical messenger (neurotransmitter). In the mammalian neurohypophysis (posterior pituitary), large and rapid changes in light scattering accompany secretion of transmitter-like neuropeptides. In the mouse, these intrinsic optical signals are intimately related to the arrival of the action potential (E-wave) and the release of arginine vasopressin and oxytocin (S-wave). We have used a high bandwidth (20 kHz) atomic force microscope (AFM) to demonstrate that these light scattering signals are associated with changes in nerve terminal volume, detected as nanometer-scale movements of a cantilever positioned on top of the neurohypophysis. The most rapid mechanical response, the ``spike'', has duration comparable to that of the action potential (˜2 ms) and probably reflects an increase in terminal volume due to H2O movement associated with Na^+-influx. Elementary calculations suggest that two H2O molecules accompanying each Na^+-ion could account for the ˜0.5-1.0 å increase in the diameter of each terminal during the action potential. Distinguishable from the mechanical ``spike'', a slower mechanical event, the ``dip'', represents a decrease in nerve terminal volume, depends upon Ca^2+-entry, as well as on intra-terminal Ca^2+-transients, and appears to monitor events associated with secretion. A simple hypothesis is that this ``dip'' reflects the extrusion of the dense core granule that comprises the secretory products. These dynamic high bandwidth AFM recordings are the first to monitor mechanical events in nervous systems and may provide novel insights into the mechanism(s) by which excitation is coupled to secretion at nerve terminals.

  20. Study on distribution of terminal branches of the facial nerve in mimetic muscles (orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle).

    PubMed

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Shiozawa, Kei; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-01-01

    There have been many anatomical reports to date regarding the course of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. However, reports are relatively scarce on the detailed distribution of the terminal branches of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. In this study, we performed detailed examination of the terminal facial nerve branches to the mimetic muscles, particularly the branches terminating in the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. Examination was performed on 25 Japanese adult autopsy cases, involving 25 hemifaces. The mean age was 87.4 years (range, 60-102 years). There were 12 men and 13 women (12 left hemifaces and 13 right hemifaces). In each case, the facial nerve was exposed through a preauricular skin incision. The main trunk of the facial nerve was dissected from the stylomastoid foramen. A microscope was used to dissect the terminal branches to the periphery and observe them. The course and distribution were examined for all terminal branches of the facial nerve. However, focus was placed on the course and distribution of the zygomatic branch, buccal branch, and mandibular branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. The temporal branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases and the marginal mandibular branch was distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in all cases. The zygomatic branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases, but it was also distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 10 of 25 cases. The buccal branch was not distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 3 of 25 cases, and it was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in 8 cases. There was no significant difference in the variations. The orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle perform particularly important movements among the facial mimetic muscles. According to textbooks, the temporal branch and zygomatic branch innervate the orbicularis oculi muscle, and the buccal branch

  1. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from nerve terminals in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, M; Inaishi, Y; Kashihara, Y; Kuno, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The amount of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from the isolated rat soleus muscle was measured by enzyme immunoassay. 2. When the soleus muscle was exposed to a solution containing high K+ (20-100 mM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin, the amount of CGRP released into the bathing medium increased with an increase in the K+ concentration. 3. The exposure to 100 mM-K+ did not increase CGRP release from chronically denervated soleus muscles or from pieces of the soleus nerve separated from the muscle. 4. The amount of CGRP released from the isolated muscle by 100 mM-K+ depended on the external Ca2+ concentration. The slope of the relation between the amount of CGRP release and the Ca2+ concentration was less than one on double logarithmic co-ordinates. 5. Following chronic section of the lumbar ventral roots, the mean amount of CGRP released from the soleus muscle by 100 mM-K+ was reduced by 28%, compared with that observed in normal muscle. 6. Antidromic stimulation of the lumbar dorsal roots at an intensity three times the threshold for most excitable sensory fibres failed to induce CGRP release from the soleus muscle, whereas stimulation at intensities 50-100 times the threshold increased significantly the amount of CGRP release from the muscle. 7. Stimulation of the muscle nerve at an intensity sufficient to activate the alpha-motor fibres did not release CGRP from the soleus muscle or from the diaphragm. 8. It is concluded that the major source of CGRP released from skeletal muscle is A delta- and/or C sensory terminals and that the Ca2+ dependence of CGRP release is less steep than that reported for acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:2023119

  2. Some properties of the presynaptic nerve terminals in a mammalian sympathetic ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Dunant, Y.

    1972-01-01

    1. Superior cervical ganglia of adult rats were excised and maintained in vitro in stable conditions. Potentials were recorded with external electrodes. After transmission was blocked by mecamylamine, a small potential change was recorded from the rostral area of the ganglion in response to preganglionic stimulation. 2. This electrical response was identified as the presynaptic action potential recorded from the nerve terminals by a number of criteria based on histological and physiological considerations including the disappearance of the spike in a glucose free solution. As shown by Nicolescu, Dolivo, Rouiller & Foroglou-Kerameus (1966) on the same preparation this condition causes an irreversible and selective lesion of the presynaptic nerve endings. 3. A suitable concentration of mecamylamine permitted the presynaptic response and the excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) to be recorded simultaneously. As the stimulus was increased, the EPSP increased linearly with the amplitude of the presynaptic response. 4. After replacement of potassium ions in the bathing solution by caesium and during the early phase of post-tetanic facilitation there was an increase in the presynaptic response accompanied by a disproportionate increase in the EPSP. 5. No changes in the presynaptic response were found in the presence of the following drugs, all of which depressed the EPSP: acetylcholine, hemicholinium, curare, further doses of ganglion-blocking agents, and high Mg2+ and low Ca2+ concentrations. 6. Ouabain (4·5 × 10-4 M) reversibly decreased the amplitude of the presynaptic response and increased the spontaneous release of transmitter. The EPSP was at first enhanced and then depressed. PMID:4335802

  3. Opioid receptor types on adrenergic nerve terminals of rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, H.; Hosoki, E.; Ishida, Y.; Moritoki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin, leucine enkephalin, [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] enkephalin, alpha-neoendorphin, beta-endorphin, dynorphin (1-13) and ethylketocyclazocine inhibited the contractions of rabbit ear artery ring segments elicited by transmural nerve stimulation at 8 Hz. Ethylketocyclazocine, dynorphin (1-13) and leucine enkephalin produced partial inhibition, their apparent intrinsic activities (alpha) being 0.57, 0.75 and 0.66, respectively. Morphine and normorphine, which are agonists at mu-receptors, did not inhibit the response of the artery. Naloxone antagonized the actions of opioids and ethylketocyclazocine, and was more effective against methionine enkephalin, leucine enkephalin and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] enkephalin than against alpha-neoendorphin, ethylketocyclazocine and dynorphin (1-13). The pA2 values of naloxone against so-called delta-agonists were approx. 8.5, and against so-called kappa-agonists were approx. 7.7. The supposed kappa-antagonist, Mr2266, was more effective than naloxone in antagonizing the actions of alpha-neoendorphin, and the kappa-agonists dynorphin (1-13) and ethylketocyclazocine. The pA2 values of Mr2266 against kappa-agonists were 8.5-9.0, and against delta-agonists were 7.8 or less. The opioid peptides and opioids tested did not cause dilatation of the artery previously contracted with histamine. These results suggest that the opioid peptides and ethylketocyclazocine acted on opioid receptors at adrenergic nerve terminals in the ear artery. The opioid receptors appear to be of the delta- and kappa-types, not the mu-type. PMID:2998521

  4. The role of calcium in depolarization-secretion coupling at the motor nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Cooke, J D; Okamoto, K; Quastel, D M

    1973-01-01

    1. The relation between m.e.p.p. frequency (F) and [Ca] was studied at the mouse neuromuscular junction, at varied concentrations of K(+) and at nerve terminals depolarized by focal depolarization.2. Under all conditions the relation between log F and log [Ca] was sigmoid, with a maximum slope that increased with depolarization or raised [K(+)]. In addition, depolarization or raised K(+) caused a progressive shift of the sigmoid curve upward and to the left (to reduced log [Ca]) and increased the range over which log F could be altered by [Ca].3. Reduction of osmotic pressure changed the relation between log F and log [Ca] in the same way as increase of depolarization, while increase of osmotic pressure did the opposite.4. Raised [Mg] acted in two ways: (a) to shift the curve of log F vs. log [Ca] to the right and (b) to reduce maximum Delta log F/Delta log [Ca] without altering the range of log F sensitive to [Ca].5. The relation between log quantal content of e.p.p.s and log [Ca] was similar to that between log m.e.p.p. frequency and log [Ca].6. Individual nerve terminals varied in both Ca-dependent and Ca-independent fractions of log F; a large Ca-independent portion appears to be associated with a low Ca-dependent portion and vice versa. With large prolonged depolarization the Ca-independent portion was increased, apparently at the expense of the Ca-dependent portion.7. The results of all experiments were summarized in terms of parameters found by fitting the observed log release -log [Ca] curves to two theoretical equations, each derived on the basis of a model: (a) all-or-nothing activation of release probability by Ca-complex(es) and (b) graded activation of release probability by Ca complex(es).8. On the basis of the all-or-nothing model, from which follows alinear relation between F and amounts of Ca complex(es), the number of Ca(2+) atoms that ;cooperate' to mediate release appeared to increase progressively with presynaptic depolarization, to a value of

  5. Hexamethonium- and methyllycaconitine-induced changes in acetylcholine release from rat motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, >Lijun; Prior, Chris; Dempster, John; Marshall, Ian G

    1997-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium and methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been used to study the putative prejunctional nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs) mediating a negative-feedback control of ACh release from motor nerve terminals in voltage-clamped rat phrenic nerve/hemidiaphragm preparations. Hexamethonium (200 μM), but not MLA (0.4–2.0 μM), decreased the time constant of decay of both endplate currents (e.p.cs) and miniature endplate currents (m.e.p.cs), indicating endplate ion channel block with hexamethonium. However, driving function analysis and reconvolution of e.p.cs and m.e.p.cs indicated that this ion channel block did not compromise the analysis of e.p.c. quantal content. At low frequencies of stimulation (0.5–2 Hz), hexamethonium (200 μM) and MLA (2.0 μM) increased e.p.c. quantal content by 30–40%. At high frequencies (50–150 Hz) neither compound affected e.p.c. quantal content. All effects on quantal content were paralleled by changes in the size of the pool of quanta available for release. The low frequency augmentation of e.p.c. quantal content by hexamethonium was absent when extracellular [Ca2+] was lowered from 2.0 to 0.5 mM. At the concentrations studied, MLA and hexamethonium produced a small (10–20%) decrease in the peak amplitude of m.e.p.cs. Neither apamin (100 nM) nor charybdotoxin (80 nM) had effects on spontaneous or nerve evoked current amplitudes at any frequency of stimulation. Thus the ability of nicotinic antagonists to augment e.p.c. quantal content is not due to inhibition of Ca2+-activated K+-channels. We suggest that hexamethonium and MLA increase evoked ACh release by blocking prejunctional nicotinic AChRs. These receptors exert a negative feedback control over evoked ACh release and are probably of the α-bungarotoxin-insensitive neuronal type. PMID:9401765

  6. Berberine Inhibits the Release of Glutamate in Nerve Terminals from Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2013-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline plant alkaloid, protects neurons against neurotoxicity. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be one of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage in several neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated whether berberine could affect endogenous glutamate release in nerve terminals of rat cerebral cortex (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Berberine inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and this phenomenon was prevented by the chelating extracellular Ca2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate. Inhibition of glutamate release by berberine was not due to it decreasing synaptosomal excitability, because berberine did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of berberine on glutamate release was associated with a reduction in the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration. Involvement of the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels in the berberine action was confirmed by blockade of the berberine-mediated inhibition of glutamate release by the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA. In addition, the inhibitory effect of berberine on evoked glutamate release was prevented by the mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors. Berberine decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synapsin I, the main presynaptic target of ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibition. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of berberine on evoked glutamate release was prevented in nerve terminals from mice lacking synapsin I. Together, these results indicated that berberine inhibits glutamate release from rats cortical synaptosomes, through the suppression of presynaptic Cav2.1 channels and ERK/synapsin I signaling

  7. Altered Active Zones, Vesicle Pools, Nerve Terminal Conductivity, and Morphology during Experimental MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishwendra; Oh, Anne; Voit, Antanina; Sultatos, Lester G.; Babu, Gopal J.; Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG). To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs) with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones) and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4%) or complete (18%) failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG. PMID:25438154

  8. Simulatory effect of porcine insulin on noradrenaline secretion in guinea-pig ileum myenteric nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Juei-Tang; Hung, Chen-Road; Lin, Ming-I

    1997-01-01

    The effect of insulin on the release of noradrenaline (NA) from nerve terminals was investigated in isolated ileal synaptosomes of guinea-pig. Release was determined as the amount of NA, quantified by h.p.l.c.-electrochemical detection, from samples incubated with insulin minus that in parallel blanks treated with some volume of vehicle.Porcine insulin stimulated the secretion of NA in a concentration-dependent manner from 0.01 i.u. ml−1, while the value of lactate dehydrogenase in the incubated medium was not influenced by insulin.The presence of insulin receptors in this preparation was illustrated by immunoblotting with insulin receptor monoclonal antibodies.The release of NA by insulin was reduced by guanethidine and bretylium and it was markedly lowered in the samples obtained from guinea-pigs that had received an intraperitoneal injection of DSP-4, the noradrenergic neurotoxin.Tetrodotoxin attenuated the action of insulin at concentrations sufficient to block sodium channels. The depolarizing effect of insulin on the membrane potential was also illustrated by a concentration-dependent increase in the fluorescence of bisoxonol, a potential-sensitive dye.The action of insulin was attenuated by removal of calcium chloride from the bathing medium. The induction of calcium ion influx by insulin into the synaptosomes is supported by the inhibitory effects of the calcium channel blockers ω-conotoxin GVIA (for the N-type channels) and nifedipine (for the L-type channels).These findings suggest that insulin can stimulate NA release from noradrenergic terminals via activation of calcium influx. PMID:9146881

  9. Phosphorylation of septin 3 on Ser-91 by cGMP-dependent protein kinase-I in nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The septins are a family of GTPase enzymes required for cytokinesis and play a role in exocytosis. Among the ten vertebrate septins, Sept5 (CDCrel-1) and Sept3 (G-septin) are primarily concentrated in the brain, wherein Sept3 is a substrate for PKG-I (cGMP-dependent protein kinase-I) in nerve terminals. There are two motifs for potential PKG-I phosphorylation in Sept3, Thr-55 and Ser-91, but phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the primary site is a serine. Derivatization of phosphoserine to S-propylcysteine followed by N-terminal sequence analysis revealed Ser-91 as a major phosphorylation site. Tandem MS revealed a single phosphorylation site at Ser-91. Substitution of Ser-91 with Ala in a synthetic peptide abolished phosphorylation. Mutation of Ser-91 to Ala in recombinant Sept3 also abolished PKG phosphorylation, confirming that Ser-91 is the major site in vitro. Antibodies raised against a peptide containing phospho-Ser-91 detected phospho-Sept3 only in the cytosol of nerve terminals, whereas Sept3 was located in a peripheral membrane extract. Therefore Sept3 is phosphorylated on Ser-91 in nerve terminals and its phosphorylation may contribute to the regulation of its subcellular localization in neurons. PMID:15107017

  10. A new technique for the direct demonstration of overlapping cutaneous innervation territories of peptidergic C-fibre afferents of rat hindlimb nerves.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Jancsó, G

    1994-11-01

    A new technique based on the phenomenon of vascular labelling has been devised for the direct visualisation of overlapping innervation territories of cutaneous nerves. The saphenous, peroneal and sural nerves on one side in anaesthetised rats were exposed, cut centrally and successively stimulated antidromically to induce a neurogenic inflammatory response after an intravenous injection of either a 1% colloidal silver solution or a suspension of 3% Monastral Blue B. Light microscopic examination of transparent preparations of the dorsal hindpaw skin revealed labelled blood vessels of different colours which represented cutaneous territories served by different nerves. Blood vessels labelled with both substances were regarded as areas of overlapping innervation. Such areas were typically localised along the border of adjacent innervation territories. In addition, distinct areas exhibiting double-labelled blood vessels were regularly encountered in regions separate from this border zone. Areas of interest were drawn with the aid of a camera lucida and measured by means of a computerised system. The results indicate a significant, although topographically variable, degree of overlap of these cutaneous innervation areas. This new technique offers a possibility to explore the importance of normally existing overlap in the reinnervation of a denervated skin area by collateral nerve sprouting. PMID:7891461

  11. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  12. Action of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome IgG at mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Prior, C; Lang, B; Wray, D; Newsom-Davis, J

    1985-06-01

    We have studied the electrophysiological effects of IgG obtained from four patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) (two with small cell carcinoma), using the mouse passive transfer model. Mice received LEMS or control IgG or plasma, 10 to 60 mg daily. Microelectrode intracellular recordings were made from diaphragm muscle. LEMS IgG and plasma decreased end-plate potential quantal content similarly, confirming IgG as the active factor. LEMS IgG was equally effective in C5-deficient mice, indicating that late complement components are not required. The time course of decline and recovery of quantal content closely followed that of the human IgG in the mouse serum, with time to half-maximal effect of about 1.5 days in each case. Binding/dissociation of IgG or down/up regulation of the antigenic determinants, possibly Ca2+ channels, has a half-life of between 2 and 36 hours. The results confirm our concept that IgG antibody to nerve terminal determinants underlies the disorder of transmitter release in LEMS.

  13. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  14. Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake Modulates Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis in Central Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Marland, Jamie Roslin Keynes; Hasel, Philip; Bonnycastle, Katherine; Cousin, Michael Alan

    2016-01-29

    Presynaptic calcium influx triggers synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and modulates subsequent SV endocytosis. A number of calcium clearance mechanisms are present in central nerve terminals that regulate intracellular free calcium levels both during and after stimulation. During action potential stimulation, mitochondria rapidly accumulate presynaptic calcium via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). The role of mitochondrial calcium uptake in modulating SV recycling has been debated extensively, but a definitive conclusion has not been achieved. To directly address this question, we manipulated the expression of the MCU channel subunit in primary cultures of neurons expressing a genetically encoded reporter of SV turnover. Knockdown of MCU resulted in ablation of activity-dependent mitochondrial calcium uptake but had no effect on the rate or extent of SV exocytosis. In contrast, the rate of SV endocytosis was increased in the absence of mitochondrial calcium uptake and slowed when MCU was overexpressed. MCU knockdown did not perturb activity-dependent increases in presynaptic free calcium, suggesting that SV endocytosis may be controlled by calcium accumulation and efflux from mitochondria in their immediate vicinity.

  15. Hyperalgesia induced in the rat by the amino-terminal octapeptide of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Y O; Levine, J D; Burch, R M; Woo, J E; Mobley, W C

    1991-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) in the mouse submandibular gland undergoes cleavage of its amino-terminal octapeptide when salivation is induced by epinephrine. The significance of this event is uncertain; cleaved NGF demonstrates bioactivity and no function has been attributed to the octapeptide produced (NGF-OP; Ser-Ser-Thr-His-Pro-Val-Phe-His). Enzyme inhibition studies indicating structural relatedness of NGF-OP and bradykinin (BK) prompted us to determine whether NGF-OP would elicit BK-like actions. We found that like BK, NGF-OP induced a decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold (i.e., produced hyperalgesia) in the hairy skin of the rat. This effect was dose-dependent and sequence-specific; like BK it was attenuated by sympathectomy and indomethacin pretreatment. However, NGF-OP actions appeared to be distinct from those for BK in that tissue injury was required for NGF-OP to induce hyperalgesia. Furthermore, we found no evidence that NGF-OP bound to or activated BK receptors. Our data indicate that NGF-OP is a distinct mediator of hyperalgesia. We suggest that NGF-OP alters pain threshold in the injured target regions of NGF-responsive neurons. PMID:1647026

  16. Purinergic modulation of [(3)H]GABA release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Cunha, R A; Ribeiro, J A

    2000-04-27

    The hippocampal GABAergic system is assumed not to be a target for purine modulation. We have now confirmed that neither adenosine A(1) and A(3) receptor nor nucleotide P(2) or P(4) receptor activation modified the K(+)-evoked [(3)H]GABA release from hippocampal synaptosomes. However, activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors with CGS 21680 (10 nM) or HENECA (30 nM) facilitated GABA release by 32% and 21%, respectively. These effects were prevented by the A(2A) antagonist, ZM 241385 (20 nM). A(2A) receptors may activate adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A since CGS 21680 (10 nM) facilitation was partially prevented by 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM), forskolin (10 microM) and HA-1004 (10 microM). Protein kinase C may also be recruited, since chelerythrine (6 microM) and phorbol-12, 13-didecanoate (250 nM) attenuated CGS 21680 (10 nM) facilitation of [(3)H]GABA release. Omega-agatoxin-IVA (200 nM) occluded CGS 21680 facilitation suggesting the involvement of P-type calcium channels. Thus, the adenosine A(2A) receptor system appears to be one of the first presynaptic neuromodulatory systems able to enhance the evoked release of GABA from hippocampal nerve terminals.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits calcium channel activation, exocytosis, and endocytosis at a central nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2015-03-18

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions.

  18. Uptake and metabolism of fructose by rat neocortical cells in vivo and by isolated nerve terminals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Elsais, Ahmed; Frøland, Anne-Sofie; Taubøll, Erik; Gjerstad, Leif; Quan, Yi; Dingledine, Raymond; Rise, Frode

    2015-05-01

    Fructose reacts spontaneously with proteins in the brain to form advanced glycation end products (AGE) that may elicit neuroinflammation and cause brain pathology, including Alzheimer's disease. We investigated whether fructose is eliminated by oxidative metabolism in neocortex. Injection of [(14) C]fructose or its AGE-prone metabolite [(14) C]glyceraldehyde into rat neocortex in vivo led to formation of (14) C-labeled alanine, glutamate, aspartate, GABA, and glutamine. In isolated neocortical nerve terminals, [(14) C]fructose-labeled glutamate, GABA, and aspartate, indicating uptake of fructose into nerve terminals and oxidative fructose metabolism in these structures. This was supported by high expression of hexokinase 1, which channels fructose into glycolysis, and whose activity was similar with fructose or glucose as substrates. By contrast, the fructose-specific ketohexokinase was weakly expressed. The fructose transporter Glut5 was expressed at only 4% of the level of neuronal glucose transporter Glut3, suggesting transport across plasma membranes of brain cells as the limiting factor in removal of extracellular fructose. The genes encoding aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase, enzymes of the polyol pathway that forms glucose from fructose, were expressed in rat neocortex. These results point to fructose being transported into neocortical cells, including nerve terminals, and that it is metabolized and thereby detoxified primarily through hexokinase activity. We asked how the brain handles fructose, which may react spontaneously with proteins to form 'advanced glycation end products' and trigger inflammation. Neocortical cells took up and metabolized extracellular fructose oxidatively in vivo, and isolated nerve terminals did so in vitro. The low expression of fructose transporter Glut5 limited uptake of extracellular fructose. Hexokinase was a main pathway for fructose metabolism, but ketohexokinase (which leads to glyceraldehyde formation) was

  19. P2X purinoceptor-mediated excitation of trigeminal lingual nerve terminals in an in vitro intra-arterially perfused rat tongue preparation.

    PubMed

    Rong, W; Burnstock, G; Spyer, K M

    2000-05-01

    A novel in vitro intra-arterially perfused adult rat tongue-nerve preparation was used to explore the possible actions of P2X purinoceptor agonists (ATP and alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha, beta-meATP)) on sensory nerve terminals innervating the rat tongue. We made whole-nerve recordings of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve (LN), which conducts general sensory information (pain, temperature, touch, etc.), and the chorda tympani (CT), which conducts taste information. Changes in LN and CT activity following intra-arterial application of P2X agonists were compared. In seven preparations, bolus close-arterial injection of ATP (30-3000 microM, 0.1 ml) or alpha,beta-meATP (10-300 microM, 0.1 ml) induced a rapid (< 1 s after injection), dose-related increase in LN activity that decayed within a few seconds. The minimal concentration of ATP (100 microM) required to elicit a response was about 10-fold higher than that of alpha,beta-meATP (10 microM). Bolus injection of ATP or alpha,beta-meATP induced a moderate decrease in firing frequency in three of seven CT preparations. LN responses to P2X agonists showed signs of rapid desensitisation with the peak frequency of discharge being smaller when the agonists were applied at short intervals. Suramin (200 microM) or PPADS (200 microM) applied by intra-arterial perfusion each antagonised the rapid increase in LN activity following application of alpha,beta-meATP (100 microM). Capsaicin (10 microM, 0.1 ml, n = 5 preparations) was injected intra-arterially to desensitise nociceptive fibres. This was found to block (n = 2) or greatly reduce (n = 3) the excitatory effects of alpha,beta-meATP (100 microM, 0.1 ml) on LN activity, implying that only capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive fibres in LN were responsive to P2X agonists. In contrast to the consistent excitatory responses in LN activity following fast application of P2X agonists as bolus, a variable and moderate change in discharge rate of LN and no change in CT activity

  20. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Guy S.; Banks, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given. PMID:27077818

  1. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Guy S; Banks, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given. PMID:27077818

  2. Pre-synaptic BK channels selectively control glutamate versus GABA release from cortical and hippocampal nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Martire, Maria; Barrese, Vincenzo; D'Amico, Monia; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Pizzarelli, Rocco; Samengo, Irene; Viggiano, Davide; Ruth, Peter; Cherubini, Enrico; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, by means of genetic, biochemical, morphological, and electrophysiological approaches, the role of large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels (BK channels) in the release of excitatory and non-excitatory neurotransmitters at hippocampal and non-hippocampal sites has been investigated. The results obtained show that the pharmacological modulation of pre-synaptic BK channels selectively regulates [(3)H]D-aspartate release from cortical and hippocampal rat synaptosomes, but it fails to influence the release of excitatory neurotransmitters from cerebellar nerve endings or that of [(3)H]GABA, [(3)H]Noradrenaline, or [(3)H]Dopamine from any of the brain regions investigated. Confocal immunofluorescence experiments in hippocampal or cerebrocortical nerve terminals revealed that the main pore-forming BK α subunit was more abundantly expressed in glutamatergic (vGLUT1(+)) versus GABAergic (GAD(65-67)(+)) nerve terminals. Double patch recordings in monosynaptically connected hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed a preferential control exerted by BK channels on glutamate over GABA release. Altogether, the present results highlight a high degree of specificity in the regulation of the release of various neurotransmitters from distinct brain regions by BK channels, supporting the concept that BK channel modulators can be used to selectively limit excessive excitatory amino acid release, a major pathogenetic mechanism in several neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Differences between nerve terminal impulses of polymodal nociceptors and cold sensory receptors of the guinea-pig cornea.

    PubMed

    Brock, J A; Pianova, S; Belmonte, C

    2001-06-01

    1. Extracellular recording techniques were used to study nerve terminal impulses (NTIs) recorded from single polymodal nociceptors and cold-sensitive receptors in guinea-pig cornea isolated in vitro. 2. The amplitude and time course of NTIs recorded from polymodal nociceptors was different from those of cold-sensitive receptors. 3. Bath application of tetrodotoxin (1 microM) changed the time course of spontaneous NTIs recorded from both polymodal and cold-sensitive receptors. 4. Bath application of lignocaine (lidocaine; 1-5 mM) abolished all electrical activity. 5. Local application of lignocaine (2.5 and 20 mM) through the recording electrode changed the time course of the NTIs recorded from polymodal nociceptors but not that of NTIs recorded from cold-sensitive nerve endings. 6. It is concluded that action potentials propagate actively in the sensory nerve endings of polymodal nociceptors. In contrast, cold-sensitive receptor nerve endings appear to be passively invaded from a point more proximal in the axon where the action potential can fail or be initiated.

  4. Ultrastructural changes in isolated peptidergic nerve terminals induced by digitonin permeabilization and K+ stimulation in the sinus gland of the crab, Cardisoma carnifex.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J J; Weatherby, T M; Haylett, B A

    1986-01-01

    The preparation of isolated peptidergic nerve terminals from the sinus gland (a neurohemal organ) of the crab (Cardisoma carnifex) is described. In this species the nerve endings can have diameters up to 30 microns. They release neurosecretory material as judged by the decrease in the volumetric density of granules upon depolarization with potassium. Similar results were obtained after permeabilization of the nerve terminals with digitonin, but only in the presence of micromolar concentrations of calcium. This preparation should prove useful in correlating electrical events with other cellular processes involved in stimulus-secretion coupling.

  5. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  6. The active zone protein family ELKS supports Ca2+ influx at nerve terminals of inhibitory hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changliang; Bickford, Lydia S; Held, Richard G; Nyitrai, Hajnalka; Südhof, Thomas C; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2014-09-10

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle exocytosis is restricted to specialized sites called active zones. At these sites, neurotransmitter release is determined by the number of releasable vesicles and their probability of release. Proteins at the active zone set these parameters by controlling the presynaptic Ca(2+) signal, and through docking and priming of synaptic vesicles. Vertebrate ELKS proteins are enriched at presynaptic active zones, but their functions are not well understood. ELKS proteins are produced by two genes in vertebrates, and each gene contributes ∼50% to total brain ELKS. We generated knock-out mice for ELKS1 and found that its constitutive removal causes lethality. To bypass lethality, and to circumvent redundancy between ELKS1 and ELKS2 in synaptic transmission, we used a conditional genetic approach to remove both genes in cultured hippocampal neurons after synapses are established. Simultaneous removal of ELKS1 and ELKS2 resulted in a 50% decrease of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses, paralleled by a reduction in release probability. Removal of ELKS did not affect synapse numbers or their electron microscopic appearance. Using Ca(2+) imaging, we found that loss of ELKS caused a 30% reduction in single action potential-triggered Ca(2+) influx in inhibitory nerve terminals, consistent with the deficits in synaptic transmission and release probability. Unlike deletion of the active zone proteins RIM, RIM-BP, or bruchpilot, ELKS removal did not lead to a measurable reduction in presynaptic Ca(2+) channel levels. Our results reveal that ELKS is required for normal Ca(2+) influx at nerve terminals of inhibitory hippocampal neurons.

  7. The Active Zone Protein Family ELKS Supports Ca2+ Influx at Nerve Terminals of Inhibitory Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changliang; Bickford, Lydia S.; Held, Richard G.; Nyitrai, Hajnalka

    2014-01-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle exocytosis is restricted to specialized sites called active zones. At these sites, neurotransmitter release is determined by the number of releasable vesicles and their probability of release. Proteins at the active zone set these parameters by controlling the presynaptic Ca2+ signal, and through docking and priming of synaptic vesicles. Vertebrate ELKS proteins are enriched at presynaptic active zones, but their functions are not well understood. ELKS proteins are produced by two genes in vertebrates, and each gene contributes ∼50% to total brain ELKS. We generated knock-out mice for ELKS1 and found that its constitutive removal causes lethality. To bypass lethality, and to circumvent redundancy between ELKS1 and ELKS2 in synaptic transmission, we used a conditional genetic approach to remove both genes in cultured hippocampal neurons after synapses are established. Simultaneous removal of ELKS1 and ELKS2 resulted in a 50% decrease of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses, paralleled by a reduction in release probability. Removal of ELKS did not affect synapse numbers or their electron microscopic appearance. Using Ca2+ imaging, we found that loss of ELKS caused a 30% reduction in single action potential-triggered Ca2+ influx in inhibitory nerve terminals, consistent with the deficits in synaptic transmission and release probability. Unlike deletion of the active zone proteins RIM, RIM-BP, or bruchpilot, ELKS removal did not lead to a measurable reduction in presynaptic Ca2+ channel levels. Our results reveal that ELKS is required for normal Ca2+ influx at nerve terminals of inhibitory hippocampal neurons. PMID:25209271

  8. Molecular microdomains in a sensory terminal, the vestibular calyx ending.

    PubMed

    Lysakowski, Anna; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chatlani, Shilpa; Price, Steven D; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-07-01

    Many primary vestibular afferents form large cup-shaped postsynaptic terminals (calyces) that envelope the basolateral surfaces of type I hair cells. The calyceal terminals both respond to glutamate released from ribbon synapses in the type I cells and initiate spikes that propagate to the afferent's central terminals in the brainstem. The combination of synaptic and spike initiation functions in these unique sensory endings distinguishes them from the axonal nodes of central neurons and peripheral nerves, such as the sciatic nerve, which have provided most of our information about nodal specializations. We show that rat vestibular calyces express an unusual mix of voltage-gated Na and K channels and scaffolding, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins, which may hold the ion channels in place. Protein expression patterns form several microdomains within the calyx membrane: a synaptic domain facing the hair cell, the heminode abutting the first myelinated internode, and one or two intermediate domains. Differences in the expression and localization of proteins between afferent types and zones may contribute to known variations in afferent physiology. PMID:21734302

  9. Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakir, M.; Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.

  10. Primary afferent origin of substance P-containing axons in the superficial dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord: depletion, regeneration and replenishment of presumed nociceptive central terminals.

    PubMed

    Knyihár-Csillik, E; Török, A; Csillik, B

    1990-07-22

    Substance P-like immunoreactivity (SPLI) was localized in the superficial spinal dorsal horn of the rat by means of light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques. Serial immunocytochemical sections were subjected to densitometric measurements with an electronic Image Analyser, and with aid of a computer program, a two-dimensional reconstruction of the fine neuroanatomical structure of the SPLI-active regions of the lumbosacral upper superficial spinal dorsal horn was obtained. SPLI activity in the superficial dorsal horn outlines four well-marked and distinctly differing regions, called, in the mediolateral sequence, areas A, B, C, and D, plus Cajal's noyeau interstitiel ("lateral spinal nucleus" = "nucleus of the dorsolateral fascicle," L). Lumbosacral dorsal rhizotomy results in an almost complete depletion of SPLI from ipsilateral areas A, B, C, and D; it induces decreased SPLI in the area of the lateral spinal nucleus (L), ipsi- or contralaterally in an alternating fashion. Transection of the segmentally related, ipsilateral peripheral nerve induces a marked depletion of SPLI from areas A, B, and C but only a slight decrease in area D and virtually none in the area of L. Whereas a simple crush of the peripheral nerve (axocompression) induces only a slight depletion of SPLI, if any, semiautomatic densitometric analysis of serial immunocytochemical sections proves that a controlled crush injury (axocontusion) results in depletion of SPLI from the upper dorsal horn, similar to transection of the peripheral nerve. Following regeneration of the ipsilateral, segmentally related peripheral nerve, the original immunocytochemical structure of the superficial dorsal horn is re-established by SPLI-positive axonal sprouts originating from previously damaged dorsal root axons.

  11. Intact cutaneous C fibre afferent properties in mechanical and cold neuropathic allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Richard; Wynick, David; Donaldson, Lucy F.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with neuropathy, report changes in sensory perception, particularly mechanical and thermal allodynia, and spontaneous pain. Similar sensory changes are seen in experimental neuropathies, in which alteration in primary afferent properties can also be determined. The neural correlate of spontaneous pain is ongoing activity in sensory afferents. Mechanical and heat allodynia are thought to result from lowered activation thresholds in primary afferent and/or central neurones, but the mechanisms underlying cold allodynia are very poorly understood. We investigated nociceptive behaviours and the properties of C and A fibre intact afferents running adjacent to damaged afferents following a partial ligation injury of the saphenous nerve (PSNI). Animals developed mechanical and cold allodynia by 3 days after PSNI. Intact mechanosensitive C fibre afferents developed ongoing activity, and had slower conduction velocities 3 and 7 days following nerve injury, with no change in mechanical threshold. There was a large increase (∼46-fold) in calculated afferent input 3 days after nerve injury, as a result of the ongoing activity in these fibres. Mechano-cooling-sensitive C fibre afferents showed both enhanced cooling-evoked firing, and increased ongoing activity. The afferent barrage associated with mechano-cooling-sensitive afferents was increased 26-fold 7 days after nerve injury. We observed no differences in the properties of intact A fibre mechanosensitive afferents. These studies demonstrate for the first time that the altered nociception seen after PSNI is associated with ongoing activity and enhanced cooling-evoked activity in intact C fibre afferents in the saphenous nerve, with no concurrent alteration in A fibre afferents. PMID:19942464

  12. In vitro Functional Characterization of Mouse Colorectal Afferent Endings

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    This video demonstrates in detail an in vitro single-fiber electrophysiological recording protocol using a mouse colorectum-nerve preparation. The approach allows unbiased identification and functional characterization of individual colorectal afferents. Extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials (APs) that originate from one or a few afferent (i.e., single-fiber) receptive fields (RFs) in the colorectum are made from teased nerve fiber fascicles. The colorectum is removed with either the pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached and opened longitudinally. The tissue is placed in a recording chamber, pinned flat and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Focal electrical stimulation is used to locate the colorectal afferent endings, which are further tested by three distinct mechanical stimuli (blunt probing, mucosal stroking and circumferential stretch) to functionally categorize the afferents into five mechanosensitive classes. Endings responding to none of these mechanical stimuli are categorized as mechanically-insensitive afferents (MIAs). Both mechanosensitive and MIAs can be assessed for sensitization (i.e., enhanced response, reduced threshold, and/or acquisition of mechanosensitivity) by localized exposure of RFs to chemicals (e.g., inflammatory soup (IS), capsaicin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)). We describe the equipment and colorectum–nerve recording preparation, harvest of colorectum with attached PN or LSN, identification of RFs in the colorectum, single-fiber recording from nerve fascicles, and localized application of chemicals to the RF. In addition, challenges of the preparation and application of standardized mechanical stimulation are also discussed. PMID:25651300

  13. Cortical Presynaptic Control of Dorsal Horn C–Afferents in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Lamina 5 sensorimotor cortex pyramidal neurons project to the spinal cord, participating in the modulation of several modalities of information transmission. A well-studied mechanism by which the corticospinal projection modulates sensory information is primary afferent depolarization, which has been characterized in fast muscular and cutaneous, but not in slow-conducting nociceptive skin afferents. Here we investigated whether the inhibition of nociceptive sensory information, produced by activation of the sensorimotor cortex, involves a direct presynaptic modulation of C primary afferents. In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of sensorimotor cortex activation on post tetanic potentiation (PTP) and the paired pulse ratio (PPR) of dorsal horn field potentials evoked by C–fiber stimulation in the sural (SU) and sciatic (SC) nerves. We also explored the time course of the excitability changes in nociceptive afferents produced by cortical stimulation. We observed that the development of PTP was completely blocked when C-fiber tetanic stimulation was paired with cortex stimulation. In addition, sensorimotor cortex activation by topical administration of bicuculline (BIC) produced a reduction in the amplitude of C–fiber responses, as well as an increase in the PPR. Furthermore, increases in the intraspinal excitability of slow-conducting fiber terminals, produced by sensorimotor cortex stimulation, were indicative of primary afferent depolarization. Topical administration of BIC in the spinal cord blocked the inhibition of C–fiber neuronal responses produced by cortical stimulation. Dorsal horn neurons responding to sensorimotor cortex stimulation also exhibited a peripheral receptive field and responded to stimulation of fast cutaneous myelinated fibers. Our results suggest that corticospinal inhibition of nociceptive responses is due in part to a modulation of the excitability of primary C–fibers by means of GABAergic inhibitory

  14. Cortical presynaptic control of dorsal horn C-afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Moreno-López, Yunuen; Pérez-Sánchez, Jimena; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Lamina 5 sensorimotor cortex pyramidal neurons project to the spinal cord, participating in the modulation of several modalities of information transmission. A well-studied mechanism by which the corticospinal projection modulates sensory information is primary afferent depolarization, which has been characterized in fast muscular and cutaneous, but not in slow-conducting nociceptive skin afferents. Here we investigated whether the inhibition of nociceptive sensory information, produced by activation of the sensorimotor cortex, involves a direct presynaptic modulation of C primary afferents. In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of sensorimotor cortex activation on post tetanic potentiation (PTP) and the paired pulse ratio (PPR) of dorsal horn field potentials evoked by C-fiber stimulation in the sural (SU) and sciatic (SC) nerves. We also explored the time course of the excitability changes in nociceptive afferents produced by cortical stimulation. We observed that the development of PTP was completely blocked when C-fiber tetanic stimulation was paired with cortex stimulation. In addition, sensorimotor cortex activation by topical administration of bicuculline (BIC) produced a reduction in the amplitude of C-fiber responses, as well as an increase in the PPR. Furthermore, increases in the intraspinal excitability of slow-conducting fiber terminals, produced by sensorimotor cortex stimulation, were indicative of primary afferent depolarization. Topical administration of BIC in the spinal cord blocked the inhibition of C-fiber neuronal responses produced by cortical stimulation. Dorsal horn neurons responding to sensorimotor cortex stimulation also exhibited a peripheral receptive field and responded to stimulation of fast cutaneous myelinated fibers. Our results suggest that corticospinal inhibition of nociceptive responses is due in part to a modulation of the excitability of primary C-fibers by means of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons

  15. Voltage-gated Na(+) channels in chemoreceptor afferent neurons--potential roles and changes with development.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, David F

    2013-01-01

    Carotid body chemoreceptors increase their action potential (AP) activity in response to a decrease in arterial oxygen tension and this response increases in the post-natal period. The initial transduction site is likely the glomus cell which responds to hypoxia with an increase in intracellular calcium and secretion of multiple neurotransmitters. Translation of this secretion to AP spiking levels is determined by the excitability of the afferent nerve terminals that is largely determined by the voltage-dependence of activation of Na(+) channels. In this review, we examine the biophysical characteristics of Na(+) channels present at the soma of chemoreceptor afferent neurons with the assumption that similar channels are present at nerve terminals. The voltage dependence of this current is consistent with a single Na(+) channel isoform with activation around the resting potential and with about 60-70% of channels in the inactive state around the resting potential. Channel openings, due to transitions from inactive/open or closed/open states, may serve to amplify external depolarizing events or generate, by themselves, APs. Over the first two post-natal weeks, the Na(+) channel activation voltage shifts to more negative potentials, thus enhancing the amplifying action of Na(+) channels on depolarization events and increasing membrane noise generated by channel transitions. This may be a significant contributor to maturation of chemoreceptor activity in the post-natal period.

  16. Preferred sites of exocytosis and endocytosis colocalize during high but not lower frequency stimulation in mouse motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Gaffield, Michael A.; Tabares, Lucia; Betz, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The spatial relationship of exocytosis and endocytosis in motor nerve terminals has been explored, with varied results, mostly in fixed preparations and without direct information on the utilization of each exocytic site. We sought to determine these spatial properties in real time using synaptopHluorin (spH) and FM 4-64. Earlier we showed that nerve stimulation elicits the appearance of spH fluorescence hot spots, which mark preferred sites of exocytosis. Here we show that nerve stimulation in the presence of the styryl dye FM 4-64 evokes hot spots of FM 4-64 fluorescence. Their size, density, and rate of appearance are similar to the spH hot spots, but their rate of disappearance after stimulation was much slower (t½ ∼9 min versus ∼10 s for spH hot spots), consistent with FM 4-64 spots identifying bulk endocytosis and subsequent slow intracellular dispersion of nascent vesicles. Simultaneous imaging of both fluorophores revealed a strong colocalization of spH and FM 4-64 spots, but only during high (100 Hz) stimulation. At 40 Hz stimulation, exo- and endocytic spots did not colocalize. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that hot spots of endocytosis, possibly in the form of bulk uptake, occur at or very near highly active exocytic sites during high frequency stimulation. PMID:19955383

  17. The effects of combined application of inorganic Martian dust simulant and carbon dots on glutamate transport rat brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Recently, the research team of this study found the minor fractions of nanoparticles with the size ~ 50 -60 nm in Lunar and Martian dust stimulants (JSC-1a and JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin), whereas the average size of the simulants was 1 mm and 4mm, respectively (Krisanova et al., 2013). Also, the research team of this study discovered new phenomenon - the neuromodulating and neurotoxic effect of carbon nano-sized particles - Carbon dots (C-dots), originated from ash of burned carbon-containing product (Borisova et al, 2015). The aims of this study was to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant of inorganic Martian dust derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, carbon dots, on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon dot-contained Martian dust analogue. These effects were associated with action of carbon component of the upgraded Martian dust stimulant but not with its inorganic constituent.

  18. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain.

  19. Interaction of /sup 125/I-labeled botulinum neurotoxins with nerve terminals. I. Ultrastructural autoradiographic localization and quantitation of distinct membrane acceptors for types A and B on motor nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.D.; Dolly, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    The labeling patterns produced by radioiodinated botulinum neurotoxin (/sup 125/I-BoNT) types A and B at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction were investigated using electron microscopic autoradiography. The data obtained allow the following conclusions to be made. (a) /sup 125/I-BoNT type A, applied in vivo or in vitro to mouse diaphragm or frog cutaneous pectoris muscle, interacts saturably with the motor nerve terminal only; silver grains occur on the plasma membrane, within the synaptic bouton, and in the axoplasm of the nerve trunk, suggesting internalization and retrograde intra-axonal transport of toxin or fragments thereof. (b) /sup 125/I-BoNT type B, applied in vitro to the murine neuromuscular junction, interacts likewise with the motor nerve terminal except that a lower proportion of internalized radioactivity is seen. This result is reconcilable with the similar, but not identical, pharmacological action of these toxin types. (c) The saturability of labeling in each case suggested the involvement of acceptors; on preventing the internalization step with metabolic inhibitors, their precise location became apparent. They were found on all unmyelinated areas of the nerve terminal membrane, including the preterminal axon and the synaptic bouton. (d) It is not proposed that these membrane acceptors target BoNT to the nerve terminal and mediate its delivery to an intracellular site, thus contributing to the toxin's selective inhibitory action on neurotransmitter release.

  20. Blockage of vibrissae afferents: I. Motor effects.

    PubMed

    Prchal, A; Albarracín, A L; Décima, E E

    2004-02-01

    In the past, it has been proposed that the rat vibrissae play an important role in other hand, postural abnormalities, muscle tone decreases and hypomotility after sensory organ destructions were proposed as evidence supporting the "level setting" or "tonic" hypothesis. This hypothesis postulates that afferent activity, besides its well know transductive functions, sets the excitability state of the central nervous system. We thought the vibrissal system to be a good model to dissect these two postulated roles because vibrissae trimming would annul the transductive function without affecting the integrity of nerve activity. Thus we compare the effects of trimming the whiskers with blocking the vibrissal afferent nerves on two types of motor behavior: activity in an open field and walking over a rope connecting two elevated platforms. We found that only vibrissal afferent blockage (both nerve section and local anaesthesia) produced severe failures in the motor performances studied. These effects could not be fully explained by the abolition of the vibrissae as a sensory modality because cutting the whiskers did not significantly affect the motor performance. These data are discussed in reference to a tonic or general excitatory function of sensory inputs upon the central nervous system. PMID:15143620

  1. A Ca2+-induced Ca2+ Release Mechanism Involved in Asynchronous Exocytosis at Frog Motor Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Narita, K.; Akita, T.; Osanai, M.; Shirasaki, T.; Kijima, H.; Kuba, K.

    1998-01-01

    The extent to which Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) affects transmitter release is unknown. Continuous nerve stimulation (20–50 Hz) caused slow transient increases in miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) frequency (MEPP-hump) and intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in presynaptic terminals (Ca2+-hump) in frog skeletal muscles over a period of minutes in a low Ca2+, high Mg2+ solution. Mn2+ quenched Indo-1 and Fura-2 fluorescence, thus indicating that stimulation was accompanied by opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. MEPP-hump depended on extracellular Ca2+ (0.05–0.2 mM) and stimulation frequency. Both the Ca2+- and MEPP-humps were blocked by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate hydrochloride (TMB-8), ryanodine, and thapsigargin, but enhanced by CN−. Thus, Ca2+-hump is generated by the activation of CICR via ryanodine receptors by Ca2+ entry, producing MEPP-hump. A short interruption of tetanus (<1 min) during MEPP-hump quickly reduced MEPP frequency to a level attained under the effect of TMB-8 or thapsigargin, while resuming tetanus swiftly raised MEPP frequency to the previous or higher level. Thus, the steady/equilibrium condition balancing CICR and Ca2+ clearance occurs in nerve terminals with slow changes toward a greater activation of CICR (priming) during the rising phase of MEPP-hump and toward a smaller activation during the decay phase. A short pause applied after the end of MEPP- or Ca2+-hump affected little MEPP frequency or [Ca2+]i, but caused a quick increase (faster than MEPP- or Ca2+-hump) after the pause, whose magnitude increased with an increase in pause duration (<1 min), suggesting that Ca2+ entry-dependent inactivation, but not depriming process, explains the decay of the humps. The depriming process was seen by giving a much longer pause (>1 min). Thus, ryanodine receptors in frog motor nerve terminals are endowed with Ca2+ entry-dependent slow priming and fast inactivation mechanisms, as well as Ca2+ entry

  2. Correlation between afferent rearrangements and behavioral deficits after local excitotoxic insult in the mammalian vestibule: a rat model of vertigo symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Travo, Cécile; Saleur, Aurélie; Broussy, Audrey; Brugeaud, Aurore; Chabbert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Damage to inner ear afferent terminals is believed to result in many auditory and vestibular dysfunctions. The sequence of afferent injuries and repair, as well as their correlation with vertigo symptoms, remains poorly documented. In particular, information on the changes that take place at the primary vestibular endings during the first hours following a selective insult is lacking. In the present study, we combined histological analysis with behavioral assessments of vestibular function in a rat model of unilateral vestibular excitotoxic insult. Excitotoxicity resulted in an immediate but transient alteration of the balance function that was resolved within a week. Concomitantly, vestibular primary afferents underwent a sequence of structural changes followed by spontaneous repair. Within the first two hours after the insult, a first phase of pronounced vestibular dysfunction coincided with extensive swelling of afferent terminals. In the next 24 h, a second phase of significant but incomplete reduction of the vestibular dysfunction was accompanied by a resorption of swollen terminals and fiber retraction. Eventually, within 1 week, a third phase of complete balance restoration occurred. The slow and progressive withdrawal of the balance dysfunction correlated with full reconstitution of nerve terminals. Competitive re-innervation by afferent and efferent terminals that mimicked developmental synaptogenesis resulted in full re-afferentation of the sensory epithelia. By deciphering the sequence of structural alterations that occur in the vestibule during selective excitotoxic impairment, this study offers new understanding of how a vestibular insult develops in the vestibule and how it governs the heterogeneity of vertigo symptoms. PMID:27483344

  3. Neurotransmitter release from tottering mice nerve terminals with reduced expression of mutated P- and Q-type Ca2+-channels.

    PubMed

    Leenders, A G Miriam; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H; Sheng, Zu-Hang; Molenaar, Peter C; Ghijsen, Wim E J M

    2002-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is triggered by Ca2+-influx through multiple sub-types of high voltage-activated Ca2+-channels. Tottering mice have a mutation in the alpha1A pore-forming subunit of P- and Q-type Ca2+-channels, two prominent sub-types that regulate transmitter release from central nerve terminals. Immunoblotting analysis of purified forebrain terminals from tottering mice revealed an 85% reduction in the protein expression level of the mutated alpha1A subunit compared to expression of the alpha1A subunit in wild-type terminals. In contrast, the expression of the alpha1B subunit of the N-type Ca2+-channels was unchanged. Release of the amino acids glutamate and GABA and of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) induced by a short (100 ms) depolarization pulse was unchanged in the terminals of tottering mice. Studies using specific blockers of Ca2+-channels however, revealed a reduced contribution of P- and Q-type Ca2+-channels to glutamate and cholecystokinin release, whereas a greater reliance on N-type Ca2+-channels for release of these transmitters was observed. In contrast, the contribution of the P-, Q- and N-type Ca2+-channels to the release of GABA was not altered in tottering mice. These results indicate that the expression of the alpha1A subunit was decreased in terminals from tottering mice, and that a decreased contribution of P- and Q-type Ca2+-channels to the release of glutamate and cholecystokinin was functionally compensated by an increased contribution of N-type Ca2+-channels.

  4. Patch-clamp capacitance measurements and Ca²⁺ imaging at single nerve terminals in retinal slices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; Vickers, Evan; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    in agar (or placed onto a filter paper) and then sliced. In this video, we employ the pre-embedding agar technique using goldfish retina. Some of the giant bipolar cell terminals in our slices of goldfish retina are axotomized (axon-cut) during the slicing procedure. This allows us to isolate single presynaptic nerve terminal inputs, because recording from axotomized terminals excludes the signals from the soma-dendritic compartment. Alternatively, one can also record from intact Mb bipolar cells, by recording from terminals attached to axons that have not been cut during the slicing procedure. Overall, use of this experimental protocol will aid in studies of retinal synaptic physiology, microcircuit functional analysis, and synaptic transmission at ribbon synapses. PMID:22297269

  5. Early Exposure to General Anesthesia Disrupts Spatial Organization of Presynaptic Vesicles in Nerve Terminals of the Developing Rat Subiculum.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, N; Oklopcic, A; Prillaman, M; Erisir, A; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to general anesthesia (GA) during critical stages of brain development induces widespread neuronal apoptosis and causes long-lasting behavioral deficits in numerous animal species. Although several studies have focused on the morphological fate of neurons dying acutely by GA-induced developmental neuroapoptosis, the effects of an early exposure to GA on the surviving synapses remain unclear. The aim of this study is to study whether exposure to GA disrupts the fine regulation of the dynamic spatial organization and trafficking of synaptic vesicles in presynaptic terminals. We exposed postnatal day 7 (PND7) rat pups to a clinically relevant anesthetic combination of midazolam, nitrous oxide, and isoflurane and performed a detailed ultrastructural analysis of the synaptic vesicle architecture at presynaptic terminals in the subiculum of rats at PND 12. In addition to a significant decrease in the density of presynaptic vesicles, we observed a reduction of docked vesicles, as well as a reduction of vesicles located within 100 nm from the active zone, in animals 5 days after an initial exposure to GA. We also found that the synaptic vesicles of animals exposed to GA are located more distally with respect to the plasma membrane than those of sham control animals and that the distance between presynaptic vesicles is increased in GA-exposed animals compared to sham controls. We report that exposure of immature rats to GA during critical stages of brain development causes significant disruption of the strategic topography of presynaptic vesicles within the nerve terminals of the subiculum. PMID:26048670

  6. The spatial pattern of exocytosis and post-exocytic mobility of synaptopHluorin in mouse motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Gaffield, Michael A; Tabares, Lucia; Betz, William J

    2009-01-01

    We monitored the spatial distribution of exo- and endocytosis at 37°C in mouse motor nerve terminals expressing synaptopHluorin (spH), confirming and extending earlier work at room temperature, which had revealed fluorescent ‘hot spots’ appearing in repeatable locations during tetanic stimulation. We also tested whether hot spots appeared during mild stimulation. Averaged responses from single shocks showed a clear fluorescence jump, but revealed no sign of hot spots; instead, fluorescence rose uniformly across the terminal. Only after 5–25 stimuli given at high frequency did hot spots appear, suggesting a novel initiation mechanism. Experiments showed that about half of the surface spH molecules were mobile, and that spH movement occurred out of hot spots, demonstrating their origin as exocytic sources, not endocytic sinks. Taken together, our results suggest that synaptic vesicles exocytose equally throughout the terminal with mild stimulation, but preferentially exocytose at specific, repeatable locations during tetanic stimulation. PMID:19153160

  7. Capsaicin-like activity of some natural pungent substances on peripheral endings of visceral primary afferents.

    PubMed

    Patacchini, R; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1990-07-01

    1. The effects of some naturally occurring pungent substances, piperine, mustard oil, eugenol and curcumin, were compared to those of capsaicin in the rat isolated urinary bladder. 2. All test compounds dose-dependently contracted the rat bladder and produced desensitization toward capsaicin (1 mumol/l). Development of cross-tachyphylaxis among the natural pungent substances on one hand and capsaicin on the other, suggested a common site of action on visceral primary afferents. 3. Contractile responses to piperine, mustard oil and eugenol were partially tetrodotoxin and ruthenium red-sensitive, suggesting that activation of sensory terminals by these agents takes place indirectly, as well as by a direct action on sensory receptors. 4. The presence of the secondary acrylamide linkage (present in the backbone of capsaicin, but not in that of test compounds) does not appear to be essential to produce desensitization of sensory nerve terminals.

  8. A novel large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel and current in nerve terminals of the rat neurohypophysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Thorn, P; Lemos, J R

    1992-01-01

    1. Nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary were acutely dissociated and identified using a combination of morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. Terminal membrane currents were studied using the 'whole-cell' patch clamp technique and channels were studied using inside-out and outside-out patches. 2. In physiological solutions, but with 7 mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), depolarizing voltage clamp steps from different holding potentials (-90 or -50 mV) elicited a fast, inward current followed by a slow, sustained, outward current. This outward current did not appear to show any steady-state inactivation. 3. The threshold for activation of the outward current was -30 mV and the current-voltage relation was 'bell-shaped'. The amplitude increased with increasingly depolarized potential steps. The outward current reversal potential was measured using tail current analysis and was consistent with that of a potassium current. 4. The sustained potassium current was determined to be dependent on the concentration of intracellular calcium. Extracellular Cd2+ (80 microM), a calcium channel blocker, also reversibly abolished the outward current. 5. The current was delayed in onset and was sustained over the length of a 150 ms-duration depolarizing pulse. The outward current reached a peak plateau and then decayed slowly. The decay was fitted by a single exponential with a time constant of 9.0 +/- 2.2 s. The decay constants did not show a dependence on voltage but rather on intracellular Ca2+. The time course of recovery from this decay was complex with full recovery taking > 190 s. 6. 4-AP (7 mM), dendrotoxin (100 nM), apamin (40-80 nM), and charybdotoxin (10-100 nM) had no effect on the sustained outward current. In contrast Ba2+ (200 microM) and tetraethylammonium inhibited the current, the latter in a dose-dependent manner (apparent concentration giving 50% of maximal inhibition (IC50) = 0.51 mM). 7. The neurohypophysial terminal outward current recorded here

  9. Non-myelinated nerve fibres and their terminals in the sub-odontoblastic plexus of the feline dental pulp.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, G R

    1980-01-01

    Serial thin sections of the coronal dental pulp of the cat's canine tooth were cut. Parts of the sub-odontoblastic neural plexus were photographed from 100 of the sections. The plexus consists of many slender, predominantly unmyelinated nerve fibres. Many axons are incompletely sheathed by their Schwann cell. Some axons leave the Schwann cell sheath and either end in the extracellar space or return to the Schwann cell after traveling a short distance. Several axons are often seen in close contact within a single invagination of the Schwann cell. They remain in contact for up to 7 micrometer.l Both Schwann cells and axons are see to branch in this region. These features may be characteristic of nerve fibres and terminals which respond to noxious stimuli. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Figs. 7-8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 PMID:7410190

  10. Long-term sensitization of mechanosensitive and -insensitive afferents in mice with persistent colorectal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-ho; Schwartz, Erica S.; Tanaka, Takahiro; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Afferent input contributes significantly to the pain and colorectal hypersensitivity that characterize irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we investigated the contributions of mechanically sensitive and mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; or silent afferents) to colorectal hypersensitivity. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD; 15–60 mmHg) was recorded in mice before and for weeks after intracolonic treatment with zymosan or saline. After CRD tests, the distal colorectum with the pelvic nerve attached was removed for single-fiber electrophysiological recordings. Colorectal afferent endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. Intracolonic zymosan produced persistent colorectal hypersensitivity (>24 days) associated with brief colorectal inflammation. Pelvic nerve muscular-mucosal but not muscular mechanosensitive afferents recorded from mice with colorectal hypersensitivity exhibited persistent sensitization. In addition, the proportion of MIAs (relative to control) was significantly reduced from 27% to 13%, whereas the proportion of serosal afferents was significantly increased from 34% to 53%, suggesting that MIAs acquired mechanosensitivity. PGP9.5 immunostaining revealed no significant loss of colorectal nerve fiber density, suggesting that the reduction in MIAs is not due to peripheral fiber loss after intracolonic zymosan. These results indicate that colorectal MIAs and sensitized muscular-mucosal afferents that respond to stretch contribute significantly to the afferent input that sustains hypersensitivity to CRD, suggesting that targeted management of colorectal afferent input could significantly reduce patients' complaints of pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:22268098

  11. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  12. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  13. Gustatory Terminal Field Organization and Developmental Plasticity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Revealed through Triple Fluorescent Labeling

    PubMed Central

    May, Olivia L.; Hill, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Early dietary sodium restriction has profound influences on the organization of the gustatory brainstem. However, the anatomical relationships among multiple gustatory nerve inputs have not been examined. Through the use of a triple fluorescence labeling procedure and confocal laser microscopy, terminal fields of the greater superficial petrosal (GSP), chorda tympani (CT), and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves were visualized concurrently in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) of developmentally sodium-restricted and control rats. Dietary sodium restriction during pre- and postnatal development resulted in a two-fold increase in the volume of both the CT and IX nerve terminal fields, but did not affect the volume of the GSP terminal field. In controls, these nerve terminal fields overlapped considerably with each other. The dietary manipulation significantly increased the overlapping zones among terminal fields, resulting in an extension of CT and IX fields past their normal boundaries. The differences in terminal field volumes were exaggerated when expressed relative to the respective NTS volumes. Further, increased terminal field volumes could not be attributed to an increase in the number of afferents because ganglion cell counts did not differ between groups. Taken together, selective increases in terminal field volume and ensuing overlap among terminal fields suggest an increased convergence of these gustatory nerve terminals onto neurons in the NTS. The genesis of such convergence is likely related to disruption of cellular and molecular mechanisms during the development of individual terminal fields, the consequences of which have implications for corresponding functional and behavioral alterations. PMID:16739199

  14. Dynamics of motor nerve terminal remodeling unveiled using SNARE-cleaving botulinum toxins: the extent and duration are dictated by the sites of SNAP-25 truncation.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Frédéric A; Lisk, Godfrey; Sesardic, Dorothea; Dolly, J Oliver

    2003-04-01

    Nerve sprouts emerge from motor nerve terminals following blockade of exo-endocytosis for more than 3 days by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), and form functional synapses, albeit temporary. Upon restoration of synaptic activity to the parent terminal 7 and 90 days after exposure to BoNT/F or A respectively, a concomitant retraction of the outgrowths was observed. BoNT/E caused short-term neuroparalysis, and dramatically accelerated the recovery of BoNT/A-paralyzed muscle by further truncation of SNAP-25 and its replenishment with functional full-length SNARE. The removal of 9 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25 by BoNT/A leads to persistence of the inhibitory product due to the formation of a nonproductive SNARE complex(es) at release sites, whereas deletion of a further 17 amino acids permits replenishment and a speedy recovery.

  15. Spatial facilitation and depression within one motor nerve terminal of frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Dudel, J; Parnas, I; Parnas, H

    1993-01-01

    1. Perfused macropatch electrodes were used to stimulate and simultaneously measure release from two sites on the same terminal of the frog cutaneous pectoris muscle. 2. It was found that release occurring at one site often affected release at an adjacent site 50 microns away, either enhancing it ('spatial facilitation') or depressing it ('spatial depression'). Spatial facilitation (or depression) was defined as the release produced by a test pulse at the second site (test electrode) when preceded by a pulse at the first site (prepulse electrode) divided by the release produced by the test pulse alone. 3. Spatial facilitation varied with the time interval between the prepulse and the test pulse. Peak spatial facilitation, which on the average was 2.14, occurred with an interval of 1-3 ms. With longer intervals spatial facilitation decayed with a time constant between 3-6 ms. When the time interval between the prepulse and the test pulse was zero (no delay), the release after the test pulse was always depressed. 4. When Ca2+ was omitted from the perfusate of the prepulse electrode, spatial facilitation was abolished. When a brief hyperpolarizing pulse followed the depolarizing prepulse with zero delay spatial facilitation was also abolished. 5. Electrotonic spread or Ca2+ diffusion within the axon terminal are excluded as coupling agents for spatial facilitation. It is suggested that the coupling agent may possibly be related to a hypothetical release-promoting factor. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8350260

  16. Molecular microdomains in a sensory terminal, the vestibular calyx ending

    PubMed Central

    Lysakowski, Anna; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chatlani, Shilpa; Price, Steven D.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Many primary vestibular afferents form large cup-shaped postsynaptic terminals (calyces) that envelope the basolateral surfaces of type I hair cells. The calyceal terminals both respond to glutamate released from ribbon synapses in the type I cells and initiate spikes that propagate to the afferent’s central terminals in the brainstem. The combination of synaptic and spike initiation functions in these unique sensory endings distinguishes them from the axonal nodes of central neurons and peripheral nerves, such as the sciatic nerve, which have provided most of our information about nodal specializations. We show that rat vestibular calyces express an unusual mix of voltage-gated Na and K channels and scaffolding, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins, which may hold the ion channels in place. Protein expression patterns form several microdomains within the calyx membrane: a synaptic domain facing the hair cell, the heminode abutting the first myelinated internode, and one or two intermediate domains. Differences in the expression and localization of proteins between afferent types and zones may contribute to known variations in afferent physiology. PMID:21734302

  17. Neuropathic pain: Early spontaneous afferent activity is the trigger

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Meij, Johanna T.A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming; Yu, Lei

    2005-01-01

    Intractable neuropathic pain often results from nerve injury. One immediate event in damaged nerve is a sustained increase in spontaneous afferent activity, which has a well-established role in ongoing pain. Using two rat models of neuropathic pain, the CCI and SNI models, we show that local, temporary nerve blockade of this afferent activity permanently inhibits the subsequent development of both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Timing is critical—the nerve blockade must last at least 3–5 days and is effective if started immediately after nerve injury, but not if started at 10 days after injury when neuropathic pain is already established. Effective nerve blockade also prevents subsequent development of spontaneous afferent activity measured electrophysiologically. Similar results were obtained in both pain models, and with two blockade methods (200 mg of a depot form bupivacaine at the injury site, or perfusion of the injured nerve just proximal to the injury site with TTX). These results indicate that early spontaneous afferent fiber activity is the key trigger for the development of pain behaviors, and suggest that spontaneous activity may be required for many of the later changes in the sensory neurons, spinal cord, and brain observed in neuropathic pain models. Many pre-clinical and clinical studies of pre-emptive analgesia have used much shorter duration of blockade, or have not started immediately after the injury. Our results suggest that effective pre-emptive analgesia can be achieved only when nerve block is administered early after injury and lasts several days. PMID:15964687

  18. Computational Modeling Reveals Optimal Strategy for Kinase Transport by Microtubules to Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Yen Ling; Koh, Cheng Gee; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular transport of proteins by motors along cytoskeletal filaments is crucial to the proper functioning of many eukaryotic cells. Since most proteins are synthesized at the cell body, mechanisms are required to deliver them to the growing periphery. In this article, we use computational modeling to study the strategies of protein transport in the context of JNK (c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase) transport along microtubules to the terminals of neuronal cells. One such strategy for protein transport is for the proteins of the JNK signaling cascade to bind to scaffolds, and to have the whole protein-scaffold cargo transported by kinesin motors along microtubules. We show how this strategy outperforms protein transport by diffusion alone, using metrics such as signaling rate and signal amplification. We find that there exists a range of scaffold concentrations for which JNK transport is optimal. Increase in scaffold concentration increases signaling rate and signal amplification but an excess of scaffolds results in the dilution of reactants. Similarly, there exists a range of kinesin motor speeds for which JNK transport is optimal. Signaling rate and signal amplification increases with kinesin motor speed until the speed of motor translocation becomes faster than kinase/scaffold-motor binding. Finally, we suggest experiments that can be performed to validate whether, in physiological conditions, neuronal cells do indeed adopt such an optimal strategy. Understanding cytoskeletal-assisted protein transport is crucial since axonal and cell body accumulation of organelles and proteins is a histological feature in many human neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we have shown that axonal transport performance changes with altered transport component concentrations and transport speeds wherein these aspects can be modulated to improve axonal efficiency and prevent or slowdown axonal deterioration. PMID:24691408

  19. Force-sensitive afferents recruited during stance encode sensory depression in the contralateral swinging limb during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Shawn; Hayes, Heather Brant; Speigel, Iris; Chang, Young-Hui

    2013-03-01

    Afferent feedback alters muscle activity during locomotion and must be tightly controlled. As primary afferent depolarization-induced presynaptic inhibition (PAD-PSI) regulates afferent signaling, we investigated hindlimb PAD-PSI during locomotion in an in vitro rat spinal cord-hindlimb preparation. We compared the relation of PAD-PSI, measured as dorsal root potentials (DRPs), to observed ipsilateral and contralateral limb endpoint forces. Afferents activated during stance-phase force strongly and proportionately influenced DRP magnitude in the swinging limb. Responses increased with locomotor frequency. Electrical stimulation of contralateral afferents also preferentially evoked DRPs in the opposite limb during swing (flexion). Nerve lesioning, in conjunction with kinematic results, support a prominent contribution from toe Golgi tendon organ afferents. Thus, force-dependent afferent feedback during stance binds interlimb sensorimotor state to a proportional PAD-PSI in the swinging limb, presumably to optimize interlimb coordination. These results complement known actions of ipsilateral afferents on PAD-PSI during locomotion.

  20. Static γ-motoneurones couple group Ia and II afferents of single muscle spindles in anaesthetised and decerebrate cats

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, M H; Matsuzaki, H

    2002-01-01

    Ideas about the functions of static γ-motoneurones are based on the responses of primary and secondary endings to electrical stimulation of single static γ-axons, usually at high frequencies. We compared these effects with the actions of spontaneously active γ-motoneurones. In anaesthetised cats, afferents and efferents were recorded in intramuscular nerve branches to single muscle spindles. The occurrence of γ-spikes, identified by a spike shape recognition system, was linked to video-taped contractions of type-identified intrafusal fibres in the dissected muscle spindles. When some static γ-motoneurones were active at low frequency (< 15 Hz) they coupled the firing of group Ia and II afferents. Activity of other static γ-motoneurones which tensed the intrafusal fibres appeared to enhance this effect. Under these conditions the secondary ending responded at shorter latency than the primary ending. In another series of experiments on decerebrate cats, responses of primary and secondary endings of single muscle spindles to activation of γ-motoneurones by natural stimuli were compared with their responses to electrical stimulation of single γ-axons supplying the same spindle. Electrical stimulation mimicked the natural actions of γ-motoneurones on either the primary or the secondary ending, but not on both together. However, γ-activity evoked by natural stimuli coupled the firing of afferents with the muscle at constant length, and also when it was stretched. Analysis showed that the timing and tightness of this coupling determined the degree of summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by each afferent in α-motoneurones and interneurones contacted by terminals of both endings, and thus the degree of facilitation of reflex actions of group II afferents. PMID:12181298

  1. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  2. α-Synuclein Mutation Inhibits Endocytosis at Mammalian Central Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin-Sheng; Sheng, Jiansong; Zhang, Zhen; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Sun, Lixin; Sgobio, Carmelo; Lin, Xian; Peng, Shiyong; Jin, Yinghui; Gan, Lin; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) missense and multiplication mutations have been suggested to cause neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies. Before causing the progressive neuronal loss, α-syn mutations impair exocytosis, which may contribute to eventual neurodegeneration. To understand how α-syn mutations impair exocytosis, we developed a mouse model that selectively expressed PD-related human α-syn A53T (h-α-synA53T) mutation at the calyx of Held terminals, where release mechanisms can be dissected with a patch-clamping technique. With capacitance measurement of endocytosis, we reported that h-α-synA53T, either expressed transgenically or dialyzed in the short term in calyces, inhibited two of the most common forms of endocytosis, the slow and rapid vesicle endocytosis at mammalian central synapses. The expression of h-α-synA53T in calyces also inhibited vesicle replenishment to the readily releasable pool. These findings may help to understand how α-syn mutations impair neurotransmission before neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT α-Synuclein (α-syn) missense or multiplication mutations may cause neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The initial impact of α-syn mutations before neuronal loss is impairment of exocytosis, which may contribute to eventual neurodegeneration. The mechanism underlying impairment of exocytosis is poorly understood. Here we report that an α-syn mutant, the human α-syn A53T, inhibited two of the most commonly observed forms of endocytosis, slow and rapid endocytosis, at a mammalian central synapse. We also found that α-syn A53T inhibited vesicle replenishment to the readily releasable pool. These results may contribute to accounting for the widely observed early synaptic impairment caused by α-syn mutations in the progression toward neurodegeneration. PMID:27098685

  3. Ferulic Acid Suppresses Glutamate Release Through Inhibition of Voltage-Dependent Calcium Entry in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the effects and possible mechanism of ferulic acid, a naturally occurring phenolic compound, on endogenous glutamate release in the nerve terminals of the cerebral cortex in rats. Results show that ferulic acid inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effect of ferulic acid on the evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca2+ ions, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate. Ferulic acid suppressed the depolarization-induced increase in a cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration, but did not alter 4-AP–mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of ferulic acid on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These results show that ferulic acid inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry. PMID:23342970

  4. Neurogenic Inflammation in Stress-Induced Termination of Murine Hair Growth Is Promoted by Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Eva Milena J.; Handjiski, Bori; Kuhlmei, Arne; Hagen, Evelin; Bielas, Hannes; Braun, Armin; Klapp, Burghard F.; Paus, Ralf; Arck, Petra Clara

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have revealed the existence of a “brain-hair follicle axis” in murine skin and have identified the neuropeptide substance P (SP) as a key mediator of stress-induced hair growth inhibition in vivo. Published evidence suggests that increased numbers of SP-immunoreactive sensory fibers, as seen in the dermis of stressed mice in anagen-catagen transition, are a result of transient high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF). Thus, we now aimed at dissecting the role of NGF in stress-triggered hair growth termination in our murine model. By real time PCR and immunohistochemistry, stress-exposed mice showed an up-regulation of NGF and its low-affinity receptor p75NTR; the NGF high-affinity receptor TrkA was moderately down-regulated. On neutralization of NGF, premature onset of catagen, apoptosis, and increased number/activation of perifollicular mast cells and antigen-presenting cells, which reflects the skin response to stress, was significantly abrogated. Stress or subcutaneous injection of recombinant NGF (to mimic stress) resulted in an increased percentage of SP+ neurons in dorsal root ganglia, as measured by retrograde tracing. Taken together, these data suggest that NGF is a central element in the perifollicular neurogenic inflammation that develops during the murine skin response to stress and antagonizing NGF may be a promising therapeutic approach to counter the negative effect of stress on hair growth. PMID:15215181

  5. Targeted delivery into motor nerve terminals of inhibitors for SNARE-cleaving proteases via liposomes coupled to an atoxic botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Edupuganti, Om P; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Zurawski, Tomas H; Schmidt, James J; Smith, Leonard; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2012-07-01

    A targeted drug carrier (TDC) is described for transferring functional proteins or peptides into motor nerve terminals, a pivotal locus for therapeutics to treat neuromuscular disorders. It exploits the pronounced selectivity of botulinum neurotoxin type B (BoNT/B) for interacting with acceptors on these cholinergic nerve endings and becoming internalized. The gene encoding an innocuous BoNT/B protease-inactive mutant (BoTIM) was fused to that for core streptavidin, expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein was conjugated to surface-biotinylated liposomes. Such decorated liposomes, loaded with fluorescein as traceable cargo, acquired pronounced specificity for motor nerve terminals in isolated mouse hemidiaphragms and facilitated the intraneuronal transfer of the fluor, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Delivery of the protease light chain of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) via this TDC accelerated the onset of neuromuscular paralysis, indicative of improved translocation of this enzyme into the presynaptic cytosol with subsequent proteolytic inactivation of synaptosomal-associated protein of molecular mass 25 kDa (SNAP-25), an exocytotic soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) essential for neurotransmitter release. BoTIM-coupled liposomes, loaded with peptide inhibitors of proteases, yielded considerable attenuation of the neuroparalytic effects of BoNT/A or BoNT/F as a result of their cytosolic transfer, the first in situ demonstration of the ability of designer antiproteases to suppress the symptoms of botulism ex vivo. Delivery of the BoNT/A inhibitor by liposomes targeted with the full-length BoTIM proved more effective than that mediated by its C-terminal neuroacceptor-binding domain. This demonstrated versatility of TDC for nonviral cargo transfer into cholinergic nerve endings has unveiled its potential for direct delivery of functional targets into motor nerve endings.

  6. Renal afferents responsive to chemical and mechanical pelvic stimuli in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Pieruzzi, F; Camisasca, P; Golin, R; Zanchetti, A; Stella, A

    1997-05-01

    1. Afferent nerve fibres sensitive to changes in the renal chemical environment have been found in the rat. To verify the existence of these fibres in the rabbit and their response pattern, afferent renal nerve activity was recorded during pelvic perfusions with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. 2. The experiments were carried out in 13 anaesthetized rabbits. Arterial pressure from a femoral catheter and afferent renal nerve activity from the distal stump of a cut renal nerve bundle were recorded. Three catheters were inserted into the renal pelvis to measure pelvic pressure, to allow pelvic perfusions at constant rates and to drain pelvic fluids. 3. After a control period, the pelvis was perfused with physiological saline (0.14 mol/l for 2 min), followed by one of a series of solutions containing increasing concentrations of NaCl (0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 mol/l for 2 min). Pelvic perfusion was performed both at a low (0.2 ml/min) and a high (0.8 ml/min) flow rate for each solution tested. 4. In all animals arterial pressure was not modified during pelvic perfusions. Physiological saline did not change afferent renal nerve activity at the low perfusion rate, but it significantly increased afferent renal nerve activity and pelvic pressure at the high rate. Hypertonic NaCl solutions caused progressive increases in afferent renal nerve activity at both perfusion rates, and these effects were larger at the high perfusion rate. 5. These data demonstrate, in the rabbit, the existence of renal afferent nerves sensitive to discrete changes in pelvic ionic or osmotic concentration. The neural response is enhanced when renal mechano- and chemo-receptors are simultaneously activated.

  7. The projection and synaptic organisation of NTS afferent connections with presympathetic neurons, GABA and nNOS neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Affleck, V S; Coote, J H; Pyner, S

    2012-09-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity, strongly associated with cardiovascular disease, is partly generated from the presympathetic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The PVN-presympathetic neurons regulating cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic activity receive information about cardiovascular status from receptors in the heart and circulation. These receptors signal changes via afferent neurons terminating in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), some of which may result in excitation or inhibition of PVN-presympathetic neurons. Understanding the anatomy and neurochemistry of NTS afferent connections within the PVN could provide important clues to the impairment in homeostasis cardiovascular control associated with disease. Transynaptic labelling has shown the presence of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing neurons and GABA interneurons that terminate on presympathetic PVN neurons any of which may be the target for NTS afferents. So far NTS connections to these diverse neuronal pools have not been demonstrated and were investigated in this study. Anterograde (biotin dextran amine - BDA) labelling of the ascending projection from the NTS and retrograde (fluorogold - FG or cholera toxin B subunit - CTB) labelling of PVN presympathetic neurons combined with immunohistochemistry for GABA and nNOS was used to identify the terminal neuronal targets of the ascending projection from the NTS. It was shown that NTS afferent terminals are apposed to either PVN-GABA interneurons or to nitric oxide producing neurons or even directly to presympathetic neurons. Furthermore, there was evidence that some NTS axons were positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGLUT2). The data provide an anatomical basis for the different functions of cardiovascular receptors that mediate their actions via the NTS-PVN pathways.

  8. Cationic influences upon synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse of the frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of inorganic cations (K+, Na+, and Ca2+) bathing the isolated frog labyrinth were varied in order to assess their role in influencing and mediating synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse. Experiments employed intracellular recordings of synaptic activity from VIIIth nerve afferents. Recordings were digitized continuously at 50 kHz, and excitatory postsynaptic potentials were detected and parameters quantified by computer algorithms. Particular attention was focused on cationic effects upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence and excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude, in order to discriminate between pre- and postsynaptic actions. Because the small size of afferents preclude long term stable recordings, alterations in cationic concentrations were applied transiently and their peak effects on synaptic activity were assessed. Increases in extracellular K+ concentration of a few millimolar produced a large increase in the frequency of occurrence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials with little change in amplitude, indicating that release of transmitter from the hair cell is tightly coupled to its membrane potential. Increasing extracellular Na+ concentration resulted in an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude with no significant change in excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence, suggesting that the transmitter-gated subsynaptic channel conducts Na+ ions. Decreases in extracellular Ca2+ concentration had little effect upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency, but increased excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency and amplitude. These findings suggest that at higher concentrations Ca2+ act presynaptically to prevent transmitter release and postsynaptically to prevent Na+ influx during the generation of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. The influences of these ions on synaptic activity at this synapse are remarkably similar to those reported at the

  9. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping the mesenteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation

  10. Comparison of nerve terminal events in vivo effecting retrograde transport of vesicles containing neurotrophins or synaptic vesicle components.

    PubMed

    Weible, M W; Ozsarac, N; Grimes, M L; Hendry, I A

    2004-03-15

    Although vesicular retrograde transport of neurotrophins in vivo is well established, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that underlie vesicle endocytosis and formation before transport. We demonstrate that in vivo not all retrograde transport vesicles are alike, nor are they all formed using identical mechanisms. As characterized by density, there are at least two populations of vesicles present in the synaptic terminal that are retrogradely transported along the axon: those containing neurotrophins (NTs) and those resulting from synaptic vesicle recycling. Vesicles containing nerve growth factor (NGF), NT-3, or NT-4 had similar densities with peak values at about 1.05 g/ml. Synaptic-derived vesicles, labeled with anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), had densities with peak values at about 1.16 g/ml. We assayed the effects of pharmacologic agents in vivo on retrograde transport from the anterior eye chamber to the superior cervical ganglion. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH (PI-3) kinase and actin function blocked transport of both anti-DBH and NGF, demonstrating an essential role for these molecules in retrograde transport of both vesicle types. Dynamin, a key element in synaptic vesicle recycling, was axonally transported in retrograde and anterograde directions, and compounds able to interfere with dynamin function had a differential effect on retrograde transport of NTs and anti-DBH. Okadaic acid significantly decreased retrograde axonal transport of anti-DBH and increased NGF retrograde transport. We conclude that there are both different and common proteins involved in endocytosis and targeting of retrograde transport of these two populations of vesicles. PMID:14994338

  11. The relationship between the size of a muscle afferent volley and the cerebral potential it produces.

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, S; Burke, D; McKeon, B

    1982-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the size of an afferent neural input produced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle and the size of the early components of the evoked cerebral potential. For five of six subjects the first peak of the afferent neural volley recorded in the popliteal fossa was uncontaminated by either motor efferents or cutaneous afferents. This was established by measuring the conduction times of motor fibres in the posterior tibial nerve and cutaneous fibres in the sural and posterior tibial nerves over the ankle to popliteal fossa segment. It is likely therefore that the first peak of the afferent volley contained predominantly, if not exclusively, activity in rapidly conducting afferents from the small muscles of the foot. The size of the two earliest components of the cerebral potential did not increase in direct proportion to the size of the afferent volley which produced it. The early components of the cerebral potential reached a maximum when the responsible muscle afferent volley was less than 50% of its maximum. PMID:6290605

  12. P2X3 antagonists: novel therapeutics for afferent sensitization and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ford, Anthony P

    2012-05-01

    SUMMARY Despite decades of innovation and effort, the pharmaceutical needs of countless patients with chronic pain remain underserved. Effective and safe treatments must clearly come from novel approaches, yet targets and molecules selected hitherto have returned little benefit. Antagonism of P2X3 purinoceptors on pain-conveying nerves is a highly novel approach, and compounds from this class are advancing into patient studies. P2X3 channels are found in C- and Aδ-primary afferent neurons in most tissues, and are strikingly specific to pain detection. P2X3 antagonists block peripheral activation of these fibers via ATP, released from most cells by inflammation, injury, stress and distension, and clearly provide an alternative pharmacological mechanism to attenuate pain signals. P2X3 is also expressed presynaptically at central spinal terminals of afferent neurons, where ATP further sensitizes painful signals en route to the brain. The selectivity of P2X3 expression allows hope of a lower potential for adverse effects in brain, gut and cardiovascular tissues - limiting factors for most analgesics. P2X3 receptor-mediated sensitization has been implicated in rodent models in inflammatory, visceral, neuropathic and cancer pain states, as well as in airways hyper-reactivity, migraine and visceral organ irritability. Although we are often reminded that the effects of new medicines can translate poorly into clinical effectiveness, the broad efficacy seen following P2X3 inhibition in rodent models strengthens the prospect that an unprecedented mechanism to counter sensitization of afferent pathways may offer some merciful relief to millions of patients struggling daily with persistent discomfort and pain.

  13. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  14. Age-related decrease of the chorda tympani nerve terminal field in the nucleus of the solitary tract is prevented by dietary sodium restriction during development.

    PubMed

    Sollars, S I; Walker, B R; Thaw, A K; Hill, D L

    2006-01-01

    Institution of a low-NaCl diet beginning at embryonic day 3 and continued throughout pre- and postnatal development has widespread effects on the neuroanatomical organization of the first gustatory relay in the nucleus of the solitary tract. To determine when these effects are expressed postnatally, the terminal field of the chorda tympani nerve was compared between sodium-restricted and sodium-replete rats at postnatal days 15-17, postnatal days 25-27, postnatal days 35-37, and adults. Total terminal fields were significantly larger in postnatal days 35-37 and adult sodium-restricted rats compared with aged-matched controls. The group-related differences appear related more to a remodeling of the terminal field in the dorsal zone of the terminal field in controls. Specifically, the terminal field volume in the dorsal zone in controls decreased dramatically from postnatal days 25-27 to postnatal days 35-37 and then again from postnatal days 35-37 to adulthood. In contrast, the fields did not change during development in sodium-restricted rats. These findings suggest that remodeling of the chorda tympani field occurs in controls at about the developmental period of taste response maturation. The lack of remodeling in sodium-restricted rats may be explained by a corresponding lack of functional response development to sodium salts. These results also illustrate the specificity and extent of how early dietary manipulations shape the developing brainstem.

  15. Characterization of primary afferent spinal innervation of mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Herweijer, Geraldine; Kyloh, Melinda; Beckett, Elizabeth A H; Dodds, Kelsi N; Spencer, Nick J

    2014-01-01

    The primary afferent innervation of the uterus is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the location and characteristics of primary afferent neurons that innervate the uterine horn of mice and correlate the different morphological types of putative primary afferent nerve endings, immunoreactive to the sensory marker, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Using retrograde tracing, injection of 5-10 μL of 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) into discrete single sites in each uterine horn revealed a biomodal distribution of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) with peak labeling occurring between T13-L3 and a second smaller peak between L6-S1. The mean cross sectional area of labeled cells was 463 μm(2) ± s.e.m. A significantly greater proportion of labeled neurons consisted of small cell bodies (<300 μm(2)) in the sacral spinal cord (S2) compared with peak labeling at the lumbar (L2) region. In both sections and whole mount preparations, immunohistochemical staining for CGRP revealed substantial innervation of the uterus by CGRP-positive nerve fibers located primarily at the border between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers (N = 4). The nerve endings were classified into three distinct types: "single," "branching," or "complex," that often aligned preferentially in either the circular or longitudinal axis of the smooth muscles. Complex endings were often associated with mesenteric vessels. We have identified that the cell bodies of primary afferent neurons innervating the mouse uterus lie primarily in DRG at L2 and S1 spinal levels. Also, the greatest density of CGRP immunoreactivity lies within the myometrium, with at least three different morphological types of nerve endings identified. These findings will facilitate further investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory transduction in mouse uterus. PMID:25120416

  16. Neurotoxic Potential of Lunar and Martian Dust: Influence on Em, Proton Gradient, Active Transport, and Binding of Glutamate in Rat Brain Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[14C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[14C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na+] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation

  17. Mechanosensory transduction of vagal and baroreceptor afferents revealed by study of isolated nodose neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Snitsarev, Vladislav; Whiteis, Carol A; Abboud, Francois M; Chapleau, Mark W

    2002-06-28

    Changes in arterial pressure and blood volume are sensed by baroreceptor and vagal afferent nerves innervating aorta and heart with soma in nodose ganglia. The inability to measure membrane potential at the nerve terminals has limited our understanding of mechanosensory transduction. Goals of the present study were to: (1) Characterize membrane potential and action potential responses to mechanical stimulation of isolated nodose sensory neurons in culture; and (2) Determine whether the degenerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENaC) blocker amiloride selectively blocks mechanically induced depolarization without suppressing membrane excitability. Membrane potential of isolated rat nodose neurons was measured with sharp microelectrodes. Mechanical stimulation with buffer ejected from a micropipette (5, 10, 20 psi) depolarized 6 of 10 nodose neurons (60%) in an intensity-dependent manner. The depolarization evoked action potentials in 4 of the 6 neurons. Amiloride (1 microM) essentially abolished mechanically induced depolarization (15 +/- 4 mV during control vs. 1 +/- 2 mV during amiloride with 20-psi stimulation, n = 6) and action potential discharge. In contrast, amiloride did not inhibit the frequency of action potential discharge in response to depolarizing current injection (n = 6). In summary, mechanical stimulation depolarizes and triggers action potentials in a subpopulation of nodose sensory neurons in culture. The DEG/ENaC blocker amiloride at a concentration of 1 microM inhibits responses to mechanical stimulation without suppressing membrane excitability. The results support the hypothesis that DEG/ENaC subunits are components of mechanosensitive ion channels on vagal afferent and baroreceptor neurons. PMID:12144042

  18. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  19. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic

  20. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD. PMID:24595534

  1. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  2. Determinants of Spatial and Temporal Coding by Semicircular Canal Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Stephen M.; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Holstein, Gay R.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular semicircular canals are internal sensors that signal the magnitude, direction, and temporal properties of angular head motion. Fluid mechanics within the 3-canal labyrinth code the direction of movement and integrate angular acceleration stimuli over time. Directional coding is accomplished by decomposition of complex angular accelerations into 3 biomechanical components—one component exciting each of the 3 ampullary organs and associated afferent nerve bundles separately. For low-frequency angular motion stimuli, fluid displacement within each canal is proportional to angular acceleration. At higher frequencies, above the lower corner frequency, real-time integration is accomplished by viscous forces arising from the movement of fluid within the slender lumen of each canal. This results in angular velocity sensitive fluid displacements. Reflecting this, a subset of afferent fibers indeed report angular acceleration to the brain for low frequencies of head movement and report angular velocity for higher frequencies. However, a substantial number of afferent fibers also report angular acceleration, or a signal between acceleration and velocity, even at frequencies where the endolymph displacement is known to follow angular head velocity. These non-velocity-sensitive afferent signals cannot be attributed to canal biomechanics alone. The responses of non-velocity-sensitive cells include a mathematical differentiation (first-order or fractional) imparted by hair-cell and/or afferent complexes. This mathematical differentiation from velocity to acceleration cannot be attributed to hair cell ionic currents, but occurs as a result of the dynamics of synaptic transmission between hair cells and their primary afferent fibers. The evidence for this conclusion is reviewed below. PMID:15845995

  3. KCa1.1 is potential marker for distinguishing Ah-type baroreceptor neurons in NTS and contributes to sex-specific presynaptic neurotransmission in baroreflex afferent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Yao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Qu, Mei-Yu; Guo, Xin-Jing; Li, Guo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yang; Ban, Tao; Sun, Hong-Li; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-09-14

    Sexual-dimorphic neurocontrol of circulation has been described in baroreflex due largely to the function of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs, 1st-order) in nodose. However, it remains unclear if sex- and afferent-specific neurotransmission could also be observed in the central synapses within nucleus of solitary track (NTS, 2nd-order). According to the principle of no mixed neurotransmission among afferents and differentiation of Ah- and A-types to iberiotoxin (IbTX) observed in nodose, the 2nd-order Ah-type BRNs are highly expected. To test this hypothesis, the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in identified 2nd-order BRNs before and after IbTX using brain slice and whole-cell patch. These results showed that, in male rats, the dynamics of EPSCs in capsaicin-sensitive C-types were dramatically altered by IbTX, but not in capsaicin-insensitive A-types. Interestingly, near 50% capsaicin-insensitive neurons in females showed similar effects to C-types, suggesting the existence of Ah-types in NTS, which may be the likely reason why the females had lower blood pressure and higher sensitivity to aortic depressor nerve stimulation via KCa1.1-mediated presynaptic glutamate release from Ah-type afferent terminals.

  4. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  5. Physiological and anatomical characteristics of primary vestibular afferent neurons in the bullfrog.

    PubMed

    Honrubia, V; Sitko, S; Kimm, J; Betts, W; Schwartz, I

    1981-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in the VIIIth nerve of the bullfrog (Rana catesbiana) to measure the membrane characteristics and obtain records of spontaneous and evoked spike activity of primary semicircular canal afferents. Physiological stimulation of the canals was achieved by rotating the preparation on a servomotor driven turntable with the animals' head centered in the rotational axis. The responses of each neuron to sinusoidal rotations at frequencies of 0.05Hz, 0.5Hz and for impulsive accelerations of 400 deg/sec2 were obtained. Membrane characteristics measured included the cell resting and action potential amplitude, and spike-activation threshold for applied currents. Physiologically characterized neurons were injected with horseradish peroxidase by applying pneumatic pressure and/or iontophoretic currents to the micropipettes containing 5% HRP in 1 M KCI. Following survival times of 12--48 h, the VIIIth nerve and attached vestibular end organ was removed for histochemical processing using a diaminobenzidine procedure to visualize the HRP reaction product. Light microscopy was used to discern the anatomical features of the neurons and to trace their peripheral dendritic trajectories from the ganglion to their termination(s) in the crista. Our studies have revealed that the bullfrog's primary vestibular afferents are characterized by a broad range of soma and axon diameters which correspond to an equally broad range of spontaneous and evoked activity characteristics. The largest neurons had more irregular spontaneous firing rates and consistently exhibited the greatest gain and smallest phase shifts with respect to head acceleration. These neurons consistently terminated at or near the central region of the crista. On the other hand, the smallest neurons were characterized by having the most regular spontaneous discharge patterns, the lowest gains, and greatest phase shifts with respect to head acceleration. Our findings are thus consistent with the

  6. Synaptic ultrastructure changes in trigeminocervical complex posttrigeminal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Park, John; Trinh, Van Nancy; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Li, Kang-Wu; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z David

    2016-02-01

    Trigeminal nerves collecting sensory information from the orofacial area synapse on second-order neurons in the dorsal horn of subnucleus caudalis and cervical C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2, or trigeminocervical complex), which is critical for sensory information processing. Injury to the trigeminal nerves may cause maladaptive changes in synaptic connectivity that plays an important role in chronic pain development. Here we examined whether injury to the infraorbital nerve, a branch of the trigeminal nerves, led to synaptic ultrastructural changes when the injured animals have developed neuropathic pain states. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic profiles in Vc/C2 at 3 weeks postinjury, corresponding to the time of peak behavioral hypersensitivity following chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Using established criteria, synaptic profiles were classified as associated with excitatory (R-), inhibitory (F-), and primary afferent (C-) terminals. Each type was counted within the superficial dorsal horn of the Vc/C2 and the means from each rat were compared between sham and injured animals; synaptic contact length was also measured. The overall analysis indicates that rats with orofacial pain states had increased numbers and decreased mean synaptic length of R-profiles within the Vc/C2 superficial dorsal horn (lamina I) 3 weeks post-CCI-ION. Increases in the number of excitatory synapses in the superficial dorsal horn of Vc/C2 could lead to enhanced activation of nociceptive pathways, contributing to the development of orofacial pain states.

  7. Activation of the galanin receptor 2 in the periphery reverses nerve injury-induced allodynia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Galanin is expressed at low levels in the intact sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia with a dramatic increase after peripheral nerve injury. The neuropeptide is also expressed in primary afferent terminals in the dorsal horn, spinal inter-neurons and in a number of brain regions known to modulate nociception. Intrathecal administration of galanin modulates sensory responses in a dose-dependent manner with inhibition at high doses. To date it is unclear which of the galanin receptors mediates the anti-nociceptive effects of the neuropeptide and whether their actions are peripherally and/or centrally mediated. In the present study we investigated the effects of direct administration into the receptive field of galanin and the galanin receptor-2/3-agonist Gal2-11 on nociceptive primary afferent mechanical responses in intact rats and mice and in the partial saphenous nerve injury (PSNI) model of neuropathic pain. Results Exogenous galanin altered the responses of mechano-nociceptive C-fibre afferents in a dose-dependent manner in both naive and nerve injured animals, with low concentrations facilitating and high concentrations markedly inhibiting mechano-nociceptor activity. Further, use of the galanin fragment Gal2-11 confirmed that the effects of galanin were mediated by activation of galanin receptor-2 (GalR2). The inhibitory effects of peripheral GalR2 activation were further supported by our demonstration that after PSNI, mechano-sensitive nociceptors in galanin over-expressing transgenic mice had significantly higher thresholds than in wild type animals, associated with a marked reduction in spontaneous neuronal firing and C-fibre barrage into the spinal cord. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the high level of endogenous galanin in injured primary afferents activates peripheral GalR2, which leads to an increase in C-fibre mechanical activation thresholds and a marked reduction in evoked and ongoing nociceptive

  8. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  9. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  10. Mechanisms underlying presynaptic Ca2+ transient and vesicular glutamate release at a CNS nerve terminal during in vitro ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Yi; Kim, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Key points Here we demonstrate presynaptic responses and mechanisms of increased vesicular glutamate release during in vitro ischaemia in the calyx of Held terminal, an experimentally accessible presynaptic terminal in the CNS. The ischaemia-induced increase in presynaptic Ca2+ was mediated by both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The reverse operation of the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) plays a key role in Ca2+ influx for triggering Ca2+ release from intracellular stores at presynaptic terminals during in vitro ischaemia. Ca2+ uptake via NCX underlies the ischaemia-induced Ca2+ rise and the consequent increase in vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in the early phase of brain ischaemia. Abstract An early consequence of brain ischaemia is an increase in vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals. However, the mechanisms of this increased glutamate release are not fully understood. Here we studied presynaptic responses and mechanisms of increased glutamate release during in vitro ischaemia, using pre- and postsynaptic whole-cell recordings and presynaptic Ca2+ imaging at the calyx of Held synapse in rat brainstem slices. Consistent with results from other brain regions, in vitro ischaemia significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) without affecting their amplitude, suggesting that ischaemia enhances vesicular glutamate release from presynaptic terminals. We found that ischaemia-induced vesicular glutamate release was dependent on a rise in basal Ca2+ at presynaptic terminals, which resulted from extracellular Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. During early ischaemia, increased Ca2+ influx into presynaptic terminals was due to reverse operation of the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) rather than presynaptic depolarization or voltage-activated Ca2+ currents. KB-R7943, an inhibitor of NCX, prevented the

  11. Octreotide inhibits capsaicin-induced activation of C and Aδ afferent fibres in rat hairy skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Guo, Yuan; Ma, Shao-Jie; Luo, Rong; Pickar, Joel G; Zhao, Yan

    2011-08-01

    1. The present study investigated whether the somatostatin receptor (SSTR) agonist, octreotide, could inhibit the activation of dorsal skin afferent fibres induced by local injection of capsaicin in the rat. 2. Single unit activity from Aδ mechano-heat sensitive (AMH; n = 41) and C mechano-heat sensitive (CMH; n = 30) afferents was recorded after their isolation in thin filaments from the dorsal cutaneous nerve branches. The effect of subcutaneous octreotide injection on the change in discharge rate and mechanical threshold induced by capsaicin was determined. 3. Capsaicin (0.05%) injection into the edge of the receptive field of both AMH and CMH units increased their discharge rate and decreased their mechanical threshold. Pre-injection of octreotide inhibited these responses, and co-application of SSTR antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reversed the inhibitory effect of octreotide. 4. The present study provides electrophysiological evidence that the signal evoked by the somatostatin receptor inhibits the activation and mechanical sensitization evoked by capsaicin in the terminals in small-diameter sensory neurons.

  12. Bothropstoxin-I reduces evoked acetylcholine release from rat motor nerve terminals: radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Noronha-Matos, José B; Timóteo, Maria A; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Marques, Patrícia; Soares, Andreimar M; Carvalho, Cicilia; Cavalcante, Walter L G; Gallacci, Márcia

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological activity profile of the snake venom components is fundamental for improving the treatment of snakebite envenomings and may also contribute for the development of new potential therapeutic agents. In this work, we tested the effects of BthTX-I, a Lys49 PLA(2) homologue from the Bothrops jararacussu snake venom. While this toxin induces conspicuous myonecrosis by a catalytically independent mechanism, a series of in vitro studies support the hypothesis that BthTX-I might also exert a neuromuscular blocking activity due to its ability to alter the integrity of muscle cell membranes. To gain insight into the mechanisms of this inhibitory neuromuscular effect, for the first time, the influence of BthTX-I on nerve-evoked ACh release was directly quantified by radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy methods. Our results show that the neuromuscular blockade produced by in vitro exposure to BthTX-I (1 μM) results from the summation of both pre- and postsynaptic effects. Modifications affecting the presynaptic apparatus were revealed by the significant reduction of nerve-evoked [(3)H]-ACh release; real-time measurements of transmitter exocytosis using the FM4-64 fluorescent dye fully supported radiochemical data. The postsynaptic effect of BthTX-I was characterized by typical histological alterations in the architecture of skeletal muscle fibers, increase in the outflow of the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and progressive depolarization of the muscle resting membrane potential. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the neuromuscular blockade produced by BthTX-I results from transient depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers, consequent to its general membrane-destabilizing effect, and subsequent decrease of evoked ACh release from motor nerve terminals. PMID:23142504

  13. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  14. Distribution of presumptive chemosensory afferents with FMRFamide- or substance P-like immunoreactivity in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M

    1997-01-23

    In five species of decapod crustaceans--Cherax destructor (crayfish), Carcinus maenas (crab), Homarus americanus (clawed lobster), Eriocheir sinensis (crab), Macrobrachium rosenbergii (shrimp)--immunocytochemical stainings revealed the presence of sensory afferents with FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system. These afferents were extremely thin, very numerous, and innervated all sensory neuropils except the optic and olfactory lobes. In their target neuropils they gave rise to condensed net- or ball-like terminal structures. Only in Homarus americanus but not in any other studied species immunocytochemistry revealed a separate, non-overlapping class of sensory afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity. Also the afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity were very thin and numerous, innervated all sensory neuropils except optic and olfactory lobes, and gave rise to condensed terminal structures. From their morphological characteristics it can be concluded that likely both classes of afferents are chemosensory. The substance P-like immunoreactivity suggests a link with the nociceptor afferents of vertebrates, with which both classes of afferents share several other morphological features.

  15. Renal afferents signaling diuretic activity in the cat.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Pieruzzi, F; Wijnmaalen, P; Centonza, L; Golin, R; Zanchetti, A; Stella, A

    1993-11-01

    Mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors have been identified inside the kidney, but their functional role is still largely unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in urine output could modify the discharge rate of renal afferent fibers. Experiments were performed in anesthetized cats in which afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA) was recorded by standard electrophysiological techniques from a centrally cut renal nerve. Arterial pressure, renal blood flow velocity, urine flow rate, and renal pelvic pressure were also measured. Three diuretic maneuvers were tested in the same cat: intravenous administration of physiological saline (8 to 13 mL/min for 2 minutes), furosemide (1 mg/kg), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, 1 microgram/kg). The three maneuvers increased urine flow rate and pelvic pressure, respectively, 137.0 +/- 20.6% and 136.8 +/- 21.1% (saline), 148.6 +/- 31.7% and 139.6 +/- 43.5% (furosemide), and 75.9 +/- 7.9% and 62.1 +/- 21.2% (ANP) at the time of the maximum response. Arterial pressure slightly increased after saline, did not change after furosemide, and slightly decreased after ANP. Renal blood flow increased after saline and did not change after furosemide and ANP. The three maneuvers increased ARNA by 98.4 +/- 15.2% (saline), 270.7 +/- 100.8% (furosemide), and 59.6 +/- 23.4% (ANP). Changes in ARNA significantly correlate with changes in both pelvic pressure and urine flow rate. Our data demonstrate that increments in urine flow rate increase the firing rate of renal afferent fibers and suggest that (1) pelvic pressure is the major determinant of the neural response, and (2) this increased afferent discharge is due to activation of renal mechanoreceptors.

  16. Bassoon, a novel zinc-finger CAG/glutamine-repeat protein selectively localized at the active zone of presynaptic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    tom Dieck, S; Sanmartí-Vila, L; Langnaese, K; Richter, K; Kindler, S; Soyke, A; Wex, H; Smalla, K H; Kämpf, U; Fränzer, J T; Stumm, M; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D

    1998-07-27

    The molecular architecture of the cytomatrix of presynaptic nerve terminals is poorly understood. Here we show that Bassoon, a novel protein of >400,000 Mr, is a new component of the presynaptic cytoskeleton. The murine bassoon gene maps to chromosome 9F. A comparison with the corresponding rat cDNA identified 10 exons within its protein-coding region. The Bassoon protein is predicted to contain two double-zinc fingers, several coiled-coil domains, and a stretch of polyglutamines (24 and 11 residues in rat and mouse, respectively). In some human proteins, e.g., Huntingtin, abnormal amplification of such poly-glutamine regions causes late-onset neurodegeneration. Bassoon is highly enriched in synaptic protein preparations. In cultured hippocampal neurons, Bassoon colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin and Piccolo, a presynaptic cytomatrix component. At the ultrastructural level, Bassoon is detected in axon terminals of hippocampal neurons where it is highly concentrated in the vicinity of the active zone. Immunogold labeling of synaptosomes revealed that Bassoon is associated with material interspersed between clear synaptic vesicles, and biochemical studies suggest a tight association with cytoskeletal structures. These data indicate that Bassoon is a strong candidate to be involved in cytomatrix organization at the site of neurotransmitter release.

  17. Interleukin-1β sensitizes abdominal visceral afferents of cats to ischaemia and histamine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    1999-01-01

    produced during brief abdominal ischaemia contributes to activation of visceral afferents during ischaemia, at least in part, by sensitizing the afferent nerve endings to ischaemia. Our data also show that exogenous IL-1β sensitizes visceral afferents to histamine. PMID:10562349

  18. Estradiol alters the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex in female rats by augmenting sympathoinhibition and attenuating sympathoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-06-01

    The chemosensitive cardiac vagal and sympathetic afferent reflexes are implicated in driving pathophysiological changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in cardiovascular disease states. This study investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex. Experiments were performed in anaesthetized, sinoaortic baroreceptor denervated male, female and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats with either intact cardiac innervation or bilateral vagotomy. To investigate the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflexes renal SNA, heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure (AP) were recorded before and following application of capsaicin onto the epicardial surface of the left ventricle. Compared to males, ovary-intact females displayed similar cardiac afferent reflex mediated changes in renal SNA albeit with a reduced maximum sympathetic reflex driven increase in renal SNA. In females, ovariectomy significantly attenuated the cardiac vagal afferent reflex mediated inhibition of renal SNA (renal SNA decreased 2 ± 17% in OVX versus -50 ± 4% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) and augmented cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex mediated sympathoexcitation (renal SNA increased 91 ± 11% in OVX vs 62 ± 9% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) so that overall increases in reflex driven sympathoexcitation were significantly enhanced. Chronic estradiol replacement, but not progesterone replacement, begun at time of ovariectomy restored cardiac afferent reflex responses to be similar as ovary-intact females. Vagal denervation eliminated all group differences. The current findings show ovariectomy in female rats, mimicking menopause in women, results in greater chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex driven sympathoexcitation and does so, at least partly, via the loss of estradiols actions on the cardiac vagal afferent reflex pathway.

  19. Triazines facilitate neurotransmitter release of synaptic terminals located in hearts of frog (Rana ridibunda) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) and in the ventral nerve cord of a beetle (Tenebrio molitor).

    PubMed

    Papaefthimiou, Chrisovalantis; Zafeiridou, Georgia; Topoglidi, Aglaia; Chaleplis, George; Zografou, Stella; Theophilidis, George

    2003-07-01

    Three triazine herbicides, atrazine, simazine and metribuzine, and some of their major metabolites (cyanuric acid and 6-azauracil) were investigated for their action on synaptic terminals using three different isolated tissue preparations from the atria of the frog, Rana ridibunda, the heart of the honeybee, Apis mellifera macedonica, and the ventral nerve cord of the beetle, Tenebrio molitor. The results indicate that triazines facilitate the release of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals, as already reported for the mammalian central nervous system. The no observed effect concentration, the maximum concentration of the herbicide diluted in the saline that has no effect on the physiological properties of the isolated tissue, was estimated for each individual preparation. According to their relative potency, the three triazines tested can be ranked as follows: atrazine (cyanuric acid), simazine>metribuzine (6-azauracil). The action of these compounds on the cholinergic (amphibians, insects), adrenergic (amphibian) and octopaminergic (insects) synaptic terminals is discussed.

  20. Putative roles of neuropeptides in vagal afferent signaling

    PubMed Central

    de Lartigue, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major pathway by which information is communicated between the brain and peripheral organs. Sensory neurons of the vagus are located in the nodose ganglia. These vagal afferent neurons innervate the heart, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract, and convey information about peripheral signals to the brain important in the control of cardiovascular tone, respiratory tone, and satiation, respectively. Glutamate is thought to be the primary neurotransmitter involved in conveying all of this information to the brain. It remains unclear how a single neurotransmitter can regulate such an extensive list of physiological functions from a wide range of visceral sites. Many neurotransmitters have been identified in vagal afferent neurons and have been suggested to modulate the physiological functions of glutamate. Specifically, the anorectic peptide transmitters, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) and the orexigenic peptide transmitters, melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) are differentially regulated in vagal afferent neurons and have opposing effects on food intake. Using these two peptides as a model, this review will discuss the potential role of peptide transmitters in providing a more precise and refined modulatory control of the broad physiological functions of glutamate, especially in relation to the control of feeding. PMID:24650553

  1. Upregulation of α1-adrenoceptors on cutaneous nerve fibres after partial sciatic nerve ligation and in complex regional pain syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D; Drummond, Eleanor S; Dawson, Linda F; Mitchell, Vanessa; Finch, Philip M; Vaughan, Christopher W; Phillips, Jacqueline K

    2014-03-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, nociceptive afferents acquire an abnormal excitability to adrenergic agents, possibly due to an enhanced expression of α1-adrenoceptors (α1-ARs) on these nerve fibres. To investigate this in the present study, changes in α1-AR expression on nerve fibres in the skin and sciatic nerve trunk were assessed using immunohistochemistry in an animal model of neuropathic pain involving partial ligation of the sciatic nerve. In addition, α1-AR expression on nerve fibres was examined in painful and unaffected skin of patients who developed complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) after a peripheral nerve injury (CRPS type II). Four days after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve, α1-AR expression was greater on dermal nerve fibres that survived the injury than on dermal nerve fibres after sham surgery. This heightened α1-AR expression was observed on nonpeptidergic nociceptive afferents in the injured sciatic nerve, dermal nerve bundles, and the papillary dermis. Heightened expression of α1-AR in dermal nerve bundles after peripheral nerve injury also colocalized with neurofilament 200, a marker of myelinated nerve fibres. In each patient examined, α1-AR expression was greater on nerve fibres in skin affected by CRPS than in unaffected skin from the same patient or from pain-free controls. Together, these findings provide compelling evidence for an upregulation of α1-ARs on cutaneous nociceptive afferents after peripheral nerve injury. Activation of these receptors by circulating or locally secreted catecholamines might contribute to chronic pain in CRPS type II.

  2. Central projections of the wing afferents in the hawkmoth, Agrius convolvuli.

    PubMed

    Ando, Noriyasu; Wang, Hao; Shirai, Koji; Kiguchi, Kenji; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2011-11-01

    Flight behaviors in various insect species are closely correlated with their mechanical and neuronal properties. Compared to locusts and flies which have been intensively studied, moths have "intermediate" properties in terms of the neurogenic muscle activations, power generation by indirect muscles, and two-winged-insect-like flapping behavior. Despite these unique characteristics, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms of flight control in moths. We investigated projections of the wing mechanosensory afferents in the central nervous system (CNS) of the hawkmoth, Agrius convolvuli, because the mechanosensory proprioceptive feedback has an essential role for flight control and would be presumably optimized for insect species. We conducted anterograde staining of nine afferent nerves from the fore- and hindwings. All of these afferents projected into the prothoracic, mesothoracic and metathoracic ganglia (TG1, 2 and 3) and had ascending fibers to the head ganglia. Prominent projection areas in the TG1-3 and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG) were common between the forewing, hindwing and contralateral forewing afferents, suggesting that information from different wings are converged at multiple levels presumably for coordinating wing flapping. On the other hand, differences of projections between the fore- and hindwing afferents were observed especially in projection areas of the tegulae in the TG1 and contralateral projections of the anterior forewing nerve in the TGs and SOG, which would reflect functional differences between corresponding mechanoreceptors on each wing. Afferents comprising groups of the campaniform sensilla at the wing bases had prominent ascending pathways to the SOG, resembling the head-neck motor system for gaze control in flies. Double staining of the wing afferents and flight or neck motoneurons also indicated potential connectivity between them. Our results suggest multiple roles of the wing proprioceptive feedback for flight and provide

  3. The small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel SK3 is localized in nerve terminals of excitatory synapses of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Obermair, Gerald J; Kaufmann, Walter A; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2003-02-01

    In the central nervous system small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels are important for generating the medium/slow afterhyperpolarization seen after single or trains of action potentials. Three SK channel isoforms (SK1,-2,-3) are differentially distributed throughout the brain, but little is known about their specific expression in particular neuronal compartments. In the hippocampus SK3 was found in the neuropil, predominantly in the terminal field of the mossy fibres and in fine varicose fibres, but excluded from the pyramidal and granule cell layers. Because this expression pattern suggested a presynaptic localization, we examined the subcellular distribution of SK3 in cultured hippocampal neurons using high-resolution immunofluorescence analysis. SK3 was localized in a punctate, synaptic pattern. The SK3 clusters were precisely colocalized with the presynaptic marker synapsin and at close range (0.4-0.5 microm) from NMDA-receptors and PSD-95. This arrangement is consistent with a localization of SK3 in the presynaptic nerve terminal, but not restricted to the synaptic membrane proper. In agreement with the increasing expression of SK3 during early postnatal development in vivo, the fraction of synapses containing SK3 increased from 14% to 57% over a six-week culture period. SK3-containing synapses were equally observed on spiny, glutamatergic and smooth GABAergic neurons. In contrast to its close association with NMDA-receptors and PSD-95, SK3 was rarely associated with GABAA-receptor clusters. Thus, SK3 is a presynaptic channel in excitatory hippocampal synapses, with no preference for glutamatergic or GABAergic postsynaptic neurons, and is probably involved in regulating neurotransmitter release.

  4. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-01

    There are ∼1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  5. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-07-01

    There are ∼ 1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  6. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  7. Echinacoside Inhibits Glutamate Release by Suppressing Voltage-Dependent Ca2+ Entry and Protein Kinase C in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng Wei; Lin, Tzu Yu; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-01-01

    The glutamatergic system may be involved in the effects of neuroprotectant therapies. Echinacoside, a phenylethanoid glycoside extracted from the medicinal Chinese herb Herba Cistanche, has neuroprotective effects. This study investigated the effects of echinacoside on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Echinacoside inhibited Ca2+-dependent, but not Ca2+-independent, 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release in a concentration-dependent manner. Echinacoside also reduced the 4-aminopyridine-evoked increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration but did not alter the synaptosomal membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of echinacoside on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was prevented by ω-conotoxin MVIIC, a wide-spectrum blocker of Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but was insensitive to the intracellular Ca2+ release-inhibitors dantrolene and 7-chloro-5-(2-chloropheny)-1,5-dihydro-4,1-benzothiazepin-2(3H)-one (CGP37157). Furthermore, echinacoside decreased the 4-aminopyridine-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C, and protein kinase C inhibitors abolished the effect of echinacoside on glutamate release. According to these results, we suggest that the inhibitory effect of echinacoside on evoked glutamate release is associated with reduced voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and subsequent suppression of protein kinase C activity. PMID:27347934

  8. Modulation of vagal afferent excitation and reduction of food intake by leptin and cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Peters, James H; Simasko, Steven M; Ritter, Robert C

    2006-11-30

    The gut-peptide, cholecystokinin (CCK), reduces food intake by acting at CCK-1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons, whereas the feeding effects of the adipokine hormone, leptin, are associated primarily with its action on receptors (ObRb) in the hypothalamus. Recently, however, ObRb mRNA has been reported in vagal afferent neurons, some of which also express CCK-1 receptor, suggesting that leptin, alone or in cooperation with CCK, might activate vagal afferent neurons, and influence food intake via a vagal route. To evaluate these possibilities we have been examining the cellular and behavioral effects of leptin and CCK on vagal afferent neurons. In cultured vagal afferent neurons leptin and CCK evoked short latency, transient depolarizations, often leading to action potentials, and increases in cytosolic calcium. There was a much higher prevalence of CCK and leptin sensitivity amongst cultured vagal afferent neurons that innervate stomach or duodenum than there was in the overall vagal afferent population. Furthermore, almost all leptin-responsive gastric and duodenal vagal afferents also were sensitive to CCK. Leptin, infused into the upper GI tract arterial supply, reduced meal size, and enhanced satiation evoked by CCK. These results indicate that vagal afferent neurons are activated by leptin, and that this activation is likely to participate in meal termination, perhaps by enhancing vagal sensitivity to CCK. Our findings are consistent with the view that leptin and CCK exert their influence on food intake by accessing multiple neural systems (viscerosensory, motivational, affective and motor) at multiple points along the neuroaxis. PMID:16872644

  9. Excitation of rat colonic afferent fibres by 5-HT3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Gareth A; Coldwell, Jonathan R; Schindler, Marcus; Bland Ward, Philip A; Jenkins, David; Lynn, Penny A; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2002-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains most of the body's 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and releases large amounts after meals or exposure to toxins. Increased 5-HT release occurs in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and their peak plasma 5-HT levels correlate with pain episodes. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists reduce symptoms of IBS clinically, but their site of action is unclear and the potential for other therapeutic targets is unexplored. Here we investigated effects of 5-HT on sensory afferents from the colon and the expression of 5-HT3 receptors on their cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Distal colon, inferior mesenteric ganglion and the lumbar splanchnic nerve bundle (LSN) were placed in a specialized organ bath. Eighty-six single fibres were recorded from the LSN. Three classes of primary afferents were found: 70 high-threshold serosal afferents, four low-threshold muscular afferents and 12 mucosal afferents. Afferent cell bodies were retrogradely labelled from the distal colon to the lumbar DRG, where they were processed for 5-HT3 receptor-like immunoreactivity. Fifty-six percent of colonic afferents responded to 5-HT (between 10−6 and 10−3 M) and 30 % responded to the selective 5-HT3 agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT (between 10−6 and 10−2 M). Responses to 2-methyl-5-HT were blocked by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist alosetron (2 × 10−7 M), whereas responses to 5-HT were only partly inhibited. Twenty-six percent of L1 DRG cell bodies retrogradely labelled from the colon displayed 5-HT3 receptor-like immunoreactivity. We conclude that colonic sensory neurones expressing 5-HT3 receptors also functionally express the receptors at their peripheral endings. Our data reveal actions of 5-HT on colonic afferent endings via both 5-HT3 and non-5-HT3 receptors. PMID:12411529

  10. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S; McMurray, Timothy P; Gebhart, G F

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15-60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14-28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14-28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs.

  11. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S.; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15–60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14–28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14–28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs. PMID:22859364

  12. Activation of guanylate cyclase-C attenuates stretch responses and sensitization of mouse colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Kiyatkin, Michael E.; La, Jun-Ho; Ge, Pei; Solinga, Robert; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by altered bowel habits, persistent pain and discomfort, and typically colorectal hypersensitivity. Linaclotide, a peripherally-restricted 14-amino acid peptide approved for the treatment of IBS with constipation, relieves constipation and reduces IBS-associated pain in these patients presumably by activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), which stimulates production and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated whether activation of GC-C by the endogenous agonist uroguanylin or the primary downstream effector of that activation, cGMP, directly modulates responses and sensitization of mechanosensitive colorectal primary afferents. The distal 2 cm of mouse colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested, pinned flat mucosal side up for in vitro single-fiber recordings and the encoding properties of mechanosensitive afferents (serosal, mucosal, muscular and muscular-mucosal) to probing and circumferential stretch studied. Both cGMP (10–300μM) and uroguanylin (1–1000nM) applied directly to colorectal receptive endings significantly reduced responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents to stretch; serosal and mucosal afferents were not affected. Sensitized responses (i.e., increased responses to stretch) of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents were reversed by cGMP, returning responses to stretch to control. Blocking the transport of cGMP from colorectal epithelia by probenecid, a mechanism validated by studies in cultured intestinal T84 cells, abolished the inhibitory effect of uroguanylin on muscular-mucosal afferents. These results suggest that GC-C agonists like linaclotide alleviate colorectal pain and hypersensitivity by dampening stretch-sensitive afferent mechanosensitivity and normalizing afferent sensitization. PMID:23739979

  13. Structure-function relationships in rat medullary and cervical dorsal horns. I. Trigeminal primary afferents.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, M F; Renehan, W E; Mooney, R D; Rhoades, R W

    1986-06-01

    Intracellular recording and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeling were used to examine structure-function relationships in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) and rostral cervical dorsal horn. In Nembutal-anesthetized rats, 78 trigeminal (V) primary afferent fibers were physiologically characterized and injected with HRP. Axons were sufficiently well stained to reconstruct all of their collaterals in the MDH. Many also extended into the cervical dorsal horn. Except for four axons, which responded best to noxious stimuli, all responded at short (mean = 0.50 ms) latencies to V ganglion shocks and to innocuous stimulation. Forty-five of our recovered fibers were associated with facial vibrissae and responded in either a rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I, slowly adapting type IIa, or slowly adapting type IIb fashion. The adequate stimuli consisted of either slow deflection, high-velocity deflection, or a noxious pinch of the vibrissa follicle. The collaterals of all of the above-described mystacial vibrissa primary afferents proceeded directly to their region of arborization in a plane perpendicular to the lateral border of the medulla to collectively form a largely continuous, circumscribed terminal column. This longitudinally oriented column of terminal and en passant boutons angled from lamina V rostrally to lamina III caudally. In the magnocellular laminae of the MDH, all mystacial vibrissa primary afferents gave rise to similarly shaped arbors, regardless of their functional classification. While morphological variability was observed both within and between individual axons, variance between functional classes was no greater than that within a class. Moreover, number of collaterals, number of boutons, or bouton size did not distinguish functional classes. Nonmystacial vibrissa afferent arbors, with more caudal peripheral fields, had their primary arbor focus in C1 and C2 dorsal horn. These arbors had relatively little rostrocaudal overlap with mystacial

  14. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  15. Myelinated Afferents Are Involved in Pathology of the Spontaneous Electrical Activity and Mechanical Hyperalgesia of Myofascial Trigger Spots in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are common causes for chronic pain. Myelinated afferents were considered to be related with muscular pain, and our clinical researches indicated they might participate in the pathology of MTrPs. Here, we applied myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs, equal to MTrPs in human) of rats to further investigate role of myelinated afferents. Modified pyridine-silver staining revealed more nerve endings at MTrSs than non-MTrSs (P < 0.01), and immunohistochemistry with Neurofilament 200 indicated more myelinated afferents existed in MTrSs (P < 0.01). Spontaneous electrical activity (SEA) recordings at MTrSs showed that specific block of myelinated afferents in sciatic nerve with tetrodotoxin (TTX) led to significantly decreased SEA (P < 0.05). Behavioral assessment showed that mechanical pain thresholds (MPTs) of MTrSs were lower than those of non-MTrSs (P < 0.01). Block of myelinated afferents by intramuscular TTX injection increased MPTs of MTrSs significantly (P < 0.01), while MPTs of non-MTrSs first decreased (P < 0.05) and then increased (P > 0.05). 30 min after the injection, MPTs at MTrSs were significantly lower than those of non-MTrSs (P < 0.01). Therefore, we concluded that proliferated myelinated afferents existed at MTrSs, which were closely related to pathology of SEA and mechanical hyperalgesia of MTrSs. PMID:26064165

  16. [Interaction of abdominal vagus and greater splanchnic nerve activities in the nucleus tractus solitarius of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Huang, Z S

    1990-12-01

    Experiments were performed on 67 rabbits. Effects of stimulation of the central ends of abdominal vagus and greater splanchnic nerve on arterial blood pressure before and after destruction of nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the unit discharges in the NTS before destruction were observed. As a result, we suggest that both the afferents coming from the abdominal vagus and greater splanchnic nerve not only converge on NTS neurons but also interact with each other. Subthreshold stimulation elicited from one of the afferent fibers suppresses the arterial blood pressure responses caused by the other afferent. Similarly, background stimulation elicited from one afferent can suppress the NTS unit discharges caused by the other afferent. It is much easier for abdominal vagal afferent to inhibit the NTS unit discharges and the arterial blood pressure changes elicited by stimulation of the splanchnic nerve. A possible mechanism of such relationship was discussed. PMID:2293366

  17. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  18. Merkel cells transduce and encode tactile stimuli to drive Aβ-afferent impulses

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Ryo; Cha, Myeounghoon; Ling, Jennifer; Jia, Zhanfeng; Coyle, Dennis; Gu, Jianguo G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensory systems for detecting tactile stimuli have evolved from touch-sensing nerves in invertebrates to complicated tactile end-organs in mammals. Merkel discs are tactile end-organs consisting of Merkel cells and Aβ-afferent nerve endings, and are localized in fingertips, whisker hair follicles and other touch-sensitive spots. Merkel discs transduce touch into slowly adapting impulses to enable tactile discrimination, but their transduction and encoding mechanisms remain unknown. Using rat whisker hair follicles, we show that Merkel cells rather than Aβ-afferent nerve endings are primary sites of tactile transduction, and identify the Piezo2 ion channel as the Merkel cell mechanical transducer. Piezo2 transduces tactile stimuli into Ca2+-action potentials in Merkel cells, which drive Aβ-afferent nerve endings to fire slowly adapting impulses. We further demonstrate that Piezo2 and Ca2+-action potentials in Merkel cells are required for behavioral tactile responses. Our findings provide insights into how tactile end-organs function and have clinical implications for tactile dysfunctions. PMID:24746027

  19. Afferent pathways of neural reno-renal reflexes controlling sodium and water excretion in the cat.

    PubMed

    Golin, R; Genovesi, S; Stella, A; Zanchetti, A

    1987-08-01

    We have studied the role of afferent renal nerve fibres in anaesthetized cats in mediating the decrease in sodium and water excretion from the contralateral kidney caused by unilateral renal denervation. Transient denervation of one kidney obtained by cooling of the left renal nerves increases contralateral efferent renal nerve activity and decreased sodium and water excretion from the opposite kidney. The results observed in animals with intact neural pathways were compared with those obtained after the left kidney had been selectively deafferentated by cutting the dorsal roots from T9 to L4. Bilateral section of dorsal roots did not affect the increase in sodium and water excretion from the transiently denervated left kidney, but entirely abolished the decrease in sodium and water excretion from the contralateral kidney. Neither the left nor the right dorsal root section alone, affected the response of the contralateral right kidney. Our data demonstrate that afferent renal nerve fibres project bilaterally to the spinal cord and form the afferent branch of the reno-renal reflex by which one kidney can control the function of the opposite one.

  20. A quantitative study of the central projection patterns of unmyelinated ventral root afferents in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M; McMahon, S B

    1990-01-01

    1. The ventral roots of the spinal cord contain a large number of unmyelinated primary afferent neurones. There is some controversy, however, about the function of these fibres and the route of their central projection. Here we have used electrophysiological techniques to quantify the central projection patterns of these neurones in the segment S2 of adult chloralose-anaesthesized cats. 2. A total of 1185 single unmyelinated units were recorded in small filaments isolated from intact and de-efferented ventral roots or intact dorsal roots of the segment S2 in nineteen cats. The projection patterns of these neurones were tested using supramaximal electrical stimulation of the pelvic and pudendal nerve (the main tributaries of the spinal nerve of this segment) and of the segmental companion root (dorsal or ventral as appropriate). 3. The principal finding of this study is that 85% of unmyelinated afferent axons in the ventral root are direct and exclusive projections. They constitute a separate class of afferents which is only capable of transmitting information from the periphery via the ventral roots. However, the proportion of these fibres that enter the central nervous system is unknown and it seems likely that some of them peter out as they approach the spinal cord and end blindly. The functional role of such afferents remains obscure. 4. For the remaining 15% of unmyelinated ventral root afferents, a projection into the segmental dorsal root was found. The majority of those fibres (about two-thirds) are primary afferent neurones innervating the pia mater. Some of these units had a small spot-like receptive field and responded to mechanical stimuli such as pressure and stretch of the root. They did not have axon projections in a peripheral nerve. 5. A few (5%) unmyelinated ventral root fibres are collateral branches of normal primary afferents projecting through the dorsal root. These trifurcating neurones are a small population which make up only some 0.5% of

  1. Kinetics, Ca2+ dependence, and biophysical properties of integrin-mediated mechanical modulation of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    1997-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals is strongly modulated by change in muscle length. Over the physiological range, there is an approximately 10% increase in spontaneous and evoked release per 1% muscle stretch. Because many muscle fibers do not receive suprathreshold synaptic inputs at rest length, this stretch-induced enhancement of release constitutes a strong peripheral amplifier of the spinal stretch reflex. The stretch modulation of release is inhibited by peptides that block integrin binding of natural ligands. The modulation varies linearly with length, with a delay of no more than approximately 1-2 msec and is maintained constant at the new length. Moreover, the stretch modulation persists in a zero Ca2+ Ringer and, hence, is not dependent on Ca2+ influx through stretch activated channels. Eliminating transmembrane Ca2+ gradients and buffering intraterminal Ca2+ to approximately normal resting levels does not eliminate the modulation, suggesting that it is not the result of release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Finally, changes in temperature have no detectable effect on the kinetics of stretch-induced changes in endplate potential (EPP) amplitude or miniature EPP (mEPP) frequency. We conclude, therefore, that stretch does not act via second messenger pathways or a chemical modification of molecules involved in the release pathway. Instead, there is direct mechanical modulation of release. We postulate that tension on integrins in the presynaptic membrane is transduced mechanically into changes in the position or conformation of one or more molecules involved in neurotransmitter release, altering sensitivity to Ca2+ or the equilibrium for a critical reaction leading to vesicle fusion.

  2. Acquisition of Spontaneous Electrical Activity During Embryonic Development of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-3 Neurons Located in the Terminal Nerve of Transgenic Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Lee, Wenjau; Navarre, Sammy; Kozlowski, David J.; Wayne, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    There are multiple populations of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons that have distinct physiological and behavioral functions. Teleost fish have a population of GnRH3 neurons located in the terminal nerve (TN) associated with the olfactory bulb that is thought to play a neuromodulatory role in multiple physiological systems, including olfactory, visual, and reproductive. We used transgenic zebrafish in which the GnRH3 promoter drives expression of a green fluorescent protein to identify GnRH3 neurons during development in live embryos. Unlike with hypophysiotropic GnRH neurons of zebrafish, TN-GnRH3 neurons are of neural crest origin and are one of the first populations of GnRH neurons to develop in the early embryo. Using a combination of optical imaging and electrophysiology, we showed that during the first three days post-fertilization, TN-GnRH3 neurons increase in number, extend neural projections, move in association with tissue expansion, and acquire an adult-pattern of spontaneous action potential firing. Early during development, about half of the neurons were quiescent/non-firing. Later, at three days post-fertilization, there was an increase in the proportion of neurons showing action potential firing and an increase in the number of neurons that showed an adult-like tonic or beating pattern of action potential firing with a firing frequency similar to that seen in adult TN-GnRH3 neurons. This study represents the first neurophysiological investigation of developing GnRH neurons in live embryos -- an important advance in understanding their potential non-reproductive roles during embryogenesis. PMID:20515692

  3. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Axel J; Wu, Shaw-Wen; Peters, James H

    2014-01-01

    Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST) contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33 to 37°C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  4. Short latency activation of pyramidal tract cells by Group I afferent volleys in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Swett, John E.; Bourassa, Charles M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The contralateral bulbar pyramids were explored with low impedance micro-electrodes in cats anaesthetized with chloralose to reveal the effect of Group I afferent volleys (deep radial nerve of the forelimb) on pyramidal tract (Pt) cells. 2. Low rate (0·5/sec) stimulation of Group I afferents produced small responses (5-30 μV) in the bulbar pyramid which could be detected only with response averaging methods. The responses appeared with an initial latency of 7·0-11·2 msec and reached peak amplitude in 15·7 msec (mean latency). The pyramidal tract origin of the potential was demonstrated by its depression at stimulus rates above 1-2 sec and its disappearance at rates above 4/sec. 3. Recordings of neurones in the Group I cortical projection zone of the posterior sigmoid gyrus revealed that several types of cells, including Pt cells, were activated by Group I afferent volleys. 4. Pt cells responding to Group I afferent volleys frequently received convergent actions from low threshold cutaneous nerve volleys. 5. Averaged response recordings from electrodes positioned in the medial portions of the lateral funiculus of the spinal cord at the level of C2, revealed a response to Group I afferent volleys as early as 7·4 msec which possessed the same characteristics as the relayed response to Group I in the bulbar pyramids. Some Pt cells, activated by Group I volleys orthodromically, could also be antidromically activated by stimulation of the recording site in C2. 6. It was concluded that group I afferent volleys can influence, after short latencies, Pt and non-Pt cells and that some of these Pt cells gave rise to axons incorporated in the corticospinal tract. PMID:16992239

  5. Cerebral, subcortical, and cerebellar activation evoked by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, Daniel L.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Colebatch, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We compared the brain areas that showed significant flow changes induced by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents using fMRI BOLD imaging. Afferents arising from the right hand were studied in eight volunteers with electrical stimulation of the digital nerve of the index finger and over the motor point of the FDI muscle. Both methods evoked areas of significant activation cortically, subcortically, and in the cerebellum. Selective muscle afferent stimulation caused significant activation in motor‐related areas. It also caused significantly greater activation within the contralateral precentral gyrus, insula, and within the ipsilateral cerebellum as well as greater areas of reduced blood flow when compared to the cutaneous stimuli. We demonstrated separate precentral and postcentral foci of excitation with muscle afferent stimulation. We conclude, contrary to the findings with evoked potentials, that muscle afferents evoke more widespread cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar activation than do cutaneous afferents. This emphasizes the importance, for studies of movement, of matching the kinematic aspects in order to avoid the results being confounded by alterations in muscle afferent activation. The findings are consistent with clinical observations of the movement consequences of sensory loss and may also be the basis for the contribution of disturbed sensorimotor processing to disorders of movement. PMID:24771687

  6. Single low-threshold afferents innervating the skin of the human foot modulate ongoing muscle activity in the upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Bent, Leah R; Lowrey, Catherine R

    2013-03-01

    We have shown for the first time that single cutaneous afferents in the foot dorsum have significant reflex coupling to motoneurons supplying muscles in the upper limb, particularly posterior deltoid and triceps brachii. These observations strengthen what we know from whole nerve stimulation, that skin on the foot and ankle can contribute to the modulation of interlimb muscles in distant innervation territories. The current work provides evidence of the mechanism behind the reflex, where one single skin afferent can evoke a reflex response, rather than a population. Nineteen of forty-one (46%) single cutaneous afferents isolated in the dorsum or plantar surface of the foot elicited a significant modulation of muscle activity in the upper limb. Identification of single afferents in this reflex indicates the strength of the connection and, ultimately, the importance of foot skin in interlimb coordination. The median response magnitude was 2.29% of background EMG, and the size of the evoked response did not significantly differ among the four mechanoreceptor classes (P > 0.1). Interestingly, although the distribution of afferents types did not differ across the foot dorsum, there was a significantly greater coupling response from receptors located on the medial aspect of the foot dorsum (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the most consistent coupling with upper limb muscles was demonstrated by type I afferents (fast and slowly adapting). This work contributes to the current literature on receptor specificity, supporting the view that individual classes of cutaneous afferents may subserve specific roles in kinesthesia, reflexes, and tactile perception.

  7. Genetic and pharmacological evidence for low-abundance TRPV3 expression in primary vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaw-Wen; Lindberg, Jonathan E M; Peters, James H

    2016-05-01

    Primary vagal afferent neurons express a multitude of thermosensitive ion channels. Within this family of ion channels, the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) greatly influences vagal afferent signaling by determining the threshold for action-potential initiation at the peripheral endings, while controlling temperature-sensitive forms of glutamate release at central vagal terminals. Genetic deletion of TRPV1 does not completely eliminate these temperature-dependent effects, suggesting involvement of additional thermosensitive ion channels. The warm-sensitive, calcium-permeable, ion channel TRPV3 is commonly expressed with TRPV1; however, the extent to which TRPV3 is found in vagal afferent neurons is unknown. Here, we begin to characterize the genetic and functional expression of TRPV3 in vagal afferent neurons using molecular biology (RT-PCR and RT-quantitative PCR) in whole nodose and isolated neurons and fluorescent calcium imaging on primary cultures of nodose ganglia neurons. We confirmed low-level TRPV3 expression in vagal afferent neurons and observed direct activation with putative TRPV3 agonists eugenol, ethyl vanillin (EVA), and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Agonist activation stimulated neurons also containing TRPV1 and was blocked by ruthenium red. FPP sensitivity overlapped with EVA and eugenol but represented the smallest percentage of vagal afferent neurons, and it was the only agonist that did not stimulate neurons from TRPV3(-/-1) mice, suggesting FPP has the highest selectivity. Further, FPP was predictive of enhanced responses to capsaicin, EVA, and eugenol in rats. From our results, we conclude TRPV3 is expressed in a discrete subpopulation of vagal afferent neurons and may contribute to vagal afferent signaling either directly or in combination with TRPV1. PMID:26843581

  8. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  9. Paraventricular nucleus is involved in the central pathway of adipose afferent reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Wang, Gui-Hua; Wu, Yu-Long; Ma, Chun-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates a link between sympathetic nervous system activation and obesity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympathoexcitatory reflex that is activated by afferent neurotransmission from the white adipose tissue (WAT). This study aimed to investigate whether the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the AAR. In anesthetized rats, the discharge activity of individual PVH neurons was recorded in vivo. Activation of WAT afferents was initiated by capsaicin injection, and the AAR was evaluated by monitoring renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses. The responses of PVH neurons to activation of WAT afferents were evaluated by c-fos immunoreactivity and the discharge activity of individual PVH neurons, which was recorded using extracellular single-unit recording. After activation of WAT afferents, both individual PVH neuron discharge activity and c-fos immunoreactivity increased. Bilateral selective lesions of the neurons in the PVH with kainic acid abolished the AAR. These results indicate that PVH is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the AAR. PMID:26963333

  10. Pharmacologically Distinct Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Drive Efferent-Mediated Excitation in Calyx-Bearing Vestibular Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Kewin, Kevin; Jordan, Paivi M.; Cameron, Peter; Klapczynski, Marcin; McIntosh, J. Michael; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Lysakowski, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of vestibular efferent neurons rapidly excites the resting discharge of calyx/dimorphic (CD) afferents. In turtle, this excitation arises when acetylcholine (ACh), released from efferent terminals, directly depolarizes calyceal endings by activating nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs). Although molecular biological data from the peripheral vestibular system implicate most of the known nAChR subunits, specific information about those contributing to efferent-mediated excitation of CD afferents is lacking. We sought to identify the nAChR subunits that underlie the rapid excitation of CD afferents and whether they differ from α9α10 nAChRs on type II hair cells that drive efferent-mediated inhibition in adjacent bouton afferents. We recorded from CD and bouton afferents innervating the turtle posterior crista during electrical stimulation of vestibular efferents while applying several subtype-selective nAChR agonists and antagonists. The α9α10 nAChR antagonists, α-bungarotoxin and α-conotoxin RgIA, blocked efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents while leaving efferent-mediated excitation in CD units largely intact. Conversely, 5-iodo-A-85380, sazetidine-A, varenicline, α-conotoxin MII, and bPiDDB (N,N-dodecane-1,12-diyl-bis-3-picolinium dibromide) blocked efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents without affecting efferent-mediated inhibition in bouton afferents. This pharmacological profile suggested that calyceal nAChRs contain α6 and β2, but not α9, nAChR subunits. Selective blockade of efferent-mediated excitation in CD afferents distinguished dimorphic from calyx afferents by revealing type II hair cell input. Dimorphic afferents differed in having higher mean discharge rates and a mean efferent-mediated excitation that was smaller in amplitude yet longer in duration. Molecular biological data demonstrated the expression of α9 in turtle hair cells and α4 and β2 in associated vestibular ganglia. PMID:25716861

  11. Meningeal afferent signaling and the pathophysiology of migraine.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Vega, Carolina; Moy, Jamie; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder. Attacks are complex and consist of multiple phases but are most commonly characterized by intense, unilateral, throbbing headache. The pathophysiology contributing to migraine is poorly understood and the disorder is not well managed with currently available therapeutics, often rendering patients disabled during attacks. The mechanisms most likely to contribute to the pain phase of migraine require activation of trigeminal afferent signaling from the cranial meninges and subsequent relay of nociceptive information into the central nervous system in a region of the dorsal brainstem known as the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Events leading to activation of meningeal afferents are unclear, but nerve endings within this tissue are mechanosensitive and also express a variety of ion channels including acid-sensing ion channels and transient receptor-potential channels. These properties may provide clues into the pathophysiology of migraine by suggesting that decreased extracellular pH and environmental irritant exposure in the meninges contributes to headache. Neuroplasticity is also likely to play a role in migraine given that attacks are triggered by routine events that are typically nonnoxious in healthy patients and clear evidence of sensitization occurs during an attack. Where and how plasticity develops is also not clear but may include events directly on the afferents and/or within the TNC. Among the mediators potentially contributing to plasticity, calcitonin gene-related peptide has received the most attention within the migraine field but other mechanisms may also contribute. Ultimately, greater understanding of the molecules and mechanisms contributing to migraine will undoubtedly lead to better therapeutics and relief for the large number of patients across the globe who suffer from this highly disabling neurological disorder.

  12. Spinal expression of Hippo signaling components YAP and TAZ following peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Lim, Grewo; Chen, Lucy; McCabe, Michael F; Kim, Hyangin; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Mao, Jianren

    2013-10-16

    Previous studies have shown that the morphology and number of cells in the spinal cord dorsal horn could change following peripheral nerve injury and that the Hippo signaling pathway plays an important role in cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and dendritic remolding. In the present study, we examined whether the expression of YAP and TAZ, two critical components regulated by Hippo signaling, in the spinal cord dorsal horn would be altered by chronic constriction sciatic nerve injury (CCI). We found that (1) YAP was mainly expressed on CGRP- and IB4-immunoreactive primary afferent nerve terminals without noticeable expression on glial cells, whereas TAZ was mainly expressed on spinal cord second order neurons as well as microglia; (2) upregulation of YAP and TAZ expression followed two distinct temporal patterns after CCI, such that the highest expression of YAP and TAZ was on day 14 and day 1 after CCI, respectively; (3) there were also unique topographic patterns of YAP and TAZ distribution in the spinal cord dorsal horn consistent with their distinctive association with primary afferents and second order neurons; (4) changes in the YAP expression were selectively induced by CCI but not CFA-induced hindpaw inflammation; and (5) the number of nuclear profiles of TAZ expression was significantly increased after CCI, indicating translocation of TAZ from the cytoplasma to nucleus. These findings indicate that peripheral nerve injury induced time-dependent and region-specific changes in the spinal YAP and TAZ expression. A role for Hippo signaling in synaptic and structural plasticity is discussed in relation to the cellular mechanism of neuropathic pain.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide determines HNO-induced stimulation of trigeminal afferents.

    PubMed

    Wild, Vanessa; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J M

    2015-08-18

    Endogenous NO and hydrogen sulfide form HNO, which causes CGRP release via TRPA1 channel activation in sensory nerves. In the present study, stimulation of intact trigeminal afferent neuron preparations with NO donors, Na2S or both was analyzed by measuring CGRP release as an index of mass activation. Combined stimulation was able to activate all parts of the trigeminal system and acted synergistic compared to stimulation with both substances alone. To investigate the contribution of both substances, we varied their ratio and tracked intracellular calcium in isolated neurons. Our results demonstrate that hydrogen sulfide is the rate-limiting factor for HNO formation. CGRP has a key role in migraine pathophysiology and HNO formation at all sites of the trigeminal system should be considered for this novel means of activation.

  14. Manipulation of isolated brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nano-sized particles and assessment of their effects on glutamate transport

    PubMed Central

    Krisanova, Natalia; Borуsov, Arsenii; Sivko, Roman; Ostapchenko, Ludmila; Babic, Michal; Horak, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The manipulation of brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field promises breakthroughs in nano-neurotechnology. D-Mannose-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts followed by oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and addition of D-mannose. Effects of D-mannose-coated superparamagnetic maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles on key characteristics of the glutamatergic neurotransmission were analysed. Using radiolabeled L-[14C]glutamate, it was shown that D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not affect high-affinity Na+-dependent uptake, tonic release and the extracellular level of L-[14C]glutamate in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Also, the membrane potential of synaptosomes and acidification of synaptic vesicles was not changed as a result of the application of D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was demonstrated with the potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the pH-sensitive dye acridine orange. The study also focused on the analysis of the potential use of these nanoparticles for manipulation of nerve terminals by an external magnetic field. It was shown that more than 84.3 ± 5.0% of L-[14C]glutamate-loaded synaptosomes (1 mg of protein/mL) incubated for 5 min with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (250 µg/mL) moved to an area, in which the magnet (250 mT, gradient 5.5 Т/m) was applied compared to 33.5 ± 3.0% of the control and 48.6 ± 3.0% of samples that were treated with uncoated nanoparticles. Therefore, isolated brain nerve terminals can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, while the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission are not affected. In other words, functionally active synaptosomes labeled with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were obtained. PMID:24991515

  15. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  16. Retinal Afferent Ingrowth to Neocortical Transplants in the Adult Rat Superior Colliculus is due to the Regeneration of Damaged Axons

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D. T.; Das, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    Retinal afferent ingrowth to embryonic neural transplants in the adult rat superior colliculus may represent either sprouting of intact axons or the regeneration of transected axons. If ingrowth represents regeneration of damaged retinofugai axons, then lesions that axotomize more retinofugal axons at the transplantation site should induce greater retinal afferent ingrowth. Alternately, if ingrowth represents terminal or collateral sprouting of intact retinofugal axons at or near the transplant/host optic layer interface, then the magnitude of retinal afferent ingrowth should be directly related to the total area of this interface. To test between these two hypotheses surgical knife wounds were made either parallel (in the sagittal plane) or perpendicular (in the transverse plane) to the course of axons in the stratum opticum, embryonic neocortical tissue was transplanted at the coordinates of these tectal slits, and retinal afferent ingrowth visualized 1-90 days after surgery using anterogradely transported HRP. A zone of traumatic reaction (ztr) in the optic layers was seen in every case, characterized by hypertrophied axons and swollen terminal clubs at 1 day. Between 30 and 90 days the damaged retinofugal axons in the zone formed dense fascicles and neuroma-like tangles. Retinal afferent ingrowth occurred only across transplant interface regions with the ztr. The magnitude of ingrowth was directly related to the area of the ztr interface and not the total optic layer interface area. Retinal afferent ingrowth appears to reflect the intrinsic regenerative capacity of adult mammalian retinal ganglion cells and not sprouting of undamaged axons. PMID:7703292

  17. The role of median nerve terminal latency index in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome in comparison with other electrodiagnostic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Khosrawi, Saeid; Chatraei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) considers the most common compression neuropathy, which nerve conduction studies (NCSs) used for its detection routinely and universally. This study was performed to determine the value of the median TLI and other NCS variables and to investigate their sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CTS. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 100 hands of healthy volunteers and 50 hands of patients who had a positive history of paresthesia and numbness in upper extremities. Information including age, gender, and result of sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), peak latency difference of median and ulnar nerves of fourth digit (M4-U4 peak latency difference), and TLI were recorded for analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of electro diagnostic parameters in the diagnosis of CTS was investigated. Results: Normal range of the median nerve TLI was 0.43 ± 0.077. There was no significant difference between two groups for MNCV means (P = 0. 45). Distal sensory latency and distal motor latency (DML) of median nerve and fourth digit median-ulnar peak latency differences (PM4-PU4) for CTS group was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and mean for sensory nerve conduction velocity was significantly higher in control group (P < 0.001). The most sensitive electrophysiological finding in CTS patients was median TLI (82%), but the most specific one was DML (98%). Conclusion: Although in early stages of CTS, we usually expect only abnormalities in the sensory studies, but TLI may better demonstrate the effect on median nerve motor fiber even in mild cases of CTS. PMID:27376049

  18. Xanthine oxidase, but not neutrophils, contributes to activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2002-01-01

    Activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia causes angina and induces important cardiovascular reflex responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important chemical stimuli of cardiac afferents during and after ischaemia. Iron-catalysed Fenton chemistry constitutes one mechanism of production of hydroxyl radicals. Another potential source of these species is xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) also contribute to the production of ROS in some conditions. The present study tested the hypothesis that both xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines and neutrophils provide a source of ROS sufficient to activate cardiac afferents during ischaemia. We recorded single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the ventricles recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1-5) of anaesthetized cats to identify the afferents' responses to ischaemia. The role of xanthine oxidase in activation of these afferents was determined by infusion of oxypurinol (10 mg kg−1, i.v.), an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The importance of neutrophils as a potential source of ROS in the activation of cardiac afferents during ischaemia was assessed by the infusion of a polyclonal antibody (3 mg ml−1 kg−1, i.v.) raised in rabbits immunized with cat PMNs. This antibody decreased the number of circulating PMNs and, to a smaller extent, platelets. Since previous data suggest that platelets release serotonin (5-HT), which activates cardiac afferents through a serotonin receptor (subtype 3,5-HT3 receptor) mechanism, before treatment with the antibody in another group, we blocked 5-HT3 receptors on sensory nerve endings with tropisetron (300 μg kg−1, i.v.). We observed that oxypurinol significantly decreased the activity of cardiac afferents during myocardial ischaemia from 1.5 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 impulses s−1. Similarly, the polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the discharge frequency of

  19. Botulinum toxin in Migraine: Role of transport in trigemino-somatic and trigemino-vascular afferents

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, Ramachandran; Carmen, Lam; Yaksh Tony, L

    2015-01-01

    Migraine secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Reported efficacy of extracranial botulinum toxin (BoNT) in treating migraine is surprising since a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for its effect upon meningeal input. We hypothesize that intradermal BoNT acts through central transport in somatic afferents. Anesthetized C57Bl/6 mice (male) received unilateral supraorbital (SO) injections of BoNT-B (1.5 U/40 μl) or saline. 3 days later, mice received ipsilateral (ipsi) -SO capsaicin (2.5 μg/30 μl) or meningeal capsaicin (4 μl of 1mg/ml). Pre-treatment with ipsi-SO BONT-B i) decreased nocicsponsive ipsilateral wiping behavior following ipsi-SO capsaicin; ii) produced cleavage of VAMP in the V1 region of ipsi-TG and in TG neurons showing WGA after SO injection; iii) reduced expression of c-fos in ipsi-TNC following ipsi-SO capsaicin; iv) reduced c-fos activation and NK-1 internalization in ipsi-TNC secondary to ipsi-meningeal capsaicin; vi) SO WGA did not label dural afferents. We conclude that BoNT-B is taken up by peripheral afferents and transported to central terminals where it inhibits transmitter release resulting in decreased activation of second order neurons. Further, this study supports the hypothesis that SO BoNT exerts a trans-synaptic action on either the second order neuron (which receives convergent input from the meningeal afferent) or the terminal/TG of the converging meningeal afferent. PMID:25958249

  20. Short-latency projections to the cat cerebral cortex from skin and muscle afferents in the contralateral forelimb

    PubMed Central

    Oscarsson, O.; Rosén, I.

    1966-01-01

    1. The potentials evoked in the first sensorimotor area on stimulation of muscle and skin nerves in the contralateral forelimb were recorded in preparations with either the dorsal funiculus (DF) or the spinocervical tract (SCT) interrupted. 2. The short-latency, surface-positive potentials in these preparations are mediated by the remaining path, either the DF or SCT. 3. Cutaneous afferents project through both paths to two discrete areas which correspond to the classical sensory and motor cortices (Fig. 10 A and B). The projection areas are not identical: the DF path seems to activate most effectively the sensory cortex; and the SCT path, most effectively the motor cortex. 4. The potentials evoked from cutaneous nerves have a similar latency in the two areas. On stimulation of the superficial radial nerve the latency was about 4·5 msec in preparations with intact DF, and about 5·3 msec in preparations with intact SCT. 5. High threshold muscle afferents project to the same areas as the cutaneous afferents. 6. Group I muscle afferents project, exclusively through the DF path, to an area distinct from the two cutaneous projection areas (Fig. 10C). It occupies a caudal part of the motor cortex and an intermediate zone between the sensory and motor cortices. 7. The projection areas are compared with the recent cytoarchitectonic map of Hassler & Muhs-Clement (1964) (Fig. 10D). 8. It is suggested that the afferent projections to the motor cortex and the intermediate zone are used in the integration of movements elicited from the cortex. The general similarity in the organization of afferent paths to the motor cortex and the cerebellum is pointed out. PMID:5937410

  1. Characterization of silent afferents in the pelvic and splanchnic innervations of the mouse colorectum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G F

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity in inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome is contributed to in part by changes in the receptive properties of colorectal afferent endings, likely including mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; silent afferents) that have the ability to acquire mechanosensitivity. The proportion and attributes of colorectal MIAs, however, have not previously been characterized. The distal ∼3 cm of colorectum with either pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached was removed, opened longitudinally, pinned flat in a recording chamber, and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Colorectal receptive endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. MIA endings were tested for response to and acquisition of mechanosensitivity by localized exposure to an inflammatory soup (IS). Colorectal afferents were also tested with twin-pulse and repetitive electrical stimulation paradigms. PN MIAs represented 23% of 211 afferents studied, 71% (30/42) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after application of IS to their receptive ending. LSN MIAs represented 33% of 156 afferents studied, only 23% (11/48) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after IS exposure. Mechanosensitive PN endings uniformly exhibited significant twin-pulse slowing whereas LSN endings showed no significant twin-pulse difference. PN MIAs displayed significantly greater activity-dependent slowing than LSN MIAs. In conclusion, significant proportions of MIAs are present in the colorectal innervation; significantly more in the PN than LSN acquire mechanosensitivity in an inflammatory environment. This knowledge contributes to our understanding of the possible roles of MIAs in colon-related disorders like inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:21071510

  2. Characterization of silent afferents in the pelvic and splanchnic innervations of the mouse colorectum

    PubMed Central

    Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity in inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome is contributed to in part by changes in the receptive properties of colorectal afferent endings, likely including mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; silent afferents) that have the ability to acquire mechanosensitivity. The proportion and attributes of colorectal MIAs, however, have not previously been characterized. The distal ∼3 cm of colorectum with either pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached was removed, opened longitudinally, pinned flat in a recording chamber, and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Colorectal receptive endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. MIA endings were tested for response to and acquisition of mechanosensitivity by localized exposure to an inflammatory soup (IS). Colorectal afferents were also tested with twin-pulse and repetitive electrical stimulation paradigms. PN MIAs represented 23% of 211 afferents studied, 71% (30/42) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after application of IS to their receptive ending. LSN MIAs represented 33% of 156 afferents studied, only 23% (11/48) of which acquired mechanosensitivity after IS exposure. Mechanosensitive PN endings uniformly exhibited significant twin-pulse slowing whereas LSN endings showed no significant twin-pulse difference. PN MIAs displayed significantly greater activity-dependent slowing than LSN MIAs. In conclusion, significant proportions of MIAs are present in the colorectal innervation; significantly more in the PN than LSN acquire mechanosensitivity in an inflammatory environment. This knowledge contributes to our understanding of the possible roles of MIAs in colon-related disorders like inflammatory/irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:21071510

  3. Effects of ankle extensor muscle afferent inputs on hip abductor and adductor activity in the decerebrate walking cat.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D A E; Misiaszek, J E

    2012-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus (LGS) nerve at group I afferent strength leads to adaptations in the amplitude and timing of extensor muscle activity during walking in the decerebrate cat. Such afferent feedback in the stance leg might result from a delay in stance onset of the opposite leg. Concomitant adaptations in hip abductor and adductor activity would then be expected to maintain lateral stability and balance until the opposite leg is able to support the body. As many hip abductors and adductors are also hip extensors, we hypothesized that stimulation of the LGS nerve at group I afferent strength would produce increased activation and prolonged burst duration in hip abductor and adductor muscles in the premammillary decerebrate walking cat. LGS nerve stimulation during the extensor phase of the locomotor cycle consistently increased burst amplitude of the gluteus medius and adductor femoris muscles, but not pectineus or gracilis. In addition, LGS stimulation prolonged the burst duration of both gluteus medius and adductor femoris. Unexpectedly, long-duration LGS stimulus trains resulted in two distinct outcomes on the hip abductor and adductor bursting pattern: 1) a change of burst duration and timing similar to medial gastrocnemius; or 2) to continue rhythmically bursting uninterrupted. These results indicate that activation of muscle afferents from ankle extensors contributes to the regulation of activity of some hip abductor and adductor muscles, but not all. These results have implications for understanding the neural control of stability during locomotion, as well as the organization of spinal locomotor networks. PMID:22972967

  4. Neural Blockade Anaesthesia of the Mandibular Nerve and Its Terminal Branches: Rationale for Different Anaesthetic Techniques Including Their Advantages and Disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Jason; Townsend, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Anaesthesia of structures innervated by the mandibular nerve is necessary to provide adequate pain control when performing dental and localised surgical procedures. To date, numerous techniques have been described and, although many of these methods are not used routinely, there are some situations where their application may be indicated. Patient factors as well as anatomical variability of the mandibular nerve and associated structures dictate that no one technique can be universally applied with a 100% success rate. This fact has led to a proliferation of alternative techniques that have appeared in the literature. This selective review of the literature provides a brief description of the different techniques available to the clinician as well as the underlying anatomy which is fundamental to successfully anaesthetising the mandibular nerve. PMID:21716730

  5. Piezo2 expression in corneal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Bron, Romke; Wood, Rhiannon J; Brock, James A; Ivanusic, Jason J

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a novel class of mechanically sensitive channels has been identified and have been called Piezo channels. In this study, we explored Piezo channel expression in sensory neurons supplying the guinea pig corneal epithelium, which have well-defined modalities in this species. We hypothesized that a proportion of corneal afferent neurons express Piezo2, and that these neurons are neurochemically distinct from corneal polymodal nociceptors or cold-sensing neurons. We used a combination of retrograde tracing to identify corneal afferent neurons and double label in situ hybridization and/or immunohistochemistry to determine their molecular and/or neurochemical profile. We found that Piezo2 expression occurs in ∼26% of trigeminal ganglion neurons and 30% of corneal afferent neurons. Piezo2 corneal afferent neurons are almost exclusively non-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (-IR), medium- to large-sized neurons that are NF200-IR, suggesting they are not corneal polymodal nociceptors. There was no coexpression of Piezo2 and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 8 (TRPM8) transcripts in any corneal afferent neurons, further suggesting that Piezo2 is not expressed in corneal cold-sensing neurons. We also noted that TRPM8-IR or CGRP-IR corneal afferent neurons are almost entirely small and lack NF200-IR. Piezo2 expression occurs in a neurochemically distinct subpopulation of corneal afferent neurons that are not polymodal nociceptors or cold-sensing neurons, and is likely confined to a subpopulation of pure mechano-nociceptors in the cornea. This provides the first evidence in an in vivo system that Piezo2 is a strong candidate for a channel that transduces noxious mechanical stimuli.

  6. Regeneration of normal afferent input does not eliminate aberrant synaptic connections of an identified auditory interneuron in the cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus.

    PubMed

    Pallas, S L; Hoy, R R

    1986-06-15

    In the cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus, the dendritic arborizations of an identified auditory interneuron (Int-1) are normally restricted to the ipsilateral auditory neuropile; unilateral deafferentation causes the medial portion of the dendritic field to sprout across the midline and make functional connections with the contralateral auditory neuropile (Hoy et al., '78: Soc. Neurosci. Abstr. 4:115, '85: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7772-7786; Hoy and Moiseff, '79: Soc. Neurosci. Abstr. 5:163). We have found that regeneration of the auditory afferents also results in an aberrant pattern of innervation of Int-1. Crickets were unilaterally deafferented during postembryonic development by crushing or cutting the auditory nerve. Regeneration of afferent-to-Int-1 connections was tested behaviorally. Of 86 nerve-crushed crickets tested as adults in the behavioral assay, 66% showed functional regeneration of the afferents. Similar results were obtained from the nerve-cut group. However, morphological investigations demonstrated that most of the regenerates still retained the aberrant contralateral dendritic projection. Electrophysiological recordings from these Int-1s showed that not only are some of them driven by their regenerated auditory afferents (the normal pathway) but that they retain their excitability via their contralateral dendrites (the aberrant pathway). This demonstrates that reinnervation of Int-1 by its normal afferent pool neither causes retraction nor prevents the formation of connections made with foreign, contralateral afferents. When the contralateral afferent pool was removed after Int-1 had sprouted, the sprouts remained present, but preliminary results suggest that if the contralateral afferents are removed before Int-1 is deafferented, sprouts are not formed. The results are discussed in relation to the roles of competition and conservation of membrane area in controlling synapse formation.

  7. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:23989007

  8. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Michael E; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S; Gebhart, G F

    2013-11-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity.

  9. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  10. Vestibular afferent responses to microrotational stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1991-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recording/labeling techniques were used to investigate vestibular afferent responses in the bullfrog, to very small amplitude (less than 5 deg p-p) sinusoidal rotations in the vertical plane over the frequency range of 0.063-4 Hz. Robust responses to peak accelerations as low as 0.031 deg/sec per sec were obtained from units subsequently traced to either the central portion of the anterior canal crista or the striolar region of the utricle. All of these microrotationally sensitive afferent neurons had irregular resting discharge rates, and the majority had transfer ratios (relative to rotational velocity) of 1-40 spikes/sec per deg/sec. Individual utricular afferent velocity transfer ratios were nearly constant over the frequency range of 0.125-4 Hz. Canal units displayed decreasing response transfer ratios as stimulus frequencies increased. These findings indicate that, although utricular striolar and central crista afferent velocity transfer ratios to microrotations were very similar, utricular striolar afferent neurons were more faithful sensors of very small amplitude rotational velocity in the vertical plane.

  11. Identification of bladder and colon afferents in the nodose ganglia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Hubscher, Charles H

    2014-11-01

    The sensory neurons innervating the urinary bladder and distal colon project to similar regions of the central nervous system and often are affected simultaneously by various diseases and disorders, including spinal cord injury. Anatomical and physiological commonalities between the two organs involve the participation of shared spinally derived pathways, allowing mechanisms of communication between the bladder and colon. Prior electrophysiological data from our laboratory suggest that the bladder also may receive sensory innervation from a nonspinal source through the vagus nerve, which innervates the distal colon as well. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether anatomical evidence exists for vagal innervation of the male rat urinary bladder and to assess whether those vagal afferents also innervate the colon. Additionally, the relative contribution to bladder and colon sensory innervation of spinal and vagal sources was determined. By using lipophilic tracers, neurons that innervated the bladder and colon in both the nodose ganglia (NG) and L6/S1 and L1/L2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were quantified. Some single vagal and spinal neurons provided dual innervation to both organs. The proportions of NG afferents labeled from the bladder did not differ from spinal afferents labeled from the bladder when considering the collective population of total neurons from either group. Our results demonstrate evidence for vagal innervation of the bladder and colon and suggest that dichotomizing vagal afferents may provide a neural mechanism for cross-talk between the organs. PMID:24845615

  12. Modeling the spinal pudendo-vesical reflex for bladder control by pudendal afferent stimulation.

    PubMed

    McGee, Meredith J; Grill, Warren M

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is a promising approach to restore continence and micturition following bladder dysfunction resulting from neurological disease or injury. Although the pudendo-vesical reflex and its physiological properties are well established, there is limited understanding of the specific neural mechanisms that mediate this reflex. We sought to develop a computational model of the spinal neural network that governs the reflex bladder response to PN stimulation. We implemented and validated a neural network architecture based on previous neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies. Using synaptically-connected integrate and fire model neurons, we created a network model with realistic spiking behavior. The model produced expected sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN) neuron firing rates from prescribed neural inputs and predicted bladder activation and inhibition with different frequencies of pudendal afferent stimulation. In addition, the model matched experimental results from previous studies of temporal patterns of pudendal afferent stimulation and selective pharmacological blockade of inhibitory neurons. The frequency- and pattern-dependent effects of pudendal afferent stimulation were determined by changes in firing rate of spinal interneurons, suggesting that neural network interactions at the lumbosacral level can mediate the bladder response to different frequencies or temporal patterns of pudendal afferent stimulation. Further, the anatomical structure of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the network model was necessary and sufficient to reproduce the critical features of the pudendo-vesical reflex, and this model may prove useful to guide development of novel, more effective electrical stimulation techniques for bladder control. PMID:26968615

  13. Allodynia mediated by C-tactile afferents in human hairy skin

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Saad S; Rubin, Troy K; Chelvanayagam, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Mahns, David A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed a contribution of low-threshold cutaneous mechanoreceptors to vibration-evoked changes in the perception of muscle pain. Neutral-touch stimulation (vibration) of the hairy skin during underlying muscle pain evoked an overall increase in pain intensity, i.e. allodynia. This effect appeared to be dependent upon cutaneous afferents, as allodynia was abolished by intradermal anaesthesia. However, it remains unclear whether allodynia results from activation of a single class of cutaneous afferents or the convergence of inputs from multiple classes. Intriguingly, no existing human study has examined the contribution of C-tactile (CT) afferents to allodynia. Detailed psychophysical observations were made in 29 healthy subjects (18 males and 11 females). Sustained muscle pain was induced by infusing hypertonic saline (HS: 5%) into tibialis anterior muscle (TA). Sinusoidal vibration (200 Hz–200 μm) was applied to the hairy skin overlying TA. Pain ratings were recorded using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In order to evaluate the role of myelinated and unmyelinated cutaneous afferents in the expression of vibration-evoked allodynia, compression block of the sciatic nerve, and low-dose intradermal anaesthesia (Xylocaine 0.25%) were used, respectively. In addition, the modulation of muscle pain by gentle brushing (1.0 and 3.0 cm s−1) – known to excite CT fibres – was examined. Brushing stimuli were applied to the hairy skin with all fibres intact and following the blockade of myelinated afferents. During tonic muscle pain (VAS 4–6), vibration evoked a significant and reproducible increase in muscle pain (allodynia) that persisted following compression of myelinated afferents. During compression block, the sense of vibration was abolished, but the vibration-evoked allodynia persisted. In contrast, selective anaesthesia of unmyelinated cutaneous afferents abolished the allodynia, whereas the percept of vibration remained unaffected

  14. Psychoactive bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) elicits rapid frequency facilitation in vagal afferents.

    PubMed

    Perez-Burgos, Azucena; Wang, Bingxian; Mao, Yu-Kang; Mistry, Bhavik; McVey Neufeld, Karen-Anne; Bienenstock, John; Kunze, Wolfgang

    2013-01-15

    Mounting evidence supports the influence of the gut microbiome on the local enteric nervous system and its effects on brain chemistry and relevant behavior. Vagal afferents are involved in some of these effects. We previously showed that ingestion of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) caused extensive neurochemical changes in the brain and behavior that were abrogated by prior vagotomy. Because information can be transmitted to the brain via primary afferents encoded as neuronal spike trains, our goal was to record those induced by JB-1 in vagal afferents in the mesenteric nerve bundle and thus determine the nature of the signals sent to the brain. Male Swiss Webster mice jejunal segments were cannulated ex vivo, and serosal and luminal compartments were perfused separately. Bacteria were added intraluminally. We found no evidence for translocation of labeled bacteria across the epithelium during the experiment. We recorded extracellular multi- and single-unit neuronal activity with glass suction pipettes. Within minutes of application, JB-1 increased the constitutive single- and multiunit firing rate of the mesenteric nerve bundle, but Lactobacillus salivarius (a negative control) or media alone were ineffective. JB-1 significantly augmented multiunit discharge responses to an intraluminal distension pressure of 31 hPa. Prior subdiaphragmatic vagotomy abolished all of the JB-1-evoked effects. This detailed exploration of the neuronal spike firing that encodes behavioral signaling to the brain may be useful to identify effective psychoactive bacteria and thereby offer an alternative new perspective in the field of psychiatry and comorbid conditions.

  15. The central localization of the vagus nerve in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and the mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Ranson, R N; Butler, P J; Taylor, E W

    1993-05-01

    The location of vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN) has been determined in nine ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) and seven mink (M. vison) using neuronal tract-tracing techniques employing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and wheat-germ agglutinin conjugated HRP (WGA-HRP) mixtures injected into the nodose ganglion of the vagus nerve. Labelled VPN were located ipsilaterally in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DmnX), nucleus ambiguus (nA), and reticular formation (rf) of the medulla oblongata. In four of the ferrets, labelled VPN were also identified in the nucleus dorsomedialis (ndm) and the nucleus of the spinal accessory nerve (nspa). In a single mink a few labelled cells were observed in the ndm but no labelled VPN were found in the nspa. Labelling of afferent components of the vagus nerve was seen in two ferrets and two mink with the best labelling obtained following an injection of an HRP/WGA-HRP mixture into the nodose ganglion. Labelled afferents were observed to cross the ipsilateral spinal trigeminal tract (SpV) before entering the tractus solitarius (TS) in regions separate from the motor axons which exit the medulla in separate fasicles. Sensory terminal fields were identified bilaterally in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (nTS) in both species and bilaterally in the area postrema (ap) of the ferret; however, the contralateral labelling was sparse in comparison to the densely labelled ipsilateral nTS/ap. Maximal terminal labelling was seen in regions just rostral and caudal to obex in both species.

  16. Changes in nerve function and nerve fibre structure induced by acute, graded compression.

    PubMed Central

    Rydevik, B; Nordborg, C

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit tibial nerves were subjected to direct, acute graded compression by means of an inflatable compression chamber. The acute and long term effects of 50, 200 and 400 mmHg applied for two hours on nerve function and nerve fibre structure were investigated. A pressure of 50 mmHg applied for two hours induced only minimal or no acute deterioration of maximal conduction velocity and nerve fibre structure. Conduction velocity was gradually reduced during compression at 200-400 mmHg pressure for two hours and in those cases the recovery of nerve conduction after pressure release was incomplete. Ultrastructural analysis revealed pronounced, early nerve fibre damage in these nerves. Three weeks after compression, nerves compressed at 50 mmHg for two hours had normal afferent and motor conduction velocity, although there were morphological signs of slight nerve fibre damage. Nerves compressed at 200 mmHg for two hours exhibited reduction of conduction velocity only at the level of compression, in contrast to the nerves compressed at 400 mmHg for two hours in which conduction velocity was reduced both at the level of compression and distal to the compressed segment. Morphologically, the nerves compressed at 200-400 mmHg for two hours showed varying degrees of demyelination and axonal degeneration three weeks after compression. Images PMID:7217952

  17. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  18. Stereological and somatotopic analysis of the spinal microglial response to peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon; Salter, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of glia, and glia-neuronal signalling in enhancing nociceptive transmission has become an area of intense scientific interest. In particular, a role has emerged for activated microglia in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. Following activation, spinal microglia proliferate and release many substances which are capable of modulating neuronal excitability within the spinal cord. Here, we the investigated the response of spinal microglia to a unilateral spared nerve injury (SNI) in terms of the quantitative increase in cell number and the spatial distribution of the increase. Design-based stereological techniques were combined with iba-1 immunohistochemistry to estimate the total number of microglia in the spinal dorsal horn in naïve and peripheral nerve-injured adult rats. In addition, by mapping the central terminals of hindlimb nerves, the somatotopic distribution of the microglial response was mapped. Following SNI there was a marked increase in the number of spinal microglia: The total number of microglia (mean ± SD) in the dorsal horn sciatic territory of the naïve rat was estimated to be 28,591 ± 2715. Following SNI the number of microglia was 82,034 ± 8828. While the pattern of microglial activation generally followed somatotopic boundaries, with the majority of microglia within the territory occupied by peripherally axotomised primary afferents, some spread was seen into regions occupied by intact, ‘spared’ central projections of the sural nerve. This study provides a reproducible method of assaying spinal microglial dynamics following peripheral nerve injury both quantitatively and spatially. PMID:17267172

  19. Purinergic nerves and receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1980-01-01

    The presence of a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic component in the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is now well established. Evidence that ATP is the transmitter released from some of these nerves (called "purinergic') includes: (a) synthesis and storage of ATP in nerves: (b) release of ATP from the nerves when they are stimulated; (c) exogenously applied ATP mimicking the action of nerve-released transmitter; (d) the presence of ectoenzymes which inactivate ATP; (e) drugs which produce similar blocking or potentiating effects on the response to exogenously applied ATP and nerve stimulation. A basis for distinguishing two types of purinergic receptors has been proposed according to four criteria: relative potencies of agonists, competitive antagonists, changes in levels of cAMP and induction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thus P1 purinoceptors are most sensitive to adenosine, are competitively blocked by methylxanthines and their occupation leads to changes in cAMP accumulation; while P2 purinoceptors are most sensitive to ATP, are blocked (although not competitively) by quinidine, 2-substituted imidazolines, 2,2'-pyridylisatogen and apamin, and their occupation leads to production of prostaglandin. P2 purinoceptors mediate responses of smooth muscle to ATP released from purinergic nerves, while P1 purinoceptors mediate the presynaptic actions of adenosine on adrenergic, cholinergic and purinergic nerve terminals. PMID:6108568

  20. The nerves of the accessory pancreatic ducts of the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris): an ultrastructural and light microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, R M; Kendall, M D

    1984-01-01

    An ultrastructural and light microscopic study was undertaken to examine the nerves of the accessory pancreatic ducts of the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), previously noted (Vinnicombe, 1982) to have a particularly dense innervation. Large numbers of nerves were found in the ducts, predominantly in the lamina propria, and all contained exclusively unmyelinated axons. Probable neuron cell bodies were observed in the smooth muscle layer, but not in the lamina propria. Schwann cells invested all the axons, and these displayed terminal swellings in a 'synapse en passage' arrangement. The nerves of the lamina propria were most numerous in the region immediately beneath the epithelium and were present in the epithelial folds. One axon was observed to have penetrated the epithelial basal lamina and to lie between two epithelial cells. Examination of the terminal profiles and their contained synaptic vesicles showed the innervation to have probable pain afferent, cholinergic, adrenergic and perhaps peptidergic components. The results of this study were compared with reports on pancreatic duct innervation in other species, mostly as parts of wider studies on pancreatic innervation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6490527

  1. Patterns of saccular afferent innervation in sciaenids.

    PubMed

    Selckmann, G M; Ramcharitar, J

    2013-09-01

    In this study, saccular afferent arborization patterns in Atlantic croaker Micropogonias undulatus, red drum Sciaenops ocellatus and spot Leiostomus xanthurus were characterized. Leiostomus xanthurus showed the simplest configuration while M. undulatus displayed the most complex. In addition, hair-cell densities at sites sampled along the rostro-caudal axis of the saccular epithelia correlated with the observed patterns of arborization. PMID:23991887

  2. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Axel J.; Wu, Shaw-wen; Peters, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST) contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33 to 37°C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals. PMID:24550768

  3. Experimental and computational evidence for an essential role of NaV1.6 in spike initiation at stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Zhu, Yi; La, Jun-Ho; Wills, Zachary P; Gebhart, G F

    2015-04-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferents comprise ∼33% of the pelvic nerve innervation of mouse colorectum, which are activated by colorectal distension and encode visceral nociception. Stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings respond tonically to stepped or ramped colorectal stretch, whereas dissociated colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons generally fail to spike repetitively upon stepped current stimulation. The present study investigated this difference in the neural encoding characteristics between the soma and afferent ending using pharmacological approaches in an in vitro mouse colon-nerve preparation and complementary computational simulations. Immunohistological staining and Western blots revealed the presence of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) 1.6 and NaV1.7 at sensory neuronal endings in mouse colorectal tissue. Responses of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings were significantly reduced by targeting NaV1.6 using selective antagonists (μ-conotoxin GIIIa and μ-conotoxin PIIIa) or tetrodotoxin. In contrast, neither selective NaV1.8 (A803467) nor NaV1.7 (ProTX-II) antagonists attenuated afferent responses to stretch. Computational simulation of a colorectal afferent ending that incorporated independent Markov models for NaV1.6 and NaV1.7, respectively, recapitulated the experimental findings, suggesting a necessary role for NaV1.6 in encoding tonic spiking by stretch-sensitive afferents. In addition, computational simulation of a dorsal root ganglion soma showed that, by adding a NaV1.6 conductance, a single-spiking neuron was converted into a tonic spiking one. These results suggest a mechanism/channel to explain the difference in neural encoding characteristics between afferent somata and sensory endings, likely caused by differential expression of ion channels (e.g., NaV1.6) at different parts of the neuron. PMID:25652923

  4. Experimental and computational evidence for an essential role of NaV1.6 in spike initiation at stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; La, Jun-Ho; Wills, Zachary P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferents comprise ∼33% of the pelvic nerve innervation of mouse colorectum, which are activated by colorectal distension and encode visceral nociception. Stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings respond tonically to stepped or ramped colorectal stretch, whereas dissociated colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons generally fail to spike repetitively upon stepped current stimulation. The present study investigated this difference in the neural encoding characteristics between the soma and afferent ending using pharmacological approaches in an in vitro mouse colon-nerve preparation and complementary computational simulations. Immunohistological staining and Western blots revealed the presence of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) 1.6 and NaV1.7 at sensory neuronal endings in mouse colorectal tissue. Responses of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings were significantly reduced by targeting NaV1.6 using selective antagonists (μ-conotoxin GIIIa and μ-conotoxin PIIIa) or tetrodotoxin. In contrast, neither selective NaV1.8 (A803467) nor NaV1.7 (ProTX-II) antagonists attenuated afferent responses to stretch. Computational simulation of a colorectal afferent ending that incorporated independent Markov models for NaV1.6 and NaV1.7, respectively, recapitulated the experimental findings, suggesting a necessary role for NaV1.6 in encoding tonic spiking by stretch-sensitive afferents. In addition, computational simulation of a dorsal root ganglion soma showed that, by adding a NaV1.6 conductance, a single-spiking neuron was converted into a tonic spiking one. These results suggest a mechanism/channel to explain the difference in neural encoding characteristics between afferent somata and sensory endings, likely caused by differential expression of ion channels (e.g., NaV1.6) at different parts of the neuron. PMID:25652923

  5. Effects of extensor and flexor group I afferent volleys on the excitability of individual soleus motoneurones in man

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Peter; Labelle, Keith

    1977-01-01

    The contour of the postsynaptic potential (PSP) produced in a neurone by an afferent volley can be derived from the contour of the post-stimulus time histogram (PSTH) of that neurone when it is discharging rhythmically. In the present study the PSTH of the firing of individual soleus motor units after stimulation of the popliteal or peroneal nerve was used to explore the effects of extensor and flexor group I afferent volleys on the excitability of single soleus motoneurones in man. Extensor group I volleys resulted in an early peak of increased impulse density in the PSTH of 75% of soleus motoneurones. The latency suggests an analogy with the Ia EPSP. The mean duration of the peak of increased impulse density, equivalent to the rise time of the EPSP, was 3.6 ms. Flexor group I volleys result in a period of reduced impulse density in the PSTH of five out of nine soleus motoneurones. The latency suggests an analogy with the Ia IPSP. We conclude that this method could be used to explore the afferent connections to single motoneurones in man and to derive some of the characteristics of the postsynaptic potentials from a variety of afferent nerve fibres in single human motoneurones. PMID:599368

  6. The ultrastructure of the sensory nerve endings in the articular capsule of the knee joint of the domestic cat (Ruffini corpuscles and Pacinian corpuscles).

    PubMed Central

    Halata, Z

    1977-01-01

    Two types of mechanoreceptor have been found in the articular capsule of the knee joint of the domestic cat--Ruffini corpuscles and Pacinian corpuscles. Ruffini corpuscles are situated in the stratum fibrosum and consist of 2 to 6 cylinders. Each cylinder is made up of an afferent axon (diameter 3-4 micrometer), its swellings and terminal processes, Schwann cells enveloping the nerve swellings and terminal processes, endoneural connective tissue and a perineural capsule. The perineural capsule is incomplete in Ruffini corpuscles. The Pacinian corpuscles are 20 to 40 micrometer wide and 150-250 micrometer long. They are situated in groups of up to five at the boundary between the stratum synoviale and the stratum fibrosum. The afferent axon is myelinated (diameter 3-5 micrometer). Its terminal portion is inside the inner bulb which is formed of modified Schwann cells. Each corpuscle is enveloped by a perineural capsule (4-8 layers). The ultrastructure of the Pacinian corpuscles is compared with the ultrastructure of the skin receptors in the cat. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:604339

  7. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  8. Terminal arbor degeneration (TAD): a novel lesion produced by the antineoplastic agent, paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary J.; Liu, Guo Kai; Xiao, Wen Hua; Jin, Hai Wei; Siau, Chiang

    2011-01-01

    The anti-neoplastic agent, paclitaxel, causes a dose-limiting distal, symmetrical, sensory peripheral neuropathy that is often accompanied by a neuropathic pain syndrome. In a low-dose model of paclitaxel-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat, we have shown that the drug causes degeneration of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), i.e., the fibers which give rise to the sensory afferent’s terminal receptor arbour. However, we did not find any evidence for axonal degeneration in samples taken at the mid-nerve level. Here we aimed to determine whether the absence of degenerating peripheral nerve axons was due to sampling a level that was too proximal. We used electron microscopy to study the distal-most branches of the nerves innervating the hind paw glabrous skin of normal and paclitaxel-treated rats. We confirmed that we sampled at a time when IENF degeneration was prominent. Because degeneration might be easier to detect with higher paclitaxel doses, we examined a four-fold cumulative dose range (8–32 mg/kg). We found no evidence of degeneration in the superficial subepidermal axon bundles (sSAB) that are located just a few microns below the epidermal basal lamina. Specifically, for all three dose groups there was no change in the number of sSAB per mm of epidermal border, no change in the number of axons per sSAB, and no change in the diameter of sSAB axons. We conclude that paclitaxel produces a novel type of lesion that is restricted to the afferent axon’s terminal arbor; we name this lesion “terminal arbor degeneration (TAD)”. PMID:21395870

  9. Target-controlled differentiation of axon terminals and synaptic organization.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, G; Frost, D O

    1987-01-01

    These experiments investigate the processes regulating the morphological differentiation of synaptic connections. Electron microscopy showed that the terminal boutons and synaptic complexes of retinal afferent axons in the main thalamic visual nucleus, the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, differ in their morphology from those of ascending afferent axons in the main thalamic somatosensory (ventrobasal) nucleus. Developing retinal ganglion cell axons in hamsters were made to project permanently to the ventrobasal nucleus, rather than to the lateral geniculate nucleus. With respect to most of the ultrastructural features examined, the terminals and synaptic complexes of mature, anterogradely labeled retino-ventrobasal axons more closely resembled those of normal somatosensory afferents to the ventrobasal nucleus than they did those of normal retinofugal axons within the lateral geniculate nucleus. These results suggest that the ultrastructural differentiation of axon terminals and synaptic complexes is regulated largely by the target environment, although some features appear to be intrinsic to the afferent axons themselves. Images PMID:2443913

  10. Changes in vagal afferent drive alter tracheobronchial coughing in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Simera, Michal; Poliacek, Ivan; Veternik, Marcel; Babalova, Lucia; Kotmanova, Zuzana; Jakus, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Unilateral cooling of the vagus nerve (<5°C, blocking mainly conductivity of myelinated fibers) and unilateral vagotomy were employed to reduce cough afferent drive in order to evaluate the effects of these interventions on the temporal features of the cough reflex. Twenty pentobarbitone anesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats were used. Cough was induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial airways. The number of coughs during vagal cooling was significantly decreased (p<0.001). Inspiratory cough efforts were reduced by approximately 30% (p<0.001) and expiratory motor drive by more than 80% (p<0.001). Temporal analysis showed prolonged inspiratory and expiratory phases, the total cycle duration, its active portion, and the interval between maxima of the diaphragm and the abdominal activity during coughing (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the average effects on the cough reflex between cooling of the left or the right vagus nerve. Compared to control, vagal cooling produced no significant difference in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure (p>0.05), however, cold block of vagal conduction reduced respiratory rate (p<0.001). Unilateral vagotomy significantly reduced cough number, cough-related diaphragmatic activity, and relative values of maximum expiratory esophageal pressure (all p<0.05). Our results indicate that reduced cough afferent drive (lower responsiveness) markedly attenuates the motor drive to respiratory pump muscles during coughing and alters cough temporal features. Differences in the effects of unilateral vagal cooling and vagotomy on coughing support an inhibitory role of sensory afferents that are relatively unaffected by cooling of the vagus nerve to 5°C on mechanically induced cough. PMID:27184303

  11. Improved bladder emptying in urinary retention by electrical stimulation of pudendal afferents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Cheng, Chen-Li; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-06-01

    Urinary retention is the inability to empty the bladder completely, and may result from bladder hypocontractility, increases in outlet resistance or both. Chronic urinary retention can lead to several urological complications and is often refractory to pharmacologic, behavioral and surgical treatments. We sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of sensory fibers in the pudendal nerve could engage an augmenting reflex and thereby improve bladder emptying in an animal model of urinary retention. We measured the efficiency of bladder emptying with and without concomitant electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents in urethane-anesthetized rats. Voiding efficiency (VE = voided volume/initial volume) was reduced from 72 ± 7% to 29 ± 7% following unilateral transection of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve (UST) and from 70 ± 5% to 18 ± 4% following bilateral transection (BST). Unilateral electrical stimulation of the proximal transected sensory pudendal nerve during distention-evoked voiding contractions significantly improved VE. Low-intensity stimulation at frequencies of 1-50 Hz increased VE to 40-51% following UST and to 39-49% following BST, while high-intensity stimulation was ineffective at increasing VE. The increase in VE was mediated by increases in the duration of distention-evoked voiding bladder contractions, rather than increases in contraction amplitude. These results are consistent with an essential role for pudendal sensory feedback in efficient bladder emptying, and raise the possibility that electrical activation of pudendal nerve afferents may provide a new approach to restore efficient bladder emptying in persons with urinary retention.

  12. Spinal inhibition of phrenic motoneurones by stimulation of afferents from leg muscle in the cat: blockade by strychnine.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Waldrop, T

    1987-08-01

    1. Phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of calf muscle receptors or their afferents were studied in paralysed high (C1) spinal cats whose phrenic nerve activity was evoked by activation of the intercostal-to-phrenic reflex. End-tidal PCO2 was maintained at a constant level by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. 2. Physical stimulation of calf muscles or electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve uniformly caused inhibition of phrenic activity evoked by facilitatory conditioning stimuli. The degree of inhibition gradually decreased as muscle stimulation continued, and there was a post-stimulus augmentation of phrenic activity. 3. Pre-treatment with subconvulsive doses of strychnine, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter glycine, partially or completely blocked the inhibitory effects on phrenic activity of muscle-afferent stimulation. The blockade was reversible with time. 4. Pre-treatment with a subconvulsive dose of bicuculline, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), had no effect on the inhibitory mechanism. 5. We conclude that glycine is an important transmitter of the inhibition of phrenic motoneurones induced by muscle-afferent stimulation, but that GABA is not involved in this inhibitory mechanism. PMID:3681723

  13. A syntaxin 1, Galpha(o), and N-type calcium channel complex at a presynaptic nerve terminal: analysis by quantitative immunocolocalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Lau, Anthony; Morris, Terence J; Guo, Lin; Fordyce, Christopher B; Stanley, Elise F

    2004-04-21

    Presynaptic Ca(V)2.2 (N-type) calcium channels are subject to modulation by interaction with syntaxin 1 and by a syntaxin 1-sensitive Galpha(O) G-protein pathway. We used biochemical analysis of neuronal tissue lysates and a new quantitative test of colocalization by intensity correlation analysis at the giant calyx-type presynaptic terminal of the chick ciliary ganglion to explore the association of Ca(V)2.2 with syntaxin 1 and Galpha(O). Ca(V)2.2 could be localized by immunocytochemistry (antibody Ab571) in puncta on the release site aspect of the presynaptic terminal and close to synaptic vesicle clouds. Syntaxin 1 coimmunoprecipitated with Ca(V)2.2 from chick brain and chick ciliary ganglia and was widely distributed on the presynaptic terminal membrane. A fraction of the total syntaxin 1 colocalized with the Ca(V)2.2 puncta, whereas the bulk colocalized with MUNC18-1. Galpha(O,) whether in its trimeric or monomeric state, did not coimmunoprecipitate with Ca(V)2.2, MUNC18-1, or syntaxin 1. However, the G-protein exhibited a punctate staining on the calyx membrane with an intensity that varied in synchrony with that for both Ca channels and syntaxin 1 but only weakly with MUNC18-1. Thus, syntaxin 1 appears to be a component of two separate complexes at the presynaptic terminal, a minor one at the transmitter release site with Ca(V)2.2 and Galpha(O), as well as in large clusters remote from the release site with MUNC18-1. These syntaxin 1 protein complexes may play distinct roles in presynaptic biology.

  14. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the N-terminal PDZ-like domain of periaxin, an abundant peripheral nerve protein linked to human neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Huijong; Kursula, Petri

    2013-01-01

    Periaxin (PRX) is an abundant protein in peripheral nerves and contains a predicted PDZ-like domain at its N-terminus. The large isoform, L-PRX, is required for the maintenance of myelin in the peripheral nervous system and its defects cause neurological disease. Here, the human periaxin PDZ-like domain was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.85 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 80.6, c = 81.0 Å, γ = 120° and either two or three molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PRX will shed light on its poorly characterized function in the nervous system. PMID:23832213

  15. Pain processing by spinal microcircuits: afferent combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Steven A; Ratté, Stéphanie

    2012-08-01

    Pain, itch, heat, cold, and touch represent different percepts arising from somatosensory input. How stimuli give rise to these percepts has been debated for over a century. Recent work supports the view that primary afferents are highly specialized to transduce and encode specific stimulus modalities. However, cross-modal interactions (e.g. inhibition or exacerbation of pain by touch) support convergence rather than specificity in central circuits. We outline how peripheral specialization together with central convergence could enable spinal microcircuits to combine inputs from distinctly specialized, co-activated afferents and to modulate the output signals thus formed through computations like normalization. These issues will be discussed alongside recent advances in our understanding of microcircuitry in the superficial dorsal horn.

  16. Pain processing by spinal microcircuits: afferent combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Steven A; Ratté, Stéphanie

    2012-08-01

    Pain, itch, heat, cold, and touch represent different percepts arising from somatosensory input. How stimuli give rise to these percepts has been debated for over a century. Recent work supports the view that primary afferents are highly specialized to transduce and encode specific stimulus modalities. However, cross-modal interactions (e.g. inhibition or exacerbation of pain by touch) support convergence rather than specificity in central circuits. We outline how peripheral specialization together with central convergence could enable spinal microcircuits to combine inputs from distinctly specialized, co-activated afferents and to modulate the output signals thus formed through computations like normalization. These issues will be discussed alongside recent advances in our understanding of microcircuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:22409855

  17. Development, plasticity and modulation of visceral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Julie A.; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Altier, Christophe; Cenac, Nicolas; Davis, Brian M.; Gebhart, Gerald F.; High, Karin W.; Kollarik, Marian; Randich, Alan; Undem, Brad; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Visceral pain is the most common reason for doctor visits in the US. Like somatic pain, virtually all visceral pain sensations begin with the activation of primary sensory neurons innervating the viscera and/or the blood vessels associated with these structures. Visceral afferents also play a central role in tissue homeostasis. Recent studies show that in addition to monitoring the state of the viscera, they perform efferent functions through the release of small molecules (e.g. peptides like CGRP) that can drive inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of visceral pathologies (e.g. diabetes Razavi, R., Chan, Y., Afifiyan, F.N., Liu, X.J., Wan, X., Yantha, J., Tsui, H., Tang, L., Tsai, S., Santamaria, P., Driver, J.P., Serreze, D., Salter, M.W., Dosch, H.M., 2006. TRPV1+ sensory neurons control beta cell stress and islet inflammation in autoimmune diabetes, Cell 127 1123–1135). Visceral afferents are heterogeneous with respect to their anatomy, neurochemistry and function. They are also highly plastic in that their cellular environment continuously influences their response properties. This plasticity makes them susceptible to long-term changes that may contribute significantly to the development of persistent pain states such as those associated with irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, and visceral cancers. This review examines recent insights into visceral afferent anatomy and neurochemistry and how neonatal insults can affect the function of these neurons in the adult. New approaches to the treatment of visceral pain, which focus on primary afferents, will also be discussed. PMID:19150371

  18. Cadaveric nerve allotransplantation in the treatment of persistent thoracic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Barbour, John R; Yee, Andrew; Moore, Amy M; Trulock, Elbert P; Buchowski, Jacob M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    When relief from neuralgia cannot be achieved with traditional methods, neurectomy may be considered to abate the stimulus, and primary opposition of the terminal nerve ending is recommended to prevent neuroma. Nerve repair with autograft is limited by autologous nerves available for large nerve defects. Cadaveric allografts provide an unlimited graft source without donor-site morbidities, but are rapidly rejected unless appropriate immunosuppression is achieved. An optimal treatment method for nerve allograft transplantation would minimize rejection while simultaneously permitting nerve regeneration. This report details a novel experience of nerve allograft transplantation using cadaveric nerve grafts to desensitize persistent postoperative thoracic neuralgia.

  19. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Internal Fascicular Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yingchun; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Peng; Qi, Jian; Liu, Xiaolin; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are important pathways for receiving afferent sensory impulses and sending out efferent motor instructions, as carried out by sensory nerve fibers and motor nerve fibers. It has remained a great challenge to functionally reconnect nerve internal fiber bundles (or fascicles) in nerve repair. One possible solution may be to establish a 3D nerve fascicle visualization system. This study described the key technology of 3D peripheral nerve fascicle reconstruction. Firstly, fixed nerve segments were embedded with position lines, cryostat-sectioned continuously, stained and imaged histologically. Position line cross-sections were identified using a trained support vector machine method, and the coordinates of their central pixels were obtained. Then, nerve section images were registered using the bilinear method, and edges of fascicles were extracted using an improved gradient vector flow snake method. Subsequently, fascicle types were identified automatically using the multi-directional gradient and second-order gradient method. Finally, a 3D virtual model of internal fascicles was obtained after section images were processed. This technique was successfully applied for 3D reconstruction for the median nerve of the hand-wrist and cubital fossa regions and the gastrocnemius nerve. This nerve internal fascicle 3D reconstruction technology would be helpful for aiding peripheral nerve repair and virtual surgery. PMID:26596642

  20. Analysis of afferent responses from isolated semicircular canal of the guitarfish using rotational acceleration white-noise inputs. I. Correlation of response dynamics with receptor innervation.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, D P; Dunn, R F

    1976-05-01

    The small-signal linear characteristics of afferent responses from the isolated semicircular canal were described by the use of white-noise rotational acceleration inputs. The results, based on cross-correlation analysis, showed a striking and systematic variation in linear system impulse response characteristics from afferents which innervated different regions of the receptor. Afferents from centrally located nerve bundles innervating the crest region of the crista exhibited an initial maximum response amplitude followed by a rapid decay. In contrast, afferents from extreme rostral and caudal nerve bundles innervating the crista slopes exhibited an initial rise up to a low-amplitude maximum followed by a slower decay. These results imply that the afferents innervating a single canal do not merely carry redundant information concerning current head acceleration, but could be considered an ensemble of specific classes of filters that are tuned individually to specific classes of head movements. On the basis of these considerations, a new hypothesis of matched filter detection was proposed as relevant to information processing and dynamic control in central vestibular pathways. PMID:948010

  1. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Séguéla, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8(+) primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2(+)-Arch(+) mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8(+) afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  2. Loss of neurotrophin-3 from smooth muscle disrupts vagal gastrointestinal afferent signaling and satiation

    PubMed Central

    Biddinger, Jessica E.; Baquet, Zachary C.; Jones, Kevin R.; McAdams, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of vagal afferents are dependent on neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) for survival. NT-3 is expressed in developing gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle, a tissue densely innervated by vagal mechanoreceptors, and thus could regulate their survival. We genetically ablated NT-3 from developing GI smooth muscle and examined the pattern of loss of NT-3 expression in the GI tract and whether this loss altered vagal afferent signaling or feeding behavior. Meal-induced c-Fos activation was reduced in the solitary tract nucleus and area postrema in mice with a smooth muscle-specific NT-3 knockout (SM-NT-3KO) compared with controls, suggesting a decrease in vagal afferent signaling. Daily food intake and body weight of SM-NT-3KO mice and controls were similar. Meal pattern analysis revealed that mutants, however, had increases in average and total daily meal duration compared with controls. Mutants maintained normal meal size by decreasing eating rate compared with controls. Although microstructural analysis did not reveal a decrease in the rate of decay of eating in SM-NT-3KO mice, they ate continuously during the 30-min meal, whereas controls terminated feeding after 22 min. This led to a 74% increase in first daily meal size of SM-NT-3KO mice compared with controls. The increases in meal duration and first meal size of SM-NT-3KO mice are consistent with reduced satiation signaling by vagal afferents. This is the first demonstration of a role for GI NT-3 in short-term controls of feeding, most likely involving effects on development of vagal GI afferents that regulate satiation. PMID:24068045

  3. Spatial convergence and divergence between cutaneous afferent axons and dorsal horn cells are not constant.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Harton, P; Millecchia, R; Lawson, J; Kunjara-Na-Ayudhya, T; Stephens, S; Miller, M A; Hicks, L; Culberson, J

    2000-05-01

    We have proposed a quantitative model of the development of dorsal horn cell receptive fields (RFs) and somatotopic organization (Brown et al. [1997] Somatosens. Motor Res. 14:93-106). One component of that model is a hypothesis that convergence and divergence of connections between low-threshold primary afferent mechanoreceptive axons and dorsal horn cells are invariant over skin location and dorsal horn location. The more limited, and more easily tested, hypothesis that spatial convergence and divergence between cutaneous mechanoreceptors and dorsal horn cell are constant was examined. Spatial divergence is the number of dorsal horn cells whose RFs overlap the RF center of a primary afferent, and spatial convergence is the number of afferent RF centers that lie within the RF of a dorsal horn cell. Innervation density was determined as a function of location on the hindlimb by using peripheral nerve recording and axon counting. A descriptive model of dorsal horn cell receptive fields (Brown et al. [1998] J. Neurophysiol. 31:833-848) was used to simulate RFs of the entire dorsal horn cell population in order to estimate RF area and map scale as a function of location on the hindlimb. Previously reported correlations among innervation density, map scale, and RF size were confirmed. However, these correlations were not linear. The hypothesis that spatial convergence and divergence are constant was rejected. The previously proposed model of development of dorsal horn cell somatotopy and RF geometries must be revised to take variable spatial convergence and divergence into account. PMID:10754502

  4. ATP decreases mechanical sensitivity of muscle thin-fiber afferents in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Teru; Kubo, Asako; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue

    2015-08-01

    ATP is an energy rich substance contained in cells in the order of mM. It is released when cells are damaged and when muscle is compressed or contracted. Subcutaneous injection of ATP induces pain-related behavior and hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimulation in rats. However, the effects of ATP in muscle have not been fully studied. In the present study we examined the effects of ATP on muscle C-fiber afferent activities using single fiber recordings, and on nociceptive behavior. Muscle C-fiber activities were recorded in vitro using extensor digitorum longus muscle-common peroneal nerve preparations excised from rats deeply anesthetized with pentobarbital. ATP (100 μM and 1 mM, but not 1 μM) superfused for 5 min before the mechanical stimulation suppressed the mechanical responses of muscle thin fibers irrespective of whether they excited the fiber. This suppressive effect was reversed by P2X receptor antagonists PPADS (100 μM) and suramin (300 μM). We also found that subcutaneous injection of ATP (10 mM) induced nociceptive behavior, whereas intramuscular injection had no effect. These findings showed that effects of ATP on muscle afferents differ from those on cutaneous afferents.

  5. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    PubMed

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable. PMID:76410

  6. Thyroid hormone is required for pruning, functioning and long-term maintenance of afferent inner hair cell synapses.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Srividya; Kong, Jee-Hyun; Fang, Qing; Salles, Felipe T; Wangsawihardja, Felix; Ricci, Anthony J; Mustapha, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Functional maturation of afferent synaptic connections to inner hair cells (IHCs) involves pruning of excess synapses formed during development, as well as the strengthening and survival of the retained synapses. These events take place during the thyroid hormone (TH)-critical period of cochlear development, which is in the perinatal period for mice and in the third trimester for humans. Here, we used the hypothyroid Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1(dw)) as a model to study the role of TH in afferent type I synaptic refinement and functional maturation. We observed defects in afferent synaptic pruning and delays in calcium channel clustering in the IHCs of Pit1(dw) mice. Nevertheless, calcium currents and capacitance reached near normal levels in Pit1(dw) IHCs by the age of onset of hearing, despite the excess number of retained synapses. We restored normal synaptic pruning in Pit1(dw) IHCs by supplementing with TH from postnatal day (P)3 to P8, establishing this window as being critical for TH action on this process. Afferent terminals of older Pit1(dw) IHCs showed evidence of excitotoxic damage accompanied by a concomitant reduction in the levels of the glial glutamate transporter, GLAST. Our results indicate that a lack of TH during a critical period of inner ear development causes defects in pruning and long-term homeostatic maintenance of afferent synapses.

  7. Thyroid hormone is required for pruning, functioning and long-term maintenance of afferent inner hair cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresan, Srividya; Kong, Jee-Hyun; Fang, Qing; Salles, Felipe T.; Wangsawihardja, Felix; Ricci, Anthony J.; Mustapha, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Functional maturation of afferent synaptic connections to inner hair cells (IHCs) involves pruning of excess synapses formed during development, as well as the strengthening and survival of the retained synapses. These events take place during the thyroid hormone (TH)-critical period of cochlear development, which is in the perinatal period for mice and in the third trimester for humans. Here, we used the hypothyroid Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1dw) as a model to study the role of TH in afferent type I synaptic refinement and functional maturation. We observed defects in afferent synaptic pruning and delays in calcium channel clustering in the IHCs of Pit1dw mice. Nevertheless, calcium currents and capacitance reached near normal levels in Pit1dw IHCs by the age of onset of hearing, despite the excess number of retained synapses. We restored normal synaptic pruning in Pit1dw IHCs by supplementing with TH from postnatal day (P)3 to P8, establishing this window as being critical for TH action on this process. Afferent terminals of older Pit1dw IHCs showed evidence of excitotoxic damage accompanied by a concomitant reduction in the levels of the glial glutamate transporter, GLAST. Our results indicate that a lack of TH during a critical period of inner ear development causes defects in pruning and long-term homeostatic maintenance of afferent synapses. PMID:26386265

  8. Hair-cell counts and afferent innervation patterns in the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey with a comparison to the chinchilla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, C.; Lysakowski, A.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The numbers of type I and type II hair cells were estimated by dissector techniques applied to semithin, stained sections of the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae in the squirrel monkey and the chinchilla. 2. The crista in each species was divided into concentrically arranged central, intermediate, and peripheral zones of equal areas. The three zones can be distinguished by the sizes of individual hair cells and calyx endings, by the density of hair cells, and by the relative frequency of calyx endings innervating single or multiple type I hair cells. 3. In the monkey crista, type I hair cells outnumber type II hair cells by a ratio of almost 3:1. The ratio decreases from 4-5:1 in the central and intermediate zones to under 2:1 in the peripheral zone. For the chinchilla, the ratio is near 1:1 for the entire crista and decreases only slightly between the central and peripheral zones. 4. Nerve fibers supplying the cristae in the squirrel monkey were labeled by extracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve. Peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the zones of the cristae they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. Results were similar for the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae. 5. Axons seldom bifurcate below the neuroepithelium. Most fibers begin branching shortly after crossing the basement membrane. Their terminal arbors are compact, usually extending no more than 50-100 microns from the parent exon. A small number of long intraepithelial fibers enter the intermediate and peripheral zones of the cristae near its base, then run unbranched for long distances through the neuroepithelium to reach the central zone. 6. There are three classes of afferent fibers innervating the monkey crista. Calyx fibers terminate exclusively on type I hair cells, and bouton fibers end only on type II hair cells. Dimorphic fibers provide a mixed innervation, including calyx

  9. The foetal pig pineal gland is richly innervated by nerve fibres containing catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and C-terminal flanking peptide of NPY, but it does not secrete melatonin.

    PubMed

    Bulc, Michał; Lewczuk, Bogdan; Prusik, Magdalena; Całka, Jarosław

    2013-05-01

    Innervation of the mammalian pineal gland during prenatal development is poorly recognized. Therefore, immunofluorescence studies of the pineals of 70- and 90-day-old foetuses of the domestic pig were performed using antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and C-terminal flanking peptide of NPY (CPON). The investigated glands were supplied by numerous nerve fibres containing TH and DβH. The density of these fibres was higher in the distal and middle parts of the gland than in the proximal one. NPY and CPON were identified in the majority of DβH-positive fibres as well as in a small population of DβH-negative fibres localized mainly in the proximal part of the pineal. The immunoreactive fibres were more numerous in 90-day-old foetuses than in 70-day-old ones. The effect of norepinephrine on melatonin secretion by the foetal pineals in the short-term organ culture was studied to determine the role of DβH-positive fibres during prenatal life. For the same purpose melatonin was measured in the blood in the umbilical cords and in the jugular vein of the mother. The pineals of both groups of foetuses did not secrete melatonin in the organ culture, independently of the presence or absence of norepinephrine in the medium. Melatonin concentrations in the blood in the umbilical cords of foetuses from the same litter and in the jugular vein of their mother were similar. The presence of adrenergic nerve fibres in the pig pineal during gestation does not seem to be associated with the control of melatonin secretion.

  10. Netrin-1 Contributes to Myelinated Afferent Fiber Sprouting and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cai-Hua; Yuan, Xiao-Cui; Gao, Fang; Li, Hong-Ping; Cao, Jie; Liu, Yan-Shen; Yu, Wei; Tian, Bo; Meng, Xian-Fang; Shi, Jing; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, Man

    2016-10-01

    Netrin-1 is a neuronal guidance molecule implicated in the development of spinal cord neurons and cortical neurons. In the adult spinal cord, UNC5H (repulsive receptor of netrin-1), but not deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) (attractive receptor of netrin-1), constitutes a major mode of netrin-1 signal transduction, which may be involved in axon repulsion and inhibits neurite outgrowth. Abnormal sprouting of myelinated afferent fibers in the spinal dorsal horn can cause mechanical allodynia associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, Shingles) and other neuropathic pains. However, whether netrin-1 participates in sprouting of myelinated afferent fibers and mechanical allodynia remains unknown. In an ultropotent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced PHN-like model, RTX treatment for 6 weeks increased netrin-1 expression in dorsal horn neurons, including NK-1-positive projection neurons. In human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we found that TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine antagonized RTX-induced upregulation of netrin-1. After RTX treatment, UNC5H2 expression was gradually decreased, whereas DCC expression was significantly increased. Silencing netrin-1 in the spinal dorsal horn significantly attenuated RTX-induced mechanical allodynia and sprouting of myelinated fibers into the spinal lamina II. Our results suggest that RTX treatment upregulates netrin-1 expression through activation of TRPV1 receptors and change UNC5H2-rich spinal dorsal horn into a growth-permissive environment by increasing DCC expression, thus enhancing the sprouting of myelinated afferent nerves. Netrin-1 may be targeted for reducing primary afferent sprouting and mechanical allodynia in PHN and other neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:26482371

  11. ACTIVATION OF TRPA1 ON DURAL AFFERENTS: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM OF HEADACHE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Le, Larry N.; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro using two TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO) and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB), on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. Using an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hindpaw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura and exploratory activity was monitored for 30 minutes using an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective anti-migraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those seen in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache. PMID:22809691

  12. Immune derived opioidergic inhibition of viscerosensory afferents is decreased in Irritable Bowel Syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Patrick A; Moretta, Melissa; Lim, Amanda; Grasby, Dallas J; Bird, Daniel; Brierley, Stuart M; Liebregts, Tobias; Adam, Birgit; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Holtmann, Gerald; Bampton, Peter; Hoffmann, Peter; Andrews, Jane M; Zola, Heddy; Krumbiegel, Doreen

    2014-11-01

    Alterations in the neuro-immune axis contribute toward viscerosensory nerve sensitivity and symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Inhibitory factors secreted from immune cells inhibit colo-rectal afferents in health, and loss of this inhibition may lead to hypersensitivity and symptoms. We aimed to determine the immune cell type(s) responsible for opioid secretion in humans and whether this is altered in patients with IBS. The β-endorphin content of specific immune cell lineages in peripheral blood and colonic mucosal biopsies were compared between healthy subjects (HS) and IBS patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) supernatants from HS and IBS patients were applied to colo-rectal sensory afferent endings in mice with post-inflammatory chronic visceral hypersensitivity (CVH). β-Endorphin was identified predominantly in monocyte/macrophages relative to T or B cells in human PBMC and colonic lamina propria. Monocyte derived β-endorphin levels and colonic macrophage numbers were lower in IBS patients than healthy subjects. PBMC supernatants from healthy subjects had greater inhibitory effects on colo-rectal afferent mechanosensitivity than those from IBS patients. The inhibitory effects of PBMC supernatants were more prominent in CVH mice compared to healthy mice due to an increase in μ-opioid receptor expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons in CVH mice. Monocyte/macrophages are the predominant immune cell type responsible for β-endorphin secretion in humans. IBS patients have lower monocyte derived β-endorphin levels than healthy subjects, causing less inhibition of colonic afferent endings. Consequently, altered immune function contributes toward visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. PMID:25063707

  13. Netrin-1 Contributes to Myelinated Afferent Fiber Sprouting and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cai-Hua; Yuan, Xiao-Cui; Gao, Fang; Li, Hong-Ping; Cao, Jie; Liu, Yan-Shen; Yu, Wei; Tian, Bo; Meng, Xian-Fang; Shi, Jing; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, Man

    2016-10-01

    Netrin-1 is a neuronal guidance molecule implicated in the development of spinal cord neurons and cortical neurons. In the adult spinal cord, UNC5H (repulsive receptor of netrin-1), but not deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) (attractive receptor of netrin-1), constitutes a major mode of netrin-1 signal transduction, which may be involved in axon repulsion and inhibits neurite outgrowth. Abnormal sprouting of myelinated afferent fibers in the spinal dorsal horn can cause mechanical allodynia associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, Shingles) and other neuropathic pains. However, whether netrin-1 participates in sprouting of myelinated afferent fibers and mechanical allodynia remains unknown. In an ultropotent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced PHN-like model, RTX treatment for 6 weeks increased netrin-1 expression in dorsal horn neurons, including NK-1-positive projection neurons. In human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we found that TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine antagonized RTX-induced upregulation of netrin-1. After RTX treatment, UNC5H2 expression was gradually decreased, whereas DCC expression was significantly increased. Silencing netrin-1 in the spinal dorsal horn significantly attenuated RTX-induced mechanical allodynia and sprouting of myelinated fibers into the spinal lamina II. Our results suggest that RTX treatment upregulates netrin-1 expression through activation of TRPV1 receptors and change UNC5H2-rich spinal dorsal horn into a growth-permissive environment by increasing DCC expression, thus enhancing the sprouting of myelinated afferent nerves. Netrin-1 may be targeted for reducing primary afferent sprouting and mechanical allodynia in PHN and other neuropathic pain conditions.

  14. Interganglionic segregation of distinct vagal afferent fibre phenotypes in guinea-pig airways.

    PubMed Central

    Ricco, M M; Kummer, W; Biglari, B; Myers, A C; Undem, B J

    1996-01-01

    1. The present study addressed the hypothesis that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia contain the somata of functionally and anatomically distinct airway afferent fibres. 2. Anatomical investigations were performed by injecting guinea-pig airways with the neuronal tracer Fast Blue. The animals were killed 7 days later, and the ganglia were removed and immunostained with antisera against substance P (SP) and neurofilament protein (NF). In the nodose ganglion, NF-immunoreactive neurones accounted for about 98% of the Fast Blue-labelled cells while in the jugular ganglion they accounted for approximately 48%. SP and NF immunoreactivity was never (n = 100) observed in the same cell suggesting that the antisera labelled distinct populations. 3. Electrophysiological investigations were performed using an in vitro guinea-pig tracheal and bronchial preparation with intact afferent vagal pathways, including nodose and jugular ganglia. Action potentials arriving from single airway afferent nerve endings were monitored extracellularly using a glass microelectrode positioned near neuronal cell bodies in either ganglion. 4. The nodose ganglion contained the somata of mainly fast-conducting tracheal A delta fibres whereas the jugular ganglion contained equal numbers of C fibre and A delta fibre tracheal afferent somata. The nodose A delta neurones adapted rapidly to mechanical stimulation, had relatively low mechanical thresholds, were not activated by capsaicin and adapted rapidly to a hyperosmotic stimulus. By contrast, jugular A delta and C fibres adapted slowly to mechanical stimulation, were often activated by capsaicin, had higher mechanical thresholds and displayed a slow adaptation to a hyperosmotic stimulus. 5. The anatomical, physiological and pharmacological data provide evidence to support the contention that the vagal ganglionic source of the fibre supplying the airways ultimately dictates its neurochemical and physiological phenotype. Images Figure 1 PMID:8910234

  15. Enhanced adipose afferent reflex contributes to sympathetic activation in diet-induced obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Wei-Wei; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2012-11-01

    We recently found that adipose afferent reflex (AAR) induced by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) increased sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in normal rats. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in obesity hypertension. Male rats were fed with a control diet (12% kcal as fat) or high-fat diet (42% kcal as fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity hypertension. Stimulation of WAT with capsaicin increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure. Both AAR and WAT afferent activity were enhanced in obesity hypertension (OH) compared with obesity nonhypertension (ON) and in ON compared with obesity-resistant or control diet rats. WAT sensory denervation induced by resiniferatoxin caused greater decreases in renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control. The depressor effect of resiniferatoxin lasted ≥ 3 weeks in OH. Leptin antagonist in WAT reduced renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH. WAT injection of capsaicin increased plasma renin, angiotensin II, and norepinephrine levels in OH and caused more c-fos expression in paraventricular nucleus in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control rats. Inhibiting paraventricular nucleus neurons with lidocaine attenuated renal sympathetic nerve activity in OH and ON, decreased mean arterial pressure in OH, and abolished the capsaicin-induced AAR in all groups. The results indicate that enhanced AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in OH, and paraventricular nucleus plays an important role in the enhanced AAR and sympathetic activation in OH.

  16. Inferior alveolar and lingual nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2011-03-01

    At present, there are no objective testing modalities available for evaluation of iatrogenic injury to the terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve, making such clinical diagnosis and management complicated for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Several imaging modalities can assist in the preoperative risk assessment of the trigeminal nerve as related to commonly performed procedures in the vicinity of the nerve, mostly third molar surgery. This article provides a review of all available imaging modalities and their clinical application relative to preoperative injury risk assessment of the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve, and postinjury and postsurgical repair recovery status.

  17. The role of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors on the differential modulation of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y release from peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Donoso, M Verónica; Aedo, Felipe; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo

    2006-03-01

    The pre-synaptic sympathetic modulator role of adenosine was assessed by studying transmitter release following electrical depolarization of nerve endings from the rat mesenteric artery. Mesentery perfusion with exogenous adenosine exclusively inhibited the release of norepinephrine (NA) but did not affect the overflow of neuropeptide Y (NPY), establishing the basis for a differential pre-synaptic modulator mechanism. Several adenosine structural analogs mimicked adenosine's effect on NA release and their relative order of potency was: 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride = 1-[2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-d-ribofuranuronamide = 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine > adenosine > N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine. The use of selective receptor subtype antagonists confirmed the involvement of A(2A) and A(3) adenosine receptors. The modulator role of adenosine is probably due to the activation of both receptors; co-application of 1 nM 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride plus 1 nM 1-[2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide caused additive reductions in NA released. Furthermore, while 1 nM of an A(2A) or A(3) receptor antagonist only partially reduced the inhibitory action of adenosine, the combined co-application of the two antagonists fully blocked the adenosine-induced inhibition. Only the simultaneous blockade of the adenosine A(2A) plus A(3) receptors with selective antagonists elicited a significant increase in NA overflow. H 89 reduced the release of both NA and NPY. We conclude that pre-synaptic A(2A) and A(3) adenosine receptor activation modulates sympathetic co-transmission by exclusively inhibiting the release of NA without affecting immunoreactive (ir)-NPY and we suggest separate mechanisms for vesicular release modulation.

  18. [Effects of afferent vagal stimulation and distention of the upper digestive tract on the micturition reflex and activity of the pontine micturition center in dogs].

    PubMed

    Moda, Y

    1992-12-01

    (1) The study was performed to elucidate the effects of afferent vagal stimulation and distension of the digestive tract on the micturition reflex in 21 acute decerebrate dogs immobilized with gallamine. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve with high voltage (17.5-25 V) and moderate frequency (10-50 Hz) elicited in most cases inhibition of the periodic bladder contractions and of outflows of the pelvic vesical branch which were induced by a sustained intravesical pressure of 10-15 cmH2O. Distension of the thoracic esophagus, the stomach, and the duodenum also induced inhibition of the bladder contractions and of the pelvic outflow to the bladder. Such inhibitions were abolished after bilateral cervical vagotomies except a few cases of distension of the duodenum. (2) Another series of experiments were undertaken to clear the effect of afferent vagal stimulation on the electrical activity of the pontine micturition center in 10 acute decerebrate dogs. By means of an extracellular glass microelectrode method, unitary discharges synchronized with the grouping discharges in the pelvic vesical branch with a rhythm of 2.2-2.5 Hz were recorded from the pontine micturition center in the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum. Such a type of discharges was detected in 6 of 59 units which discharged by afferent stimulation of the pelvic vesical branch. This type of discharges was inhibited by afferent vagal stimulation at the supradiaphragmatic level. From these results, it may be concluded that the afferent pathway of the bladder relaxation reflex induced by distension of the upper digestive tract is mainly involved in the vagal nerves, but in some cases of the strong distension of the duodenum, the pathway is in splanchnic nerves, and that inhibition of the bladder contraction after stimulation of vagal nerve is induced by suppression of the pontine micturition centers.

  19. Oligosynaptic inhibition of group I afferents between the brachioradialis and flexor carpi radialis in humans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Hayashi, Masahiro; Shinozaki, Katsuhiro; Nito, Mitsuhiro; Hashizume, Wataru; Miyasaka, Takuji; Shindo, Masaomi; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Spinal reflex arcs mediated by low threshold afferents between the brachioradialis (BR) and flexor carpi radialis (FCR) were studied in eleven healthy human subjects using a post-stimulus time-histogram method. Electrical conditioning stimuli (ES) to the radial nerve branch innervating BR with the intensity below the motor threshold (MT) induced an early and significant trough (inhibition) in 32/85 FCR motor units (MUs) in 9/9 subjects. Such inhibition was never provoked by cutaneous stimulation. The central synaptic delay (CSD) of the inhibition was approximately 1.1ms longer than that of the homonymous FCR facilitation. ES to the median nerve branch innervating FCR with the intensity below MT induced an inhibition in 27/71 BR-MUs in 10/10 subjects. CSD of the inhibition was about 1.1ms longer than that of the homonymous BR facilitation. These findings suggest that inhibition between BR and FCR exists in humans. Group I afferents seem to mediate the inhibition through an oligo(di or tri)-synaptic path. PMID:26996830

  20. An afferent explanation for sexual dimorphism in the aortic baroreflex of rat.

    PubMed

    Santa Cruz Chavez, Grace C; Li, Bai-Yan; Glazebrook, Patricia A; Kunze, Diana L; Schild, John H

    2014-09-15

    Sex differences in baroreflex (BRx) function are well documented. Hormones likely contribute to this dimorphism, but many functional aspects remain unresolved. Our lab has been investigating a subset of vagal sensory neurons that constitute nearly 50% of the total population of myelinated aortic baroreceptors (BR) in female rats but less than 2% in male rats. Termed "Ah," this unique phenotype has many of the nonoverlapping electrophysiological properties and chemical sensitivities of both myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type BR afferents. In this study, we utilize three distinct experimental protocols to determine if Ah-type barosensory afferents underlie, at least in part, the sex-related differences in BRx function. Electron microscopy of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) revealed that female rats have less myelin (P < 0.03) and a smaller fiber cross-sectional area (P < 0.05) per BR fiber than male rats. Electrical stimulation of the ADN evoked compound action potentials and nerve conduction profiles that were markedly different (P < 0.01, n = 7 females and n = 9 males). Selective activation of ADN myelinated fibers evoked a BRx-mediated depressor response that was 3-7 times greater in female (n = 16) than in male (n = 17) rats. Interestingly, the most striking hemodynamic difference was functionally dependent upon the rate of myelinated barosensory fiber activation. Only 5-10 Hz of stimulation evoked a rapid, 20- to 30-mmHg reduction in arterial pressure of female rats, whereas rates of 50 Hz or higher were required to elicit a comparable depressor response from male rats. Collectively, our experimental results are suggestive of an alternative myelinated baroreceptor afferent pathway in females that may account for, at least in part, the noted sex-related differences in autonomic control of cardiovascular function.

  1. The Role of the Paratrigeminal Nucleus in Vagal Afferent Evoked Respiratory Reflexes: A Neuroanatomical and Functional Study in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Alexandria K.; Farrell, Michael J.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; McGovern, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory tree receives sensory innervation from the jugular and nodose vagal sensory ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia are derived from embryologically distinct origins and as such demonstrate differing molecular, neurochemical and physiological phenotypes. Furthermore, whereas nodose afferent neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS), recent neuroanatomical studies in rats suggest that jugular neurons have their central terminations in the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5). In the present study we confirm that guinea pigs demonstrate a comparable distinction between the brainstem terminations of nodose and jugular ganglia afferents. Thus, microinjection of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CT-B) neural tracers into the caudal nTS and Pa5 resulted in highly specific retrograde labeling of neurons in the nodose and jugular ganglia, respectively. Whereas, nodose neurons more often expressed 160 KD neurofilament proteins and the alpha3 subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase, significantly more jugular neurons expressed the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and, especially, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP). Indeed, terminal fibers in the Pa5 compared to the nTS were characterized by their significantly greater expression of CGRP, further supporting the notion that jugular afferents project to trigeminal-related brainstem regions. Electrical stimulation of the guinea pig larynx following selective surgical denervation of the nodose afferent innervation to the larynx (leaving intact the jugular innervation) resulted in stimulus dependent respiratory slowing and eventual apnea. This jugular ganglia neuron mediated response was unaffected by bilateral microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the nTS, but was abolished by muscimol injected into the Pa5. Taken together these data confirm that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia afferent neurons innervate distinct central circuits and support the notion that multiple peripheral and central pathways

  2. High-frequency dynamics of regularly discharging canal afferents provide a linear signal for angular vestibuloocular reflexes.

    PubMed

    Hullar, T E; Minor, L B

    1999-10-01

    Regularly discharging vestibular-nerve afferents innervating the semicircular canals were recorded extracellularly in anesthetized chinchillas undergoing high-frequency, high-velocity sinusoidal rotations. In the range from 2 to 20 Hz, with peak velocities of 151 degrees/s at 6 Hz and 52 degrees/s at 20 Hz, 67/70 (96%) maintained modulated discharge throughout the sinusoidal stimulus cycle without inhibitory cutoff or excitatory saturation. These afferents showed little harmonic distortion, no dependence of sensitivity on peak amplitude of stimulation, and no measurable half-cycle asymmetry. A transfer function fitting the data predicts no change in sensitivity (gain) of regularly discharging afferents over the frequencies tested but shows a phase lead with regard to head velocity increasing from 0 degrees at 2 Hz to 30 degrees at 20 Hz. These results indicate that regularly discharging afferents provide a plausible signal to drive the angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) even during high-frequency head motion but are not a likely source for nonlinearities present in the VOR. PMID:10515990

  3. Neuronal activity of the cat supraoptic nucleus is influenced by muscle small-diameter afferent (groups III and IV) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kannan, H; Yamashita, H; Koizumi, K; Brooks, C M

    1988-08-01

    In anesthetized cats, responses of single neurosecretory neurons of the supraoptic nucleus to activation of muscle receptors were investigated. Electrical stimulation (1-3 pulses at 200 Hz) of group III and IV pure muscle afferents (gastrocnemius nerve) evoked excitation of greater than 50% of supraoptic nucleus neurons (n = 50), whereas stimulation of group Ia or Ib fibers was ineffective. Baroreceptor stimulation inhibited 95% of these supraoptic nucleus neurons that responded to activation of muscle afferents. Excitation of receptors in the gastrocnemius muscle by intra-arterial injection of chemicals (NaCl, KCl, and bradykinin) increased firing rates of most (84%, 74%, and 80%, respectively) neurosecretary neurons. The magnitude of the excitatory response was dose dependent--bradykinin being the most effective. The response disappeared after muscle denervation. When the gastrocnemius muscle alone was contracted phasically by ventral root stimulation, discharges of the supraoptic nucleus neurons increased, whereas quick stretch of the muscle had no effect. We conclude that activation of muscle receptors by chemical or mechanical stimulus can directly excite neurosecretory neurons in the supraoptic nucleus and that afferent impulses are carried by polymodal fibers of small diameter but not by the largest afferents (group I) from the muscle. The results may relate to increased concentrations of plasma vasopressin during exercise.

  4. Expression of receptors for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands in sacral spinal cord reveals separate targets of pelvic afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Shelley L; Keast, Janet R

    2008-02-20

    Nerve growth factor has been proposed to mediate many structural and chemical changes in bladder sensory neurons after injury or inflammation. We have examined the expression of receptors for the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family within sensory terminals located in the sacral spinal cord and in bladder-projecting sacral dorsal root ganglion neurons of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Nerve fibers immunolabelled for GFRalpha1 (GDNF receptor), GFRalpha2 (neurturin receptor), or GFRalpha3 (artemin receptor) showed distinct distribution patterns in the spinal cord, suggesting separate populations of sensory fibers with different functions: GFRalpha1-labeled fibers were in outer lamina II and the lateral-collateral pathway and associated with autonomic interneurons and preganglionic neurons; GFRalpha2-labeled fibers were only in inner lamina II; GFRalpha3-labeled fibers were in lamina I, the lateral-collateral pathway, and areas surrounding dorsal groups of preganglionic neurons and associated interneurons. Immunofluorescence studies of retrogradely labelled bladder-projecting neurons in sacral dorsal root ganglia showed that approximately 25% expressed GFRalpha1 or GFRalpha3 immunoreactivity, the preferred receptors for GDNF and artemin, respectively. After cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation, fluorescence intensity of GFRalpha1-positive fibers increased within the dorsal horn, but there was no change in the GFRalpha2- or GFRalpha3-positive fibers. These studies have shown that GDNF and artemin may target bladder sensory neurons and potentially mediate plasticity of sacral visceral afferent neurons following inflammation. Our results have also revealed three distinct subpopulations of sensory fibers within the sacral spinal cord, which have not been identified previously using other markers.

  5. Reflex control of inflammation by sympathetic nerves, not the vagus.

    PubMed

    Martelli, D; Yao, S T; McKinley, M J; McAllen, R M

    2014-04-01

    We investigated a neural reflex that controls the strength of inflammatory responses to immune challenge - the inflammatory reflex. In anaesthetized rats challenged with intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 60 μg kg(-1)), we found strong increases in plasma levels of the key inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) 90 min later. Those levels were unaffected by previous bilateral cervical vagotomy, but were enhanced approximately 5-fold if the greater splanchnic sympathetic nerves had been cut. Sham surgery had no effect, and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected by nerve sections, so could not explain this result. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that efferent neural activity in the splanchnic nerve and its splenic branch was strongly increased by LPS treatment. Splenic nerve activity was dependent on inputs from the splanchnic nerves: vagotomy had no effect on the activity in either nerve. Together, these data demonstrate that immune challenge with this dose of LPS activates a neural reflex that is powerful enough to cause an 80% suppression of the acute systemic inflammatory response. The efferent arm of this reflex is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves, not the vagi as previously proposed. As with other physiological responses to immune challenge, the afferent pathway is presumptively humoral: the present data show that vagal afferents play no measurable part. Because inflammation sits at the gateway to immune responses, this reflex could play an important role in immune function as well as inflammatory diseases.

  6. Reflex control of inflammation by sympathetic nerves, not the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, D; Yao, S T; McKinley, M J; McAllen, R M

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a neural reflex that controls the strength of inflammatory responses to immune challenge – the inflammatory reflex. In anaesthetized rats challenged with intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 60 μg kg−1), we found strong increases in plasma levels of the key inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) 90 min later. Those levels were unaffected by previous bilateral cervical vagotomy, but were enhanced approximately 5-fold if the greater splanchnic sympathetic nerves had been cut. Sham surgery had no effect, and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected by nerve sections, so could not explain this result. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that efferent neural activity in the splanchnic nerve and its splenic branch was strongly increased by LPS treatment. Splenic nerve activity was dependent on inputs from the splanchnic nerves: vagotomy had no effect on the activity in either nerve. Together, these data demonstrate that immune challenge with this dose of LPS activates a neural reflex that is powerful enough to cause an 80% suppression of the acute systemic inflammatory response. The efferent arm of this reflex is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves, not the vagi as previously proposed. As with other physiological responses to immune challenge, the afferent pathway is presumptively humoral: the present data show that vagal afferents play no measurable part. Because inflammation sits at the gateway to immune responses, this reflex could play an important role in immune function as well as inflammatory diseases. PMID:24421357

  7. Towards determining the afferent sites of perception feedback on residual arms of amputees with transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Fang, Peng; Tian, Lan; Zheng, Yue; Zhou, Hui; Li, Guanglin; Zhang, Xiufeng

    2015-01-01

    The coordination and combination of motion and sensation are critical to realize a natural and precise control of prosthetic hands. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) is one of possible methods to develop an intuitive perception feedback for limb amputees. However, the perception afferent sites would be a critical issue that is still unexplored in depth. This paper reports a preliminary study on using somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to determine the proper afferent sites of perceptions on residual arms of transradial amputees. In this study, two transradial amputees with phantom finger perception (PFP) were recruited and SEP for the stimulation of median nerves and ulnar nerves were recorded and analyzed. PFP distribution maps on subjects' stumps were obtained by mechanical stimulations performed manually. Electrical stimulation was then applied to some selected sites on the stumps of their residual arms with surface electrodes to evoke SEP. In the experiments, SEP were successfully recorded, which means that the proposed method might be a suitable approach for localizing the afferent sites of perceptions, and could provide technique support for possible intuitive neural feedback for limb amputees in future work.

  8. Putative role of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in the afferent limb of cardio renal reflexes in rats.

    PubMed

    Ditting, Tilmann; Linz, Peter; Hilgers, Karl F; Jung, Oliver; Geiger, Helmut; Veelken, Roland

    2003-11-01

    Recent studies suggest a role of ion channels of the DEG/ENaC family for mechanosensation in different species and in baroreceptor reflex control in rats. We tested the hypothesis that ENaC within the cardiac sensory network are mandatory for mechanosensation. Experiments were performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats, isolated nodose ganglion cells with cardiac afferents and isolated vagus nerves. Epicardial delivery of the amiloride analogue benzamil intended to specifically inhibit ENaC presumably located on cardiac sensory afferents indeed blunted the mechanosensitive (i. e., sympathoinhibition by intravenous volume loading [-32% and -42% in treated groups vs. -67% in controls; n = 7 each; p < 0.05]) as well as-though to a lesser extent-the 5-HT(3)-mediated chemosensitive cardiorenal reflex in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. Using patch clamp technique, however, it turned out that neither amiloride nor benzamil influenced mechanically induced currents in ganglion nodosum cells in vitro, stimulated by hypoosmotic stress. The unspecific stretch activated ion channel blocker gadolinium completely abolished mechanically induced currents, indicating respective cells were mechanosensitive. In isolated vagus nerves benzamil impaired action potentials obtained by electrical stimulation (C-spike amplitude [-33%]; latency [+12%]; n = 8; p < 0.05). Our findings at least cast doubt on ENaC exclusively playing a specific role as mechanotransducers within the cardiac sensory network. Other ion channels might be involved. Furthermore the observed findings in vivo could also be due to unspecific disturbance of afferent signal conduction. PMID:14556084

  9. [The stimulating effects of contralateral glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal afferent fibers on the glossopharyngeo-hypoglossal reflex activities in the frog].

    PubMed

    Murayama, N

    1991-01-01

    American Bullfrogs, Rana catesbiana, immobilized with suxamethonium chloride (20 mg/kg b. w., i. p.), were used. By stimulating the glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve, reflex activities, composed of early (10-20 ms in latency) and late (greater than 20 ms) components, were evoked in both protoractor branch (P. br.) and retractor branch (R. br.) of the ipsilateral hypoglossal (XII) nerve. Contralateral IXth nerve stimulation increased the reflex activities of both components in the P. br. elicited ipsilaterally by the homonymous nerve. Whereas, it increased the reflex activities of the early component in the R. br. but, decreased that of the late component. On the other hand, stimulation of P. br. in the contralateral XIIth nerve increased the activities of both components in the P. br. and those of the late component in the R. br., but did not affect the activities of the early component in the R. br. The time course of these effects was similar to that by contralateral IXth nerve stimulation. The present findings strongly suggest the existence of afferent fibers in the XIIth nerve. PMID:1770456

  10. Effects of stimulation of vesical afferents on colonic motility in cats.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, M; Grimaud, J C; Abysique, A

    1990-05-01

    The effects of distension and isovolumetric contraction of urinary bladder on colonic motility were studied in anesthetized cats. Distension and contraction of the urinary bladder induced an inhibition of spontaneous colonic electromyographic activity and a decrease in the amplitudes of the excitatory junction potentials evoked in the colon by stimulation of the distal end of the parasympathetic nerve fibers. This inhibition was blocked by guanethidine and phentolamine. Reversely, vesical emptying resulted in an increase in colonic motility, abolished by atropine, and an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory junction potentials. Both excitatory and inhibitory reflexes disappeared after hexamethonium. The inhibitory effects of bladder distension were abolished by bilateral section of the lumbar ventral or dorsal spinal roots and after bilateral section of the lumbar colonic or hypogastric nerves. These results indicate (a) that the vesical afferents responsible for the inhibitory and excitatory reflexes run in the hypogastric and pelvic nerves respectively and (b) that the inhibitory and excitatory effects are caused by the activation of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent nerve fibers, respectively. The supraspinal nervous structures were not implicated in these reflexes because they persisted in spinal cats.

  11. Opioids inhibit visceral afferent activation of catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ran Ji; Roberts, Brandon L.; Zhao, Huan; Andresen, Michael C.; Appleyard, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Brainstem A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) influence many homeostatic functions, including food intake, stress, respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. They also play a role in both opioid reward and withdrawal. Injections of opioids into the NTS modulate many autonomic functions influenced by catecholamine neurons including food intake and cardiac function. We recently showed that NTS-CA neurons are directly activated by incoming visceral afferent inputs. Here we determined whether opioid agonists modulate afferent activation of NTS-CA neurons using transgenic mice with EGFP expressed under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. The opioid agonist Met-enkephalin (Met-Enk) significantly attenuated solitary tract evoked EPSCs (ST-EPSCs) in NTS TH-EGFP neurons by 80%, an effect reversed by wash or the mu opioid receptor specific antagonist, CTOP. Met-Enk had a significantly greater effect to inhibit afferent inputs onto TH-EGFP positive neurons than EGFP negative neurons, which were only inhibited by 50%. The mu agonist, DAMGO, also inhibited the ST-EPSC in TH-EGFP neurons in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, neither the delta agonist DPDPE, nor the kappa agonist, U69,593, consistently inhibited the ST-EPSC amplitude. Met-Enk and DAMGO increased the paired pulse ratio, decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of mini-EPSCs and had no effect on holding current, input resistance or current-voltage relationships in TH-EGFP neurons, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action on afferent terminals. Met-Enk significantly reduced both the basal firing rate of NTS TH-EGFP neurons and the ability of afferent stimulation to evoke an action potential. These results suggest that opioids inhibit NTS-CA neurons by reducing an excitatory afferent drive onto these neurons through presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release and elucidate one potential mechanism by which opioids

  12. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fascicles) that contain hundreds of individual nerve fibers (neurons). Neurons consist of dendrites, axon, and cell body. The ... tree-like structures that receive signals from other neurons and from special sensory cells that sense the ...

  13. Vagal afferent projections to lobule VIIa of the rabbit cerebellar vermis related to cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Sears, T A; Sadakane, K; Nisimaru, N

    1998-02-01

    In decerebrate rabbits we recorded simultaneously field potentials in lobule VIIa of the vermal cerebellar cortex and the vagal compound action potentials (vCAPs) proximally in the vagus nerve following electrical stimulation distally in the same nerve at different intensities. Four principal components of the vCAP were distinguished based on their peak conduction velocities. Their velocities were component I, 67-100 m/s; II, 28-50 m/s; III, 6-28 m/s, IV, 0.4-1.3 m/s. A collision test based on stimulating the recurrent laryngeal nerve identified component I and sub-component IIa of the vCAP as being due to the motor fibres of the descending limb of the nerve. The field potentials evoked in lobule VIIa by electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus nerve were climbing fibre responses as judged by the characteristics of their lamina profile and their response to high frequency stimulation. These field potentials in lobule VIIa correlated most closely with the component III of the vCAP; particularly with a sub-component IIIa of the vagus. Based on the investigations by Evans and Murray (1954) (Histological and functional studies on the fibre composition of the vagus nerve of the rabbit. J. Anat. (Lond.) 88, 320-337) in the rabbit, and by Paintal (1963) (Vagal afferent fibres. Ergeb. Physiol. 52, 74-156) and Mei (1970) (Cardiovascular and respiratory vagal mechanoreceptors in the cat. Exp. Brain Res. 11, 480-501) in the cat, component III is most likely to be due to receptors from the heart and a part of the pulmonary stretch receptors.

  14. Effects of acid on vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-08-15

    Acid reflux-induced heartburn and noncardiac chest pain are processed peripherally by sensory nerve endings in the wall of the esophagus, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effects of acid on esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in guinea pig vagal nodose or jugular C fiber neurons by using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. We recorded action potentials (AP) of esophageal nodose or jugular C fibers evoked by acid perfusion and compared esophageal distension-evoked AP before and after acid perfusion. Acid perfusion for 30 min (pH range 7.4 to 5.8) did not evoke AP in nodose C fibers but significantly decreased their responses to esophageal distension, which could be recovered after washing out acid for 90 min. In jugular C fibers, acid perfusion not only evoked AP but also inhibited their responses to esophageal distension, which were not recovered after washing out acid for 120 min. Lower concentration of capsaicin perfusion mimicked acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fibers. Pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) inhibitor amiloride, significantly inhibited acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fiber. These results demonstrate that esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent nerve subtypes display distinctive responses to acid. Acid activates jugular, but not nodose, C fibers and inhibits both of their responses to esophageal distension. These effects are mediated mainly through TRPV1. This inhibitory effect is a novel finding and may contribute to esophageal sensory/motor dysfunction in acid reflux diseases.

  15. Integrated phrenic responses to carotid afferent stimulation in adult rats following perinatal hyperoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, L; Olson, E B; Vidruk, E H; Mitchell, G S

    1997-01-01

    1. Hypoxic ventilatory responses are greatly attenuated in adult rats exposed to moderate hyperoxia (60% O2) during the first month of life (perinatal treated rats). The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that perinatal hyperoxia impairs central integration of carotid chemoreceptor afferent inputs, thereby diminishing the hypoxic ventilatory response. 2. Time-dependent phrenic nerve responses to electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN) and steady-state relationships between CSN stimulation frequency and phrenic nerve output were compared in control and perinatal treated rats. The rats were urethane anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed and artificially ventilated. End-tidal CO2 was monitored and maintained at isocapnic levels; arterial blood gases were determined. 3. Two stimulation protocols were used: (1) three 2 min episodes of CSN stimulation (20 Hz, 0.2 ms duration, 3 x threshold), separated by 5 min intervals; and (2) nine 45 s episodes of CSN stimulation with stimulus frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 20 Hz (0.2 ms duration, 3 x threshold), separated by 4 min intervals. 4. The mean threshold currents to elicit phrenic responses were similar between groups. Burst frequency (f, burst min-1), peak amplitude of integrated phrenic activity (integral of Phr), and minute phrenic activity (integral of Phr x f) during and after CSN stimulation were not distinguishable between groups in either protocol at any time or at any stimulus intensity (P > 0.05). 5. Perinatal hyperoxia does not alter temporal or steady-state phrenic responses to CSN stimulation, suggesting that the central integration of carotid chemoreceptor afferent inputs is not impaired in perinatal treated rats. It is speculated that carotid chemoreceptors per se are impaired in perinatal treated rats. PMID:9161991

  16. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  17. Electrical potentials from the eye and optic nerve of Strombus: effects of electrical stimulation of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Gillary, H L

    1977-02-01

    1. Photic stimulation of the mature eye of Strombus can evoke in the optic nerve 'on' activity in numerous small afferent fibres and repetitive 'off' bursts of afferent impulses in a smaller number of larger fibres. 2. Synchronous invasion of the eye by electrically evoked impulses in small optic nerve fibres (apparently the 'on' afferents, antidromically activated) can evoke a burst of impulses in the larger 'off' fibres which propagate away from the eye. Invasion of the eye via one branch of optic nerve can evoke an answering burst in another branch. 3. Such electrically evoked bursts are similar to light-evoked 'off' bursts with respect to their impulse composition, their ability to be inhibited by illumination of the eye, and their susceptibility to MgCl2 anaesthesia. 4. Invasion of the eye by a train of repetitive electrically evoked impulses in the absence of photic stimulation can give rise to repetitive 'off' bursts as well as concomitant oscillatory potentials in the eye which are similar to those normally evoked by cessation of a photic stimulus. 5. The electrically evoked 'off' bursts appear to be caused by an excitatory rebound following the cessation of inhibitory synaptic input from photoreceptors which can be antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve. 6. The experimental results suggest that the rhythmic discharge of the 'off' fibres evoked by the cessation of a photic stimulus is mediated by the abrupt decrease of inhibitory synaptic input from the receptors. PMID:192827

  18. Gait phase detection from sciatic nerve recordings in functional electrical stimulation systems for foot drop correction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun-Uk; Song, Kang-Il; Han, Sungmin; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kang, Ji Yoon; Hwang, Dosik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Choi, Kuiwon; Youn, Inchan

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous afferent activities recorded by a nerve cuff electrode have been used to detect the stance phase in a functional electrical stimulation system for foot drop correction. However, the implantation procedure was difficult, as the cuff electrode had to be located on the distal branches of a multi-fascicular nerve to exclude muscle afferent and efferent activities. This paper proposes a new gait phase detection scheme that can be applied to a proximal nerve root that includes cutaneous afferent fibers as well as muscle afferent and efferent fibers. To test the feasibility of this scheme, electroneurogram (ENG) signals were measured from the rat sciatic nerve during treadmill walking at several speeds, and the signal properties of the sciatic nerve were analyzed for a comparison with kinematic data from the ankle joint. On the basis of these experiments, a wavelet packet transform was tested to define a feature vector from the sciatic ENG signals according to the gait phases. We also propose a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) classifier and investigate whether it could be used successfully to discriminate feature vectors into the stance and swing phases. In spite of no significant differences in the rectified bin-integrated values between the stance and swing phases, the sciatic ENG signals could be reliably classified using the proposed wavelet packet transform and GMM classification methods.

  19. Nerve Demyelination Increases Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Expression in Peripheral Painful Mononeuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang; Tseng, To-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration or nerve demyelination, arising from spinal nerve compression, is thought to bring on chronic neuropathic pain. The widely distributed metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is involved in modulating nociceptive transmission. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of mGluR5 on peripheral hypersensitivities after chronic constriction injury (CCI). Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on with four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve to induce thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Primary afferents in dermis after CCI exhibited progressive decreases, defined as partial cutaneous denervation; importantly, mGluR5 expressions in primary afferents were statistically increased. CCI-induced neuropathic pain behaviors through the intraplantar injections of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a selective mGluR5 antagonist, were dose-dependently attenuated. Furthermore, the most increased mGluR5 expressions in primary afferents surrounded by reactive Schwann cells were observed at the distal CCI stumps of sciatic nerves. In conclusion, these results suggest that nerve demyelination results in the increases of mGluR5 expression in injured primary afferents after CCI; and further suggest that mGluR5 represents a main therapeutic target in developing pharmacological strategies to prevent peripheral hypersensitivities. PMID:25739080

  20. Effects of changing skin mechanics on the differential sensitivity to surface compliance by tactile afferents in the human finger pad

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Kathryn M.; Condon, Melia; Ackerley, Rochelle; McGlone, Francis; Olausson, Håkan; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how changes in skin mechanics affect the responses of cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the finger pads to compression forces. We used venous occlusion to change the stiffness of the fingers and investigated whether this influenced the firing of low-threshold mechanoreceptors to surfaces of differing stiffness. Unitary recordings were made from 10 slowly adapting type I (SAI), 10 fast adapting type I (FAI) and 9 slowly adapting type II (SAII) units via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the median nerve at the wrist. A servo-controlled stimulator applied ramp-and-hold forces (1, 2, and 4 N) at a constant loading and unloading rate (2 N/s) via a flat 2.5-cm-diameter silicone disk over the center of the finger pad. Nine silicone disks (objects), varying in compliance, were used. Venous occlusion, produced by inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper arm to 40 ± 5 mmHg, was used to induce swelling of the fingers and increase the compliance of the finger pulp. Venous occlusion had no effect on the firing rates of the SAI afferents, nor on the slopes of the relationship between mean firing rate and object compliance at each amplitude, but did significantly reduce the slopes for the FAI afferents. Although the SAII afferents possess a poor capacity to encode changes in object compliance, mean firing rates were significantly lower during venous occlusion. The finding that venous occlusion had no effect on the firing properties of SAI afferents indicates that these afferents preserve their capacity to encode changes in object compliance, despite changes in skin mechanics. PMID:26269550

  1. Effects of changing skin mechanics on the differential sensitivity to surface compliance by tactile afferents in the human finger pad.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Kathryn M; Condon, Melia; Ackerley, Rochelle; McGlone, Francis; Olausson, Håkan; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2015-10-01

    It is not known how changes in skin mechanics affect the responses of cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the finger pads to compression forces. We used venous occlusion to change the stiffness of the fingers and investigated whether this influenced the firing of low-threshold mechanoreceptors to surfaces of differing stiffness. Unitary recordings were made from 10 slowly adapting type I (SAI), 10 fast adapting type I (FAI) and 9 slowly adapting type II (SAII) units via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the median nerve at the wrist. A servo-controlled stimulator applied ramp-and-hold forces (1, 2, and 4 N) at a constant loading and unloading rate (2 N/s) via a flat 2.5-cm-diameter silicone disk over the center of the finger pad. Nine silicone disks (objects), varying in compliance, were used. Venous occlusion, produced by inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper arm to 40 ± 5 mmHg, was used to induce swelling of the fingers and increase the compliance of the finger pulp. Venous occlusion had no effect on the firing rates of the SAI afferents, nor on the slopes of the relationship between mean firing rate and object compliance at each amplitude, but did significantly reduce the slopes for the FAI afferents. Although the SAII afferents possess a poor capacity to encode changes in object compliance, mean firing rates were significantly lower during venous occlusion. The finding that venous occlusion had no effect on the firing properties of SAI afferents indicates that these afferents preserve their capacity to encode changes in object compliance, despite changes in skin mechanics.

  2. Effects of changing skin mechanics on the differential sensitivity to surface compliance by tactile afferents in the human finger pad.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Kathryn M; Condon, Melia; Ackerley, Rochelle; McGlone, Francis; Olausson, Håkan; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2015-10-01

    It is not known how changes in skin mechanics affect the responses of cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the finger pads to compression forces. We used venous occlusion to change the stiffness of the fingers and investigated whether this influenced the firing of low-threshold mechanoreceptors to surfaces of differing stiffness. Unitary recordings were made from 10 slowly adapting type I (SAI), 10 fast adapting type I (FAI) and 9 slowly adapting type II (SAII) units via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the median nerve at the wrist. A servo-controlled stimulator applied ramp-and-hold forces (1, 2, and 4 N) at a constant loading and unloading rate (2 N/s) via a flat 2.5-cm-diameter silicone disk over the center of the finger pad. Nine silicone disks (objects), varying in compliance, were used. Venous occlusion, produced by inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper arm to 40 ± 5 mmHg, was used to induce swelling of the fingers and increase the compliance of the finger pulp. Venous occlusion had no effect on the firing rates of the SAI afferents, nor on the slopes of the relationship between mean firing rate and object compliance at each amplitude, but did significantly reduce the slopes for the FAI afferents. Although the SAII afferents possess a poor capacity to encode changes in object compliance, mean firing rates were significantly lower during venous occlusion. The finding that venous occlusion had no effect on the firing properties of SAI afferents indicates that these afferents preserve their capacity to encode changes in object compliance, despite changes in skin mechanics. PMID:26269550

  3. Dendritic HCN Channels Shape Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials at the Inner Hair Cell Afferent Synapse in the Mammalian Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Eunyoung; Roux, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic transmission at the inner hair cell (IHC) afferent synapse, the first synapse in the auditory pathway, is specialized for rapid and reliable signaling. Here we investigated the properties of a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih), expressed in the afferent dendrite of auditory nerve fibers, and its role in shaping postsynaptic activity. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from afferent dendrites directly where they contact the IHC in excised postnatal rat cochlear turns. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of variable amplitude (1–35 mV) were found with 10–90% rise times of about 1 ms and time constants of decay of about 5 ms at room temperature. Current–voltage relations recorded in afferent dendrites revealed Ih. The pharmacological profile and reversal potential (−45 mV) indicated that Ih is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels. The HCN channel subunits HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 were found to be expressed in afferent dendrites using immunolabeling. Raising intracellular cAMP levels sped up the activation kinetics, increased the magnitude of Ih and shifted the half activation voltage (Vhalf) to more positive values (−104 ± 3 to −91 ± 2 mV). Blocking Ih with 50 μM ZD7288 resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (∼4 mV) and slowing the decay of the EPSP by 47%, suggesting that Ih is active at rest and shortens EPSPs, thereby potentially improving rapid and reliable signaling at this first synapse in the auditory pathway. PMID:20220080

  4. Dendritic HCN channels shape excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the inner hair cell afferent synapse in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunyoung; Roux, Isabelle; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic transmission at the inner hair cell (IHC) afferent synapse, the first synapse in the auditory pathway, is specialized for rapid and reliable signaling. Here we investigated the properties of a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)), expressed in the afferent dendrite of auditory nerve fibers, and its role in shaping postsynaptic activity. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from afferent dendrites directly where they contact the IHC in excised postnatal rat cochlear turns. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of variable amplitude (1-35 mV) were found with 10-90% rise times of about 1 ms and time constants of decay of about 5 ms at room temperature. Current-voltage relations recorded in afferent dendrites revealed I(h). The pharmacological profile and reversal potential (-45 mV) indicated that I(h) is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels. The HCN channel subunits HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 were found to be expressed in afferent dendrites using immunolabeling. Raising intracellular cAMP levels sped up the activation kinetics, increased the magnitude of I(h) and shifted the half activation voltage (V(half)) to more positive values (-104 +/- 3 to -91 +/- 2 mV). Blocking I(h) with 50 microM ZD7288 resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (approximately 4 mV) and slowing the decay of the EPSP by 47%, suggesting that I(h) is active at rest and shortens EPSPs, thereby potentially improving rapid and reliable signaling at this first synapse in the auditory pathway.

  5. A potential anti-allodynic mechanism of GDNF following L5 spinal nerve ligation; Mitigation of NPY up-regulation in the touch sense pathway.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, T; Noguchi, K

    2015-09-24

    Intrathecal delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reverses mechanical allodynia after 5th lumbar (L5) spinal nerve ligation (SNL). However, the molecular mechanism behind this process is not fully understood. Following sciatic nerve injury, primary afferent neurons in the injured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) begin to express neuropeptide Y (NPY) that is absent in normal DRG. The aim of the current study was to determine the relationship of this de novo expression of NPY and the anti-allodynic effect of GDNF. Following L5 SNL, 73% of neurons began to express NPY mRNA in the ipsilateral L5 DRG and robust NPY-immunoreactive fibers appeared in the ipsilateral GN where the touch-sense mediating A-fiber primary afferents from the hindpaw terminate. Seven-daylong intrathecal infusion of GDNF at the L5 DRG level, starting on day three when mechanical allodynia had fully developed, reversed once-established these changes. The GN neurons normally expressed NPY Y1 receptor, but not Y2, Y4, or Y5 receptors, and L5 SNL did not change the expression pattern. Bolus intracisternal injection of BIBP3226, a Y1 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently reversed mechanical allodynia. We demonstrated that GDNF reversed once-established mechanical allodynia as well as NPY induction in the touch-sense processing pathway. NPY could facilitate touch-sense processing by Y1 receptor in the gracile nucleus after peripheral nerve injury. GDNF may exert anti-allodynic effects through mitigation of this NPY up-regulation. The effectiveness of delayed treatment further indicates the therapeutic potential of GDNF on neuropathic pain.

  6. Circadian variation in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Frisby, Claudine L; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2013-12-01

    Food intake is coordinated to cellular metabolism by clock gene expression with a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus synchronized by light exposure. Gastric vagal afferents play a role in regulating food intake, but it is unknown whether they exhibit circadian variation in their mechanosensitivity. We aimed to determine whether gastric vagal afferents express clock genes and whether their response to mechanical stimuli oscillates throughout the light/dark cycle. Nodose ganglia were collected from 8-week-old female C57BL/6 mice every 3 h starting at lights off (1800 h) to quantify Bmal1, Per1, Per2, and Nr1d1 mRNA by qRT-PCR. Additionally in vitro single-fiber recordings of gastric vagal mechanoreceptors were taken at all time points. Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Nr1d1 mRNA is expressed in the nodose ganglia and levels oscillated over a 24 h period. In mice fed ad libitum, gastric content was 3 times higher at 0000 h and 0300 h than 1200 h. The response of tension receptors to 3 g stretch was reduced by up to 70% at 2100 h, 0000 h, and 0300 h compared with 1200 h. Gastric mucosal receptor response to stroking with a 50 mg von Frey hair was 3 times greater at 1200 h and 1500 h than the response at 0000 h. Similar findings were obtained in mice fasted for 6 h or maintained in darkness for 3 d before study. Therefore, these changes do not result from food intake or the light/dark cycle. Thus, gastric vagal mechanoreceptors display circadian rhythm, which may act to control food intake differentially at different times of the day. PMID:24305819

  7. Synaptic-like vesicles and candidate transduction channels in mechanosensory terminals.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Guy S

    2015-08-01

    This article summarises progress to date over an exciting and very enjoyable first 15 years of collaboration with Bob Banks. Our collaboration began when I contacted him with (to me) an unexpected observation that a dye used to mark recycling synaptic vesicle membrane at efferent terminals also labelled muscle spindle afferent terminals. This observation led to the re-discovery of a system of small clear vesicles present in all vertebrate primary mechanosensory nerve terminals. These synaptic-like vesicles (SLVs) have been, and continue to be, the major focus of our work. This article describes our characterisation of the properties and functional significance of these SLVs, combining our complementary skills: Bob's technical expertise and encyclopaedic knowledge of mechanosensation with my experience of synaptic vesicles and the development of the styryl pyridinium dyes, of which the most widely used is FM1-43. On the way we have found that SLVs seem to be part of a constitutive glutamate secretory system necessary to maintain the stretch-sensitivity of spindle endings. The glutamate activates a highly unusual glutamate receptor linked to phospholipase D activation, which we have termed the PLD-mGluR. It has a totally distinct pharmacology first described in the hippocampus nearly 20 years ago but, like the SLVs that were first described over 50 years ago, has since been little researched. Yet, our evidence and literature searches suggest this glutamate/SLV/PLD-mGluR system is a ubiquitous feature of mechanosensory endings and, at least for spindles, is essential for maintaining mechanosensory function. This article summarises how this system integrates with the classical model of mechanosensitive channels in spindles and other mechanosensory nerve terminals, including hair follicle afferents and baroreceptors controlling blood pressure. Finally, in this time when there is an imperative to show translational relevance, I describe how this fascinating system might

  8. Synaptic-like vesicles and candidate transduction channels in mechanosensory terminals

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Guy S

    2015-01-01

    This article summarises progress to date over an exciting and very enjoyable first 15 years of collaboration with Bob Banks. Our collaboration began when I contacted him with (to me) an unexpected observation that a dye used to mark recycling synaptic vesicle membrane at efferent terminals also labelled muscle spindle afferent terminals. This observation led to the re-discovery of a system of small clear vesicles present in all vertebrate primary mechanosensory nerve terminals. These synaptic-like vesicles (SLVs) have been, and continue to be, the major focus of our work. This article describes our characterisation of the properties and functional significance of these SLVs, combining our complementary skills: Bob’s technical expertise and encyclopaedic knowledge of mechanosensation with my experience of synaptic vesicles and the development of the styryl pyridinium dyes, of which the most widely used is FM1-43. On the way we have found that SLVs seem to be part of a constitutive glutamate secretory system necessary to maintain the stretch-sensitivity of spindle endings. The glutamate activates a highly unusual glutamate receptor linked to phospholipase D activation, which we have termed the PLD-mGluR. It has a totally distinct pharmacology first described in the hippocampus nearly 20 years ago but, like the SLVs that were first described over 50 years ago, has since been little researched. Yet, our evidence and literature searches suggest this glutamate/SLV/PLD-mGluR system is a ubiquitous feature of mechanosensory endings and, at least for spindles, is essential for maintaining mechanosensory function. This article summarises how this system integrates with the classical model of mechanosensitive channels in spindles and other mechanosensory nerve terminals, including hair follicle afferents and baroreceptors controlling blood pressure. Finally, in this time when there is an imperative to show translational relevance, I describe how this fascinating system

  9. Distribution of input and output synapses on the central branches of bushcricket and cricket auditory afferent neurones: immunocytochemical evidence for GABA and glutamate in different populations of presynaptic boutons.

    PubMed

    Hardt, M; Watson, A H

    1999-01-18

    In order to investigate the synapses on the terminals of primary auditory afferents in the bushcricket and cricket, these were impaled with microelectrodes and after physiological characterisation, injected intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase. The tissue was prepared for electron microscopy, and immunocytochemistry for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate was carried out on ultrathin sections by using a post-embedding immunogold technique. The afferent terminals received many input synapses. Between 60-65% of these were made by processes immunoreactive for GABA and approximately 25% from processes immunoreactive for glutamate. The relative distribution of the different classes of input were analysed from serial section reconstruction of terminal afferent branches. Inputs from GABA and glutamate-immunoreactive processes appeared to be scattered at random over the terminal arborisation of the afferents both with respect to each other and to the architecture of the terminals. They were, however, always found close to the output synapses. The possible roles of presynaptic inhibition in the auditory afferents is discussed in the context of the auditory responses of the animals.

  10. Compartmental modeling of rat macular primary afferents from three-dimensional reconstructions of transmission electron micrographs of serial sections.

    PubMed

    Chimento, T C; Doshay, D G; Ross, M D

    1994-05-01

    1. We cut serial sections through the medial part of the rat vestibular macula for transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination, computer-assisted three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction, and compartmental modeling. The ultrastructural research showed that many primary vestibular neurons have an unmyelinated segment, often branched, that extends between the heminode [putative site of the spike initiation zone (SIZ)] and the expanded terminal(s) (calyx, calyces). These segments, termed the neuron branches, and the calyces frequently have spinelike processes of various dimensions that morphologically are afferent, efferent, or reciprocal to other macular neural elements. The purpose of this research was to determine whether morphometric data obtained ultrastructurally were essential to compartmental models [i.e., they influenced action potential (AP) generation, latency, or amplitude] or whether afferent parts could be collapsed into more simple units without markedly affecting results. We used the compartmental modeling program NEURON for this research. 2. In the first set of simulations we studied the relative importance of small variations in process morphology on distant depolarization. A process was placed midway along an isolated piece of a passive neuron branch. The dimensions of the four processes corresponded to actual processes in the serial sections. A synapse, placed on the head of each process, was activated and depolarization was recorded at the end of the neuron branch. When we used 5 nS synaptic conductance, depolarization varied by 3 mV. In a systematic study over a representative range of stem dimensions, depolarization varied by 15.7 mV. Smaller conductances produced smaller effects. Increasing membrane resistivity from 5,000 to 50,000 omega cm2 had no significant effect. 3. In a second series of simulations, using whole primary afferents, we examined the combined effects of process location and afferent morphology on depolarization magnitude

  11. Unmyelinated type II afferent neurons report cochlear damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian cochlea, acoustic information is carried to the brain by the predominant (95%) large-diameter, myelinated type I afferents, each of which is postsynaptic to a single inner hair cell. The remaining thin, unmyelinated type II afferents extend hundreds of microns along the cochlear duct to contact many outer hair cells. Despite this extensive arbor, type II afferents are weakly activated by outer hair cell transmitter release and are insensitive to sound. Intriguingly, type II afferents remain intact in damaged regions of the cochlea. Here, we show that type II afferents are activated when outer hair cells are damaged. This response depends on both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors, binding ATP released from nearby supporting cells in response to hair cell damage. Selective activation of P2Y receptors increased type II afferent excitability by the closure of KCNQ-type potassium channels, a potential mechanism for the painful hypersensitivity (that we term “noxacusis” to distinguish from hyperacusis without pain) that can accompany hearing loss. Exposure to the KCNQ channel activator retigabine suppressed the type II fiber’s response to hair cell damage. Type II afferents may be the cochlea’s nociceptors, prompting avoidance of further damage to the irreparable inner ear. PMID:26553995

  12. Micromotional studies of utricular and canal afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Edwin R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-range goal of this research was to refine our understanding of the sensitivity of the vestibular components of the ear to very-low-amplitude motion, especially, the role of gravity in this sensitivity. We focused on the American bullfrog--a common animal subject for vestibular sensory research. Our principal experimental method was to apply precise, sinusoidal microrotational stimuli to an anesthetized animal subject, to record the resulting responses in an individual vestibular nerve fiber from the intact ear, and to use intracellular dye to trace the fiber and thus identify the vestibular sensor that gave rise to it. In this way, we were able to identify specific micromotional sensitivities and to associate those sensitivities definitely with specific sensors. Furthermore, by recording from nerve fibers after they leave the intact inner-ear cavity, we were able to achieve these identifications without interrupting the delicate micromechanics of the inner ear. We were especially concerned with the relative roles of the utricle and the anterior semicircular canal in the sensing of microrotational motion of the head about horizontal axes, and with the role of gravity in mediating that sensing process in the utricle. The functional characterization of individual nerve fibers was accomplished with a conventional analytical tool, the cycle histogram, in which the nerve impulse rate was plotted against the phase of the sinusoidal stimulus.

  13. Dense-cored vesicles, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria are closely associated with non-specialized parts of plasma membrane of nerve terminals: implications for exocytosis and calcium buffering by intraterminal organelles.

    PubMed

    Lysakowski, A; Figueras, H; Price, S D; Peng, Y Y

    1999-01-18

    To determine whether there are anatomical correlates for intraterminal Ca2+ stores to regulate exocytosis of dense-cored vesicles (DCVs) and whether these stores can modulate exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, we studied the spatial distributions of DCVs, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), and mitochondria in 19 serially reconstructed nerve terminals in bullfrog sympathetic ganglia. On average, each bouton had three active zones, 214 DCVs, 26 SER fragments (SERFs), and eight mitochondria. DCVs, SERFs and mitochondria were located, on average, 690, 624, and 526 nm, respectively, away from active zones. Virtually no DCVs were within "docking" (i.e., < or = 50 nm) distances of the active zones. Thus, it is unlikely that DCV exocytosis occurs at active zones via mechanisms similar to those for exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because there were virtually no SERFs or mitochondria within 50 nm of any active zone, Ca2+ modulation by these organelles is unlikely to affect ACh release evoked by a single action potential. In contrast, 30% of DCVs and 40% of SERFs were located within 50 nm of the nonspecialized regions of the plasma membrane. Because each bouton had at least one SERF within 50 nm of the plasma membrane and most of these SERFs had DCVs, but not mitochondria, near them, it is possible for Ca2+ release from the SER to provide the Ca2+ necessary for DCV exocytosis. The fact that 60% of the mitochondria had some part within 50 nm of the plasma membrane means that it is possible for mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering to affect DCV exocytosis.

  14. Transplantation of tectal tissue in rats. I. Organization of transplants and pattern of distribution of host afferents within them

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, R.D.; Harvey, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined the maturation of tectal tissue transplanted from fetal rats to the midbrain of newborns and have characterized the distribution of host retinal and cortical afferents within the transplants. The transplants develop characteristic internal order and connections which distinguish them from either embryonic cortex or retina placed in the same region. Host retinal afferents project to clearly circumscribed regions, where they synapse mainly on small dendrites or dendritic spines, and only rarely on vesicle-containing profiles. The retinorecipient areas contain few stained axons in neurofibrillar preparations and are almost always located at the surface of the transplant. There is very little overlap in the input from the two eyes into a single transplant even though the projections from each eye may lie adjacent to one another. Cortical afferents spread more broadly in the transplants, but are largely absent from areas of optic termination and from other more deeply located regions with sparse fiber staining properties. The observations suggest that when placed close to its normal location, tectal tissue can develop a number of features characteristic of normal superior colliculus. Appreciation of the internal order of the transplants makes it possible to investigate the cortical and retinal afferent pathways using physiological techniques.

  15. The pattern of excitation of human lower limb motoneurones by probable group II muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Simonetta-Moreau, M; Marque, P; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Pierrot-Deseilligny, E

    1999-05-15

    1. Heteronymous group II effects were investigated in the human lower limb. Changes in firing probability of single motor units in quadriceps (Q), biceps (Bi), semitendinosus (ST), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) were studied after electrical stimuli between 1 and 3 times motor threshold (MT) applied to common peroneal (CP), superficial (SP) and deep (DP) peroneal, Bi and GM nerves in those nerve-muscle combinations without recurrent inhibition. 2. Stimulation of the CP and Bi nerves evoked in almost all of the explored Q motor units a biphasic excitation with a low-threshold early peak, attributable to non-monosynaptic group I excitation, and a higher threshold late peak. When the CP nerve was cooled (or the stimulation applied to a distal branch, DP), the increase in latency was greater for the late than for the early peak, indicating that the late excitation is due to stimulation of afferents with a slower conduction velocity than group I fibres, presumably in the group II range. In ST motor units the group II excitation elicited by stimulation of the GM and SP nerves was particularly large and frequent, and the non-monosynaptic group I excitation was often replaced by an inhibition. 3. A late group II-induced excitation from CP to Q motoneurones and from GM and SP to ST motoneurones was also observed when using the H reflex as a test. 4. The electrical threshold and conduction velocity of the largest diameter fibres evoking the group II excitation were estimated to be 2.1 and 0.65 times those of the fastest Ia afferents, respectively. In the combinations tested in the present investigation the group II input seemed to be primarily of muscle origin. 5. The potent heteronymous group II excitation of motoneurones of both flexors and extensors of the knee contrasted with the absence of a group II effect from DP to GM and from GM to TA. In none of the combinations explored was there any evidence for group II inhibition of motoneurones. The

  16. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain123

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8+ primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch+ mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2+-Arch+mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch+ mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8+ afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  17. Forebrain organization representing baroreceptor gating of somatosensory afferents within the cortical autonomic network.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ruma; Frances, Maria Fernanda; Steinback, Craig Douglas; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2012-07-01

    Somatosensory afferents are represented within the cortical autonomic network (CAN). However, the representation of somatosensory afferents, and the consequent cardiovascular effects, may be modified by levels of baroreceptor input. Thus, we examined the cortical regions involved with processing somatosensory inputs during baroreceptor unloading. Neuroimaging sessions (functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]) recorded brain activity during 30 mmHg lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) alone and combined with somatosensory stimulation (LBNP+SS) of the forearm (n = 14). Somatosensory processing was also assessed during increased sympathetic outflow via end-expiratory apnea. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), cardiac output (Q), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded during the same protocols in a separate laboratory session. SS alone had no effect on any cardiovascular or MSNA variable at rest. Measures of HR, BP, and Q during LBNP were not different compared with LBNP+SS. The rise in MSNA burst frequency was attenuated during LBNP+SS versus LBNP alone (8 vs. 12 bursts/min, respectively, P < 0.05). SS did not affect the change in MSNA during apnea. Activations within the insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) observed during LBNP were not seen during LBNP+SS. Anterior insula and ACC activations occurring during apnea were not modified by SS. Thus, the absence of insular and dorsal ACC activity during LBNP+SS along with an attenuation of MSNA burst frequency suggest sympathoinhibitory effects of sensory stimulation during decreased baroreceptor input by a mechanism that includes conjoint insula-dorsal ACC regulation. These findings reveal that the level of baroreceptor input influences the forebrain organization of somatosensory afferents. PMID:22514285

  18. Cardiac Sympathetic Afferent Denervation Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling and Improves Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Rats with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Jun; Wang, Wei; Cornish, Kurtis G.; Rozanski, George J.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2014-01-01

    The enhanced cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) contributes to the exaggerated sympatho-excitation in chronic heart failure (CHF). Increased sympatho-excitation is positively related to mortality in CHF patients. However, the potential beneficial effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac and autonomic function in CHF have not been previously explored. Here we determined the effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. In order to selectively delete the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1) -expressing CSAR afferents, epicardial application of resiniferatoxin (RTX, 50 μg/ml), an ultrapotent analogue of capsaicin, was performed during myocardium infarction (MI) surgery in rats. This procedure largely abolished the enhanced CSAR, prevented the exaggerated renal and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and improved baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Most importantly, we found that epicardial application of RTX largely prevented the elevated LVEDP, lung edema and cardiac hypertrophy, partially reduced left ventricular dimensions in the failing heart and increased cardiac contractile reserve in response to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with isoproterenol in CHF rats. Molecular evidence showed that RTX attenuated cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis and reduced expression of fibrotic markers and TGF β-receptor I in CHF rats. Pressure - volume loop analysis showed that RTX reduced the end diastolic pressure volume relations in CHF rats indicating improved cardiac compliance. In summary, cardiac sympathetic afferent deletion exhibits protective effects against deleterious cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. These data suggest a potential new paradigm and therapeutic potential in the management of CHF. PMID:24980663

  19. Directional sound sensitivity in utricular afferents in the toadfish Opsanus tau.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Mensinger, Allen F

    2015-06-01

    The inner ear of fishes contains three paired otolithic end organs, the saccule, lagena and utricle, which function as biological accelerometers. The saccule is the largest otolith in most fishes and much of our current understanding on auditory function in this diverse group of vertebrates is derived from anatomical and neurophysiological studies on this end organ. In contrast, less is known about how the utricle contributes to auditory functions. In this study, chronically implanted electrodes were used, along with neural telemetry or tethers to record primary afferent responses from the utricular nerve in free-ranging and naturally behaving oyster toadfish Opsanus tau Linnaeus. The hypothesis was that the utricle plays a role in detecting underwater sounds, including conspecific vocalizations, and exhibits directional sensitivity. Utricular afferents responded best to low frequency (80-200 Hz) pure tones and to playbacks of conspecific boatwhistles and grunts (80-180 Hz fundamental frequency), with the majority of the units (∼75%) displaying a clear, directional response, which may allow the utricle to contribute to sound detection and localization during social interactions. Responses were well within the sound intensity levels of toadfish vocalization (approximately 140 SPL dBrms re. 1 µPa with fibers sensitive to thresholds of approximately 120 SPL dBrms re. 1 µPa). Neurons were also stimulated by self-generated body movements such as opercular movements and swimming. This study is the first to investigate underwater sound-evoked response properties of primary afferents from the utricle of an unrestrained/unanesthetized free-swimming teleost fish. These data provide experimental evidence that the utricle has an auditory function, and can contribute to directional hearing to facilitate sound localization. PMID:25883378

  20. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  1. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c—interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  2. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  3. Tracing and 3-dimensional representation of the primary afferents from the moth ear.

    PubMed

    Zhemchuzhnikov, Mikhail K; Pfuhl, Gerit; Berg, Bente G

    2014-05-01

    Heliothine moths perceive acoustic information via two auditory sensory neurons only. Previous cobalt staining experiments have described the projection pattern of the two auditory neurons, called the A1 and the A2 cell, plus one additional neuron, the so-called B cell, up to the prothorax. We have obtained new and improved data about the projection pattern of the three sensory afferents by means of fluorescent staining experiments combined with scanning confocal microscopy. The present data show the fine structure of each sensory axon that arises from the moth ear and its ascending pathway relative to that of the others. In accordance with the previous data, the A2 auditory cell was found to extend projections in the pterothorax only. A novel finding is that terminal branches of the A2 cell cross the midline. The staining pattern of the two remaining neurons, the A1 and B cell, which project tightly together in the thoracic ganglia, differ somewhat from that previously described. As demonstrated here, one of these two neurons, the A1 cell, terminates in the prothoracic ganglion whereas the other, the B cell, projects further on via the cervical connectives to the subesophageal ganglion. The current data, therefore, indicate that none of the auditory afferents in the heliothine moth projects to the brain.

  4. Influences of laryngeal afferent inputs on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in the cat.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Yoshida, K; Nakajima, Y; Konno, A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the possible role of the laryngeal afferent inputs in the regulation of intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization. We studied the influences of airflow and/or pressure applied to the larynx on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in ketamine-anesthetized cats. Vocalization was induced by airflow applied to the upper airway, which was isolated from the lower airway, during pontine call site stimulation. When the upper airway was open to the atmosphere through the nostrils and mouth, the airflow increased not only the vocal fold adductor and tensor activities but also the duration of these activities. The adductor and tensor activities were increased suddenly at a critical subglottic pressure level equivalent to the subglottic pressure threshold for vocalization. These effects were significantly reduced by sectioning of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve or by lidocaine application to the laryngeal mucosa. Sustained pressure applied to the isolated upper airway, when the mouth and nostrils were occluded, did not affect adductor or tensor activities. These results indicate that the afferent inputs evoked by vocal fold stretching or vibration play an important role in the motor control of intralaryngeal and respiratory muscles during vocalization.

  5. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  6. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  7. Mast Cell-dependent Mesenteric Afferent Activation by Mucosal Supernatant From Different Bowel Segments of Guinea Pigs With Post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Tao; Qian, Wei; Li, Rui; Hou, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Mesenteric afferent nerves (MANs) play a pivotal role in the visceral-nociceptive perception. Inappropriate activation of MANs may be involved in the pathogenesis of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed the effects of mucosal mediators from different bowel segments of guinea pigs with PI-IBS on MAN firing and the role of mast cells. Methods PI-IBS was induced in guinea pigs by Trichinella spiralis infection. Inflammation in terminal ileum, proximal and distal colon was scored with hematoxylin-eosin staining, and mast cell infiltration was assessed with immunofluorescence. We determined the effects of supernatant extracted from the mucosa of different bowel segments of PI-IBS on MANs activity, and assessed the role of mast cells in this process. Results Eight weeks after infection, intestinal inflammation resolved, whereas mast cell numbers increased significantly in terminal ileum and proximal colon (P < 0.05) compared with findings in controls. Mucosal supernatant from different bowel segments of PI-IBS models, but not from controls, significantly enhanced the frequency of MAN firing (terminal ileum 41.01 ± 7.60 Hz vs. 26.55 ± 0.67 Hz, P = 0.001; proximal colon 45.90 ± 11.20 Hz vs. 30.88 ± 6.92 Hz, P = 0.002; distal colon 48.25 ± 9.70 Hz vs. 29.47 ± 6.13 Hz, P < 0.001). In addition, the excitatory effects were inhibited by mast cell stabilizer Nasmil (terminal ileum, 32.71 ± 2.52 Hz, P = 0.030; proximal colon, 30.94 ± 4.44 Hz, P = 0.002; distal colon, 27.15 ± 5.83 Hz, P < 0.001). Conclusions Supernatant from the intestinal mucosa of different bowel segments of PI-IBS models markedly enhanced the MAN firing in a mast cell-dependent manner, indicating that mast cell-mediated MAN activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PI-IBS. PMID:25843076

  8. [The cerebral control of afferent somatosensory projections].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, E V; Orlova, T V; Liubimov, N N

    1993-09-01

    Cortical and dorsal column nuclei somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) induced by electrical stimulation of the median nerve were recorded and analysed in 16 healthy volunteers practising transcendental meditation (TM) for two years. The records were performed before and during TM. The SEP changes during TM consisted of an increase in early SEP components amplitude. There were no changes in early SEP components peak latencies during TM.

  9. Microsurgical anatomy of the trochlear nerve.

    PubMed

    Joo, Wonil; Rhoton, Albert L

    2015-10-01

    The trochlear nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest intracranial course, but also the thinnest. It is the only nerve that arises from the dorsal surface of the brainstem and decussates in the superior medullary velum. After leaving the dorsal surface of the brainstem, it courses anterolaterally around the lateral surface of the brainstem and then passes anteriorly just beneath the free edge of the tentorium. It passes forward to enter the cavernous sinus, traverses the superior orbital fissure and terminates in the superior oblique muscle in the orbit. Because of its small diameter and its long course, the trochlear nerve can easily be injured during surgical procedures. Therefore, precise knowledge of its surgical anatomy and its neurovascular relationships is essential for approaching and removing complex lesions of the orbit and the middle and posterior fossae safely. This review describes the microsurgical anatomy of the trochlear nerve and is illustrated with pictures involving the nerve and its surrounding connective and neurovascular structures.

  10. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley-Day syndrome?

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-11-01

    The Riley-Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10-30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  11. Resistance of a crayfish sensory interneurone to hyperinnervation by acceptable afferents.

    PubMed Central

    Krasne, F B; Lee, S H

    1982-01-01

    1. Intact normal innervation of muscle fibres and other peripheral targets usually prevents regenerating nerves from forming synapses with the targets. Whether intact innervation similarly prevents synapse formation on central target neurones has rarely been tested. This question was examined here for interneurone A of the crayfish last abdominal ganglion. 2. Interneurone A normally receives synaptic input from mechanoreceptor neurones distributed over the side of the tailfan ipsilateral to interneurone A's axon and unilateral dendrites. When the five nerve roots carrying mechanoreceptor axons of one side are cut and central and peripheral ends of one or more are sutured together, regeneration and reinnervation of interneurone A occurs over some two to six weeks. If peripheral ends of roots from the 'wrong' (contralateral) side of the body are sutured to ipsilateral central stumps, they also form connexions with interneurone A. When roots from the two sides of the body are simultaneously tied to a central stump, functional connexion formation occurs equally well for afferents from both sides. Therefore, roots of the two sides seem to be equivalent in their ability to reinnervate interneurone A. 3. If peripheral ends of roots from one side of the tailfan are tied to roots on the intact opposite side of the body, the cut axons appear to grow into the last ganglion but usually do not form functional synapses there. The intact innervation therefore seems to exclude further innervation by other acceptable afferents. 4. It is known that mechanoreceptors are added to the tailfan at moult. Exclusion of extra innervation often broke down partially in animals that moulted during the present experiments. This suggests the possibility that synapse formation or exchange may be controlled by moult-inducing hormones. PMID:7153906

  12. Dopaminergic Modulation of the Voltage-Gated Sodium Current in the Cochlear Afferent Neurons of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Baizabal, Catalina; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA) plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway. PMID:25768433

  13. Diverse firing properties and Aβ-, Aδ-, and C-afferent inputs of small local circuit neurons in spinal lamina I.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Elisabete C; Luz, Liliana L; Mytakhir, Oleh; Lukoyanov, Nikolai V; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V

    2016-02-01

    Spinal lamina I is a key element of the pain processing system, which integrates primary afferent input and relays it to supraspinal areas. More than 90% of neurons in this layer are local circuit neurons, whose role in the signal processing is poorly understood. We performed whole-cell recordings in a spinal cord preparation with attached dorsal roots to examine morphological features and physiological properties of small local circuit neurons (n = 47) in lamina I. Cells successfully filled with biocytin (n = 17) had fusiform (n = 10), flattened (n = 4), and multipolar (n = 3) somatodendritic morphology; their axons branched extensively and terminated in laminae I-III. Intrinsic firing properties were diverse; in addition to standard tonic (n = 16), adapting (n = 7), and delayed (n = 6) patterns, small local circuit neurons also generated rhythmic discharges (n = 6) and plateau potentials (n = 10), the latter were suppressed by the L-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker nifedipine. The neurons received monosynaptic inputs from Aδ and C afferents and could generate bursts of spikes on the root stimulation. In addition, we identified lamina I neurons (n = 7) with direct inputs from the low-threshold Aβ afferents, which could be picked up by ventral dendrites protruding to lamina III. Stimulation of afferents also evoked a disynaptic inhibition of neurons. Thus, small local circuit neurons exhibit diverse firing properties, can generate rhythmic discharges and plateau potentials, and their dendrites extending into several laminae allow broad integration of Aβ-, Aδ-, and C-afferent inputs. These properties are required for processing diverse modalities of nociceptive inputs in lamina I and may underlie spinal sensitization to pain.

  14. Dopaminergic modulation of the voltage-gated sodium current in the cochlear afferent neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Baizabal, Catalina; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA) plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway. PMID:25768433

  15. Dual Modulation of Nociception and Cardiovascular Reflexes during Peripheral Ischemia through P2Y1 Receptor-Dependent Sensitization of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Queme, Luis F.; Ross, Jessica L.; Lu, Peilin; Hudgins, Renita C.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous musculoskeletal pain disorders are based in dysfunction of peripheral perfusion and are often comorbid with altered cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction/exercise. We have recently found in mice that 24 h peripheral ischemia induced by a surgical occlusion of the brachial artery (BAO) induces increased paw-guarding behaviors, mechanical hypersensitivity, and decreased grip strength. These behavioral changes corresponded to increased heat sensitivity as well as an increase in the numbers of chemosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents as assessed by an ex vivo forepaw muscles/median and ulnar nerves/dorsal root ganglion (DRG)/spinal cord (SC) recording preparation. Behaviors also corresponded to specific upregulation of the ADP-responsive P2Y1 receptor in the DRGs. Since group III/IV muscle afferents have separately been associated with regulating muscle nociception and exercise pressor reflexes (EPRs), and P2Y1 has been linked to heat responsiveness and phenotypic switching in cutaneous afferents, we sought to determine whether upregulation of P2Y1 was responsible for the observed alterations in muscle afferent function, leading to modulation of muscle pain-related behaviors and EPRs after BAO. Using an afferent-specific siRNA knockdown strategy, we found that inhibition of P2Y1 during BAO not only prevented the increased mean blood pressure after forced exercise, but also significantly reduced alterations in pain-related behaviors. Selective P2Y1 knockdown also prevented the increased firing to heat stimuli and the BAO-induced phenotypic switch in chemosensitive muscle afferents, potentially through regulating membrane expression of acid sensing ion channel 3. These results suggest that enhanced P2Y1 in muscle afferents during ischemic-like conditions may dually regulate muscle nociception and cardiovascular reflexes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our current results suggest that P2Y1 modulates heat responsiveness and chemosensation in muscle afferents

  16. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  17. De novo expression of neurokinin-1 receptors by spinoparabrachial lamina I pyramidal neurons following a peripheral nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Abeer W; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo

    2013-06-01

    Lamina I of the spinal dorsal horn is a major site of integration and transmission to higher centers of nociceptive information from the periphery. One important primary afferent population that transmits such information to the spinal cord expresses substance P (SP). These fibers terminate in contact with lamina I projection neurons that express the SP receptor, also known as the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1r). Three types of lamina I projection neurons have been described: multipolar, fusiform, and pyramidal. Most neurons of the first two types are thought to be nociceptive and express the NK-1r, whereas most pyramidal neurons are nonnociceptive and do not express the NK-1r. In this immunocytochemical and behavioral study, we induced a neuropathic pain-like condition in the rat by means of a polyethylene cuff placed around in the sciatic nerve. We document that this lesion led to a de novo expression of NK-1r on pyramidal neurons as well as a significant increase in SP-immunoreactive innervation onto these neurons. These phenotypic changes were evident at the time of onset of neuropathic pain-related behavior. Additionally, we show that, after a noxious stimulus (intradermal capsaicin injection), these NK-1r on pyramidal neurons were internalized, providing evidence that these neurons become responsive to peripheral noxious stimulation. We suggest that the changes following nerve lesion in the phenotype and innervation pattern of pyramidal neurons are of significance for neuropathic pain and/or limb temperature regulation.

  18. Neural responses from the filiform receptor neuron afferents of the wind-sensitive cercal system in three cockroach species.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Anne C K; Triblehorn, Jeffrey D

    2014-09-01

    The wind-sensitive insect cercal system is involved in many important behaviors, such as initiating terrestrial escape responses and providing sensory feedback during flight. The occurrence of these behaviors vary in cockroach species Periplaneta americana (strong terrestrial response and flight), Blaberus craniifer (weak terrestrial response and flight), and Gromphodorhina portentosa (no terrestrial response and no flight). A previous study focusing on wind-sensitive interneuron (WSI) responses demonstrated that variations in sensory processing of wind information accompany these behavioral differences. In this study, we recorded extracellularly from the cercal nerve to characterize filiform afferent population responses to different wind velocities to investigate how sensory processing differs across these species at the initial encoding of wind. We compared these results and responses from the WSI population to examine information transfer at the first synapse. Our main results were: (1) G. portentosa had the weakest responses of the three species over the stimulus duration and possessed the smallest cerci with the least filiform hair receptors of the three species; (2) B. craniifer filiform responses were similar to or greater than P. americana responses even though B. craniifer possessed smaller cerci with less filiform hair receptors than P. americana; (3) the greater filiform afferent responses in B. craniifer, including a larger amplitude second positive peak compared to the other two species, suggest more synchronous activity between filiform afferents in this species; (4) the transfer of information at the first synapse appears to be similar in both P. americana and G. portentosa, but different in B. craniifer.

  19. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z-Y; McDowell, T; Wang, P; Alvarez, R; Gomez, T; Bjorling, D E

    2014-09-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100ng/ml) for 30 min significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca(2 +) concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling.

  20. Neural responses from the filiform receptor neuron afferents of the wind-sensitive cercal system in three cockroach species

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Anne C.K.; Triblehorn, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The wind-sensitive insect cercal system is involved in many important behaviors, such as initiating terrestrial escape responses and providing sensory feedback during flight. The occurrence of these behaviors vary in cockroach species Periplaneta americana (strong terrestrial response and flight), Blaberus craniifer (weak terrestrial response and flight), and Gromphodorhina portentosa (no terrestrial response and no flight). A previous study focusing on wind-sensitive interneuron (WSI) responses demonstrated that variations in sensory processing of wind information accompany these behavioral differences. In this study, we recorded extracellurlarly from the cercal nerve to characterize filiform afferent population responses to different wind velocities to investigate how sensory processing differs across these species at the initial encoding of wind. We compared these results and responses from the WSI population to examine information transfer at the first synapse. Our main results were: 1) G portentosa had the weakest responses of the three species over the stimulus duration and possessed the smallest cerci with the least filiform hair receptors of the three species; 2) B. craniifer filiform responses were similar to or greater than P. americana responses even though B. craniifer possessed smaller cerci with less filiform hair receptors than P. americana; 3) the greater filiform afferent responses in B. craniifer, including a larger amplitude second positive peak compared to the other two species, suggest more synchronous activity between filiform afferents in this species; 4) the transfer of information at the first synapse appears to be similar in both P. americana and G. portentosa, but different in B. craniifer. PMID:25046275

  1. Morphology of the rat cochlear primary afferents during prenatal development: a Cajal's reduced silver and rapid Golgi study.

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, A; Merchán, J A; Merchán, M A

    1990-01-01

    In this study, we analyse the process of spatial organisation of the cochlear root related to the morphological and topographical changes in the CN during the prenatal development of Wistar rats, placing special emphasis on aspects of the latero-medial distribution of the cochlear afferents. A total of 35 embryos from 8 Wistar rats was employed, corresponding to embryonic days 14, 16, 18 and 20. Twenty of these embryos were studied by the Cajal's reduced silver stain and 15 by the rapid Golgi method (osmium dichromate method). The otocyst, the vestibulo-cochlear ganglion and vestibulo-cochlear nerve were first observed at embryonic Day 14 (E14). At E16, a sharp separation between the cochlear and vestibular roots was distinguished. The final position of the primary afferents and their main branches (anterior and posterior) in the CN was observed at E18 and E20, when the total number of cochlear turns had been formed. The cochlear afferents coming from the apical coil, the last to be incorporated into the cochlear root, project their posterior branches at the bifurcation towards more medial portions of the PVCN and their anterior branches towards the more lateral regions of the AVCN. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3(Cont.) Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5(Cont.) Fig. 5 PMID:1691163

  2. Physiological identification of morphologically distinct afferent classes innervating the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysakowski, A.; Minor, L. B.; Fernandez, C.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. Semicircular-canal afferents in the squirrel monkey were characterized by their resting discharge, discharge regularity, sensitivity to galvanic currents delivered to the ear (beta *), the gain (g2Hz), and phase lead (phi 2Hz) of their response to 2-Hz sinusoidal head rotations, and their antidromic conduction velocity. Discharge regularity was measured by a normalized coefficient of variation (CV*); the higher the CV*, the more irregular the discharge. g2Hz and phi 2Hz were expressed relative to angular head velocity. 2. These physiological measures were used in an attempt to discern the discharge properties of the three morphological classes of afferents innervating the crista. Presumed bouton (B) fibers were identified as slowly conducting afferents. Presumed calyx (C) fibers were recognized by their irregular discharge and low rotational gains. The remaining fibers were considered to be dimorphic (D) units. Single letters (B, C, and D) are used to emphasize that the classification is based on circumstantial evidence and may be wrong for individual fibers. Of the 125 identified fibers, 13 (10%) were B units, 36 (29%) were C units, and 76 (61%) were D units. 3. B units were regularly discharging D units ranged from regularly to irregularly discharging. C units were the most irregularly discharging afferents encountered. The mean resting discharge for the entire sample was 74 spikes/s. Resting rates were similar for regularly discharging B and D units and higher than those for irregularly discharging C and D units. 4. Except for their lower conduction velocities, the discharge properties of B units are indistinguishable from those of regularly discharging D units. Many of the discharge properties of B and D units vary with discharge regularity. There is a strong, positive relation when beta *, g2Hz, or phi 2Hz is plotted against CV*. For beta * or phi 2Hz, C units conform to the relation for B and D units. In contrast, values of g2Hz for C units are three to

  3. Chronic recruitment of primary afferent neurons by microstimulation in the feline dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lee E.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Ciollaro, Mattia; Ventura, Valérie; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. This study describes results of primary afferent neural microstimulation experiments using microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of four cats. The goal was to test the stability and selectivity of these microelectrode arrays as a potential interface for restoration of somatosensory feedback after damage to the nervous system such as amputation. Approach. A five-contact nerve-cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve was used to record the antidromic compound action potential response to DRG microstimulation (2-15 µA biphasic pulses, 200 µs cathodal pulse width), and the threshold for eliciting a response was tracked over time. Recorded responses were segregated based on conduction velocity to determine thresholds for recruiting Group I and Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers. Main results. Thresholds were initially low (5.1 ± 2.3 µA for Group I and 6.3 ± 2.0 µA for Group II/Aβ) and increased over time. Additionally the number of electrodes with thresholds less than or equal to 15 µA decreased over time. Approximately 12% of tested electrodes continued to elicit responses at 15 µA up to 26 weeks after implantation. Higher stimulation intensities (up to 30 µA) were tested in one cat at 23 weeks post-implantation yielding responses on over 20 additional electrodes. Within the first six weeks after implantation, approximately equal numbers of electrodes elicited only Group I or Group II/Aβ responses at threshold, but the relative proportion of Group II/Aβ responses decreased over time. Significance. These results suggest that it is possible to activate Group I or Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers in isolation with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in the DRG, and that those responses can be elicited up to 26 weeks after implantation, although it may be difficult to achieve a consistent response day-to-day with currently available electrode technology. The DRG are compelling targets

  4. Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Wendy; Nagy, James I; Dai, Yue; McCrea, David A

    2012-01-01

    Electrical synapses formed by gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cx36) promote synchronous activity of interneurones in many regions of mammalian brain; however, there is limited information on the role of electrical synapses in spinal neuronal networks. Here we show that Cx36 is widely distributed in the spinal cord and is involved in mechanisms that govern presynaptic inhibition of primary afferent terminals. Electrophysiological recordings were made in spinal cord preparations from 8- to 11-day-old wild-type and Cx36 knockout mice. Several features associated with presynaptic inhibition evoked by conditioning stimulation of low threshold hindlimb afferents were substantially compromised in Cx36 knockout mice. Dorsal root potentials (DRPs) evoked by low intensity stimulation of sensory afferents were reduced in amplitude by 79% and in duration by 67% in Cx36 knockouts. DRPs were similarly affected in wild-types by bath application of gap junction blockers. Consistent with presynaptic inhibition of group Ia muscle spindle afferent terminals on motoneurones described in adult cats, conditioning stimulation of an adjacent dorsal root evoked a long duration inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes recorded from the ventral root in wild-type mice, and this inhibition was antagonized by bicuculline. The same conditioning stimulation failed to inhibit monosynaptic reflexes in Cx36 knockout mice. Immunofluorescence labelling for Cx36 was found throughout the dorsal and ventral horns of the spinal cord of juvenile mice and persisted in mature animals. In deep dorsal horn laminae, where interneurones involved in presynaptic inhibition of large diameter muscle afferents are located, cells were extensively dye-coupled following intracellular neurobiotin injection. Coupled cells displayed Cx36-positive puncta along their processes. Our results indicate that gap junctions formed by Cx36 in spinal cord are required for maintenance of presynaptic inhibition, including the

  5. TRPV4 mediates afferent pathways in the urinary bladder. A spinal c-fos study showing TRPV1 related adaptations in the TRPV4 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Dick A W; Hoenderop, Joost G; Heesakkers, John P F A; Schalken, Jack A

    2016-10-01

    The role of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4) channels in urinary bladder afferent neural pathways was investigated using spinal c-fos measurements in mice. Anesthetized wild type and TRPV4 knockout (-/-) mice underwent noxious bladder distention and treatment with either intravesical instillation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX), vehicle or an intraperitoneal injected TRPV4 antagonist (HC067047). Mice underwent paraformaldehyde perfusion for rapid fixation and L6-S1 spinal cord sections were removed followed by immunohistochemical staining for c-fos. A number of c-fos expressing neurons in the dorsal horns of L6-S1 spinal cord transections were quantified. Groups were compared using univariate ANOVA. Even with the absence of bladder inflammation on H&E, the TRPV4 -/- mice still have a significant twofold higher c-fos expression (n = 39, SD 2) after noxious bladder distention compared to wild type mice (n = 20, SD 3). A twofold increase in c-fos expression was observed after LPS treatment in wild types (n = 42, SD 5), but no increase was seen in TRPV4 -/- mice (n = 42, SD 2). After desensitization of primary afferent C-nerve fibers with RTX, c-fos expression in TRPV4-/- mice decreased significantly (threefold) (n = 12, SD 4). Results imply that TRPV4 channels are important for bladder afferent signaling. TRPV4 -/- mice bladders generate more noxious sensory output, which is predominantly mediated through TRPV1 expressing high threshold nerve fibers. This study reveals TRPV1 related adaptive changes in afferent pathways of the TRPV4 -/- mouse. We propose that this effect is caused by a congenital impairment of low threshold nerves that mediate normal bladder filling sensations. PMID:27491796

  6. TRPV4 mediates afferent pathways in the urinary bladder. A spinal c-fos study showing TRPV1 related adaptations in the TRPV4 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Dick A W; Hoenderop, Joost G; Heesakkers, John P F A; Schalken, Jack A

    2016-10-01

    The role of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4) channels in urinary bladder afferent neural pathways was investigated using spinal c-fos measurements in mice. Anesthetized wild type and TRPV4 knockout (-/-) mice underwent noxious bladder distention and treatment with either intravesical instillation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX), vehicle or an intraperitoneal injected TRPV4 antagonist (HC067047). Mice underwent paraformaldehyde perfusion for rapid fixation and L6-S1 spinal cord sections were removed followed by immunohistochemical staining for c-fos. A number of c-fos expressing neurons in the dorsal horns of L6-S1 spinal cord transections were quantified. Groups were compared using univariate ANOVA. Even with the absence of bladder inflammation on H&E, the TRPV4 -/- mice still have a significant twofold higher c-fos expression (n = 39, SD 2) after noxious bladder distention compared to wild type mice (n = 20, SD 3). A twofold increase in c-fos expression was observed after LPS treatment in wild types (n = 42, SD 5), but no increase was seen in TRPV4 -/- mice (n = 42, SD 2). After desensitization of primary afferent C-nerve fibers with RTX, c-fos expression in TRPV4-/- mice decreased significantly (threefold) (n = 12, SD 4). Results imply that TRPV4 channels are important for bladder afferent signaling. TRPV4 -/- mice bladders generate more noxious sensory output, which is predominantly mediated through TRPV1 expressing high threshold nerve fibers. This study reveals TRPV1 related adaptive changes in afferent pathways of the TRPV4 -/- mouse. We propose that this effect is caused by a congenital impairment of low threshold nerves that mediate normal bladder filling sensations.

  7. Selective impact of Tau loss on nociceptive primary afferents and pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, Ioannis; Lopes, André T; Pinto, Vitor; Lopes, Sofia; Carlos, Sara; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa; Pinheiro, Sara; Fernandes, Rui; Almeida, Armando; Sousa, Nuno; Leite-Almeida, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    Tau protein hyperphosphorylation and consequent malfunction are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease pathology; importantly, pain perception is diminished in these patients. In physiological conditions, Tau contributes to cytoskeletal dynamics and in this way, influences a number of cellular mechanisms including axonal trafficking, myelination and synaptic plasticity, processes that are also implicated in pain perception. However, there is no in vivo evidence clarifying the role of Tau in nociception. Thus, we tested Tau-null (Tau-/-) and Tau+/+ mice for acute thermal pain (Hargreaves' test), acute and tonic inflammatory pain (formalin test) and mechanical allodynia (Von Frey test). We report that Tau-/- animals presented a decreased response to acute noxious stimuli when compared to Tau+/+ while their pain-related behavior is augmented under tonic painful stimuli. This increased reactivity to tonic pain was accompanied by enhanced formalin-evoked c-fos staining of second order nociceptive neurons at Tau-null dorsal horn. In addition, we analyzed the primary afferents conveying nociceptive signals, estimating sciatic nerve fiber density, myelination and nerve conduction. Ultrastructural analysis revealed a decreased C-fiber density in the sciatic nerve of Tau-null mice and a hypomyelination of myelinated fibers (Aδ-fibers) - also confirmed by western blot analysis - followed by altered conduction properties of Tau-null sciatic nerves. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study that demonstrates that Tau depletion negatively affects the main systems conveying nociceptive information to the CNS, adding to our knowledge about Tau function(s) that might also be relevant for understanding peripheral neurological deficits in different Tauopathies.

  8. Criticality and degeneracy in injury-induced changes in primary afferent excitability and the implications for neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ratté, Stéphanie; Zhu, Yi; Lee, Kwan Yeop; Prescott, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains notoriously difficult to treat despite numerous drug targets. Here, we offer a novel explanation for this intractability. Computer simulations predicted that qualitative changes in primary afferent excitability linked to neuropathic pain arise through a switch in spike initiation dynamics when molecular pathologies reach a tipping point (criticality), and that this tipping point can be reached via several different molecular pathologies (degeneracy). We experimentally tested these predictions by pharmacologically blocking native conductances and/or electrophysiologically inserting virtual conductances. Multiple different manipulations successfully reproduced or reversed neuropathic changes in primary afferents from naïve or nerve-injured rats, respectively, thus confirming the predicted criticality and its degenerate basis. Degeneracy means that several different molecular pathologies are individually sufficient to cause hyperexcitability, and because several such pathologies co-occur after nerve injury, that no single pathology is uniquely necessary. Consequently, single-target-drugs can be circumvented by maladaptive plasticity in any one of several ion channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02370.001 PMID:24692450

  9. Histaminergic afferent system in the cerebellum: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Histaminergic afferent system of the cerebellum, having been considered as an essential component of the direct hypothalamocerebellar circuits, originates from the tuberomammillary nucleus in the hypothalamus. Unlike the mossy fibers and climbing fibers, the histaminergic afferent fibers, a third type of cerebellar afferents, extend fine varicose fibers throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. Histamine receptors, belonging to the family of G protein-coupled receptors, are widely present in the cerebellum. Through these histamine receptors, histamine directly excites Purkinje cells and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as the cerebellar nuclear neurons. Therefore, the histaminergic afferents parallelly modulate these dominant components in the cerebellar circuitry and consequently influence the final output of the cerebellum. In this way, the histaminergic afferent system actively participates in the cerebellum-mediated motor balance and coordination and nonsomatic functions. Accordingly, histaminergic reagents may become potential drugs for clinical treatment of cerebellar ataxia and other cerebellar disease. On the other hand, considering the hypothalamus is a high regulatory center for autonomic and visceral activities, the hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers/projections, bridging the nonsomatic center to somatic structure, may play a critical role in the somatic-nonsomatic integration.

  10. Thermal nociceptive properties of trigeminal afferent neurons in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although nociceptive afferents innervating the body have been heavily studied form many years, much less attention has been paid to trigeminal afferent biology. In particular, very little is known concerning trigeminal nociceptor responses to heat, and almost nothing in the rat. This study uses a highly controlled and reproducible diode laser stimulator to investigate the activation of trigeminal afferents to noxious skin heating. Results The results of this experiment demonstrate that trigeminal thermonociceptors are distinct from themonociceptors innervating the limbs. Trigeminal nociceptors have considerably slower action potential conduction velocities and lower temperature thresholds than somatic afferent neurons. On the other hand, nociceptors innervating both tissue areas separate into those that respond to short pulse, high rate skin heating and those that respond to long pulse, low rate skin heating. Conclusions This paper provides the first description in the literature of the in vivo properties of thermonociceptors in rats. These finding of two separate populations aligns with the separation between C and A-delta thermonociceptors innervating the paw, but have significant differences in terms of temperature threshold and average conduction velocities. An understanding of the temperature response properties of afferent neurons innervating the paw skin have been critical in many mechanistic discoveries, some leading to new pain therapies. A clear understanding of trigeminal nociceptors may be similarly useful in the investigation of trigeminal pain mechanisms and potential therapies. PMID:20609212

  11. Gut vagal afferents differentially modulate innate anxiety and learned fear.

    PubMed

    Klarer, Melanie; Arnold, Myrtha; Günther, Lydia; Winter, Christine; Langhans, Wolfgang; Meyer, Urs

    2014-05-21

    Vagal afferents are an important neuronal component of the gut-brain axis allowing bottom-up information flow from the viscera to the CNS. In addition to its role in ingestive behavior, vagal afferent signaling has been implicated modulating mood and affect, including distinct forms of anxiety and fear. Here, we used a rat model of subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA), the most complete and selective vagal deafferentation method existing to date, to study the consequences of complete disconnection of abdominal vagal afferents on innate anxiety, conditioned fear, and neurochemical parameters in the limbic system. We found that compared with Sham controls, SDA rats consistently displayed reduced innate anxiety-like behavior in three procedures commonly used in preclinical rodent models of anxiety, namely the elevated plus maze test, open field test, and food neophobia test. On the other hand, SDA rats exhibited increased expression of auditory-cued fear conditioning, which specifically emerged as attenuated extinction of conditioned fear during the tone re-exposure test. The behavioral manifestations in SDA rats were associated with region-dependent changes in noradrenaline and GABA levels in key areas of the limbic system, but not with functional alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal grand stress. Our study demonstrates that innate anxiety and learned fear are both subjected to visceral modulation through abdominal vagal afferents, possibly via changing limbic neurotransmitter systems. These data add further weight to theories emphasizing an important role of afferent visceral signals in the regulation of emotional behavior.

  12. Semicircular Canal Geometry, Afferent Sensitivity And Animal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hullar, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry of the semicircular canals has been used in evolutionary studies to predict the behaviors of extinct animals. These predictions have relied on an assumption that the responses of the canals can be determined from their dimensions, and that an organism’s behavior can be determined from these responses. However, the relationship between a canal’s sensitivity and its size is not well known. An intraspecies comparison among canal responses in each of three species (cat, squirrel monkey, and pigeon) was undertaken to evaluate various models of canal function and determine how their dimensions may be related to afferent physiology. All models predicted the responses of the cat afferents, but the models performed less well for squirrel monkey and pigeon. Possible causes for this discrepancy include incorrectly assuming that afferent responses accurately represent canal function, or errors in current biophysical models of the canals. These findings leave open the question as to how reliably canal anatomy can be used to estimate afferent responses and how closely afferent responses are related to behavior. Other labyrinthine features—such as orientation of the horizontal canal, which is reliably held near earth-horizontal across many species—may be better to use when extrapolating the posture and related behavior of extinct animals from labyrinthine morphology. PMID:16550591

  13. The correlated blanching of synaptic bodies and reduction in afferent firing rates caused by transmitter-depleting agents in the frog semicircular canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guth, P.; Norris, C.; Fermin, C. D.; Pantoja, M.

    1993-01-01

    Synaptic bodies (SBs) associated with rings of synaptic vesicles and well-defined, pre- and post-synaptic membrane structures are indicators of maturity in most hair cell-afferent nerve junctions. The role of the SBs remains elusive despite several experiments showing that they may be involved in storage of neurotransmitter. Our results demonstrate that SBs of the adult posterior semicircular canal (SCC) cristae hair cells become less electron dense following incubation of the SCC with the transmitter-depleting drug tetrabenazine (TBZ). Objective quantification and comparison of the densities of the SBs in untreated and TBZ-treated frog SCC demonstrated that TBZ significantly decreased the electron density of SBs. This reduction in electron density was accompanied by a reduction in firing rates of afferent fibers innervating the posterior SCC. A second transmitter-depleting drug, guanethidine, previously shown to reduce the electron density of hair cell SBs, also reduced the firing rates of afferent fibers innervating the posterior SCC. In contrast, the electron density of dense granules (DG), similar in size and shape to synaptic bodies (SB) in hair cells, did not change after incubation in TBZ, thus indicating that granules and SBs are not similar in regard to their electron density. The role of SBs in synaptic transmission and the transmitter, if any, stored in the SBs remain unknown. Nonetheless, the association of the lessening of electron density with a reduction in afferent firing rate provides impetus for the further investigation of the SB's role in neurotransmission.

  14. [Anatomical study of the cavernous nerve in relation to nerve sparing operation].

    PubMed

    Hanawa, K

    1994-08-01

    Recently, nerve sparing radical prostatectomy has became widely considered as the primary goal for maintaining a high standard of quality of life (QOL). However, anatomical localization of the cavernous nerve has not yet been precisely clarified in terms of the terminal end in the corpus cavernous penis distal to the urogenital membrane. Here in attempt to demonstrate the precise localization of the cavernous nerve, in six adult male cadaver. The cavernous nerves ran between the prostatic capsule and the prostatic fascia, through the capsule of the seminal vesicle. The nerves penetrated the membranous urethra at 8 mm from the margin of the urethra at the position of 5 and 7 o'clock. Therefore, the following procedures are critical to achieve successful nerve sparing: 1) meticulous division of the seminal-vesicle, 2) precise separation of the neurovascular bundle between the prostatic capsule and fascia, and 3) the careful transaction of the membranous urethra.

  15. [ELECTRIC STIMULATION OF VAGUS NERVE MODULATES A PROPAGATION OF OXYGEN EPILEPSY IN RABBITS].

    PubMed

    Zhilyaev, S Yu; Moskvin, A N; Platonova, T F; Demchenko, I T

    2015-11-01

    The activation of autonomic afferents (achieved through the vagus nerve (VN) electrical stimulation) on CNS O2 toxicity and cardiovascular function was investigated. In conscious rabbits at 5 ATA 02, prodromal signs of CNS O2 toxicity and convulsion latency were determined with and without vagus nerve (VN) stimulation. EEG, ECG and respiration were also recorded. In rabbits at 5 ATA, sympathetic overdrive and specific patterns on the EEG (synchronization of slow-waves), ECG (tachycardia) and respiration (respiratory minute volume increase) preceded motor convulsions. Vagus nerve stimulation increased parasympathetic component of autonomic drive and significantly delayed prodromal signs of oxygen toxicity and convulsion latency. Autonomic afferent input to the brain is a novel target for preventing CNS toxicity in HBO2. PMID:26995956

  16. Effects of stimulus intensity, cervical cord tractotomies and cerebellectomy on somatosensory evoked potentials from skin and muscle afferents of cat hind limb.

    PubMed

    Schieppati, M; Ducati, A

    1981-04-01

    The somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded from the sensory cortex were investigated by using graded stimulation of skin and muscle nerves from contralateral hind limb in the cat. Sections were made of the middle cervical cord to assess the pathways involved in mediating SEPs evoked by large and small diameter fibers. Dorsal column (DC) section caused a decrease of SEPs from skin group I afferents, and a small increase in those from group I muscle afferents. A subsequent section of dorso-lateral fasciculus (DLF) further decreased SEPs from skin and eliminated SEPs from muscle, evoked at low stimulus intensity. When the stimulus recruited group III fibres, SEPs were still present after DC and DLF section, both from skin and muscle nerves. Section of ALT in addition to DC confirmed a major role played by DLF (mainly spino-cervical tract of Morin) in transmitting impulses from muscle afferents; the role of DLF in mediating potentials evoked from skin is less remarkable than that of DC. Cerebellectomy did not change any SEP, however evoked. Previous results in the literature are discussed, taking into account the methodologies employed by various authors, and the possible interactions among pathways mediating SEPs.

  17. Adipose afferent reflex: sympathetic activation and obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xiong, X-Q; Chen, W-W; Zhu, G-Q

    2014-03-01

    Excessive sympathetic activity contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the progression of the related organ damage. Adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympatho-excitatory reflex that the afferent activity from white adipose tissue (WAT) increases sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN or PVH) is one of the central sites in the control of the AAR, and ionotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus mediate the AAR. The AAR is enhanced in obesity and obesity hypertension. Enhanced WAT afferent activity and AAR contribute to the excessive sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity. Blockage of the AAR attenuates the excessive sympathetic activity and hypertension. Leptin may be one of sensors in the WAT for the AAR, and is involved in the enhanced AAR in obesity and hypertension. This review focuses on the neuroanatomical basis and physiological functions of the AAR, and the important role of the enhanced AAR in the pathogenesis of obesity hypertension.

  18. [Central projections of the rat recurrent laryngeal nerve].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, A; Maranillo, E; Merchán, A; Vázquez, T; Sañudo, J R; Valderrama-Canales, F J

    2006-01-01

    Laryngeal nerves contain the fibres that control the laryngeal function. The studies carried out on the rat with the purpose of having a better knowledge of the functional components and the real origin of the fibres conveyed by the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) are few and in disagreement. No one of such papers were developed using biotinylated dextrane amines (BDA), a powerful tool for tracing neural pathways. The aim of our study was to identify in the rat using BDA, the nuclei of real origin of the fibres of the RLN, knowing in this way the functional components of this nerve. The study has been developed in 31 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, applying the BDA into the lesioned RLN. The results obtained in all the animals show that the rat's RLN does not contain afferent fibres, whereas the efferent fibres were originated within the ipsilateral nucleus ambiguus (NA). So, in the rat, the RLN seems to contain exclusively efferent fibres, probably been the superior laryngeal nerve who conveyed the afferent fibres.

  19. The afferent pupillary defect in acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with acute optic neuritis were studied by the techniques of infrared pupillometry and visual evoked responses (VER) to pattern reversal. A relative afferent pupillary defect was found in all cases and the magnitude of this defect was found to be related to the amplitude, but not to the latency, of the VER. During follow-up the afferent defect was found to remain persistently abnormal while other methods of clinical evaluation could not demonstrate abnormality reliably. The amplitude of the VER also remained low. PMID:501365

  20. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Joseph C; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits. PMID:26430636

  1. Electrical stimulation of low-threshold afferent fibers induces a prolonged synaptic depression in lamina II dorsal horn neurons to high-threshold afferent inputs in mice.

    PubMed

    Sdrulla, Andrei D; Xu, Qian; He, Shao-Qiu; Tiwari, Vinod; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Chen; Shu, Bin; Shechter, Ronen; Raja, Srinivasa N; Wang, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Guan, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of low-threshold Aβ-fibers (Aβ-ES) is used clinically to treat neuropathic pain conditions that are refractory to pharmacotherapy. However, it is unclear how Aβ-ES modulates synaptic responses to high-threshold afferent inputs (C-, Aδ-fibers) in superficial dorsal horn. Substantia gelatinosa (SG) (lamina II) neurons are important for relaying and modulating converging spinal nociceptive inputs. We recorded C-fiber-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in spinal cord slices in response to paired-pulse test stimulation (500 μA, 0.1 millisecond, 400 milliseconds apart). We showed that 50-Hz and 1000-Hz, but not 4-Hz, Aβ-ES (10 μA, 0.1 millisecond, 5 minutes) induced prolonged inhibition of C-fiber eEPSCs in SG neurons in naive mice. Furthermore, 50-Hz Aβ-ES inhibited both monosynaptic and polysynaptic forms of C-fiber eEPSC in naive mice and mice that had undergone spinal nerve ligation (SNL). The paired-pulse ratio (amplitude second eEPSC/first eEPSC) increased only in naive mice after 50-Hz Aβ-ES, suggesting that Aβ-ES may inhibit SG neurons by different mechanisms under naive and nerve-injured conditions. Finally, 50-Hz Aβ-ES inhibited both glutamatergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, which were identified by fluorescence in vGlut2-Td and glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice after SNL. These findings show that activities in Aβ-fibers lead to frequency-dependent depression of synaptic transmission in SG neurons in response to peripheral noxious inputs. However, 50-Hz Aβ-ES failed to induce cell-type-selective inhibition in SG neurons. The physiologic implication of this novel form of synaptic depression for pain modulation by Aβ-ES warrants further investigation. PMID:25974163

  2. Tracing of motoneurones and primary afferent projections after intracellular staining with Lucifer Yellow: dye-coupling.

    PubMed

    Adanina, V O; Shapovalov, A I; Shiriaev, B I; Tamarova, Z A

    1983-06-01

    Intracellular injection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow CH into single motoneurones of the isolated perfused frog spinal cord resulted in backfilling of presynaptic fibres originating from dorsal roots and ventrolateral funiculi. The dye transfer from primary sensory fibres into motoneurones was observed following application of Lucifer Yellow to the central end of the cut dorsal root. The dye-coupling coincides with electrical coupling at sensory-motor synapses presumably through gap junctions. The fluorescent primary afferent fibres were traced from the dorsal roots to the motor nucleus where they terminate the chains of swellings. Most swellings are located in dorsal horn and in the intermediate zone approximately 100-100 micrometers from the somata of motoneurones. A few varicosities are located ion the cell bodies of the motoneurones.

  3. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  4. Relationships between segregated afferents and postsynaptic neurones in the optic tectum of three-eyed frogs.

    PubMed

    Katz, L C; Constantine-Paton, M

    1988-09-01

    In 3-eyed frogs, afferents from 2 eyes converge on an optic tectum that normally receives input from only 1 eye. This produces an interdigitating series of stripes, resembling the ocular dominance columns in cats and monkeys. The consequences of this induced striping on the behavior of tectal dendrites was investigated in an in vitro preparation of the tectum. Stripes were labeled by anterograde transport of a fluorescent dye (rhodamine) and postsynaptic tectal cells labeled by intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow. The same types of cells were present in both normal and striped tecta, but dendritic arbors were altered in 2 ways. In normal tecta, dendrites were most frequently biased in a rostral direction. In striped tecta, dendrites were more frequently unbiased: fewer arbors had a strong rostral bias. The second effect of stripes was on the behaviors of individual dendrites of certain cell types. Some cells, primarily those with small, highly branched arbors, had dendrites that abruptly terminated at the borders between stripes. Other cells, with larger arbors, maintained "clumps" of dendrites in both eye's stripes. While these cells had portions of their dendritic arbor in more than one stripe, each individual dendrite was restricted to a single stripe. However, the processes of many cells, especially those with extensive, medial-laterally oriented dendrites, did not respect stripe boundaries in any obvious fashion. At the border between 2 stripes, there is an abrupt discontinuity in the patterns of activity in afferent axons. The dendritic alterations seen in striped tecta suggest that correlated activity can, in some cells, modulate the spatial arrangement of dendrites, such that an individual dendrite preferentially arborizes within such areas, but not between them. These cells as a whole can accommodate uncorrelated inputs, if these are segregated onto separate dendrites. This implies that local interactions between presynaptic terminals and

  5. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger to the site of persistent inflammation in nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Nicole N; Gold, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and recruitment of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) implicating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a major Ca(2+) extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca(2+) loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca(2+) transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation. PMID:26041911

  6. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger to the site of persistent inflammation in nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Nicole N; Gold, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and recruitment of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) implicating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a major Ca(2+) extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca(2+) loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca(2+) transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation.

  7. Severe hypoxia affects exercise performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Millet, Guillaume Y; Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; Laursen, Paul B; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that hypoxia centrally affects performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue, we conducted two experiments under complete vascular occlusion of the exercising muscle under different systemic O(2) environmental conditions. In experiment 1, 12 subjects performed repeated submaximal isometric contractions of the elbow flexor to exhaustion (RCTE) with inspired O(2) fraction fixed at 9% (severe hypoxia, SevHyp), 14% (moderate hypoxia, ModHyp), 21% (normoxia, Norm), or 30% (hyperoxia, Hyper). The number of contractions (performance), muscle (biceps brachii), and prefrontal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) parameters and high-frequency paired-pulse (PS100) evoked responses to electrical muscle stimulation were monitored. In experiment 2, 10 subjects performed another RCTE in SevHyp and Norm conditions in which the number of contractions, biceps brachii electromyography responses to electrical nerve stimulation (M wave), and transcranial magnetic stimulation responses (motor-evoked potentials, MEP, and cortical silent period, CSP) were recorded. Performance during RCTE was significantly reduced by 10-15% in SevHyp (arterial O(2) saturation, SpO(2) = ∼75%) compared with ModHyp (SpO(2) = ∼90%) or Norm/Hyper (SpO(2) > 97%). Performance reduction in SevHyp occurred despite similar 1) metabolic (muscle NIRS parameters) and functional (changes in PS100 and M wave) muscle states and 2) MEP and CSP responses, suggesting comparable corticospinal excitability and spinal and cortical inhibition between SevHyp and Norm. It is concluded that, in SevHyp, performance and central drive can be altered independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue. It is concluded that submaximal performance in SevHyp is partly reduced by a mechanism related directly to brain oxygenation. PMID:22323647

  8. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Idaira; Wanat, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review, we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders. PMID:27014097

  9. Changes in monkey horizontal semicircular canal afferent responses after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.; Perachio, A. A.; Dickman, J. D.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.; Sirota, M. G.; Iakushin, S. B.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular responses from single horizontal semicircular canal afferents in two rhesus monkeys were studied after recovery from a 14-day biosatellite (Cosmos 2044) orbital spaceflight. On the 1st postflight day, the mean gain for 9 different horizontal canal afferents, tested using one or several different passive yaw rotation waveforms, was nearly twice that for 20 horizontal canal afferents similarly tested during preflight and postflight control studies. Adaptation of the afferent response to passive yaw rotation on the 1st postflight day was also greater. These results suggest that at least one component of the vestibular end organ (the semicircular canals) is transiently modified after exposure to 14 days of microgravity. It is unclear whether the changes are secondary to other effects of microgravity, such as calcium loss, or an adaptive response. If the response is adaptive, then this report is the first evidence that the response of the vestibular end organ may be modified (presumably by the central nervous system via efferent connections) after prolonged unusual vestibular stimulation. If this is the case, the sites of plasticity of vestibular responses may not be exclusively within central nervous system vestibular structures, as previously believed.

  10. Nucleus of the solitary tract in the C57BL/6J mouse: Subnuclear parcellation, chorda tympani nerve projections, and brainstem connections

    PubMed Central

    Ganchrow, Donald; Ganchrow, Judith R; Cicchini, Vanessa; Bartel, Dianna L; Kaufman, Daniel; Girard, David; Whitehead, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) processes gustatory and related somatosensory information rostrally and general viscerosensory information caudally. To compare its connections with those of other rodents, this study in the C57BL/6J mouse provides a subnuclear cytoarchitectonic parcellation (Nissl stain) of the NST into rostral, intermediate, and caudal divisions. Subnuclei are further characterized by NADPH staining and P2X2 immunoreactivity (IR). Cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) labeling revealed those NST subnuclei receiving chorda tympani nerve (CT) afferents, those connecting with the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and reticular formation (RF), and those interconnecting NST subnuclei. CT terminals are densest in the rostral central (RC) and medial (M) subnuclei; less dense in the rostral lateral (RL) subnucleus; and sparse in the ventral (V), ventral lateral (VL), and central lateral (CL) subnuclei. CTb injection into the PBN retrogradely labels cells in the aforementioned subnuclei; RC and M providing the largest source of PBN projection neurons. Pontine efferent axons terminate mainly in V and rostral medial (RM) subnuclei. CTb injection into the medullary RF labels cells and axonal endings predominantly in V at rostral and intermediate NST levels. Small CTb injections within the NST label extensive projections from the rostral division to caudal subnuclei. Projections from the caudal division primarily interconnect subnuclei confined to the caudal division of the NST; they also connect with the area postrema. P2X2-IR identifies probable vagal nerve terminals in the central (Ce) subnucleus in the intermediate/caudal NST. Ce also shows intense NADPH staining and does not project to the PBN. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:1565–1596, 2014. PMID:24151133

  11. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  12. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  13. A role for nociceptive, myelinated nerve fibers in itch sensation.

    PubMed

    Ringkamp, Matthias; Schepers, Raf J; Shimada, Steven G; Johanek, Lisa M; Hartke, Timothy V; Borzan, Jasenka; Shim, Beom; LaMotte, Robert H; Meyer, Richard A

    2011-10-19

    Despite its clinical importance, the underlying neural mechanisms of itch sensation are poorly understood. In many diseases, pruritus is not effectively treated with antihistamines, indicating the involvement of nonhistaminergic mechanisms. To investigate the role of small myelinated afferents in nonhistaminergic itch, we tested, in psychophysical studies in humans, the effect of a differential nerve block on itch produced by intradermal insertion of spicules from the pods of a cowhage plant (Mucuna pruriens). Electrophysiological experiments in anesthetized monkey were used to investigate the responsiveness of cutaneous, nociceptive, myelinated afferents to different chemical stimuli (cowhage spicules, histamine, capsaicin). Our results provide several lines of evidence for an important role of myelinated fibers in cowhage-induced itch: (1) a selective conduction block in myelinated fibers substantially reduces itch in a subgroup of subjects with A-fiber-dominated itch, (2) the time course of itch sensation differs between subjects with A-fiber- versus C-fiber-dominated itch, (3) cowhage activates a subpopulation of myelinated and unmyelinated afferents in monkey, (4) the time course of the response to cowhage is different in myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, (5) the time of peak itch sensation for subjects with A-fiber-dominated itch matches the time for peak response in myelinated fibers, and (6) the time for peak itch sensation for subjects with C-fiber-dominated itch matches the time for the peak response in unmyelinated fibers. These findings demonstrate that activity in nociceptive, myelinated afferents contributes to cowhage-induced sensations, and that nonhistaminergic itch is mediated through activity in both unmyelinated and myelinated afferents. PMID:22016517

  14. Adenosine triphosphate attenuates renal sympathetic nerve activity through left ventricular chemosensitive receptors.

    PubMed

    Taneyama, C; Benson, K T; Hild, P G; Goto, H

    1997-02-01

    We previously reported that ATP, but not adenosine, administered i.v. attenuates the baroreflex-mediated increase in sympathetic nerve activity in response to arterial hypotension by a vagal afferent mechanism. It was not elucidated in that study which vagal afferent endings are involved. Mongrel dogs were anesthetized with alpha-chloralose, thoracotomy was performed and a 27-gauge hypodermic needle was inserted into the left circumflex coronary artery. The left renal sympathetic nerves were isolated and placed on a bipolar silver electrode for measurement of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Dose-response effects of intracoronary or i.v. infusion of ATP (100, 200 or 400 microg/kg/min) on RSNA and mean arterial pressure were studied in neuraxis-intact and cervically vagotomized dogs. RSNA was increased dose-dependently with decreasing mean arterial pressure during the i.v. ATP infusion. Elevation of RSNA was attenuated by higher intracoronary ATP infusion rates, despite the fact that mean arterial pressure was decreased dose-dependently. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, however, remained unchanged. This suppression of RSNA by the intracoronary ATP infusion was completely abolished by bilateral cervical vagotomy. Our data suggest that ATP attenuates reflex increases in sympathetic nerve activity by possibly stimulating ventricular chemoreceptors with cardiac vagal afferents. PMID:9023265

  15. Short-interval intracortical inhibition is modulated by high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takenobu; Sakuma, Kenji; Nomura, Takashi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    Cortical excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent input. We investigated the influence of peripheral mixed nerve stimulation on the excitability of the motor cortex. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB), extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles were evaluated using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation (150 Hz, 30 min) over the right median nerve at the wrist. The MEP amplitude and SICI of the APB muscle decreased transiently 0-10 min after the intervention, whereas the ICF did not change. High-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation reduced the excitability of the motor cortex. The decrement in the SICI, which reflects the function of GABA(A)ergic inhibitory interneurons, might compensate for the reduced motor cortical excitability after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

  16. Termination Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Mike; Hill, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined 11 workplaces to determine how they handle termination documentation, an empirically unexplored area in technical communication and rhetoric. We found that the use of termination documentation is context dependent while following a basic pattern of infraction, investigation, intervention, and termination. Furthermore,…

  17. Reconstruction of atonic bladder innervation after spinal cord injury: A bladder reflex arc with afferent and efferent pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Li, Guitao; Luo, Dixin; Sun, Hongtao; Qi, Yong; Li, Yiyi; Jin, Xunjie

    2015-11-01

    Background Establishing bladder reflex arcs only with the efferent pathway to induce micturition after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been successful. However, the absence of sensory function and micturition desires can lead to serious complications. Objectives To reconstruct a bladder reflex arc with both afferent and efferent pathways to achieve atonic bladder innervation after SCI. Methods A reflex arc was established by microanastomosis of the S2 dorsal root to the peripheral process of the L5 dorsal ganglion and the L5 ventral root to the S2 ventral root. The functions of the reflex arc were evaluated using electrophysiology, wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) tracing, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunocytochemistry analysis. Hind-paw motion was evaluated by CatWalk gait. Results Compound action potentials and compound muscle action potentials were recorded at the right L5 dorsal root following electrical stimulation of right S2 dorsal root. Similar to the control side, these were not significantly different before or after the spinal cord destruction between L6 and S4. WGA-HRP tracing and CGRP immunocytochemistry showed that construction of the afferent and efferent pathways of the bladder reflex arc encouraged axonal regeneration of motor and sensory nerves, which then made contact with the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, ultimately reestablishing axoplasmic transportation. Gait analysis showed that at 3 months following the operation, only the regularity index was significantly different as compared with 1 day before the operation, other parameters showing no difference. Conclusion Bladder reflex arc with the afferent and efferent pathways reconstructs the micturition function without great influence on the motion of leg.

  18. Thresholds of cutaneous afferents related to perceptual threshold across the human foot sole.

    PubMed

    Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2015-10-01

    Perceptual thresholds are known to vary across the foot sole, despite a reported even distribution in cutaneous afferents. Skin mechanical properties have been proposed to account for these differences; however, a direct relationship between foot sole afferent firing, perceptual threshold, and skin mechanical properties has not been previously investigated. Using the technique of microneurography, we recorded the monofilament firing thresholds of cutaneous afferents and associated perceptual thresholds across the foot sole. In addition, receptive field hardness measurements were taken to investigate the influence of skin hardness on these threshold measures. Afferents were identified as fast adapting [FAI (n = 48) or FAII (n = 13)] or slowly adapting [SAI (n = 21) or SAII (n = 20)], and were grouped based on receptive field location (heel, arch, metatarsals, toes). Overall, perceptual thresholds were found to most closely align with firing thresholds of FA afferents. In contrast, SAI and SAII afferent firing thresholds were found to be significantly higher than perceptual thresholds and are not thought to mediate monofilament perceptual threshold across the foot sole. Perceptual thresholds and FAI afferent firing thresholds were significantly lower in the arch compared with other regions, and skin hardness was found to positively correlate with both FAI and FAII afferent firing and perceptual thresholds. These data support a perceptual influence of skin hardness, which is likely the result of elevated FA afferent firing threshold at harder foot sole sites. The close coupling between FA afferent firing and perceptual threshold across foot sole indicates that small changes in FA afferent firing can influence perceptual thresholds.

  19. [Central projections of the rat superior laryngeal nerve].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, A; Maranillo, E; Merchán, A; Vázquez, T; Safiudo, J R; Valderrama-Canales, F

    2006-01-01

    Laryngeal nerves contain the fibres that control the laryngeal function. On the rat, the studies on the functional components and the real origin of the fibres conveyed by the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) are few. No one of such works were developed using biotinylated dextrane amines (BDA), a powerful tool for tracing neural pathways. The aim of our study was to identify by using BDA, in the rat, the nuclei of real origin of the fibres of the SLN, knowing in this way the functional components of this nerve. The study has been developed in 11 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, applying the BDA into the damaged SLN. The results obtained in all the animals shown that the rat SLN carries efferent fibres originated within the ipsilateral nucleus ambiguous (NA) and dorsal nucleus of the vagus (DNV), and that afferent fibres reach the tractus solitari and the nucleus tractus solitari. So, in the rat, the SLN seems to convey efferent fibres from the NA and DNV and, probably, all the laryngeal afferent fibres.

  20. Sciatic nerve regeneration through alginate with tubulation or nontubulation repair in cat.

    PubMed

    Sufan, W; Suzuki, Y; Tanihara, M; Ohnishi, K; Suzuki, K; Endo, K; Nishimura, Y

    2001-03-01

    A novel material for nerve regeneration, alginate, was employed in both tubulation and nontubulation repair of a long peripheral nerve defect injury. Twelve cats underwent severing of the right sciatic nerve to generate a 50-mm gap, which was treated by tubulation repair (n = 6) or nontubulation repair (n = 6). In the tubulation group, a nerve conduit consisting of polyglycolic acid mesh tube filled with alginate sponge was implanted into the gap and the tube was sutured to both nerve stumps. In the nontubulation group, the nerve defect was repaired by a simple interpolation of two pieces of alginate sponge without any suture. The animals in both groups exhibited similar recovery of locomotor function. Three months postoperatively, successful axonal elongation and reinnervation in both the afferent and efferent systems were detected by electrophysiological examinations. Intracellular electrical activity was also recorded, which is directly indicative of continuity of the regenerated nerve and restoration of the spinal reflex circuit. Eight months after operation, many regenerated myelinated axons with fascicular organization by perineurial cells were observed within the gap, peroneal and tibial branches were found in both groups, while no alginate residue was found within the regenerated nerves. In morphometric analysis of the axon density and diameter, there were no significant differences between the two groups. These results suggest that alginate is a potent material for promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. It can also be concluded that the nontubulation method is a possible repair approach for peripheral nerve defect injury.

  1. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats.

  2. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats. PMID:27071004

  3. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats. PMID:27071004

  4. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, A. L.; Farfán, F. D.; Felice, C. J.

    2007-11-01

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle.

  5. Effect of somatic nerve stimulation on the kidney in intact, vagotomized and carotid sinus-denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, G; Johns, E J

    1991-01-01

    1. The influence of cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptors on the renal nerve-dependent functional responses of the kidney to electrical stimulation of somatic afferent nerves was studied in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats. 2. Electrical stimulation of the left brachial nerve plexus at 3 Hz, 0.2 ms and 15 V in the intact animals increased blood pressure by 22%, and while renal perfusion pressure was maintained at pre-stimulus levels, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate decreased by 14 and 22% respectively. At the same time urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretion decreased by 36, 42 and 27% respectively. In animals subjected to acute renal nerve section these renal functional responses could not be elicited. 3. Following bilateral vagotomy the systemic and renal haemodynamic responses to brachial nerve stimulation were similar to the intact group. However, urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretions decreased by 50, 59 and 47% respectively, responses which were significantly greater than in the intact group. 4. In a group of rats in which the carotid sinus nerves had been sectioned, stimulation of the brachial plexus caused reductions of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate of the same magnitude as in the intact group; however, urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretion fell by 51, 60 and 48%, respectively, which were significantly larger than in the intact group. 5. These results demonstrate that the afferent nerve information arising from muscle joints and skin and carried via the brachial plexus caused reflex renal nerve-dependent reductions in renal haemodynamics and an antidiuresis and antinatriuresis. The cardiopulmonary and carotid sinus baroreceptors exert a tonic inhibitory action on these reflex renal responses insofar as they appeared to attenuate the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to somatic afferent nerve stimulation.

  6. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  7. Distinct recurrent versus afferent dynamics in cortical visual processing.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, Kimberly; Lien, Anthony D; Scanziani, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    How intracortical recurrent circuits in mammalian sensory cortex influence dynamics of sensory representation is not understood. Previous methods could not distinguish the relative contributions of recurrent circuits and thalamic afferents to cortical dynamics. We accomplish this by optogenetically manipulating thalamus and cortex. Over the initial 40 ms of visual stimulation, excitation from recurrent circuits in visual cortex progressively increased to exceed direct thalamocortical excitation. Even when recurrent excitation exceeded thalamic excitation, upon silencing thalamus, sensory-evoked activity in cortex decayed rapidly, with a time constant of 10 ms, which is similar to a neuron's integration time window. In awake mice, this cortical decay function predicted the time-locking of cortical activity to thalamic input at frequencies <15 Hz and attenuation of the cortical response to higher frequencies. Under anesthesia, depression at thalamocortical synapses disrupted the fidelity of sensory transmission. Thus, we determine dynamics intrinsic to cortical recurrent circuits that transform afferent input in time.

  8. Coding of stimuli by ampullary afferents in Gnathonemus petersii.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, J; Gertz, S; Goulet, J; Schuh, A; von der Emde, G

    2010-10-01

    Weakly electric fish use electroreception for both active and passive electrolocation and for electrocommunication. While both active and passive electrolocation systems are prominent in weakly electric Mormyriform fishes, knowledge of their passive electrolocation ability is still scarce. To better estimate the contribution of passive electric sensing to the orientat