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Sample records for afferent nociceptive neurons

  1. [Postsynaptic reactions of cerebral cortex neurons, activated by nociceptive afferents during stimulation of the Raphe nuclei].

    PubMed

    Labakhua, T Sh; Dzhanashiia, T K; Gedevanishvili, G I; Dzhokhadze, L D; Tkemaladze, T T; Abzianidze, I V

    2012-01-01

    On cats, we studied the influence of stimulation of the Raphe nuclei (RN) on postsynaptic processes evoked in neurons of the somatosensory cortex by stimulation of nociceptive (intensive stimulation of the tooth pulp) and non-nociceptive (moderate stimulation of the ventroposteromedial--VPN--nucleus of the thalamus) afferent inputs. 6 cells, selectively excited by stimulation of nocciceptors and 9 cells, activated by both the above nociceptive and non-nociceptive influences (nociceptive and convergent neurons, respectively) were recorded intracellular. In neurons of both groups, responses to nociceptive stimulation (of sufficient intensity) looked like an EPSP-spike-IPSP (the letter of significant duration, up to 200-300 ms) compleх. Conditioning stimulation of the RN which preceded test stimulus applied to the tooth pulp or VPM nucleus by 100 to 800 ms, induced 40-60 % decrease of the IPSP amplitude only, while maхimal effect of influence, in both cases, was noted within intervals of 300-800 ms between conditioning and test stimulus. During stimulation of the RN, serotonin released via receptor and second messengers, provides postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic system, decreasing the IPSP amplitude which occurs after stimulation of both the tooth pulp and VPM thalamic nucleus. This process may be realized trough either pre- or postsynaptic mechanisms. PMID:22392784

  2. The TTX-Resistant Sodium Channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3): Expression and Correlation with Membrane Properties in Rat Nociceptive Primary Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Djouhri, Laiche; Fang, Xin; Okuse, Kenji; Wood, John N; Berry, Carol M; Lawson, Sally N

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the sensory neuron-specific Na+ channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) in nociceptive and non-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and whether its distribution is related to neuronal membrane properties. Nav1.8-like immunoreactivity (Nav1.8-LI) was examined with an affinity purified polyclonal antiserum (SNS11) in rat DRG neurons that were classified according to sensory receptive properties and by conduction velocity (CV) as C-, Aδ- or Aα/β. A significantly higher proportion of nociceptive than low threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) neurons showed Nav1.8-LI, and nociceptive neurons had significantly more intense immunoreactivity in their somata than LTM neurons. Results showed that 89, 93 and 60 % of C-, Aδ- and Aα/β-fibre nociceptive units respectively and 88 % of C-unresponsive units were positive. C-unresponsive units had electrical membrane properties similar to C-nociceptors and were considered to be nociceptive-type neurons. Weak positive Nav1.8-LI was also present in some LTM units including a C LTM, all Aδ LTM units (D hair), about 10 % of cutaneous LTM Aα/β-units, but no muscle spindle afferent units. Nav1.8-LI intensity was negatively correlated with soma size (all neurons) and with dorsal root CVs in A- but not C-fibre neurons. Nav1.8-LI intensity was positively correlated with action potential (AP) duration (both rise and fall time) in A-fibre neurons and with AP rise time only in positive C-fibre neurons. It was also positively correlated with AP overshoot in positive neurons. Thus high levels of Nav1.8 protein may contribute to the longer AP durations (especially in A-fibre neurons) and larger AP overshoots that are typical of nociceptors. PMID:12794175

  3. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain. PMID:26520849

  4. Nociceptive Afferents to the Premotor Neurons That Send Axons Simultaneously to the Facial and Hypoglossal Motoneurons by Means of Axon Collaterals

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yulin; Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Fuxing; Li, Yunqing

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR) responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG) or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA) were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt), dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV), supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup) and parabrachial nucleus (PBN) with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals. PMID:21980505

  5. Nociceptive afferents to the premotor neurons that send axons simultaneously to the facial and hypoglossal motoneurons by means of axon collaterals.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yulin; Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Fuxing; Li, Yunqing

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR) responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG) or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA) were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt), dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV), supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup) and parabrachial nucleus (PBN) with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals. PMID:21980505

  6. Mechanical sensibility of nociceptive and non-nociceptive fast-conducting afferents is modulated by skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo; Eisenach, James C; Ririe, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish mechanical from thermal input is a critical component of peripheral somatosensory function. Polymodal C fibers respond to both stimuli. However, mechanosensitive, modality-specific fast-conducting tactile and nociceptor afferents theoretically carry information only about mechanical forces independent of the thermal environment. We hypothesize that the thermal environment can nonetheless modulate mechanical force sensibility in fibers that do not respond directly to change in temperature. To study this, fast-conducting mechanosensitive peripheral sensory fibers in male Sprague-Dawley rats were accessed at the soma in the dorsal root ganglia from T11 or L4/L5. Neuronal identification was performed using receptive field characteristics and passive and active electrical properties. Neurons responded to mechanical stimuli but failed to generate action potentials in response to changes in temperature alone, except for the tactile mechanical and cold sensitive neurons. Heat and cold ramps were utilized to determine temperature-induced modulation of response to mechanical stimuli. Mechanically evoked electrical activity in non-nociceptive, low-threshold mechanoreceptors (tactile afferents) decreased in response to changes in temperature while mechanically induced activity was increased in nociceptive, fast-conducting, high-threshold mechanoreceptors in response to the same changes in temperature. These data suggest that mechanical activation does not occur in isolation but rather that temperature changes appear to alter mechanical afferent activity and input to the central nervous system in a dynamic fashion. Further studies to understand the psychophysiological implications of thermal modulation of fast-conducting mechanical input to the spinal cord will provide greater insight into the implications of these findings. PMID:26581873

  7. Corneal afferents differentially target thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Sue A.; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal horn neurons send ascending projections to both thalamic nuclei and parabrachial nuclei; these pathways are thought to be critical pathways for central processing of nociceptive information. Afferents from the corneal surface of the eye mediate nociception from this tissue which is susceptible to clinically important pain syndromes. This study examined corneal afferents to the trigeminal dorsal horn and compared inputs to thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons. We used anterograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit to identify corneal afferent projections to trigeminal dorsal horn, and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold to identify projection neurons. Studies were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our analysis was conducted at two distinct levels of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) which receive corneal afferent projections. We found that corneal afferents project more densely to the rostral pole of Vc than the caudal pole. We also quantified the number of thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in the regions of Vc that receive corneal afferents. Corneal afferent inputs to both groups of projection neurons were also more abundant in the rostral pole of Vc. Finally, by comparing the frequency of corneal afferent appositions to thalamic- versus parabrachial-projecting neurons, we found that corneal afferents preferentially target parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal dorsal horn. These results suggest that nociceptive pain from the cornea may be primarily mediated by a non-thalamic ascending pathway. PMID:23201828

  8. Roles of isolectin B4-binding afferents in colorectal mechanical nociception.

    PubMed

    La, Jun-Ho; Feng, Bin; Kaji, Kaori; Schwartz, Erica S; Gebhart, G F

    2016-02-01

    Isolectin B4-binding (IB4+) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are distinct from peptidergic DRG neurons in their terminal location in the spinal cord and respective contributions to various classes and modalities of nociception. In DRG neurons innervating the mouse colon (c-DRG neurons), the reported proportion of IB4+ population is inconsistent across studies, and little is known regarding their role in colorectal mechanonociception. To address these issues, in C57BL/6J mice, we quantified IB4+ binding after labeling c-DRG neurons with Fast Blue and examined functional consequences of ablating these neurons by IB4-conjugated saporin. Sixty-one percent of Fast Blue-labeled neurons in the L6 DRG were IB4+, and 95% of these IB4+ c-DRG neurons were peptidergic. Intrathecal administration of IB4-conjugated saporin reduced the proportion of IB4+ c-DRG neurons to 37%, which was due to the loss of c-DRG neurons showing strong to medium IB4+ intensity; c-DRG neurons with weak IB4+ intensity were spared. However, this loss altered neither nociceptive behaviors to colorectal distension nor the relative proportions of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent classes characterized by single-fiber recordings. These findings demonstrate that more than 1 half of viscerosensory L6 c-DRG neurons in C57BL/6J mouse are IB4+ and suggest, in contrast to the reported roles of IB4+/nonpeptidergic neurons in cutaneous mechanonociception, c-DRG neurons with strong-to-medium IB4+ intensity do not play a significant role in colorectal mechanonociception. PMID:26447707

  9. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger to the site of persistent inflammation in nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Nicole N; Gold, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and recruitment of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) implicating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a major Ca(2+) extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca(2+) loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca(2+) transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation. PMID:26041911

  10. Control of somatic membrane potential in nociceptive neurons and its implications for peripheral nociceptive transmission.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaona; Hao, Han; Gigout, Sylvain; Huang, Dongyang; Yang, Yuehui; Li, Li; Wang, Caixue; Sundt, Danielle; Jaffe, David B; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral sensory ganglia contain somata of afferent fibres conveying somatosensory inputs to the central nervous system. Growing evidence suggests that the somatic/perisomatic region of sensory neurons can influence peripheral sensory transmission. Control of resting membrane potential (Erest) is an important mechanism regulating excitability, but surprisingly little is known about how Erest is regulated in sensory neuron somata or how changes in somatic/perisomatic Erest affect peripheral sensory transmission. We first evaluated the influence of several major ion channels on Erest in cultured small-diameter, mostly capsaicin-sensitive (presumed nociceptive) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The strongest and most prevalent effect on Erest was achieved by modulating M channels, K2P and 4-aminopiridine-sensitive KV channels, while hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated, voltage-gated Na(+), and T-type Ca(2+) channels to a lesser extent also contributed to Erest. Second, we investigated how varying somatic/perisomatic membrane potential, by manipulating ion channels of sensory neurons within the DRG, affected peripheral nociceptive transmission in vivo. Acute focal application of M or KATP channel enhancers or a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker to L5 DRG in vivo significantly alleviated pain induced by hind paw injection of bradykinin. Finally, we show with computational modelling how somatic/perisomatic hyperpolarization, in concert with the low-pass filtering properties of the t-junction within the DRG, can interfere with action potential propagation. Our study deciphers a complement of ion channels that sets the somatic Erest of nociceptive neurons and provides strong evidence for a robust filtering role of the somatic and perisomatic compartments of peripheral nociceptive neuron. PMID:25168672

  11. Control of somatic membrane potential in nociceptive neurons and its implications for peripheral nociceptive transmission

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaona; Hao, Han; Gigout, Sylvain; Huang, Dongyang; Yang, Yuehui; Li, Li; Wang, Caixue; Sundt, Danielle; Jaffe, David B.; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral sensory ganglia contain somata of afferent fibres conveying somatosensory inputs to the central nervous system. Growing evidence suggests that the somatic/perisomatic region of sensory neurons can influence peripheral sensory transmission. Control of resting membrane potential (Erest) is an important mechanism regulating excitability, but surprisingly little is known about how Erest is regulated in sensory neuron somata or how changes in somatic/perisomatic Erest affect peripheral sensory transmission. We first evaluated the influence of several major ion channels on Erest in cultured small-diameter, mostly capsaicin-sensitive (presumed nociceptive) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The strongest and most prevalent effect on Erest was achieved by modulating M channels, K2P and 4-aminopiridine-sensitive KV channels, while hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated, voltage-gated Na+, and T-type Ca2+ channels to a lesser extent also contributed to Erest. Second, we investigated how varying somatic/perisomatic membrane potential, by manipulating ion channels of sensory neurons within the DRG, affected peripheral nociceptive transmission in vivo. Acute focal application of M or KATP channel enhancers or a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker to L5 DRG in vivo significantly alleviated pain induced by hind paw injection of bradykinin. Finally, we show with computational modelling how somatic/perisomatic hyperpolarization, in concert with the low-pass filtering properties of the t-junction within the DRG, can interfere with action potential propagation. Our study deciphers a complement of ion channels that sets the somatic Erest of nociceptive neurons and provides strong evidence for a robust filtering role of the somatic and perisomatic compartments of peripheral nociceptive neuron. PMID:25168672

  12. Neural coding of nociceptive stimuli-from rat spinal neurones to human perception.

    PubMed

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Ronga, Irene; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2013-08-01

    Translational studies are key to furthering our understanding of nociceptive signalling and bridging the gaps between molecules and pathways to the patients. This requires use of appropriate preclinical models that accurately depict outcome measures used in humans. Whereas behavioural animal studies classically involve reports related to nociceptive thresholds of, for example, withdrawal, electrophysiological recordings of spinal neurones that receive convergent input from primary afferents permits investigation of suprathreshold events and exploration of the full-range coding of different stimuli. We explored the central processing of nociceptive inputs in a novel parallel investigation between rats and humans. Using radiant laser pulses, we first compared the electrophysiological responses of deep wide dynamic range and superficial nociceptive-specific neurones in the rat dorsal horn with human psychophysics and cortical responses. Secondly, we explored the effects of spatial summation using laser pulses of identical energy and different size. We observed 3 main findings. Firstly, both rodent and human data confirmed that neodymium-yttrium aluminium perovskite laser stimulation is a nociceptive-selective stimulus that never activates Aβ afferents. Secondly, graded laser stimulation elicited similarly graded electrophysiological and behavioural responses in both species. Thirdly, there was a significant degree of spatial summation of laser nociceptive input. The remarkable similarity in rodent and human coding indicates that responses of rat dorsal horn neurones can translate to human nociceptive processing. These findings suggest that recordings of spinal neuronal activity elicited by laser stimuli could be a valuable predictive measure of human pain perception. PMID:23719576

  13. Endothelin-1 induced desensitization in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terika P.; Smith, Sherika N.; Sweitzer, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a known algogen that causes acute pain and sensitization in humans and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors when injected into the periphery in rats, and is elevated during vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Previously, our lab has shown that a priming dose of ET-1 produces sensitization to capsaicin-induce secondary hyperalgesia. The goal of this study was to determine if the sensitization induced by ET-1 priming is occurring at the level of the primary afferent neuron. Calcium imaging in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was utilized to examine the effects of ET-1 on primary afferent neurons. ET-1 induces [Ca2+]i transients in unprimed cells. ET-1 induced [Ca2+]i transients are attenuated by priming with ET-1. This priming effect occurs whether the priming dose is given 0-4 days prior to the challenge dose. Similarly, ET-1 priming decreases capsaicin-induced [Ca2+]i transients. At the level of the primary afferent neuron, ET-1 priming has a desensitizing effect on challenge exposures to ET-1 and capsaicin. PMID:25220703

  14. Effects of acid on vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-08-15

    Acid reflux-induced heartburn and noncardiac chest pain are processed peripherally by sensory nerve endings in the wall of the esophagus, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effects of acid on esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in guinea pig vagal nodose or jugular C fiber neurons by using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. We recorded action potentials (AP) of esophageal nodose or jugular C fibers evoked by acid perfusion and compared esophageal distension-evoked AP before and after acid perfusion. Acid perfusion for 30 min (pH range 7.4 to 5.8) did not evoke AP in nodose C fibers but significantly decreased their responses to esophageal distension, which could be recovered after washing out acid for 90 min. In jugular C fibers, acid perfusion not only evoked AP but also inhibited their responses to esophageal distension, which were not recovered after washing out acid for 120 min. Lower concentration of capsaicin perfusion mimicked acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fibers. Pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) inhibitor amiloride, significantly inhibited acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fiber. These results demonstrate that esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent nerve subtypes display distinctive responses to acid. Acid activates jugular, but not nodose, C fibers and inhibits both of their responses to esophageal distension. These effects are mediated mainly through TRPV1. This inhibitory effect is a novel finding and may contribute to esophageal sensory/motor dysfunction in acid reflux diseases. PMID:24994852

  15. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  16. Dual Modulation of Nociception and Cardiovascular Reflexes during Peripheral Ischemia through P2Y1 Receptor-Dependent Sensitization of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Queme, Luis F.; Ross, Jessica L.; Lu, Peilin; Hudgins, Renita C.

    2016-01-01

    to play a key role in the development of pain-related behaviors during ischemia. At the same time, under these pathological conditions, the changes in muscle sensory neurons appear to modulate an increase in mean systemic blood pressure after exercise. This is the first report of the potential peripheral mechanisms by which group III/IV muscle afferents can dually regulate muscle nociception and the exercise pressor reflex. These data provide evidence related to the potential underlying reasons for the comorbidity of muscle pain and altered sympathetic reflexes in disease states that are based in problems with peripheral perfusion and may indicate a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26740646

  17. Paclitaxel-induced increase in NCX activity in subpopulations of nociceptive afferents: A protective mechanism against chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated, in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), that there is a significant decrease in the duration of the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transient in isolated somata of putative nociceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but no change in transient magnitude or the resting concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i). Because the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) only contributes to the regulation of the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient, in putative nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, we hypothesized that an increase in NCX activity underlies the CIPN-induced change in this subpopulation of neurons. Acutely dissociated retrogradely labeled sensory neurons from naïve, vehicle-, and paclitaxel-treated rats were studied with fura-2 based Ca(2+) imaging. There was no difference in the relative level of NCX activity between glabrous neurons from paclitaxel-treated or control rats. However, in contrast to the relatively large and long lasting Ca(2+) transients needed to evoke NCX activity in neurons from naïve rats, there was evidence of resting NCX activity in glabrous neurons from both vehicle- and paclitaxel-treated rats. More interestingly, there was a paclitaxel-induced increase in NCX activity in putative nociceptive neurons innervating the thigh, neurons in which there is no evidence of a change in the depolarization-induced Ca(2+) transient, or a body site in which there was a change in nociceptive threshold. Furthermore, while the majority of NCX activity in glabrous neurons is sensitive to the NCX3-preferring blocker KB-R7943, the increase in NCX activity in thigh neurons was resistant to KB-R7943 but sensitive to the NCX1-preferring blocker SEA0400. These results suggest that a mechanism(s) other than NCX underlies the paclitaxel-induced decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient in putative nociceptive glabrous skin neurons. However, the compensatory

  18. Dynamic mechanical allodynia in humans is not mediated by a central presynaptic interaction of A beta-mechanoreceptive and nociceptive C-afferents.

    PubMed

    Wasner, G; Baron, R; Jänig, W

    1999-02-01

    Recently, Cervero and Laird (NeuroReport, 7 (1996) 526-528; Pain, 68 (1996) 13-23) proposed a new pathophysiological mechanism of dynamic mechanical allodynia in skin. Using the capsaicin pain model in humans, they showed that light mechanical stimulation within an area of secondary mechanical allodynia induces vasodilatation measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry. They suggested that the low-threshold A beta-mechanoreceptive fibres depolarize the central terminals of nociceptive primary afferent neurons via interneurons. Consequently, the vasodilatation is produced by impulses conducted antidromically in nociceptive C-axons. The allodynia was proposed to result from depolarization of central terminals of primary afferent neurons with C-fibres with activation of nociceptive dorsal horn neurons. In order to extend these findings, we used the same experimental approach but additionally stimulated the A beta-fibres electrically to evoke secondary allodynia during simultaneous monitoring skin blood flow. Twenty microlitres of a 0.5% capsaicin solution was injected intradermally into the dorsal forearm. Skin sites that demonstrated dynamic mechanical allodynia but were not located within the area of primary hyperalgesia and flare were investigated. Ten mm away from a laser-Doppler probe, dynamic mechanical allodynia was induced for 1 min (1) by moving a cotton swab and (2) by electrically stimulating the afferent nerve endings transdermally. Increasing stimulus intensities were applied (0.3-4 mA, 40 Hz, pulse duration 0.2 ms). After intracutaneous injection of capsaicin, light mechanical stimulation elicited a burning painful sensation (numeric analogue scale (NAS) 1.5-3) and concomitant movement artefacts at the laser signal. Antidromic vasodilatation was never observed. In this area of dynamic allodynia, electrical stimulation at stimulus intensities that were not painful before capsaicin injection (A beta-stimulation) was now able to elicit a burning painful sensation

  19. Nociceptive neurons protect Drosophila larvae from parasitoid wasps

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yifan; Johnson, Trevor; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Natural selection has resulted in a complex and fascinating repertoire of innate behaviors that are produced by insects. One puzzling example occurs in fruitfly larvae that have been subjected to a noxious mechanical or thermal sensory input. In response, the larvae “roll” using a motor pattern that is completely distinct from the style of locomotion that is used for foraging. Results We have precisely mapped the sensory neurons that are used by the Drosophila larvae to detect nociceptive stimuli. Using complementary optogenetic activation and targeted silencing of sensory neurons, we have demonstrated that a single class of neuron (Class IV multidendritic neuron) is sufficient and necessary for triggering the unusual rolling behavior. In addition, we find that larvae have an innately encoded directional preference in the directionality of rolling. Surprisingly, the initial direction of rolling locomotion is towards the side of the body that has been stimulated. We propose that directional rolling might provide a selective advantage in escape from parasitoid wasps that are ubiquitously present in the natural environment of Drosophila. Consistent with this hypothesis, we have documented that larvae can escape attack of Leptopilina boulardi parasitoid wasps by rolling, occasionally flipping the attacker onto its back. Conclusions The Class IV multidendritic neurons of Drosophila larvae are nociceptive. The nociception behavior of Drosophila melanagaster larvae includes an innately encoded directional preference. Nociception behavior is elicited by the ecologically relevant sensory stimulus of parasitoid wasp attack. PMID:18060782

  20. Changes in Aβ non-nociceptive primary sensory neurons in a rat model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain is a major debilitating factor in osteoarthritis (OA), yet few mechanism-based therapies are available. To address the need to understand underlying mechanisms the aim of the present study was to determine changes in sensory neurons in an animal model of OA pain. Results The model displayed typical osteoarthritis pathology characterized by cartilage degeneration in the knee joint and also manifested knee pathophysiology (edema and increased vasculature permeability of the joint) and altered nociception of the affected limb (hind paw tenderness and knee articulation-evoked reduction in the tail flick latency). Neurons included in this report innervated regions throughout the entire hind limb. Aβ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors exhibited a slowing of the dynamics of action potential (AP) genesis, including wider AP duration and slower maximum rising rate, and muscle spindle neurons were the most affected subgroup. Only minor AP configuration changes were observed in either C- or Aδ-fiber nociceptors. Conclusion Thus, at one month after induction of the OA model Aβ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors but not C- or Aδ-fiber nociceptors had undergone changes in electrophysiological properties. If these changes reflect a change in functional role of these neurons in primary afferent sensory processing, then Aβ-fiber non-nociceptive primary sensory neurons may be involved in the pathogenesis of OA pain. Further, it is important to point out that the patterns of the changes we observed are consistent with observations in models of peripheral neuropathy but not models of peripheral inflammation. PMID:20594346

  1. Larval Defense against Attack from Parasitoid Wasps Requires Nociceptive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jessica L.; Tsubouchi, Asako; Tracey, W. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps are a fierce predator of Drosophila larvae. Female Leptopilina boulardi (LB) wasps use a sharp ovipositor to inject eggs into the bodies of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. The wasp then eats the Drosophila larva alive from the inside, and an adult wasp ecloses from the Drosophila pupal case instead of a fly. However, the Drosophila larvae are not defenseless as they may resist the attack of the wasps through somatosensory-triggered behavioral responses. Here we describe the full range of behaviors performed by the larval prey in immediate response to attacks by the wasps. Our results suggest that Drosophila larvae primarily sense the wasps using their mechanosensory systems. The range of behavioral responses included both “gentle touch” like responses as well as nociceptive responses. We found that the precise larval response depended on both the somatotopic location of the attack, and whether or not the larval cuticle was successfully penetrated during the course of the attack. Interestingly, nociceptive responses are more likely to be triggered by attacks in which the cuticle had been successfully penetrated by the wasp. Finally, we found that the class IV neurons, which are necessary for mechanical nociception, were also necessary for a nociceptive response to wasp attacks. Thus, the class IV neurons allow for a nociceptive behavioral response to a naturally occurring predator of Drosophila. PMID:24205297

  2. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception. PMID:25591866

  3. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin. PMID:24879873

  4. The Specification and Maturation of Nociceptive Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Erin M.; Engle, Sandra J.; Hallowell, Shawn E.; Liu, Ping; Wang, Zhao-Wen; Li, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Nociceptive neurons play an essential role in pain sensation by transmitting painful stimuli to the central nervous system. However, investigations of nociceptive neuron biology have been hampered by the lack of accessibility of human nociceptive neurons. Here, we describe a system for efficiently guiding human embryonic stem cells into nociceptive neurons by first inducing these cells to the neural lineage. Subsequent addition of retinoic acid and BMP4 at specific time points and concentrations yielded a high population of neural crest progenitor cells (AP2α+, P75+), which further differentiated into nociceptive neurons (TRKA+, Nav1.7+, P2X3+). The overexpression of Neurogenin 1 (Neurog1) promoted the neurons to express genes related to sensory neurons (Peripherin, TrkA) and to further mature into TRPV1+ nociceptive neurons. Importantly, the overexpression of Neurog1 increased the response of these neurons to capsaicin stimulation, a hallmark of mature functional nociceptive neurons. Taken together, this study reveals the important role that Neurog1 plays in generating functional human nociceptive neurons. PMID:26581770

  5. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zun-Yi; McDowell, Thomas; Wang, Peiqing; Alvarez, Roxanne; Gomez, Timothy; Bjorling, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100 ng/ml) for 30 minutes significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10 nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling. PMID:25088915

  6. Delayed Exercise Is Ineffective at Reversing Aberrant Nociceptive Afferent Plasticity or Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Quiros-Molina, Daniel; Javia, Amy S; Daggubati, Lekhaj; Nehlsen, Anthony D; Naqvi, Ali; Ninan, Vinu; Vannix, Kirsten N; McMullen, Mary-Katharine; Amin, Sheena; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that correlates with sensory fiber sprouting. Recent data indicate that exercise initiated early after SCI prevents the development of allodynia and modulated nociceptive afferent plasticity. This study determined if delaying exercise intervention until pain is detected would similarly ameliorate established SCI-induced pain. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats with a C5 unilateral contusion were separated into SCI allodynic and SCI non-allodynic cohorts at 14 or 28 days postinjury when half of each group began exercising on automated running wheels. Allodynia, assessed by von Frey testing, was not ameliorated by exercise. Furthermore, rats that began exercise with no allodynia developed paw hypersensitivity within 2 weeks. At the initiation of exercise, the SCI Allodynia group displayed marked overlap of peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptive afferents in the C7 and L5 dorsal horn, while the SCI No Allodynia group had scant overlap. At the end of 5 weeks of exercise both the SCI Allodynia and SCI No Allodynia groups had extensive overlap of the 2 c-fiber types. Our findings show that exercise therapy initiated at early stages of allodynia is ineffective at attenuating neuropathic pain, but rather that it induces allodynia-aberrant afferent plasticity in previously pain-free rats. These data, combined with our previous results, suggest that there is a critical therapeutic window when exercise therapy may be effective at treating SCI-induced allodynia and that there are postinjury periods when exercise can be deleterious. PMID:26671215

  7. The integrative role of orexin/hypocretin neurons in nociceptive perception and analgesic regulation.

    PubMed

    Inutsuka, Ayumu; Yamashita, Akira; Chowdhury, Srikanta; Nakai, Junichi; Ohkura, Masamichi; Taguchi, Toru; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The level of wakefulness is one of the major factors affecting nociception and pain. Stress-induced analgesia supports an animal's survival via prompt defensive responses against predators or competitors. Previous studies have shown the pharmacological effects of orexin peptides on analgesia. However, orexin neurons contain not only orexin but also other co-transmitters such as dynorphin, neurotensin and glutamate. Thus, the physiological importance of orexin neuronal activity in nociception is unknown. Here we show that adult-stage selective ablation of orexin neurons enhances pain-related behaviors, while pharmacogenetic activation of orexin neurons induces analgesia. Additionally, we found correlative activation of orexin neurons during nociception using fiber photometry recordings of orexin neurons in conscious animals. These findings suggest an integrative role for orexin neurons in nociceptive perception and pain regulation. PMID:27385517

  8. The integrative role of orexin/hypocretin neurons in nociceptive perception and analgesic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Inutsuka, Ayumu; Yamashita, Akira; Chowdhury, Srikanta; Nakai, Junichi; Ohkura, Masamichi; Taguchi, Toru; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The level of wakefulness is one of the major factors affecting nociception and pain. Stress-induced analgesia supports an animal’s survival via prompt defensive responses against predators or competitors. Previous studies have shown the pharmacological effects of orexin peptides on analgesia. However, orexin neurons contain not only orexin but also other co-transmitters such as dynorphin, neurotensin and glutamate. Thus, the physiological importance of orexin neuronal activity in nociception is unknown. Here we show that adult-stage selective ablation of orexin neurons enhances pain-related behaviors, while pharmacogenetic activation of orexin neurons induces analgesia. Additionally, we found correlative activation of orexin neurons during nociception using fiber photometry recordings of orexin neurons in conscious animals. These findings suggest an integrative role for orexin neurons in nociceptive perception and pain regulation. PMID:27385517

  9. Possible involvement of convergent nociceptive input to medullary dorsal horn neurons in intraoral hyperalgesia following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Ryuji; Tsuchiya, Hiroki; Omura, Shinji; Maruhama, Kotaro; Mizutani, Masahide; Iida, Seiji; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the number of c-Fos protein-like immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) evoked by noxious stimulation was increased after peripheral nerve injury, and such increase has been proposed to reflect the development of neuropathic pain state. The aim of this study was to examine the MDH for convergent collateral primary afferent input to second order neurons deafferented by peripheral nerve injury, and to explore a possibility of its contribution to the c-Fos hyperinducibility. Double immunofluorescence labeling for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) was performed to detect convergent synaptic input. c-Fos expression and the phosphorylation of ERK were induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin and by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), respectively. The number of c-Fos-IR neurons in the MDH induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin was increased after IAN injury, whereas the number of p-ERK immunoreactive neurons remained unchanged. The number of double-labeled neurons, that presumably received convergent primary afferent input from the lingual nerve and the IAN, was significantly increased after IAN injury. These results indicated that convergent primary nociceptive input through neighboring intact nerves may contribute to the c-Fos hyperinducibility in the MDH and the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain following trigeminal nerve injury. PMID:25407627

  10. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at -68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at -60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  11. Immature spinal cord neurons are dynamic regulators of adult nociceptive sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Rusanescu, Gabriel; Mao, Jianren

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with unknown mechanism. Nociceptive sensitivity may be regulated by genetic factors, some of which have been separately linked to neuronal progenitor cells and neuronal differentiation. This suggests that genetic factors that interfere with neuronal differentiation may contribute to a chronic increase in nociceptive sensitivity, by extending the immature, hyperexcitable stage of spinal cord neurons. Although adult rodent spinal cord neurogenesis was previously demonstrated, the fate of these progenitor cells is unknown. Here, we show that peripheral nerve injury in adult rats induces extensive spinal cord neurogenesis and a long-term increase in the number of spinal cord laminae I–II neurons ipsilateral to injury. The production and maturation of these new neurons correlates with the time course and modulation of nociceptive behaviour, and transiently mimics the cellular and behavioural conditions present in genetically modified animal models of chronic pain. This suggests that the number of immature neurons present at any time in the spinal cord dorsal horns contributes to the regulation of nociceptive sensitivity. The continuous turnover of these neurons, which can fluctuate between normal and injured states, is a dynamic regulator of nociceptive sensitivity. In support of this hypothesis, we find that promoters of neuronal differentiation inhibit, while promoters of neurogenesis increase long-term nociception. TrkB agonists, well-known promoters of nociception in the short-term, significantly inhibit long-term nociception by promoting the differentiation of newly produced immature neurons. These findings suggest that promoters of neuronal differentiation may be used to alleviate chronic pain. PMID:26223362

  12. 5-HT1B receptors inhibit glutamate release from primary afferent terminals in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Choi, I-S; Cho, J-H; An, C-H; Jung, J-K; Hur, Y-K; Choi, J-K; Jang, I-S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although 5-HT1B receptors are expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons, it is still not known whether these receptors can modulate nociceptive transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique under a voltage-clamp condition. KEY RESULTS CP93129, a selective 5-HT1B receptor agonist, reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, CP93129 reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by GR55562, a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, but not LY310762, a 5-HT1D receptor antagonist. Sumatriptan, an anti-migraine drug, also decreased EPSC amplitude, and this effect was partially blocked by either GR55562 or LY310762. On the other hand, primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were mediated by the Ca2+ influx passing through both presynaptic N-type and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by ω-conotoxin GVIA, an N-type Ca2+ channel blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results suggest that the activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors reduces glutamate release from primary afferent terminals onto medullary dorsal horn neurons, and that 5-HT1B receptors could be, at the very least, a potential target for the treatment of pain from orofacial tissues. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Connor, pp. 353–355 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.01963.x PMID:22462474

  13. [Comparison of membrane electrical properties of somatic nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons of the anterior cingulate gyrus in cats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yao, Yang; Yang, Yu; Wu, Min-Fan

    2015-04-25

    Using intracellular potential recording technique in vivo, a series of hyperpolarizing and depolarizing currents at different intensities with a 50-ms duration were injected to somatic nociceptive neurons (SNNs) and somatic non-nociceptive neurons (SNNNs) in the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) of cats. The membrane electrical responses of the neurons were recorded, and the membrane electrical parameters of the neurons were calculated for comparative study on membrane electrical properties of SNNs and SNNNs of the ACG. A total of 188 ACG neurons from 57 cats were recorded. Among the 188 neurons, 172 (91.5%) and 16 (8.5%) were SNNs and SNNNs, respectively. The I-V curves of SNNs and SNNNs in the ACG were "S" shapes. When the absolute value of injected current intensity was less than or equal to 1 nA (≤ 1 nA), the I and V of I-V curves of both SNNs and SNNNs were linearly correlated (rSNNs = 0.99, rSNNNs = 0.99). When the absolute value of injected current intensity was more than 1 nA, both SNNs and SNNNs showed a certain inward or outward rectification behavior. Compared with SNNNs, SNNs had stronger rectification and lower adaptability (P < 0.01). With the increase of injected current intensity, the changes of frequency of discharges of SNNs were higher than those of SNNNs. In addition, the membrane resistance (Rm), the membrane capacity (Cm) and the time constant (τ) of SNNs were larger than those of SNNNs (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The differences in the membrane electrical properties between SNNs and SNNNs in the ACG suggested the disparity in neuronal cell size and cell membrane structure between them. The results of this study provided the experimental basis for deeply elucidating the mechanisms of somatic nociceptive sensation and characteristics on the membrane electrical aspects of ACG neurons. PMID:25896048

  14. Functional dopamine D2 receptors on rat vagal afferent neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A J; Krstew, E; Jarrott, B

    1995-01-01

    1. In the present study in vitro electrophysiology and receptor autoradiography were used to determine whether rat vagal afferent neurones possess dopamine D2 receptors. 2. Dopamine (10-300 microM) elicited a temperature- and concentration-dependent depolarization of the rat isolated nodose ganglion preparation. When applied to the tissue 15 min prior to agonist, raclopride (10 microM), clozapine (10 microM) or a mixture of raclopride and clozapine (10 microM each) all produced a threefold parallel shift to the right of the dopamine concentration-response curve. In contrast, SCH 23390 (100 nM), phentolamine and propranolol (1 microM each) failed to antagonize the dopamine-mediated depolarization. 3. [125I]-NCQ 298 (0.5 nM), a D2 selective radioligand, bound topographically to sections of rat brainstem. Densitometric quantification of autoradiograms revealed 93.8 +/- 0.5% specific binding of this salicylamide radioligand, as determined by raclopride (10 microM, n = 10 animals). Binding was highest in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), particularly the medial and gelatinous subnuclei. In addition, specific binding was also observed in the interpolar spinal trigeminal nucleus and the inferior olive. 4. Unilateral nodose ganglionectomy caused a 36.6 +/- 3.0% reduction in specific binding in the denervated NTS compared to the contralateral NTS. Furthermore, the loss of binding was confined to the dorsal aspect of the medial subnucleus of the NTS. Sham surgery had no effect on the binding of [125I]-NCQ 298 in rat brainstem. 5. The present data provide evidence for the presence of functionally relevant dopamine D2 receptors on both the soma and central terminals of rat vagal afferent neurones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 PMID:7606337

  15. State-space decoding of primary afferent neuron firing rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. B.; Ventura, V.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Kinematic state feedback is important for neuroprostheses to generate stable and adaptive movements of an extremity. State information, represented in the firing rates of populations of primary afferent (PA) neurons, can be recorded at the level of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Previous work in cats showed the feasibility of using DRG recordings to predict the kinematic state of the hind limb using reverse regression. Although accurate decoding results were attained, reverse regression does not make efficient use of the information embedded in the firing rates of the neural population. In this paper, we present decoding results based on state-space modeling, and show that it is a more principled and more efficient method for decoding the firing rates in an ensemble of PA neurons. In particular, we show that we can extract confounded information from neurons that respond to multiple kinematic parameters, and that including velocity components in the firing rate models significantly increases the accuracy of the decoded trajectory. We show that, on average, state-space decoding is twice as efficient as reverse regression for decoding joint and endpoint kinematics.

  16. Teleantagonism: A pharmacodynamic property of the primary nociceptive neuron

    PubMed Central

    Funez, Mani I.; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Duarte, Djane B.; Sachs, Daniela; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Lorenzetti, Berenice B.; Parada, Carlos A.; Ferreira, Sérgio H.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work from our group showed that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of substances such as glutamate, NMDA, or PGE2 induced sensitization of the primary nociceptive neuron (PNN hypernociception) that was inhibited by a distal intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of either morphine or dipyrone. This pharmacodynamic phenomenon is referred to in the present work as “teleantagonism”. We previously observed that the antinociceptive effect of i.t. morphine could be blocked by injecting inhibitors of the NO signaling pathway in the paw (i.pl.), and this effect was used to explain the mechanism of opioid-induced peripheral analgesia by i.t. administration. The objective of the present investigation was to determine whether this teleantagonism phenomenon was specific to this biochemical pathway (NO) or was a general property of the PNNs. Teleantagonism was investigated by administering test substances to the two ends of the PNN (i.e., to distal and proximal terminals; i.pl. plus i.t. or i.t. plus i.pl. injections). We found teleantagonism when: (i) inhibitors of the NO signaling pathway were injected distally during the antinociception induced by opioid agonists; (ii) a nonselective COX inhibitor was tested against PNN sensitization by IL-1β; (iii) selective opioid-receptor antagonists tested against antinociception induced by corresponding selective agonists. Although the dorsal root ganglion seems to be an important site for drug interactions, the teleantagonism phenomenon suggests that, in PNNs, a local sensitization spreads to the entire cell and constitutes an intriguing and not yet completely understood pharmacodynamic property of this group of neurons. PMID:18799742

  17. Changes in Activity of the Same Thalamic Neurons to Repeated Nociception in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2015-01-01

    The sensory thalamus has been reported to play a key role in central pain sensory modulation and processing, but its response to repeated nociception at thalamic level is not well known. Current study investigated thalamic response to repeated nociception by recording and comparing the activity of the same thalamic neuron during the 1st and 2nd formalin injection induced nociception, with a week interval between injections, in awake and behaving mice. Behaviorally, the 2nd injection induced greater nociceptive responses than the 1st. Thalamic activity mirrored these behavioral changes with greater firing rate during the 2nd injection. Analysis of tonic and burst firing, characteristic firing pattern of thalamic neurons, revealed that tonic firing activity was potentiated while burst firing activity was not significantly changed by the 2nd injection relative to the 1st. Likewise, burst firing property changes, which has been consistently associated with different phases of nociception, were not induced by the 2nd injection. Overall, data suggest that repeated nociception potentiated responsiveness of thalamic neurons and confirmed that tonic firing transmits nociceptive signals. PMID:26070157

  18. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander; Liao, James C

    2015-01-15

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  19. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  20. Indomethacin inhibits tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channels at acidic pH in rat nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Michiko; Jang, Il-Sung

    2016-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are well-known inhibitors of cyclooxygenases (COXs) and are widely used for the treatment of inflammatory pain; however several NSAIDs display COX-independent analgesic action including the inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) channels expressed in primary afferent neurons. In the present study, we examined whether NSAIDs modulate tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels and if this modulation depends on the extracellular pH. The TTX-R Na(+) currents were recorded from small-sized trigeminal ganglion neurons by using a whole-cell patch clamp technique. Among eight NSAIDs tested in this study, several drugs, including aspirin and ibuprofen, did not affect TTX-R Na(+) channels either at pH 7.4 or at pH 6.0. However, we found that indomethacin, and, to a lesser extent, ibuprofen and naproxen potently inhibited the peak amplitude of TTX-R Na(+) currents at pH 6.0. The indomethacin-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) channels was more potent at depolarized membrane potentials. Indomethacin significantly shifted both the voltage-activation and voltage-inactivation relationships to depolarizing potentials at pH 6.0. Indomethacin accelerated the development of inactivation and retarded the recovery from inactivation of TTX-R Na(+) channels at pH 6.0. Given that indomethacin and several other NSAIDs could further suppress local nociceptive signals by inhibiting TTX-R Na(+) channels at an acidic pH in addition to the classical COX inhibition, these drugs could be particularly useful for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:26898291

  1. Genetic and pharmacological evidence for low-abundance TRPV3 expression in primary vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaw-Wen; Lindberg, Jonathan E M; Peters, James H

    2016-05-01

    Primary vagal afferent neurons express a multitude of thermosensitive ion channels. Within this family of ion channels, the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) greatly influences vagal afferent signaling by determining the threshold for action-potential initiation at the peripheral endings, while controlling temperature-sensitive forms of glutamate release at central vagal terminals. Genetic deletion of TRPV1 does not completely eliminate these temperature-dependent effects, suggesting involvement of additional thermosensitive ion channels. The warm-sensitive, calcium-permeable, ion channel TRPV3 is commonly expressed with TRPV1; however, the extent to which TRPV3 is found in vagal afferent neurons is unknown. Here, we begin to characterize the genetic and functional expression of TRPV3 in vagal afferent neurons using molecular biology (RT-PCR and RT-quantitative PCR) in whole nodose and isolated neurons and fluorescent calcium imaging on primary cultures of nodose ganglia neurons. We confirmed low-level TRPV3 expression in vagal afferent neurons and observed direct activation with putative TRPV3 agonists eugenol, ethyl vanillin (EVA), and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Agonist activation stimulated neurons also containing TRPV1 and was blocked by ruthenium red. FPP sensitivity overlapped with EVA and eugenol but represented the smallest percentage of vagal afferent neurons, and it was the only agonist that did not stimulate neurons from TRPV3(-/-1) mice, suggesting FPP has the highest selectivity. Further, FPP was predictive of enhanced responses to capsaicin, EVA, and eugenol in rats. From our results, we conclude TRPV3 is expressed in a discrete subpopulation of vagal afferent neurons and may contribute to vagal afferent signaling either directly or in combination with TRPV1. PMID:26843581

  2. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Li, Xingde; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE. PMID:25591867

  3. Similar nociceptive afferents mediate psychophysical and electrophysiological responses to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Iannetti, G D; Zambreanu, L; Tracey, I

    2006-01-01

    The ability to perceive and withdraw rapidly from noxious environmental stimuli is crucial for survival. When heat stimuli are applied to primate hairy skin, first pain sensation is mediated by type-II A-fibre nociceptors (II-AMHs). In contrast, the reported absence of first pain and II-AMH microneurographical responses when heat stimuli are applied to the hand palm has led to the notion that II-AMHs are lacking in this primate glabrous skin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of hairy and glabrous skin stimulation on neural transmission of nociceptive inputs elicited by different kinds of thermal heating. We recorded psychophysical and EEG brain responses to radiant (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs) and contact heat stimuli (contact heat-evoked potentials, CHEPs) delivered to the dorsum and the palm of the hand in normal volunteers. Brain responses were analysed at a single-trial level, using an automated approach based on multiple linear regression. Laser stimulation of hairy and glabrous skin at the same energy elicited remarkably similar psychophysical ratings and LEPs. This finding provides strong evidence that first pain to heat does exist in glabrous skin, and suggests that similar nociceptive afferents, with the physiological properties of II-AMHs, mediate first pain to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans. In contrast, when contact heat stimuli were employed, a significantly higher nominal temperature had to be applied to glabrous skin in order to achieve psychophysical ratings similar to those obtained following hairy skin stimulation, and CHEPs following glabrous skin stimulation had significantly longer latencies (N2 wave, +25%; P2 wave, +24%) and smaller amplitudes (N2 wave, −40%; P2 wave, −44%) than CHEPs following hairy skin stimulation. Irrespective of the stimulated territory, CHEPs always had significantly longer latencies (hairy skin N2 wave, +75%; P2 wave, +56%) and smaller amplitudes (hairy skin N2 wave, −42%; P

  4. Ethyl pyruvate attenuates formalin-induced inflammatory nociception by inhibiting neuronal ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethyl pyruvate (EP) possesses anti-inflammatory activity. However, the potential anti-nociceptive value of EP for the treatment of the inflammatory nociception is largely unknown. We investigated whether EP could have any anti-nociceptive effect on inflammatory pain, after systemic administration of EP (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p.), 1 hour before formalin (5%, 50 μl) injection into the plantar surface of the hind paws of rats. Results EP significantly decreased formalin-induced nociceptive behavior during phase II, the magnitude of paw edema, and the activation of c-Fos in L4-L5 spinal dorsal horn. EP also attenuated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the neurons of L4-L5 spinal dorsal horn after formalin injection. Interestingly, the i.t. administration of PD98059, an ERK upstream kinase (MEK) inhibitor, completely blocked the formalin-induced inflammatory nociceptive responses. Conclusions These results demonstrate that EP may effectively inhibit formalin-induced inflammatory nociception via the inhibition of neuronal ERK phosphorylation in the spinal dorsal horn, indicating its therapeutic potential in suppressing acute inflammatory pain. PMID:22640699

  5. Unmyelinated type II afferent neurons report cochlear damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian cochlea, acoustic information is carried to the brain by the predominant (95%) large-diameter, myelinated type I afferents, each of which is postsynaptic to a single inner hair cell. The remaining thin, unmyelinated type II afferents extend hundreds of microns along the cochlear duct to contact many outer hair cells. Despite this extensive arbor, type II afferents are weakly activated by outer hair cell transmitter release and are insensitive to sound. Intriguingly, type II afferents remain intact in damaged regions of the cochlea. Here, we show that type II afferents are activated when outer hair cells are damaged. This response depends on both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors, binding ATP released from nearby supporting cells in response to hair cell damage. Selective activation of P2Y receptors increased type II afferent excitability by the closure of KCNQ-type potassium channels, a potential mechanism for the painful hypersensitivity (that we term “noxacusis” to distinguish from hyperacusis without pain) that can accompany hearing loss. Exposure to the KCNQ channel activator retigabine suppressed the type II fiber’s response to hair cell damage. Type II afferents may be the cochlea’s nociceptors, prompting avoidance of further damage to the irreparable inner ear. PMID:26553995

  6. Nociceptive responses and spinal plastic changes of afferent C-fibers in three neuropathic pain models induced by sciatic nerve injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Casals-Díaz, Laura; Vivó, Meritxell; Navarro, Xavier

    2009-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries induce plastic changes on primary afferent fibers and on the spinal circuitry, which are related to the emergence of neuropathic pain. In this study we compared three models of sciatic nerve injury in the rat with different degrees of damage and impact on regeneration capability: crush nerve injury, chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury (SNI). All three models were characterized by means of nerve histology, in order to describe the degenerative and regenerative process of injured axons. Nociceptive responses were evaluated by mechanical and thermal algesimetry tests. Crush animals displayed higher withdrawal thresholds on the ipsilateral paw compared to the contralateral during the time of denervation, while CCI and SNI animals showed mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Central plasticity was evaluated by immunohistochemical labeling of non-peptidergic (IB4-positive) and peptidergic (substance P-positive) nociceptive C-fibers on L4-L6 spinal cord sections. After crush nerve injury and SNI, we observed progressive and sustained reduction of IB4 and SP immunolabeling at the sciatic projection territory in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn, which affected only the tibial and peroneal nerves projection areas in the case of SNI. After CCI, changes on SP-immunoreactivity were not observed, and IB4-immunoreactive area decreased initially but recovered to normal levels on the second week post-injury. Thus, nociceptive responses depend on the type of injury, and the immunoreactivity pattern of afferent fibers at the spinal cord display changes less pronounced after partial than complete sciatic nerve injury. Although signs of neuropathic pain appear in all three lesion models, nociceptive responses and central plasticity patterns differ between them. PMID:19416675

  7. Inhibition of M current in sensory neurons by exogenous proteases: a signaling pathway mediating inflammatory nociception.

    PubMed

    Linley, John E; Rose, Kirstin; Patil, Mayur; Robertson, Brian; Akopian, Armen N; Gamper, Nikita

    2008-10-29

    Inflammatory pain is thought to be mediated in part through the action of inflammatory mediators on membrane receptors of peripheral nerve terminals, however, the downstream signaling events which lead to pain are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the nociceptive pathways induced by activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in damage-sensing (nociceptive) neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We found that activation of PAR-2 in these cells strongly inhibited M-type potassium currents (conducted by Kv7 potassium channels). Such inhibition caused depolarization of the neuronal resting membrane potential leading, ultimately, to nociception. Consistent with this mechanism, injection of the specific M channel blocker XE991 into rat paw induced nociception in a concentration-dependent manner. Injection of a PAR-2 agonist peptide also induced nociception but coinjection of XE991 and the PAR-2 agonist did not result in summation of nociception, suggesting that the action of both agents may share a similar mechanism. We also studied the signaling pathway of M current inhibition by PAR-2 using patch-clamp and fluorescence imaging of DRG neurons. These experiments revealed that the PAR-2 effect was mediated by phospholipase C (PLC). Further experiments demonstrated that M current inhibition required concurrent rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and depletion of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). We propose that PLC- and Ca(2+)/PIP(2)-mediated inhibition of M current in sensory neurons may represent one of the general mechanisms underlying pain produced by inflammatory mediators, and may therefore open up a new therapeutic window for treatment of this major clinical problem. PMID:18971466

  8. Differences in electrophysiological properties of functionally identified nociceptive sensory neurons in an animal model of cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong Fang; Ungard, Robert; Seidlitz, Eric; Zacal, Natalie; Huizinga, Jan; Henry, James L

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone cancer pain is often severe, yet little is known about mechanisms generating this type of chronic pain. While previous studies have identified functional alterations in peripheral sensory neurons that correlate with bone tumours, none has provided direct evidence correlating behavioural nociceptive responses with properties of sensory neurons in an intact bone cancer model. Results In a rat model of prostate cancer-induced bone pain, we confirmed tactile hypersensitivity using the von Frey test. Subsequently, we recorded intracellularly from dorsal root ganglion neurons in vivo in anesthetized animals. Neurons remained connected to their peripheral receptive terminals and were classified on the basis of action potential properties, responses to dorsal root stimulation, and to mechanical stimulation of the respective peripheral receptive fields. Neurons included C-, Aδ-, and Aβ-fibre nociceptors, identified by their expression of substance P. We suggest that bone tumour may induce phenotypic changes in peripheral nociceptors and that these could contribute to bone cancer pain. Conclusions This work represents a significant technical and conceptual advance in the study of peripheral nociceptor functions in the development of cancer-induced bone pain. This is the first study to report that changes in sensitivity and excitability of dorsal root ganglion primary afferents directly correspond to mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia behaviours following prostate cancer cell injection into the femur of rats. Furthermore, our unique combination of techniques has allowed us to follow, in a single neuron, mechanical pain-related behaviours, electrophysiological changes in action potential properties, and dorsal root substance P expression. These data provide a more complete understanding of this unique pain state at the cellular level that may allow for future development of mechanism-based treatments for cancer-induced bone pain. PMID:27030711

  9. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  10. The afferent signaling complex: Regulation of type I spiral ganglion neuron responses in the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Reijntjes, Daniël O J; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-06-01

    The spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the first action potential generating neurons in the auditory pathway. The type I SGNs contact the sensory inner hair cells via their peripheral dendrites and relay auditory information to the brainstem via their central axon fibers. Individual afferent fibers show differences in response properties that are essential for normal hearing. The mechanisms that give rise to the heterogeneity of afferent responses are very poorly understood but are likely already in place at the peripheral dendrites where synapses are formed and action potentials are generated. To identify these molecular mechanisms, this review synthesizes a variety of literature and comprehensively outlines the cellular and molecular components positioned to regulate SGN afferent dendrite excitability, especially following glutamate release. These components include 1) proteins of the SGN postsynapses and neighboring supporting cells that together shape glutamatergic signaling, 2) the ion channels and transporters that determine the intrinsic excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites, and 3) the neurotransmitter receptors that extrinsically modify this excitability via synaptic input from the lateral olivocochlear efferents. This cellular and molecular machinery, together with presynaptic specializations of the inner hair cells, can be collectively referred to as the type I afferent signaling complex. As this review underscores, interactions of this signaling complex determine excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites and the afferent fiber responses. Moreover, this complex establishes the environmental milieu critical for the development and maintenance of the SGN afferent dendrites and synapses. Motivated by these important functions, this review also indicates areas of future research to elucidate the contributions of the afferent signaling complex to both normal hearing and also hearing loss. PMID:27018296

  11. Systemic administration of resveratrol suppress the nociceptive neuronal activity of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    PubMed

    Takehana, Shiori; Sekiguchi, Kenta; Inoue, Maki; Kubota, Yoshiko; Ito, Yukihiko; Yui, Kei; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Takeda, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Although a modulatory role has been reported for the red wine polyphenol resveratrol on several types of ion channels and excitatory synaptic transmission in the nervous system, the acute effects of resveratrol in vivo, particularly on nociceptive transmission of the trigeminal system, remain to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acute intravenous resveratrol administration to rats attenuates the excitability of wide dynamic range (WDR) spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neurons in response to nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation in vivo. Extracellular single unit recordings were made from 18 SpVc neurons in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Responses to both non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli were analyzed in the present study. The mean firing frequency of SpVc WDR neurons in response to both non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli was inhibited by resveratrol (0.5-2 mg/kg, i.v.) and maximum inhibition of the discharge frequency of both non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli was seen within 10 min. These inhibitory effects were reversed after approximately 20 min. The relative magnitude of inhibition by resveratrol of SpVc WDR neuronal discharge frequency was significantly greater for noxious than non-noxious stimulation. These results suggest that, in the absence of inflammatory or neuropathic pain, acute intravenous resveratrol administration suppresses trigeminal sensory transmission, including nociception, and so resveratrol may be used as a complementary and alternative medicine therapeutic agent for the treatment of trigeminal nociceptive pain, including hyperalgesia. PMID:26608254

  12. Opioids inhibit visceral afferent activation of catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cui, R J; Roberts, B L; Zhao, H; Andresen, M C; Appleyard, S M

    2012-10-11

    Brainstem A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) influence many homeostatic functions, including food intake, stress, respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. They also play a role in both opioid reward and withdrawal. Injections of opioids into the NTS modulate many autonomic functions influenced by catecholamine neurons including food intake and cardiac function. We recently showed that NTS-CA neurons are directly activated by incoming visceral afferent inputs. Here we determined whether opioid agonists modulate afferent activation of NTS-CA neurons using transgenic mice with EGFP expressed under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. The opioid agonist Met-enkephalin (Met-Enk) significantly attenuated solitary tract-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs) in NTS TH-EGFP neurons by 80%, an effect reversed by wash or the mu opioid receptor-specific antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP). Met-Enk had a significantly greater effect to inhibit afferent inputs onto TH-EGFP-positive neurons than EGFP-negative neurons, which were only inhibited by 50%. The mu agonist, DAMGO, also inhibited the ST-EPSC in TH-EGFP neurons in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, neither the delta agonist DPDPE, nor the kappa agonist, U69,593, consistently inhibited the ST-EPSC amplitude. Met-Enk and DAMGO increased the paired pulse ratio, decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of mini-EPSCs and had no effect on holding current, input resistance or current-voltage relationships in TH-EGFP neurons, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action on afferent terminals. Met-Enk significantly reduced both the basal firing rate of NTS TH-EGFP neurons and the ability of afferent stimulation to evoke an action potential. These results suggest that opioids inhibit NTS-CA neurons by reducing an excitatory afferent drive onto these neurons through presynaptic inhibition of

  13. Capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons contribute to the detection of pathogenic bacterial colonization in the gut.

    PubMed

    Riley, T P; Neal-McKinney, J M; Buelow, D R; Konkel, M E; Simasko, S M

    2013-04-15

    Vagal activation can reduce inflammation and disease activity in various animal models of intestinal inflammation via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. In the current model of this pathway, activation of descending vagal efferents is dependent on a signal initiated by stimulation of vagal afferents. However, little is known about how vagal afferents are activated, especially in the context of subclinical or clinical pathogenic bacterial infection. To address this question, we first determined if selective lesions of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents altered c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) after mice were inoculated with either Campylobacter jejuni or Salmonella typhimurium. Our results demonstrate that the activation of nTS neurons by intraluminal pathogenic bacteria is dependent on intact, capsaicin sensitive vagal afferents. We next determined if inflammatory mediators could cause the observed increase in c-Fos expression in the nTS by a direct action on vagal afferents. This was tested by the use of single-cell calcium measurements in cultured vagal afferent neurons. We found that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly activate cultured vagal afferent neurons and that almost all TNFα and LPS responsive neurons were sensitive to capsaicin. We conclude that activation of the afferent arm of the parasympathetic neuroimmune reflex by pathogenic bacteria in the gut is dependent on capsaicin sensitive vagal afferent neurons and that the release of inflammatory mediators into intestinal tissue can be directly sensed by these neurons. PMID:23481698

  14. Capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons contribute to the detection of pathogenic bacterial colonization in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Riley, T.P.; Neal-McKinney, J.M.; Buelow, D.R.; Konkel, M.E.; Simasko, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Vagal activation can reduce inflammation and disease activity in various animal models of intestinal inflammation via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. In the current model of this pathway, activation of descending vagal efferents is dependent on a signal initiated by stimulation of vagal afferents. However, little is known about how vagal afferents are activated, especially in the context of subclinical or clinical pathogenic bacterial infection. To address this question, we first determined if selective lesions of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents altered c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) after mice were inoculated with either Campylobacter jejuni or Salmonella typhimurium. Our results demonstrate that the activation of nTS neurons by intraluminal pathogenic bacteria is dependent on intact, capsaicin sensitive vagal afferents. We next determined if inflammatory mediators could cause the observed increase in c-Fos expression in the nTS by a direct action on vagal afferents. This was tested by the use of single-cell calcium measurements in cultured vagal afferent neurons. We found that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly activate cultured vagal afferent neurons and that almost all TNFα and LPS responsive neurons were sensitive to capsaicin. We conclude that activation of the afferent arm of the parasympathetic neuroimmune reflex by pathogenic bacteria in the gut is dependent on capsaicin sensitive vagal afferent neurons and that the release of inflammatory mediators into intestinal tissue can be directly sensed by these neurons. PMID:23481698

  15. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording to study the acid responsiveness and action potential (AP) configuration of capsaicin-sensitive neurons innervating to gastrocnemius muscle. Here we showed that IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons are heterogeneous in terms of cell size, resting membrane potential, AP configuration, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistance, and acid-induced current (Iacid), as well as capsaicin-induced current (Icap). TRPV1-expressing neurons were all acid-sensitive and could be divided into two acid-sensitive groups depending on an acid-induced sustained current (type I) or an acid-induced biphasic ASIC3-like current (type II). Type I TRPV1-expressing neurons were distinguishable from type II TRPV1-expressing neurons in AP overshoot, after-hyperpolarization duration, and all Iacid parameters, but not in AP threshold, TTX-resistance, resting membrane potential, and Icap parameters. These differential biophysical properties of TRPV1-expressing neurons might partially annotate their different roles involved in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. PMID:27493509

  16. 5,6-EET Is Released upon Neuronal Activity and Induces Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity via TRPA1 on Central Afferent Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Park, Chul-Kyu; Angioni, Carlo; Zhang, Dong Dong; von Hehn, Christian; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kumaran, Vigneswara; Lu, Ruirui; Grant, Andrew; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidtko, Achim; Reeh, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus; Brenneis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450-epoxygenase-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid that act as endogenous signaling molecules in multiple biological systems. Here we have investigated the specific contribution of 5,6-EET to transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation in nociceptor neurons and its consequence for nociceptive processing. We found that, during capsaicin-induced nociception, 5,6-EET levels increased in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the dorsal spinal cord, and 5,6-EET is released from activated sensory neurons in vitro. 5,6-EET potently induced a calcium flux (100 nm) in cultured DRG neurons that was completely abolished when TRPA1 was deleted or inhibited. In spinal cord slices, 5,6-EET dose dependently enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons that also responded to mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate), indicating a presynaptic action. Furthermore, 5,6-EET-induced enhancement of sEPSC frequency was abolished in TRPA1-null mice, suggesting that 5,6-EET presynaptically facilitated spinal cord synaptic transmission by TRPA1. Finally, in vivo intrathecal injection of 5,6-EET caused mechanical allodynia in wild-type but not TRPA1-null mice. We conclude that 5,6-EET is synthesized on the acute activation of nociceptors and can produce mechanical hypersensitivity via TRPA1 at central afferent terminals in the spinal cord. PMID:22553041

  17. Optoactivation of Locus Ceruleus Neurons Evokes Bidirectional Changes in Thermal Nociception in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Louise; Li, Yong; Fyson, Sarah J.; Watson, Thomas C.; Perrins, Ray; Hewinson, James; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Furue, Hidemasa; Lumb, Bridget M.

    2014-01-01

    Pontospinal noradrenergic neurons are thought to form part of a descending endogenous analgesic system that exerts inhibitory influences on spinal nociception. Using optogenetic targeting, we tested the hypothesis that excitation of the locus ceruleus (LC) is antinociceptive. We transduced rat LC neurons by direct injection of a lentiviral vector expressing channelrhodopsin2 under the control of the PRS promoter. Subsequent optoactivation of the LC evoked repeatable, robust, antinociceptive (+4.7°C ± 1.0, p < 0.0001) or pronociceptive (−4.4°C ± 0.7, p < 0.0001) changes in hindpaw thermal withdrawal thresholds. Post hoc anatomical characterization of the distribution of transduced somata referenced against the position of the optical fiber and subsequent further functional analysis showed that antinociceptive actions were evoked from a distinct, ventral subpopulation of LC neurons. Therefore, the LC is capable of exerting potent, discrete, bidirectional influences on thermal nociception that are produced by specific subpopulations of noradrenergic neurons. This reflects an underlying functional heterogeneity of the influence of the LC on the processing of nociceptive information. PMID:24647936

  18. Monosynaptic convergence of somatic and visceral C-fiber afferents on projection and local circuit neurons in lamina I: a substrate for referred pain

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Liliana L.; Fernandes, Elisabete C.; Sivado, Miklos; Kokai, Eva; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Referred pain is a phenomenon of feeling pain at a site other than the site of the painful stimulus origin. It arises from a pathological mixing of nociceptive processing pathways for visceral and somatic inputs. Despite numerous studies based on unit recordings from spinal and supraspinal neurons, the exact mechanism and site of this mixing within the central nervous system are not known. Here, we selectively recorded from lamina I neurons, using a visually guided patch-clamp technique, in thoracic spinal cord preparation with preserved intercostal (somatic) and splanchnic (visceral) nerves. We show that somatic and visceral C fibers converge monosynaptically onto a group of lamina I neurons, which includes both projection and local circuit neurons. Other groups of lamina I neurons received inputs from either somatic or visceral afferents. We have also identified a population of lamina I local circuit neurons showing overall inhibitory responses upon stimulation of both nerves. Thus, the present data allow us to draw two major conclusions. First, lamina I of the spinal cord is the first site in the central nervous system where somatic and visceral pathways directly converge onto individual projection and local circuit neurons. Second, the mechanism of somatovisceral convergence is complex and based on functional integration of monosynaptic and polysynaptic excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs in specific groups of neurons. This complex pattern of convergence provides a substrate for alterations in the balance between visceral and somatic inputs causing referred pain. PMID:26098437

  19. Regulation of Piezo2 Mechanotransduction by Static Plasma Membrane Tension in Primary Afferent Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanfeng; Ikeda, Ryo; Ling, Jennifer; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Gu, Jianguo G

    2016-04-22

    The Piezo2 channel is a newly identified mammalian mechanical transducer that confers rapidly adapting mechanically activated (RA-MA) currents in primary afferent neurons. The Piezo2 channels sense rapid membrane displacement, but it is not clear whether they are sensitive to osmotic swelling, which slowly increases static plasma membrane tension (SPMT). Here, we show that SPMT exerts a profound impact on the mechanical sensitivity of RA-MA channels in primary afferent neurons. RA-MA currents are greatly enhanced, and the mechanical threshold was reduced in both primary afferent neurons of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2 when these cells undergo osmotic swelling to increase SPMT. Osmotic swelling switches the kinetics of RA-MA currents to the slowly adapting type in both cultured DRG neurons and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2. The potentiation of RA-MA currents is abolished when cultured DRG neurons are treated with cytochalasin D, an actin filament disruptor that prevents SPMT of cultured DRG neurons from an increase by osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling significantly increases DRG neuron mechano-excitability such that a subthreshold mechanical stimulus can result in action potential firing. Behaviorally, the mechanical hind paw withdrawal threshold in rats is reduced following the injection of a hypotonic solution, but this osmotic effect is abolished when cytochalasin D or Gd(3+) is co-administered with the hypo-osmotic solution. Taken together, our findings suggest that Piezo2-mediated mechanotransduction is regulated by SPMT in primary afferent neurons. Because SPMT can be changed by multiple biological factors, our findings may have broad implications in mechanical sensitivity under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26929410

  20. Phrenic nerve afferent activation of neurons in the cat SI cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Paul W; Reep, Roger L; Thompson, Floyd J

    2010-03-01

    Stimulation of respiratory afferents elicits neural activity in the somatosensory region of the cerebral cortex in humans and animals. Respiratory afferents have been stimulated with mechanical loads applied to breathing and electrical stimulation of respiratory nerves and muscles. It was hypothesized that stimulation of the phrenic nerve myelinated afferents will activate neurons in the 3a and 3b region of the somatosensory cortex. This was investigated in cats with electrical stimulation of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve and C(5) root of the phrenic nerve. The somatosensory cortical response to phrenic afferent stimulation was recorded from the cortical surface, contralateral to the phrenic nerve, ispilateral to the phrenic nerve and with microelectrodes inserted into the cortical site of the surface dipole. Short-latency, primary cortical evoked potentials (1 degrees CEP) were recorded with stimulation of myelinated afferents of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve in the contralateral post-cruciate gyrus of all animals (n = 42). The mean onset and peak latencies were 8.5 +/- 5.7 ms and 21.8 +/- 9.8 ms, respectively. The rostro-caudal surface location of the 1 degrees CEP was found between the rostral edge of the post-cruciate dimple (PCD) and the rostral edge of the ansate sulcus, medio-lateral location was between 2 mm lateral to the sagittal sulcus and the lateral end of the cruciate sulcus. Histological examination revealed that the 1 degrees CEP sites were recorded over areas 3a and 3b of the SI somatosensory cortex. Intracortical activation of 16 neurons with two patterns of neural activity was recorded: (1) short-latency, short-duration activation of neurons and (2) long-latency, long-duration activation of neurons. Short-latency neurons had a mean onset latency of 10.4 +/- 3.1 ms and mean burst duration of 10.1 +/- 3.2 ms. The short-latency units were recorded at an average depth of 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm below the cortical surface. The long-latency neurons had a

  1. Spatiotemporal processing of linear acceleration: primary afferent and central vestibular neuron responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Spatiotemporal convergence and two-dimensional (2-D) neural tuning have been proposed as a major neural mechanism in the signal processing of linear acceleration. To examine this hypothesis, we studied the firing properties of primary otolith afferents and central otolith neurons that respond exclusively to horizontal linear accelerations of the head (0.16-10 Hz) in alert rhesus monkeys. Unlike primary afferents, the majority of central otolith neurons exhibited 2-D spatial tuning to linear acceleration. As a result, central otolith dynamics vary as a function of movement direction. During movement along the maximum sensitivity direction, the dynamics of all central otolith neurons differed significantly from those observed for the primary afferent population. Specifically at low frequencies (neurons peaked in phase with linear velocity, in contrast to primary afferents that peaked in phase with linear acceleration. At least three different groups of central response dynamics were described according to the properties observed for motion along the maximum sensitivity direction. "High-pass" neurons exhibited increasing gains and phase values as a function of frequency. "Flat" neurons were characterized by relatively flat gains and constant phase lags (approximately 20-55 degrees ). A few neurons ("low-pass") were characterized by decreasing gain and phase as a function of frequency. The response dynamics of central otolith neurons suggest that the approximately 90 degrees phase lags observed at low frequencies are not the result of a neural integration but rather the effect of nonminimum phase behavior, which could arise at least partly through spatiotemporal convergence. Neither afferent nor central otolith neurons discriminated between gravitational and inertial components of linear acceleration. Thus response sensitivity was indistinguishable during 0.5-Hz pitch oscillations and fore-aft movements

  2. Breadth of tuning in taste afferent neurons varies with stimulus strength.

    PubMed

    Wu, An; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory stimuli are detected by taste buds and transmitted to the hindbrain via sensory afferent neurons. Whether each taste quality (sweet, bitter and so on) is encoded by separate neurons ('labelled lines') remains controversial. We used mice expressing GCaMP3 in geniculate ganglion sensory neurons to investigate taste-evoked activity. Using confocal calcium imaging, we recorded responses to oral stimulation with prototypic taste stimuli. Up to 69% of neurons respond to multiple tastants. Moreover, neurons tuned to a single taste quality at low concentration become more broadly tuned when stimuli are presented at higher concentration. Responses to sucrose and monosodium glutamate are most related. Although mice prefer dilute NaCl solutions and avoid concentrated NaCl, we found no evidence for two separate populations of sensory neurons that encode this distinction. Altogether, our data suggest that taste is encoded by activity in patterns of peripheral sensory neurons and challenge the notion of strict labelled line coding. PMID:26373451

  3. Distribution of nociceptive neurons in the ventrobasal complex of macaque thalamus.

    PubMed

    Koyama, N; Nishikawa, Y; Yokota, T

    1998-05-01

    In urethane-chloralose anesthetized Japanese macaques, the distribution of nociceptive neurons within the thalamic ventrobasal (VB) complex was studied. Nociceptive specific (NS) and wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons were found in the periphery of the contralateral integument compartment of the VB complex. Thus, they formed a shell at the perimeter of this compartment with a somatotopic organization. The compartment consisted of large parts of nucleus ventralis posteromedialis (VPM) and nucleus ventralis posterolateralis, pars caudalis (VPLc). NS neurons were located more caudally than WDR neurons. In the NS zone of VPM, the forehead was represented caudally, and oral structures rostrally. In the ventral NS zone of VPM, there was a sequential representation of the tongue, gum and mandibular skin from the medial to the lateral edge. The hand was represented medially in the NS zone of VPLc, and its representation dominated in the rostral NS zone. There was a sequential representation of the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral and caudal segments mediolaterally along the dorsal VPLc. In the medial half of ventral NS zone of VPLc, the upper body half was represented, and in the lateral half, the lower body half. The foot was represented at or near the medial edge of lateral half. In the rostral WDR zone, the trunk and peripheral face were represented. PMID:9704977

  4. An in vitro assay system for studying synapse formation between nociceptive dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Donald J.; Choudhury, Papiya; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Synapses between nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and spinal cord dorsal horn neurons represent the first loci for transmission of painful stimuli. Our knowledge of the molecular organization and development of these synapses is sparse due, partly, to a lack of a reliable model system that reconstitutes synaptogenesis between these two neuronal populations. To address this issue, we have established an in vitro assay system consisting of separately purified DRG neurons and dorsal horn neurons on astrocyte micro-islands. Using immunocytochemistry, we have found that 97%, 93%, 98%, 96%, and 94% of DRG neurons on these microislands express markers often associated with nociceptive neurons including Substance P, TRPV1, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), TrKA, and peripherin, respectively. Triple labeling with these nociceptive-like markers, synaptic vesicle marker Vglut2 and using MAP2 as a dendritic marker revealed the presence of nociceptive-like markers at synaptic terminals. Using this immunocytochemical approach, we counted contact points as overlapping MAP2/Vglut2 puncta and showed that they increased with time in culture. Single and dual patch clamp recordings showed that overlapping Vglut2/MAP2 puncta observed after a few days in culture are likely to be functional synapses between DRG and dorsal horn neurons in our in vitro assay system. Taken together, these data suggest our co-culture microisland model system consists of mostly nociceptive-like DRG neurons that express presynaptic markers and form functional synapses with their dorsal horn partners. Thus, this model system may have direct application for studies on factors regulating development of nociceptive DRG/dorsal horn synapses. PMID:20385165

  5. Nociceptive sensory neurons drive interleukin-23-mediated psoriasiform skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Paust, Silke; Wood, John N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2014-06-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbours specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17-producing γδ T (γδT17) cells, the aberrant activation of which by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibres. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear. We exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod, which induces IL-23-dependent psoriasis-like inflammation. Here we show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and Nav1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in imiquimod-exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23-dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were markedly reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response. These findings indicate that TRPV1(+)Nav1.8(+) nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  6. Nociceptive Sensory Neurons Drive Interleukin-23 Mediated Psoriasiform Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Wood, John N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbors specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17 producing γδ T cells (γδT17), whose aberrant activation by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation1–4. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibers. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear5,6. Here, we have exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod (IMQ), which induces IL-23 dependent psoriasis-like inflammation7,8. We show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and NaV1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors9–11, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in IMQ exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23 dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were dramatically reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response12. These findings indicate that TRPV1+NaV1.8+ nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  7. TRPV1 expression level in isolectin B₄-positive neurons contributes to mouse strain difference in cutaneous thermal nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kentaro; Ye, Yi; Viet, Chi T; Dang, Dongmin; Schmidt, Brian L

    2015-05-01

    Differential thermal nociception across inbred mouse strains has genetic determinants. Thermal nociception is largely attributed to the heat/capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1); however, the contribution of this channel to the genetics of thermal nociception has not been revealed. In this study we compared TRPV1 expression levels and electrophysiological properties in primary sensory neurons and thermal nociceptive behaviors between two (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) inbred mouse strains. Using immunofluorescence and patch-clamp physiology methods, we demonstrated that TRPV1 expression was significantly higher in isolectin B4 (IB4)-positive trigeminal sensory neurons of C57BL/6 relative to BALB/c; the expression in IB4-negative neurons was similar between the strains. Furthermore, using electrophysiological cell classification (current signature method), we showed differences between the two strains in capsaicin sensitivity in IB4-positive neuronal cell types 2 and 13, which were previously reported as skin nociceptors. Otherwise electrophysiological membrane properties of the classified cell types were similar in the two mouse strains. In publicly available nocifensive behavior data and our own behavior data from the using the two mouse strains, C57BL/6 exhibited higher sensitivity to heat stimulation than BALB/c, independent of sex and anatomical location of thermal testing (the tail, hind paw, and whisker pad). The TRPV1-selective antagonist JNJ-17203212 inhibited thermal nociception in both strains; however, removing IB4-positive trigeminal sensory neurons with IB4-conjugated saporin inhibited thermal nociception on the whisker pad in C57BL/6 but not in BALB/c. These results suggest that TRPV1 expression levels in IB4-positive type 2 and 13 neurons contributed to differential thermal nociception in skin of C57BL/6 compared with BALB/c. PMID:25787958

  8. Response characteristics of pruriceptive and nociceptive trigeminoparabrachial tract neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Nico A; Giesler, Glenn J

    2015-01-01

    We tested the possibility that the trigeminoparabrachial tract (VcPbT), a projection thought to be importantly involved in nociception, might also contribute to sensation of itch. In anesthetized rats, 47 antidromically identified VcPbT neurons with receptive fields involving the cheek were characterized for their responses to graded mechanical and thermal stimuli and intradermal injections of pruritogens (serotonin, chloroquine, and β-alanine), partial pruritogens (histamine and capsaicin), and an algogen (mustard oil). All pruriceptive VcPbT neurons were responsive to mechanical stimuli, and more than half were additionally responsive to thermal stimuli. The majority of VcPbT neurons were activated by injections of serotonin, histamine, capsaicin, and/or mustard oil. A subset of neurons were inhibited by injection of chloroquine. The large majority of VcPbT neurons projected to the ipsilateral and/or contralateral external lateral parabrachial and Kölliker-Fuse nuclei, as evidenced by antidromic mapping techniques. Analyses of mean responses and spike-timing dynamics of VcPbT neurons suggested clear differences in firing rates between responses to noxious and pruritic stimuli. Comparisons between the present data and those previously obtained from trigeminothalamic tract (VcTT) neurons demonstrated several differences in responses to some pruritogens. For example, responses of VcPbT neurons to injection of serotonin often endured for nearly an hour and showed a delayed peak in discharge rate. In contrast, responses of VcTT neurons endured for roughly 20 min and no delayed peak of firing was noted. Thus the longer duration responses to 5-HT and the delay in peak firing of VcPbT neurons better matched behavioral responses to stimulation in awake rats than did those of VcTT neurons. The results indicate that VcPbT neurons may have important roles in the signaling of itch as well as pain. PMID:25298386

  9. Turn Down That Noise: Synaptic Encoding of Afferent SNR in a Single Spiking Neuron.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Saeed; George, Libin; Thakur, Chetan Singh; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André; de Chazal, Philip; Hamilton, Tara Julia

    2015-04-01

    We have added a simplified neuromorphic model of Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) to the previously described Synapto-dendritic Kernel Adapting Neuron (SKAN), a hardware efficient neuron model capable of learning spatio-temporal spike patterns. The resulting neuron model is the first to perform synaptic encoding of afferent signal-to-noise ratio in addition to the unsupervised learning of spatio-temporal spike patterns. The neuron model is particularly suitable for implementation in digital neuromorphic hardware as it does not use any complex mathematical operations and uses a novel shift-based normalization approach to achieve synaptic homeostasis. The neuron's noise compensation properties are characterized and tested on random spatio-temporal spike patterns as well as a noise corrupted subset of the zero images of the MNIST handwritten digit dataset. Results show the simultaneously learning common patterns in its input data while dynamically weighing individual afferents based on their signal to noise ratio. Despite its simplicity the interesting behaviors of the neuron model and the resulting computational power may also offer insights into biological systems. PMID:25910252

  10. Molecular mechanism of modulation of nociceptive neuron membrane excitability by a tripeptide.

    PubMed

    Shelykh, T N; Rogachevsky, I V; Nozdrachev, A D; Veselkina, O S; Podzorova, S A; Krylov, B V; Plakhova, V B

    2016-01-01

    Using the whole-cell patch-clamp method, the ability of arginine-containing tripeptide Ac-RER-NH2, dipeptide Ac-RR-NH2, and free Arg molecule to modulate the membrane excitability of nociceptors was studied. Extracellular Ac-RER-NH2 upon interaction with the outer membrane of the nociceptive neuron decreases the Zeff value of the activation gating system of Nav1.8 channels. Thus, the tripeptide Ac-RER-NH2 can be considered as a new effective and safe analgesic. PMID:27025494

  11. Regulation of Nociceptive Plasticity Threshold and DARPP-32 Phosphorylation in Spinal Dorsal Horn Neurons by Convergent Dopamine and Glutamate Inputs.

    PubMed

    Buesa, Itsaso; Aira, Zigor; Azkue, Jon Jatsu

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine can influence NMDA receptor function and regulate glutamate-triggered long-term changes in synaptic strength in several regions of the CNS. In spinal cord, regulation of the threshold of synaptic plasticity may determine the proneness to undergo sensitization and hyperresponsiveness to noxious input. In the current study, we increased endogenous dopamine levels in the dorsal horn by using re-uptake inhibitor GBR 12935. During the so-induced hyperdopaminergic transmission, conditioning low-frequency (1 Hz) stimulation (LFS) to the sciatic nerve induced long-term potentiation (LTP) of C-fiber-evoked potentials in dorsal horn neurons. The magnitude of LTP was attenuated by blockade of either dopamine D1-like receptors (D1LRs) by with SCH 23390 or NMDA receptor subunit NR2B with antagonist Ro25-6981. Conditioning LFS during GBR 12935 administration increased phosphorylation of dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32kDa (DARPP-32) at threonine 34 residue in synaptosomal (P3) fraction of dorsal horn homogenates, as assessed by Western blot analysis, which was partially prevented by NR2B blockade prior to conditioning stimulation. Conditioning LFS also was followed by higher co-localization of phosphorylated form of NR2B at tyrosine 1472 and pDARPP-32Thr34- with postsynaptic marker PSD-95 in transverse L5 dorsal horn sections. Such increase could be significantly attenuated by D1LR blockade with SCH 23390. The current results support that coincidental endogenous recruitment of D1LRs and NR2B in dorsal horn synapses plays a role in regulating afferent-induced nociceptive plasticity. Parallel increases in DARPP-32 phosphorylation upon LTP induction suggests a role for this phosphoprotein as intracellular detector of convergent D1L- and NMDA receptor activation. PMID:27610622

  12. Stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates glutamatergic neurons in the parabrachial nucleus: relation to neurons containing nNOS.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Moazzami, Ali R; Longhurst, John C

    2005-08-16

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates neurons in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), a region known to play a role in central integration of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes. However, phenotypes of these activated neurons have not been well identified. Glutamate, an important excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is involved in PBN-mediated cardiovascular responses. Recent identification of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) has provided a novel and unique marker to locate distinctive perikarya of neurons that use glutamate as a neurotransmitter. The action of glutamate in the brain is influenced by nitric oxide. Thus, using triple immunofluorescent labeling, the present study examined expression of c-Fos, an immediate early gene, in the neurons containing VGLUT3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the PBN following stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. In anesthetized cats with bilateral barodenervation and cervical vagotomy, topical application of bradykinin (BK, 1-10 microg/ml, 50 microl, n = 6) on the left ventricle was performed six times, every 20 min. Repeated administration of BK elicited consistent increases in blood pressure over a 100 min period while no changes were noted in the animals treated with the vehicle for BK (0.9% saline, n=5). Compared to control cats, c-Fos expression was increased significantly in the cell bodies containing VGLUT3 as well as both VGLUT3 and nNOS in the external lateral PBN (elPBN) in BK-treated animals (all P < 0.01). In addition, using similar triple-staining method, we noted that fibers of activated neurons containing nNOS in the elPBN co-localized with vesicular glutamate transporter 2 following BK stimulation. These data suggest that glutamatergic neurons represent a cell type in the PBN that is activated by stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. Nitric oxide has the potential to influence the action of glutamatergic neurons in

  13. Afferent neurons of the hypoglossal nerve of the rat as demonstrated by horseradish peroxidase tracing.

    PubMed

    Neuhuber, W; Mysicka, A

    1980-01-01

    Cell bodies of sensory neurons of the rat's hypoglossal nerve were demonstrated by the somatopetal horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transport technique. Labelled perikarya were found within the second and third cervical spinal ganglia and in the vagal sensory ganglia. After application of HRP to the cut peripheral trunk of the hypoglossal nerve about 200 labelled cell bodies were counted in each animal. The vast majority of the axons from cervical spinal ganglion cells reach the hypoglossal nerve via the descending ramus (N. descendens hypoglossi). However, there may exist an additional pathway, probably via the cervical sympathetic trunk. Application of HPR to the medial and lateral end branches led to a labelling of much fewer spinal ganglion cells while the number of labelled vegal sensory neurons remained unchanged. Thus, it is suggested that the majority of the cervical afferents of the hypoglossal nerve originates within the extrinsic tongue musculature and the geniohyoid muscle, whereas the vagal afferents may perhaps derive exclusively from the intrinsic muslces. Histograms of the mean diameters of labelled cell bodies show a predominance of very small perikarya. This contrasts with the diameter distribution of sensory perikarya labelled after HRP application to nerves supplying other skeletal muscles. It is therefore assumed that the afferent component of the hypoglossal nerve is composed mainly of small-calibre axons. PMID:7356184

  14. Direct targeting of peptidergic amygdalar neurons by noradrenergic afferents: linking stress-integrative circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Kravets, J. L.; Reyes, B. A. S.; Unterwald, E. M.; Van Bockstaele, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalar norepinephrine (NE) plays a key role in regulating neural responses to emotionally arousing stimuli and is involved in memory consolidation of emotionally charged events. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and dynorphin (DYN), two neuropeptides that mediate the physiological and behavioral responses to stress, are abundant in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and directly innervate brainstem noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. Whether the CRF- and DYN-containing amygdalar neurons receive direct noradrenergic innervation has not yet been elucidated. The present study sought to define cellular substrates underlying noradrenergic modulation of CRF- and DYN-containing neurons in the CeA using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that NE-labeled axon terminals form synapses with CRF- and DYN-containing neurons in the CeA. Semi-quantitative analysis showed that approximately 31% of NET-labeled axon terminals targeted CeA neurons that co-expressed DYN and CRF. As a major source of CRF innervation to the LC, it is also not known whether CRF-containing CeA neurons are directly targeted by noradrenergic afferents. To test this, retrograde tract-tracing using FluoroGold (FG) from the LC was combined with immunocytochemical detection of CRF and NET in the CeA. Our results revealed a population of LC-projecting CRF-containing CeA neurons that are directly innervated by NE afferents. Analysis showed that approximately 34% of NET-labeled axon terminals targeted LC-projecting CeA neurons that contain CRF. Taken together, these results indicate significant interactions between NE, CRF, and DYN in this critical limbic region and reveal direct synaptic interactions of NE with amygdalar CRF that influence the LC-NE arousal system. PMID:24271021

  15. Mu Opioid Receptors on Primary Afferent Nav1.8 Neurons Contribute to Opiate-Induced Analgesia: Insight from Conditional Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Wood, John N.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund’s Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain. PMID:24069332

  16. Local administration of resveratrol inhibits excitability of nociceptive wide-dynamic range neurons in rat trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Yoshihito; Shibuya, Eri; Takehana, Shiori; Sekiguchi, Kenta; Oshima, Katsuo; Kamata, Hiroaki; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Although we recently reported that intravenous administration of resveratrol suppresses trigeminal nociception, the precise peripheral effect of resveratrol on nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation-induced trigeminal neuron activity in vivo remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol attenuates mechanical stimulation-induced excitability of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neuron activity in rats, in vivo. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made of SpVc wide-dynamic range (WDR) neuron activity in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Neurons responded to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimulation applied to the orofacial skin. Local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol (1-10mM) into the orofacial skin dose dependently and significantly reduced the mean number of SpVc WDR neurons firing in response to both non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli, with the maximal inhibition of discharge frequency in response to both stimuli being seen within 5min. These inhibitory effects were no longer evident after approximately 20min. The mean magnitude of inhibition by resveratrol (10mM) of SpVc neuron discharge frequency was almost equal to that of the local anesthetic 1% lidocaine (37mM). These results suggest that local injection of resveratrol into the peripheral receptive field suppresses the excitability of SpVc neurons, possibly via inhibition of Na(+) channels in the nociceptive nerve terminals of trigeminal ganglion neurons. Therefore, local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol may provide relief of trigeminal nociceptive pain, without side effects, thus contributing to the suite of complementary and alternative medicines used as local anesthetic agents. PMID:27288246

  17. Ginger and Its Pungent Constituents Non-Competitively Inhibit Serotonin Currents on Visceral Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Kim, Sojin; Park, Cheung-Seog; Park, Yong Seek

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and emesis are a major side effect and obstacle for chemotherapy in cancer patients. Employ of antiemetic drugs help to suppress chemotherapy-induced emesis in some patients but not all patients. Ginger, an herbal medicine, has been traditionally used to treat various kinds of diseases including gastrointestinal symptoms. Ginger is effective in alleviating nausea and emesis, particularly, for cytotoxic chemotherapy drug-induced emesis. Ginger-mediated antiemetic effect has been attributed to its pungent constituents-mediated inhibition of serotonin (5-HT) receptor activity but its cellular mechanism of action is still unclear. Emetogenic chemotherapy drugs increase 5-HT concentration and activate visceral vagal afferent nerve activity. Thus, 5-HT mediated vagal afferent activation is essential to provoke emesis during chemotherapy. In this experiment, water extract of ginger and its three major pungent constituent's effect on 5-HT-evoked responses were tested on acutely dispersed visceral afferent neurons with patch-clamp methods. The ginger extract has similar effects to antiemetic drug ondansetron by blocking 5-HT-evoked responses. Pungent constituents of the ginger, [6]-shogaol, [6]-gingerol, and zingerone inhibited 5-HT responses in a dose dependent manner. The order of inhibitory potency for these compounds were [6]-shogaol>[6]-gingerol>zingerone. Unlike well-known competitive 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron, all tested ginger constituents acted as non-competitive antagonist. Our results imply that ginger and its pungent constituents exert antiemetic effects by blocking 5-HT-induced emetic signal transmission in vagal afferent neurons. PMID:24757377

  18. Ginger and its pungent constituents non-competitively inhibit serotonin currents on visceral afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Kim, Sojin; Park, Cheung-Seog; Park, Yong Seek; Jin, Young-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Nausea and emesis are a major side effect and obstacle for chemotherapy in cancer patients. Employ of antiemetic drugs help to suppress chemotherapy-induced emesis in some patients but not all patients. Ginger, an herbal medicine, has been traditionally used to treat various kinds of diseases including gastrointestinal symptoms. Ginger is effective in alleviating nausea and emesis, particularly, for cytotoxic chemotherapy drug-induced emesis. Ginger-mediated antiemetic effect has been attributed to its pungent constituents-mediated inhibition of serotonin (5-HT) receptor activity but its cellular mechanism of action is still unclear. Emetogenic chemotherapy drugs increase 5-HT concentration and activate visceral vagal afferent nerve activity. Thus, 5-HT mediated vagal afferent activation is essential to provoke emesis during chemotherapy. In this experiment, water extract of ginger and its three major pungent constituent's effect on 5-HT-evoked responses were tested on acutely dispersed visceral afferent neurons with patch-clamp methods. The ginger extract has similar effects to antiemetic drug ondansetron by blocking 5-HT-evoked responses. Pungent constituents of the ginger, [6]-shogaol, [6]-gingerol, and zingerone inhibited 5-HT responses in a dose dependent manner. The order of inhibitory potency for these compounds were [6]-shogaol>[6]-gingerol>zingerone. Unlike well-known competitive 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron, all tested ginger constituents acted as non-competitive antagonist. Our results imply that ginger and its pungent constituents exert antiemetic effects by blocking 5-HT-induced emetic signal transmission in vagal afferent neurons. PMID:24757377

  19. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  20. State-space receptive fields of semicircular canal afferent neurons in the bullfrog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulin, M. G.; Hoffman, L. F.

    2001-01-01

    Receptive fields are commonly used to describe spatial characteristics of sensory neuron responses. They can be extended to characterize temporal or dynamical aspects by mapping neural responses in dynamical state spaces. The state-space receptive field of a neuron is the probability distribution of the dynamical state of the stimulus-generating system conditioned upon the occurrence of a spike. We have computed state-space receptive fields for semicircular canal afferent neurons in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded spike times during broad-band Gaussian noise rotational velocity stimuli, computed the frequency distribution of head states at spike times, and normalized these to obtain conditional pdfs for the state. These state-space receptive fields quantify what the brain can deduce about the dynamical state of the head when a single spike arrives from the periphery. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Breadth of tuning in taste afferent neurons varies with stimulus strength

    PubMed Central

    Wu, An; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory stimuli are detected by taste buds and transmitted to the hindbrain via sensory afferent neurons. Whether each taste quality (sweet, bitter and so on) is encoded by separate neurons (‘labelled lines') remains controversial. We used mice expressing GCaMP3 in geniculate ganglion sensory neurons to investigate taste-evoked activity. Using confocal calcium imaging, we recorded responses to oral stimulation with prototypic taste stimuli. Up to 69% of neurons respond to multiple tastants. Moreover, neurons tuned to a single taste quality at low concentration become more broadly tuned when stimuli are presented at higher concentration. Responses to sucrose and monosodium glutamate are most related. Although mice prefer dilute NaCl solutions and avoid concentrated NaCl, we found no evidence for two separate populations of sensory neurons that encode this distinction. Altogether, our data suggest that taste is encoded by activity in patterns of peripheral sensory neurons and challenge the notion of strict labelled line coding. PMID:26373451

  2. Cholinergic neurons in the mouse rostral ventrolateral medulla target sensory afferent areas

    PubMed Central

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Macon, Conrad J.; Nguyen, Thanh M.; Coates, Melissa B.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2012-01-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) primarily regulates respiration and the autonomic nervous system. Its medial portion (mRVLM) contains many choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons of unknown function. We sought to clarify the role of these cholinergic cells by tracing their axonal projections. We first established that these neurons are neither parasympathetic preganglionic neurons nor motor neurons because they did not accumulate intraperitoneally administered Fluorogold. We traced their axonal projections by injecting a Cre-dependent vector (floxed-AAV2) expressing either GFP or mCherrry into the mRVLM of ChAT-Cre mice. Transduced neurons expressing GFP or mCherry were confined to the injection site and were exclusively ChAT-ir. Their axonal projections included the dorsal column nuclei, medullary trigeminal complex, cochlear nuclei, superior olivary complex and spinal cord lamina III. For control experiments, the floxed-AAV2 (mCherry) was injected into the RVLM of dopamine beta-hydroxylase-Cre mice. In these mice mCherry was exclusively expressed by RVLM catecholaminergic neurons. Consistent with data from rats, these catecholaminergic neurons targeted brain regions involved in autonomic and endocrine regulation. These regions were almost totally different from those innervated by the intermingled mRVLM-ChAT neurons. This study emphasizes the advantages of using Cre-driver mouse strains in combination with floxed-AAV2 to trace the axonal projections of chemically defined neuronal groups. Using this technique, we revealed previously unknown projections of mRVLM-ChAT neurons and showed that despite their close proximity to the cardiorespiratory region of the RVLM, these cholinergic neurons regulate sensory afferent information selectively and presumably have little to do with respiration or circulatory control. PMID:22460939

  3. Cholinergic neurons in the mouse rostral ventrolateral medulla target sensory afferent areas.

    PubMed

    Stornetta, Ruth L; Macon, Conrad J; Nguyen, Thanh M; Coates, Melissa B; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2013-03-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) primarily regulates respiration and the autonomic nervous system. Its medial portion (mRVLM) contains many choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons of unknown function. We sought to clarify the role of these cholinergic cells by tracing their axonal projections. We first established that these neurons are neither parasympathetic preganglionic neurons nor motor neurons because they did not accumulate intraperitoneally administered Fluorogold. We traced their axonal projections by injecting a Cre-dependent vector (floxed-AAV2) expressing either GFP or mCherrry into the mRVLM of ChAT-Cre mice. Transduced neurons expressing GFP or mCherry were confined to the injection site and were exclusively ChAT-ir. Their axonal projections included the dorsal column nuclei, medullary trigeminal complex, cochlear nuclei, superior olivary complex and spinal cord lamina III. For control experiments, the floxed-AAV2 (mCherry) was injected into the RVLM of dopamine beta-hydroxylase-Cre mice. In these mice, mCherry was exclusively expressed by RVLM catecholaminergic neurons. Consistent with data from rats, these catecholaminergic neurons targeted brain regions involved in autonomic and endocrine regulation. These regions were almost totally different from those innervated by the intermingled mRVLM-ChAT neurons. This study emphasizes the advantages of using Cre-driver mouse strains in combination with floxed-AAV2 to trace the axonal projections of chemically defined neuronal groups. Using this technique, we revealed previously unknown projections of mRVLM-ChAT neurons and showed that despite their close proximity to the cardiorespiratory region of the RVLM, these cholinergic neurons regulate sensory afferent information selectively and presumably have little to do with respiration or circulatory control. PMID:22460939

  4. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE2 induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE2 effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE2 itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE2-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type 4 (EP4) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE2 effects. PGE2 induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE2 potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors by selectively targeting EP4 receptor/PKA pathway without interrupt prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:25446121

  5. TMC-1 Mediates Alkaline Sensation in C. elegans through Nociceptive Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Guang; Liu, Jie; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-07-01

    Noxious pH triggers pungent taste and nocifensive behavior. While the mechanisms underlying acidic pH sensation have been extensively characterized, little is known about how animals sense alkaline pH in the environment. TMC genes encode a family of evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins whose functions are largely unknown. Here, we characterize C. elegans TMC-1, which was suggested to form a Na(+)-sensitive channel mediating salt chemosensation. Interestingly, we find that TMC-1 is required for worms to avoid noxious alkaline environment. Alkaline pH evokes an inward current in nociceptive neurons, which is primarily mediated by TMC-1 and to a lesser extent by the TRP channel OSM-9. However, unlike OSM-9, which is sensitive to both acidic and alkaline pH, TMC-1 is only required for alkali-activated current, revealing a specificity for alkaline sensation. Ectopic expression of TMC-1 confers alkaline sensitivity to alkali-insensitive cells. Our results identify an unexpected role for TMCs in alkaline sensation and nociception. PMID:27321925

  6. The RNA binding and transport proteins staufen and fragile X mental retardation protein are expressed by rat primary afferent neurons and localize to peripheral and central axons.

    PubMed

    Price, T J; Flores, C M; Cervero, F; Hargreaves, K M

    2006-09-15

    Neuronal proteins have been traditionally viewed as being derived solely from the soma; however, accumulating evidence indicates that dendritic and axonal sites are capable of a more autonomous role in terms of new protein synthesis. Such extra-somal translation allows for more rapid, on-demand regulation of neuronal structure and function than would otherwise be possible. While mechanisms of dendritic RNA transport have been elucidated, it remains unclear how RNA is trafficked into the axon for this purpose. Primary afferent neurons of the dorsal root (DRG) and trigeminal (TG) ganglia have among the longest axons in the neuraxis and such axonal protein synthesis would be advantageous, given the greater time involved for protein trafficking to occur via axonal transport. Therefore, we hypothesized that these primary sensory neurons might express proteins involved in RNA transport. Rat DRG and TG neurons expressed staufen (stau) 1 and 2 (detected at the mRNA level) and stau2 and fragile x mental retardation protein (FMRP; detected at the protein level). Stau2 mRNA was also detected in human TG neurons. Stau2 and FMRP protein were localized to the sciatic nerve and dorsal roots by immunohistochemistry and to dorsal roots by Western blot. Stau2 and FMRP immunoreactivities colocalized with transient receptor potential channel type 1 immunoreactivity in sensory axons of the sciatic nerve and dorsal root, suggesting that these proteins are being transported into the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive sensory axons. Based on these findings, we propose that stau2 and FMRP proteins are attractive candidates to subserve RNA transport in sensory neurons, linking somal transcriptional events to axonal translation. PMID:16809002

  7. GABAergic neurons of the medial septum play a nodal role in facilitation of nociception-induced affect

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Seok Ting; Lee, Andy Thiam Huat; Foo, Fang Chee; Ng, Lynn; Low, Chian-Ming; Khanna, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the functional details of the influence of medial septal region (MSDB) on spectrum of nociceptive behaviours by manipulating intraseptal GABAergic mechanisms. Results showed that formalin-induced acute nociception was not affected by intraseptal microinjection of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or on selective lesion of septal GABAergic neurons. Indeed, the acute nociceptive responses were dissociated from the regulation of sensorimotor behaviour and generation of theta-rhythm by the GABAergic mechanisms in MSDB. The GABAergic lesion attenuated formalin-induced unconditioned cellular response in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and blocked formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA), and as well as the contextual fear induced on conditioning with brief footshock. The effects of lesion on nociceptive-conditioned cellular responses were, however, variable. Interestingly, the lesion attenuated the conditioned representation of experimental context in dorsal hippocampus field CA1 in the F-CPA task. Collectively, the preceding suggests that the MSDB is a nodal centre wherein the GABAergic neurons mediate nociceptive affect-motivation by regulating cellular mechanisms in ACC that confer an aversive value to the noxious stimulus. Further, in conjunction with a modulatory influence on hippocampal contextual processing, MSDB may integrate affect with context as part of associative learning in the F-CPA task. PMID:26487082

  8. GABAergic Afferents activate both GABAA and GABAB receptors in mouse substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brazhnik, Elena; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Most in vivo electrophysiological studies of substantia nigra have employed rats. With the recent proliferation of the use of mice for in vitro neurophysiological studies due to the availability of various genetically modified strains to identify the roles of various channels and proteins in neuronal function, it is crucial to obtain data on in vivo responses in mice to verify that the in vitro results reflect functioning of systems comparable to those that have been well studied in rat. Inhibitory responses of rat nigral dopaminergic neurons by stimulation of afferents from striatum, globus pallidus or pars reticulata have been shown to be mediated predominantly or exclusively by GABAA receptors. This is puzzling given the substantial expression of GABAB receptors and the ubiquitous appearance of GABAB synaptic responses in rat dopaminergic neurons in vitro. In the present study we studied electrically evoked GABAergic inhibition in nigral dopaminergic neurons in C57BL/6J mice. Stimulation of the three major GABAergic inputs elicited stronger and longer lasting inhibitory responses than those seen in rats. The early inhibition was GABAA mediated, whereas the later component, absent in rats, was GABAB mediated and selectively enhanced by GABA uptake inhibition. Striatal-evoked inhibition exhibited a slower onset and a weaker initial component compared to inhibition from globus pallidus or substantia nigra pars reticulata. These results are discussed with respect to differences in the size and neuronal density of the rat and mouse brain, and the different sites of synaptic contact of the synapses from the three GABAergic afferents. PMID:18842898

  9. Periaqueductal grey cyclooxygenase-dependent facilitation of C-nociceptive drive and encoding in dorsal horn neurons in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Leith, J Lianne; Wilson, Alex W; You, Hao-Jun; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The experience of pain is strongly affected by descending control systems originating in the brainstem ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (VL-PAG), which control the spinal processing of nociceptive information. A- and C-fibre nociceptors detect noxious stimulation, and have distinct and independent contributions to both the perception of pain quality (fast and slow pain, respectively) and the development of chronic pain. Evidence suggests a separation in the central processing of information arising from A- vs. C-nociceptors; for example, inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)–prostaglandin system within the VL-PAG alters spinal nociceptive reflexes evoked by C-nociceptor input in vivo via descending pathways, leaving A-nociceptor-evoked reflexes largely unaffected. As the spinal neuronal mechanisms underlying these different responses remain unknown, we determined the effect of inhibition of VL-PAG COX-1 on dorsal horn wide dynamic-range neurons evoked by C- vs. A-nociceptor activation. Inhibition of VL-PAG COX-1 in anaesthetised rats increased firing thresholds of lamina IV–V wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons in response to both A- and C-nociceptor stimulation. Importantly, wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons continued to faithfully encode A-nociceptive information, even after VL-PAG COX-1 inhibition, whereas the encoding of C-nociceptor information by wide dynamic-range spinal neurons was significantly disrupted. Dorsal horn neurons with stronger C-nociceptor input were affected by COX-1 inhibition to a greater extent than those with weak C-fibre input. These data show that the gain and contrast of C-nociceptive information processed in individual wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons is modulated by prostanergic descending control mechanisms in the VL-PAG. PMID:25239460

  10. Type II spiral ganglion afferent neurons drive medial olivocochlear reflex suppression of the cochlear amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Froud, Kristina E.; Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Cederholm, Jennie M. E.; Klugmann, Matthias; Sandow, Shaun L.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F.; Housley, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic adjustment of hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity is mediated by the medial olivocochlear efferent reflex, which suppresses the gain of the ‘cochlear amplifier' in each ear. Such efferent feedback is important for promoting discrimination of sounds in background noise, sound localization and protecting the cochleae from acoustic overstimulation. However, the sensory driver for the olivocochlear reflex is unknown. Here, we resolve this longstanding question using a mouse model null for the gene encoding the type III intermediate filament peripherin (Prph). Prph(−/−) mice lacked type II spiral ganglion neuron innervation of the outer hair cells, whereas innervation of the inner hair cells by type I spiral ganglion neurons was normal. Compared with Prph(+/+) controls, both contralateral and ipsilateral olivocochlear efferent-mediated suppression of the cochlear amplifier were absent in Prph(−/−) mice, demonstrating that outer hair cells and their type II afferents constitute the sensory drive for the olivocochlear efferent reflex. PMID:25965946

  11. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2013-01-01

    Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in vivo for their advantages such as reduction of noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Urethane has been a widely used anesthetic in thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested this assumption by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during “the awake state” or under “urethane anesthesia” using the extracellular single unit recording technique. We first tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane, and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over a 4 h recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane. PMID:24133420

  12. Aromatase inhibitors augment nociceptive behaviors in rats and enhance the excitability of sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Robarge, Jason D; Duarte, Djane B; Shariati, Behzad; Wang, Ruizhong; Flockhart, David A; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Although aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are commonly used therapies for breast cancer, their use is limited because they produce arthralgia in a large number of patients. To determine whether AIs produce hypersensitivity in animal models of pain, we examined the effects of the AI, letrozole, on mechanical, thermal, and chemical sensitivity in rats. In ovariectomized (OVX) rats, administering a single dose of 1 or 5mg/kg letrozole significantly reduced mechanical paw withdrawal thresholds, without altering thermal sensitivity. Repeated injection of 5mg/kg letrozole in male rats produced mechanical, but not thermal, hypersensitivity that extinguished when drug dosing was stopped. A single dose of 5mg/kg letrozole or daily dosing of letrozole or exemestane in male rats also augmented flinching behavior induced by intraplantar injection of 1000nmol of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). To determine whether sensitization of sensory neurons contributed to AI-induced hypersensitivity, we evaluated the excitability of neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia of male rats chronically treated with letrozole. Both small and medium-diameter sensory neurons isolated from letrozole-treated rats were more excitable, as reflected by increased action potential firing in response to a ramp of depolarizing current, a lower resting membrane potential, and a lower rheobase. However, systemic letrozole treatment did not augment the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from spinal cord slices, suggesting that the enhanced nociceptive responses were not secondary to an increase in peptide release from sensory endings in the spinal cord. These results provide the first evidence that AIs modulate the excitability of sensory neurons, which may be a primary mechanism for the effect of these drugs to augment pain behaviors in rats. PMID:27072527

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain. PMID:26224622

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain. PMID:26224622

  15. Evidence that antidromically stimulated vagal afferents activate inhibitory neurones innervating guinea-pig trachealis.

    PubMed Central

    Canning, B J; Undem, B J

    1994-01-01

    -selective agonist, acetyl-[Arg6, Sar9, Met (O2)11]-SP(6-11), elicited oesophagus-dependent relaxations of the trachealis that were abolished by oesophagus removal. Furthermore, pretreatment with the NK1-selective antagonists, CP 96345 and CP 99994, or pretreatment with a concentration of SR 48968 that also blocks NK3 receptors, markedly attenuated relaxations elicited by stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive vagal pathways. 6. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that relaxations elicited by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents involve tachykinin-mediated activation of peripheral NANC inhibitory neurones that are in some way associated with the oesophagus. The data also indicate that airway smooth muscle tone might be regulated by peripheral reflexes initiated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibres. PMID:7869272

  16. Presynaptic inhibitory effects of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on nociceptive excitatory synaptic transmission in spinal superficial dorsal horn neurons of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tomoyose, Orie; Kodama, Daisuke; Ono, Hideki; Tanabe, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to exert analgesic effects in humans and laboratory animals. However, its effects on spinal nociceptive synaptic transmission have not been fully characterized. Here, whole-cell recordings were made from dorsal horn neurons in spinal slices with attached dorsal roots from adult mice, and the effects of fluvoxamine on monosynaptic A-fiber- and C-fiber-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked in response to electrical stimulation of a dorsal root were studied. Fluvoxamine (10 - 100 μM) concentration-dependently suppressed both monosynaptic A-fiber- and C-fiber-mediated EPSCs, which were attenuated by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. In the presence of the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron, fluvoxamine hardly suppressed A-fiber-mediated EPSCs, whereas its inhibitory effect on C-fiber-mediated EPSCs was not affected. Although fluvoxamine increased the paired-pulse ratio of A-fiber-mediated EPSCs, it increased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs (sEPSCs and mEPSCs). Since sEPSCs and mEPSCs appeared to arise largely from spinal interneurons, we then recorded strontium-evoked asynchronous events occurring after A-fiber stimulation, whose frequency was reduced by fluvoxamine. These results suggest that fluvoxamine reduces excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferent fibers via presynaptic mechanisms involving 5-HT1A and/or 5-HT3 receptors, which may contribute to its analgesic effects. PMID:25252797

  17. Contribution of opioid receptors on primary afferent versus sympathetic neurons to peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Zhang, Q; Stein, C; Schäfer, M

    1998-08-01

    Opioid receptors are synthesized in dorsal root ganglia and transported into peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. Activation of such receptors results in antinociceptive effects that are most prominent in inflammation. In addition, opioid receptors located on sympathetic postganglionic neuron terminals may be involved in these effects. This study investigates the peripheral analgesic efficacy of the mu, delta and kappa receptor agonists [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin, [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin and trans-(+/-)3, 4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]-benzeneacetamid e, the effective number of peripheral mu, delta and kappa receptors in relation to the development of inflammation and the contribution of sympathetic vs. sensory neurons by use of capsaicin and 6-hydroxydopamine, respectively. In Wistar rats with Freund's adjuvant-induced hindpaw inflammation, antinociceptive effects of intraplantar [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (1.0-32 microg), [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin (10-100 microg) and trans-(+/-)3, 4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(l-pyrrolidiny)-cyclohexyl]-benzeneace tam ide (10-100 microg) were evaluated by paw pressure test. These effects increased linearly between 6 and 24 hr, but did not change between 24 and 96 hr of inflammation, whereas the doses of the irreversible antagonists beta-funaltrexamine, [D-Ala2,Leu5,Cys6]enkephalin or (+/-)-(5beta,7a,8beta)-3, 4-dichloro-N-[3-methylene-2-oxo-8-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspir[4, 5]dec-7-yl]benzeneacetamide required to abolish the respective agonist effects increased between 12 and 96 hr. Pretreatment with capsaicin (30, 50, 70 mg/kg s.c. over 3 days) but not with 6-hydroxydopamine (75 mg/kg i.p. over 3 days) reversed the hyperalgesia in inflamed paws and almost abolished antinociceptive effects of all three agonists. These results suggest that the increased opioid agonist efficacy is due to an increased number of peripheral opioid receptors at later stages of inflammation and that

  18. Selective depression of nociceptive responses of dorsal horn neurones by SNC 80 in a perfused hindquarter preparation of adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Cao, C Q; Hong, Y G; Dray, A; Perkins, M N

    2001-01-01

    Detailed electrophysiological characterisation of spinal opioid receptors in the mouse has been limited due to various technical difficulties. In this study, extracellular single unit recordings were made from dorsal horn neurones in a perfused spinal cord with attached trunk-hindquarter to investigate the role of delta-opioid receptor in mediating nociceptive and non-nociceptive transmission in mouse. Noxious electrical shock, pinch and heat stimuli evoked a mean response of 20.8+/-2.5 (n=10, P<0.005), 30.1+/-5.4 (n=58, P<0.005) and 40.9+/-6.3 (n=29, P<0.005) spikes per stimulus respectively. In 5 of 22 cells, repetitive noxious electrical stimuli applied to the hindpaw for 20 s produced a progressive increase in spike number, the phenomenon known as 'wind-up' and/or hyperactivity. When the selective delta-opioid receptor agonist (+)-4-[(alpha R)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC 80) was perfused for 8-10 min, these evoked nociceptive responses were reversibly depressed. SNC 80 (2 microM) depressed the nociceptive responses evoked by electrical shock, pinch and heat by 74.0+/-13.7% (n=8, P<0.01), 66.5+/-16.6% (n=10, P<0.01) and 74.1+/-17.0% (n=10, P<0.01) respectively. The maximum depression by 5 microM SNC 80 was 92.6+/-6.8% (n=3). SNC 80 at 5 microM also completely abolished the wind-up and/or hypersensitivity (n=5). The depressant effects of SNC 80 on the nociceptive responses were completely blocked by 10 microM naloxone (n=5) and 3 microM 17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,7-dehydro-4,5 alpha-epoxy-14 beta-ethoxy-5 beta-methylindolo [2',3':6',7'] morphinan-3-ol hydrochloride (HS 378, n=8), a novel highly selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist. Interestingly, HS 378 (3 microM) itself potentiated the background activity and evoked responses to pinch and heat by 151.8+/-38.4% (P<0.05, n=8), 34.2+/-6.1% (P<0.01, n=7) and 45.5+/-11.8% (P<0.05, n=5) respectively. In contrast, the responses of non-nociceptive

  19. Subcellular localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract in relation to vagal afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, L; Batten, T F C; Corbett, E K A; Sinfield, J K; Deuchars, J

    2003-01-01

    In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), nitric oxide (NO) modulates neuronal circuits controlling autonomic functions. A proposed source of this NO is via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) present in vagal afferent fibre terminals, which convey visceral afferent information to the NTS. Here, we first determined with electron microscopy that neuronal NOS (nNOS) is present in both presynaptic and postsynaptic structures in the NTS. To examine the relationship of nNOS to vagal afferent fibres the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the nodose ganglion and detected in brainstem sections using peroxidase-based methods. nNOS was subsequently visualised using a pre-embedding immunogold procedure. Ultrastructural examination revealed nNOS immunoreactivity in dendrites receiving vagal afferent input. However, although nNOS-immunoreactive terminals were frequently evident in the NTS, none were vagal afferent in origin. Dual immunofluorescence also confirmed lack of co-localisation. Nevertheless, nNOS immunoreactivity was observed in vagal afferent neurone cell bodies of the nodose ganglion. To determine if these labelled cells in the nodose ganglion were indeed vagal afferent neurones nodose ganglion sections were immunostained following application of cholera toxin B subunit to the heart. Whilst some cardiac-innervating neurones were also nNOS immunoreactive, nNOS was never detected in the central terminals of these neurones. These data show that nNOS is present in the NTS in both pre- and postsynaptic structures. However, these presynaptic structures are unlikely to be of vagal afferent origin. The lack of nNOS in vagal afferent terminals in the NTS, yet the presence in some vagal afferent cell bodies, suggests it is selectively targeted to specific regions of the same neurones. PMID:12676143

  20. The role of trigeminal nasal TRPM8-expressing afferent neurons in the antitussive effects of menthol.

    PubMed

    Plevkova, J; Kollarik, M; Poliacek, I; Brozmanova, M; Surdenikova, L; Tatar, M; Mori, N; Canning, B J

    2013-07-15

    The cold-sensitive cation channel TRPM8 is a target for menthol, which is used routinely as a cough suppressant and as an additive to tobacco and food products. Given that cold temperatures and menthol activate neurons through gating of TRPM8, it is unclear how menthol actively suppresses cough. In this study we describe the antitussive effects of (-)-menthol in conscious and anesthetized guinea pigs. In anesthetized guinea pigs, cough evoked by citric acid applied topically to the tracheal mucosa was suppressed by menthol only when it was selectively administered as vapors to the upper airways. Menthol applied topically to the tracheal mucosa prior to and during citric acid application or administered continuously as vapors or as an aerosol to the lower airways was without effect on cough. These actions of upper airway menthol treatment were mimicked by cold air delivered to the upper airways but not by (+)-menthol, the inactive isomer of menthol, or by the TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist icilin administered directly to the trachea. Subsequent molecular analyses confirmed the expression of TRPM8 in a subset of nasal trigeminal afferent neurons that do not coincidently express TRPA1 or TRPV1. We conclude that menthol suppresses cough evoked in the lower airways primarily through a reflex initiated from the nose. PMID:23640596

  1. Kv4 Channels Underlie the Subthreshold-Operating A-type K+-current in Nociceptive Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Phuket, Thanawath Ratanadilok Na; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains heterogeneous populations of sensory neurons including primary nociceptive neurons and C-fibers implicated in pain signaling. Recent studies have demonstrated DRG hyperexcitability associated with downregulation of A-type K+ channels; however, the molecular correlate of the corresponding A-type K+ current (IA) has remained hypothetical. Kv4 channels may underlie the IA in DRG neurons. We combined electrophysiology, molecular biology (Whole-Tissue and Single-Cell RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry to investigate the molecular basis of the IA in acutely dissociated DRG neurons from 7- to 8-day-old rats. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate a robust tetraethylammonium-resistant (20 mM) and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive (5 mM) IA. Matching Kv4 channel properties, activation and inactivation of this IA occur in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials and the rate of recovery from inactivation is rapid and voltage-dependent. Among Kv4 transcripts, the DRG expresses significant levels of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 mRNAs. Also, single small-medium diameter DRG neurons (∼30 μm) exhibit correlated frequent expression of mRNAs encoding Kv4.1 and Nav1.8, a known nociceptor marker. In contrast, the expressions of Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 mRNAs at the whole-tissue and single-cell levels are relatively low and infrequent. Kv4 protein expression in nociceptive DRG neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which demonstrates colocalization of Kv4.3 and Nav1.8, and negligible expression of Kv4.2. Furthermore, specific dominant-negative suppression and overexpression strategies confirmed the contribution of Kv4 channels to IA in DRG neurons. Contrasting the expression patterns of Kv4 channels in the central and peripheral nervous systems, we discuss possible functional roles of these channels in primary sensory neurons. PMID:19668710

  2. Dopaminergic Modulation of the Voltage-Gated Sodium Current in the Cochlear Afferent Neurons of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Baizabal, Catalina; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA) plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway. PMID:25768433

  3. Peripheral oxytocin activates vagal afferent neurons to suppress feeding in normal and leptin-resistant mice: a route for ameliorating hyperphagia and obesity.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusaku; Maejima, Yuko; Suyama, Shigetomo; Yoshida, Masashi; Arai, Takeshi; Katsurada, Kenichi; Kumari, Parmila; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-03-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt), a neuropeptide produced in the hypothalamus, is implicated in regulation of feeding. Recent studies have shown that peripheral administration of Oxt suppresses feeding and, when infused subchronically, ameliorates hyperphagic obesity. However, the route through which peripheral Oxt informs the brain is obscure. This study aimed to explore whether vagal afferents mediate the sensing and anorexigenic effect of peripherally injected Oxt in mice. Intraperitoneal Oxt injection suppressed food intake and increased c-Fos expression in nucleus tractus solitarius to which vagal afferents project. The Oxt-induced feeding suppression and c-Fos expression in nucleus tractus solitarius were blunted in mice whose vagal afferent nerves were blocked by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or capsaicin treatment. Oxt induced membrane depolarization and increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in single vagal afferent neurons. The Oxt-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases were markedly suppressed by Oxt receptor antagonist. These Oxt-responsive neurons also responded to cholecystokinin-8 and contained cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript. In obese diabetic db/db mice, leptin failed to increase, but Oxt increased [Ca(2+)]i in vagal afferent neurons, and single or subchronic infusion of Oxt decreased food intake and body weight gain. These results demonstrate that peripheral Oxt injection suppresses food intake by activating vagal afferent neurons and thereby ameliorates obesity in leptin-resistant db/db mice. The peripheral Oxt-regulated vagal afferent neuron provides a novel target for treating hyperphagia and obesity. PMID:25540101

  4. Peripheral nerve injury induces loss of nociceptive neuron-specific Gαi-interacting protein in neuropathic pain rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Fei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gαi-interacting protein (GINIP) is expressed specifically in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and functions in modulation of peripheral gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GBR). Genetic deletion of GINIP leads to impaired responsiveness to GBR agonist-mediated analgesia in rodent. It is, however, not defined whether nerve injury changes GINIP expression. Results Immunolabeling with validated antibody revealed GINIP expression in ∼40% of total lumbar DRG neurons in normal adult rats. GINIP immunoreactivity was detected in ∼80% of IB4-positive (nonpeptidergic) and ∼30% of CGRP-positive (peptidergic) neurons. GINIP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn was colabeled with IB4 and partially with CGRP. In addition, GINIP was expressed in DRG neurons immunopositive for GBR1, GBR2, Gαi(s), and Gαo and was also extensively colabeled with multiple nociceptive neuronal markers, including Trpv1, NaV1.7, CaV2.2α1b, CaV3.2α1b, TrkA, and Trek2. Peripheral nerve injury by L5 spinal nerve ligation significantly decreased the proportion of GINIP immunoreactivity-positive neurons from 40 ± 8.4% to 0.8 ± 0.1% (p < 0.01, mean ± SD, four weeks after spinal nerve ligation) and the total GINIP protein to 1.3% ± 0.04% of its basal level (p < 0.01, n = 6 animals in each group, two weeks after spinal nerve ligation) in the ipsilateral L5 DRGs. Conclusion Our results show that GINIP is predominantly expressed by small nonpeptidergic nociceptive neurons and that nerve injury triggers loss of GINIP expression. Signal transduction roles of GINIP may be diverse as it colabeled with various subgroups of nociceptive neurons. Future studies may investigate details of the signaling mechanism engaged by GINIP, as well as the pathophysiological significance of lost expression of GINIP in neuropathic pain. PMID:27145804

  5. Two psychophysical channels of whisker deflection in rats align with two neuronal classes of primary afferents.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, Maik C; Rüter, Johannes; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2006-07-26

    The rat whisker system has evolved into in an excellent model system for sensory processing from the periphery to cortical stages. However, to elucidate how sensory processing finally relates to percepts, methods to assess psychophysical performance pertaining to precise stimulus kinematics are needed. Here, we present a head-fixed, behaving rat preparation that allowed us to measure detectability of a single whisker deflection as a function of amplitude and peak velocity. We found that velocity thresholds for detection of small-amplitude stimuli (<3 degrees) were considerably higher than for detection of large-amplitude stimuli (>3 degrees). This finding suggests the existence of two psychophysical channels mediating detection of whisker deflection: one channel exhibiting high amplitude and low velocity thresholds (W1), and the other channel exhibiting high velocity and low amplitude thresholds (W2). The correspondence of W1 to slowly adapting (SA) and W2 to rapidly adapting (RA) neuronal classes in the trigeminal ganglion was revealed in acute neurophysiological experiments. Neurometric plots of SA and RA cells were closely aligned to psychophysical performance in the corresponding W1 and W2 parameter ranges. Interestingly, neurometric data of SA cells fit the behavior best if it was based on a short time window integrating action potentials during the initial phasic response, in contrast to integrating across the tonic portion of the response. This suggests that detection performance in both channels is based on the assessment of very few spikes in their corresponding groups of primary afferents. PMID:16870738

  6. Inflammation-induced plasticity of the afferent innervation of the airways.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M J; Undem, B J

    2001-01-01

    The activation of primary afferent neurons that innervate the airways leads to homeostatic and defensive reflexes. The anatomic and physiologic characteristics of these afferent fibers do not appear to be static properties but rather appear to change rapidly in response to inflammation. The threshold for activation of airway afferent neurons to various stimuli, for example, is not fixed; these fibers can be become sensitized during inflammation. A subset of nociceptive-like (C-fibers) airway afferent neurons not only participates in centrally mediated reflexes but is also thought to release neuropeptides at their peripheral terminals, leading to neurogenic inflammation. An increase in the content of tachykinins is commonly seen in inflamed tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that irritation and inflammation of the airways is associated with the induction of tachykinin synthesis in non-nociceptive airway afferent fibers that under normal conditions do not contain neuropeptides. The release of neurokinins from the peripheral terminals in the airways and their central terminals in the brain stem may contribute to the symptoms of inflammatory airway diseases. Elevated release of neurokinins from peripheral terminals may promote local inflammatory responses, and the release of neurokinins in the brainstem, together with inflammation-induced increases in the excitability of afferent fibers, may culminate in altered visceral autonomic reflex activity, changes in breathing pattern, and cough. PMID:11544165

  7. pH-dependent inhibition of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channels by diclofenac in rat nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Michiko; Jang, Il-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the treatment of inflammatory pain. It is well established that NSAIDs exert their analgesic effects by inhibiting cyclooxygenase to prevent the production of prostaglandins; however, several NSAIDs including diclofenac also modulate other ion channels expressed in nociceptive neurons. In this study, we investigated the pH-dependent effects of diclofenac on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels in rat trigeminal sensory neurons by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Diclofenac decreased the peak amplitude of TTX-R Na(+) currents (INa) in a concentration dependent manner. While diclofenac had little effect on the voltage-activation relationship, it significantly shifted the steady-state fast inactivation relationship toward hyperpolarized potentials. Diclofenac increased the extent of use-dependent inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) currents. Diclofenac also significantly accelerated the development of inactivation and retarded the recovery from inactivation of TTX-R Na(+) channels. The effects of diclofenac on TTX-R Na(+) channels were stronger at pH 6.0 than at pH7.4 for most of the parameters tested. Considering that the extracellular pH falls in inflamed tissues, and that TTX-R Na(+) channels expressed on nociceptive neurons are implicated in the prostaglandin-mediated development and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia, our findings could provide an additional analgesic effect of diclofenac under acidic pH conditions. PMID:26176424

  8. 17β-Estradiol Enhances ASIC Activity in Primary Sensory Neurons to Produce Sex Difference in Acidosis-Induced Nociception.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zu-Wei; Liu, Ting-Ting; Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Ren, Ping; Rao, Zhiguo; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Sex differences have been reported in a number of pain conditions. Women are more sensitive to most types of painful stimuli than men, and estrogen plays a key role in the sex differences in pain perception. However, it is unclear whether there is a sex difference in acidosis-evoked pain. We report here that both male and female rats exhibit nociceptive behaviors in response to acetic acid, with females being more sensitive than males. Local application of exogenous 17β-estradiol (E2) exacerbated acidosis-evoked nociceptive response in male rats. E2 and estrogen receptor (ER)-α agonist 1,3,5-Tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole, but not ERβ agonist 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile, replacement also reversed attenuation of the acetic acid-induced nociceptive response in ovariectomized females. Moreover, E2 can exert a rapid potentiating effect on the functional activity of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which mediated the acidosis-induced events. E2 dose dependently increased the amplitude of ASIC currents with a 42.8 ± 1.6 nM of EC50. E2 shifted the concentration-response curve for proton upward with a 50.1% ± 6.2% increase of the maximal current response to proton. E2 potentiated ASIC currents via an ERα and ERK1/2 signaling pathway. E2 also altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of dorsal root ganglia neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acidic stimuli. E2 potentiation of the functional activity of ASICs revealed a peripheral mechanism underlying this sex difference in acetic acid-induced nociception. PMID:26441237

  9. Thyroid hormone is required for the pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Balasubbu, S; Mustapha, M

    2016-01-15

    Afferent connections to the sensory inner (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) in the cochlea refine and functionally mature during the thyroid hormone (TH)-critical period of inner ear development that occurs perinatally in rodents. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypothyroidism on afferent type II innervation to outer hair cells using the Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1(dw)). Using a transgenic approach to specifically label type II spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), we found that lack of TH causes persistence of excess type II SGN connections to the OHCs, as well as continued expression of the hair cell functional marker, otoferlin (OTOF), in the OHCs beyond the maturation period. We also observed a concurrent delay in efferent attachment to the OHCs. Supplementing with TH during the early postnatal period from postnatal day (P) 3 to P4 reversed the defect in type II SGN pruning but did not alter OTOF expression. Our results show that hypothyroidism causes a defect in the large-scale pruning of afferent type II SGNs in the cochlea, and a delay in efferent attachment and the maturation of OTOF expression. Our data suggest that the state of maturation of hair cells, as determined by OTOF expression, may not regulate the pruning of their afferent innervation. PMID:26592716

  10. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boccella, Serena; Vacca, Valentina; Errico, Francesco; Marinelli, Sara; Squillace, Marta; Di Maio, Anna; Vitucci, Daniela; Palazzo, Enza; De Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Pavone, Flaminia; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO). D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/−) or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6) and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions. PMID:25629055

  11. Stimulation of the ventral tegmental area increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased spinal dorsal horn neuronal activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Ling; Sibi, Jiny E; Yang, Xiaofei; Chiao, Jung-Chih; Peng, Yuan Bo

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been found to be effective in relieving intractable pain. The ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays a role not only in the reward process, but also in the modulation of nociception. Lesions of VTA result in increased pain thresholds and exacerbate pain in several pain models. It is hypothesized that direct activation of VTA will reduce pain experience. In this study, we investigated the effect of direct electrical stimulation of the VTA on mechanical, thermal and carrageenan-induced chemical nociceptive thresholds in Sprague-Dawley rats using our custom-designed wireless stimulator. We found that: (1) VTA stimulation itself did not show any change in mechanical or thermal threshold; and (2) the decreased mechanical and thermal thresholds induced by carrageenan injection in the hind paw contralateral to the stimulation site were significantly reversed by VTA stimulation. To further explore the underlying mechanism of VTA stimulation-induced analgesia, spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal responses to graded mechanical stimuli were recorded. VTA stimulation significantly inhibited dorsal horn neuronal activity in response to pressure and pinch from the paw, but not brush. This indicated that VTA stimulation may have exerted its analgesic effect via descending modulatory pain pathways, possibly through its connections with brain stem structures and cerebral cortex areas. PMID:26821313

  12. Microstimulation of the lumbar DRG recruits primary afferent neurons in localized regions of lower limb.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Christopher A; Fisher, Lee E; Gaunt, Robert A; Weber, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Patterned microstimulation of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) has been proposed as a method for delivering tactile and proprioceptive feedback to amputees. Previous studies demonstrated that large- and medium-diameter afferent neurons could be recruited separately, even several months after implantation. However, those studies did not examine the anatomical localization of sensory fibers recruited by microstimulation in the DRG. Achieving precise recruitment with respect to both modality and receptive field locations will likely be crucial to create a viable sensory neuroprosthesis. In this study, penetrating microelectrode arrays were implanted in the L5, L6, and L7 DRG of four isoflurane-anesthetized cats instrumented with nerve cuff electrodes around the proximal and distal branches of the sciatic and femoral nerves. A binary search was used to find the recruitment threshold for evoking a response in each nerve cuff. The selectivity of DRG stimulation was characterized by the ability to recruit individual distal branches to the exclusion of all others at threshold; 84.7% (n = 201) of the stimulation electrodes recruited a single nerve branch, with 9 of the 15 instrumented nerves recruited selectively. The median stimulation threshold was 0.68 nC/phase, and the median dynamic range (increase in charge while stimulation remained selective) was 0.36 nC/phase. These results demonstrate the ability of DRG microstimulation to achieve selective recruitment of the major nerve branches of the hindlimb, suggesting that this approach could be used to drive sensory input from localized regions of the limb. This sensory input might be useful for restoring tactile and proprioceptive feedback to a lower-limb amputee. PMID:27052583

  13. Identification of different functional types of spinal afferent neurons innervating the mouse large intestine using a novel CGRPα transgenic reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Kestell, Garreth R; Kyloh, Melinda A; Brookes, Simon J H; Wattchow, David A; Spencer, Nick J

    2016-04-15

    Spinal afferent neurons detect noxious and physiological stimuli in visceral organs. Five functional classes of afferent terminals have been extensively characterized in the colorectum, primarily from axonal recordings. Little is known about the corresponding somata of these classes of afferents, including their morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology. To address this, we made intracellular recordings from somata in L6/S1 dorsal root ganglia and applied intraluminal colonic distensions. A transgenic calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα)-mCherry reporter mouse, which enabled rapid identification of soma neurochemistry and morphology following electrophysiological recordings, was developed. Three distinct classes of low-threshold distension-sensitive colorectal afferent neurons were characterized; an additional group was distension-insensitive. Two of three low-threshold classes expressed CGRPα. One class expressing CGRPα discharged phasically, with inflections on the rising phase of their action potentials, at low frequencies, to both physiological (<30 mmHg) and noxious (>30 mmHg) distensions. The second class expressed CGRPα and discharged tonically, with smooth, briefer action potentials and significantly greater distension sensitivity than phasically firing neurons. A third class that lacked CGRPα generated the highest-frequency firing to distension and had smaller somata. Thus, CGRPα expression in colorectal afferents was associated with lower distension sensitivity and firing rates and larger somata, while colorectal afferents that generated the highest firing frequencies to distension had the smallest somata and lacked CGRPα. These data fill significant gaps in our understanding of the different classes of colorectal afferent somata that give rise to distinct functional classes of colorectal afferents. In healthy mice, the majority of sensory neurons that respond to colorectal distension are low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range afferents

  14. Chronic inflammation and estradiol interact through MAPK activation to affect TMJ nociceptive processing by trigeminal caudalis neurons.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, A; Okamoto, K; Bereiter, D A

    2009-12-29

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway plays a key role in mediating estrogen actions in the brain and neuronal sensitization during inflammation. Estrogen status is a risk factor in chronic temporomandibular muscle/joint (TMJ) disorders; however, the basis for this relationship is not known. The present study tested the hypothesis that estrogen status acts through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway to alter TMJ nociceptive processing. Single TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded in laminae I-II at the spinomedullary (Vc/C(1-2)) junction in naïve ovariectomized (OvX) female rats treated for 2 days with high-dose (20 microg/day; HE2) or low-dose estradiol (2 microg/day; LE2) and after chronic inflammation of the TMJ region by complete Freund's adjuvant for 12-14 days. Intra-TMJ injection of ATP (1 mM) was used to activate Vc/C(1-2) neurons. The MAPK/ERK inhibitor (PD98059, 0.01-1 mM) was applied topically to the dorsal Vc/C(1-2) surface at the site of recording 10 min prior to each ATP stimulus. In naïve HE2 rats, low-dose PD98059 caused a maximal inhibition of ATP-evoked activity, whereas even high doses had only minor effects on units in LE2 rats. By contrast, after chronic TMJ inflammation, PD98059 produced a marked and similar dose-related inhibition of ATP-evoked activity in HE2 and LE2 rats. These results suggested that E2 status and chronic inflammation acted, at least in part, through a common MAPK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway to enhance TMJ nociceptive processing by laminae I-II neurons at the spinomedullary junction region. PMID:19786077

  15. Intraspinal sprouting of unmyelinated pelvic afferents after complete spinal cord injury is correlated with autonomic dysreflexia induced by visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Duale, Hanad; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a potentially life-threatening hypertensive syndrome following high thoracic (T) spinal cord injury (SCI). It is commonly triggered by noxious pelvic stimuli below the injury site that correlates with increased sprouting of primary afferent C-fibers into the lumbosacral spinal cord. We have recently demonstrated that injury-induced plasticity of lumbosacral propriospinal neurons, which relay pelvic visceral sensations to thoracolumbar sympathetic preganglionic neurons, is also correlated with the development of this syndrome. To determine the phenotype of pelvic afferent fiber sprouts after SCI, cholera toxin subunit beta (CTb) was injected into the distal colon 2 weeks post T4 transection/sham to label colonic visceral afferents. After 1 week transport, the lumbosacral spinal cords were cryosectioned and immunohistochemically stained for CTb, the nociceptive-specific marker calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and the myelinated fiber marker RT97. Quantitative analysis showed that the density of CGRP+ afferent fibers was significantly increased in the L6/S1 dorsal horns of T4-transected versus sham rats, whereas RT97+ afferent fiber density showed no change. Importantly, CTb-labeled pelvic afferent fibers were co-localized with CGRP+ fibers, but not with RT97+ fibers. These results suggest that the sprouting of unmyelinated nociceptive pelvic afferents following high thoracic SCI, but not myelinated fibers, contributes to hypertensive autonomic dysreflexia induced by pelvic visceral pain. PMID:19146928

  16. Discovery of Prostamide F2α and Its Role in Inflammatory Pain and Dorsal Horn Nociceptive Neuron Hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Catia; Boccella, Serena; Lichtman, Aron; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    It was suggested that endocannabinoids are metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in the spinal cord of rats with kaolin/λ-carrageenan-induced knee inflammation, and that this mechanism contributes to the analgesic effects of COX-2 inhibitors in this experimental model. We report the development of a specific method for the identification of endocannabinoid COX-2 metabolites, its application to measure the levels of these compounds in tissues, and the finding of prostamide F2α (PMF2α) in mice with knee inflammation. Whereas the levels of spinal endocannabinoids were not significantly altered by kaolin/λ-carrageenan-induced knee inflammation, those of the COX-2 metabolite of AEA, PMF2α, were strongly elevated. The formation of PMF2α was reduced by indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor), NS-398 (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) and SC-560 (a selective COX-1 inhibitor). In healthy mice, spinal application of PMF2α increased the firing of nociceptive (NS) neurons, and correspondingly reduced the threshold of paw withdrawal latency (PWL). These effects were attenuated by the PMF2α receptor antagonist AGN211336, but not by the FP receptor antagonist AL8810. Also prostaglandin F2α increased NS neuron firing and reduced the threshold of PWL in healthy mice, and these effects were antagonized by AL8810, and not by AGN211336. In mice with kaolin/λ-carrageenan-induced knee inflammation, AGN211336, but not AL8810, reduced the inflammation-induced NS neuron firing and reduction of PWL. These findings suggest that inflammation-induced, and prostanoid-mediated, enhancement of dorsal horn NS neuron firing stimulates the production of spinal PMF2α, which in turn contributes to further NS neuron firing and pain transmission by activating specific receptors. PMID:22363560

  17. Dynorphin-Dependent Reduction of Excitability and Attenuation of Inhibitory Afferents of NPS Neurons in the Pericoerulear Region of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jüngling, Kay; Blaesse, Peter; Goedecke, Lena; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    The Neuropeptide S system, consisting of the 20-amino acid peptide neuropeptide S (NPS) and its G-protein coupled receptor (NPSR), modulates arousal, wakefulness, anxiety, and fear-extinction in mice. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the NPS system attenuates stress-dependent impairment of fear extinction, and that NPS-expressing neurons in close proximity to the locus coeruleus region (LC; pericoerulear, periLC) are activated by stress. Furthermore, periLC NPS neurons receive afferents from neurons of the centrolateral nucleus of the amygdala (CeL), of which a substantial population expresses the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) ligand precursor prodynorphin. This study aims to identify the effect of the dynorphinergic system on NPS neurons in the periLC via pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. Using electrophysiological recordings in mouse brain slices, we provide evidence that NPS neurons in the periLC region are directly inhibited by dynorphin A (DynA) via activation of κ-opioid receptor 1 (KOR1) and a subsequent increase of potassium conductances. Thus, the dynorphinergic system is suited to inactivate NPS neurons in the periLC. In addition to this direct, somatic effect, DynA reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses on NPS neurons via KOR1 and KOR2. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the interaction of the NPS and the kappa opioid system in the periLC. Therefore, the endogenous opioid dynorphin is suited to inhibit NPS neurons with a subsequent decrease in NPS release in putative target regions leading to a variety of physiological consequences such as increased anxiety or vulnerability to stress exposure. PMID:27013974

  18. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Deletion in Efferent Olivocochlear Neurons Perturbs Afferent Synaptic Maturation and Reduces the Dynamic Range of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Tyler T.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Normal hearing requires proper differentiation of afferent ribbon synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) that carry acoustic information to the brain. Within individual IHCs, presynaptic ribbons show a size gradient with larger ribbons on the modiolar face and smaller ribbons on the pillar face. This structural gradient is associated with a gradient of spontaneous rates and threshold sensitivity, which is essential for a wide dynamic range of hearing. Despite their importance for hearing, mechanisms that direct ribbon differentiation are poorly defined. We recently identified adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) as a key regulator of interneuronal synapse maturation. Here, we show that APC is required for ribbon size heterogeneity and normal cochlear function. Compared with wild-type littermates, APC conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit decreased auditory brainstem responses. The IHC ribbon size gradient is also perturbed. Whereas the normal-developing IHCs display ribbon size gradients before hearing onset, ribbon sizes are aberrant in APC cKOs from neonatal ages on. Reporter expression studies show that the CaMKII-Cre used to delete the floxed APC gene is present in efferent olivocochlear (OC) neurons, not IHCs or SGNs. APC loss led to increased volumes and numbers of OC inhibitory dopaminergic boutons on neonatal SGN fibers. Our findings identify APC in efferent OC neurons as essential for regulating ribbon heterogeneity, dopaminergic terminal differentiation, and cochlear sensitivity. This APC effect on auditory epithelial cell synapses resembles interneuronal and nerve–muscle synapses, thereby defining a global role for APC in synaptic maturation in diverse cell types. Significance Statement This study identifies novel molecules and cellular interactions that are essential for the proper maturation of afferent ribbon synapses in sensory cells of the inner ear, and for normal hearing. PMID:26085645

  19. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals) plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1) expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy) produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71%) also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking), in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:21527011

  20. Primary afferents with TRPM8 and TRPA1 profiles target distinct subpopulations of rat superficial dorsal horn neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wrigley, Paul J; Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, transient receptor potential melastatin-1 (TRPM8) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), are expressed in subpopulations of sensory neurones and have been proposed to mediate innocuous and noxious cold sensation respectively. The aim of this study was to compare TRPM8 and TRPA1 modulation of glutamatergic afferent transmission within the spinal dorsal horn. Experimental approach: Whole cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat spinal cord slices in vitro to examine the effect of TRP agonists and temperature on glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Key results: Icilin (3 or 100 µmol·L−1), menthol (200 µmol·L−1) and capsaicin (1 µmol·L−1) reduced the amplitude of primary afferent evoked EPSCs in subpopulations of lamina I and II neurones. In a subpopulation of superficial neurones, innocuous cold (threshold 29°C), 3 µmol·L−1 icilin (EC50 1.5 µmol·L−1) and menthol (EC50 263 µmol·L−1) increased the rate of spontaneous miniature EPSCs. In the majority of lamina I and II neurones, 100 µmol·L−1 icilin (EC50 79 µmol·L−1), allyl isothiocyanate (EC50 226 µmol·L−1), cinnamaldehyde (EC50 38 µmol·L−1) and capsaicin (1 µmol·L−1) increased miniature EPSC rate. The response to 100 µmol·L−1, but not 3 µmol·L−1 icilin, was abolished by ruthenium red, while neither was affected by iodoresiniferatoxin. Responsiveness to 3 µmol·L−1, but not to 100 µmol·L−1 icilin, was highly predictive of innocuous cold responsiveness. Neurones responding to 3 µmol·L−1 icilin and innocuous cold were located more superficially than those responding to 100 µmol·L−1 icilin. Conclusions and implications: Activation of TRPM8 and TRPA1 presynaptically modulated glutamatergic transmission onto partially overlapping but distinct populations of superficial dorsal horn neurones. Spinal TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels may therefore provide

  1. In Vivo Analysis of the Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Afferent Regulation of Chick Cochlear Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Carzoli, Kathryn L.; Hyson, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of approximately 20-30% of neurons in the chick nucleus magnocellularis (NM). One early event in NM neuronal degradation is the disruption of their ribosomes. This can be visualized in the first few hours following cochlea removal using Y10B, an antibody that recognizes ribosomal RNA. Previous studies using a brain slice preparation suggest that maintenance of ribosomal integrity in NM neurons requires metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation. Isolating the brain slice in vitro, however, may eliminate other potential sources of trophic support and only allows for evaluation of the early changes that occur in NM neurons following deafferentation. Consequently, it is not known if mGluR activation is truly required for the maintenance of NM neurons in the intact system. The current experiments evaluated the importance of mGluRs in vivo. The effects of short-term receptor blockade were assessed through Y10B labeling and the effects of long-term blockade were assessed through stereological counting of NM neurons in Nissl-stained tissue. mGluR antagonists or vehicle were administered intracerebroventricularly following unilateral cochlea removal. Vehicle-treated subjects replicated the previously reported effects of cochlea removal, showing lighter Y10B-labeling and fewer Nissl-stained NM neurons on the deafened side of the brain. Blockade of mGluRs prevented the rapid activity-dependent difference in Y10B labeling, and in some cases, had the reverse effect, yielding lighter labeling of NM neurons on the intact side of the brain. Similarly, mGluR blockade over longer survival periods resulted in a reduction in number of cells on both intact and deafferented sides of the brain, and in some cases, yielded a reverse effect of fewer neurons on the intact side versus deafened side. These data are consistent with in vitro findings and suggest that mGluR activation plays a vital role in the afferent maintenance of NM neurons. PMID

  2. Oral manganese as an MRI contrast agent for the detection of nociceptive activity.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Kathleen E; Behera, Deepak; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Gold, Garry; Moseley, Michael; Yeomans, David; Biswal, Sandip

    2012-04-01

    The ability of divalent manganese to enter neurons via calcium channels makes manganese an excellent MRI contrast agent for the imaging of nociception, the afferent neuronal encoding of pain perception. There is growing evidence that nociceptive neurons possess increased expression and activity of calcium channels, which would allow for the selective accumulation of manganese at these sites. In this study, we show that oral manganese chloride leads to increased enhancement of peripheral nerves involved in nociception on T(1)-weighted MRI. Oral rather than intravenous administration was chosen for its potentially better safety profile, making it a better candidate for clinical translation with important applications, such as pain diagnosis, therapy and research. The spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain was used for the purposes of this study. SNI rats were given, sequentially, increasing amounts of manganese chloride (lowest, 2.29 mg/100 g weight; highest, 20.6 mg/100 g weight) with alanine and vitamin D(3) by oral gavage. Compared with controls, SNI rats demonstrated increased signal-to-background ratios on T(1)-weighted fast spin echo MRI, which was confirmed by and correlated strongly with spectrometry measurements of nerve manganese concentration. We also found the difference between SNI and control rats to be greater at 48 h than at 24 h after dosing, indicating increased manganese retention in addition to increased manganese uptake in nociceptive nerves. This study demonstrates that oral manganese is a viable method for the imaging of nerves associated with increased nociceptive activity. PMID:22447731

  3. Functional properties of monkey motor cortex neurones receiving afferent input from the hand and fingers

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    1. Records have been made from area 4 of the cerebral cortex in five conscious monkeys. The properties of 216 neurones responsive to natural stimulation of the hand and fingers have been investigated. 2. 46% of these neurones responded only to cutaneous stimulation (especially light brushing across the glabrous skin) and a further 38% responded only to movement of the digits. 4% responded to brief prods of the hand. 12% of the sample responded to more than one stimulus modality. 3. Many hand-input neurones, including pyramidal tract neurones, responded at short-latency (8-15 msec) to light mechanical stimulation of the hand and to weak electrical stimulation of the median nerve. 4. Responsive neurones were found at all depths of the cortical grey matter. Responses of shortest latency were encountered in neurones probably located in layers IV and V. 5. The behaviour of eighty hand-input neurones was analysed during a simple, stereotyped task which involved pulling a lever and collecting a food reward from a small well. For comparison, the activity of 117 neurones with inputs from the wrist, elbow or shoulder was also analysed. 6. Nearly all hand-input neurones modulated their activity either before (48/80) or during (29/80) the retrieval of the reward which required precision grip between index finger and thumb. Many were silent during proximal arm movements and some displayed activity patterns independent of these movements. 7. By contrast, the activity of many neurones with proximal arm (elbow, shoulder) inputs was unrelated to food retrieval and manipulation, but well related to arm movements. 8. Forty-three of the eighty neurones had cutaneous input from the hand. Twenty-seven were active before hand contact. Thirty-five modulated their discharge when contact was made (twenty-one excitation, fourteen inhibition). 9. Most hand-input neurones were more active during fractionated movements of the hand or fingers than during power or ball grips requiring

  4. In vivo responses of cutaneous C-mechanosensitive neurons in mouse to punctate chemical stimuli that elicit itch and nociceptive sensations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ma, C.; Nie, H.; Gu, Q.; Sikand, P.

    2012-01-01

    Native cowhage spicules, and heat-inactivated spicules containing histamine or capsaicin, evoke similar sensations of itch and nociceptive sensations in humans. In ongoing studies of the peripheral neural mechanisms of chemical itch and pain in the mouse, extracellular electrophysiological recordings were obtained, in vivo, from the cell bodies of mechanosensitive nociceptive neurons in response to spicule stimuli delivered to their cutaneous receptive fields (RFs) on the distal hindlimb. A total of 43 mechanosensitive, cutaneous, nociceptive neurons with axonal conduction velocities in the C-fiber range (C-nociceptors) were classified as CM if responsive to noxious mechanical stimuli, such as pinch, or CMH if responsive to noxious mechanical and heat stimuli (51°C, 5 s). The tips of native cowhage spicules, or heat-inactivated spicules containing histamine or capsaicin, were applied to the RF. Heat-inactivated spicules containing no chemical produced only a transient response occurring during insertion. Of the 43 mechanosensitive nociceptors recorded, 20 of the 25 CMHs responded to capsaicin, and of these, 13 also responded to cowhage and/or histamine. In contrast, none of the 18 CMs responded to any of the chemical stimuli. The time course of the mean discharge rate of CMHs was similar in response to each type of spicule and generally similar, although reaching a peak earlier, to the temporal profiles of itch and nociceptive sensations evoked by the same stimuli in humans. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the itch and nociceptive sensations evoked by these punctuate chemical stimuli are mediated at least in part by the activity of mechanoheat-sensitive C-nociceptors. In contrast, activity in mechanosensitive C-nociceptors that do not respond to heat or to pruritic chemicals is hypothesized as contributing to pain but not to itch. PMID:21994268

  5. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels Expression, Identity and Role in the Excitability of the Cochlear Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    González-Garrido, Antonia; Vega, Rosario; Mercado, Francisco; López, Iván A.; Soto, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are activated by an increase in the extracellular proton concentration. There are four genes (ASIC1-4) that encode six subunits, and they are involved in diverse neuronal functions, such as mechanosensation, learning and memory, nociception, and modulation of retinal function. In this study, we characterize the ASIC currents of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). These ASIC currents are primarily carried by Na+, exhibit fast activation and desensitization, display a pH50 of 6.2 and are blocked by amiloride, indicating that these are ASIC currents. The ASIC currents were further characterized using several pharmacological tools. Gadolinium and acetylsalicylic acid reduced these currents, and FMRFamide, zinc (at high concentrations) and N,N,N’,N’–tetrakis-(2-piridilmetil)-ethylenediamine increased them, indicating that functional ASICs are composed of the subunits ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3. Neomycin and streptomycin reduced the desensitization rate of the ASIC current in SGNs, indicating that ASICs may contribute to the ototoxic action of aminoglycosides. RT-PCR of the spiral ganglion revealed significant expression of all ASIC subunits. By immunohistochemistry the expression of the ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3 subunits was detected in SGNs. Although only a few SGNs exhibited action potential firing in response to an acidic stimulus, protons in the extracellular solution modulated SGN activity during sinusoidal stimulation. Our results show that protons modulate the excitability of SGNs via ASICs. PMID:26733809

  6. Upregulation of Ih expressed in IB4-negative Aδ nociceptive DRG neurons contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da-Lu; Lu, Na; Han, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Gui; Cong, Rui; Xie, Rou-Gang; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Kong, Wei-Wei; Hu, San-Jue; Luo, Ceng

    2015-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy represents aberrant mechanical hypersensitivity. Primary sensory neuron’s ability to sense mechanical force forms mechanotransduction. However, whether this property undergoes activity-dependent plastic changes and underlies mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain (CRP) is not clear. Here we show a new CRP model producing stable mechanical compression of dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which induces dramatic behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity. Amongst nociceptive DRG neurons, a mechanically sensitive neuron, isolectin B4 negative Aδ-type (IB4− Aδ) DRG neuron displays spontaneous activity with hyperexcitability after chronic compression of cervical DRGs. Focal mechanical stimulation on somata of IB4- Aδ neuron induces abnormal hypersensitivity. Upregulated HCN1 and HCN3 channels and increased Ih current on this subset of primary nociceptors underlies the spontaneous activity together with neuronal mechanical hypersensitivity, which further contributes to the behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity associated with CRP. This study sheds new light on the functional plasticity of a specific subset of nociceptive DRG neurons to mechanical stimulation and reveals a novel mechanism that could underlie the mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26577374

  7. Influence of nasotrigeminal afferents on medullary respiratory neurones and upper airway patency in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dutschmann, M; Paton, J F R

    2002-05-01

    Noxious stimulation of the nasal mucosa evokes a nasotrigeminal reflex (diving response), consisting of apnoea, bradycardia and vasoconstriction. However, the central mechanisms underlying the respiratory component remain unclear. Here, we describe the influence of nasotrigeminal stimulation (NS) on different types of ventral medullary respiratory neurones and upper airway patency in the rat. In an arterially perfused working heart-brainstem preparation (WHBP), NS was induced by either irrigation of the nasal passage with cold saline (100-200 microl) or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ethmoidal nerve (EN5, 20 Hz, 10 s, 100 micros, 0.5-2 V). Both stimuli evoked apnoea, bradycardia, a pressor response, persistent discharge in the recurrent laryngeal nerve and marked glottal adduction (P<0.001). NS evoked a distinct pattern of response in respiratory neurones: inspiratory (I) neurones ceased firing and hyperpolarized (n=19), while postinspiratory neurones depolarized (n=10) and discharged persistently. The latency of EN5-evoked synaptic responses (excitatory to postinspiratory neurones 12.3+/-2.8 ms, n=10; inhibitory to inspiratory neurones 11.8+/-1.9 ms; n=19) was comparable. During the NS-evoked apnoea burst discharges were superimposed on a maintained level of tonic activity recorded from both the recurrent laryngeal nerve (n=4) and some postinspiratory neurones (n=7). The physiological significance of these "apnoeic rhythms" is discussed. We conclude that the cardiorespiratory components of the diving response are mediated by activation of distinct sets of postinspiratory respiratory neurones. PMID:11976936

  8. Persistent Adaptations in Afferents to Ventral Tegmental Dopamine Neurons after Opiate Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kaufling, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Protracted opiate withdrawal is accompanied by altered responsiveness of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, including a loss of DA cell response to morphine, and by behavioral alterations, including affective disorders. GABAergic neurons in the tail of the ventral tegmental area (tVTA), also called the rostromedial tegmental nucleus, are important for behavioral responses to opiates. We investigated the tVTA–VTA circuit in rats after chronic morphine exposure to determine whether tVTA neurons participate in the loss of opiate-induced disinhibition of VTA DA neurons observed during protracted withdrawal. In vivo recording revealed that VTA DA neurons, but not tVTA GABAergic neurons, are tolerant to morphine after 2 weeks of withdrawal. Optogenetic stimulation of tVTA neurons inhibited VTA DA neurons similarly in opiate-naive and long-term withdrawn rats. However, tVTA inactivation increased VTA DA activity in opiate-naive rats, but not in withdrawn rats, resembling the opiate tolerance effect in DA cells. Thus, although inhibitory control of DA neurons by tVTA is maintained during protracted withdrawal, the capacity for disinhibitory control is impaired. In addition, morphine withdrawal reduced both tVTA neural activity and tonic glutamatergic input to VTA DA neurons. We propose that these changes in glutamate and GABA inputs underlie the apparent tolerance of VTA DA neurons to opiates after chronic exposure. These alterations in the tVTA–VTA DA circuit could be an important factor in opiate tolerance and addiction. Moreover, the capacity of the tVTA to inhibit, but not disinhibit, DA cells after chronic opiate exposure may contribute to long-term negative affective states during withdrawal. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopaminergic (DA) cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are the origin of a brain reward system and are critically involved in drug abuse. Morphine has long been known to affect VTA DA cells via GABAergic interneurons. Recently, GABAergic neurons

  9. Chronic recruitment of primary afferent neurons by microstimulation in the feline dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lee E.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Ciollaro, Mattia; Ventura, Valérie; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. This study describes results of primary afferent neural microstimulation experiments using microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of four cats. The goal was to test the stability and selectivity of these microelectrode arrays as a potential interface for restoration of somatosensory feedback after damage to the nervous system such as amputation. Approach. A five-contact nerve-cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve was used to record the antidromic compound action potential response to DRG microstimulation (2-15 µA biphasic pulses, 200 µs cathodal pulse width), and the threshold for eliciting a response was tracked over time. Recorded responses were segregated based on conduction velocity to determine thresholds for recruiting Group I and Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers. Main results. Thresholds were initially low (5.1 ± 2.3 µA for Group I and 6.3 ± 2.0 µA for Group II/Aβ) and increased over time. Additionally the number of electrodes with thresholds less than or equal to 15 µA decreased over time. Approximately 12% of tested electrodes continued to elicit responses at 15 µA up to 26 weeks after implantation. Higher stimulation intensities (up to 30 µA) were tested in one cat at 23 weeks post-implantation yielding responses on over 20 additional electrodes. Within the first six weeks after implantation, approximately equal numbers of electrodes elicited only Group I or Group II/Aβ responses at threshold, but the relative proportion of Group II/Aβ responses decreased over time. Significance. These results suggest that it is possible to activate Group I or Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers in isolation with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in the DRG, and that those responses can be elicited up to 26 weeks after implantation, although it may be difficult to achieve a consistent response day-to-day with currently available electrode technology. The DRG are compelling targets

  10. Extended secondhand tobacco smoke exposure induces plasticity in nucleus tractus solitarius second-order lung afferent neurons in young guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sekizawa, Shin-Ichi; Chen, Chao-Yin; Bechtold, Andrea G; Tabor, Jocelyn M; Bric, John M; Pinkerton, Kent E; Joad, Jesse P; Bonham, Ann C

    2008-08-01

    Infants and young children experiencing extended exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) have an increased occurrence of asthma, as well as increased cough, wheeze, mucus production and airway hyper-reactivity. Plasticity in lung reflex pathways has been implicated in causing these symptoms, as have changes in substance P-related mechanisms. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings and immunohistochemistry in brainstem slices containing anatomically identified second-order lung afferent nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons, we determined whether extended SHS exposure during the equivalent period of human childhood modified evoked or spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission, and whether those modifications were altered by endogenous substance P. SHS exposure enhanced evoked synaptic transmission between sensory afferents and the NTS second-order neurons by eliminating synaptic depression of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs), an effect reversed by the neurokinin-1-receptor antagonist (SR140333). The recruitment of substance P in enhancing evoked synaptic transmission was further supported by an increased number of substance P-expressing lung afferent central terminals synapsing onto the second-order lung afferent neurons. SHS exposure did not change background spontaneous EPSCs. The data suggest that substance P in the NTS augments evoked synaptic transmission of lung sensory input following extended exposure to a pollutant. The mechanism may help to explain some of the exaggerated respiratory responses of children exposed to SHS. PMID:18657181

  11. Effects of D-kyotorphin on nociception and NADPH-d neurons in rat's periaqueductal gray after immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Dzambazova, Elena B; Landzhov, Boycho V; Bocheva, Adriana I; Bozhilova-Pastirova, Anastasia A

    2011-10-01

    D-kyotorphin (D-Kyo) is a synthetic analogue of the neuropeptide kyotorphin and produces naloxone reversible analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia (SIA) is an in-built mammalian pain-suppression response that occurs during or following exposure to a stressful stimulus. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is implicated as a critical site for processing strategies for coping with different types of stress and pain and NO affects its activity. The objectives of the present study were twofold: (1) to examine the effects of D-Kyo (5 mg/kg) on acute immobilization SIA; (2) to investigate the effect of peptide on NO activity in rat PAG after the stress procedure mentioned above. All drugs were injected intraperitoneally in male Wistar rats. The nociception was measured by the paw pressure and hot plate tests. A histochemical procedure for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d)-reactive neurons was used as indirect marker of NO activity. Our results revealed that D-Kyo has modulating effects on acute immobilization stress-induced analgesia in rats may be by opioid and non-opioid systems. Although D-Kyo is incapable of crossing the blood-brain barrier it showed an increased number of NADPH-d reactive neurons in dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) in control but not in stressed groups. We may speculate that the effect of D-Kyo in the brain is due to structural and functional interaction between opioidergic and NO-ergic systems or D-Kyo appears itself as a stressor. Further studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms of its action. PMID:21046177

  12. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  13. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Fawley, Jessica A.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1− ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1− inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  14. Increased Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in trigeminal nociceptive neurons following propofol administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Emi; Kitagawa, Junichi; Suzuki, Ikuko; Nitta-Kubota, Ieko; Miyamoto, Makiko; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuji; Oi, Yoshiyuki; Ren, Ke; Iwata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Although propofol (PRO) is widely used in clinic as a hypnotic agent, the underlying mechanisms of its action on pain pathways is still unknown. Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to receive PRO or pentobarbital (PEN) and were divided into two groups as LIGHT and DEEP hypnotic levels based on the EEG analysis. Rats in each hypnotic level received capsaicin injection into the face and phosphorylated extracellular regulated-kinase (pERK) immunohistochemistry were performed in subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord. A large number of pERK-like immunoreactive (LI) cells was observed in the trigeminal spinal subnuclei interpolaris and caudalis transition zone (Vi/Vc), middle Vc and transition zone between Vc and upper cervical spinal cord (Vc/C2) in the rats with PEN or PRO administration following capsaicin injection into the whisker pad region. The number of pERK-LI cells in Vi/Vc, middle Vc and Vc/C2 was significantly larger in rats with PRO injection than those with PEN injection. The number of pERK-LI cells was increased following an increase in the dose of PRO but not in PEN. The pERK-LI cells were dominantly distributed in the Vi/Vc, middle Vc and Vc/C2 after the bolus injections of PRO. The expression of pERK-LI cells was depressed after the intravenous lidocaine application before PRO injection. The present findings suggested that PRO induced an enhancement of the activity of trigeminal nociceptive pathways through nociceptors innervating the venous structure, as indicated by a lidocaine-sensitive increase in pERK. This may explain deep pain around the injection regions during intravenous bolus injection of PRO. Perspective: The effect of propofol administration on ERK phosphorylation in the subregions of the spinal trigeminal complex and upper cervical spinal cord neurons were precisely analyzed in rats with PRO injection. A large number of pERK-LI cells was observed following intravenous PRO administration, suggesting an enhancement of

  15. Divergence in Endothelin-1- and Bradykinin-Activated Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Afferent Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szteyn, Kalina; Gomez, Ruben; Berg, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and bradykinin (BK) are endogenous peptides that signal through Gαq/11-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to produce nociceptor sensitization and pain. Both peptides activate phospholipase C to stimulate Ca2+ accumulation, diacylglycerol production, and protein kinase C activation and are rapidly desensitized via a G-protein receptor kinase 2-dependent mechanism. However, ET-1 produces a greater response and longer lasting nocifensive behavior than BK in multiple models, indicating a potentially divergent signaling mechanism in primary afferent sensory neurons. Using cultured sensory neurons, we demonstrate significant differences in both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores following ET-1 and BK treatments. As intracellular store depletion may contribute to the regulation of other signaling cascades downstream of GPCRs, we concentrated our investigation on store-operated Ca2+ channels. Using pharmacological approaches, we identified transient receptor potential canonical channel 3 (TRPC3) as a dominant contributor to Ca2+ influx subsequent to ET-1 treatment. On the other hand, BK treatment stimulated Orai1 activation, with only minor input from TRPC3. Taken together, data presented here suggest that ET-1 signaling targets TRPC3, generating a prolonged Ca2+ signal that perpetuates nocifensive responses. In contrast, Orai1 dominates as the downstream target of BK receptor activation and results in transient intracellular Ca2+ increases and abridged nocifensive responses. PMID:25873305

  16. Nociceptive neurons differentially express fast and slow T-type Ca²⁺ currents in different types of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Khomula, Eugen V; Borisyuk, Anya L; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav Y; Briede, Andrea; Belan, Pavel V; Voitenko, Nana V

    2014-01-01

    T-type Ca²⁺ channels are known as important participants of nociception and their remodeling contributes to diabetes-induced alterations of pain sensation. In this work we have established that about 30% of rat nonpeptidergic thermal C-type nociceptive (NTCN) neurons of segments L4-L6 express a slow T-type Ca²⁺ current (T-current) while a fast T-current is expressed in the other 70% of these neurons. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in young rats resulted in thermal hyperalgesia, hypoalgesia, or normalgesia 5-6 weeks after the induction. Our results show that NTCN neurons obtained from hyperalgesic animals do not express the slow T-current. Meanwhile, the fraction of neurons expressing the slow T-current did not significantly change in the hypo- and normalgesic diabetic groups. Moreover, the peak current density of fast T-current was significantly increased only in the neurons of hyperalgesic group. In contrast, the peak current density of slow T-current was significantly decreased in the hypo- and normalgesic groups. Experimental diabetes also resulted in a depolarizing shift of steady-state inactivation of fast T-current in the hyperalgesic group and slow T-current in the hypo- and normalgesic groups. We suggest that the observed changes may contribute to expression of different types of peripheral diabetic neuropathy occurring during the development of diabetes mellitus. PMID:24693454

  17. Dopaminergic Presynaptic Modulation of Nigral Afferents: Its Role in the Generation of Recurrent Bursting in Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata Neurons

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Aceves, José; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernández, Ricardo; Plata, Víctor; Ibañez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown the functions associated with activation of dopamine presynaptic receptors in some substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) afferents: (i) striatonigral terminals (direct pathway) posses presynaptic dopamine D1-class receptors whose action is to enhance inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and GABA transmission. (ii) Subthalamonigral terminals posses D1- and D2-class receptors where D1-class receptor activation enhances and D2-class receptor activation decreases excitatory postsynaptic currents. Here we report that pallidonigral afferents posses D2-class receptors (D3 and D4 types) that decrease inhibitory synaptic transmission via presynaptic modulation. No action of D1-class agonists was found on pallidonigral synapses. In contrast, administration of D1-receptor antagonists greatly decreased striatonigral IPSCs in the same preparation, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels help in maintaining the function of the striatonigral (direct) pathway. When both D3 and D4 type receptors were blocked, pallidonigral IPSCs increased in amplitude while striatonigral connections had no significant change, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels are repressing a powerful inhibition conveyed by pallidonigral synapses (a branch of the indirect pathway). We then blocked both D1- and D2-class receptors to acutely decrease direct pathway (striatonigral) and enhance indirect pathways (subthalamonigral and pallidonigral) synaptic force. The result was that most SNr projection neurons entered a recurrent bursting firing mode similar to that observed during Parkinsonism in both patients and animal models. These results raise the question as to whether the lack of dopamine in basal ganglia output nuclei is enough to generate some pathological signs of Parkinsonism. PMID:21347219

  18. Oxytocin hyperpolarizes cultured duodenum myenteric intrinsic primary afferent neurons by opening BK(Ca) channels through IP₃ pathway.

    PubMed

    Che, Tongtong; Sun, Hui; Li, Jingxin; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Dexiao; Xue, Bing; Liu, Kejing; Zhang, Min; Kunze, Wolfgang; Liu, Chuanyong

    2012-05-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is clinically important in gut motility and constitutively reduces duodenum contractility. Intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs), whose physiological classification is as AH cells, are the 1st neurons of the peristaltic reflex pathway. We set out to investigate if this inhibitory effect is mediated by IPANs and to identify the ion channel(s) and intracellular signal transduction pathway that are involved in this effect. Myenteric neurons were isolated from the longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparation of rat duodenum and cultured for 16-24 h before electrophysiological recording in whole cell mode and AH cells identified by their electrophysiological characteristics. The cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺](i) ) of isolated neurons was measured using calcium imaging. The concentration of IP(3) in the LMMP and the OT secreted from the LMMP were measured using ELISA. The oxytocin receptor (OTR) and large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels, as well as the expression of OT and the IPAN marker calbindin 28 K, on the myenteric plexus neurons were localized using double-immunostaining techniques. We found that administration of OT (10⁻⁷ to 10⁻⁵ M) dose dependently hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the total outward current. The OTR antagonist atosiban or the BK(Ca) channel blocker iberiotoxin (IbTX) blocked the effects of OT suggesting that the increased outward current resulted from BK(Ca) channel opening. OTR and the BK(Ca) α subunit were co-expressed on a subset of myenteric neurons at the LMMP. NS1619 (10⁻⁵ M, a BK(Ca) channel activator) increased the outward current similar to the effect of OT. OT administration also increased [Ca²⁺](i) and the OT-evoked outward current was significantly attenuated by thapsigargin (10⁻⁶ M) or CdCl₂. The effect of OT on the BK(Ca) current was also blocked by pre-treatment with the IP₃ receptor antagonist 2-APB (10⁻⁴ M

  19. An ionic current model for neurons in the rat medial nucleus tractus solitarii receiving sensory afferent input.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, J H; Khushalani, S; Clark, J W; Andresen, M C; Kunze, D L; Yang, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Neurons from a horizontal slice of adult rat brainstem were examined using intracellular recording techniques. Investigations were restricted to a region within the nucleus tractus solitarii, medial to the solitary tract and centred on the obex (mNTS). Previous work has shown this restricted area of the NTS to contain the greatest concentration of aortic afferent baroreceptor terminal fields. Electrical stimulation of the tract elicited short-latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials in all neurons. 2. mNTS neurons were spontaneously active with firing frequencies ranging between 1 and 10 Hz, at resting potentials of -65 to -45 mV. These neurons did not exhibit spontaneous bursting activity. 3. Depolarizing current injection immediately evoked a finite, high-frequency spike discharge which rapidly declined to a lower steady-state level (i.e. spike frequency adaptation, SFA). Increasing depolarizations produced a marked increase in the peak instantaneous frequency but a much smaller increase in the steady-state firing level. 4. Conditioning with a hyperpolarizing prepulse resulted in a prolonged delay of up to 600 ms before the first action potential (i.e. delayed excitation, DE) with an attendant decrease in peak discharge rates. DE was modulated by both the magnitude and duration of the prestimulus hyperpolarization, as well as the magnitude of the depolarizing stimulus. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) eliminated spike discharge but had little effect on the ramp-like membrane depolarization characteristic of DE. 5. We have developed a mathematical model for mNTS neurons to facilitate our understanding of the interplay between the underlying ionic currents. It consists of a comprehensive membrane model of the Hodgkin-Huxley type coupled with a fluid compartment model describing cytoplasmic [Ca2+]i homeostasis. 6. The model suggests that (a) SFA is caused by an increase in [Ca2+]i which activates the outward K+ current, IK,Ca, and (b) DE results from the competitive

  20. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  1. Reticular thalamic responses to nociceptive inputs in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chen-Tung; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2003-04-11

    The present study compares nociceptive responses of neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RT) to those of the ventroposterior lateral nucleus (VPL). Extracellular single-unit activities of cells in the RT and VPL were recorded in anesthetized rats. Only units with identified tactile receptive fields in the forepaw or hindpaw were studied. In the first series of experiments, RT and VPL responses to pinching with a small artery clamp were tested with the rats under pentobarbital, urethane, ketamine, or halothane anesthesia. Under all types of anesthesia, many RT units were inhibited. Second, the specificity of the nociceptive response was tested by pinching and noxious heating of the unit's tactile receptive field. Of the 39 VPL units tested, 20 were excited by both types of noxious stimuli. In sharp contrast, of the 30 RT units tested, none were excited and 17 were inhibited. In a third series of experiments, low-intensity and beam-diffused CO(2) laser irradiation was used to activate peripheral nociceptive afferents. Wide-dynamic-range VPL units responded with short- and long-latency excitations. In contrast, RT units had short-latency excitation followed by long-latency inhibition. Nociceptive input inhibited RT units in less than 500 ms. We conclude that a significant portion of RT neurons were polysynaptically inhibited by nociceptive inputs. Since all the cells tested were excited by light tactile inputs, the somatosensory RT may serve in the role of a modality gate, which modifies (i.e. inhibits) tactile inputs while letting noxious inputs pass. PMID:12663087

  2. Differential effects of GABA in modulating nociceptive vs. non-nociceptive synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Summers, T; Peterson, W; Miiller, E; Burrell, B D

    2015-07-01

    GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) -mediated signaling is normally associated with synaptic inhibition due to ionotropic GABA receptors that gate an inward Cl(-) current, hyperpolarizing the membrane potential. However, there are also situations where ionotropic GABA receptors trigger a Cl(-) efflux that results in depolarization. The well-characterized central nervous system of the medicinal leech was used to study the functional significance of opposing effects of GABA at the synaptic circuit level. Specifically, we focused on synapses made by the nociceptive N cell and the non-nociceptive P (pressure) cell that converge onto a common postsynaptic target. It is already known that GABA hyperpolarizes the P cell, but depolarizes the N cell and that inhibition of ionotropic GABA receptors by bicuculline (BIC) has opposing effects on the synapses made by these two inputs; enhancing P cell synaptic transmission, but depressing N cell synapses. The goal of the present study was to determine whether the opposing effects of GABA were due to differences in Cl(-) homeostasis between the two presynaptic neurons. VU 0240551 (VU), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) exporter K-Cl co-transporter isoform 2 (KCC2), attenuated GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the non-nociceptive afferent while bumetanide (BUM), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) importer Na-K-Cl co-transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), reduced GABA-mediated depolarization of the nociceptive neuron. VU treatment also enhanced P cell synaptic signaling, similar to the previously observed effects of BIC and consistent with the idea that GABA inhibits synaptic signaling at the presynaptic level. BUM treatment depressed N cell synapses, again similar to what is observed following BIC treatment and suggests that GABA has an excitatory effect on these synapses. The opposing effects of GABA could also be observed at the behavioral level with BIC and VU increasing responsiveness to non-nociceptive stimulation while BIC and BUM decreased responsiveness

  3. Modulation of the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) by cyclic nucleotides in guinea-pig primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, S L; Williams, J T

    1996-01-01

    1. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from dissociated guinea-pig nodose and trigeminal ganglion neurons in culture to study second messenger mechanisms of the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) modulation. 2. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and forskolin modulate Ih in primary afferents by shifting the activation curve in the depolarizing direction and increasing the maximum amplitude. 3. The cAMP analogues, RP-cAMP-S (an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA)) and SP-cAMP-S (an activator of PKA), both shifted the activation curve of Ih to more depolarized potentials and occluded the effects of forskolin. These results suggest that Ih is modulated by a direct action of the cAMP analogues. 4. Superfusion of other cyclic nucleotide analogues (8-Br-cAMP, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP) mimicked the actions of forskolin and PGE2, but dibutyryl cGMP, 5'-AMP and adenosine had no effect on Ih. 8-Br-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP had similar concentration response profiles, suggesting that Ih has little nucleotide selectivity. 5. The inhibitor peptide (PKI), the catalytic subunit of PKA (C subunit) and phosphatase inhibitors (microcystin and okadaic acid) had no effect on forskolin modulation of Ih. 6. These results indicate that Ih is regulated by cyclic nucleotides in sensory neurons. Positive regulation of Ih by prostaglandins produced during inflammation may lead to depolarization and facilitation of repetitive activity, and thus contribute to sensitization to painful stimuli. PMID:8730586

  4. Limb-state information encoded by peripheral and central somatosensory neurons: Implications for an afferent interface

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Douglas J.; London, Brian M.; Hokanson, James A.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Torres, Ricardo R.; Zaaimi, Boubker; Miller, Lee E.

    2013-01-01

    A major issue to be addressed in the development of neural interfaces for prosthetic control is the need for somatosensory feedback. Here, we investigate two possible strategies: electrical stimulation of either dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or primary somatosensory cortex (S1). In each approach, we must determine a model that reflects the representation of limb state in terms of neural discharge. This model can then be used to design stimuli that artificially activate the nervous system to convey information about limb state to the subject. Electrically activating DRG neurons using naturalistic stimulus patterns, modeled on recordings made during passive limb movement, evoked activity in S1 that was similar to that of the original movement. We also found that S1 neural populations could accurately discriminate different patterns of DRG stimulation across a wide range of stimulus pulse-rates. In studying the neural coding of limb-state in S1, we also decoded the kinematics of active limb movement using multi-electrode recordings in the monkey. Neurons having both proprioceptive and cutaneous receptive fields contributed equally to this decoding. Some neurons were most informative of limb state in the recent past, but many others appeared to signal upcoming movements suggesting that they also were modulated by an efference copy signal. Finally, we show that a monkey was able to detect stimulation through a large percentage of electrodes implanted in area 2. We discuss the design of appropriate stimulus paradigms for conveying time-varying limb state information, and the relative merits and limitations of central and peripheral approaches. PMID:21878419

  5. Pontomesencephalic Tegmental Afferents to VTA Non-dopamine Neurons Are Necessary for Appetitive Pavlovian Learning.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Wang, Dong V; Tsou, Jen-Hui; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Billy T; Deisseroth, Karl; Ikemoto, Satoshi; Bonci, Antonello

    2016-09-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) receives phenotypically distinct innervations from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg). While PPTg-to-VTA inputs are thought to play a critical role in stimulus-reward learning, direct evidence linking PPTg-to-VTA phenotypically distinct inputs in the learning process remains lacking. Here, we used optogenetic approaches to investigate the functional contribution of PPTg excitatory and inhibitory inputs to the VTA in appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. We show that photoinhibition of PPTg-to-VTA cholinergic or glutamatergic inputs during cue presentation dampens the development of anticipatory approach responding to the food receptacle during the cue. Furthermore, we employed in vivo optetrode recordings to show that photoinhibition of PPTg cholinergic or glutamatergic inputs significantly decreases VTA non-dopamine (non-DA) neural activity. Consistently, photoinhibition of VTA non-DA neurons disrupts the development of cue-elicited anticipatory approach responding. Taken together, our study reveals a crucial regulatory mechanism by PPTg excitatory inputs onto VTA non-DA neurons during appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. PMID:27568569

  6. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L.; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. Results: SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca2+ channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K+ channels described earlier. Innovation: Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca2+ current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K+ current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. Conclusion: SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233–251. PMID:27306612

  7. Inputs from regularly and irregularly discharging vestibular nerve afferents to secondary neurons in squirrel monkey vestibular nuclei. III. Correlation with vestibulospinal and vestibuloocular output pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Goldberg, J. M.; Highstein, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. A previous study measured the relative contributions made by regularly and irregularly discharging afferents to the monosynaptic vestibular nerve (Vi) input of individual secondary neurons located in and around the superior vestibular nucleus of barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Here, the analysis is extended to more caudal regions of the vestibular nuclei, which are a major source of both vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways. As in the previous study, antidromic stimulation techniques are used to classify secondary neurons as oculomotor or spinal projecting. In addition, spinal-projecting neurons are distinguished by their descending pathways, their termination levels in the spinal cord, and their collateral projections to the IIIrd nucleus. 2. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded intracellularly from secondary neurons as shocks of increasing strength were applied to Vi. Shocks were normalized in terms of the threshold (T) required to evoke field potentials in the vestibular nuclei. As shown previously, the relative contribution of irregular afferents to the total monosynaptic Vi input of each secondary neuron can be expressed as a %I index, the ratio (x100) of the relative sizes of the EPSPs evoked by shocks of 4 x T and 16 x T. 3. Antidromic stimulation was used to type secondary neurons as 1) medial vestibulospinal tract (MVST) cells projecting to spinal segments C1 or C6; 2) lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST) cells projecting to C1, C6; or L1; 3) vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) cells projecting both to the IIIrd nucleus and by way of the MVST to C1 or C6; and 4) vestibuloocular (VOR) neurons projecting to the IIIrd nucleus but not to the spinal cord. Most of the neurons were located in the lateral vestibular nucleus (LV), including its dorsal (dLV) and ventral (vLV) divisions, and adjacent parts of the medial (MV) and descending nuclei (DV). Cells receiving quite different proportions of their direct inputs

  8. Differential ATF3 expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons reveals the profile of primary afferents engaged by diverse noxious chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, João M.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    Although transgenic and knockout mice have helped delineate the mechanisms of action of diverse noxious compounds, it is still difficult to determine unequivocally the subpopulations of primary afferent nociceptor that these molecules engage. As most noxious stimuli lead to tissue and/or nerve injury, here we used induction of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a reliable marker of nerve injury, to assess the populations of primary afferent fibers that are activated after peripheral administration of noxious chemical stimuli. In wild-type mice, hindpaw injections of capsaicin, formalin, mustard oil or menthol induce expression of ATF3 in distinct subpopulations of sensory neurons. Interestingly, even though these noxious chemicals are thought to act through subtypes of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, all compounds also induced ATF3 in neurons that appear not to express the expected TRP channel subtypes. On the other hand, capsaicin failed to induce ATF3 in mice lacking TRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 is required for both the direct and indirect induction of ATF3 in sensory neurons. By contrast, only low doses of formalin or mustard oil failed to induce ATF3 in TRPA1 null mice, indicating that injections of high doses (>0.5%) of formalin or mustard oil recruit both TRPA1 and non-TRPA1 expressing primary afferent fibers. Finally, peripheral injection of menthol, a TRPM8 receptor agonist, induced ATF3 in a wide variety of sensory neurons, but in a TRPM8-independent manner. We conclude that purportedly selective agonists can activate a heterogeneous population of sensory neurons, which ultimately could contribute to the behavioral responses evoked. PMID:20605331

  9. Satb2 Stations Neurons along Reflex Arcs.

    PubMed

    Hantman, Adam W; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2016-08-17

    The nociceptive flexor withdrawal reflex has an august place in the history of neuroscience. In this issue of Neuron, Hilde et al. (2016) advance our understanding of this reflex by characterizing the molecular identity and circuit connectivity of component interneurons. They assess how a DNA-binding factor Satb2 controls cell position, molecular identity, pre-and postsynaptic targeting, and function of a population of inhibitory sensory relay interneurons that serve to integrate both proprioceptive and nociceptive afferent information. PMID:27537478

  10. An In Vitro Adult Mouse Muscle-nerve Preparation for Studying the Firing Properties of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joy A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn; Wilkinson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sensory neurons innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs encode length and force changes essential to proprioception. Additional afferent fibers monitor other characteristics of the muscle environment, including metabolite buildup, temperature, and nociceptive stimuli. Overall, abnormal activation of sensory neurons can lead to movement disorders or chronic pain syndromes. We describe the isolation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and nerve for in vitro study of stretch-evoked afferent responses in the adult mouse. Sensory activity is recorded from the nerve with a suction electrode and individual afferents can be analyzed using spike sorting software. In vitro preparations allow for well controlled studies on sensory afferents without the potential confounds of anesthesia or altered muscle perfusion. Here we describe a protocol to identify and test the response of muscle spindle afferents to stretch. Importantly, this preparation also supports the study of other subtypes of muscle afferents, response properties following drug application and the incorporation of powerful genetic approaches and disease models in mice. PMID:25285602

  11. Ketamine-mediated afferent-specific presynaptic transmission blocks in low-threshold and sex-specific subpopulation of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons of rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Yin, Lei; Fan, Yao; Wang, Ye; Chen, Wei-Ran; Chen, Pei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Xiao-Long; Sun, Hong-Li; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine enhances autonomic activity, and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptor afferents are more susceptible to be blocked by ketamine than myelinated A-types. However, the presynaptic transmission block in low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) is not elucidated. Methods Action potentials (APs) and excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were investigated in BRNs/barosensitive neurons identified by conduction velocity (CV), capsaicin-conjugated with Iberiotoxin-sensitivity and fluorescent dye using intact nodose slice and brainstem slice in adult female rats. The expression of mRNA and targeted protein for NMDAR1 was also evaluated. Results Ketamine time-dependently blocked afferent CV in Ah-types in nodose slice with significant changes in AP discharge. The concentration-dependent inhibition of ketamine on AP discharge profiles were also assessed and observed using isolated Ah-type BRNs with dramatic reduction in neuroexcitability. In brainstem slice, the 2nd-order capsaicin-resistant EPSCs were identified and ∼50% of them were blocked by ketamine concentration-dependently with IC50 estimated at 84.4 μM compared with the rest (708.2 μM). Interestingly, the peak, decay time constant, and area under curve of EPSCs were significantly enhanced by 100 nM iberiotoxin in ketamine-more sensitive myelinated NTS neurons (most likely Ah-types), rather than ketamine-less sensitive ones (A-types). Conclusions These data have demonstrated, for the first time, that low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type BRNs in nodose and Ah-type barosensitive neurons in NTS are more susceptible to ketamine and may play crucial roles in not only mean blood pressure regulation but also buffering dynamic changes in pressure, as well as the ketamine-mediated cardiovascular dysfunction through sexual-dimorphic baroreflex afferent pathway. PMID:26675761

  12. Cutaneous tissue damage induces long-lasting nociceptive sensitization and regulation of cellular stress- and nerve injury-associated genes in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kristofer K; Hill, Caitlin E; Harrison, Benjamin J; Venkat, Gayathri; Koenig, Heidi M; Cook, Sarah B; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Taylor, Bradley K; Hai, Tsonwin; Petruska, Jeffrey C

    2016-09-01

    Tissue damage is one of the major etiological factors in the emergence of chronic/persistent pain, although mechanisms remain enigmatic. Using incision of the back skin of adult rats as a model for tissue damage, we observed sensitization in a nociceptive reflex enduring to 28days post-incision (DPI). To determine if the enduring behavioral changes corresponded with a long-term impact of tissue damage on sensory neurons, we examined the temporal expression profile of injury-regulated genes and the electrophysiological properties of traced dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. The mRNA for the injury/stress-hub gene Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) was upregulated and peaked within 4 DPI, after which levels declined but remained significantly elevated out to 28 DPI, a time when the initial incision appears healed and tissue-inflammation largely resolved. Accordingly, stereological image analysis indicated that some neurons expressed ATF3 only transiently (mostly medium-large neurons), while in others it was sustained (mostly small neurons), suggesting cell-type-specific responses. In retrogradely-traced ATF3-expressing neurons, Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CAMK4) protein levels and isolectin-B4 (IB4)-binding were suppressed whereas Growth Associated Protein-43 (GAP-43) and Neuropeptide Y (NPY) protein levels were enhanced. Electrophysiological recordings from DiI-traced sensory neurons 28 DPI showed a significant sensitization limited to ATF3-expressing neurons. Thus, ATF3 expression is revealed as a strong predictor of single cells displaying enduring pain-related electrophysiological properties. The cellular injury/stress response induced in sensory neurons by tissue damage and indicated by ATF3 expression is positioned to contribute to pain which can occur after tissue damage. PMID:27264359

  13. Effects of afferent volleys from the limbs on the discharge patterns of interpositus neurones in cats anaesthetized with alpha-chloralose.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, D M; Cogdell, B; Harvey, R

    1975-01-01

    that the short latency responses of the interpositus neurones were a result of synaptic excitation via cerebellar afferents, while the ensuing inhibition was a result of post-synaptic inhibition resulting from the Purkinje cell excitation due to the afferent volleys. It is suggested that the long latency excitation is due to the afferent volleys. It is suggested that the long latency excitation is due at least in part to disinhibition resulting from long pauses in Purkinje cell firing following their activation by climbing fibre afferents. 9. The possibility that these long latency responses have a physiological significance in relation to locomotion is discussed. PMID:1151794

  14. elPBN neurons regulate rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections during activation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Longhurst, John C; Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu

    2016-08-01

    The external lateral parabrachial nucleus (elPBN) within the pons and rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) contributes to central processing of excitatory cardiovascular reflexes during stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves (CSAN). However, the importance of elPBN cardiovascular neurons in regulation of rVLM activity during CSAN activation remains unclear. We hypothesized that CSAN stimulation excites the elPBN cardiovascular neurons and, in turn, increases rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections. Compared with controls, in rats subjected to microinjection of retrograde tracer into the rVLM, the numbers of elPBN neurons double-labeled with c-Fos (an immediate early gene) and the tracer were increased after CSAN stimulation (P < 0.05). The majority of these elPBN neurons contain vesicular glutamate transporter 3. In cats, epicardial bradykinin and electrical stimulation of CSAN increased the activity of elPBN cardiovascular neurons, which was attenuated (n = 6, P < 0.05) after blockade of glutamate receptors with iontophoresis of kynurenic acid (Kyn, 25 mM). In separate cats, microinjection of Kyn (1.25 nmol/50 nl) into the elPBN reduced rVLM activity evoked by both bradykinin and electrical stimulation (n = 5, P < 0.05). Excitation of the elPBN with microinjection of dl-homocysteic acid (2 nmol/50 nl) significantly increased basal and CSAN-evoked rVLM activity. However, the enhanced rVLM activity induced by dl-homocysteic acid injected into the elPBN was reversed following iontophoresis of Kyn into the rVLM (n = 7, P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiac sympathetic afferent stimulation activates cardiovascular neurons in the elPBN and rVLM sequentially through a monosynaptic (glutamatergic) excitatory elPBN-rVLM pathway. PMID:27225950

  15. Hydrogen sulfide prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Jand Venes R; Bezerra, Víctor H; Gomes, Antoniella S; Barbosa, André Luiz R; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Soares, Pedro Marcos G; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Souza, Marcellus H L P

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in mice and the influence of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferent neurons, and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 receptors on such an effect. Saline and L-cysteine alone or with propargylglycine, sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), or Lawesson's reagent were administrated for testing purposes. For other experiments, mice were pretreated with glibenclamide, neurotoxic doses of capsaicin, or capsazepine. Afterward, mice received L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent. After 30 min, 50% ethanol was administrated by gavage. After 1 h, mice were sacrificed, and gastric damage was evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic analyses. L-cysteine, NaHS, and Lawesson's reagent treatment prevented ethanol-induced macroscopic and microscopic gastric damage in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of propargylglycine, an inhibitor of endogenous H(2)S synthesis, reversed gastric protection induced by L-cysteine. Glibenclamide reversed L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent gastroprotective effects against ethanol-induced macroscopic damage in a dose-dependent manner. Chemical ablation of sensory afferent neurons by capsaicin reversed gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine or H(2)S donors (NaHS or Lawesson's reagent) in ethanol-induced macroscopic gastric damage. Likewise, in the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, the gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent were also abolished. Our results suggest that H(2)S prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage. Although there are many mechanisms through which this effect can occur, our data support the hypothesis that the activation of K(ATP) channels and afferent neurons/TRPV1 receptors is of primary importance. PMID:19491326

  16. L5 spinal nerve axotomy induces sensitization of cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons in the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche

    2016-06-15

    Partial nerve injury often leads to peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), a major health problem that lacks effective drug treatment. PNP is characterized by ongoing/spontaneous pain, and hypersensitivity to noxious (hyperalgesia) and innocuous (allodynia) stimuli. Preclinical studies using the L5 spinal nerve ligation/axotomy (SNL/SNA) model of PNP suggest that this type of chronic pain results partly from sensitization of ipsilateral L4C-and Aδ-fiber nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, but whether L4 β-nociceptors, which constitute a substantial group of DRG neurons, also become sensitized remains unanswered. To address this issue, intracellular recordings from somata of cutaneous Aβ-nociceptors (classified according to their dorsal root conduction velocities (>6.5m/s), and physiologically based on their responses to noxious (but not innocuous) mechanical stimuli) were made from L4-DRGs in normal (control) rats and in rats seven days after L5 SNA in vivo. Compared with control, cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive DRG neurons in SNA rats (that developed mechanical hypersensitivity) exhibited sensitization indicated by: a) decreased mean mechanical threshold (from 57.8±7.1 to 10.3±1.7mN), b) decreased mean dorsal root electrical threshold (from 11.4±0.7 to 4.3±0.4V), c) increased mean response to a suprathreshold mechanical stimulus (from 18.5±1.8 to 34±3.7spikes/sec) and d) an obvious, but non-significant, increase in the incidence of ongoing/spontaneous activity (from 3% to 18%). These findings suggest that cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptors also become sensitized after L5 SNA, and that sensitization of this subclass of A-fiber nociceptors may contribute both directly and indirectly to nerve injury-induced PNP. PMID:27173166

  17. Silencing of the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene in sensory neurons demonstrates its major role in nociception

    PubMed Central

    Bourinet, Emmanuel; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Monteil, Arnaud; Barrère, Christian; Couette, Brigitte; Poirot, Olivier; Pages, Anne; McRory, John; Snutch, Terrance P; Eschalier, Alain; Nargeot, Joël

    2005-01-01

    Analgesic therapies are still limited and sometimes poorly effective, therefore finding new targets for the development of innovative drugs is urgently needed. In order to validate the potential utility of blocking T-type calcium channels to reduce nociception, we explored the effects of intrathecally administered oligodeoxynucleotide antisenses, specific to the recently identified T-type calcium channel family (CaV3.1, CaV3.2, and CaV3.3), on reactions to noxious stimuli in healthy and mononeuropathic rats. Our results demonstrate that the antisense targeting CaV3.2 induced a knockdown of the CaV3.2 mRNA and protein expression as well as a large reduction of ‘CaV3.2-like' T-type currents in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons. Concomitantly, the antisense treatment resulted in major antinociceptive, anti-hyperalgesic, and anti-allodynic effects, suggesting that CaV3.2 plays a major pronociceptive role in acute and chronic pain states. Taken together, the results provide direct evidence linking CaV3.2 T-type channels to pain perception and suggest that CaV3.2 may offer a specific molecular target for the treatment of pain. PMID:15616581

  18. Ventral tegmental area afferents to the prefrontal cortex maintain membrane potential 'up' states in pyramidal neurons via D(1) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B L; O'Donnell, P

    2000-12-01

    The electrophysiological nature of dopamine actions has been controversial for years, with data supporting both inhibitory and excitatory actions. In this study, we tested whether stimulation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the source of the dopamine innervation of the prefrontal cortex, would exert different responses depending on the membrane potential states that pyramidal neurons exhibit when recorded in vivo, and whether VTA stimulation would have a role in controlling transitions between these states. Prefrontal cortical neurons have a very negative resting membrane potential (down state) interrupted by plateau depolarizations (up state). Although the up state had been shown to be dependent on hippocampal afferents in nucleus accumbens neurons, our results indicate that neither hippocampal nor thalamic inputs are sufficient to drive up events in prefrontal cortical neurons. Electrical VTA stimulation resulted in a variety of actions, in many cases depending on the neuron membrane potential state. Trains of stimuli resembling burst firing evoked a long-lasting transition to the up state, an effect blocked by a D(1) antagonist and mimicked by chemical VTA stimulation. These results indicate that projections from the VTA to the prefrontal cortex may be involved in controlling membrane potential states that define assemblies of activable pyramidal neurons in this region. PMID:11073866

  19. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    PubMed

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve. PMID:2719524

  20. Experimental and computational evidence for an essential role of NaV1.6 in spike initiation at stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; La, Jun-Ho; Wills, Zachary P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferents comprise ∼33% of the pelvic nerve innervation of mouse colorectum, which are activated by colorectal distension and encode visceral nociception. Stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings respond tonically to stepped or ramped colorectal stretch, whereas dissociated colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons generally fail to spike repetitively upon stepped current stimulation. The present study investigated this difference in the neural encoding characteristics between the soma and afferent ending using pharmacological approaches in an in vitro mouse colon-nerve preparation and complementary computational simulations. Immunohistological staining and Western blots revealed the presence of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) 1.6 and NaV1.7 at sensory neuronal endings in mouse colorectal tissue. Responses of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings were significantly reduced by targeting NaV1.6 using selective antagonists (μ-conotoxin GIIIa and μ-conotoxin PIIIa) or tetrodotoxin. In contrast, neither selective NaV1.8 (A803467) nor NaV1.7 (ProTX-II) antagonists attenuated afferent responses to stretch. Computational simulation of a colorectal afferent ending that incorporated independent Markov models for NaV1.6 and NaV1.7, respectively, recapitulated the experimental findings, suggesting a necessary role for NaV1.6 in encoding tonic spiking by stretch-sensitive afferents. In addition, computational simulation of a dorsal root ganglion soma showed that, by adding a NaV1.6 conductance, a single-spiking neuron was converted into a tonic spiking one. These results suggest a mechanism/channel to explain the difference in neural encoding characteristics between afferent somata and sensory endings, likely caused by differential expression of ion channels (e.g., NaV1.6) at different parts of the neuron. PMID:25652923

  1. Activation of P2X7 receptors in glial satellite cells reduces pain through downregulation of P2X3 receptors in nociceptive neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Wang, Congying; Li, GuangWen; Gu, Yanping; Huang, Li-Yen Mae

    2008-01-01

    Purinergic ionotropic P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are closely associated with excitotoxicity and nociception. Inhibition of P2X7R activation has been considered as a potentially useful strategy to improve recovery from spinal cord injury and reduce inflammatory damage to trauma. The physiological functions of P2X7Rs, however, are poorly understood, even though such information is essential for making the P2X7R an effective therapeutic target. We show here that P2X7Rs in satellite cells of dorsal root ganglia tonically inhibit the expression of P2X3Rs in neurons. Reducing P2X7R expression using siRNA or blocking P2X7R activity by antagonists elicits P2X3R up-regulation, increases the activity of sensory neurons responding to painful stimuli, and evokes abnormal nociceptive behaviors in rats. Thus, contrary to the notion that P2X7R activation is cytotoxic, P2X7Rs in satellite cells play a crucial role in maintaining proper P2X3R expression in dorsal root ganglia. Studying the mechanism underlying the P2X7R–P2X3R control, we demonstrate that activation of P2X7Rs evokes ATP release from satellite cells. ATP in turn stimulates P2Y1 receptors in neurons. P2Y1 receptor activation appears to be necessary and sufficient for the inhibitory control of P2X3R expression. We further determine the roles of the P2X7R–P2Y1–P2X3R inhibitory control under injurious conditions. Activation of the inhibitory control effectively prevents the development of allodynia and increases the potency of systemically administered P2X7R agonists in inflamed rats. Thus, direct blocking P2X7Rs, as proposed before, may not be the best strategy for reducing pain or lessening neuronal degeneration because it also disrupts the protective function of P2X7Rs. PMID:18946042

  2. Dopaminergic Modulation of Lateral Amygdala Neuronal Activity: Differential D1 and D2 Receptor Effects on Thalamic and Cortical Afferent Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Background: In auditory fear conditioning, the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) integrates a conditioned stimulus (CS) from the auditory thalamus (MGN) and the auditory association cortex (Te3) with an aversive unconditioned stimulus. The thalamic input provides a basic version of the CS, while the cortical input provides a processed representation of the stimulus. Dopamine (DA) is released in the LA under heightened arousal during the presentation of the CS. Methods: In this study we examined how D1 or D2 receptor activation affects LA afferent-driven neuronal firing using in vivo extracellular single-unit recordings with local micro-iontophoretic drug application in anesthetized rats. LA neurons that were responsive (~50%) to electrical stimulation in either the MGN or the Te3 were tested by iontophoresis of either the D1 agonist, SKF38393, or the D2 agonist, quinpirole. Results: We found that most of the LA projection neurons exhibited either facilitatory or attenuating effects (changes in evoked probability >15% relative to baseline) on afferent input by activation of D1 or D2 receptors. In general, it required significantly higher stimulation current to evoke ~50% baseline responses to the cortical input. Activation of the D1 receptor showed no difference in modulation between the thalamic or cortical pathways. On the other hand, activation of the D2 receptor had a stronger inhibitory modulation of the cortical pathway, but a stronger excitatory modulation of the thalamic pathway. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a shift in balance favoring the thalamic pathway in response to DA acting via the D2 receptor. PMID:25716776

  3. Activation of μ-opioid receptors inhibits calcium-currents in the vestibular afferent neurons of the rat through a cAMP dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Seseña, Emmanuel; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors are expressed in the vestibular endorgans (afferent neurons and hair cells) and are activated by the efferent system, which modulates the discharge of action potentials in vestibular afferent neurons (VANs). In mammals, VANs mainly express the μ opioid-receptor, but the function of this receptors activation and the cellular mechanisms by which they exert their actions in these neurons are poorly studied. To determine the actions of μ opioid receptor (MOR) and cell signaling mechanisms in VANs, we made perforated patch-clamp recordings of VANs that were obtained from postnatal days 7 to 10 (P7–10) rats and then maintained in primary culture. The MOR agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited the total voltage-gated outward current; this effect was prevented by the perfusion of a Ca2+-free extracellular solution. We then studied the voltage-gated calcium current (Ica) and found that DAMGO Met-enkephalin or endomorphin-1 inhibited the ICa in a dose-response fashion. The effects of DAMGO were prevented by the MOR antagonist (CTAP) or by pertussis toxin (PTX). The use of specific calcium channel blockers showed that MOR activation inhibited T-, L- and N-type ICa. The use of various enzyme activators and inhibitors and of cAMP analogs allowed us to demonstrate that the MOR acts through a cAMP dependent signaling mechanism. In current clamp experiments, MOR activation increased the duration and decreased the amplitude of the action potentials and modulated the discharge produced by current injection. Pre-incubation with PTX occluded MOR activation effect. We conclude that MOR activation inhibits the T-, L- and N-type ICa through activation of a Gαi/o protein that involves a decrease in AC-cAMP-PKA activity. The modulation of ICa may have an impact on the synaptic integration, excitability, and neurotransmitter release from VANs. PMID:24734002

  4. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  5. Development of inner ear afferent connections: forming primary neurons and connecting them to the developing sensory epithelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    The molecular and cellular origin of the primary neurons of the inner ear, the vestibular and spiral neurons, is reviewed including how they connect to the specific sensory epithelia and what the molecular nature of their survival is. Primary neurons of the ear depend on a single basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) protein for their formation, neurogenin 1 (ngn1). An immediate downstream gene is the bHLH gene neuronal differentiation (NeuroD). Targeted null mutations of ngn1 results in absence of primary neuron formation; targeted null mutation of NeuroD results in loss of almost all spiral and many vestibular neurons. NeuroD and a later expressed gene, Brn3a, play a role in pathfinding to and within sensory epithelia. The molecular nature of this pathfinding property is unknown. Reduction of hair cells in ngn1 null mutations suggests a clonal relationship with primary neurons. This relationship may play some role in specifying the identity of hair cells and the primary neurons that connect with them. Primary neuron neurites growth to sensory epithelia is initially independent of trophic factors released from developing sensory epithelia, but becomes rapidly dependent on those factors. Null mutations of specific neurotrophic factors lose distinct primary neuron populations which undergo rapid embryonic cell death.

  6. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG-no injury), exercise group (EG-no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG-injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG-injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  7. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  8. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:23989007

  9. Satellite Glial Cells Surrounding Primary Afferent Neurons Are Activated and Proliferate during Monoarthritis in Rats: Is There a Role for ATF3?

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Diana Sofia Marques; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel; Neto, Fani Lourença Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Joint inflammatory diseases are debilitating and very painful conditions that still lack effective treatments. Recently, glial cells were shown to be crucial for the development and maintenance of chronic pain, constituting novel targets for therapeutic approaches. At the periphery, the satellite glial cells (SGCs) that surround the cell bodies of primary afferents neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) display hypertrophy, proliferation, and activation following injury and/or inflammation. It has been suggested that the expression of neuronal injury factors might initially trigger these SGCs-related events. We then aimed at evaluating if SGCs are involved in the establishment/maintenance of articular inflammatory pain, by using the monoarthritis (MA) model, and if the neuronal injury marker activating transcriptional factor 3 (ATF3) is associated with these SGCs' reactive changes. Western Blot (WB) analysis of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was performed in L4-L5 DRGs from control non-inflamed rats and MA animals at different time-points of disease (4, 7, and 14d, induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection into the left hind paw ankle joint). Data indicate that SGCs activation is occurring in MA animals, particularly after day 7 of disease evolution. Additionally, double-immunostaining for ATF3 and GFAP in L5 DRG sections shows that SGCs's activation significantly increases around stressed neurons at 7d of disease, when compared with control animals. The specific labelling of GFAP in SGCs rather than in other cell types was also confirmed by immunohistochemical labeling. Finally, BrdU incorporation indicates that proliferation of SGCs is also significantly increased after 7 days of MA. Data indicate that SGCs play an important role in the mechanisms of articular inflammation, with 7 days of disease being a critical time-point in the MA model, and suggest that ATF3 might be involved in SGCs' reactive changes such as activation. PMID

  10. Activation of neuronal Kv7/KCNQ/M-channels by the opener QO58-lysine and its anti-nociceptive effects on inflammatory pain in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Bo-chuan; Song, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Ma, Tian-yang; Qi, Jin-long; Zhang, Hai-lin; Li, Gang; Wang, KeWei

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the activation of neuronal Kv7/KCNQ channels by a novel modified Kv7 opener QO58-lysine and to test the anti-nociceptive effects of QO58-lysine on inflammatory pain in rodent models. Methods: Assays including whole-cell patch clamp recordings, HPLC, and in vivo pain behavioral evaluations were employed. Results: QO58-lysine caused instant activation of Kv7.2/7.3 currents, and increasing the dose of QO58-lysine resulted in a dose-dependent activation of Kv7.2/Kv7.3 currents with an EC50 of 1.2±0.2 μmol/L. QO58-lysine caused a leftward shift of the voltage-dependent activation of Kv7.2/Kv7.3 to a hyperpolarized potential at V1/2=-54.4±2.5 mV from V1/2=-26.0±0.6 mV. The half-life in plasma (t1/2) was derived as 2.9, 2.7, and 3.0 h for doses of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. The absolute bioavailabilities for the three doses (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg) of QO58-lysine (po) were determined as 13.7%, 24.3%, and 39.3%, respectively. QO58-lysine caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the licking times during phase II pain induced by the injection of formalin into the mouse hindpaw. In the Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model in rats, oral or intraperitoneal administration of QO58-lysine resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the paw withdrawal threshold, and the anti-nociceptive effect on mechanical allodynia could be reversed by the channel-specific blocker XE991 (3 mg/kg). Conclusion: Taken together, our findings show that a modified QO58 compound (QO58-lysine) can specifically activate Kv7.2/7.3/M-channels. Oral or intraperitoneal administration of QO58-lysine, which has improved bioavailability and a half-life of approximately 3 h in plasma, can reverse inflammatory pain in rodent animal models. PMID:27264315

  11. Differential expression of vesicular glutamate transporters by vagal afferent terminals in rat nucleus of the solitary tract: projections from the heart preferentially express vesicular glutamate transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Corbett, E K A; Sinfield, J K; McWilliam, P N; Deuchars, J; Batten, T F C

    2005-01-01

    peptide markers of nociceptive afferent neurones. These data suggest that the population of cardiac vagal afferents labeled by pericardial cholera toxin B-subunit injection is neurochemically varied, which may be related to a functional heterogeneity of baroreceptive, chemoreceptive and nociceptive afferent fibers. A high proportion of cardiac neurones appear to be glutamatergic, but differ from other vagal afferents in expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 1. PMID:16084661

  12. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Séguéla, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8(+) primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2(+)-Arch(+) mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8(+) afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  13. Keratinocytes can modulate and directly initiate nociceptive responses

    PubMed Central

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; DeBerry, Jennifer J; Adelman, Peter C; Miller, Richard H; Hachisuka, Junichi; Lee, Kuan Hsien; Ross, Sarah E; Koerber, H Richard; Davis, Brian M; Albers, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    How thermal, mechanical and chemical stimuli applied to the skin are transduced into signals transmitted by peripheral neurons to the CNS is an area of intense study. Several studies indicate that transduction mechanisms are intrinsic to cutaneous neurons and that epidermal keratinocytes only modulate this transduction. Using mice expressing channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in keratinocytes we show that blue light activation of the epidermis alone can produce action potentials (APs) in multiple types of cutaneous sensory neurons including SA1, A-HTMR, CM, CH, CMC, CMH and CMHC fiber types. In loss of function studies, yellow light stimulation of keratinocytes that express halorhodopsin reduced AP generation in response to naturalistic stimuli. These findings support the idea that intrinsic sensory transduction mechanisms in epidermal keratinocytes can directly elicit AP firing in nociceptive as well as tactile sensory afferents and suggest a significantly expanded role for the epidermis in sensory processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09674.001 PMID:26329459

  14. Cranial sensory ganglia neurons require intrinsic N-cadherin function for guidance of afferent fibers to their final targets

    PubMed Central

    LaMora, Angela; Voigt, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules, such as N-cadherin (cdh2), are essential for normal neuronal development, and as such have been implicated in an array of processes including neuronal differentiation and migration, and axon growth and fasciculation. Cdh2 is expressed in neurons of the peripheral nervous system during development, but its role in these cells during this time is poorly understood. Using the transgenic zebrafish line, tg(p2xr3.2:eGFPsl1), we have examined the involvement of cdh2 in the formation of sensory circuits by the peripheral nervous system. The tg(p2xr3.2:eGFPsl1) fish allows visualization of neurons comprising gV, gVII, gIX and gX and their axons throughout development. Reduction of cdh2 in this line was achieved by either crosses to the cdh2-mutant strain, glass onion (glo) or injection of a cdh2 morpholino (MO) into single-cell embryos. Here we show that cdh2 function is required to alter the directional vectors of growing axons upon reaching intermediate targets. The central axons enter the hindbrain appropriately but fail to turn caudally towards their final targets. Similarly, the peripheral axons extend ventrally, but fail to turn and project along a rostral/caudal axis. Furthermore, by expressing dominant negative cdh2 constructs selectively within cranial sensory ganglia (CSG) neurons, we found that cdh2 function is necessary within the axons to elicit these stereotypic turns, thus demonstrating that cdh2 acts cell autonomously. Together, our in vivo data reveal a novel role for cdh2 in the establishment of circuits by peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:19356698

  15. Response properties of whisker-associated primary afferent neurons following infraorbital nerve transection with microsurgical repair in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Zanoun, Rami R; Carvell, George E; Simons, Daniel J; Washington, Kia M

    2016-03-01

    The rodent whisker/trigeminal system, characterized by high spatial and temporal resolution, provides an experimental model for developing new therapies for improving sensory functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, we use controlled whisker stimulation and single-unit recordings of trigeminal ganglion cells to examine in detail the nature and time course of functional recovery of mechanoreceptive afferents following nerve transection with microsurgical repair of the infraorbital nerve (ION) branch of the trigeminal nerve in adult rats. Response measures include rapid vs. slow adaptation, firing rate, interspike intervals, latency, and angular (directional) tuning. Whisker-evoked responses, readily observable by 3 wk post-transection, recover progressively for at least the next 5 wk. All cells in transected animals, as in control cases, responded to deflections of single whiskers only, but topography within the ganglion was clearly disrupted. The time course and extent of recovery of quantitative response measures were receptor dependent. Cells displaying slowly adapting (SA) properties recovered more quickly than rapidly adapting (RA) populations, and for some response measures-notably evoked firing rates-closely approached or attained control levels by 8 wk post-transection. Angular tuning of RA cells was slightly better than control units, whereas SA tuning did not differ from control values. Nerve conduction times and refractory periods, examined separately using electrical stimulation of the ION, were slower than normal in all transected animals and poorly reflected recovery of whisker-evoked response latencies and interspike intervals. Results underscore the need for multiple therapeutic strategies that target different aspects of functional restitution following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26792886

  16. Role of prostaglandin D2 in mast cell activation-induced sensitization of esophageal vagal afferents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shizhong; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Joo, Moon Kyung; Heldsinger, Andrea; Song, Il; Owyang, Chung; Yu, Shaoyong

    2013-05-15

    Sensitization of esophageal afferents plays an important role in esophageal nociception, but the mechanism is less clear. Our previous studies demonstrated that mast cell (MC) activation releases the preformed mediators histamine and tryptase, which play important roles in sensitization of esophageal vagal nociceptive C fibers. PGD2 is a lipid mediator released by activated MCs. Whether PGD2 plays a role in this sensitization process has yet to be determined. Expression of the PGD2 DP1 and DP2 receptors in nodose ganglion neurons was determined by immunofluorescence staining, Western blotting, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings were performed in ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distension were compared before and after perfusion of PGD2, DP1 and DP2 receptor agonists, and MC activation, with or without pretreatment with antagonists. The effect of PGD2 on 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal nodose neurons was determined by patch-clamp recording. Our results demonstrate that DP1 and DP2 receptor mRNA and protein were expressed mainly in small- and medium-diameter neurons in nodose ganglia. PGD2 significantly increased esophageal distension-evoked action potential discharges in esophageal nodose C fibers. The DP1 receptor agonist BW 245C mimicked this effect. PGD2 directly sensitized DiI-labeled esophageal nodose neurons by decreasing the action potential threshold. Pretreatment with the DP1 receptor antagonist BW A868C significantly inhibited PGD2 perfusion- or MC activation-induced increases in esophageal distension-evoked action potential discharges in esophageal nodose C fibers. In conclusion, PGD2 plays an important role in MC activation-induced sensitization of esophageal nodose C fibers. This adds a novel mechanism of visceral afferent sensitization. PMID:23471341

  17. Peripheral prostaglandin E2 prolongs the sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons possibly by facilitating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2014-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator enriched in inflamed tissues, plays a pivotal role in the genesis of chronic pain conditions such as inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PGE2-prolonged sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) may contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that facilitating synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP receptors contribute to PGE2-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of a stabilized PGE2 analog, 16,16 dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2), in a dose- and time-dependent manner, not only elicited primary tactile allodynia which lasted for 1d, but also prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by a subsequent i.pl. injection of dmPGE2 from 1d to 4d. Moreover, the duration of tactile allodynia was progressively prolonged following multiple sequential i.pl. injections of dmPGE2. Co-injection of the selective EP1 or EP4 receptor antagonist, the inhibitors of cAMP, PKA, PKC, PKCε or PLC as well as an interleukin-6 (IL-6) neutralizing antiserum differentially blocked primary tactile allodynia elicited by the 1st dmPGE2 and the prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by the 2nd dmPGE2, suggesting the involvement of these signaling events in dmPGE2-induced nociceptor activation and sensitization. Co-injection of a selective COX2 inhibitor or two EP4 antagonists prevented or shortened inflammagen-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. I.pl. injection of dmPGE2 or carrageenan time-dependently increased EP4 levels in L4-6 DRG neurons and peripheral nerves. EP4 was expressed in almost half of IB4-binding nociceptors of L4-6 DRG. Taken together, our data suggest that stimulating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking to increase EP4 availability at the axonal terminals of nociceptors is likely a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-prolonged nociceptor

  18. Nociceptor-Enriched Genes Required for Normal Thermal Nociception.

    PubMed

    Honjo, Ken; Mauthner, Stephanie E; Wang, Yu; Skene, J H Pate; Tracey, W Daniel

    2016-07-12

    Here, we describe a targeted reverse genetic screen for thermal nociception genes in Drosophila larvae. Using laser capture microdissection and microarray analyses of nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, we identified 275 nociceptor-enriched genes. We then tested the function of the enriched genes with nociceptor-specific RNAi and thermal nociception assays. Tissue-specific RNAi targeted against 14 genes caused insensitive thermal nociception while targeting of 22 genes caused hypersensitive thermal nociception. Previously uncategorized genes were named for heat resistance (i.e., boilerman, fire dancer, oven mitt, trivet, thawb, and bunker gear) or heat sensitivity (firelighter, black match, eucalyptus, primacord, jet fuel, detonator, gasoline, smoke alarm, and jetboil). Insensitive nociception phenotypes were often associated with severely reduced branching of nociceptor neurites and hyperbranched dendrites were seen in two of the hypersensitive cases. Many genes that we identified are conserved in mammals. PMID:27346357

  19. Electrophysiological and neurochemical techniques to investigate sensory neurons in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Babes, Alexandru; Fischer, Michael J M; Reid, Gordon; Sauer, Susanne K; Zimmermann, Katharina; Reeh, Peter W

    2010-01-01

    The primary afferent nociceptive neuron has recently attracted major research interest because of the cloning of very selectively expressed and well-conserved ion channel genes. All parts of the neuron, sensory terminals, axon and cell body, are accessible to validated research techniques in vitro using various isolated tissues or cells taken from laboratory animals. Single-unit recording and measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release as well as patch-clamping and calcium imaging of cultured sensory neurons provide different kinds of information, and no model alone answers all questions. In combination, however, consistent results and complementary evidence form a solid basis for translational research to follow. PMID:20336427

  20. Involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerves in the proteinase-activated receptor 2-mediated vasodilatation in the rat dura mater.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Rosta, J; Sántha, P; Jancsó, G

    2009-07-01

    Neurogenic inflammation of the dura mater encephali has been suggested to contribute to the mechanisms of meningeal nociception and blood flow regulation. Recent findings demonstrated that the rat dura mater is innervated by trigeminal capsaicin-sensitive peptidergic nociceptive afferent nerves which mediate meningeal vascular responses through activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. The present work explored the functional significance of the capsaicin-sensitive subpopulation of dural afferent nerves via their contribution to the meningeal vascular responses evoked through activation of the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). The vascular responses of the dura mater were studied by laser Doppler flowmetry in a rat open cranial window preparation. Topical applications of trypsin, a PAR-2-activator, or Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-amide (SLIGRL-NH(2)), a selective PAR-2 agonist peptide, resulted in dose-dependent increases in meningeal blood flow. The SLIGRL-NH(2)-induced vasodilatation was significantly reduced following capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerve defunctionalization by prior systemic capsaicin treatment and by pretreatment of the dura mater with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37). Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) an unspecific inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production, but not 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole (TRIM), a neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, also inhibited the vasodilator response to SLIGRL-NH(2). The vasodilator responses elicited by very low concentrations of capsaicin (10 nM) were significantly enhanced by prior application of SLIGRL-NH(2). The present findings demonstrate that activation of the PAR-2 localized on capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal nociceptive afferent nerves induces vasodilatation in the dural vascular bed by mechanisms involving NO and CGRP release. The results indicate that the PAR-2-mediated activation and

  1. Botulinum Toxin B in the Sensory Afferent: Transmitter release, Spinal activation and Pain Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Marc J.; Terashima, Tetsuji; Steinauer, Joanne J.; Eddinger, Kelly A.; Yaksh, Tony L.; Xu, Qinghao

    2014-01-01

    We addressed the hypothesis that intraplantar Botulinum toxin B (rimabotulinumtoxin B: BoNT-B) has an early local effect upon peripheral afferent terminal releasing function and over time will be transported to the central terminals of the primary afferent. Once in the terminals it will cleave synaptic protein, block spinal afferent transmitter release and thereby prevent spinal nociceptive excitation and behavior. In mice, C57Bl/6 males, intraplantar BoNT-B (1U), given unilaterally into the hind paw had no effect upon survival or motor function but ipsilaterally decreased: i) intraplantar formalin evoked flinching; ii) intraplantar capsaicin evoked plasma extravasation in the hindpaw measured by Evans blue in the paw; iii) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn SP release (NK1 receptor internalization); iv) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn neuronal activation (cFos); v) ipsilateral DRG VAMP; vi) ipsilateral SP release otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal capsaicin; vii) ipsilateral activation of cFos otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal substance P. These results indicate that BoNT-B after unilateral intraplantar delivery is taken up by the peripheral terminal, is locally active (blocking plasma extravasation), is transported to the ipsilateral DRG to cleave VAMP and is acting presynaptically to block release from the spinal peptidergic terminal. The observations following intrathecal SP offer evidence for a possible transsynaptic effect of intraplantar BoNT. These results provide robust evidence that peripheral BoNT-B can alter peripheral and central terminal release from a nociceptor and attenuate downstream nociceptive processing via a presynaptic effect, with further evidence suggesting a possible postsynaptic effect. PMID:24333775

  2. Role of GnRH Neurons and Their Neuronal Afferents as Key Integrators between Food Intake Regulatory Signals and the Control of Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive function is regulated by a plethora of signals that integrate physiological and environmental information. Among others, metabolic factors are key components of this circuit since they inform about the propitious timing for reproduction depending on energy availability. This information is processed mainly at the hypothalamus that, in turn, modulates gonadotropin release from the pituitary and, thereby, gonadal activity. Metabolic hormones, such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, act as indicators of the energy status and convey this information to the reproductive axis regulating its activity. In this review, we will analyse the central mechanisms involved in the integration of this metabolic information and their contribution to the control of the reproductive function. Particular attention will be paid to summarize the participation of GnRH, Kiss1, NPY, and POMC neurons in this process and their possible interactions to contribute to the metabolic control of reproduction. PMID:24101924

  3. Role of GnRH Neurons and Their Neuronal Afferents as Key Integrators between Food Intake Regulatory Signals and the Control of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive function is regulated by a plethora of signals that integrate physiological and environmental information. Among others, metabolic factors are key components of this circuit since they inform about the propitious timing for reproduction depending on energy availability. This information is processed mainly at the hypothalamus that, in turn, modulates gonadotropin release from the pituitary and, thereby, gonadal activity. Metabolic hormones, such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, act as indicators of the energy status and convey this information to the reproductive axis regulating its activity. In this review, we will analyse the central mechanisms involved in the integration of this metabolic information and their contribution to the control of the reproductive function. Particular attention will be paid to summarize the participation of GnRH, Kiss1, NPY, and POMC neurons in this process and their possible interactions to contribute to the metabolic control of reproduction. PMID:24101924

  4. The expression profile of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) subunits ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3 in the esophageal vagal afferent nerve subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Dusenkova, Svetlana; Ru, Fei; Surdenikova, Lenka; Nassenstein, Christina; Hatok, Jozef; Dusenka, Robert; Banovcin, Peter; Kliment, Jan; Tatar, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have been implicated in esophageal acid sensing and mechanotransduction. However, insufficient knowledge of ASIC subunit expression profile in esophageal afferent nerves hampers the understanding of their role. This knowledge is essential because ASIC subunits form heteromultimeric channels with distinct functional properties. We hypothesized that the esophageal putative nociceptive C-fiber nerves (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPV1-positive) express multiple ASIC subunits and that the ASIC expression profile differs between the nodose TRPV1-positive subtype developmentally derived from placodes and the jugular TRPV1-positive subtype derived from neural crest. We performed single cell RT-PCR on the vagal afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus. In the guinea pig, nearly all (90%–95%) nodose and jugular esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons expressed ASICs, most often in a combination (65–75%). ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3 were expressed in 65–75%, 55–70%, and 70%, respectively, of both nodose and jugular TRPV1-positive neurons. The ASIC1 splice variants ASIC1a and ASIC1b and the ASIC2 splice variant ASIC2b were similarly expressed in both nodose and jugular TRPV1-positive neurons. However, ASIC2a was found exclusively in the nodose neurons. In contrast to guinea pig, ASIC3 was almost absent from the mouse vagal esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons. However, ASIC3 was similarly expressed in the nonnociceptive TRPV1-negative (tension mechanoreceptors) neurons in both species. We conclude that the majority of esophageal vagal nociceptive neurons express multiple ASIC subunits. The placode-derived nodose neurons selectively express ASIC2a, known to substantially reduce acid sensitivity of ASIC heteromultimers. ASIC3 is expressed in the guinea pig but not in the mouse vagal esophageal TRPV1-positive neurons, indicating species differences in ASIC expression. PMID:25190475

  5. Skin incision-induced receptive field responses of mechanosensitive peripheral neurons are developmentally regulated in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Giffear, Kelly; Eisenach, James C.; Ririe, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation of the nervous system results in changes in both central and peripheral processing. To better understand responses to injury in the young, developmental differences in the acute response to incision were investigated in both tactile and nociceptive myelinated peripheral mechanosensitive afferent neurons in vivo. Neuronal intrasomal recordings were performed in juvenile and infant rats in 34 L5 dorsal root ganglia, and each neuron was phenotypically defined. Neurons had a mechanosensitive receptive field in the glabrous skin on the plantar surface of the hind paw, which was characterized at baseline and for up to 45 min after incision. Fundamental maturational differences in the effect of incision were clear: in high-threshold nociceptive mechanoreceptors, the mechanical threshold decreased immediately and the receptive field size increased rapidly in juvenile rats but not in infant rats. Additionally, a divergence in changes in the instantaneous response frequency of tactile afferents occurred between the two ages. These differences may help explain maturational differences in responses to peripheral injury and suggest that differences in central nervous system responses may be partially mitigated by spatially confined and frequency-dependent differences resulting from tactile and nociceptive mechanosensitive input. PMID:22673323

  6. Neuroanatomy of extrinsic afferents supplying the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Blackshaw, L A; Brookes, S J H; Grundy, D

    2004-04-01

    Here we discuss the neuroanatomy of extrinsic gastrointestinal (GI) afferent neurones, the relationship between structure and function and the role of afferents in disease. Three pathways connect the gut to the central nervous system: vagal afferents signal mainly from upper GI regions, pelvic afferents mainly from the colorectal region and splanchnic afferents from throughout. Vagal afferents mediate reflex regulation of gut function and behaviour, operating mainly at physiological levels. There are two major functional classes - tension receptors, responding to muscular contraction and distension, and mucosal receptors. The function of vagal endings correlates well with their anatomy: tracing studies show intramuscular arrays (IMAs) and intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs); IGLEs are now known to respond to tension. Functional mucosal receptors correlate with endings traced to the lamina propria. Pelvic afferents serve similar functions to vagal afferents, and additionally mediate both innocuous and noxious sensations. Splanchnic afferents comprise mucosal and stretch-sensitive afferents with low thresholds in addition to high-threshold serosal/mesenteric afferents suggesting diverse roles. IGLEs, probably of pelvic origin, have been identified recently in the rectum and respond similarly to gastric vagal IGLEs. Gastrointestinal afferents may be sensitized or inhibited by chemical mediators released from several cell types. Whether functional changes have anatomical correlates is not known, but it is likely that they underlie diseases involving visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:15066001

  7. Intracellular calcium regulation among subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Xiulin; Gold, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Primary afferent neurons are functionally heterogeneous. To determine whether this functional heterogeneity reflects, in part, heterogeneity in the regulation of the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), the magnitude and decay of evoked Ca2+ transients were assessed in subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with voltage clamp and fura-2 ratiometric imaging. To determine whether differences in evoked Ca2+ transients among subpopulations of DRG neurons reflected differences in the contribution of Ca2+ regulatory mechanisms, pharmacological techniques were employed to assess the contribution of influx, efflux, release and uptake pathways. Subpopulations of DRG neurons were defined by cell body size, binding of the plant lectin IB4 and responsiveness to the algogenic compound capsaicin (CAP). Ca2+ transients were evoked with 30 mm K+ or voltage steps to 0 mV. There were marked differences between subpopulations of neurons with respect to both the magnitude and decay of the Ca2+ transient, with the largest and most slowly decaying Ca2+ transients in small-diameter, IB4-positive, CAP-responsive neurons. The smallest and most rapidly decaying transients were in large-diameter, IB4-negative and CAP-unresponsive DRG neurons. These differences were not due to a differential distribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents. However, these differences did appear to reflect a differential contribution of other influx, efflux, release and uptake mechanisms between subpopulations of neurons. These results suggest that electrical activity in subpopulations of DRG neurons will have a differential influence on Ca2+-regulated phenomena such as spike adaptation, transmitter release and gene transcription. Significantly more activity should be required in large-diameter non-nociceptive afferents than in small-diameter nociceptive afferents to have a comparable influence on these processes. PMID:16945973

  8. Persistent changes in peripheral and spinal nociceptive processing after early tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M; Beggs, Simon; Baccei, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    It has become clear that tissue damage during a critical period of early life can result in long-term changes in pain sensitivity, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here we review the clinical and preclinical evidence for persistent alterations in nociceptive processing following neonatal tissue injury, which collectively point to the existence of both a widespread hypoalgesia at baseline as well as an exacerbated degree of hyperalgesia following a subsequent insult to the same somatotopic region. We also highlight recent work investigating the effects of early trauma on the organization and function of ascending pain pathways at a cellular and molecular level. These effects of neonatal injury include altered ion channel expression in both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons, shifts in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition within the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) network, and a 'priming' of microglial responses in the adult SDH. A better understanding of how early tissue damage influences the maturation of nociceptive circuits could yield new insight into strategies to minimize the long-term consequences of essential, but invasive, medical procedures on the developing somatosensory system. PMID:26103453

  9. Roles of phosphotase 2A in nociceptive signal processing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple protein kinases affect the responses of dorsal horn neurons through phosphorylation of synaptic receptors and proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the consequences of this modulation may be spinal central sensitization. In contrast, the phosphatases catalyze an opposing reaction of de-phosphorylation, which may also modulate the functions of crucial proteins in signaling nociception. This is an important mechanism in the regulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways in nociceptive neurons. Accumulated evidence has shown that phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a serine/threonine specific phosphatase, is implicated in synaptic plasticity of the central nervous system and central sensitization of nociception. Therefore, targeting protein phosphotase 2A may provide an effective and novel strategy for the treatment of clinical pain. This review will characterize the structure and functional regulation of neuronal PP2A and bring together recent advances on the modulation of PP2A in targeted downstream substrates and relevant multiple nociceptive signaling molecules. PMID:24010880

  10. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain123

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8+ primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch+ mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2+-Arch+mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch+ mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8+ afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  11. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, Robert P.; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C.; Boyle, Kieran A.; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to “unclassified” cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn. PMID:25972186

  12. Nerve injury induces a new profile of tactile and mechanical nociceptor input from undamaged peripheral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Aschenbrenner, Carol A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Ririe, Douglas G.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain after nerve injury is often accompanied by hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli, yet whether this reflects altered input, altered processing, or both remains unclear. Spinal nerve ligation or transection results in hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in skin innervated by adjacent dorsal root ganglia, but no previous study has quantified the changes in receptive field properties of these neurons in vivo. To address this, we recorded intracellularly from L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons of anesthetized young adult rats, 1 wk after L5 partial spinal nerve ligation (pSNL) or sham surgery. One week after pSNL, hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold in awake, freely behaving animals was decreased in the L4 distribution on the nerve-injured side compared with sham controls. Electrophysiology revealed that high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells of A-fiber conduction velocity in L4 were sensitized, with a seven-fold reduction in mechanical threshold, a seven-fold increase in receptive field area, and doubling of maximum instantaneous frequency in response to peripheral stimuli, accompanied by reductions in after-hyperpolarization amplitude and duration. Only a reduction in mechanical threshold (minimum von Frey hair producing neuronal activity) was observed in C-fiber conduction velocity high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells. In contrast, low-threshold mechanoreceptive cells were desensitized, with a 13-fold increase in mechanical threshold, a 60% reduction in receptive field area, and a 40% reduction in instantaneous frequency to stimulation. No spontaneous activity was observed in L4 ganglia, and the likelihood of recording from neurons without a mechanical receptive field was increased after pSNL. These data suggest massively altered input from undamaged sensory afferents innervating areas of hypersensitivity after nerve injury, with reduced tactile and increased nociceptive afferent response. These findings differ importantly from previous preclinical

  13. The Anoctamin Family Channel Subdued Mediates Thermal Nociception in Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Wijeong; Kim, Ji Young; Cui, Shanyu; Jo, Juyeon; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Lee, Yeonwoo; Kwon, Ki-Sun; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Changsoo

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-permeable and thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels mediate the nociceptive transduction of noxious temperature in Drosophila nociceptors. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we find that Subdued, a calcium-activated chloride channel of the Drosophila anoctamin family, functions in conjunction with the thermo-TRPs in thermal nociception. Genetic analysis with deletion and the RNAi-mediated reduction of subdued show that subdued is required for thermal nociception in nociceptors. Further genetic analysis of subdued mutant and thermo-TRP mutants show that they interact functionally in thermal nociception. We find that Subdued expressed in heterologous cells mediates a strong chloride conductance in the presence of both heat and calcium ions. Therefore, our analysis suggests that Subdued channels may amplify the nociceptive neuronal firing that is initiated by thermo-TRP channels in response to thermal stimuli. PMID:25505177

  14. Vestibular afferent responses to microrotational stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1991-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recording/labeling techniques were used to investigate vestibular afferent responses in the bullfrog, to very small amplitude (less than 5 deg p-p) sinusoidal rotations in the vertical plane over the frequency range of 0.063-4 Hz. Robust responses to peak accelerations as low as 0.031 deg/sec per sec were obtained from units subsequently traced to either the central portion of the anterior canal crista or the striolar region of the utricle. All of these microrotationally sensitive afferent neurons had irregular resting discharge rates, and the majority had transfer ratios (relative to rotational velocity) of 1-40 spikes/sec per deg/sec. Individual utricular afferent velocity transfer ratios were nearly constant over the frequency range of 0.125-4 Hz. Canal units displayed decreasing response transfer ratios as stimulus frequencies increased. These findings indicate that, although utricular striolar and central crista afferent velocity transfer ratios to microrotations were very similar, utricular striolar afferent neurons were more faithful sensors of very small amplitude rotational velocity in the vertical plane.

  15. Tachykinin acts upstream of autocrine Hedgehog signaling during nociceptive sensitization in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Im, Seol Hee; Takle, Kendra; Jo, Juyeon; Babcock, Daniel T; Ma, Zhiguo; Xiang, Yang; Galko, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Pain signaling in vertebrates is modulated by neuropeptides like Substance P (SP). To determine whether such modulation is conserved and potentially uncover novel interactions between nociceptive signaling pathways we examined SP/Tachykinin signaling in a Drosophila model of tissue damage-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity. Tissue-specific knockdowns and genetic mutant analyses revealed that both Tachykinin and Tachykinin-like receptor (DTKR99D) are required for damage-induced thermal nociceptive sensitization. Electrophysiological recording showed that DTKR99D is required in nociceptive sensory neurons for temperature-dependent increases in firing frequency upon tissue damage. DTKR overexpression caused both behavioral and electrophysiological thermal nociceptive hypersensitivity. Hedgehog, another key regulator of nociceptive sensitization, was produced by nociceptive sensory neurons following tissue damage. Surprisingly, genetic epistasis analysis revealed that DTKR function was upstream of Hedgehog-dependent sensitization in nociceptive sensory neurons. Our results highlight a conserved role for Tachykinin signaling in regulating nociception and the power of Drosophila for genetic dissection of nociception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10735.001 PMID:26575288

  16. Signalling of a step-like intensity change of noxious mechanical stimuli by dorsal horn neurones in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Laird, J M; Cervero, F

    1991-01-01

    1. Single-unit extracellular recordings were made from thirty-one dorsal horn neurones in the sacral spinal cord of barbiturate-anaesthetized rats. Each neurone was tested with four noxious mechanical pinches applied to its receptive field on the tail. Each pinch lasted 120 s, with a step-like change in intensity after 60 s. In two pinches the step increased the intensity, from 4 to 6 N or from 6 to 8 N, and in two the step decreased the intensity, from 8 to 6 N or from 6 to 4 N. 2. The ability of the neurones to signal these step changes in intensity was examined. Five neurones with an exclusively low-threshold afferent input (class 1) were tested, and found to fire only briefly at the start of the 120 s stimulus. Neurones with a high-threshold input (nociceptive neurones), either exclusively (class 3; n = 10) or in addition to a low-threshold input (class 2: n = 16), responded throughout the 120 s stimuli. 3. Nociceptive dorsal horn neurones have been divided into two groups of 'good' and 'poor' encoders on the basis of their response to the step changes in intensity. 4. 'Good' encoders (n = 13) were neurones signalling both a step increase and a step decrease in intensity, of which seven were class 2 and six class 3, five recorded in the superficial dorsal horn and eight in the deep dorsal horn. 5. 'Poor' encoders (n = 13) were neurones which failed to signal one or both of the step changes in intensity, of which nine were class 2 and four class 3, three recorded in the superficial dorsal horn and ten in the deep dorsal horn. 6. These results demonstrate that neurones with similar input properties and location are not necessarily a homogeneous group in terms of their processing of nociceptive stimuli. Moreover, they suggest that subgroups of both class 2 and class 3 and of superficial and deep dorsal horn neurones contribute to the different components of a nociceptive response. 7. We propose that the output and projection target of a particular dorsal horn

  17. Abnormal Development of Glutamatergic Synapses Afferent to Dopaminergic Neurons of the Pink1−/− Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Edouard; Michel, François J.; Save, Laurène; Ferrari, Diana C.; Hammond, Constance

    2016-01-01

    In a preceding study, we showed that in adult pink1−/− mice, a monogenic animal model of Parkinson’s disease (PD), striatal neurons display aberrant electrical activities that precede the onset of overt clinical manifestations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the maturation of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the pink1−/− substantia nigra compacta (SNc) follows, from early stages on, a different developmental trajectory from age-matched wild type (wt) SNc DA neurons. We used immature (postnatal days P2–P10) and young adult (P30–P90) midbrain slices of pink1−/− mice expressing the green fluorescent protein in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons. We report that the developmental sequence of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) is altered in pink1−/− SNc DA neurons, starting from shortly after birth. They lack the transient episode of high NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal activity characteristic of the immature stage of wt SNc DA neurons. The maturation of the membrane resistance of pink1−/− SNc DA neurons is also altered. Collectively, these observations suggest that electrical manifestations occurring shortly after birth in SNc DA neurons might lead to dysfunction in dopamine release and constitute an early pathogenic mechanism of PD. PMID:27445695

  18. Effects of peripheral nerve injuries and tissue inflammation on the levels of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in rat primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, S; Kajander, K C; Bennett, G J

    1992-12-11

    Changes in neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPYir) in the rat L4 and L5 spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were examined after different sciatic nerve injuries (transection, loose ligation, and crush) and a localized, painful inflammation of the hind paw. Inflammation had no effect on NPYir. All the nerve injuries produced comparable increases in NPYir in ipsilateral laminae III-V axons and varicosities, and induction of NPYir in many DRG cells. Most NPYir DRG cells were medium to large (mean diameters: 40-45 microns); less than 2% of the cells had diameters of 25 microns or less. We conclude that the nerve injury-evoked increase in NPYir occurs mostly in the somata and intraspinal arbors of low-threshold mechanoreceptors; very few, if any, C-fiber afferents are involved. Nerve injury, rather than a painful condition, appears to be the stimulus for the induction of NPYir synthesis. PMID:1486499

  19. Microstimulation of primary afferent neurons in the L7 dorsal root ganglia using multielectrode arrays in anesthetized cats: thresholds and recruitment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, R. A.; Hokanson, J. A.; Weber, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    Current research in motor neural prosthetics has focused primarily on issues related to the extraction of motor command signals from the brain (e.g. brain-machine interfaces) to direct the motion of prosthetic limbs. Patients using these types of systems could benefit from a somatosensory neural interface that conveys natural tactile and kinesthetic sensations for the prosthesis. Electrical microstimulation within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been proposed as one method to accomplish this, yet little is known about the recruitment properties of electrical microstimulation in activating nerve fibers in this structure. Current-controlled microstimulation pulses in the range of 1-15 µA (200 µs, leading cathodic pulse) were delivered to the L7 DRG in four anesthetized cats using penetrating microelectrode arrays. Evoked responses and their corresponding conduction velocities (CVs) were measured in the sciatic nerve with a 5-pole nerve cuff electrode arranged as two adjacent tripoles. It was found that in 76% of the 69 electrodes tested, the stimulus threshold was less than or equal to 3 µA, with the lowest recorded threshold being 1.1 µA. The CVs of afferents recruited at threshold had a bimodal distribution with peaks at 70 m s-1 and 85 m s-1. In 53% of cases, the CV of the response at threshold was slower (i.e. smaller diameter fiber) than the CVs of responses observed at increasing stimulation amplitudes. In summary, we found that microstimulation applied through penetrating microelectrodes in the DRG provides selective recruitment of afferent fibers from a range of sensory modalities (as identified by CVs) at very low stimulation intensities. We conclude that the DRG may serve as an attractive location from which to introduce surrogate somatosensory feedback into the nervous system.

  20. A role for nociceptive, myelinated nerve fibers in itch sensation

    PubMed Central

    Ringkamp, M.; Schepers, R. J.; Shimada, S.G.; Johanek, L.M.; Hartke, T.V.; Borzan, J.; Shim, B.; LaMotte, R.H.; Meyer, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the underlying neural mechanisms of itch sensation are poorly understood. In many diseases, pruritus is not effectively treated with antihistamines, indicating the involvement of non-histaminergic mechanisms. To investigate the role of small myelinated afferents in non-histaminergic itch, we tested, in psychophysical studies in humans, the effect of a differential nerve block on itch produced by intradermal insertion of spicules from the pods of a cowhage plant (Mucuna pruriens). Electrophysiological experiments in anesthetized monkey were used to investigate the responsiveness of cutaneous, nociceptive, myelinated afferents to different chemical stimuli (cowhage spicules, histamine, capsaicin). Our results provide several lines of evidence for an important role of myelinated fibers in cowhage-induced itch: 1) a selective conduction block in myelinated fibers substantially reduces itch in a sub-group of subjects with A-fiber dominated itch, 2) the time course of itch sensation differs between subjects with A-fiber versus C-fiber dominated itch, 3) cowhage activates a subpopulation of myelinated and unmyelinated afferents in monkey, 4) the time course of the response to cowhage is different in myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, 5) the time of peak itch sensation for subjects with A-fiber dominated itch matches the time for peak response in myelinated fibers, and 6) the time for peak itch sensation for subjects with C-fiber dominated itch matches the time for the peak response in unmyelinated fibers. These findings demonstrate that activity in nociceptive, myelinated afferents contributes to cowhage-induced sensations, and that non-histaminergic itch is mediated through activity in both unmyelinated and myelinated afferents. PMID:22016517

  1. Hypergravity modulates behavioral nociceptive responses in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumei, Y.; Shimokawa, R.; Toda, K.; Kawauchi, Y.; Makita, K.; Terasawa, M.; Ohya, K.; Shimokawa, H.

    Hypergravity (2G) exposure elevated the nociceptive threshold (pain suppression) concomitantly with evoked neuronal activity in the hypothalamus. Young Wistar male rats were exposed to 2G by centrifugal rotation for 10 min. Before and after 2G exposure, the nociceptive threshold was measured as the withdrawal reflex by using the von Frey type needle at a total of 8 sites of each rat (nose, four quarters, upper and lower back, tail), and then rats were sacrificed. Fos expression was examined immunohistochemically in the hypothalamic slices of the 2G-treated rats. When rats were exposed to 2G hypergravity, the nociceptive threshold was significantly elevated to approximately 150 to 250% of the 1G baseline control levels in all the examination sites. The 2G hypergravity remarkably induced Fos expression in the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus. The analgesic effects of 2G hypergravity were attenuated by naloxone pretreatment. Data indicate that hypergravity induces analgesic effects in rats, mediated through hypothalamic neuronal activity in the endogenous opioid system and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  2. Contribution of Primary Afferent Input to Trigeminal Astroglial Hyperactivity, Cytokine Induction and NMDA Receptor Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Guo, W; Yang, K; Wei, F; Dubner, R; Ren, K

    2010-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that primary afferent inputs play a role in astroglial hyperactivity after tissue injury. We first injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 0.05 ml, 1:1 oil/saline) into the masseter muscle, which upregulated glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astrocytes, interleukin (IL)-1β an inflammatory cytokine, and phosphorylation of serine896 of the NR1 subunit (P-NR1) of the NMDA receptor in the subnuclei interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition zone, an important structure for processing trigeminal nociceptive input. Local anesthetic block with lidocaine (2%) of the masseter muscle at 10 min prior to injection of CFA into the same site significantly reduced the CFA-induced increase in GFAP, IL-1β and P-NR1 (p<0.05, n=4/group). We then tested the effect of peripheral electrical stimulation (ES). The ES protocol was burst stimulation consisting of trains of 4 square pulses (10-100 Hz, 0.1-3 mA, 0.5 ms pulse width). Under pentobarbital anesthesia, an ES was delivered every 0.2 s for a total of 30 min. The Vi/Vc tissues were processed for immunohistochemistry or western blot analysis at 10-120 min after ES. Compared to naive and SHAM-treated rats, there was increased immunoreactivity against GFAP, IL-1β and P-NR1 in the Vi/Vc in rats receiving ES. Double staining showed that IL-1β was selectively localized in GFAP-positive astroglia, and P-NR1-immunoreactivity was localized to neurons. These findings indicate that primary afferent inputs are necessary and sufficient to induce astroglial hyperactivity and upregulation of IL-1β, as well as neuronal NMDA receptor phosphorylation. PMID:21170295

  3. Ca2+-Dependent Regulation of Ca2+ Currents in Rat Primary Afferent Neurons: Role of CaMKII and the Effect of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qingbo; Bangaru, Madhavi Latha Yadav; Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Wu, Hsiang-En; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory J.; McCallum, J. Bruce; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Currents through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (ICa) may be regulated by cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c), producing Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) or facilitation (CDF). Since ICa regulates sensory neuron excitability, altered CDI or CDF could contribute to pain generation after peripheral nerve injury. We explored this by manipulating [Ca2+]c while recording ICa in rat sensory neurons. In uninjured neurons, elevating [Ca2+]c with a conditioning prepulse (−15 mV, 2 s) inactivated ICa measured during subsequent test pulses (−15 mV, 5 ms). This inactivation was Ca2+-dependent (CDI), since it was decreased with elimination of Ca2+ influx by depolarization to above the ICa reversal potential, with high intracellular Ca2+ buffering (EGTA 10 mm or BAPTA 20 mm), and with substitution of Ba2+ for extracellular Ca2+, revealing a residual voltage-dependent inactivation. At longer latencies after conditioning (>6 s), ICa recovered beyond baseline. This facilitation also proved to be Ca2+-dependent (CDF) using the protocols limiting cytoplasmic Ca2+ elevation. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockers applied by bath (KN-93, myristoyl-AIP) or expressed selectively in the sensory neurons (AIP) reduced CDF, unlike their inactive analogues. Protein kinase C inhibition (chelerythrine) had no effect. Selective blockade of N-type Ca2+ channels eliminated CDF, whereas L-type channel blockade had no effect. Following nerve injury, CDI was unaffected, but CDF was eliminated in axotomized neurons. Excitability of sensory neurons in intact ganglia from control animals was diminished after a similar conditioning pulse, but this regulation was eliminated by injury. These findings indicate that ICa in sensory neurons is subject to both CDI and CDF, and that hyperexcitability following injury-induced loss of CDF may result from diminished CaMKII activity. PMID:22915116

  4. Classification of neurons by dendritic branching pattern. A categorisation based on Golgi impregnation of spinal and cranial somatic and visceral afferent and efferent cells in the adult human.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-06-01

    Neurons from adult human brainstem and spinal cord, fixed by immersion in formalin, were impregnated by a Golgi method and examined in sections 100 micron thick. Objective numerical criteria were used to classify completely impregnated neurons. Only the parameters mentioned below were found to be valid. Neurons in 100 micron sections were classified on the basis of (i) the primary dendrite number, indicated by a Roman numeral and called group; (ii) the dendritic branching pattern, comprising the highest branching order seen, indicated by an Arabic numeral and called category; the lowest dendritic branching order observed in complete neurons, indicated by an upper case letter and called class; and the number of branching orders seen between the two preceding, indicated by a lower case letter and called subclass. On the basis of the above characteristics, all neurons seen in the grey matter of the spinal cord and cranial nerve nuclei could be classified into thirteen 'families'. The results of other investigations (Abdel-Maguid & Bowsher, 1979, 1984) showed that this classification has functional value. PMID:6204961

  5. Capsaicin, Nociception and Pain.

    PubMed

    Frias, Bárbara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the hot chili pepper, is known to act on the transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is involved in somatic and visceral peripheral inflammation, in the modulation of nociceptive inputs to spinal cord and brain stem centers, as well as the integration of diverse painful stimuli. In this review, we first describe the chemical and pharmacological properties of capsaicin and its derivatives in relation to their analgesic properties. We then consider the biochemical and functional characteristics of TRPV1, focusing on its distribution and biological effects within the somatosensory and viscerosensory nociceptive systems. Finally, we discuss the use of capsaicin as an agonist of TRPV1 to model acute inflammation in slices and other ex vivo preparations. PMID:27322240

  6. VGLUT2-Dependent Sensory Neurons in the TRPV1 Population Regulate Pain and Itch

    PubMed Central

    Lagerström, Malin C.; Rogoz, Katarzyna; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Persson, Emma; Reinius, Björn; Nordenankar, Karin; Ölund, Caroline; Smith, Casey; Mendez, José Alfredo; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Wood, John N.; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa; Kullander, Klas

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The natural response to itch sensation is to scratch, which relieves the itch through an unknown mechanism. Interaction between pain and itch has been frequently demonstrated, and the selectivity hypothesis of itch, based on data from electrophysiological and behavioral experiments, postulates the existence of primary pain afferents capable of repressing itch. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 2 in a subpopulation of neurons partly overlapping with the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) primary afferents resulted in a dramatic increase in itch behavior accompanied by a reduced responsiveness to thermal pain. The increased itch behavior was reduced by administration of antihistaminergic drugs and by genetic deletion of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, demonstrating a dependence on VGLUT2 to maintain normal levels of both histaminergic and nonhistaminergic itch. This study establishes that VGLUT2 is a major player in TRPV1 thermal nociception and also serves to regulate a normal itch response. PMID:21040852

  7. Nociception at the diabetic foot, an uncharted territory

    PubMed Central

    Chantelau, Ernst A

    2015-01-01

    The diabetic foot is characterised by painless foot ulceration and/or arthropathy; it is a typical complication of painless diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy depletes the foot skin of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of the afferent A-delta and C-fibres, which are mostly nociceptors and excitable by noxious stimuli only. However, some of them are cold or warm receptors whose functions in diabetic neuropathy have frequently been reported. Hence, it is well established by quantitative sensory testing that thermal detection thresholds at the foot skin increase during the course of painless diabetic neuropathy. Pain perception (nociception), by contrast, has rarely been studied. Recent pilot studies of pinprick pain at plantar digital skinfolds showed that the perception threshold was always above the upper limit of measurement of 512 mN (equivalent to 51.2 g) at the diabetic foot. However, deep pressure pain perception threshold at musculus abductor hallucis was beyond 1400 kPa (equivalent to 14 kg; limit of measurement) only in every fifth case. These discrepancies of pain perception between forefoot and hindfoot, and between skin and muscle, demand further study. Measuring nociception at the feet in diabetes opens promising clinical perspectives. A critical nociception threshold may be quantified (probably corresponding to a critical number of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings), beyond which the individual risk of a diabetic foot rises appreciably. Staging of diabetic neuropathy according to nociception thresholds at the feet is highly desirable as guidance to an individualised injury prevention strategy. PMID:25897350

  8. Quantitative characterization reveals three types of dry-sensitive corneal afferents: pattern of discharge, receptive field, and thermal and chemical sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    This study reveals that the cold-sensitive (CS) + dry-sensitive (DS) corneal afferents reported in a previous study consist of two types: 1) low threshold (LT)-CS + DS neurons with <1°C cooling sensitivity, and 2) high threshold (HT)-CS + DS neurons with a wide range of cooling sensitivities (∼1–10°C cooling). We also found DS neurons with no cooling sensitivity down to 19°C [cold-insensitive (CI) + DS neurons]. LT-CS + DS neurons showed highly irregular discharge patterns during the dry cornea characterized by numerous spiking bursts, reflecting small temperature changes in the cornea. Their receptive fields (RFs) were mainly located in the cornea's center, the first place for tears to ebb from the surface and be susceptible to external temperature fluctuations. HT-CS and CI + DS neurons showed a gradual rise in firing rate to a stable level over ∼60 s after the dry stimulus onset. Their RFs were located mostly in the cornea's periphery, the last place for tears to evaporate. The exquisite sensitivity to cooling in LT-CS + DS neurons was highly correlated with heat sensitivity (∼45°C). There was a perfect correlation between noxious heat sensitivity and capsaicin responsiveness in each neuron type. The high sensitivity to noxious osmotic stress was a defining property of the HT-CS and CI + DS neurons, while high sensitivity to menthol was a major characteristic of the LT-CS + DS neurons. These observations suggest that three types of DS neurons serve different innocuous and nociceptive functions related to corneal dryness. PMID:22914652

  9. Role of thalamic nuclei in the modulation of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex during hypertonic saline-induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Lei, J; Ye, G; Xu, H; You, H-J

    2015-09-24

    It has been proposed that thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei form thalamic 'nociceptive discriminators' in discrimination of nociceptive afferents, and specifically govern endogenous descending facilitation and inhibition. The present study conducted in rats was to explore the role of thalamic MD and VM nuclei in modulation of cerebral neuronal activities by means of detection of spatiotemporal variations of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex. Following a unilateral intramuscular injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, Fos expression within the bilateral, different areas of the cerebral cortex except S2 was significantly increased (P<0.05). Particularly, the increases in Fos expression within the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex occurred at 0.5h, 4h and reached the peak level at 4h, 16h, respectively. Electrolytic lesion of the contralateral thalamic MD and VM nuclei significantly blocked the 5.8% saline intramuscularly induced increases in Fos expression within the bilateral cingulate and insular cortices, respectively. Additionally, the 5.8% saline-induced Fos expression in the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex were dose-dependently attenuated by microinjection of μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride into the thalamic MD and VM nuclei. It is suggested that (1) the neural circuits of 'thalamic MD nucleus - cingulate cortex' and 'thalamic VM nucleus - insular cortex' form two distinct pathways in the endogenous control of nociception, (2) mirror or contralateral pain is hypothesized to be related to cross-talk of neuronal activities within the bilateral cerebral cortices modulated by μ-opioid receptors within the thalamic MD and VM nuclei. PMID:26189794

  10. Disparate cholinergic currents in rat principal trigeminal sensory nucleus neurons mediated by M1 and M2 receptors: a possible mechanism for selective gating of afferent sensory neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, Kristi A; Soja, Peter J; Kristensen, Morten P

    2006-06-01

    Neurons situated in the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (PSTN) convey orofacial sensory inputs to thalamic relay regions and higher brain centres, and the excitability of these ascending tract cells is modulated across sleep/wakefulness states and during pain conditions. Moreover, acetylcholine release changes profoundly across sleep/wakefulness states and ascending sensory neurotransmission is altered by cholinergic agonists. An intriguing possibility is, therefore, that cholinergic mechanisms mediate such state-dependent modulation of PSTN tract neurons. We tested the hypotheses that cholinergic agonists can modulate PSTN cell excitability and that such effects are mediated by muscarinic receptor subtypes, using patch-clamp methods in rat and mouse. In all examined cells, carbachol elicited an electrophysiological response that was independent of action potential generation as it persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Responses were of three types: depolarization, hyperpolarization or a biphasic response consisting of hyperpolarization followed by depolarization. In voltage-clamp mode, carbachol evoked corresponding inward, outward or biphasic currents. Moreover, immunostaining for the vesicle-associated choline transporter showed cholinergic innervation of the PSTN. Using muscarinic receptor antagonists, we found that carbachol-elicited PSTN neuron hyperpolarization was mediated by M2 receptors and depolarization, in large part, by M1 receptors. These data suggest that acetylcholine acting on M1 and M2 receptors may contribute to selective excitability enhancement or depression in individual, rostrally projecting sensory neurons. Such selective gating effects via cholinergic input may play a functional role in modulation of ascending sensory transmission, including across behavioral states typified by distinct cholinergic tone, e.g. sleep/wakefulness arousal levels or neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:16820015

  11. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum

    PubMed Central

    Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding characteristics of colorectal afferents. The colorectum with PN attached was dissected, opened longitudinally, and pinned flat in a Sylgard-lined chamber. Action potentials of afferent fibers evoked by circumferential stretch (servo-controlled force actuator) were recorded from the PN. Stretch-sensitive fibers were categorized into the following four groups: colonic muscular, colonic muscular/mucosal, rectal muscular, and rectal muscular/mucosal. Seventy-nine stretch-sensitive PN afferents evenly distributed into the above four groups were studied. Rectal muscular afferents had significantly greater stretch-responses than the other three groups. Virtually all rectal afferents (98%) had low thresholds for response and encoded stimulus intensity into the noxious range without obvious saturation. Most colonic afferents (72%) also had low thresholds (<14 mmHg), but a significant proportion (28%) had high thresholds (>18 mmHg) for response. These high-threshold colonic afferents were sensitized to stretch by inflammatory soup; response threshold was significantly reduced (from 23 to 12 mmHg), and response magnitude significantly increased. These results suggest that the encoding of mechanosensory information differs between colonic and rectal stretch-sensitive PN afferents. Rectal afferents have a wide response range to stretch, whereas high-threshold colonic afferents likely contribute to visceral nociception. PMID:20075141

  12. Altered nociception in mice with genetically induced hypoglutamatergic tone.

    PubMed

    Kayser, V; Viguier, F; Melfort, M; Bourgoin, S; Hamon, M; Masson, J

    2015-05-01

    Extensive pharmacological evidence supports the idea that glutamate plays a key role in both acute and chronic pain. In the present study, we investigated the implication of the excitatory amino acid in physiological nociception by using mutant mice deficient in phosphate-activated glutaminase type 1 (GLS1), the enzyme that synthesizes glutamate in central glutamatergic neurons. Because homozygous GLS1-/- mutants die shortly after birth, assays for assessing mechanical, thermal and chemical (formalin) nociception were performed on heterozygous GLS1+/- mutants, which present a clear-cut decrease in glutamate synthesis in central neurons. As compared to paired wild-type mice, adult male GLS1+/- mutants showed decreased responsiveness to mechanical (von Frey filament and tail-pressure, but not tail-clip, tests) and thermal (Hargreaves' plantar, tail-immersion and hot-plate tests) nociceptive stimuli. Genotype-related differences were also found in the formalin test for which GLS1+/- mice exhibited marked decreases in the nociceptive responses (hindlimb lift, lick and flinch) during both phase 1 (0-5 min) and phase 2 (16-45 min) after formalin injection. On the other hand, acute treatment with memantine (1mg/kg i.p.), an uncompetitive antagonist at NMDA glutamate receptors, reduced nociception responses in wild-type but not GLS1+/- mice. Conversely, antinociceptive response to acute administration of a low dose (1mg/kg s.c.) of morphine was significantly larger in GLS1+/- mutants versus wild-type mice. Our findings indicate that genetically driven hypoactivity of central glutamatergic neurotransmission renders mice hyposensitive to nociceptive stimulations, and promotes morphine antinociception, further emphasizing the critical role of glutamate in physiological nociception and its opioid-mediated control. PMID:25743253

  13. Thalamic Responses to Nociceptive-Specific Input in Humans: Functional Dichotomies and Thalamo-Cortical Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bastuji, Hélène; Frot, Maud; Mazza, Stéphanie; Perchet, Caroline; Magnin, Michel; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2016-06-01

    While nociceptive cortical activation is now well characterized in humans, understanding of the nociceptive thalamus remains largely fragmentary. We used laser stimuli and intracerebral electrodes in 17 human subjects to record nociceptive-specific field responses in 4 human thalamic nuclei and a number of cortical areas. Three nuclei known to receive spinothalamic (STT) projections in primates (ventro-postero-lateral [VPL], anterior pulvinar [PuA], and central lateral [CL]) exhibited responses with similar latency, indicating their parallel activation by nociceptive afferents. Phase coherence analysis, however, revealed major differences in their functional connectivity: while VPL and PuA drove a limited set of cortical targets, CL activities were synchronized with a large network including temporal, parietal, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that STT afferents reach simultaneously a set of lateral and medial thalamic regions unconstrained by traditional nuclear borders. The broad pattern of associated cortical networks suggests that a single nociceptive volley is able to trigger the sensory, cognitive, and emotional activities that underlie the complex pain experience. The medial pulvinar, an associative nucleus devoid of STT input, exhibited delayed responses suggesting its dependence on descending cortico-thalamic projections. Its widespread cortical connectivity suggests a role in synchronizing parietal, temporal, and frontal activities, hence contributing to the access of noxious input to conscious awareness. PMID:25994963

  14. Roles of prefrontal cortex and paraventricular thalamus in affective and mechanical components of visceral nociception.

    PubMed

    Jurik, Angela; Auffenberg, Eva; Klein, Sabine; Deussing, Jan M; Schmid, Roland M; Wotjak, Carsten T; Thoeringer, Christoph K

    2015-12-01

    Visceral pain represents a major clinical challenge in the management of many gastrointestinal disorders, eg, pancreatitis. However, cerebral neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral nociception are poorly understood. As a representative model of visceral nociception, we applied cerulein hyperstimulation in C57BL6 mice to induce acute pancreatitis and performed a behavioral test battery and c-Fos staining of brains. We observed a specific pain phenotype and a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT), the periaqueductal gray, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Using neuronal tracing, we observed projections of the PVT to cortical layers of the mPFC with contacts to inhibitory GABAergic neurons. These inhibitory neurons showed more activation after cerulein treatment suggesting thalamocortical "feedforward inhibition" in visceral nociception. The activity of neurons in pancreatitis-related pain centers was pharmacogenetically modulated by designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs, selectively and cell type specifically expressed in target neurons using adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. Pharmacogenetic inhibition of PVT but not periaqueductal gray neurons attenuated visceral pain and induced an activation of the descending inhibitory pain pathway. Activation of glutamatergic principle neurons in the mPFC, but not inhibitory neurons, also reversed visceral nociception. These data reveal novel insights into central pain processing that underlies visceral nociception and may trigger the development of novel, potent centrally acting analgesic drugs. PMID:26262826

  15. Rapid optical control of nociception with an ion-channel photoswitch.

    PubMed

    Mourot, Alexandre; Fehrentz, Timm; Le Feuvre, Yves; Smith, Caleb M; Herold, Christian; Dalkara, Deniz; Nagy, Frédéric; Trauner, Dirk; Kramer, Richard H

    2012-04-01

    Local anesthetics effectively suppress pain sensation, but most of these compounds act nonselectively, inhibiting activity of all neurons. Moreover, their actions abate slowly, preventing precise spatial and temporal control of nociception. We developed a photoisomerizable molecule, quaternary ammonium-azobenzene-quaternary ammonium (QAQ), that enables rapid and selective optical control of nociception. QAQ is membrane-impermeant and has no effect on most cells, but it infiltrates pain-sensing neurons through endogenous ion channels that are activated by noxious stimuli, primarily TRPV1. After QAQ accumulates intracellularly, it blocks voltage-gated ion channels in the trans form but not the cis form. QAQ enables reversible optical silencing of mouse nociceptive neuron firing without exogenous gene expression and can serve as a light-sensitive analgesic in rats in vivo. Because intracellular QAQ accumulation is a consequence of nociceptive ion-channel activity, QAQ-mediated photosensitization is a platform for understanding signaling mechanisms in acute and chronic pain. PMID:22343342

  16. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  17. trkA modulation of developing somatosensory neurons in oro-facial tissues: tooth pulp fibers are absent in trkA knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, S; Ichikawa, H; Henderson, T A; Silos-Santiago, I; Barbacid, M; Arends, J J; Jacquin, M F

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the nerve growth factor requirement of developing oro-facial somatosensory afferents, we have studied the survival of sensory fibers subserving nociception, mechanoreception or proprioception in receptor tyrosine kinase (trkA) knockout mice using immunohistochemistry. trkA receptor null mutant mice lack nerve fibers in tooth pulp, including sympathetic fibers, and showed only sparse innervation of the periodontal ligament. Ruffini endings were formed definitively in the periodontal ligament of the trkA knockout mice, although calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-immunoreactive fibers were reduced in number or had disappeared completely. trkA gene deletion had also no obvious effect on the formation of Meissner corpuscles in the palate. In the vibrissal follicle, however, some mechanoreceptive afferents were sensitive for trkA gene deletion, confirming a previous report [Fundin et al. (1997) Dev. Biol. 190, 94-116]. Moreover, calretinin-positive fibers innervating longitudinal lanceolate endings were completely lost in trkA knockout mice, as were the calretinin-containing parent cells in the trigeminal ganglion.These results indicate that trkA is indispensable for developing nociceptive neurons innervating oral tissues, but not for developing mechanoreceptive neurons innervating oral tissues (Ruffini endings and Meissner corpuscles), and that calretinin-containing, trkA dependent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion normally participate in mechanoreception through longitudinal lanceolate endings of the vibrissal follicle. PMID:11516838

  18. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  19. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Idaira; Wanat, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review, we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders. PMID:27014097

  20. GluA2-Containing AMPA Receptors Distinguish Ribbon-Associated from Ribbonless Afferent Contacts on Rat Cochlear Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo; Liu, Chang; Weisz, Catherine; Vyas, Pankhuri; Fuchs, Paul Albert; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells release glutamate at ribbon synapses to excite postsynaptic afferent neurons, via AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs). However, type II afferent neurons contacting outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea were thought to differ in this respect, failing to show GluA immunolabeling and with many "ribbonless" afferent contacts. Here it is shown that antibodies to the AMPAR subunit GluA2 labeled afferent contacts below inner and outer hair cells in the rat cochlea, and that synaptic currents in type II afferents had AMPAR-specific pharmacology. Only half the postsynaptic densities of type II afferents that labeled for PSD-95, Shank, or Homer were associated with GluA2 immunopuncta or presynaptic ribbons, the "empty slots" corresponding to ribbonless contacts described previously. These results extend the universality of AMPAergic transmission by hair cells, and support the existence of silent afferent contacts. PMID:27257620

  1. Sensory Neuron Development in Mouse Coccygeal Vertebrae and Its Relationship to Tail Biopsies for Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jerald; Hendricks, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    A common method of genotyping mice is via tissue obtained from tail biopsies. However, there is no available information on the temporal development of sensory neurons in the tail and how their presence or absence might affect the age for performing tail biopsies. The goals of this study were to determine if afferent sensory neurons, and in particular nociceptive neurons, are present in the coccygeal vertebrae at or near the time of birth and if not, when they first can be visualized on or in those vertebrae. Using toluidine blue neuronal staining, transmission electron microscopy, and calcitonin-related gene peptide immunostaining, we found proximal to distal maturation of coccygeal nerve growth in the C57BL/6J mouse. Single nerve bundles were first seen on postpartum day (PPD) 0. On PPD 3 presumptive nociceptive sensory nerve fibers were seen entering the vertebral perichondrium. Neural development continued through the last time point (PPD 7) but at no time were neural fibers seen entering the body of the vertebrae. The effect of age on the development of pain perception in the neonatal mouse is discussed. PMID:24505409

  2. Modulation of vagal afferent excitation and reduction of food intake by leptin and cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Peters, James H; Simasko, Steven M; Ritter, Robert C

    2006-11-30

    The gut-peptide, cholecystokinin (CCK), reduces food intake by acting at CCK-1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons, whereas the feeding effects of the adipokine hormone, leptin, are associated primarily with its action on receptors (ObRb) in the hypothalamus. Recently, however, ObRb mRNA has been reported in vagal afferent neurons, some of which also express CCK-1 receptor, suggesting that leptin, alone or in cooperation with CCK, might activate vagal afferent neurons, and influence food intake via a vagal route. To evaluate these possibilities we have been examining the cellular and behavioral effects of leptin and CCK on vagal afferent neurons. In cultured vagal afferent neurons leptin and CCK evoked short latency, transient depolarizations, often leading to action potentials, and increases in cytosolic calcium. There was a much higher prevalence of CCK and leptin sensitivity amongst cultured vagal afferent neurons that innervate stomach or duodenum than there was in the overall vagal afferent population. Furthermore, almost all leptin-responsive gastric and duodenal vagal afferents also were sensitive to CCK. Leptin, infused into the upper GI tract arterial supply, reduced meal size, and enhanced satiation evoked by CCK. These results indicate that vagal afferent neurons are activated by leptin, and that this activation is likely to participate in meal termination, perhaps by enhancing vagal sensitivity to CCK. Our findings are consistent with the view that leptin and CCK exert their influence on food intake by accessing multiple neural systems (viscerosensory, motivational, affective and motor) at multiple points along the neuroaxis. PMID:16872644

  3. TRPA1 in mast cell activation-induced long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal afferent C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z; Ouyang, Ann

    2009-07-01

    Sensitization of esophageal sensory afferents by inflammatory mediators plays an important role in esophageal nociception. We have shown esophageal mast cell activation induces long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity in vagal nodose C-fibers. However, the roles of mast cell mediators and downstream ion channels in this process are unclear. Mast cell tryptase via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)-mediated pathways sensitizes sensory nerves and induces hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) plays an important role in mechanosensory transduction and nociception. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cell activation via a PAR2-dependent mechanism sensitizes TRPA1 to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in esophageal vagal C-fibers. The expression profiles of PAR2 and TRPA1 in vagal nodose ganglia were determined by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings from esophageal nodose neurons were performed in ex vivo guinea pig esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distention and chemical perfusion were compared. Both PAR2 and TRPA1 expressions were identified in vagal nodose neurons by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Ninety-one percent of TRPA1-positive neurons were of small and medium diameters, and 80% coexpressed PAR2. Esophageal mast cell activation significantly enhanced the response of nodose C-fibers to esophageal distension (mechanical hypersensitivity). This was mimicked by PAR2-activating peptide, which sustained for 90 min after wash, but not by PAR2 reverse peptide. TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 pretreatment significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity induced by either mast cell activation or PAR2 agonist. Collectively, our data provide new evidence that sensitizing TRPA1 via a PAR2-dependent mechanism plays an important role in mast cell activation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal nodose C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus. PMID:19423751

  4. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  5. Functional specializations of primary auditory afferents on the Mauthner cells: interactions between membrane and synaptic properties.

    PubMed

    Curti, Sebastian; Pereda, Alberto E

    2010-01-01

    Primary auditory afferents are usually perceived as passive, timing-preserving, lines of communication. Contrasting this view, a special class of auditory afferents to teleost Mauthner cells, a command neuron that organizes tail-flip escape responses, undergoes potentiation of their mixed (electrical and chemical) synapses in response to high frequency cellular activity. This property is likely to represent a mechanism of input sensitization as these neurons provide the Mauthner cell with essential information for the initiation of an escape response. We review here the anatomical and physiological specializations of these identifiable auditory afferents. In particular, we discuss how their membrane and synaptic properties act in concert to more efficaciously activate the Mauthner cells. The striking functional specializations of these neurons suggest that primary auditory afferents might be capable of more sophisticated contributions to auditory processing than has been generally recognized. PMID:19941953

  6. Coarse topographic organization of pheromone-sensitive afferents from different antennal surfaces in the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Kamimura, Itsuro; Yokohari, Fumio; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-05-19

    In contrast to visual, auditory, taste, and mechanosensory neuropils, in which sensory afferents are topographically organized on the basis of their peripheral soma locations, axons of cognate sensory neurons from different locations of the olfactory sense organ converge onto a small spherical neuropil (glomerulus) in the first-order olfactory center. In the cockroach Periplaneta americana, sex pheromone-sensitive afferents with somata in the antero-dorsal and postero-ventral surfaces of a long whip-like antenna are biased toward the anterior and posterior regions of a macroglomerulus, respectively. In each region, afferents with somata in the more proximal antenna project to more proximal region, relative to the axonal entry points. However, precise topography of afferents in the macroglomerulus has remained unknown. Using single and multiple neuronal stainings, we showed that afferents arising from anterior, dorsal, ventral and posterior surfaces of the proximal regions of an antenna were biased progressively from the anterior to posterior region of the macroglomerulus, reflecting chiasmatic axonal re-arrangements that occur immediately before entering the antennal lobe. Morphologies of individual afferents originating from the proximal antenna matched results of mass neuronal stainings, but their three-dimensional origins in the antenna were hardly predictable on the basis of the projection patterns. Such projection biases made by neuronal populations differ from strict somatotopic projections of antennal mechanosensory neurons in the same species, suggesting a unique sensory mechanism to process information about odor location and direction on a single antenna. PMID:25849528

  7. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herrity, April N.; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Stirling, David P.; Rau, Kristofer K.

    2015-01-01

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  8. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Rau, Kristofer K; Hubscher, Charles H

    2015-06-15

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  9. Effects of intravenous metamizole on ongoing and evoked activity of dura-sensitive thalamic neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Alexey Y; Lyubashina, Olga A; Sivachenko, Ivan B; Panteleev, Sergey S

    2014-05-15

    Migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) are the most common forms of primary headaches. A general key mechanism underlying development of both the diseases is the trigeminal system activation associated with the ascending nociceptive transmission via the trigemino-thalamo-cortical pathway. The ventroposteromedial (VPM) nucleus is a key thalamic structure, receiving afferent inflow from the craniofacial region; it holds the third-order neurons responsible for conveying sensory information from the extra- and intracranial nociceptors to the cortex. The VPM is currently seen as a therapeutic target for various antimigraine medications, which is shown to reduce the VPM neuronal excitability. A non-opioid analgesic metamizole is widely used in some countries for acute treatment of migraine or TTH. However, the precise mechanisms underlying anticephalgic action of metamizole remain unclear. The objective of our study performed in the rat model of trigemino-durovascular nociception was to evaluate the effects of intravenously administered metamizole on ongoing and evoked firing of the dura-sensitive VPM neurons. The experiments were carried out on rats under urethane-chloralose anesthesia. Cumulative administration of metamizole (thrice-repeated intravenous infusion of 150 mg/kg performed 30 min apart) in 56% of cases produced a suppression of both the ongoing activity of the thalamic VPM neurons and their responses to dural electrical stimulation. Although the inhibitory effect was prevailing, a number of VPM neurons were indifferent to the administration of metamizole. These data suggest that one of the main components of neural mechanism underlying anticephalgic action of metamizole is suppression of the thalamo-cortical nociceptive transmission associated with trigemino-vascular activation. PMID:24650732

  10. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  11. Histaminergic afferent system in the cerebellum: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Histaminergic afferent system of the cerebellum, having been considered as an essential component of the direct hypothalamocerebellar circuits, originates from the tuberomammillary nucleus in the hypothalamus. Unlike the mossy fibers and climbing fibers, the histaminergic afferent fibers, a third type of cerebellar afferents, extend fine varicose fibers throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. Histamine receptors, belonging to the family of G protein-coupled receptors, are widely present in the cerebellum. Through these histamine receptors, histamine directly excites Purkinje cells and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as the cerebellar nuclear neurons. Therefore, the histaminergic afferents parallelly modulate these dominant components in the cerebellar circuitry and consequently influence the final output of the cerebellum. In this way, the histaminergic afferent system actively participates in the cerebellum-mediated motor balance and coordination and nonsomatic functions. Accordingly, histaminergic reagents may become potential drugs for clinical treatment of cerebellar ataxia and other cerebellar disease. On the other hand, considering the hypothalamus is a high regulatory center for autonomic and visceral activities, the hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers/projections, bridging the nonsomatic center to somatic structure, may play a critical role in the somatic-nonsomatic integration. PMID:26331029

  12. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Sam M; Andresen, Michael C; Aicher, Sue A

    2016-03-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  13. Learned control over spinal nociception reduces supraspinal nociception as quantified by late somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Bäumler, Maximilian; Feller, Moritz; Krafft, Stefanie; Sommer, Jens; Straube, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We have recently shown that subjects can learn to use cognitive-emotional strategies to suppress their spinal nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) under visual RIII feedback and proposed that this reflects learned activation of descending pain inhibition. Here, we investigated whether learned RIII suppression also affects supraspinal nociception and whether previous relaxation training increases success. Subjects were trained over 3 sessions to reduce their RIII size by self-selected cognitive-emotional strategies. Two groups received true RIII feedback (with or without previous relaxation training) and a sham group received false feedback (15 subjects per group). RIII reflexes, late somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), and F-waves were recorded and pain intensity ratings collected. Both true feedback groups achieved significant (P < 0.01) but similar RIII suppression (to 79% ± 21% and 70% ± 17% of control). Somatosensory evoked potential amplitude (100-150 milliseconds after stimulation) was reduced in parallel with the RIII size (r = 0.57, P < 0.01). In the sham group, neither RIII size nor SEP amplitude was significantly reduced during feedback training. Pain intensity was significantly reduced in all 3 groups and also correlated with RIII reduction (r = 0.44, P < 0.01). F-wave parameters were not affected during RIII suppression. The present results show that learned RIII suppression also affects supraspinal nociception as quantified by SEPs, although effects on pain ratings were less clear. Lower motor neuron excitability as quantified by F-waves was not affected. Previous relaxation training did not significantly improve RIII feedback training success. PMID:26270584

  14. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  15. GluA2-Containing AMPA Receptors Distinguish Ribbon-Associated from Ribbonless Afferent Contacts on Rat Cochlear Hair Cells123

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mechanosensory hair cells release glutamate at ribbon synapses to excite postsynaptic afferent neurons, via AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs). However, type II afferent neurons contacting outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea were thought to differ in this respect, failing to show GluA immunolabeling and with many “ribbonless” afferent contacts. Here it is shown that antibodies to the AMPAR subunit GluA2 labeled afferent contacts below inner and outer hair cells in the rat cochlea, and that synaptic currents in type II afferents had AMPAR-specific pharmacology. Only half the postsynaptic densities of type II afferents that labeled for PSD-95, Shank, or Homer were associated with GluA2 immunopuncta or presynaptic ribbons, the “empty slots” corresponding to ribbonless contacts described previously. These results extend the universality of AMPAergic transmission by hair cells, and support the existence of silent afferent contacts. PMID:27257620

  16. Activation of TRESK channels by the inflammatory mediator lysophosphatidic acid balances nociceptive signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kollert, Sina; Dombert, Benjamin; Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons TRESK channels constitute a major current component of the standing outward current IKSO. A prominent physiological role of TRESK has been attributed to pain sensation. During inflammation mediators of pain e.g. lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are released and modulate nociception. We demonstrate co-expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in DRG neurons. Heterologous expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in Xenopus oocytes revealed augmentation of basal K+ currents upon LPA application. In DRG neurons nociception can result from TRPV1 activation by capsaicin or LPA. Upon co-expression in Xenopus oocytes LPA simultaneously increased both depolarising TRPV1 and hyperpolarising TRESK currents. Patch-clamp recordings in cultured DRG neurons from TRESK[wt] mice displayed increased IKSO after application of LPA whereas under these conditions IKSO in neurons from TRESK[ko] mice remained unaltered. Under current-clamp conditions LPA application differentially modulated excitability in these genotypes upon depolarising pulses. Spike frequency was attenuated in TRESK[wt] neurons and, in contrast, augmented in TRESK[ko] neurons. Accordingly, excitation of nociceptive neurons by LPA is balanced by co-activation of TRESK channels. Hence excitation of sensory neurons is strongly controlled by the activity of TRESK channels, which therefore are good candidates for the treatment of pain disorders. PMID:26224542

  17. Activation of TRESK channels by the inflammatory mediator lysophosphatidic acid balances nociceptive signalling.

    PubMed

    Kollert, Sina; Dombert, Benjamin; Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons TRESK channels constitute a major current component of the standing outward current IKSO. A prominent physiological role of TRESK has been attributed to pain sensation. During inflammation mediators of pain e.g. lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are released and modulate nociception. We demonstrate co-expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in DRG neurons. Heterologous expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in Xenopus oocytes revealed augmentation of basal K(+) currents upon LPA application. In DRG neurons nociception can result from TRPV1 activation by capsaicin or LPA. Upon co-expression in Xenopus oocytes LPA simultaneously increased both depolarising TRPV1 and hyperpolarising TRESK currents. Patch-clamp recordings in cultured DRG neurons from TRESK[wt] mice displayed increased IKSO after application of LPA whereas under these conditions IKSO in neurons from TRESK[ko] mice remained unaltered. Under current-clamp conditions LPA application differentially modulated excitability in these genotypes upon depolarising pulses. Spike frequency was attenuated in TRESK[wt] neurons and, in contrast, augmented in TRESK[ko] neurons. Accordingly, excitation of nociceptive neurons by LPA is balanced by co-activation of TRESK channels. Hence excitation of sensory neurons is strongly controlled by the activity of TRESK channels, which therefore are good candidates for the treatment of pain disorders. PMID:26224542

  18. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  19. Bright light activates a trigeminal nociceptive pathway

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Tashiro, Akimasa; Chang, Zheng; Bereiter, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Bright light can cause ocular discomfort and/or pain; however, the mechanism linking luminance to trigeminal nerve activity is not known. In this study we identify a novel reflex circuit necessary for bright light to excite nociceptive neurons in superficial laminae of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc/C1). Vc/C1 neurons encoded light intensity and displayed a long delay (>10 s) for activation. Microinjection of lidocaine into the eye or trigeminal root ganglion (TRG) inhibited light responses completely, whereas topical application onto the ocular surface had no effect. These findings indicated that light-evoked Vc/C1 activity was mediated by an intraocular mechanism and transmission through the TRG. Disrupting local vasomotor activity by intraocular microinjection of the vasoconstrictive agents, norepinephrine or phenylephrine, blocked light-evoked neural activity, whereas ocular surface or intra-TRG microinjection of norepinephrine had no effect. Pupillary muscle activity did not contribute since light-evoked responses were not altered by atropine. Microinjection of lidocaine into the superior salivatory nucleus diminished light-evoked Vc/C1 activity and lacrimation suggesting that increased parasympathetic outflow was critical for light-evoked responses. The reflex circuit also required input through accessory visual pathways since both Vc/C1 activity and lacrimation were prevented by local blockade of the olivary pretectal nucleus. These findings support the hypothesis that bright light activates trigeminal nerve activity through an intraocular mechanism driven by a luminance-responsive circuit and increased parasympathetic outflow to the eye. PMID:20206444

  20. Impaired intestinal afferent nerve satiety signalling and vagal afferent excitability in diet induced obesity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donna M; Park, Sung Jin; Valinsky, William C; Beyak, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Gastrointestinal vagal afferents transmit satiety signals to the brain via both chemical and mechanical mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these signals may be attenuated in obesity. We hypothesized that responses to satiety mediators and distension of the gut would be attenuated after induction of diet induced obesity. Obesity was induced by feeding a high fat diet (60% kcal from fat). Low fat fed mice (10% kcal from fat) served as a control. High fat fed mice were obese, with increased visceral fat, but were not hyperglycaemic. Recordings from jejunal afferents demonstrated attenuated responses to the satiety mediators cholecystokinin (CCK, 100 nm) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10 μm), as was the response to low intensity jejunal distension, while responses to higher distension pressures were preserved. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings on nodose ganglion neurons, both unlabelled, and those labelled by fast blue injection into the wall of the jejunum. The cell membrane of both labelled and unlabelled nodose ganglion neurons was less excitable in HFF mice, with an elevated rheobase and decreased number of action potentials at twice rheobase. Input resistance of HFF neurons was also significantly decreased. Calcium imaging experiments revealed reduced proportion of nodose ganglion neurons responding to CCK and 5-HT in obese mice. These results demonstrate a marked reduction in afferent sensitivity to satiety related stimuli after a chronic high fat diet. A major mechanism underlying this change is reduced excitability of the neuronal cell membrane. This may explain the development of hyperphagia when a high fat diet is consumed. Improving sensitivity of gastrointestinal afferent nerves may prove useful to limit food intake in obesity. PMID:21486762

  1. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators. PMID:26671526

  2. Response properties of gerbil otolith afferents to small angle pitch and roll tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Angelaki, D. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The responses from isolated single otolith afferent fibers were obtained to small angle sinusoidal pitch and roll tilts in anesthetized gerbils. The stimulus directions that produced the maximum (response vector) and minimum response sensitivities were determined for each otolith afferent, with response vectors for the units being spread throughout the horizontal plane, similar to those reported for other species. A breadth of tuning measure was derived, with narrowly tuned neurons responding maximally to stimulation in one direction and minimally along an orthogonal ('null') direction. Most (approximately 80%) otolith afferents are narrowly tuned, however, some fibers were broadly tuned responding significantly to stimulations in any direction in the horizontal plane. The number of broadly tuned otolith afferents (approximately 20%) differs significantly from the more substantial number of broadly tuned vestibular nuclei neurons (88%) recently reported in rats.

  3. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sitt Wai; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Wu, Meng-Fang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  4. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  5. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in hypertrophic intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Pengmin; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Grundy, David; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-03-15

    Partial intestinal obstruction causes smooth muscle hypertrophy, enteric neuronal plasticity, motility disorders, and biomechanical remodeling. In this study we characterized the stimulus-response function of afferent fibers innervating the partially obstructed jejunum. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled mechanical tissue properties or from adaptive afferent processes. Partial obstruction was created by placing a polyethylene ring for 2 wk in jejunum of seven rats. Sham obstruction was made in six rats and seven rats served as normal controls. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerve bundles was recorded during mechanical ramp, relaxation, and creep tests. Stress-strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR), and firing rate in single units were assessed for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations, histomorphometry data, and afferent nerve discharge. Partial intestinal obstruction resulted in hypertrophy and jejunal stiffening proximal to the obstruction site. Low SRIR at low strains during fast distension and at high stresses during slow distension was found in the obstructed rats. Single unit analysis showed increased proportion of mechanosensitive units but absent high-threshold (HT) units during slow stimulation, decreased number of HT units during fast stimulation, and shift from HT sensitivity towards low threshold sensitivity in the obstructed jejunum. Biomechanical remodeling and altered afferent response to mechanical stimulations were found in the obstructed jejunum. Afferents from obstructed jejunum preserved their function in encoding ongoing mechanical stimulation but showed changes in their responsiveness. The findings support that mechanical factors rather than adaption are important for afferent remodeling. PMID:26585414

  6. [Nerve growth factor and the physiology of pain: the relationships among interoception, sympathetic neurons and the emotional response indicated by the molecular pathophysiology of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Indo, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophic factor essential for the survival and maintenance of neurons. Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in NTRK1, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, for NGF. Mutations in NTRK1 cause the selective loss of NGF-dependent neurons, including both NGF-dependent primary afferents and sympathetic postganglionic neurons, in otherwise intact systems. The NGF-dependent primary afferents are thinly myelinated AΔ or unmyelinated C-fibers that are dependent on the NGF-TrkA system during development. NGF-dependent primary afferents are not only nociceptive neurons that transmit pain and temperature sensation, but also are polymodal receptors that play essential roles for interoception by monitoring various changes in the physiological status of all tissues in the body. In addition, they contribute to various inflammatory processes in acute, chronic and allergic inflammation. Together with sympathetic postganglionic neurons, they maintain the homeostasis of the body and emotional responses via interactions with the brain, immune and endocrine systems. Pain is closely related to emotions that accompany physical responses induced by systemic activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast to a negative image of emotions in daily life, Antonio Damasio proposed the 'Somatic Marker Hypothesis', wherein emotions play critical roles in the decision-making and reasoning processes. According to this hypothesis, reciprocal communication between the brain and the body-proper are essential for emotional responses. Using the pathophysiology of CIPA as a foundation, this article suggests that NGF-dependent neurons constitute a part of the neuronal network required for homeostasis and emotional responses, and indicates that this network plays important roles in mediating the reciprocal communication between the brain and the body-proper. PMID:26211335

  7. Application of bifurcation analysis for determining the mechanism of coding of nociceptive signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dik, O. E.; Shelykh, T. N.; Plakhova, V. B.; Nozdrachev, A. D.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2015-10-01

    The patch clamp method is used for studying the characteristics of slow sodium channels responsible for coding of nociceptive signals. Quantitative estimates of rate constants of transitions of "normal" and pharmacologically modified activation gating mechanisms of these channels are obtained. A mathematical model of the type of Hogdkin-Huxley nociceptive neuron membrane is constructed. Cometic acid, which is a drug substance of a new nonopioid analgesic, is used as a pharmacological agent. The application of bifurcation analysis makes it possible to outline the boundaries of the region in which a periodic impulse activity is generated. This boundary separates the set of values of the model parameter for which periodic pulsation is observed from the values for which such pulsations are absent or damped. The results show that the finest effect of modulation of physical characteristic of a part of a protein molecule and its effective charge suppresses the excitability of the nociceptive neuron membrane and, hence, leads to rapid reduction of pain.

  8. Paraventricular nucleus is involved in the central pathway of adipose afferent reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Wang, Gui-Hua; Wu, Yu-Long; Ma, Chun-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates a link between sympathetic nervous system activation and obesity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympathoexcitatory reflex that is activated by afferent neurotransmission from the white adipose tissue (WAT). This study aimed to investigate whether the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the AAR. In anesthetized rats, the discharge activity of individual PVH neurons was recorded in vivo. Activation of WAT afferents was initiated by capsaicin injection, and the AAR was evaluated by monitoring renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses. The responses of PVH neurons to activation of WAT afferents were evaluated by c-fos immunoreactivity and the discharge activity of individual PVH neurons, which was recorded using extracellular single-unit recording. After activation of WAT afferents, both individual PVH neuron discharge activity and c-fos immunoreactivity increased. Bilateral selective lesions of the neurons in the PVH with kainic acid abolished the AAR. These results indicate that PVH is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the AAR. PMID:26963333

  9. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD. PMID:24595534

  10. Age-Dependent Changes in the Inflammatory Nociceptive Behavior of Mice

    PubMed Central

    King-Himmelreich, Tanya S.; Möser, Christine V.; Wolters, Miriam C.; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The processing of pain undergoes several changes in aging that affect sensory nociceptive fibers and the endogenous neuronal inhibitory systems. So far, it is not completely clear whether age-induced modifications are associated with an increase or decrease in pain perception. In this study, we assessed the impact of age on inflammatory nociception in mice and the role of the hormonal inhibitory systems in this context. We investigated the nociceptive behavior of 12-month-old versus 6–8-week-old mice in two behavioral models of inflammatory nociception. Levels of TRP channels, and cortisol as well as cortisol targets, were measured by qPCR, ELISA, and Western blot in the differently aged mice. We observed an age-related reduction in nociceptive behavior during inflammation as well as a higher level of cortisol in the spinal cord of aged mice compared to young mice, while TRP channels were not reduced. Among potential cortisol targets, the NF-κB inhibitor protein alpha (IκBα) was increased, which might contribute to inhibition of NF-κB and a decreased expression and activity of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In conclusion, our results reveal a reduced nociceptive response in aged mice, which might be at least partially mediated by an augmented inflammation-induced increase in the hormonal inhibitory system involving cortisol. PMID:26593904

  11. Operant Nociception in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kangas, Brian D.; Bergman, Jack

    2014-01-01

    The effective management of pain is a longstanding public health concern. Morphine-like opioids have long been front-line analgesics, but produce undesirable side effects that can limit their application. Slow progress in the introduction of novel improved medications for pain management over the last 5 decades has prompted a call for innovative translational research, including new preclinical assays. Most current in vivo procedures (e.g., tail flick, hot plate, warm water tail withdrawal) assay the effects of nociceptive stimuli on simple spinal reflexes or unconditioned behavioral reactions. However, clinical treatment goals may include the restoration of previous behavioral activities, which can be limited by medication-related side-effects that are not measured in such procedures. The present studies describe an apparatus and procedure to study the disruptive effects of nociceptive stimuli on voluntary behavior in nonhuman primates, and the ability of drugs to restore such behavior through their analgesic actions. Squirrel monkeys were trained to pull a cylindrical thermode for access to a highly palatable food. Next, sessions were conducted in which the temperature of the thermode was increased stepwise until responding stopped, permitting the determination of stable nociceptive thresholds. Tests revealed that several opioid analgesics, but not d-amphetamine or Δ9-THC, produced dose-related increases in threshold that were antagonist-sensitive and efficacy-dependent, consistent with their effects using traditional measures of antinociception. Unlike traditional reflex-based measures, however, the results also permitted the concurrent evaluation of response disruption, providing an index with which to characterize the behavioral selectivity of antinociceptive drugs. PMID:24968803

  12. Structure of the Afferent Terminals in Terminal Ganglion of a Cricket and Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacob; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    We use topological data analysis to investigate the three dimensional spatial structure of the locus of afferent neuron terminals in crickets Acheta domesticus. Each afferent neuron innervates a filiform hair positioned on a cercus: a protruding appendage at the rear of the animal. The hairs transduce air motion to the neuron signal that is used by a cricket to respond to the environment. We stratify the hairs (and the corresponding afferent terminals) into classes depending on hair length, along with position. Our analysis uncovers significant structure in the relative position of these terminal classes and suggests the functional relevance of this structure. Our method is very robust to the presence of significant experimental and developmental noise. It can be used to analyze a wide range of other point cloud data sets. PMID:22649516

  13. Functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 sodium channel in Aβ afferent fibers subjected to chronic peripheral inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional alterations in the properties of Aβ afferent fibers may account for the increased pain sensitivity observed under peripheral chronic inflammation. Among the voltage-gated sodium channels involved in the pathophysiology of pain, Nav1.8 has been shown to participate in the peripheral sensitization of nociceptors. However, to date, there is no evidence for a role of Nav1.8 in controlling Aβ-fiber excitability following persistent inflammation. Methods Distribution and expression of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves were qualitatively or quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemical staining and by real time-polymerase chain reaction at different time points following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) administration. Using a whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, we further determined both total INa and TTX-R Nav1.8 currents in large-soma dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons isolated from sham or CFA-treated rats. Finally, we analyzed the effects of ambroxol, a Nav1.8-preferring blocker on the electrophysiological properties of Nav1.8 currents and on the mechanical sensitivity and inflammation of the hind paw in CFA-treated rats. Results Our findings revealed that Nav1.8 is up-regulated in NF200-positive large sensory neurons and is subsequently anterogradely transported from the DRG cell bodies along the axons toward the periphery after CFA-induced inflammation. We also demonstrated that both total INa and Nav1.8 peak current densities are enhanced in inflamed large myelinated Aβ-fiber neurons. Persistent inflammation leading to nociception also induced time-dependent changes in Aβ-fiber neuron excitability by shifting the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.8 in the hyperpolarizing direction, thus decreasing the current threshold for triggering action potentials. Finally, we found that ambroxol significantly reduces the potentiation of Nav1.8 currents in Aβ-fiber neurons observed following intraplantar CFA injection and

  14. Single tactile afferents outperform human subjects in a vibrotactile intensity discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, Ehsan; Clifford, Colin W G; Harris, Justin A; Mahns, David A; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2014-11-15

    We simultaneously compared the sensitivity of single primary afferent neurons supplying the glabrous skin of the hand and the psychophysical amplitude discrimination thresholds in human subjects for a set of vibrotactile stimuli delivered to the receptive field. All recorded afferents had a dynamic range narrower than the range of amplitudes across which the subjects could discriminate. However, when the vibration amplitude was chosen to be within the steepest part of the afferent's stimulus-response function the response of single afferents, defined as the spike count over the vibration duration (500 ms), was often more sensitive in discriminating vibration amplitude than the perceptual judgment of the participants. We quantified how the neuronal performance depended on the integration window: for short windows the neuronal performance was inferior to the performance of the subject. The neuronal performance progressively improved with increasing spike count duration and reached a level significantly above that of the subjects when the integration window was 250 ms or longer. The superiority in performance of individual neurons over observers could reflect a nonoptimal integration window or be due to the presence of noise between the sensory periphery and the cortical decision stage. Additionally, it could indicate that the range of perceptual sensitivity comes at the cost of discrimination through pooling across neurons with different response functions. PMID:25143540

  15. Lidocaine Inhibits HCN Currents in Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Nana; Lv, Minhua; Ma, Longxian; Peng, Huizhen; Peng, Sicong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, which blocks voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely used in surgical anesthesia and pain management. Recently, it has been proposed that the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channel is one of the other novel targets of lidocaine. Substantia gelatinosa in the spinal dorsal horn, which plays key roles in modulating nociceptive information from primary afferents, comprises heterogeneous interneurons that can be electrophysiologically categorized by firing pattern. Our previous study demonstrated that a substantial proportion of substantia gelatinosa neurons reveal the presence of HCN current (Ih); however, the roles of lidocaine and HCN channel expression in different types of substantia gelatinosa neurons remain unclear. METHODS: By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the effect of lidocaine on Ih in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons of acute dissociated spinal cord slices. RESULTS: We found that lidocaine rapidly decreased the peak Ih amplitude with an IC50 of 80 μM. The inhibition rate on Ih was not significantly different with a second application of lidocaine in the same neuron. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, did not affect lidocaine’s effect on Ih. In addition, lidocaine shifted the half-activation potential of Ih from −109.7 to −114.9 mV and slowed activation. Moreover, the reversal potential of Ih was shifted by −7.5 mV by lidocaine. In the current clamp, lidocaine decreased the resting membrane potential, increased membrane resistance, delayed rebound depolarization latency, and reduced the rebound spike frequency. We further found that approximately 58% of substantia gelatinosa neurons examined expressed Ih, in which most of them were tonically firing. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that lidocaine strongly inhibits Ih in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner in substantia gelatinosa neurons, independent of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels. Thus, our

  16. Deletion of Interleukin-6 Signal Transducer gp130 in Small Sensory Neurons Attenuates Mechanonociception and Down-Regulates TRPA1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Malsch, Philipp; Andratsch, Manfred; Vogl, Christian; Link, Andrea S.; Alzheimer, Christian; Brierley, Stuart M.; Hughes, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    Glycoprotein 130 (gp130) is the signal transducing receptor subunit for cytokines of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) family, and it is expressed in a multitude of cell types of the immune and nervous system. IL-6-like cytokines are not only key regulators of innate immunity and inflammation but are also essential factors for the differentiation and development of the somatosensory system. Mice with a null mutation of gp130 in primary nociceptive afferents (SNS-gp130−/−) are largely protected from hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in mouse models of pathological pain. Therefore, we set out to investigate how neuronal gp130 regulates mechanonociception. SNS-gp130−/− mice revealed reduced mechanosensitivity to high mechanical forces in the von Frey assay in vivo, and this was associated with a reduced sensitivity of nociceptive primary afferents in vitro. Together with these findings, transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) mRNA expression was significantly reduced in DRG from SNS-gp130−/− mice. This was also reflected by a reduced number of neurons responding with calcium transients to TRPA1 agonists in primary DRG cultures. Downregulation of Trpa1 expression was predominantly discovered in nonpeptidergic neurons, with the deficit becoming evident during stages of early postnatal development. Regulation of Trpa1 mRNA expression levels downstream of gp130 involved the classical Janus kinase family-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway. Our results closely link proinflammatory cytokines to the expression of TRPA1, both of which have been shown to contribute to hypersensitive pain states. We suggest that gp130 has an essential role in mechanonociception and in the regulation of TRPA1 expression. PMID:25057188

  17. Central changes in primary afferent fibers following peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Lekan, H A; Doubell, T P; Allchorne, A; Woolf, C J

    1997-04-01

    Cutting or crushing rat sciatic nerve does not significantly reduce the number of central myelinated sensory axons in the dorsal roots entering the fourth and fifth lumbar segments even over very extended periods of time. Unmyelinated axons were reduced by approximately 50%, but only long after sciatic nerve lesions (four to eight months), and reinnervation of the peripheral target did not rescue these axons. This indicates that a peripheral nerve lesion sets up a slowly developing but major shift towards large afferent fiber domination of primary afferent input into the spinal cord. In addition, since myelinated axons are never lost, this is good evidence that the cells that give rise to these fibers are also not lost. If this is the case, this would indicate that adult primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons do not depend on peripheral target innervation for survival. PMID:9130791

  18. Changes in thalamic nociception resulting from morphine- and meperidine-dependence in rats.

    PubMed

    Emmers, R

    1984-01-01

    Rats were injected with progressively increasing doses of morphine or meperidine during a period of 3 to 40 days. From this colony of animals individual rats were used at 3- to 4-day intervals for electrophysiologic experiments to analyze the activity of nociceptive neurons in the somesthetic thalamus. After an i.p. injection of chloralose-urethane and the appropriate preparation for a stereotaxic microelectrode penetration of the thalamus, a nociceptive neuron was identified in the nucleus ventralis posterolateralis by its unique spacing of spike potentials emitted in response to pricking the foot with a pin. In addition to the short-latency response that formed a high activity peak on poststimulus time histograms, spikes following the stimulus up to 500 ms also formed activity peaks. Single-pulse stimulation of the sciatic nerve evoked the same response as pinpricks, but innocuous stimuli (pin shielded with a piece of cork) evoked a response without the late activity peaks. Only neurons that exhibited this differential response were regarded as nociceptive. Their response and spontaneous activity were accumulated separately on a digital computer. Following this, naloxone was infused i.v. and the computer accumulations were repeated. It was found that during naloxone-precipitated narcotic withdrawal, innocuous stimuli evoked responses indicative of pain; the nociceptive system was sensitized. Furthermore, a small dose or morphine or meperidine heightened the sensitization. This action of the narcotic agents was reversed by 5-hydroxytryptophan, which assisted the narcotics in suppressing pain in morphine- or meperidine-dependent rats but had no demonstrable effect in control animals. The spontaneous tonic activity of the nociceptive neurons of the somesthetic thalamus was high in rats exhibiting narcotic dependence. Naloxone decreased the count, but not to the value of the control animals. The sensitization of nociception can be explained by a decreased action of a

  19. Shielding cognition from nociception with working memory.

    PubMed

    Legrain, Valéry; Crombez, Geert; Plaghki, Léon; Mouraux, André

    2013-01-01

    Because pain often signals the occurrence of potential tissue damage, nociceptive stimuli have the capacity to capture attention and interfere with ongoing cognitive activities. Working memory is known to guide the orientation of attention by maintaining goal priorities active during the achievement of a task. This study investigated whether the cortical processing of nociceptive stimuli and their ability to capture attention are under the control of working memory. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants performed primary tasks on visual targets that required or did not require rehearsal in working memory (1-back vs 0-back conditions). The visual targets were shortly preceded by task-irrelevant tactile stimuli. Occasionally, in order to distract the participants, the tactile stimuli were replaced by novel nociceptive stimuli. In the 0-back conditions, task performance was disrupted by the occurrence of the nociceptive distracters, as reflected by the increased reaction times in trials with novel nociceptive distracters as compared to trials with standard tactile distracters. In the 1-back conditions, such a difference disappeared suggesting that attentional capture and task disruption induced by nociceptive distracters were suppressed by working memory, regardless of task demands. Most importantly, in the conditions involving working memory, the magnitude of nociceptive ERPs, including ERP components at early latency, were significantly reduced. This indicates that working memory is able to modulate the cortical processing of nociceptive input already at its earliest stages, and could explain why working memory reduces consequently ability of nociceptive stimuli to capture attention and disrupt performance of the primary task. It is concluded that protecting cognitive processing against pain interference is best guaranteed by keeping out of working memory pain-related information. PMID:23026759

  20. Utricular afferents: morphology of peripheral terminals

    PubMed Central

    Huwe, J. A.; Logan, G. J.; Williams, B.; Rowe, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The utricle provides critical information about spatiotemporal properties of head movement. It comprises multiple subdivisions whose functional roles are poorly understood. We previously identified four subdivisions in turtle utricle, based on hair bundle structure and mechanics, otoconial membrane structure and hair bundle coupling, and immunoreactivity to calcium-binding proteins. Here we ask whether these macular subdivisions are innervated by distinctive populations of afferents to help us understand the role each subdivision plays in signaling head movements. We quantified the morphology of 173 afferents and identified six afferent classes, which differ in structure and macular locus. Calyceal and dimorphic afferents innervate one striolar band. Bouton afferents innervate a second striolar band; they have elongated terminals and the thickest processes and axons of all bouton units. Bouton afferents in lateral (LES) and medial (MES) extrastriolae have small-diameter axons but differ in collecting area, bouton number, and hair cell contacts (LES >> MES). A fourth, distinctive population of bouton afferents supplies the juxtastriola. These results, combined with our earlier findings on utricular hair cells and the otoconial membrane, suggest the hypotheses that MES and calyceal afferents encode head movement direction with high spatial resolution and that MES afferents are well suited to signal three-dimensional head orientation and striolar afferents to signal head movement onset. PMID:25632074

  1. Mechanisms Involved in the Nociception Triggered by the Venom of the Armed Spider Phoneutria nigriventer

    PubMed Central

    Gewehr, Camila; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Trevisan, Gabriela; Dalmolin, Gerusa Duarte; Rigo, Flávia Karine; de Castro Júnior, Célio José; Cordeiro, Marta Nascimento; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequency of accidental spider bites in Brazil is growing, and poisoning due to bites from the spider genus Phoneutria nigriventer is the second most frequent source of such accidents. Intense local pain is the major symptom reported after bites of P. nigriventer, although the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms involved in nociception triggered by the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer (PNV). Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty microliters of PNV or PBS was injected into the mouse paw (intraplantar, i.pl.). The time spent licking the injected paw was considered indicative of the level of nociception. I.pl. injection of PNV produced spontaneous nociception, which was reduced by arachnid antivenin (ArAv), local anaesthetics, opioids, acetaminophen and dipyrone, but not indomethacin. Boiling or dialysing the venom reduced the nociception induced by the venom. PNV-induced nociception is not dependent on glutamate or histamine receptors or on mast cell degranulation, but it is mediated by the stimulation of sensory fibres that contain serotonin 4 (5-HT4) and vanilloid receptors (TRPV1). We detected a kallikrein-like kinin-generating enzyme activity in tissue treated with PNV, which also contributes to nociception. Inhibition of enzymatic activity or administration of a receptor antagonist for kinin B2 was able to inhibit the nociception induced by PNV. PNV nociception was also reduced by the blockade of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, acid-sensitive ion channels (ASIC) and TRPV1 receptors. Conclusion/Significance Results suggest that both low- and high-molecular-weight toxins of PNV produce spontaneous nociception through direct or indirect action of kinin B2, TRPV1, 5-HT4 or ASIC receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels present in sensory neurons but not in mast cells. Understanding the mechanisms involved in nociception caused by PNV are of interest not only for

  2. Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) signaling modulates acute and tonic nociception

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Eugene L.; Petrus, Emily; Usdin, Ted B.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) synthesizing neurons at the caudal border of the thalamus and in the lateral pons project to areas rich in its receptor, the parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R). These areas include many involved in processing nociceptive information. Here we examined the potential role of TIP39 signaling in nociception using a PTH2R antagonist (HYWH) and mice with deletion of TIP39's coding sequence or PTH2R null mutation. Intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of HYWH significantly inhibited nociceptive responses in tail-flick and hot-plate tests and attenuated the nociceptive response to hindpaw formalin injection. TIP39-KO and PTH2R-KO had increased response latency in the 55 °C hot-plate test and reduced responses in the hindpaw formalin test. The tail-flick test was not affected in either KO line. Thermal hypoalgesia in KO mice was dose-dependently reversed by systemic administration of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonist rimonabant, which did not affect nociception in wild-type (WT). Systemic administration of the cannabinoid agonist CP 55,940 did not affect nociception in KO mice at a dose effective in WT. WT mice administered HYWH icv, and both KOs, had significantly increased stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Rimonabant blocked the increased SIA in TIP39-KO, PTH2R-KO or after HYWH infusion. CB1 and FAAH mRNA were decreased and increased, respectively, in the basolateral amygdala of TIP39-KO mice. These data suggest that TIP39 signaling modulates nociception, very likely by inhibiting endocannabinoid circuitry at a supraspinal level. We infer a new central mechanism for endocannabinoid regulation, via TIP39 acting on the PTH2R in discrete brain regions. PMID:20696160

  3. Neurovascular coupling during nociceptive processing in the primary somatosensory cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey-Gauthier, Renaud; Guillemot, Jean-Paul; Piché, Mathieu

    2013-08-01

    Neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been used extensively to investigate pain-related cerebral mechanisms. However, these methods rely on a tight coupling of neuronal activity to hemodynamic changes. Because pain may be associated with hemodynamic changes unrelated to local neuronal activity (eg, increased mean arterial pressure [MAP]), it is essential to determine whether the neurovascular coupling is maintained during nociceptive processing. In this study, local field potentials (LFP) and cortical blood flow (CBF) changes evoked by electrical stimulation of the left hind paw were recorded concomitantly in the right primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in 15 rats. LFP, CBF, and MAP changes were examined in response to stimulus intensities ranging from 3 to 30 mA. In addition, LFP, CBF, and MAP changes evoked by a 10-mA stimulation were examined during immersion of the tail in non-nociceptive or nociceptive hot water (counter-stimulation). SI neurovascular coupling was altered for stimuli of nociceptive intensities (P<0.001). This alteration was intensity-dependent and was strongly associated with MAP changes (r=0.98, P<0.001). However, when the stimulus intensity was kept constant, SI neurovascular coupling was not significantly affected by nociceptive counter-stimulation (P=0.4), which similarly affected the amplitude of shock-evoked LFP and CBF changes. It remains to be determined whether such neurovascular uncoupling occurs in humans, and whether it also affects other regions usually activated by painful stimuli. These results should be taken into account for accurate interpretation of fMRI studies that involve nociceptive stimuli associated with MAP changes. PMID:23707276

  4. Top-Down Effect of Direct Current Stimulation on the Nociceptive Response of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dimov, Luiz Fabio; Franciosi, Adriano Cardozo; Campos, Ana Carolina Pinheiro; Brunoni, André Russowsky

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging, noninvasive technique of neurostimulation for treating pain. However, the mechanisms and pathways involved in its analgesic effects are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of direct current stimulation (DCS) on thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds and on the activation of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (DHSC) in rats; these central nervous system areas are associated with pain processing. Male Wistar rats underwent cathodal DCS of the motor cortex and, while still under stimulation, were evaluated using tail-flick and paw pressure nociceptive tests. Sham stimulation and naive rats were used as controls. We used a randomized design; the assays were not blinded to the experimenter. Immunoreactivity of the early growth response gene 1 (Egr-1), which is a marker of neuronal activation, was evaluated in the PAG and DHSC, and enkephalin immunoreactivity was evaluated in the DHSC. DCS did not change the thermal nociceptive threshold; however, it increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold of both hind paws compared with that of controls, characterizing a topographical effect. DCS decreased the Egr-1 labeling in the PAG and DHSC as well as the immunoreactivity of spinal enkephalin. Altogether, the data suggest that DCS disinhibits the midbrain descending analgesic pathway, consequently inhibiting spinal nociceptive neurons and causing an increase in the nociceptive threshold. This study reinforces the idea that the motor cortex participates in the neurocircuitry that is involved in analgesia and further clarifies the mechanisms of action of tDCS in pain treatment. PMID:27071073

  5. Coeruleotrigeminal inhibition of nociceptive processing in the rat trigeminal subnucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Masayoshi; Matsutani, Kiyo; Maeda, Masako; Inoue, Tomio

    2003-12-12

    It has been accepted that the descending system from the nucleus locus coeruleus (LC)/nucleus subcoeruleus (SC) plays a significant role in spinal nociceptive processing. The present study was designed to examine modulation of nociceptive processing in the caudal part of the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex, the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis which is generally considered to be involved in the relay of oral-facial nociceptive information. Experiments were performed on anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. The site of LC/SC stimulation was confirmed by histology using potassium ferrocyanide to produce a Prussian blue reaction product marking the iron deposited from the stimulating electrode tip. Only data from rats which had electrode placements in the LC/SC were used. Electrical stimulation was delivered at a stimulus intensity below 100 microA in the present study. Stimulation at sites inside the LC/SC produced a reduction of both spontaneous activity and responses of subnucleus caudalis neurons to somatic input, especially nociceptive input. Increasing stimulation frequency in the LC/SC resulted in an increase in inhibitory effects on nociceptive responses of subnucleus caudalis neurons. At three of nine sites outside the LC/SC, electrical stimulation was effective on descending inhibition. A significant difference in the inhibitory effects was observed when the inhibitory effects were compared between sites of stimulation inside the LC/SC and three effective sites of stimulation outside the LC/SC. These findings suggest that nociceptive processing in the subnucleus caudalis is under the control of the descending modulation system from the LC/SC. To understand the effects of repetitive stimulation with high frequency on fine unmyelinated LC/SC fibers, the existence of recurrent collateral excitation in the LC/SC may be considered. PMID:14642840

  6. A pro-nociceptive role of neuromedin U in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang Qing; Yu, Xiao Hong; Dray, Andy; Filosa, Angelo; Perkins, Martin N

    2003-08-01

    Although the neuropeptide neuromedin U (NMU) was first isolated from the spinal cord, its actions in this site are unknown. The recent identification of the NMU receptor subtype 2 (NMU2R) in the spinal cord has increased the interest in investigating the role of NMU in this part of the central nervous system. Here, we report a novel function for NMU in spinal nociception in the mouse. Systemic perfusion of NMU (rat, NMU-23) dose-dependently (0.2, 0.5, 1, and 2.5 microM) potentiated both the background activity and noxious pinch-evoked response of nociceptive or wide dynamic range, but not non-nociceptive, dorsal horn neurons. At 2.5 microM, NMU-23 increased the total background activity from 154+/-34 to 1374+/-260 spikes/160 s (P<0.005, n=28) and increased the evoked nociceptive response by 185+/-50% (P<0.01, n=13). Intrathecal administration of NMU-23 (0.4, 1.1, and 3.8 nmol/10 microl) dose-dependently decreased thermal withdrawal latencies and produced a morphine-sensitive behavioral response. These electrophysiological and behavioral results suggest that NMU may be a novel physiological regulator in spinal nociceptive transmission and processing. PMID:12927633

  7. Connectivity of Pacemaker Neurons in the Neonatal Rat Superficial Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Neil C.; Arbabi, Shahriar; Baccei, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Pacemaker neurons with an intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic burst-firing have been characterized in lamina I of the neonatal spinal cord, where they are innervated by high-threshold sensory afferents. However, little is known about the output of these pacemakers, as the neuronal populations which are targeted by pacemaker axons have yet to be identified. The present study combines patch clamp recordings in the intact neonatal rat spinal cord with tract-tracing to demonstrate that lamina I pacemaker neurons contact multiple spinal motor pathways during early life. Retrograde labeling of premotor interneurons with the trans-synaptic virus PRV-152 revealed the presence of burst-firing in PRV-infected lamina I neurons, thereby confirming that pacemakers are synaptically coupled to motor networks in the spinal ventral horn. Notably, two classes of pacemakers could be distinguished in lamina I based on cell size and the pattern of their axonal projections. While small pacemaker neurons possessed ramified axons which contacted ipsilateral motor circuits, large pacemaker neurons had unbranched axons which crossed the midline and ascended rostrally in the contralateral white matter. Recordings from identified spino-parabrachial and spino-PAG neurons indicated the presence of pacemaker activity within neonatal lamina I projection neurons. Overall, these results show that lamina I pacemakers are positioned to regulate both the level of activity in developing motor circuits as well as the ascending flow of nociceptive information to the brain, thus highlighting a potential role for pacemaker activity in the maturation of pain and sensorimotor networks in the CNS. PMID:25380417

  8. Identification of bladder and colon afferents in the nodose ganglia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Hubscher, Charles H

    2014-11-01

    The sensory neurons innervating the urinary bladder and distal colon project to similar regions of the central nervous system and often are affected simultaneously by various diseases and disorders, including spinal cord injury. Anatomical and physiological commonalities between the two organs involve the participation of shared spinally derived pathways, allowing mechanisms of communication between the bladder and colon. Prior electrophysiological data from our laboratory suggest that the bladder also may receive sensory innervation from a nonspinal source through the vagus nerve, which innervates the distal colon as well. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether anatomical evidence exists for vagal innervation of the male rat urinary bladder and to assess whether those vagal afferents also innervate the colon. Additionally, the relative contribution to bladder and colon sensory innervation of spinal and vagal sources was determined. By using lipophilic tracers, neurons that innervated the bladder and colon in both the nodose ganglia (NG) and L6/S1 and L1/L2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were quantified. Some single vagal and spinal neurons provided dual innervation to both organs. The proportions of NG afferents labeled from the bladder did not differ from spinal afferents labeled from the bladder when considering the collective population of total neurons from either group. Our results demonstrate evidence for vagal innervation of the bladder and colon and suggest that dichotomizing vagal afferents may provide a neural mechanism for cross-talk between the organs. PMID:24845615

  9. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  10. Social Stress Engages Neurochemically-Distinct Afferents to the Rat Locus Coeruleus Depending on Coping Strategy123

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Zitnik, Gerard; Foster, Celia; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stress increases vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, partly by affecting brain monoamine systems, such as the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine system. During stress, LC activity is coregulated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and endogenous opioids. This study identified neural circuitry that regulates LC activity of intruder rats during the resident–intruder model of social stress. LC afferents were retrogradely labeled with Fluorogold (FG) and rats were subjected to one or five daily exposures to an aggressive resident. Sections through the nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi) and central amygdalar nucleus (CNA), major sources of enkephalin (ENK) and CRF LC afferents, respectively, were immunocytochemically processed to detect c-fos, FG, and CRF or ENK. In response to a single exposure, intruder rats assumed defeat with a relatively short latency (SL). LC neurons, PGI-ENK LC afferents, and CNA-CRF LC afferents were activated in these rats as indicated by increased c-fos expression. With repeated stress, rats exhibited either a SL or long latency (LL) to defeat and these strategies were associated with distinct patterns of neuronal activation. In SL rats, LC neurons were activated, as were CNA-CRF LC afferents but not PGI-ENK LC afferents. LL rats had an opposite pattern, maintaining activation of PGi-ENK LC afferents but not CNA-CRF LC afferents or LC neurons. Together, these results indicate that the establishment of different coping strategies to social stress is associated with changes in the circuitry that regulates activity of the brain norepinephrine system. This may underlie differential vulnerability to the consequences of social stress that characterize these different coping strategies. PMID:26634226

  11. Efferent Control of Hair Cell and Afferent Responses in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Richard; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Highstein, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The sensations of sound and motion generated by the inner ear are controlled by the brain through extensive centripetal innervation originating within the brain stem. In the semicircular canals, brain stem efferent neurons make synaptic contacts with mechanosensory hair cells and with the dendrites of afferent neurons. Here, we examine the relative contributions of efferent action on hair cells and afferents. Experiments were performed in vivo in the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. The efferent system was activated via electrical pulses to the brain stem and sensory responses to motion stimuli were quantified by simultaneous voltage recording from afferents and intracellular current- and/or voltage-clamp recordings from hair cells. Results showed synaptic inputs to both afferents and hair cells leading to relatively long-latency intracellular signaling responses: excitatory in afferents and inhibitory in hair cells. Generally, the net effect of efferent action was an increase in afferent background discharge and a simultaneous decrease in gain to angular motion stimuli. Inhibition of hair cells was likely the result of a ligand-gated opening of a major basolateral conductance. The reversal potential of the efferent-evoked current was just below the hair cell resting potential, thus resulting in a small hyperpolarization. The onset latency averaged about 90 ms and latency to peak response was 150–400 ms. Hair cell inhibition often outlasted afferent excitation and, in some cases, latched hair cells in the “off” condition for >1 s following cessation of stimulus. These features endow the animal with a powerful means to adjust the sensitivity and dynamic range of motion sensation. PMID:19571186

  12. Functional analysis of ultra high information rates conveyed by rat vibrissal primary afferents

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, André M.; Theis, Lucas; Sengupta, Biswa; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Bethge, Matthias; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Sensory receptors determine the type and the quantity of information available for perception. Here, we quantified and characterized the information transferred by primary afferents in the rat whisker system using neural system identification. Quantification of “how much” information is conveyed by primary afferents, using the direct method (DM), a classical information theoretic tool, revealed that primary afferents transfer huge amounts of information (up to 529 bits/s). Information theoretic analysis of instantaneous spike-triggered kinematic stimulus features was used to gain functional insight on “what” is coded by primary afferents. Amongst the kinematic variables tested—position, velocity, and acceleration—primary afferent spikes encoded velocity best. The other two variables contributed to information transfer, but only if combined with velocity. We further revealed three additional characteristics that play a role in information transfer by primary afferents. Firstly, primary afferent spikes show preference for well separated multiple stimuli (i.e., well separated sets of combinations of the three instantaneous kinematic variables). Secondly, neurons are sensitive to short strips of the stimulus trajectory (up to 10 ms pre-spike time), and thirdly, they show spike patterns (precise doublet and triplet spiking). In order to deal with these complexities, we used a flexible probabilistic neuron model fitting mixtures of Gaussians to the spike triggered stimulus distributions, which quantitatively captured the contribution of the mentioned features and allowed us to achieve a full functional analysis of the total information rate indicated by the DM. We found that instantaneous position, velocity, and acceleration explained about 50% of the total information rate. Adding a 10 ms pre-spike interval of stimulus trajectory achieved 80–90%. The final 10–20% were found to be due to non-linear coding by spike bursts. PMID:24367295

  13. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  14. Spinal nociceptive transmission by mechanical stimulation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Takemi; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-01-01

    Background Since bone marrow receives innervation from A-delta and C-fibers and since an increase in intramedullary pressure in bone marrow may induce acute pain in orthopedic patients during surgery and chronic pain in patients with bone marrow edema, skeletal pain may partly originate from bone marrow. Intraosseous lesions, such as osteomyelitis and bone cancer, are also known to produce cutaneous hypersensitivity, which might be referred pain from bone. However, little is known about pain perception in bone marrow and referred pain induced by bone disease. Thus, we carried out an in vivo electrophysiological study and behavioral study to determine whether increased intraosseous pressure of the femur induces acute pain and whether increased intraosseous pressure induces referred pain in the corresponding receptive fields of the skin. Results Intraosseous balloon inflation caused spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in the lumbosacral region. Single neuronal activities of spinal dorsal horn neurons were extracellularly isolated, and then evoked responses to non-noxious and noxious cutaneous stimuli and intraosseous balloon inflation were recorded. Ninety-four spinal dorsal horn neurons, which had somatic receptive fields at the lower back and thigh, were obtained. Sixty-two percent of the wide-dynamic-range neurons (24/39) and 86% of the high-threshold neurons (12/14) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation, while none of the low-threshold neurons (0/41) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation. Spinally administered morphine (1 µg) abolished balloon inflation-induced spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia in awake rats and also suppressed evoked activities of wide-dynamic-range neurons to noxious cutaneous stimulation and intraosseous balloon inflation. Conclusions The results suggest that mechanical stimulation to bone marrow produces nociception, concomitantly producing its referred pain

  15. Fish oil concentrate delays sensitivity to thermal nociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Veigas, Jyothi M; Williams, Paul J; Halade, Ganesh; Rahman, Mizanur M; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    Fish oil has been used to alleviate pain associated with inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. The anti-inflammatory property of fish oil is attributed to the n-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. Contrarily, vegetable oils such as safflower oil are rich in n-6 fatty acids which are considered to be mediators of inflammation. This study investigates the effect of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids rich oils as dietary supplements on the thermally induced pain sensitivity in healthy mice. C57Bl/6J mice were fed diet containing regular fish oil, concentrated fish oil formulation (CFO) and safflower oil (SO) for 6 months. Pain sensitivity was measured by Plantar test and was correlated to the expression of acid sensing ion channels (ASICs), transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and c-fos in dorsal root ganglion cells. Significant delay in sensitivity to thermal nociception was observed in mice fed CFO compared to mice fed SO (p<0.05). A significant diminution in expression of ion channels such as ASIC1a (64%), ASIC13 (37%) and TRPV1 (56%) coupled with reduced expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was observed in the dorsal root ganglion cells of mice fed CFO compared to that fed SO. In conclusion, we describe here the potential of fish oil supplement in reducing sensitivity to thermal nociception in normal mice. PMID:21345372

  16. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amanda H.; Joe, Christopher L.; Davoodi, Auva; Takechi, Kenichi; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, E

    2014-01-01

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive TRPA1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42°C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue. PMID:24759772

  17. Trigemino-hypoglossal somatic reflex in the pharmacological studies of nociception in orofacial area.

    PubMed

    Zubrzycki, Marek; Janecka, Anna; Zubrzycka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Disorders involving the orofacial area represent a major medical and social problem. They are a consequence of central nociceptive processes associated with stimulation of the trigeminal nerve nucleus. A rat model of trigeminal pain, utilizing tongue jerks evoked by electrical tooth pulp stimulation during perfusion of the cerebral ventricles with various neuropeptide solutions, can be used in the pharmacological studies of nociception in orofacial area. The investigated neuropeptides diffuse through the cerebroventricular lining producing an analgesic effect either directly, through the trigemino-hypoglossal reflex arc neurons or indirectly through the periaqueductal central gray, raphe nuclei or locus coeruleus neurons. The aim of this review is to present the effect of pharmacological activity of various neuropeptides affecting the transmission of the sensory information from the orofacial area on the example of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats. PMID:26581382

  18. Botulinum toxin in Migraine: Role of transport in trigemino-somatic and trigemino-vascular afferents

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, Ramachandran; Carmen, Lam; Yaksh Tony, L

    2015-01-01

    Migraine secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Reported efficacy of extracranial botulinum toxin (BoNT) in treating migraine is surprising since a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for its effect upon meningeal input. We hypothesize that intradermal BoNT acts through central transport in somatic afferents. Anesthetized C57Bl/6 mice (male) received unilateral supraorbital (SO) injections of BoNT-B (1.5 U/40 μl) or saline. 3 days later, mice received ipsilateral (ipsi) -SO capsaicin (2.5 μg/30 μl) or meningeal capsaicin (4 μl of 1mg/ml). Pre-treatment with ipsi-SO BONT-B i) decreased nocicsponsive ipsilateral wiping behavior following ipsi-SO capsaicin; ii) produced cleavage of VAMP in the V1 region of ipsi-TG and in TG neurons showing WGA after SO injection; iii) reduced expression of c-fos in ipsi-TNC following ipsi-SO capsaicin; iv) reduced c-fos activation and NK-1 internalization in ipsi-TNC secondary to ipsi-meningeal capsaicin; vi) SO WGA did not label dural afferents. We conclude that BoNT-B is taken up by peripheral afferents and transported to central terminals where it inhibits transmitter release resulting in decreased activation of second order neurons. Further, this study supports the hypothesis that SO BoNT exerts a trans-synaptic action on either the second order neuron (which receives convergent input from the meningeal afferent) or the terminal/TG of the converging meningeal afferent. PMID:25958249

  19. Touch inhibits subcortical and cortical nociceptive responses

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Flavia; Beaumont, Anne-Lise; Hu, Li; Haggard, Patrick; Iannetti, Gian Domenico D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The neural mechanisms of the powerful analgesia induced by touching a painful body part are controversial. A long tradition of neurophysiologic studies in anaesthetized spinal animals indicate that touch can gate nociceptive input at spinal level. In contrast, recent studies in awake humans have suggested that supraspinal mechanisms can be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. To investigate this issue, we evaluated the modulation exerted by touch on established electrophysiologic markers of nociceptive function at both subcortical and cortical levels in humans. Aδ and C skin nociceptors were selectively activated by high-power laser pulses. As markers of subcortical and cortical function, we recorded the laser blink reflex, which is generated by brainstem circuits before the arrival of nociceptive signals at the cortex, and laser-evoked potentials, which reflect neural activity of a wide array of cortical areas. If subcortical nociceptive responses are inhibited by concomitant touch, supraspinal mechanisms alone are unlikely to be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. Touch induced a clear analgesic effect, suppressed the laser blink reflex, and inhibited both Aδ-fibre and C-fibre laser-evoked potentials. Thus, we conclude that touch-induced analgesia is likely to be mediated by a subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, which in turn results in a modulation of cortical responses. Hence, supraspinal mechanisms alone are not sufficient to mediate touch-induced analgesia. PMID:26058037

  20. Touch inhibits subcortical and cortical nociceptive responses.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Flavia; Beaumont, Anne-Lise; Hu, Li; Haggard, Patrick; Iannetti, Giandomenico D; Iannetti, Gian Domenico D

    2015-10-01

    The neural mechanisms of the powerful analgesia induced by touching a painful body part are controversial. A long tradition of neurophysiologic studies in anaesthetized spinal animals indicate that touch can gate nociceptive input at spinal level. In contrast, recent studies in awake humans have suggested that supraspinal mechanisms can be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. To investigate this issue, we evaluated the modulation exerted by touch on established electrophysiologic markers of nociceptive function at both subcortical and cortical levels in humans. Aδ and C skin nociceptors were selectively activated by high-power laser pulses. As markers of subcortical and cortical function, we recorded the laser blink reflex, which is generated by brainstem circuits before the arrival of nociceptive signals at the cortex, and laser-evoked potentials, which reflect neural activity of a wide array of cortical areas. If subcortical nociceptive responses are inhibited by concomitant touch, supraspinal mechanisms alone are unlikely to be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. Touch induced a clear analgesic effect, suppressed the laser blink reflex, and inhibited both Aδ-fibre and C-fibre laser-evoked potentials. Thus, we conclude that touch-induced analgesia is likely to be mediated by a subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, which in turn results in a modulation of cortical responses. Hence, supraspinal mechanisms alone are not sufficient to mediate touch-induced analgesia. PMID:26058037

  1. Modeling the spinal pudendo-vesical reflex for bladder control by pudendal afferent stimulation.

    PubMed

    McGee, Meredith J; Grill, Warren M

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is a promising approach to restore continence and micturition following bladder dysfunction resulting from neurological disease or injury. Although the pudendo-vesical reflex and its physiological properties are well established, there is limited understanding of the specific neural mechanisms that mediate this reflex. We sought to develop a computational model of the spinal neural network that governs the reflex bladder response to PN stimulation. We implemented and validated a neural network architecture based on previous neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies. Using synaptically-connected integrate and fire model neurons, we created a network model with realistic spiking behavior. The model produced expected sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN) neuron firing rates from prescribed neural inputs and predicted bladder activation and inhibition with different frequencies of pudendal afferent stimulation. In addition, the model matched experimental results from previous studies of temporal patterns of pudendal afferent stimulation and selective pharmacological blockade of inhibitory neurons. The frequency- and pattern-dependent effects of pudendal afferent stimulation were determined by changes in firing rate of spinal interneurons, suggesting that neural network interactions at the lumbosacral level can mediate the bladder response to different frequencies or temporal patterns of pudendal afferent stimulation. Further, the anatomical structure of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the network model was necessary and sufficient to reproduce the critical features of the pudendo-vesical reflex, and this model may prove useful to guide development of novel, more effective electrical stimulation techniques for bladder control. PMID:26968615

  2. Morphological, biophysical and synaptic properties of glutamatergic neurons of the mouse spinal dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    Punnakkal, Pradeep; Schoultz, Carolin; Haenraets, Karen; Wildner, Hendrik; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Interneurons of the spinal dorsal horn are central to somatosensory and nociceptive processing. A mechanistic understanding of their function depends on profound knowledge of their intrinsic properties and their integration into dorsal horn circuits. Here, we have used BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the control of the vesicular glutamate transporter (vGluT2) gene (vGluT2::eGFP mice) to perform a detailed electrophysiological and morphological characterisation of excitatory dorsal horn neurons, and to compare their properties to those of GABAergic (Gad67::eGFP tagged) and glycinergic (GlyT2::eGFP tagged) neurons. vGluT2::eGFP was detected in about one-third of all excitatory dorsal horn neurons and, as demonstrated by the co-expression of vGluT2::eGFP with different markers of subtypes of glutamatergic neurons, probably labelled a representative fraction of these neurons. Three types of dendritic tree morphologies (vertical, central, and radial), but no islet cell-type morphology, were identified in vGluT2::eGFP neurons. vGluT2::eGFP neurons had more depolarised action potential thresholds and longer action potential durations than inhibitory neurons, while no significant differences were found for the resting membrane potential, input resistance, cell capacitance and after-hyperpolarisation. Delayed firing and single action potential firing were the single most prevalent firing patterns in vGluT2::eGFP neurons of the superficial and deep dorsal horn, respectively. By contrast, tonic firing prevailed in inhibitory interneurons of the dorsal horn. Capsaicin-induced synaptic inputs were detected in about half of the excitatory and inhibitory neurons, and occurred more frequently in superficial than in deep dorsal horn neurons. Primary afferent-evoked (polysynaptic) inhibitory inputs were found in the majority of glutamatergic and glycinergic neurons, but only in less than half of the GABAergic population. Excitatory

  3. Microsecond-Scale Timing Precision in Rodent Trigeminal Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Campagner, Dario; Erskine, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the nervous system occurs by spikes: the timing precision with which spikes are fired is a fundamental limit on neural information processing. In sensory systems, spike-timing precision is constrained by first-order neurons. We found that spike-timing precision of trigeminal primary afferents in rats and mice is limited both by stimulus speed and by electrophysiological sampling rate. High-speed video of behaving mice revealed whisker velocities of at least 17,000°/s, so we delivered an ultrafast “ping” (>50,000°/s) to single whiskers and sampled primary afferent activity at 500 kHz. Median spike jitter was 17.4 μs; 29% of neurons had spike jitter < 10 μs. These results indicate that the input stage of the trigeminal pathway has extraordinary spike-timing precision and very high potential information capacity. This timing precision ranks among the highest in biology. PMID:25878266

  4. Nociceptive Local Field Potentials Recorded from the Human Insula Are Not Specific for Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Giulia; Klöcker, Anne; Safronova, Marta M.; Ferrão Santos, Susana; Ribeiro Vaz, Jose-Geraldo; Raftopoulos, Christian; Mouraux, André

    2016-01-01

    The insula, particularly its posterior portion, is often regarded as a primary cortex for pain. However, this interpretation is largely based on reverse inference, and a specific involvement of the insula in pain has never been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the high spatiotemporal resolution of direct intracerebral recordings, we investigated whether the human insula exhibits local field potentials (LFPs) specific for pain. Forty-seven insular sites were investigated. Participants received brief stimuli belonging to four different modalities (nociceptive, vibrotactile, auditory, and visual). Both nociceptive stimuli and non-nociceptive vibrotactile, auditory, and visual stimuli elicited consistent LFPs in the posterior and anterior insula, with matching spatial distributions. Furthermore, a blind source separation procedure showed that nociceptive LFPs are largely explained by multimodal neural activity also contributing to non-nociceptive LFPs. By revealing that LFPs elicited by nociceptive stimuli reflect activity unrelated to nociception and pain, our results confute the widespread assumption that these brain responses are a signature for pain perception and its modulation. PMID:26734726

  5. Nociception, pain, negative moods and behavior selection

    PubMed Central

    Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain adapts with pain, as well as imparts risk for developing chronic pain. Within this context we revisit the concepts for nociception, acute and chronic pain, and negative moods relative to behavior selection. We redefine nociception as the mechanism protecting the organism from injury; while acute pain as failure of avoidant behavior; and a mesolimbic threshold process that gates the transformation of nociceptive activity to conscious pain. Adaptations in this threshold process are envisioned to be critical for development of chronic pain. We deconstruct chronic pain into four distinct phases, each with specific mechanisms; and outline current state of knowledge regarding these mechanisms: The limbic brain imparting risk, while mesolimbic learning processes reorganizing the neocortex into a chronic pain state. Moreover, pain and negative moods are envisioned as a continuum of aversive behavioral learning, which enhance survival by protecting against threats. PMID:26247858

  6. Organization of sensory input to the nociceptive-specific cutaneous trunk muscle reflex in rat, an effective experimental system for examining nociception and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Barker, Darrell F.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Trainer, Robert; Fransen, James W.; Seidman, Peggy A.; Soto, Roy G.; Mendell, Lorne M.; Johnson, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed characterization of neural circuitries furthers our understanding of how nervous systems perform specific functions and enables the use of those systems to test hypotheses. We have characterized the sensory input to the cutaneous trunk muscle (CTM; also cutaneus trunci (rat) or cutaneus maximus (mouse)) reflex (CTMR), which manifests as a puckering of the dorsal thoracolumbar skin and is selectively driven by noxious stimuli. CTM electromyography (EMG) and neurogram recordings in naïve rats revealed that CTMR responses were elicited by natural stimuli and electrical stimulation of all segments from C4 to L6, a much greater extent of segmental drive to the CTMR than previously described. Stimulation of some subcutaneous paraspinal tissue can also elicit this reflex. Using a selective neurotoxin, we also demonstrate differential drive of the CTMR by trkA-expressing and non-expressing small diameter afferents. These observations highlight aspects of the organization of the CTMR system which make it attractive for studies of nociception and anesthesiology and plasticity of primary afferents, motoneurons, and the propriospinal system. We use the CTMR system to qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate that experimental pharmacological treatments can be compared to controls applied either to the contralateral side or to another segment, with the remaining segments providing controls for systemic or other treatment effects. These data indicate the potential for using the CTMR system as both an invasive and non-invasive quantitative assessment tool providing improved statistical power and reduced animal use. PMID:23983104

  7. Nociceptive sensitization by the secretory protein Bv8

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Giannini, Elisa; Metere, Alessio; Colucci, Mariantonella; Barra, Donatella; Kreil, Günther; Melchiorri, Pietro

    2002-01-01

    The small protein Bv8, isolated from amphibian skin, belongs to a novel family of secretory proteins (Bv8-Prokineticin family, SWISS-PROT: Q9PW66) whose orthologues have been conserved throughout evolution, from invertebrates to humans. When injected intravenously or subcutaneously (from 0.06 to 500 pmol kg−1) or intrathecally (from 6 fmol to 250 pmol) in rats, Bv8 produced an intense systemic nociceptive sensitization to mechanical and thermal stimuli applied to the tail and paws. Topically delivered into one rat paw, 50 fmol of Bv8 decreased by 50% the nociceptive threshold to pressure in the injected paw without affecting the threshold in the contralateral paw. The two G-protein coupled prokineticin receptors, PK-R1 and PK-R2, were expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and in dorsal quadrants of spinal cord (DSC) and bound Bv8 and the mammalian orthologue, EG-VEGF, with high affinity. In DSC, PK-R1 was more abundant than PK-R2, whereas both receptors were equally expressed in DRG. IC50 of Bv8 and EG-VEGF to inhibit [125I]-Bv8 binding to rat DRG and DSC were 4.1±0.4 nM Bv8 and 76.4±7.6 nM EG-VEGF, in DRG; 7.3±0.9 nM Bv8 and 330±41 nM EG-VEGF, in DSC. In the small diameter neurons (<30 μm) of rat DRG cultures, Bv8 concentrations, ranging from 0.2 to 10 nM, raised [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that Bv8, through binding to PK receptors of DSC and primary sensitive neurons, results in intense sensitization of peripheral nociceptors to thermal and mechanical stimuli. PMID:12466223

  8. Peripheral and central alterations affecting spinal nociceptive processing and pain at adulthood in rats exposed to neonatal maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Juif, Pierre-Eric; Salio, Chiara; Zell, Vivien; Melchior, Meggane; Lacaud, Adrien; Petit-Demouliere, Nathalie; Ferrini, Francesco; Darbon, Pascal; Hanesch, Ulrike; Anton, Fernand; Merighi, Adalberto; Lelièvre, Vincent; Poisbeau, Pierrick

    2016-08-01

    The nociceptive system of rodents is not fully developed and functional at birth. Specifically, C fibers transmitting peripheral nociceptive information establish synaptic connections in the spinal cord already during the embryonic period that only become fully functional after birth. Here, we studied the consequences of neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD, 3 h/day, P2-P12) on the functional establishment of C fiber-mediated neurotransmission in spinal cord and of pain-related behavior. In vivo recording revealed that C fiber-mediated excitation of spinal cord neurons could be observed at P14 only in control but not in NMD rats. NMD was associated with a strong alteration in the expression of growth factors controlling C nociceptor maturation as well as two-pore domain K+ channels known to set nociceptive thresholds. In good agreement, C-type sensory neurons from NMD animals appeared to be hypoexcitable but functionally connected to spinal neurons, especially those expressing TRPV1 receptors. In vivo and in vitro recordings of lamina II spinal neurons at P14 revealed that the NMD-related lack of C fiber-evoked responses resulted from an inhibitory barrage in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Eventually, C-type sensory-spinal processing could be recovered after a delay of about 10 days in NMD animals. However, animals remained hypersensitive to noxious stimulus up to P100 and this might be due to an excessive expression of Nav1.8 transcripts in DRG neurons. Together, our data provide evidence for a deleterious impact of perinatal stress exposure on the maturation of the sensory-spinal nociceptive system that may contribute to the nociceptive hypersensitivity in early adulthood. PMID:27285721

  9. Effect of hypergravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.

    Gravity is a critical factor in the normal development of the vestibular system, as prolonged prenatal exposures to either micro- or hypergravity will alter the pattern of projections from specific vestibular organs to specific targets in the vestibular nuclei. This study addresses the effect of gravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar projections. In adult rats the semicircular canal afferents project mainly to the cerebellar nodulus whereas the otolith maculae project mainly to the ventral uvula of the cerebellum. To determine if the distribution pattern of these afferents is altered by exposures to altered gravity, 10 pregnant rats were exposed to hypergravity (1.5g) from embryonic day 12 (before vestibular ganglion neurons contact vestibular nuclei) to embryonic day 21 (near the time when the vestibular system becomes functional). Controls were exposed to Earth's gravity but otherwise received the same treatment. At the end of the exposure the embryos were deeply anesthetized and fixed by transcardiac perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH7.4). Filter strips coated with DiI and PTIR were implanted into the saccule (gravistatic vestibular receptor) or into the posterior vertical canal (angular acceleration receptor), and allowed to diffuse for 2 weeks at 37°C. Then the brains were dissected and sectioned for fluorescent confocal imaging. Examination of the control cerebella revealed that the canal and otolith afferents have reached the nodulus and uvula, and axons extend into the internal granular, Purkinje, and molecular layers. Projections from the saccule and posterior vertical canal were partially segregated into their respective domains, the uvula and nodulus. In contrast, in hypergravity-exposed rat fetuses the saccule and posterior vertical canal projections were poorly segregated, and both organs contributed labeled fibers to all layers of the nodulus and uvula. This contrasts with the increased afferent segregation

  10. Painful, degenerating intervertebral discs up-regulate neurite sprouting and CGRP through nociceptive factors.

    PubMed

    Krock, Emerson; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Haglund, Lisbet

    2014-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) can result in chronic low back pain, a common cause of morbidity and disability. Inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration, however the relationship between inflammatory factors and chronic low back pain remains unclear. Furthermore, increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are both associated with inflammation and chronic low back pain, but whether degenerating discs release sufficient concentrations of factors that induce nociceptor plasticity remains unclear. Degenerating IVDs from low back pain patients and healthy, painless IVDs from human organ donors were cultured ex vivo. Inflammatory and nociceptive factors released by IVDs into culture media were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and protein arrays. The ability of factors released to induce neurite growth and nociceptive neuropeptide production was investigated. Degenerating discs release increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, NGF and BDNF. Factors released by degenerating IVDs increased neurite growth and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression, both of which were blocked by anti-NGF treatment. Furthermore, protein arrays found increased levels of 20 inflammatory factors, many of which have nociceptive effects. Our results demonstrate that degenerating and painful human IVDs release increased levels of NGF, inflammatory and nociceptive factors ex vivo that induce neuronal plasticity and may actively diffuse to induce neo-innervation and pain in vivo. PMID:24650225

  11. Discrete Pattern of Burst Stimulation in the Ventrobasal Thalamus for Anti-Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus has been proposed to play a role in sensory modulation via switching between tonic and burst dual firing of individual neurons. Of the two firing modes, altered burst firing has been repeatedly implicated with pathological pain conditions, which suggests that maintaining a certain form of thalamic burst could be crucial for controlling pain. However, specific elements of burst firing that may contribute to pain control have not yet been actively investigated. Utilizing the deep brain stimulation (DBS) technique, we explored the effects of bursting properties in pain control by electrically stimulating the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus in forms of burst patterned to test different aspects of bursts during the formalin induced nociception in mice. Our results demonstrated that electrical stimulations mimicking specific burst firing properties are important in producing an anti-nociceptive effect and found that the ≤3 ms interval between burst pluses (intra-burst-interval: IntraBI) and ≥3 pulses per burst were required to reliably reduce formalin induced nociceptive responses in mice. Periodicity of IntraBI was also suggested to contribute to anti-nociception to a limited extent. PMID:23950787

  12. Painful, degenerating intervertebral discs up-regulate neurite sprouting and CGRP through nociceptive factors

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Emerson; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Haglund, Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) can result in chronic low back pain, a common cause of morbidity and disability. Inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration, however the relationship between inflammatory factors and chronic low back pain remains unclear. Furthermore, increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are both associated with inflammation and chronic low back pain, but whether degenerating discs release sufficient concentrations of factors that induce nociceptor plasticity remains unclear. Degenerating IVDs from low back pain patients and healthy, painless IVDs from human organ donors were cultured ex vivo. Inflammatory and nociceptive factors released by IVDs into culture media were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and protein arrays. The ability of factors released to induce neurite growth and nociceptive neuropeptide production was investigated. Degenerating discs release increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, NGF and BDNF. Factors released by degenerating IVDs increased neurite growth and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression, both of which were blocked by anti-NGF treatment. Furthermore, protein arrays found increased levels of 20 inflammatory factors, many of which have nociceptive effects. Our results demonstrate that degenerating and painful human IVDs release increased levels of NGF, inflammatory and nociceptive factors ex vivo that induce neuronal plasticity and may actively diffuse to induce neo-innervation and pain in vivo. PMID:24650225

  13. Carnosine has antinociceptive properties in the inflammation-induced nociceptive response in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Mutoh, Junpei; Asato, Megumi; Yamamoto, Shohei; Ono, Hideki; Hisa, Hiroaki; Kamei, Junzo

    2012-05-01

    Carnosine is a biologically active dipeptide that is found in fish and chicken muscle. Recent studies have revealed that carnosine has neuroprotective activity in zinc-induced neural cell apoptosis and ischemic stroke. In the present study, we examined the expression of carnosine in the spinal cord, and the antinociceptive potency of carnosine in a mouse model of inflammation-induced nociceptive pain. Immunohistochemical studies with antiserum against carnosine showed an abundance of carnosine-immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the mouse spinal cord. Double-immunostaining techniques revealed that carnosine was expressed in the neurons and astrocytes in the spinal cord. Oral administration of carnosine attenuated the number of writhing behaviors induced by the intraperitoneal administration of 0.6% acetic acid. Treatment with carnosine also attenuated the second phase, but not the first phase, of the nociceptive response to formalin. Moreover, intrathecal, but not intraplanter, administration of carnosine attenuated the second phase of the nociceptive response to formalin. Our immunohistochemical and behavioral data suggest that carnosine has antinociceptive effects toward inflammatory pain, which may be mediated by the attenuation of nociceptive sensitization in the spinal cord. PMID:22366199

  14. The Role of the Paratrigeminal Nucleus in Vagal Afferent Evoked Respiratory Reflexes: A Neuroanatomical and Functional Study in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Alexandria K.; Farrell, Michael J.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; McGovern, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory tree receives sensory innervation from the jugular and nodose vagal sensory ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia are derived from embryologically distinct origins and as such demonstrate differing molecular, neurochemical and physiological phenotypes. Furthermore, whereas nodose afferent neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS), recent neuroanatomical studies in rats suggest that jugular neurons have their central terminations in the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5). In the present study we confirm that guinea pigs demonstrate a comparable distinction between the brainstem terminations of nodose and jugular ganglia afferents. Thus, microinjection of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CT-B) neural tracers into the caudal nTS and Pa5 resulted in highly specific retrograde labeling of neurons in the nodose and jugular ganglia, respectively. Whereas, nodose neurons more often expressed 160 KD neurofilament proteins and the alpha3 subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase, significantly more jugular neurons expressed the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and, especially, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP). Indeed, terminal fibers in the Pa5 compared to the nTS were characterized by their significantly greater expression of CGRP, further supporting the notion that jugular afferents project to trigeminal-related brainstem regions. Electrical stimulation of the guinea pig larynx following selective surgical denervation of the nodose afferent innervation to the larynx (leaving intact the jugular innervation) resulted in stimulus dependent respiratory slowing and eventual apnea. This jugular ganglia neuron mediated response was unaffected by bilateral microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the nTS, but was abolished by muscimol injected into the Pa5. Taken together these data confirm that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia afferent neurons innervate distinct central circuits and support the notion that multiple peripheral and central pathways

  15. Vagal afferent innervation of the rat fundic stomach: morphological characterization of the gastric tension receptor.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Powley, T L

    1992-05-01

    Although the gastric tension receptor has been characterized behaviorally and electrophysiologically quite well, its location and structure remains elusive. Therefore, the vagal afferents to the rat fundus (forestomach or nonglandular stomach) were anterogradely labeled in vivo with injections of the carbocyanine dye Dil into the nodose ganglia, and the nerves and ganglia of the enteric nervous system were labeled in toto with intraperitoneal Fluorogold injection. Dissected layers and cryostat cross sections of the fundic wall were mounted in glycerin and analyzed by means of conventional and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Particularly in the longitudinal, and to a lesser extent in the circular, smooth muscle layers, Dil-labeled fibers and terminals were abundant. These processes, which originated from fibers coursing through the myenteric ganglia and connectives, entered either muscle coat and then ran parallel to the respective muscle fibers, often for several millimeters. They ran in close association with the Fluorogold-labeled network of interstitial cells of Cajal, upon which they appeared to form multiple spiny appositions or varicosities. In the myenteric plexus, two different types of afferent vagal structures were observed. Up to 300 highly arborizing endings forming dense accumulations of small puncta similar to the esophageal intraganglionic laminar endings (Rodrigo et al., '75 Acta Anat. 92:79-100) were found in the fundic wall ipsilateral to the injected nodose ganglion. They often covered small clusters of myenteric neurons or even single isolated ganglion cells (mean = 5.8 neurons) and tended to extend throughout the neuropil of the ganglia. In a second pattern, fine varicose fibers with less profuse arborizations innervated mainly the central regions of myenteric ganglia. Camera lucida analyses established that single vagal afferent fibers had separate collaterals in both a smooth muscle layer and the myenteric ganglia. Finally, Dil

  16. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 3 of 3: symptoms and signs of nociceptive pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    PubMed

    Smart, Keith M; Blake, Catherine; Staines, Anthony; Thacker, Mick; Doody, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain 'nociceptive pain' (NP) refers to pain attributable to the activation of the peripheral receptive terminals of primary afferent neurones in response to noxious chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. The symptoms and signs associated with clinical classifications of NP have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of NP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol after which their pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist indicating the presence/absence of various symptoms and signs. A regression analysis identified a cluster of seven clinical criteria predictive of NP, including: 'Pain localised to the area of injury/dysfunction', 'Clear, proportionate mechanical/anatomical nature to aggravating and easing factors', 'Usually intermittent and sharp with movement/mechanical provocation; may be a more constant dull ache or throb at rest', and the absence of 'Pain in association with other dysesthesias', 'Night pain/disturbed sleep', 'Antalgic postures/movement patterns' and 'Pain variously described as burning, shooting, sharp or electric-shock-like'. This cluster was found to have high levels of classification accuracy (sensitivity 90.9%, 95% CI: 86.6-94.1; specificity 91.0%, 95% CI: 86.1-94.6). Pattern recognition of this empirically-derived cluster of symptoms and signs may help clinicians identify an assumed dominance of NP mechanisms in patients with low back pain disorders. PMID:22464885

  17. Membrane properties and electrogenesis in the distal axons of small dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vasylyev, Dmytro V; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-08-01

    Although it is generally thought that sensory transduction occurs at or close to peripheral nerve endings, with action potentials subsequently propagating along the axons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons toward the central nervous system, the small diameter of nociceptive axons and their endings have made it difficult to estimate their membrane properties and electrogenic characteristics. Even the resting potentials of nociceptive axons are unknown. In this study, we developed the capability to record directly with patch-clamp electrodes from the small-diameter distal axons of DRG neurons in vitro. We showed using current-clamp recordings that 1) these sensory axons have a resting potential of -60.2 ± 1 mV; 2) both tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels are present and available for activation at resting potential, at densities that can support action potential electrogenesis in these axons; 3) TTX-sensitive channels contribute to the amplification of small depolarizations that are subthreshold with respect to the action potential in these axons; 4) TTX-R channels can support the production of action potentials in these axons; and 5) these TTX-R channels can produce repetitive firing, even at depolarized membrane potentials where TTX-S channels are inactivated. Finally, using voltage-clamp recordings with an action potential as the command, we confirmed the presence of both TTX-S and TTX-R channels, which are activated sequentially during action potential in these axons. These results provide direct evidence for the presence of TTX-S and TTX-R Na(+) channels that are functionally available at resting potential and contribute to electrogenesis in small-diameter afferent axons. PMID:22572942

  18. pH-evoked dural afferent signaling is mediated by ASIC3 and is sensitized by mast cell mediators

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Bischoff, Christina; Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Dussor, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have shown that decreased meningeal pH activates dural afferents via opening of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) suggesting one pathophysiological mechanism for the generation of headaches. The studies described here further examined the ASIC subtype mediating pH-induced dural-afferent activation and examined whether sensitization influences pH responses. Objective Given the potential importance of meningeal mast cells to headache, the goal of this study was to evaluate dural afferent responses to pH following sensitization with mast cell mediators. Methods Cutaneous allodynia was measured in rats following stimulation of the dura with decreased pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators. Trigeminal ganglion neurons retrogradely-labeled from the dura were stained with an ASIC3 antibody using immunohistochemistry. Currents and action potentials evoked by changes in pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators were measured in retrogradely-labeled dural afferents using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Results pH-sensitive dural afferents generated currents in response to the ASIC3 activator 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), approximately 80% of these neurons express ASIC3 protein, and pH-evoked behavioral responses were inhibited by the ASIC3 blocker APETx2. Following exposure to mast cell mediators, dural afferents exhibited increased pH-evoked excitability and cutaneous allodynia was observed at higher pH than with pH stimuli alone. Conclusion These data indicate that the predominant ASIC subtype responding to decreased meningeal pH is ASIC3. Additionally, they demonstrate that in the presence of inflammation, dural afferents respond to even smaller decreases in pH providing further support for the ability of small pH changes within the meninges to initiate afferent input leading to headache. PMID:23808707

  19. DAMGO modulates two-pore domain K(+) channels in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Im, Jay Zoon; Jung, Sung Jun

    2016-09-01

    The analgesic mechanism of opioids is known to decrease the excitability of substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons receiving the synaptic inputs from primary nociceptive afferent fiber by increasing inwardly rectifying K(+) current. In this study, we examined whether a µ-opioid agonist, [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), affects the two-pore domain K(+) channel (K2P) current in rat SG neurons using a slice whole-cell patch clamp technique. Also we confirmed which subtypes of K2P channels were associated with DAMGO-induced currents, measuring the expression of K2P channel in whole spinal cord and SG region. DAMGO caused a robust hyperpolarization and outward current in the SG neurons, which developed almost instantaneously and did not show any time-dependent inactivation. Half of the SG neurons exhibited a linear I~V relationship of the DAMGO-induced current, whereas rest of the neurons displayed inward rectification. In SG neurons with a linear I~V relationship of DAMGO-induced current, the reversal potential was close to the K(+) equilibrium potentials. The mRNA expression of TWIK (tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel) related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK) 1 and 3 was found in the SG region and a low pH (6.4) significantly blocked the DAMGO-induced K(+) current. Taken together, the DAMGO-induced hyperpolarization at resting membrane potential and subsequent decrease in excitability of SG neurons can be carried by the two-pore domain K(+) channel (TASK1 and 3) in addition to inwardly rectifying K(+) channel. PMID:27610039

  20. DAMGO modulates two-pore domain K+ channels in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Im, Jay Zoon

    2016-01-01

    The analgesic mechanism of opioids is known to decrease the excitability of substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons receiving the synaptic inputs from primary nociceptive afferent fiber by increasing inwardly rectifying K+ current. In this study, we examined whether a µ-opioid agonist, [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), affects the two-pore domain K+ channel (K2P) current in rat SG neurons using a slice whole-cell patch clamp technique. Also we confirmed which subtypes of K2P channels were associated with DAMGO-induced currents, measuring the expression of K2P channel in whole spinal cord and SG region. DAMGO caused a robust hyperpolarization and outward current in the SG neurons, which developed almost instantaneously and did not show any time-dependent inactivation. Half of the SG neurons exhibited a linear I~V relationship of the DAMGO-induced current, whereas rest of the neurons displayed inward rectification. In SG neurons with a linear I~V relationship of DAMGO-induced current, the reversal potential was close to the K+ equilibrium potentials. The mRNA expression of TWIK (tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K+ channel) related acid-sensitive K+ channel (TASK) 1 and 3 was found in the SG region and a low pH (6.4) significantly blocked the DAMGO-induced K+ current. Taken together, the DAMGO-induced hyperpolarization at resting membrane potential and subsequent decrease in excitability of SG neurons can be carried by the two-pore domain K+ channel (TASK1 and 3) in addition to inwardly rectifying K+ channel. PMID:27610039

  1. Different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in stomach and esophagus identified by anterograde tracing from dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J; Kyloh, Melinda; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Brookes, Simon; Hibberd, Tim

    2016-10-15

    In visceral organs of mammals, most noxious (painful) stimuli as well as innocuous stimuli are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). One of the major unresolved questions is the location, morphology, and neurochemistry of the nerve endings of spinal afferents that actually detect these stimuli in the viscera. In the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, there have been many anterograde tracing studies of vagal afferent endings, but none on spinal afferent endings. Recently, we developed a technique that now provides selective labeling of only spinal afferents. We used this approach to identify spinal afferent nerve endings in the upper GI tract of mice. Animals were anesthetized, and injections of dextran-amine were made into thoracic DRGs (T8-T12). Seven days post surgery, mice were euthanized, and the stomach and esophagus were removed, fixed, and stained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Spinal afferent axons were identified that ramified extensively through many rows of myenteric ganglia and formed nerve endings in discrete anatomical layers. Most commonly, intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) were identified in myenteric ganglia of the stomach and varicose simple-type endings in the circular muscle and mucosa. Less commonly, nerve endings were identified in internodal strands, blood vessels, submucosal ganglia, and longitudinal muscle. In the esophagus, only IGVEs were identified in myenteric ganglia. No intraganglionic lamellar endings (IGLEs) were identified in the stomach or esophagus. We present the first identification of spinal afferent endings in the upper GI tract. Eight distinct types of spinal afferent endings were identified in the stomach, and most of them were CGRP immunoreactive. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3064-3083, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019197

  2. Temperature Differentially Facilitates Spontaneous but Not Evoked Glutamate Release from Cranial Visceral Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, Jessica A.; Hofmann, Mackenzie E.; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is fundamentally important to all biological functions including synaptic glutamate release. Vagal afferents from the solitary tract (ST) synapse on second order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract, and glutamate release at this first central synapse controls autonomic reflex function. Expression of the temperature-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 receptor separates ST afferents into C-fibers (TRPV1+) and A-fibers (TRPV1-). Action potential-evoked glutamate release is similar between C- and A-fiber afferents, but TRPV1 expression facilitates a second form of synaptic glutamate release in C-fibers by promoting substantially more spontaneous glutamate release. The influence of temperature on different forms of glutamate release is not well understood. Here we tested how temperature impacts the generation of evoked and spontaneous release of glutamate and its relation to TRPV1 expression. In horizontal brainstem slices of rats, activation of ST primary afferents generated synchronous evoked glutamate release (ST-eEPSCs) at constant latency whose amplitude reflects the probability of evoked glutamate release. The frequency of spontaneous EPSCs in these same neurons measured the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. We measured both forms of glutamate from each neuron during ramp changes in bath temperature of 4–5°C. Spontaneous glutamate release from TRPV1+ closely tracked with these thermal changes indicating changes in the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. In the same neurons, temperature changed axon conduction registered as latency shifts but ST-eEPSC amplitudes were constant and independent of TRPV1 expression. These data indicate that TRPV1-operated glutamate release is independent of action potential-evoked glutamate release in the same neurons. Together, these support the hypothesis that evoked and spontaneous glutamate release originate from two pools of vesicles that are independently

  3. Descending influence from the nucleus locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus on visceral nociceptive transmission in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, M; Wang, D; Tamaki, J; Inoue, T

    2010-02-17

    Visceral nociceptive signals are the subject of descending modulation from the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus (LC/SC). We have recently found dorsal horn neurons whose visceral nociceptive responses are not inhibited by the descending LC/SC system (LC/SC-unaffected neurons) in the rat. The aim of the present study was to estimate a possible role of LC/SC-unaffected neurons for pain processing and pain-related responses. We focused on the fact that nociceptive signals from a visceral organ produce not only visceral pain but also visceromotor reflexes (muscular defense). Different effects of LC/SC stimulation can be expected between visceral pain and visceromotor reflexes. To accomplish our objective, the descending colon was electrically stimulated, and both the evoked discharge (ED) in the ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus and the electromyogram (EMG) of the abdominal muscle were simultaneously recorded under halothane anesthesia. The ED recorded from the VPL was completely inhibited with the increase of LC/SC stimulus intensity, while the EMG of the abdominal muscle still remained even after the ED disappeared. This result suggests that the minimum visceromotor reflex responses are maintained by the presence of LC/SC-unaffected neurons, which play the important role of protecting the visceral organs. Considering a role of muscular defense, the presence of the LC/SC-unaffected neurons may be advantageous for the individual under an abnormal pain state, such as inflammation. PMID:19958815

  4. Self-injurious behavior in neurodevelopmental disorders: relevance of nociceptive and immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Symons, Frank J

    2011-04-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) among individuals with intellectual and related neurodevelopmental disorders (IDD) is a clinical challenge and scientific puzzle. The physiological mechanisms regulating the sensory components of SIB remain a mystery with no clear understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. The central dogma regarding sensory processing in general and pain in particular among individuals with IDD and chronic SIB is that sensory processing is reduced and pain is absent or blunted. In this paper, recent findings challenging some of the conventional wisdom regarding pain and sensory function among individuals with IDD and SIB are reviewed. It seems that at least a subgroup of individuals with IDD and chronic SIB may be in a physiological state similar to neuropathic pain in which hyperalgesia is mediated by plasticity mechanisms regulating inflammatory, immune, and nociceptive systems. In response to repeated tissue damage associated with chronic self-injury, innate immune cells may be producing pro-inflammatory and pro-nociceptive cytokines that act on the brain to cause sickness-like behavior and sensitize primary sensory nerve afferents contributing to pain hypersensitivity (i.e., hyperalgesia). PMID:21237197

  5. Afferent modulation of neonatal rat respiratory rhythm in vitro: cellular and synaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mellen, Nicholas M; Roham, Maryam; Feldman, Jack L

    2004-05-01

    In mammals, expiration is lengthened by mid-expiratory lung inflation (Breuer-Hering Expiratory reflex; BHE). The central pathway mediating the BHE is paucisynaptic, converging on neurones in the rostral ventrolateral medulla. An in vitro neonatal rat brainstem-lung preparation in which mid-expiratory inflation lengthens expiration was used to study afferent modulation of respiratory neurone activity. Recordings were made from respiratory neurones in or near the pre-Bötzinger Complex (preBötC). Respiratory neurone membrane properties and BHE-induced changes in activity were characterized. Our findings suggest the following mechanisms for the BHE: (i) lung afferent signals strongly excite biphasic neurones that convey these signals to respiratory neurones in ventrolateral medulla; (ii) expiratory lengthening is mediated by inhibition of rhythmogenic and (pre)motoneuronal networks; and (iii) pre-inspiratory (Pre-I) neurones, some of which project to abdominal expiratory motoneurones, are excited during the BHE. These findings are qualitatively similar to studies of the BHE in vivo. Where there are differences, they can largely be accounted for by developmental changes and experimental conditions. PMID:14766932

  6. Dysaesthesiae induced by physiological and electrical activation of posterior column afferents after stroke.

    PubMed

    Triggs, W J; Berić, A

    1994-09-01

    Six of 48 stroke patients had functionally limiting dysaesthesiae induced by repetitive light touch, joint movement, or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMS). Only one of these six patients had a thalamic lesion. Quantitative sensory testing showed substantial impairment of pain and temperature sensation in all six patients, whereas light touch, vibration and position sense, and graphaesthesia were normal (three patients) or relatively spared (three patients). By contrast, none of 15 stroke patients in whom NMS did not evoke dysaesthesiae had clinical evidence of dissociated sensory loss. Conscious perception of joint movement and light touch is mediated mainly by the same population of large myelinated fibres activated preferentially by low intensity electrical stimulation. It is suggested that activation of these non-nociceptive, presumably dorsal column, afferents may contribute to dysaesthesiae in some patients with sensory loss after stroke. PMID:8089673

  7. Dysaesthesiae induced by physiological and electrical activation of posterior column afferents after stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Triggs, W J; Berić, A

    1994-01-01

    Six of 48 stroke patients had functionally limiting dysaesthesiae induced by repetitive light touch, joint movement, or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMS). Only one of these six patients had a thalamic lesion. Quantitative sensory testing showed substantial impairment of pain and temperature sensation in all six patients, whereas light touch, vibration and position sense, and graphaesthesia were normal (three patients) or relatively spared (three patients). By contrast, none of 15 stroke patients in whom NMS did not evoke dysaesthesiae had clinical evidence of dissociated sensory loss. Conscious perception of joint movement and light touch is mediated mainly by the same population of large myelinated fibres activated preferentially by low intensity electrical stimulation. It is suggested that activation of these non-nociceptive, presumably dorsal column, afferents may contribute to dysaesthesiae in some patients with sensory loss after stroke. PMID:8089673

  8. Trigeminal nociceptive transmission in migraineurs predicts migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Stankewitz, Anne; Aderjan, David; Eippert, Falk; May, Arne

    2011-02-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a major role of the trigeminovascular system in the pathogenesis of migraine. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we compared brain responses during trigeminal pain processing in migraine patients with those of healthy control subjects. The main finding is that the activity of the spinal trigeminal nuclei in response to nociceptive stimulation showed a cycling behavior over the migraine interval. Although interictal (i.e., outside of attack) migraine patients revealed lower activations in the spinal trigeminal nuclei compared with controls, preictal (i.e., shortly before attack) patients showed activity similar to controls, which demonstrates that the trigeminal activation level increases over the pain-free migraine interval. Remarkably, the distance to the next headache attack was predictable by the height of the signal intensities in the spinal nuclei. Migraine patients scanned during the acute spontaneous migraine attack showed significantly lower signal intensities in the trigeminal nuclei compared with controls, demonstrating activity levels similar to interictal patients. Additionally we found-for the first time using fMRI-that migraineurs showed a significant increase in activation of dorsal parts of the pons, previously coined "migraine generator." Unlike the dorsal pons activation usually linked to migraine attacks, the gradient-like activity following nociceptive stimulation in the spinal trigeminal neurons likely reflects a raise in susceptibility of the brain to generate the next attack, as these areas increase their activity long before headache starts. This oscillating behavior may be a key player in the generation of migraine headache, whereas attack-specific pons activations are most likely a secondary event. PMID:21307231

  9. Experimental evidence for alleviating nociceptive hypersensitivity by single application of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Dong, Fei; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The single application of high-concentration of capsaicin has been used as an analgesic therapy of persistent pain. However, its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain to be further evaluated with experimental approaches. The present study provided evidence showing that the single application of capsaicin dose-dependently alleviated nociceptive hypersensitivity, and reduced the action potential firing in small-diameter neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats and mice. Pre-treatment with capsaicin reduced formalin-induced acute nocifensive behavior after a brief hyperalgesia in rats and mice. The inhibitory effects of capsaicin were calcium-dependent, and mediated by the capsaicin receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1). We further found that capsaicin exerted inhibitory effects on the persistent nociceptive hypersensitivity induced by peripheral inflammation and nerve injury. Thus, these results support the long-lasting and inhibitory effects of topical capsaicin on persistent pain, and the clinic use of capsaicin as a pain therapy. PMID:25896608

  10. Neuropeptidergic Signaling and Active Feeding State Inhibit Nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Marina; Walker, Denise S; Beets, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter; Schafer, William R

    2016-03-16

    Food availability and nutritional status are important cues affecting behavioral states. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a cascade of dopamine and neuropeptide signaling acts to inhibit nociception in food-poor environments. In the absence of food, animals show decreased sensitivity and increased adaptation to soluble repellents sensed by the polymodal ASH nociceptors. The effects of food on adaptation are affected by dopamine and neuropeptide signaling; dopamine acts via the DOP-1 receptor to decrease adaptation on food, whereas the neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 act to increase adaptation off food. NPR-1 and NPR-2 function cell autonomously in the ASH neurons to increase adaptation off food, whereas the DOP-1 receptor controls neuropeptide release from interneurons that modulate ASH activity indirectly. These results indicate that feeding state modulates nociception through the interaction of monoamine and neuropeptide signaling pathways. PMID:26985027

  11. Neuropeptidergic Signaling and Active Feeding State Inhibit Nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ezcurra, Marina; Walker, Denise S.; Beets, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Food availability and nutritional status are important cues affecting behavioral states. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a cascade of dopamine and neuropeptide signaling acts to inhibit nociception in food-poor environments. In the absence of food, animals show decreased sensitivity and increased adaptation to soluble repellents sensed by the polymodal ASH nociceptors. The effects of food on adaptation are affected by dopamine and neuropeptide signaling; dopamine acts via the DOP-1 receptor to decrease adaptation on food, whereas the neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 act to increase adaptation off food. NPR-1 and NPR-2 function cell autonomously in the ASH neurons to increase adaptation off food, whereas the DOP-1 receptor controls neuropeptide release from interneurons that modulate ASH activity indirectly. These results indicate that feeding state modulates nociception through the interaction of monoamine and neuropeptide signaling pathways. PMID:26985027

  12. Gravity stress elevates the nociceptive threshold level with immunohistochemical changes in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Reiko; Kimoto, Mari; Kawauchi, Yasuko; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Makita, Koshi; Ohya, Keiichi; Toda, Kazuo

    2001-08-01

    Young Wistar male rats were exposed to 2G hypergravity by continuous centrifugation for 15 minutes. The nociceptive threshold was measured by using the von Frey type filament on the rat skin surfaces after hypergravity exposure. Following the hypergravity exposure, rats were sacrificed with anesthesia, then perfused and fixed for immunohistochemical examination. The 2G hypergravity elevated the nociceptive threshold up to 2-fold and induced analgesic effects on rats that remained for 2 hours after termination of centrifugation. Expression of Fos-immunoreactive proteins was prominently induced by 2G hypergravity in the arcuate nucleas and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. The 15-minute flash exposure to 2G hypergravity induced pain suppression in rats, which might be attributed to change of neuronal activity in rat hypothalamus.

  13. The roles of sodium channels in nociception: implications for mechanisms of pain

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Theodore R; Sheets, Patrick L; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in nociception may provide important insights into pain mechanisms. Voltage-gated sodium channels are critically important for electrogenesis and nerve impulse conduction, and a target for important clinically relevant analgesics such as lidocaine. Furthermore, within the last decade studies have shown that certain sodium channel isoforms are predominantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons associated with pain sensation, and that the expression and functional properties of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral sensory neurons can be dynamically regulated following axonal injury or peripheral inflammation. These data suggest that specific voltage-gated sodium channels may play crucial roles in nociception. Experiments with transgenic mice lines have clearly implicated Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 in inflammatory, and possibly neuropathic, pain. However the most convincing and perhaps most exciting results regarding the role of voltage-gated sodium channels has come out recently from studies on human inherited disorders of nociception. Point mutations in Nav1.7 have been identified in patients with two distinct autosomal dominant severe chronic pain syndromes. Electrophysiological experiments indicate that these pain-associated mutations cause small yet significant changes in the gating properties of voltage-gated sodium channels that are likely to contribute substantially to the development of chronic pain. Equally exciting, a recent study has indicated that recessive mutations in Nav1.7 that eliminate functional current can result in an apparent complete, and possibly specific, indifference to pain in humans, suggesting that isoform specific blockers could be very effective in treating pain. In this review we will examine what is known about the roles of voltage-gated sodium channels in nociception. PMID:17766042

  14. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  15. The auriculo-vagal afferent pathway and its role in seizure suppression in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The afferent projections from the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) to the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) have been proposed as the anatomical basis for the increased parasympathetic tone seen in auriculo-vagal reflexes. As the afferent center of the vagus nerve, the NTS has been considered to play roles in the anticonvulsant effect of cervical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). Here we proposed an “auriculo-vagal afferent pathway” (AVAP), by which transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) suppresses pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptic seizures by activating the NTS neurons in rats. Results The afferent projections from the ABVN to the NTS were firstly observed in rats. ta-VNS increased the first grand mal latency of the epileptic seizure and decreased the seizure scores in awake rats. Furthermore, when the firing rates of the NTS neurons decreased, epileptiform activity manifested as electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization increased with 0.37±0.12 s delay in anaesthetized rats. The change of instantaneous frequency, mean frequency of the NTS neurons was negative correlated with the amplitude of the epileptic activity in EEG traces. ta-VNS significantly suppressed epileptiform activity in EEG traces via increasing the firing rates of the neurons of the NTS. In comparison with tan-VNS, the anticonvulsant durations of VNS and ta-VNS were significantly longer (P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the anticonvulsant durations of VNS and ta-VNS (P>0.05). The anticonvulsant effect of ta-VNS was weakened by reversible cold block of the NTS. Conclusions There existed an anatomical relationship between the ABVN and the NTS, which strongly supports the concept that ta-VNS has the potential for suppressing epileptiform activity via the AVAP in rats. ta-VNS will provide alternative treatments for neurological disorders, which can avoid the disadvantage of VNS. PMID:23927528

  16. Convergence of sensory inputs upon projection neurons of somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zarzecki, P; Wiggin, D M

    1982-01-01

    Cortico-cortical neurons and pyramidal tract neurons of the cat were tested for convergent inputs from forelimb afferents. Neurons were recorded in cortical areas 1, 2, and 3a. Consideration was given to both suprathreshold and subthreshold inputs evoked by electrical stimulation of forelimb nerves. Individual cortico-cortical neurons and also pyramidal tract neurons were characterized by convergence of multiple somatosensory inputs from different regions of skin, from several muscle groups, and between group I deep afferents and low threshold cutaneous afferents. Certain patterns of afferent input varied with cytoarchitectonic area. There was, however, no difference between area 3a and areas 1-2 in the incidence of cross-modality convergence in the form of input from cutaneous and also deep nerves. Many of the inputs were subthreshold. Arguments are presented that these inputs, though subthreshold, must be considered for a role in cortical information processing. The convergent nature of the sensory inputs is discussed in relation to the proposed specificities of cortical columns. The patterns of afferent inputs reaching cortico-cortical neurons seem to be appropriate for them to have a role in the formation of sensory fields of motor cortex neurons. PT neurons of somatosensory cortex have possible roles as modifiers of ascending sensory systems, however, the convergent input which these PT neurons receive argues against a simple relationship between the modality of peripheral stimuli influencing them and the modality of the ascending tract neurons under their descending control. PMID:7140889

  17. Decoding of the spike timing of primary afferents during voluntary arm movements in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Hidenori; Sato, Masa-aki; Kawato, Mitsuo; Isa, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of encoding forelimb kinematics in the activity of peripheral afferents is essential for developing a somatosensory neuroprosthesis. To investigate whether the spike timing of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons could be estimated from the forelimb kinematics of behaving monkeys, we implanted two multi-electrode arrays chronically in the DRGs at the level of the cervical segments in two monkeys. Neuronal activity during voluntary reach-to-grasp movements were recorded simultaneously with the trajectories of hand/arm movements, which were tracked in three-dimensional space using a motion capture system. Sixteen and 13 neurons, including muscle spindles, skin receptors, and tendon organ afferents, were recorded in the two monkeys, respectively. We were able to reconstruct forelimb joint kinematics from the temporal firing pattern of a subset of DRG neurons using sparse linear regression (SLiR) analysis, suggesting that DRG neuronal ensembles encoded information about joint kinematics. Furthermore, we estimated the spike timing of the DRG neuronal ensembles from joint kinematics using an integrate-and-fire model (IF) incorporating the SLiR algorithm. The temporal change of firing frequency of a subpopulation of neurons was reconstructed precisely from forelimb kinematics using the SLiR. The estimated firing pattern of the DRG neuronal ensembles encoded forelimb joint angles and velocities as precisely as the originally recorded neuronal activity. These results suggest that a simple model can be used to generate an accurate estimate of the spike timing of DRG neuronal ensembles from forelimb joint kinematics, and is useful for designing a proprioceptive decoder in a brain machine interface. PMID:24860416

  18. Responsiveness of electrical nociceptive detection thresholds to capsaicin (8 %)-induced changes in nociceptive processing.

    PubMed

    Doll, Robert J; van Amerongen, Guido; Hay, Justin L; Groeneveld, Geert J; Veltink, Peter H; Buitenweg, Jan R

    2016-09-01

    Pain disorders can be initiated and maintained by malfunctioning of one or several mechanisms underlying the nociceptive function. Psychophysical procedures allow the estimation of nociceptive detection thresholds using intra-epidermal electrical stimuli. By varying the temporal properties of electrical stimuli, various contributions of nociceptive processes to stimulus processing can be observed. To observe the responsiveness of nociceptive thresholds to changes in nociceptive function, a model of capsaicin-induced nerve defunctionalization was used. Its effect on nociceptive detections thresholds was investigated over a period of 84 days. A cutaneous capsaicin (8 %) patch was applied for 60 min to the upper leg of eight healthy human participants. Single- and double-pulse electrical stimuli were presented in a pseudo-random order using an intra-epidermal electrode. Stimuli and corresponding responses were recorded on both treated and untreated skin areas prior to capsaicin application and on days 2, 7, 28, and 84. Increases in electrical detection thresholds at the capsaicin area were observed on days 2 and 7 for single-pulse stimuli. Detection thresholds corresponding to double-pulse stimuli were increased on days 7 and 28, suggesting a delayed and longer lasting effect on double-pulse stimuli. In the present study, it was demonstrated that the responsiveness of detection thresholds to capsaicin application depends on the temporal properties of electrical stimuli. The observation of capsaicin-induced changes by estimation of detection thresholds revealed different time patterns of contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to stimulus processing. PMID:27142052

  19. Relationships among metabolic homeostasis, diet, and peripheral afferent neuron biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well-established that food intake behavior and energy balance are regulated by cross-talk between peripheral organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS), for instance through the actions of peripherally-derived leptin on hindbrain and hypothalamic loci. Diet- or obesity-associated dist...

  20. Responses in muscle afferent fibres of slow conduction velocity to contractions and ischaemia in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Mense, S; Stahnke, M

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out to what extent muscle receptors with slowly conducting afferent fibres (group III and IV) are activated by muscular contractions of moderate force, and what kind of muscle afferents could mediate the pain of ischaemic exercise. In chloralose-anaesthetized cats, the impulse activity of single afferent units from the triceps surae muscle was recorded from dorsal root filaments during muscular contractions with intact blood supply and after occlusion of the muscle artery. Two types of responses were observed to contractions without muscular ischaemia. One was characterized by sudden onset and a graded response amplitude to contractions of increasing force. In most cases stretching the muscle was also an effective stimulus. Units showing this response behaviour were labelled c.s.m (contraction-sensitive with mechanical mechanism of activation). The other response type had a more delayed onset and often outlasted the exercise period; because of the unknown mechanism of activation, units of this kind were labelled c.s.x. The proportion of c.s.m receptors was significantly higher amongst group III than amongst group IV units. During ischaemic contractions of comparable force the c.s.m and c.s.x receptors exhibited an unchanged or a decreased response amplitude. Under these conditions another receptor type (N, for nociceptive) was activated which did not respond to contractions with intact blood supply. Vigorous activations during ischaemic work were only observed in group IV receptors. The majority of the 131 group III and IV units tested did not respond to contractions at all. These contraction-insensitive (c.i.) endings probably comprised different receptor populations (nociceptors, thermoreceptors, low-threshold mechanoreceptors). It is concluded that the various central nervous effects of muscular exercise without ischaemia which are known to be due to raised activity in thin muscle afferents (e.g. cardiopulmonary adjustments

  1. Endogenous descending facilitation and inhibition differ in control of formalin intramuscularly induced persistent muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; You, Hao-Jun

    2013-10-01

    In conscious rats, intramuscular injection of 2.5% formalin into the gastrocnemius muscle, at volumes between 25 and 200 μl, evoked dose-dependent biphasic persistent flinching activities: phase 1 (0-10 min) and phase 2 (10-60 min). During this intramuscular formalin-induced ipsilateral muscle nociception, bilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and heat hypoalgesia assessed by measuring thresholds of paw withdrawal reflex to noxious mechanical and heat stimuli were observed (P<0.05). Lesion of either the ipsilateral dorsal funiculus (DF) or contralateral thalamic mediodorsal (MD) nucleus significantly alleviated the formalin-induced flinches in both phase 1 and phase 2 of the behavioral response, and blocked the occurrence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, but not heat hypoalgesia. By contrast, lesion of the ipsilateral dorsal lateral funiculus (DLF) or contralateral thalamic ventromedial (VM) nucleus markedly enhanced the formalin induced flinching behavior in the late part (30-60 min) of phase 2 alone; phase 1 and early part (10-30 min) of phase 2 response were unaffected. Heat hypoalgesia, but not mechanical hyperalgesia, was markedly attenuated by this treatment (P<0.05). Microinjection of GABA (0.1 μg/0.5 μl) into the thalamic MD nucleus significantly depressed the intramuscular formalin-induced biphasic persistent nociception, and the occurrence of bilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly delayed (P<0.05). By contrast, microinjection of GABA into the thalamic VM nucleus significantly enhanced the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in the late part (30-60 min) of phase 2, and the bilateral secondary heat hypoalgesia was temporarily prevented (P<0.05). The present study demonstrates that intramuscular formalin evokes biphasic muscle nociception, and that bilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and heat hypoalgesia are differentially controlled by endogenous descending facilitation and inhibition respectively. It is

  2. Compartmental modeling of rat macular primary afferents from three-dimensional reconstructions of transmission electron micrographs of serial sections.

    PubMed

    Chimento, T C; Doshay, D G; Ross, M D

    1994-05-01

    1. We cut serial sections through the medial part of the rat vestibular macula for transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination, computer-assisted three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction, and compartmental modeling. The ultrastructural research showed that many primary vestibular neurons have an unmyelinated segment, often branched, that extends between the heminode [putative site of the spike initiation zone (SIZ)] and the expanded terminal(s) (calyx, calyces). These segments, termed the neuron branches, and the calyces frequently have spinelike processes of various dimensions that morphologically are afferent, efferent, or reciprocal to other macular neural elements. The purpose of this research was to determine whether morphometric data obtained ultrastructurally were essential to compartmental models [i.e., they influenced action potential (AP) generation, latency, or amplitude] or whether afferent parts could be collapsed into more simple units without markedly affecting results. We used the compartmental modeling program NEURON for this research. 2. In the first set of simulations we studied the relative importance of small variations in process morphology on distant depolarization. A process was placed midway along an isolated piece of a passive neuron branch. The dimensions of the four processes corresponded to actual processes in the serial sections. A synapse, placed on the head of each process, was activated and depolarization was recorded at the end of the neuron branch. When we used 5 nS synaptic conductance, depolarization varied by 3 mV. In a systematic study over a representative range of stem dimensions, depolarization varied by 15.7 mV. Smaller conductances produced smaller effects. Increasing membrane resistivity from 5,000 to 50,000 omega cm2 had no significant effect. 3. In a second series of simulations, using whole primary afferents, we examined the combined effects of process location and afferent morphology on depolarization magnitude

  3. Sensory neuron subpopulation-specific dysregulation of intracellular calcium in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Gold, M S

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the prediction that the unique manifestation of chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) would be reflected in a specific pattern of changes in the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in subpopulations of cutaneous neurons. To test this prediction, we characterized the pattern of changes in mechanical nociceptive threshold associated with paclitaxel administration (2mg/kg, iv, every other day for four days), as well as the impact of target of innervation and paclitaxel treatment on the regulation of [Ca(2+)]i in subpopulations of putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons. Neurons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin of the hindpaw as well as the thigh were identified with retrograde tracers, and fura-2 was used to assess changes in [Ca(2+)]i. Paclitaxel was associated with a persistent decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold in response to stimuli applied to the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but not the hairy skin of the hindpaw or the thigh. However, in both putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, resting [Ca(2+)]i was significantly lower in neurons innervating the thigh after treatment. The magnitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transient was also lower in putative non-nociceptive thigh neurons. More interestingly, while paclitaxel had no detectable influence on either resting or depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative non-nociceptive neurons, in putative nociceptive neurons there was a subpopulation-specific decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient that was largely restricted to neurons innervating the glabrous skin. These results suggest that peripheral nerve length alone, does not account for the selective distribution of CIPN symptoms. Rather, they suggest the symptoms of CIPN reflect an interaction between the toxic actions of the therapeutic and unique properties of the neurons deleteriously impacted. PMID

  4. Role of primary afferents in the developmental regulation of motor axon synapse numbers on Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Siembab, Valerie C; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Rotterman, Travis M; Shneider, Neil A; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2016-06-15

    Motor function in mammalian species depends on the maturation of spinal circuits formed by a large variety of interneurons that regulate motoneuron firing and motor output. Interneuron activity is in turn modulated by the organization of their synaptic inputs, but the principles governing the development of specific synaptic architectures unique to each premotor interneuron are unknown. For example, Renshaw cells receive, at least in the neonate, convergent inputs from sensory afferents (likely Ia) and motor axons, raising the question of whether they interact during Renshaw cell development. In other well-studied neurons, such as Purkinje cells, heterosynaptic competition between inputs from different sources shapes synaptic organization. To examine the possibility that sensory afferents modulate synaptic maturation on developing Renshaw cells, we used three animal models in which afferent inputs in the ventral horn are dramatically reduced (ER81(-/-) knockout), weakened (Egr3(-/-) knockout), or strengthened (mlcNT3(+/-) transgenic). We demonstrate that increasing the strength of sensory inputs on Renshaw cells prevents their deselection and reduces motor axon synaptic density, and, in contrast, absent or diminished sensory afferent inputs correlate with increased densities of motor axons synapses. No effects were observed on other glutamatergic inputs. We conclude that the early strength of Ia synapses influences their maintenance or weakening during later development and that heterosynaptic influences from sensory synapses during early development regulates the density and organization of motor inputs on mature Renshaw cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1892-1919, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660356

  5. Whisker-related afferents in superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A; Favero, Morgana

    2016-05-01

    Rodents use their whiskers to explore the environment, and the superior colliculus is part of the neural circuits that process this sensorimotor information. Cells in the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus integrate trigeminotectal afferents from trigeminal complex and corticotectal afferents from barrel cortex. Using histological methods in mice, we found that trigeminotectal and corticotectal synapses overlap somewhat as they innervate the lower and upper portions of the intermediate granular layer, respectively. Using electrophysiological recordings and optogenetics in anesthetized mice in vivo, we showed that, similar to rats, whisker deflections produce two successive responses that are driven by trigeminotectal and corticotectal afferents. We then employed in vivo and slice experiments to characterize the response properties of these afferents. In vivo, corticotectal responses triggered by electrical stimulation of the barrel cortex evoke activity in the superior colliculus that increases with stimulus intensity and depresses with increasing frequency. In slices from adult mice, optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing trigeminotectal and corticotectal fibers revealed that cells in the intermediate layers receive more efficacious trigeminotectal, than corticotectal, synaptic inputs. Moreover, the efficacy of trigeminotectal inputs depresses more strongly with increasing frequency than that of corticotectal inputs. The intermediate layers of superior colliculus appear to be tuned to process strong but infrequent trigeminal inputs and weak but more persistent cortical inputs, which explains features of sensory responsiveness, such as the robust rapid sensory adaptation of whisker responses in the superior colliculus. PMID:26864754

  6. Contractile properties of afferent and efferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Abe, K

    1997-07-01

    1. The balance of vascular tone of the afferent and efferent arteriole is a crucial determinant of glomerular haemodynamics. Despite their intimate anatomical relationship in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, the mechanisms that regulate afferent and efferent arteriolar tone are different. 2. In the afferent arteriole, two intrinsic mechanisms, the myogenic response and macula densa-mediated tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) play a dominant role, maintaining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at a constant level over a wide range of renal perfusion pressure. Studies have shown that these two mechanisms are modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In addition, an interaction between TGF and angiotensin II (AngII) seems to be essential to maintaining GFR despite large variations in daily intake of salt and water. 3. In the efferent arteriole, neither myogenic response nor TGF seems to be important, while AngII is one major factor involved in the control of vascular resistance. In addition, recent studies have provided evidence that NO and prostaglandins produced by the glomerulus may control resistance of the downstream efferent arteriole. 4. As the early segment of the efferent arteriole resides within the glomerulus, various autacoid hormones produced by the glomerulus may reach and directly act on this segment, thereby controlling the glomerular capillary pressure. Thus, it would be important to understand the differences in the mechanisms operating at the afferent and efferent arteriole, as well as their alterations in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9248673

  7. Cannabinoids Inhibit Acid-Sensing Ion Channel Currents in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chun-Yu; Cai, Qi; Zou, Pengcheng; Wu, Heming; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Local acidosis has been found in various pain-generating conditions such as inflammation and tissue injury. Cannabinoids exert a powerful inhibitory control over pain initiation via peripheral cognate receptors. However, the peripheral molecular targets responsible for the antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. WIN55,212-2 dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. WIN55,212-2 shifted the proton concentration–response curve downwards, with an decrease of 48.6±3.7% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the EC50 value. The inhibition of proton-gated current induced by WIN55,212-2 was almost completely blocked by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM 281, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Pretreatment of forskolin, an AC activator, and the addition of cAMP also reversed the inhibition of WIN55,212-2. Moreover, WIN55,212-2 altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, WIN55,212-2 attenuated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that WIN55,212-2 inhibits the activity of ASICs via CB1 receptor and cAMP dependent pathway in rat primary sensory neurons. Thus, cannabinoids can exert their analgesic action by interaction with ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which was novel analgesic mechanism of cannabinoids. PMID:23029075

  8. Thermoreception and Nociception of the Skin: A Classic Paper of Bessou and Perl and Analyses of Thermal Sensitivity during a Student Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhtz-Buschbeck, Johann P.; Andresen, Wiebke; Gobel, Stephan; Gilster, Rene; Stick, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    About four decades ago, Perl and collaborators were the first ones who unambiguously identified specifically nociceptive neurons in the periphery. In their classic work, they recorded action potentials from single C-fibers of a cutaneous nerve in cats while applying carefully graded stimuli to the skin (Bessou P, Perl ER. Response of cutaneous…

  9. Synaptic Conversion of Chloride-Dependent Synapses in Spinal Nociceptive Circuits: Roles in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Mark S.; Przebinda, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological conversion of chloride-dependent synapses from inhibitory to excitatory function, as a result of aberrant neuronal chloride homeostasis, is a known mechanism for the genesis of neuropathic pain. This paper examines theoretically how this type of synaptic conversion can disrupt circuit logic in spinal nociceptive circuits. First, a mathematical scaling factor is developed to represent local aberration in chloride electrochemical driving potential. Using this mathematical scaling factor, electrophysiological symbols are developed to represent the magnitude of synaptic conversion within nociceptive circuits. When inserted into a nociceptive circuit diagram, these symbols assist in understanding the generation of neuropathic pain associated with the collapse of transmembrane chloride gradients. A more generalized scaling factor is also derived to represent the interplay of chloride and bicarbonate driving potentials on the function of GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. These mathematical and symbolic representations of synaptic conversion help illustrate the critical role that anion driving potentials play in the transduction of pain. Using these representations, we discuss ramifications of glial-mediated synaptic conversion in the genesis, and treatment, of neuropathic pain. PMID:22110931

  10. Encoding of mechanical nociception differs in the adult and infant brain

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Verriotis, Madeleine; Williams, Gemma; Lee, Amy; Meek, Judith; Olhede, Sofia; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Newborn human infants display robust pain behaviour and specific cortical activity following noxious skin stimulation, but it is not known whether brain processing of nociceptive information differs in infants and adults. Imaging studies have emphasised the overlap between infant and adult brain connectome architecture, but electrophysiological analysis of infant brain nociceptive networks can provide further understanding of the functional postnatal development of pain perception. Here we hypothesise that the human infant brain encodes noxious information with different neuronal patterns compared to adults. To test this we compared EEG responses to the same time-locked noxious skin lance in infants aged 0–19 days (n = 18, clinically required) and adults aged 23–48 years (n = 21). Time-frequency analysis revealed that while some features of adult nociceptive network activity are present in infants at longer latencies, including beta-gamma oscillations, infants display a distinct, long latency, noxious evoked 18-fold energy increase in the fast delta band (2–4 Hz) that is absent in adults. The differences in activity between infants and adults have a widespread topographic distribution across the brain. These data support our hypothesis and indicate important postnatal changes in the encoding of mechanical pain in the human brain. PMID:27345331

  11. Encoding of mechanical nociception differs in the adult and infant brain.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Verriotis, Madeleine; Williams, Gemma; Lee, Amy; Meek, Judith; Olhede, Sofia; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Newborn human infants display robust pain behaviour and specific cortical activity following noxious skin stimulation, but it is not known whether brain processing of nociceptive information differs in infants and adults. Imaging studies have emphasised the overlap between infant and adult brain connectome architecture, but electrophysiological analysis of infant brain nociceptive networks can provide further understanding of the functional postnatal development of pain perception. Here we hypothesise that the human infant brain encodes noxious information with different neuronal patterns compared to adults. To test this we compared EEG responses to the same time-locked noxious skin lance in infants aged 0-19 days (n = 18, clinically required) and adults aged 23-48 years (n = 21). Time-frequency analysis revealed that while some features of adult nociceptive network activity are present in infants at longer latencies, including beta-gamma oscillations, infants display a distinct, long latency, noxious evoked 18-fold energy increase in the fast delta band (2-4 Hz) that is absent in adults. The differences in activity between infants and adults have a widespread topographic distribution across the brain. These data support our hypothesis and indicate important postnatal changes in the encoding of mechanical pain in the human brain. PMID:27345331

  12. The role of protease-activated receptor type 2 in nociceptive signaling and pain.

    PubMed

    Mrozkova, P; Palecek, J; Spicarova, D

    2016-07-18

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor family, that are expressed in many body tissues especially in different epithelial cells, mast cells and also in neurons and astrocytes. PARs play different physiological roles according to the location of their expression. Increased evidence supports the importance of PARs activation during nociceptive signaling and in the development of chronic pain states. This short review focuses on the role of PAR2 receptors in nociceptive transmission with the emphasis on the modulation at the spinal cord level. PAR2 are cleaved and subsequently activated by endogenous proteases such as tryptase and trypsin. In vivo, peripheral and intrathecal administration of PAR2 agonists induces thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity that is thought to be mediated by PAR2-induced release of pronociceptive neuropeptides and modulation of different receptors. PAR2 activation leads also to sensitization of transient receptor potential channels (TRP) that are crucial for nociceptive signaling and modulation. PAR2 receptors may play an important modulatory role in the development and maintenance of different pathological pain states and could represent a potential target for new analgesic treatments. PMID:27070742

  13. A pro-nociceptive phenotype unmasked in mice lacking fatty-acid amide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lawrence M; Slivicki, Richard A; Leishman, Emma; Cornett, Ben; Mackie, Ken; Bradshaw, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is the major enzyme responsible for degradation of anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of FAAH (FAAH KO) produces antinociception in preclinical pain models that is largely attributed to anandamide-induced activation of cannabinoid receptors. However, FAAH metabolizes a wide range of structurally related, biologically active lipid signaling molecules whose functions remain largely unknown. Some of these endogenous lipids, including anandamide itself, may exert pro-nociceptive effects under certain conditions. In our study, FAAH KO mice exhibited a characteristic analgesic phenotype in the tail flick test and in both formalin and carrageenan models of inflammatory nociception. Nonetheless, intradermal injection of the transient receptor potential channel V1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin increased nocifensive behavior as well as mechanical and heat hypersensitivity in FAAH KO relative to wild-type mice. This pro-nociceptive phenotype was accompanied by increases in capsaicin-evoked Fos-like immunoreactive (FLI) cells in spinal dorsal horn regions implicated in nociceptive processing and was attenuated by CB1 (AM251) and TRPV1 (AMG9810) antagonists. When central sensitization was established, FAAH KO mice displayed elevated levels of anandamide, other fatty-acid amides, and endogenous TRPV1 agonists in both paw skin and lumbar spinal cord relative to wild-type mice. Capsaicin decreased spinal cord 2-AG levels and increased arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 levels in both spinal cord and paw skin irrespective of genotype. Our studies identify a previously unrecognized pro-nociceptive phenotype in FAAH KO mice that was unmasked by capsaicin challenge. The heightened nociceptive response was mediated by CB1 and TRPV1 receptors and accompanied by enhanced spinal neuronal activation. Moreover, genetic deletion of FAAH has a profound impact on the peripheral and central lipidome. Thus, genetic

  14. A pro-nociceptive phenotype unmasked in mice lacking fatty-acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Carey, Lawrence M; Slivicki, Richard A; Leishman, Emma; Cornett, Ben; Mackie, Ken; Bradshaw, Heather; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2016-02-01

    Fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is the major enzyme responsible for degradation of anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of FAAH (FAAH KO) produces antinociception in preclinical pain models that is largely attributed to anandamide-induced activation of cannabinoid receptors. However, FAAH metabolizes a wide range of structurally related, biologically active lipid signaling molecules whose functions remain largely unknown. Some of these endogenous lipids, including anandamide itself, may exert pro-nociceptive effects under certain conditions. In our study, FAAH KO mice exhibited a characteristic analgesic phenotype in the tail flick test and in both formalin and carrageenan models of inflammatory nociception. Nonetheless, intradermal injection of the transient receptor potential channel V1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin increased nocifensive behavior as well as mechanical and heat hypersensitivity in FAAH KO relative to wild-type mice. This pro-nociceptive phenotype was accompanied by increases in capsaicin-evoked Fos-like immunoreactive (FLI) cells in spinal dorsal horn regions implicated in nociceptive processing and was attenuated by CB1 (AM251) and TRPV1 (AMG9810) antagonists. When central sensitization was established, FAAH KO mice displayed elevated levels of anandamide, other fatty-acid amides, and endogenous TRPV1 agonists in both paw skin and lumbar spinal cord relative to wild-type mice. Capsaicin decreased spinal cord 2-AG levels and increased arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 levels in both spinal cord and paw skin irrespective of genotype. Our studies identify a previously unrecognized pro-nociceptive phenotype in FAAH KO mice that was unmasked by capsaicin challenge. The heightened nociceptive response was mediated by CB1 and TRPV1 receptors and accompanied by enhanced spinal neuronal activation. Moreover, genetic deletion of FAAH has a profound impact on the peripheral and central lipidome. Thus, genetic

  15. Relationship between BDNF expression in major striatal afferents, striatum morphology and motor behavior in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Samadi, P; Boutet, A; Rymar, V V; Rawal, K; Maheux, J; Kvann, J-C; Tomaszewski, M; Beaubien, F; Cloutier, J F; Levesque, D; Sadikot, A F

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and transgenic mouse models of HD show neuronal loss in the striatum as a major feature, which contributes to cognitive and motor manifestations. Reduced expression of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in striatal afferents may play a role in neuronal loss. How progressive loss of BDNF expression in different cortical or subcortical afferents contributes to striatal atrophy and behavioral dysfunction in HD is not known, and may best be determined in animal models. We compared age-dependent alterations of BDNF mRNA expression in major striatal afferents from the cerebral cortex, thalamus and midbrain in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. Corresponding changes in striatal morphology were quantified using unbiased stereology. Changes in motor behavior were measured using an open field, grip strength monitor, limb clasping and a rotarod apparatus. BDNF expression in cortical limbic and midbrain striatal afferents is reduced by age 4 weeks, prior to onset of motor abnormalities. BDNF expression in motor cortex and thalamic afferents is reduced by 6 weeks, coinciding with early motor dysfunction and reduced striatum volume. BDNF loss in afferents progresses until death at 13-15 weeks, correlating with progressive striatal neuronal loss and motor abnormalities. Mutant huntingtin protein expression in R6/2 mice results in progressive loss of BDNF in both cortical and subcortical striatal afferents. BDNF loss in limbic and dopaminergic striatal inputs may contribute to cognitive/psychiatric dysfunction in HD. Subsequent BDNF loss in cortical motor and thalamic afferents may accelerate striatal degeneration, resulting in progressive involuntary movements. PMID:23006318

  16. Role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in pudendal inhibition of the nociceptive bladder reflex in cats.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jeremy N; Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-04-15

    This study examined the role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in the inhibtion of this reflex by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS). In α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after spinal cord transection at the T9/T10 level, intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid irritated the bladder, activated nociceptive C-fiber afferents, and induced spinal reflex bladder contractions of low amplitude (<50 cmH2O) and short duration (<20 s) at a smaller bladder capacity ∼80% of saline control capacity. PNS significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity from 85.5 ± 10.1 to 137.3 ± 14.1 or 148.2 ± 11.2% at 2T or 4T stimulation, respectively, where T is the threshold intensity for PNS to induce anal twitch. MTEP {3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine; 3 mg/kg iv, a selective mGluR5 antagonist} completely removed the PNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 71.8 ± 9.9 to 94.0 ± 13.9% of saline control, but it did not change the bladder contraction amplitude. After propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β1/β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) treatment, PNS inhibition remained but MTEP significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder contraction amplitude from 18.6 ± 2.1 to 6.6 ± 1.2 cmH2O and eliminated PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder contraction amplitude from 20.9 ± 3.2 to 8.1 ± 1.5 cmH2O on average demonstrating that spinal reflexes were responsible for a major component of the contractions. This study shows that spinal mGluR5 plays an important role in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in pudendal inhibition of this spinal reflex. PMID:25673810

  17. Factors affecting mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Andrew M; Ranheim, Birgit; Fosse, Torunn K; Hild, Sophie; Nordgreen, Janicke; Moe, Randi O; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the stability and repeatability of measures of mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets and to examine potentially confounding factors when using a hand held algometer. Study design Descriptive, prospective cohort. Animals Forty-four piglets from four litters, weighing 4.6 ± 1.0 kg (mean ± SD) at 2 weeks of age. Methods Mechanical thresholds were measured twice on each of 2 days during the first and second week of life. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures design to test the effects of behavior prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, and repetition within day. The effect of body weight and the interaction between piglet weight and behaviour were also tested. Piglet was entered into the model as a random effect as an additional test of repeatability. The effect of repeated testing was used to test the stability of measures. Pearson correlations between repeated measures were used to test the repeatability of measures. Variance component analysis was used to describe the variability in the data. Results Variance component analysis indicated that piglet explained only 17% of the variance in the data. All variables in the model (behaviour prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, repetition within day, body weight, the interaction between body weight and behaviour, piglet identity) except sex had a significant effect (p < 0.04 for all). Correlations between repeated measures increased from the first to the second week. Conclusions and Clinical relevance Repeatability was acceptable only during the second week of testing and measures changed with repeated testing and increased with increasing piglet weight, indicating that time (age) and animal body weight should be taken into account when measuring mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets. Mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds can be used both for testing the efficacy of anaesthetics and analgesics, and for assessing hyperalgesia in chronic pain states in research and

  18. Repetitive trigeminal nociceptive stimulation in rats increases their susceptibility to cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Haruki; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Ebine, Taeko; Takizawa, Tsubasa; Kayama, Yohei; Koh, Anri; Shibata, Mamoru; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2016-05-01

    We examined the ability of trigeminal nerve activation to induce cortical spreading depression in rats. Capsaicin was injected into the bilateral plantar or whisker pad for either 4 or 6 days in rats. The number and duration of cortical spreading depressions induced by potassium were significantly increased in animals injected with capsaicin in the bilateral whisker pad compared with animals injected in the bilateral plantar or in controls, while administration of a GABAA receptor agonist decreased these effects. Repetitive nociceptive stimulation of the trigeminal nerve lowers the threshold for the induction of cortical spreading depression by altering GABAergic neuronal activity. PMID:26739227

  19. Roles of the periaqueductal gray in descending facilitatory and inhibitory controls of intramuscular hypertonic saline induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; Sun, Tao; Lumb, Bridget M; You, Hao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Despite the importance of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the modulation of nociception and pain, many aspects of the roles of the different columns of the PAG in descending controls: facilitation and inhibition, are not understood. Employing a tonic muscle pain model established by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, we now report the results of investigations designed to explore any differences in Fos expression in the different functional columns of the PAG in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In a second series of experiments, effects of the PAG on descending control of spinally-organized nociception were assessed by measuring hind paw withdrawal reflexes to noxious mechanical and heat stimulation before and after electrolytic lesion of specific columns of the PAG. Our results show that Fos expression within different columns of the PAG increases significantly and differentially following i.m. injection of 5.8% saline. The mean number of Fos positive neurons in the dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l), dorsomedial (dm) PAG elicited by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline reached a peak at 4h with a gradual decrease over time, whereas the maximum number of Fos-positive neurons in the ventrolateral (vl) PAG was observed 8h after i.m. injection. Contralateral lesion of the dl PAG significantly depressed ipsilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia in intramuscularly induced (5.8% saline) nociception (P<0.05), whereas heat hypoalgesia was not affected (P>0.05). By contrast, contralateral lesion of the vl PAG completely blocked the occurrence of ipsilateral heat hypoalgesia (P<0.05), while bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia was unaffected (P>0.05). In conclusion, functions of specific columns of the PAG in the control of spinal nociceptive activities are not homogeneous. It is suggested that, in this muscle pain model, the dl PAG and vl PAG participate in descending facilitation and inhibition of nociception, respectively. PMID:24792920

  20. Fine-grained nociceptive maps in primary somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Flavia; Haggard, Patrick; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Longo, Matthew R.; Sereno, Martin I.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic maps of the receptive surface are a fundamental feature of neural organization in many sensory systems. While touch is finely mapped in the cerebral cortex, it remains controversial how precise any cortical nociceptive map may be. Given that nociceptive innervation density is relatively low on distal skin regions such as the digits, one might conclude that the nociceptive system lacks fine representation of these regions. Indeed, only gross spatial organization of nociceptive maps has been reported so far. However, here we reveal the existence of fine-grained somatotopy for nociceptive inputs to the digits in human primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Using painful nociceptive-selective laser stimuli to the hand, and phase-encoded fMRI analysis methods, we observed somatotopic maps of the digits in contralateral SI. These nociceptive maps were highly aligned with maps of non-painful tactile stimuli, suggesting comparable cortical representations for, and possible interactions between, mechanoreceptive and nociceptive signals. Our findings may also be valuable for future studies tracking the timecourse and the spatial pattern of plastic changes in cortical organization involved in chronic pain. PMID:23197708

  1. Social feeding in Caenorhabditis elegans is induced by neurons that detect aversive stimuli

    PubMed Central

    de Bono, Mario; Tobin, David M.; Davis, M. Wayne; Avery, Leon; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2014-01-01

    Natural Caenorhabditis elegans isolates exhibit either social or solitary feeding on bacteria. We show here that social feeding is induced by nociceptive neurons that detect adverse or stressful conditions. Ablation of the nociceptive neurons ASH and ADL transforms social animals into solitary feeders. Social feeding is probably due to the sensation of noxious chemicals by ASH and ADL neurons; it requires the genes ocr-2 and osm-9, which encode TRP-related transduction channels, and odr-4 and odr-8, which are required to localize sensory chemoreceptors to cilia. Other sensory neurons may suppress social feeding, as social feeding in ocr-2 and odr-4 mutants is restored by mutations in osm-3, a gene required for the development of 26 ciliated sensory neurons. Our data suggest a model for regulation of social feeding by opposing sensory inputs: aversive inputs to nociceptive neurons promote social feeding, whereas antagonistic inputs from neurons that express osm-3 inhibit aggregation. PMID:12410303

  2. Follistatin-like 1 suppresses sensory afferent transmission by activating Na+,K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-Cheng; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Li, Chang-Lin; Wang, Feng; Yu, Ming-Yan; Zhong, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Kai-Hua; Lu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Qiong; Ma, Xiao-Li; Yao, Jun-Ru; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Lin, Li-Bo; Han, Mei; Zhang, Yu-Qiu; Kuner, Rohini; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Bao, Lan; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Xu

    2011-03-10

    Excitatory synaptic transmission is modulated by inhibitory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. We found that the synaptic transmission of somatic sensory afferents can be rapidly regulated by a presynaptically secreted protein, follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1), which serves as a direct activator of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA). The FSTL1 protein is highly expressed in small-diameter neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). It is transported to axon terminals via small translucent vesicles and secreted in both spontaneous and depolarization-induced manners. Biochemical assays showed that FSTL1 binds to the α1 subunit of NKA and elevates NKA activity. Extracellular FSTL1 induced membrane hyperpolarization in cultured cells and inhibited afferent synaptic transmission in spinal cord slices by activating NKA. Genetic deletion of FSTL1 in small DRG neurons of mice resulted in enhanced afferent synaptic transmission and sensory hypersensitivity, which could be reduced by intrathecally applied FSTL1 protein. Thus, FSTL1-dependent activation of NKA regulates the threshold of somatic sensation. PMID:21382556

  3. Control of arousal through neuropeptide afferents of the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Gerard A

    2016-06-15

    The locus coeruleus-norepinephine (LC-NE) system is implicated in mediating several aspects of arousal. Alterations in LC neuronal discharge is associated with distinct changes in behavior, cognition, sensory processing and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Changes in LC output and subsequent release of NE in target brain regions help adjust arousal state to respond appropriately to environmental conditions and behavioral circumstances. One way in which LC activity is controlled is through release of endogenous neuropeptides. Based on the sleep-wake cycle and environmental cues specific neuropeptide afferent systems are activated, innervating the LC. These neuropeptides include: corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), orexin (ORX), endogenous opioids, substance P (SP), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS). This review summarizes studies examining the neuroanatomical projections of these neuropeptides, their receptors in the LC, the actions on LC neurons and downstream NE release, as well as the behavioral and cognitive effects associated individual neuropeptide-mediated innervation of the LC. Finally, the relationship between individual neuropeptides, the LC-NE system and various clinical disorders is discussed, providing evidence for possible therapeutic targets for treatment of several arousal- and stress-related disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26688115

  4. Pain processing by spinal microcircuits: afferent combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Steven A; Ratté, Stéphanie

    2012-08-01

    Pain, itch, heat, cold, and touch represent different percepts arising from somatosensory input. How stimuli give rise to these percepts has been debated for over a century. Recent work supports the view that primary afferents are highly specialized to transduce and encode specific stimulus modalities. However, cross-modal interactions (e.g. inhibition or exacerbation of pain by touch) support convergence rather than specificity in central circuits. We outline how peripheral specialization together with central convergence could enable spinal microcircuits to combine inputs from distinctly specialized, co-activated afferents and to modulate the output signals thus formed through computations like normalization. These issues will be discussed alongside recent advances in our understanding of microcircuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:22409855

  5. Central connectivity of the chorda tympani afferent terminals in the rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Kyung; Lee, Dae Seop; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-03-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives gustatory input via chorda tympani (CT) afferents from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and transmits it to higher brain regions. To help understand how the gustatory information is processed at the 1st relay nucleus of the brain stem, we investigated the central connectivity of the CT afferent terminals in the central subdivision of the rat rNST through retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, immunogold staining for GABA, glycine, and glutamate, and quantitative ultrastructural analysis. Most CT afferents were small myelinated fibers (<5 µm(2) in cross-sectional area) and made simple synaptic arrangements with 1-2 postsynaptic dendrites. It suggests that the gustatory signal is relayed to a specific group of neurons with a small degree of synaptic divergence. The volume of the identified synaptic boutons was positively correlated with their mitochondrial volume and active zone area, and also with the number of their postsynaptic dendrites. One-fourth of the boutons received synapses from GABA-immunopositive presynaptic profiles, 27 % of which were also glycine-immunopositive. These results suggest that the gustatory information mediated by CT afferents to the rNST is processed in a simple and specific manner. They also suggest that the minority of CT afferents are presynaptically modulated by GABA- and/or glycine-mediated mechanism. PMID:25503820

  6. In pursuit of P2X3 antagonists: novel therapeutics for chronic pain and afferent sensitization.

    PubMed

    Ford, Anthony P

    2012-02-01

    Treating pain by inhibiting ATP activation of P2X3-containing receptors heralds an exciting new approach to pain management, and Afferent's program marks the vanguard in a new class of drugs poised to explore this approach to meet the significant unmet needs in pain management. P2X3 receptor subunits are expressed predominately and selectively in so-called C- and Aδ-fiber primary afferent neurons in most tissues and organ systems, including skin, joints, and hollow organs, suggesting a high degree of specificity to the pain sensing system in the human body. P2X3 antagonists block the activation of these fibers by ATP and stand to offer an alternative approach to the management of pain and discomfort. In addition, P2X3 is expressed pre-synaptically at central terminals of C-fiber afferent neurons, where ATP further sensitizes transmission of painful signals. As a result of the selectivity of the expression of P2X3, there is a lower likelihood of adverse effects in the brain, gastrointestinal, or cardiovascular tissues, effects which remain limiting factors for many existing pain therapeutics. In the periphery, ATP (the factor that triggers P2X3 receptor activation) can be released from various cells as a result of tissue inflammation, injury or stress, as well as visceral organ distension, and stimulate these local nociceptors. The P2X3 receptor rationale has aroused a formidable level of investigation producing many reports that clarify the potential role of ATP as a pain mediator, in chronic sensitized states in particular, and has piqued the interest of pharmaceutical companies. P2X receptor-mediated afferent activation has been implicated in inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain states, as well as in airways hyperreactivity, migraine, itch, and cancer pain. It is well appreciated that oftentimes new mechanisms translate poorly from models into clinical efficacy and effectiveness; however, the breadth of activity seen from P2X3 inhibition in models offers

  7. Synaptic and network consequences of monosynaptic nociceptive inputs of parabrachial nucleus origin in the central amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, Yae K.; Takahashi, Yukari; Watabe, Ayako M.

    2016-01-01

    A large majority of neurons in the superficial layer of the dorsal horn projects to the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB). LPB neurons then project to the capsular part of the central amygdala (CeA; CeC), a key structure underlying the nociception-emotion link. LPB-CeC synaptic transmission is enhanced in various pain models by using electrical stimulation of putative fibers of LPB origin in brain slices. However, this approach has limitations for examining direct monosynaptic connections devoid of directly stimulating fibers from other structures and local GABAergic neurons. To overcome these limitations, we infected the LPB of rats with an adeno-associated virus vector expressing channelrhodopsin-2 and prepared coronal and horizontal brain slices containing the amygdala. We found that blue light stimulation resulted in monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), with very small latency fluctuations, followed by a large polysynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic current in CeC neurons, regardless of the firing pattern type. Intraplantar formalin injection at 24 h before slice preparation significantly increased EPSC amplitude in late firing-type CeC neurons. These results indicate that direct monosynaptic glutamatergic inputs from the LPB not only excite CeC neurons but also regulate CeA network signaling through robust feed-forward inhibition, which is under plastic modulation in response to persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:26888105

  8. Steady-state evoked potentials to tag specific components of nociceptive cortical processing.

    PubMed

    Colon, Elisabeth; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Legrain, Valery; Mouraux, André

    2012-03-01

    Studies have shown that the periodic repetition of a stimulus induces, at certain stimulation frequencies, a sustained electro-cortical response of corresponding frequency, referred to as steady-state evoked potential (SSEP). Using infrared laser stimulation, we recently showed that SSEPs can be used to explore nociceptive cortical processing. Here, we implemented a novel approach to elicit such responses, using a periodic intra-epidermal electrical stimulation of cutaneous Aδ-nociceptors (Aδ-SSEPs). Using a wide range of frequencies (3-43 Hz), we compared the scalp topographies and temporal dynamics of these Aδ-SSEPs to the Aβ-SSEPs elicited by non-nociceptive transcutaneous electrical stimulation, as well as to the transient ERPs elicited by the onsets of the 10-s stimulation trains, applied to the left and right hand. At 3 Hz, we found that the topographies of Aβ- and Aδ-SSEPs were both maximal at the scalp vertex, and resembled closely that of the late P2 wave of transient ERPs, suggesting activity originating from the same neuronal populations. The responses also showed marked habituation, suggesting that they were mainly related to unspecific, attention-related processes. In contrast, at frequencies >3 Hz, the topographies of Aβ- and Aδ-SSEPs were markedly different. Aβ-SSEPs were maximal over the contralateral parietal region, whereas Aδ-SSEPs were maximal over midline frontal regions, thus indicating an entrainment of distinct neuronal populations. Furthermore, the responses showed no habituation, suggesting more obligatory and specific stages of sensory processing. Taken together, our results indicate that Aβ- and Aδ-SSEPs offer a unique opportunity to study the cortical representation of nociception and touch. PMID:22197788

  9. Blockage of vibrissae afferents: I. Motor effects.

    PubMed

    Prchal, A; Albarracín, A L; Décima, E E

    2004-02-01

    In the past, it has been proposed that the rat vibrissae play an important role in other hand, postural abnormalities, muscle tone decreases and hypomotility after sensory organ destructions were proposed as evidence supporting the "level setting" or "tonic" hypothesis. This hypothesis postulates that afferent activity, besides its well know transductive functions, sets the excitability state of the central nervous system. We thought the vibrissal system to be a good model to dissect these two postulated roles because vibrissae trimming would annul the transductive function without affecting the integrity of nerve activity. Thus we compare the effects of trimming the whiskers with blocking the vibrissal afferent nerves on two types of motor behavior: activity in an open field and walking over a rope connecting two elevated platforms. We found that only vibrissal afferent blockage (both nerve section and local anaesthesia) produced severe failures in the motor performances studied. These effects could not be fully explained by the abolition of the vibrissae as a sensory modality because cutting the whiskers did not significantly affect the motor performance. These data are discussed in reference to a tonic or general excitatory function of sensory inputs upon the central nervous system. PMID:15143620

  10. Population Coding of Forelimb Joint Kinematics by Peripheral Afferents in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Tatsuya; Seki, Kazuhiko; Sato, Masa-aki; Nishimura, Yukio; Kawato, Mitsuo; Isa, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Various peripheral receptors provide information concerning position and movement to the central nervous system to achieve complex and dexterous movements of forelimbs in primates. The response properties of single afferent receptors to movements at a single joint have been examined in detail, but the population coding of peripheral afferents remains poorly defined. In this study, we obtained multichannel recordings from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in cervical segments of monkeys. We applied the sparse linear regression (SLiR) algorithm to the recordings, which selects useful input signals to reconstruct movement kinematics. Multichannel recordings of peripheral afferents were performed by inserting multi-electrode arrays into the DRGs of lower cervical segments in two anesthetized monkeys. A total of 112 and 92 units were responsive to the passive joint movements or the skin stimulation with a painting brush in Monkey 1 and Monkey 2, respectively. Using the SLiR algorithm, we reconstructed the temporal changes of joint angle, angular velocity, and acceleration at the elbow, wrist, and finger joints from temporal firing patterns of the DRG neurons. By automatically selecting a subset of recorded units, the SLiR achieved superior generalization performance compared with a regularized linear regression algorithm. The SLiR selected not only putative muscle units that were responsive to only the passive movements, but also a number of putative cutaneous units responsive to the skin stimulation. These results suggested that an ensemble of peripheral primary afferents that contains both putative muscle and cutaneous units encode forelimb joint kinematics of non-human primates. PMID:23112841

  11. Morphology of single primary spindle afferents of the intercostal muscles in the cat.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Niwa, M; Sasaki, S I; Ichikawa, T; Hirai, N

    1998-09-01

    A reconstruction was made of the trajectory of primary spindle afferents from the intercostal muscles in the spinal cord of the cat. Intraaxonal recordings were performed from the primary spindle afferents that were identified by their response to lung inflation and stimulus threshold to activate the action potentials. The afferents were stained by using intraaxonal injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Results were obtained mainly from internal intercostal Ia fibers, which entered the spinal cord and bifurcated into ascending and descending branches. The ascending branches could be traced up to 10.7 mm, and the descending branches could be traced up to 7.3 mm. The ascending branches extended to the next segment. Collaterals ranging from one to six were given off from these branches. The distances between adjacent collaterals ranged from 0.9 mm to 4.7 mm. Each collateral had similar morphological characteristics. The collaterals entered the dorsal horn and ran toward lamina IX through the medial half of the gray matter. Fine branches and boutons were given off in laminae V, VII, VIII, and IX. The aggregations of these branches were found in lamina VII, mainly in the region of Clarke's column and in the ventral and ventrolateral regions thereof and in lamina IX, mainly in the nucleus lateromedialis. Most terminals did not contact the somata of target neurons in all laminae in which terminals were found. However, a few terminals were found to contact large neurons in lamina IX. In addition to these aggregates, there were some terminals scattered throughout the ventral horn. Thus, it was concluded that single intercostal Ia afferents project to the region of Clarke's column, to the intercostal motor nucleus, and to the intermediate regions. PMID:9717703

  12. The Nociception Coma Scale: a new tool to assess nociception in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Schnakers, Caroline; Chatelle, Camille; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Majerus, Steve; Ledoux, Didier; Boly, Melanie; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Boveroux, Pierre; Demertzi, Athena; Moonen, Gustave; Laureys, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Assessing behavioral responses to nociception is difficult in severely brain-injured patients recovering from coma. We here propose a new scale developed for assessing nociception in vegetative (VS) and minimally conscious (MCS) coma survivors, the Nociception Coma Scale (NCS), and explore its concurrent validity, inter-rater agreement and sensitivity. Concurrent validity was assessed by analyzing behavioral responses of 48 post-comatose patients to a noxious stimulation (pressure applied to the fingernail) (28 VS and 20 MCS; age range 20-82 years; 17 of traumatic etiology). Patients' were assessed using the NCS and four other scales employed in non-communicative patients: the 'Neonatal Infant Pain Scale' (NIPS) and the 'Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability' (FLACC) used in newborns; and the 'Pain Assessment In Advanced Dementia Scale' (PAINAD) and the 'Checklist of Non-verbal Pain Indicators' (CNPI) used in dementia. For the establishment of inter-rater agreement, fifteen patients were concurrently assessed by two examiners. Concurrent validity, assessed by Spearman rank order correlations between the NCS and the four other validated scales, was good. Cohen's kappa analyses revealed a good to excellent inter-rater agreement for the NCS total and subscore measures, indicating that the scale yields reproducible findings across examiners. Finally, a significant difference between NCS total scores was observed as a function of diagnosis (i.e., VS or MCS). The NCS constitutes a sensitive clinical tool for assessing nociception in severely brain-injured patients. This scale constitutes the first step to a better management of patients recovering from coma. PMID:19854576

  13. Ventromedial hypothalamic expression of Bdnf is required to establish normal patterns of afferent GABAergic connectivity and responses to hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamitakahara, Anna; Xu, Baoji; Simerly, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) controls energy and glucose homeostasis through direct connections to a distributed network of nuclei in the hypothalamus, midbrain, and hindbrain. Structural changes in VMH circuit morphology have the potential to alter VMH function throughout life, however, molecular signals responsible for specifying its neural connections are not fully defined. The VMH contains a high density of neurons that express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a potent neurodevelopmental effector known to regulate neuronal survival, growth, differentiation, and connectivity in a number of neural systems. In the current study, we examined whether BDNF impacts the afferent and efferent connections of the VMH, as well as energy homeostatic function. Methods To determine if BDNF is required for VMH circuit formation, a transgenic mouse model was used to conditionally delete Bdnf from steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) expressing neurons of the VMH prior to the onset of establishing neural connections with other regions. Projections of SF1 expressing neurons were visualized with a genetically targeted fluorescent label and immunofluorescence was used to measure the density of afferents to SF1 neurons in the absence of BDNF. Physiological changes in body weight and circulating blood glucose were also evaluated in the mutant mice. Results Our findings suggest that BDNF is required to establish normal densities of GABAergic afferents onto SF1 neurons located in the ventrolateral part of the VMH. Furthermore, loss of BDNF from VMH SF1 neurons results in impaired physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that BDNF is required for formation and/or maintenance of inhibitory inputs to SF1 neurons, with enduring effects on glycemic control. PMID:26909317

  14. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  15. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersensitivity remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of the GDNF family receptor α-3 (GFRα3) signaling in visceral hypersensitivity by quantifying visceromotor responses (VMR) to colorectal distension before and after intracolonic treatment with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baseline responses to colorectal distension did not differ between C57BL/6 and GFRα3 knockout (KO) mice. Relative to intracolonic saline treatment, TNBS significantly enhanced the VMR to colorectal distension in C57BL/6 mice 2, 7, 10, and 14 days posttreatment, whereas TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed in GFRα3 KO mice. The proportion of GFRα3 immunopositive thoracolumbar and lumbosacral colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly elevated 2 days after TNBS treatment. In single fiber recordings, responses to circumferential stretch of colorectal afferent endings in C57BL/6 mice were significantly increased (sensitized) after exposure to an inflammatory soup, whereas responses to stretch did not sensitize in GFRα3 KO mice. These findings suggest that enhanced GFRα3 signaling in visceral afferents may contribute to development of colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:21193524

  16. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Klein, A H; Joe, C L; Davoodi, A; Takechi, K; Carstens, M I; Carstens, E

    2014-06-20

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive transient receptor potential ankyrin (TRPA)-1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42 °C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue. PMID:24759772

  17. Systemic morphine treatment induces changes in firing patterns and responses of nociceptive afferent fibers in mouse glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Dale; Baker, Alyssa L; Morón, Jose A; Carlton, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    Patients receiving opioids for pain may experience decreased effectiveness of the drug and even abnormal pain sensitivity-hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. We hypothesized that peripheral nociceptor hyperexcitability contributes to opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tested this using an in vitro mouse glabrous skin-nerve preparation. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of morphine (5, 8, 10, 15 mg/kg) or saline every 12 hours for 48 hours and killed approximately 12 hours after the last injection. Receptive fields of nociceptors were tested for mechanical, heat, and cold sensitivity. Activity was also measured during an initial 2-minute period and during 5-minute periods between stimuli. Aberrant activity was common in fibers from morphine-treated mice but rare in saline-treated mice. Resting background activity was elevated in C-fibers from morphine-treated mice. Both C- and Aδ-fibers had afterdischarge in response to mechanical, heat, and/or cold stimulation of the skin as well as spontaneous, unevoked activity. Compared to saline, morphine treatment increased the proportion of fibers displaying polymodal rather than mechanical-only responses. A significant increase in Aδ-mechanoreceptive fibers responding to cold accounted for most of this change. In agreement with this, morphine-treated mice showed increased sensitivity in the cold tail flick test. In morphine-treated mice, aberrant activity and hyperexcitability of nociceptors could contribute to increased pain sensitivity. Importantly, this activity is likely driving central sensitization, a phenomenon contributing to abnormal sensory processing and chronic pain. If similar changes occur in human patients, aberrant nociceptor activity is likely to be interpreted as pain and could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:23711478

  18. Effects of Intrathecal Carbenoxolone Treatment on Nociception and Analgesia in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Kamalpour, Marjan; Fereidoni, Masoud; Moghimi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gap junctions (GJ) are important in pain signalling at the spinal cord level. Aims: The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of GJ on nociception and the analgesic/hyperalgesic effects of morphine following administration of carbenoxolone as a GJ blocker. Male Wistar rats (200–250 g) were divided into three groups: saline i.p., 10 mg/kg and 1 μg/kg i.p. morphine, each with two subgroups. One was treated intrathecally with saline and the other with carben oxolone. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: The thermal nociception threshold was measured prior to and after injections using the tail flick test. Chemical nociception assessment was conducted using a 0.05-mL subplantar injection of 2.5% formalin. Results: Both formalin-induced neurogenic and inflammatory nociception were reduced in the [saline i.p./carbenoxolone i.t.] and [morphine 1 μg/kg, i.p./carbenoxolone i.t.] subgroups (p<0.001). The 10 mg/kg i.p. morphine, i.t./carbenoxolone treatment reduced morphine-induced analgesia in the inflammatory phase (p<0.05), while it was ineffective in the neurogenic phase. Carbenoxolone decreased 1 μg/kg i.p. morphine-induced hyperalgesia in the tail flick test (p<0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results, GJ probably play a role in nociception at the spinal cord level. This may be due to the facilitation of inflammatory mediators released from glial cells or the connection between stimulatory interneurons and projection neurons. GJ blocking attenuated morphine-induced analgesia. This may be due to the attenuation of pre/post-synaptic inhibitory effects of morphine at the spinal cord level. As demonstrated by the investigations, GJ are present between inhibitory interneurons. Therefore, we can assume that blockage of GJ between inhibitory interneurons will reduce morphine-induced analgesia at the spinal cord level. However, this requires further investigation. PMID:25207190

  19. An integrated study of heart pain and behavior in freely moving rats (using fos as a marker for neuronal activation).

    PubMed

    Albutaihi, Ibrahim A M; DeJongste, Mike J L; Ter Horst, Gert J

    2004-01-01

    The awareness in specific brain centers of angina pectoris most often results from ischemic episodes in the heart. These ischemic episodes induce the release of a collage of chemicals that activate chemosensitive and mechanoreceptive receptors in the heart, which in turn excite receptors of the sympathetic afferent pathways. Ascending pain signals from these fibers result in the activation of the brain centers which are involved in the perception and integration of cardiac pain. Cytochemical studies of the nervous system provide the opportunity to identify these areas at the cellular level. In the present investigation, cardiac nociception was studied in the brains and the spinal cords of rats, using Fos protein as a marker of neuronal activation, following the application of pain-inducing chemicals to the heart. Induction of myocardial pain in conscious rats was achieved by infusion of bradykinin (0.5 microg) or capsaicin (5 microg) into the pericardial sac. During pain stimulation, the rats demonstrated pain behavior, in conjunction with alterations in heart rate and blood pressure. The cerebral Fos expression pattern was studied 2 h after pain stimulation. In contrast to the control group, increased Fos expression was found following the use of both capsaicin and bradykinin in a variety of areas of the brain. Bradykinin, but not capsaicin, induced Fos expression in the upper thoracic and upper cervical spinal cord; these segments are the sites where cardiac sympathetic fibers terminate. This finding suggests that these two chemicals use two different pathways, and provides extra evidence for the role of the vagus nerve in the transmission of cardiac nociception. Different cerebral areas showed an increase in the c-fos activity following pericardial application of pain-inducing chemicals. The role of these cerebral areas in the integration of cardiac pain is discussed in relation to the identified pathways which transmit cardiac pain. PMID:15305089

  20. Antinociceptive Effects of Transcytosed Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Trigeminal Nociception in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Geun-Woo; Kim, Min-Ji; Yang, Kui-Ye; Kim, Seong-Taek; Bae, Yong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of peripherally or centrally administered botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) on orofacial inflammatory pain to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of BoNT-A and its underlying mechanisms. The experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the formalin-induced nociceptive response in the second phase. Both subcutaneous (1 or 3 U/kg) and intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) injection of BoNT-A increased the latency of head withdrawal response in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated rats. Intracisternal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evoked nociceptive behavior via the activation of trigeminal neurons, which was attenuated by the subcutaneous or intracisternal injection of BoNT-A. Intracisternal injection of NMDA up-regulated c-Fos expression in the trigeminal neurons of the medullary dorsal horn. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly reduced the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in the NMDA-treated rats. These results suggest that the central antinociceptive effects the peripherally or centrally administered BoNT-A are mediated by transcytosed BoNT-A or direct inhibition of trigeminal neurons. Our data suggest that central targets of BoNT-A might provide a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of orofacial chronic pain conditions. PMID:26170739

  1. Investigation of Van Gogh-like 2 mRNA regulation and localisation in response to nociception in the brain of adult common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Reilly, Siobhan C; Kipar, Anja; Hughes, David J; Quinn, John P; Cossins, Andrew R; Sneddon, Lynne U

    2009-11-20

    The Van Gogh-like 2 (vangl2) gene is typically associated with planar cell polarity pathways, which is essential for correct orientation of epithelial cells during development. The encoded protein of this gene is a transmembrane protein and is highly conserved through evolution. Van Gogh-like 2 was selected for further study on the basis of consistent regulation after a nociceptive stimulus in adult common carp and rainbow trout in a microarray study. An in situ hybridisation was conducted in the brain of mature common carp (Cyprinus carpio), 1.5 and 3 h after a nociceptive stimulus comprising of an acetic acid injection to the lips of the fish and compared with a saline-injected control. The vangl2 gene was expressed in all brain regions, and particularly intensely in neurons of the telencephalon and in ependymal cells. In the cerebellum, a greater number (P=0.018) of Purkinje cells expressed vangl2 after nociception (n=7) compared with controls (n=5). This regulation opens the possibility that vangl2 is involved in nociceptive processing in the adult fish brain and may be a novel target for central nociception in vertebrates. PMID:19781599

  2. Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakir, M.; Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.

  3. Parthenolide inhibits nociception and neurogenic vasodilatation in the trigeminovascular system by targeting TRPA1 channel

    PubMed Central

    Materazzi, Serena; Benemei, Silvia; Fusi, Camilla; Gualdani, Roberta; De Siena, Gaetano; Vastani, Nisha; Andersson, David A.; Trevisan, Gabriela; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Wei, Xiaomei; Dussor, Gregory; Pollastro, Federica; Patacchini, Riccardo; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Nassini, Romina

    2013-01-01

    While feverfew has been used for centuries to treat pain and headaches and is recommended for migraine treatment, the mechanism for its protective action remains unknown. Migraine is triggered by calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from trigeminal neurons. Peptidergic sensory neurons, express a series of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, including the ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel. Recent findings have identified agents either inhaled from the environment or produced endogenously, which are known to trigger migraine or cluster headache attacks, as TRPA1 simulants. A major constituent of feverfew, parthenolide, may interact with TRPA1 nucleophilic sites, suggesting that feverfew antimigraine effect derives from its ability to target TRPA1. We found that parthenolide stimulates recombinant (transfected cells) or natively expressed (rat/mouse trigeminal neurons) TRPA1, where it, however, behaves as a partial agonist. Furthermore, in rodents, after initial stimulation, parthenolide desensitizes the TRPA1 channel, and renders peptidergic, TRPA1-expressing nerve terminals unresponsive to any stimulus. This effect of parthenolide abrogates nociceptive responses evoked by stimulation of peripheral trigeminal endings. TRPA1 targeting and neuronal desensitization by parthenolide inhibits CGRP release from trigeminal neurons and CGRP-mediated meningeal vasodilatation, evoked by either TRPA1 agonists or other unspecific stimuli. TRPA1 partial agonism, together with desensitization and nociceptor defunctionalization, ultimately resulting in inhibition of CGRP release within the trigeminovascular system, may contribute to the antimigraine effect of parthenolide. PMID:23933184

  4. Discharge properties of dorsal medullary inspiratory neurons in newborn pigs.

    PubMed

    Sica, A L; Donnelly, D F; Steele, A M; Gandhi, M R

    1987-04-01

    The discharges of medullary inspiratory neurons were recorded in newborn pigs. They were classified by discharge pattern; response to lung inflation; synaptic relation to phrenic motoneurons. Our results showed: these neurons have similar discharge patterns and responses to lung inflation as adult cats; most neurons do not project to phrenic motoneurons. It is suggested that our sampled population of neurons is involved in integrating pulmonary afferent inputs. PMID:3594209

  5. Evoked Pain Analgesia in Chronic Pelvic Pain Patients using Respiratory-gated Auricular Vagal Afferent Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Napadow, Vitaly; Edwards, Robert R; Cahalan, Christine M; Mensing, George; Greenbaum, Seth; Valovska, Assia; Li, Ang; Kim, Jieun; Maeda, Yumi; Park, Kyungmo; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects, and recent non-invasive approaches; termed transcutaneous-VNS, or t-VNS, have utilized stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve in the ear. The dorsal medullary vagal system operates in tune with respiration, and we propose that supplying vagal afferent stimulation gated to the exhalation phase of respiration can optimize t-VNS. Design counterbalanced, crossover study. Patients patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) due to endometriosis in a specialty pain clinic. Interventions/Outcomes We evaluated evoked pain analgesia for Respiratory-gated Auricular Vagal Afferent Nerve Stimulation (RAVANS) compared with Non-Vagal Auricular Stimulation (NVAS). RAVANS and NVAS were evaluated in separate sessions spaced at least one week apart. Outcome measures included deep tissue pain intensity, temporal summation of pain, and anxiety ratings, which were assessed at baseline, during active stimulation, immediately following stimulation, and 15 minutes after stimulus cessation. Results RAVANS demonstrated a trend for reduced evoked pain intensity and temporal summation of mechanical pain, and significantly reduced anxiety in N=15 CPP patients, compared to NVAS, with moderate to large effect sizes (eta2>0.2). Conclusion Chronic pain disorders such as CPP are in great need of effective, non-pharmacological options for treatment. RAVANS produced promising anti-nociceptive effects for QST outcomes reflective of the noted hyperalgesia and central sensitization in this patient population. Future studies should evaluate longer-term application of RAVANS to examine its effects on both QST outcomes and clinical pain. PMID:22568773

  6. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2014-05-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75(NTR) ), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75(NTR) inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr(1472) phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and a Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. PMID:24611998

  7. Transcriptional changes in sensory ganglia associated with primary afferent axon collateral sprouting in spared dermatome model

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Benjamin J.; Venkat, Gayathri; Hutson, Thomas; Rau, Kristofer K.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Mendell, Lorne M.; Gage, Fred H.; Johnson, Richard D.; Hill, Caitlin; Rouchka, Eric C.; Moon, Lawrence; Petruska, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Primary afferent collateral sprouting is a process whereby non-injured primary afferent neurons respond to some stimulus and extend new branches from existing axons. Neurons of both the central and peripheral nervous systems undergo this process, which contributes to both adaptive and maladaptive plasticity (e.g., [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]). In the model used here (the “spared dermatome” model), the intact sensory neurons respond to the denervation of adjacent areas of skin by sprouting new axon branches into that adjacent denervated territory. Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Consequently, it can be used to develop treatments to promote functional recovery for spinal cord injury and other similar conditions. This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact (“naïve”) sensory ganglia. Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551). PMID:26697387

  8. Transcriptional changes in sensory ganglia associated with primary afferent axon collateral sprouting in spared dermatome model.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Benjamin J; Venkat, Gayathri; Hutson, Thomas; Rau, Kristofer K; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Mendell, Lorne M; Gage, Fred H; Johnson, Richard D; Hill, Caitlin; Rouchka, Eric C; Moon, Lawrence; Petruska, Jeffrey C

    2015-12-01

    Primary afferent collateral sprouting is a process whereby non-injured primary afferent neurons respond to some stimulus and extend new branches from existing axons. Neurons of both the central and peripheral nervous systems undergo this process, which contributes to both adaptive and maladaptive plasticity (e.g., [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]). In the model used here (the "spared dermatome" model), the intact sensory neurons respond to the denervation of adjacent areas of skin by sprouting new axon branches into that adjacent denervated territory. Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Consequently, it can be used to develop treatments to promote functional recovery for spinal cord injury and other similar conditions. This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact ("naïve") sensory ganglia. Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551). PMID:26697387

  9. Transient, afferent input-dependent, postnatal niche for neural progenitor cells in the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Oshima, Kazuo; Sinkkonen, Saku T.; Corrales, C. Eduardo; Most, Sam P.; Chai, Renjie; Jan, Taha A.; van Amerongen, Renée; Cheng, Alan G.; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear nucleus (CN), the first central relay of the auditory pathway, the survival of neurons during the first weeks after birth depends on afferent innervation from the cochlea. Although input-dependent neuron survival has been extensively studied in the CN, neurogenesis has not been evaluated as a possible mechanism of postnatal plasticity. Here we show that new neurons are born in the CN during the critical period of postnatal plasticity. Coincidently, we found a population of neural progenitor cells that are controlled by a complex interplay of Wnt, Notch, and TGFβ/BMP signaling, in which low levels of TGFβ/BMP signaling are permissive for progenitor proliferation that is promoted by Wnt and Notch activation. We further show that cells with activated Wnt signaling reside in the CN and that these cells have high propensity for neurosphere formation. Cochlear ablation resulted in diminishment of progenitors and Wnt/β-catenin-active cells, suggesting that the neonatal CN maintains an afferent innervation-dependent population of progenitor cells that display active canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:23940359

  10. Afference copy as a quantitative neurophysiological model for consciousness.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D

    2014-06-01

    Consciousness is a topic of considerable human curiosity with a long history of philosophical analysis and debate. We consider there is nothing particularly complicated about consciousness when viewed as a necessary process of the vertebrate nervous system. Here, we propose a physiological "explanatory gap" is created during each present moment by the temporal requirements of neuronal activity. The gap extends from the time exteroceptive and proprioceptive stimuli activate the nervous system until they emerge into consciousness. During this "moment", it is impossible for an organism to have any conscious knowledge of the ongoing evolution of its environment. In our schematic model, a mechanism of "afference copy" is employed to bridge the explanatory gap with consciously experienced percepts. These percepts are fabricated from the conjunction of the cumulative memory of previous relevant experience and the given stimuli. They are structured to provide the best possible prediction of the expected content of subjective conscious experience likely to occur during the period of the gap. The model is based on the proposition that the neural circuitry necessary to support consciousness is a product of sub/preconscious reflexive learning and recall processes. Based on a review of various psychological and neurophysiological findings, we develop a framework which contextualizes the model and briefly discuss further implications. PMID:25012715

  11. PAP and NT5E inhibit nociceptive neurotransmission by rapidly hydrolyzing nucleotides to adenosine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) produce extracellular adenosine from the nucleotide AMP in spinal nociceptive (pain-sensing) circuits; however, it is currently unknown if these are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine or how rapidly they generate adenosine. Results We found that AMP hydrolysis, when measured histochemically, was nearly abolished in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and lamina II of spinal cord from Pap/Nt5e double knockout (dKO) mice. Likewise, the antinociceptive effects of AMP, when combined with nucleoside transport inhibitors (dipyridamole or 5-iodotubericidin), were reduced by 80-100% in dKO mice. In addition, we used fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure adenosine production at subsecond resolution within lamina II. Adenosine was maximally produced within seconds from AMP in wild-type (WT) mice but production was reduced >50% in dKO mice, indicating PAP and NT5E rapidly generate adenosine in lamina II. Unexpectedly, we also detected spontaneous low frequency adenosine transients in lamina II with FSCV. Adenosine transients were of short duration (<2 s) and were reduced (>60%) in frequency in Pap-/-, Nt5e-/- and dKO mice, suggesting these ectonucleotidases rapidly hydrolyze endogenously released nucleotides to adenosine. Field potential recordings in lamina II and behavioral studies indicate that adenosine made by these enzymes acts through the adenosine A1 receptor to inhibit excitatory neurotransmission and nociception. Conclusions Collectively, our experiments indicate that PAP and NT5E are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive circuits and indicate these enzymes transform pulsatile or sustained nucleotide release into an inhibitory adenosinergic signal. PMID:22011440

  12. Comparison of nociceptive behavior in prostaglandin E, F, D, prostacyclin and thromboxane receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Popp, Laura; Häussler, Annett; Olliges, Anke; Nüsing, Rolf; Narumiya, Shuh; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2009-08-01

    Antagonist at specific prostaglandin receptors might provide analgesia with a more favourable toxicity profile compared with cyclooxygenase inhibitors. We analyzed nociceptive responses in prostaglandin D, E, F, prostacyclin and thromboxane receptor knockout mice and mice deficient of cyclooxygenase 1 or 2 to evaluate the contribution of individual prostaglandin receptors for heat, mechanical and formalin-evoked pain. None of the knockouts was uniformly protected from all of these pain stimuli but COX-1 and EP4 receptor knockouts presented with reduced heat pain and EP3 receptor and COX-2 knockout mice had reduced licking responses in the 2nd phase of the formalin assay. This was accompanied with reduced c-Fos immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn in EP3 knockouts. Oppositely, heat pain sensitivity was increased in FP, EP1 and EP1+3 double mutant mice possibly due to a loss of FP or EP1 receptor mediated central control of thermal pain sensitivity. Deficiency of either EP2 or DP1 was associated with increased formalin-evoked flinching responses and c-Fos IR in dorsal horn neurons suggesting facilitated spinal cord pain reflex circuity. Thromboxane and prostacyclin receptor knockout mice showed normal pain behavior in all tests. The results suggest a differential, pain-stimulus and site-specific contribution of specific PG-receptors for the processing of the nociceptive stimuli, a differential modulation of nociceptive responses by COX-1 and COX-2 derived prostaglandins and compensatory and/or developmental adaptations in mice lacking specific PG receptors. PMID:18938093

  13. ACTIVATION OF TRPA1 ON DURAL AFFERENTS: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM OF HEADACHE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Le, Larry N.; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro using two TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO) and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB), on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. Using an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hindpaw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura and exploratory activity was monitored for 30 minutes using an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective anti-migraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those seen in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache. PMID:22809691

  14. DNA Methylation Modulates Nociceptive Sensitization after Incision

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan; Sahbaie, Peyman; Liang, DeYong; Li, Wenwu; Shi, Xiaoyou; Kingery, Paige; Clark, J. David

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling DNA accessibility and gene expression. Blockade of DNA methylation can significantly affect pain behaviors implicated in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of DNA methylation with regard to postoperative pain has not yet been explored. In this study we sought to investigate the role of DNA methylation in modulating incisional pain and identify possible targets under DNA methylation and contributing to incisional pain. DNA methyltranferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine significantly reduced incision-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal sensitivity. Aza-2′-deoxycytidine also reduced hindpaw swelling after incision, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. Global DNA methylation and DNMT3b expression were increased in skin after incision, but none of DNMT1, DNMT3a or DNMT3b was altered in spinal cord or DRG. The expression of proopiomelanocortin Pomc encoding β-endorphin and Oprm1 encoding the mu-opioid receptor were upregulated peripherally after incision; moreover, Oprm1 expression was further increased under DNMT inhibitor treatment. Finally, local peripheral injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone significantly exacerbated incision-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results suggest that DNA methylation is functionally relevant to incisional nociceptive sensitization, and that mu-opioid receptor signaling might be one methylation regulated pathway controlling sensitization after incision. PMID:26535894

  15. Effects of Anethole in Nociception Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Otani, Fernando; de Oliveira, Rubia Maria Weffort; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl)), major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum), in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg) in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg), and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg). In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25506382

  16. DNA Methylation Modulates Nociceptive Sensitization after Incision.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Sahbaie, Peyman; Liang, DeYong; Li, Wenwu; Shi, Xiaoyou; Kingery, Paige; Clark, J David

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling DNA accessibility and gene expression. Blockade of DNA methylation can significantly affect pain behaviors implicated in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of DNA methylation with regard to postoperative pain has not yet been explored. In this study we sought to investigate the role of DNA methylation in modulating incisional pain and identify possible targets under DNA methylation and contributing to incisional pain. DNA methyltranferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine significantly reduced incision-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal sensitivity. Aza-2'-deoxycytidine also reduced hindpaw swelling after incision, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. Global DNA methylation and DNMT3b expression were increased in skin after incision, but none of DNMT1, DNMT3a or DNMT3b was altered in spinal cord or DRG. The expression of proopiomelanocortin Pomc encoding β-endorphin and Oprm1 encoding the mu-opioid receptor were upregulated peripherally after incision; moreover, Oprm1 expression was further increased under DNMT inhibitor treatment. Finally, local peripheral injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone significantly exacerbated incision-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results suggest that DNA methylation is functionally relevant to incisional nociceptive sensitization, and that mu-opioid receptor signaling might be one methylation regulated pathway controlling sensitization after incision. PMID:26535894

  17. Gain control mechanisms in the nociceptive system.

    PubMed

    Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-06-01

    The "gate control theory of pain" of 1965 became famous for integrating clinical observations and the understanding of spinal dorsal horn circuitry at that time into a testable model. Although it became rapidly clear that spinal circuitry is much more complex than that proposed by Melzack and Wall, their prediction of the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal cord stimulation has left an important clinical legacy also 50 years later. In the meantime, it has been recognized that the sensitivity of the nociceptive system can be decreased or increased and that this "gain control" can occur at peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal levels. The resulting changes in pain sensitivity can be rapidly reversible or persistent, highly localized or widespread. Profiling of spatio-temporal characteristics of altered pain sensitivity (evoked pain to mechanical and/or heat stimuli) allows implications on the mechanisms likely active in a given patient, including peripheral or central sensitization, intraspinal or descending inhibition. This hypothesis generation in the diagnostic process is an essential step towards a mechanism-based treatment of pain. The challenge now is to generate the rational basis of multimodal pain therapy algorithms by including profile-based stratification of patients into studies on efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. This review outlines the current evidence base for this approach. PMID:26817644

  18. Effects of anethole in nociception experimental models.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Otani, Fernando; de Oliveira, Rubia Maria Weffort; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl)), major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum), in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg) in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg), and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg). In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25506382

  19. Identification of Different Types of Spinal Afferent Nerve Endings That Encode Noxious and Innocuous Stimuli in the Large Intestine Using a Novel Anterograde Tracing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  20. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  1. Translational control of nociception via 4E-binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Khoutorsky, Arkady; Bonin, Robert P; Sorge, Robert E; Gkogkas, Christos G; Pawlowski, Sophie Anne; Jafarnejad, Seyed Mehdi; Pitcher, Mark H; Alain, Tommy; Perez-Sanchez, Jimena; Salter, Eric W; Martin, Loren; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; De Koninck, Yves; Cervero, Fernando; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase in models of acute and chronic pain is strongly implicated in mediating enhanced translation and hyperalgesia. However, the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR regulates nociception remain unclear. Here we show that deletion of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), a major mTOR downstream effector, which represses eIF4E activity and cap-dependent translation, leads to mechanical, but not thermal pain hypersensitivity. Mice lacking 4E-BP1 exhibit enhanced spinal cord expression of neuroligin 1, a cell-adhesion postsynaptic protein regulating excitatory synapse function, and show increased excitatory synaptic input into spinal neurons, and a lowered threshold for induction of synaptic potentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of eIF4E or genetic reduction of neuroligin 1 levels normalizes the increased excitatory synaptic activity and reverses mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, translational control by 4E-BP1 downstream of mTOR effects the expression of neuroligin 1 and excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord, and thereby contributes to enhanced mechanical nociception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12002.001 PMID:26678009

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-3 (TRPM3) Mediates Nociceptive-Like Responses in Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Scalici, Massimiliano; Lauro, Filomena; Russo, Valeria; Persichini, Tiziana; Salvemini, Daniela; Mollace, Vincenzo; Fini, Massimo; Raffaeli, William

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mammals to feel noxious stimuli lies in a heterogeneous group of primary somatosensory neurons termed nociceptors, which express specific membrane receptors, such as the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. Here, we show that one of the most important nociceptive-like pathways is conserved in the freshwater coelenterate Hydra vulgaris, the most primitive organism possessing a nervous system. In particular, we found that H. vulgaris expresses TRPM3, a nociceptor calcium channel involved in the detection of noxious heat in mammals. Furthermore, we detected that both heat shock and TRPM3 specific agonist (i.e., pregnenolone sulfate) induce the modulation of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), two genes activated by TRP-mediated heat painful stimuli in mammals. As expected, these effects are inhibited by a TRPM3 antagonist (i.e., mefenamic acid). Interestingly, the TRPM3 agonist and heat shock also induce the expression of nuclear transcription erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), known markers of oxidative stress; noteworthy gene expression was also inhibited by the TRPM3 antagonist. As a whole, our results demonstrate the presence of conserved molecular oxidative/nociceptive-like pathways at the primordial level of the animal kingdom. PMID:26974325

  3. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-3 (TRPM3) Mediates Nociceptive-Like Responses in Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Scalici, Massimiliano; Lauro, Filomena; Russo, Valeria; Persichini, Tiziana; Salvemini, Daniela; Mollace, Vincenzo; Fini, Massimo; Raffaeli, William; Muscoli, Carolina; Colasanti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mammals to feel noxious stimuli lies in a heterogeneous group of primary somatosensory neurons termed nociceptors, which express specific membrane receptors, such as the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. Here, we show that one of the most important nociceptive-like pathways is conserved in the freshwater coelenterate Hydra vulgaris, the most primitive organism possessing a nervous system. In particular, we found that H. vulgaris expresses TRPM3, a nociceptor calcium channel involved in the detection of noxious heat in mammals. Furthermore, we detected that both heat shock and TRPM3 specific agonist (i.e., pregnenolone sulfate) induce the modulation of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), two genes activated by TRP-mediated heat painful stimuli in mammals. As expected, these effects are inhibited by a TRPM3 antagonist (i.e., mefenamic acid). Interestingly, the TRPM3 agonist and heat shock also induce the expression of nuclear transcription erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), known markers of oxidative stress; noteworthy gene expression was also inhibited by the TRPM3 antagonist. As a whole, our results demonstrate the presence of conserved molecular oxidative/nociceptive-like pathways at the primordial level of the animal kingdom. PMID:26974325

  4. Molecular Basis Determining Inhibition/Activation of Nociceptive Receptor TRPA1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Banzawa, Nagako; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Kashio, Makiko; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a Ca2+-permeable, nonselective cation channel mainly expressed in a subset of nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 functions as a cellular sensor detecting mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimuli. Because TRPA1 is considered to be a key player in nociception and inflammatory pain, TRPA1 antagonists have been developed as analgesic agents. Recently, by utilizing species differences, we identified the molecular basis of the antagonistic action of A967079, one of the most potent mammalian TRPA1 antagonists. Here, we show a unique effect of A967079 on TRPA1 from diverse vertebrate species, i.e. it acts as an agonist but not as an antagonist for chicken and frog TRPA1s. By characterizing chimeric channels of human and chicken TRPA1s, as well as point mutants, we found that a single specific amino acid residue located within the putative fifth transmembrane domain was involved in not only the stimulatory but also the inhibitory actions of A967079. AP18, structurally related to A967079, exerted similar pharmacological properties to A967079. Our findings and previous reports on species differences in the sensitivity to TRPA1 antagonists supply useful information in the search for novel analgesic medicines targeting TRPA1. PMID:25271161

  5. A digital wireless system for closed-loop inhibition of nociceptive signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Yang; Hagains, Christopher E.; Li, Ai-Ling; Peng, Yuan B.; Chiao, J.-C.

    2012-10-01

    Neurostimulation of the spinal cord or brain has been used to inhibit nociceptive signals in pain management applications. Nevertheless, most of the current neurostimulation models are based on open-loop system designs. There is a lack of closed-loop systems for neurostimulation in research with small freely-moving animals and in future clinical applications. Based on our previously developed analog wireless system for closed-loop neurostimulation, a digital wireless system with real-time feedback between recorder and stimulator modules has been developed to achieve multi-channel communication. The wireless system includes a wearable recording module, a wearable stimulation module and a transceiver connected to a computer for real-time and off-line data processing, display and storage. To validate our system, wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn have been recorded from anesthetized rats in response to graded mechanical stimuli (brush, pressure and pinch) applied in the hind paw. The identified nociceptive signals were used to automatically trigger electrical stimulation at the periaqueductal gray in real time to inhibit their own activities by the closed-loop design. Our digital wireless closed-loop system has provided a simplified and efficient method for further study of pain processing in freely-moving animals and potential clinical application in patients. Groups 1, 2 and 3 contributed equally to this project.

  6. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  7. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chuanxin M.; Nandyala, Sirish K.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin–Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems. PMID:25538613

  8. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  9. Circadian variation in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Frisby, Claudine L; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2013-12-01

    Food intake is coordinated to cellular metabolism by clock gene expression with a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus synchronized by light exposure. Gastric vagal afferents play a role in regulating food intake, but it is unknown whether they exhibit circadian variation in their mechanosensitivity. We aimed to determine whether gastric vagal afferents express clock genes and whether their response to mechanical stimuli oscillates throughout the light/dark cycle. Nodose ganglia were collected from 8-week-old female C57BL/6 mice every 3 h starting at lights off (1800 h) to quantify Bmal1, Per1, Per2, and Nr1d1 mRNA by qRT-PCR. Additionally in vitro single-fiber recordings of gastric vagal mechanoreceptors were taken at all time points. Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Nr1d1 mRNA is expressed in the nodose ganglia and levels oscillated over a 24 h period. In mice fed ad libitum, gastric content was 3 times higher at 0000 h and 0300 h than 1200 h. The response of tension receptors to 3 g stretch was reduced by up to 70% at 2100 h, 0000 h, and 0300 h compared with 1200 h. Gastric mucosal receptor response to stroking with a 50 mg von Frey hair was 3 times greater at 1200 h and 1500 h than the response at 0000 h. Similar findings were obtained in mice fasted for 6 h or maintained in darkness for 3 d before study. Therefore, these changes do not result from food intake or the light/dark cycle. Thus, gastric vagal mechanoreceptors display circadian rhythm, which may act to control food intake differentially at different times of the day. PMID:24305819

  10. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 gene deficiency attenuates nociceptive behaviors in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Rahman, Md Habibur; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinases (PDKs) 1-4, expressed in peripheral and central tissues, regulate the activity of the PDH complex (PDC). The PDC is an important mitochondrial gatekeeping enzyme that controls cellular metabolism. The role of PDKs in diverse neurological disorders, including neurometabolic aberrations and neurodegeneration, has been described. Implications for a role of PDKs in inflammation and neurometabolic coupling led us to investigate the effect of genetic ablation of PDK2/4 on nociception in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain. Deficiency in Pdk2 and/or Pdk4 in mice led to attenuation of formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors (flinching, licking, biting, or lifting of the injected paw). Likewise, the pharmacological inhibition of PDKs substantially diminished the nociceptive responses in the second phase of the formalin test. Furthermore, formalin-provoked paw edema formation and mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities were significantly reduced in Pdk2/4-deficient mice. Formalin-driven neutrophil recruitment at the site of inflammation, spinal glial activation, and neuronal sensitization were substantially lessened in the second or late phase of the formalin test in Pdk2/4-deficient animals. Overall, our results suggest that PDK2/4 can be a potential target for the development of pharmacotherapy for the treatment of acute inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26931482

  11. Nociceptive Reactions in Rats during Repeated Stress Exposure.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A Yu; Abramova, A Yu; Chekhlov, V V; Grigorchuk, O S; Pertsov, S S

    2015-10-01

    Changes in nociceptive sensitivity of rats with various behavioral patterns in the open-field test were studied after repeated stress exposure on the model of daily 4-h immobilization for 8 days. The tail-flick latency in response to light-heat stimulation in passive and active specimens decreased most significantly on days 2 and 7, respectively. However, this parameter did not differ from the baseline on day 8 of observations. Vocalization threshold during electrocutaneous stimulation in behaviorally active animals did not change over the first 7 days of repeated stress exposure, but increased significantly on day 8 of the study. The emotional component of nociception in passive animals increased on day 3, but decreased on days 4 and 6 of the experiment. Therefore, repeated stress exposure in rats is mainly accompanied by an increase in the perceptual component of nociception. Variations in the emotional component of nociceptive sensitivity after stress loads are manifested in the initial increase and subsequent decrease in this parameter. The observed changes are more pronounced in behaviorally passive rats than in active animals. These data illustrate the specifics of stress-induced changes in nociception of specimens with various individual and typological characteristics. Our results hold much promise for the development of new individual approaches to modulation of pain sensitivity in humans under conditions of negative emotiogenic exposures. PMID:26519267

  12. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine. PMID:26949181

  13. Morphologic diversity of cutaneous sensory afferents revealed by genetically directed sparse labeling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Williams, John; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of cutaneous sensory afferents has been studied by many investigators using behavioral, physiologic, molecular, and genetic approaches. Largely missing, thus far, is an analysis of the complete morphologies of individual afferent arbors. Here we present a survey of cutaneous sensory arbor morphologies in hairy skin of the mouse using genetically-directed sparse labeling with a sensory neuron-specific alkaline phosphatase reporter. Quantitative analyses of 719 arbors, among which 77 were fully reconstructed, reveal 10 morphologically distinct types. Among the two types with the largest arbors, one contacts ∼200 hair follicles with circumferential endings and a second is characterized by a densely ramifying arbor with one to several thousand branches and a total axon length between one-half and one meter. These observations constrain models of receptive field size and structure among cutaneous sensory neurons, and they raise intriguing questions regarding the cellular and developmental mechanisms responsible for this morphological diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00181.001 PMID:23256042

  14. Circuit formation and function in the olfactory bulb of mice with reduced spontaneous afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Paolo; Redolfi, Nelly; Podolsky, Michael J; Zamparo, Ilaria; Franchi, Sira Angela; Pietra, Gianluca; Boccaccio, Anna; Menini, Anna; Murthy, Venkatesh N; Lodovichi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The type of neuronal activity required for circuit development is a matter of significant debate. We addressed this issue by analyzing the topographic organization of the olfactory bulb in transgenic mice engineered to have very little afferent spontaneous activity due to the overexpression of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 in the olfactory sensory neurons (Kir2.1 mice). In these conditions, the topography of the olfactory bulb was unrefined. Odor-evoked responses were readily recorded in glomeruli with reduced spontaneous afferent activity, although the functional maps were coarser than in controls and contributed to altered olfactory discrimination behavior. In addition, overexpression of Kir2.1 in adults induced a regression of the already refined connectivity to an immature (i.e., coarser) status. Our data suggest that spontaneous activity plays a critical role not only in the development but also in the maintenance of the topography of the olfactory bulb and in sensory information processing. PMID:25568110

  15. Implications for Bidirectional Signaling Between Afferent Nerves and Urothelial Cells—ICI-RS 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Anthony; Fry, Christopher; Ikeda, Youko; Kullmann, Florenta Aura; Parsons, Brian; Birder, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Aims To present a synopsis of the presentations and discussions from Think Tank I, “Implications for afferent–urothelial bidirectional communication” of the 2014 International Consultation on Incontinence-Research Society (ICI-RS) meeting in Bristol, UK. Methods The participants presented what is new, currently understood or still unknown on afferent–urothelial signaling mechanisms. New avenues of research and experimental methodologies that are or could be employed were presented and discussed. Results It is clear that afferent–urothelial interactions are integral to the regulation of normal bladder function and that its disruption can have detrimental consequences. The urothelium is capable of releasing numerous signaling factors that can affect sensory neurons innervating the suburothelium. However, the understanding of how factors released from urothelial cells and afferent nerve terminals regulate one another is incomplete. Utilization of techniques such as viruses that genetically encode Ca2+ sensors, based on calmodulin and green fluorescent protein, has helped to address the cellular mechanisms involved. Additionally, the epithelial–neuronal interactions in the urethra may also play a significant role in lower urinary tract regulation and merit further investigation. Conclusion The signaling capabilities of the urothelium and afferent nerves are well documented, yet how these signals are integrated to regulate bladder function is unclear. There is unquestionably a need for expanded methodologies to further our understanding of lower urinary tract sensory mechanisms and their contribution to various pathologies. PMID:26872567

  16. Identification and properties of parietal pleural afferents in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Jammes, Yves; Trousse, Delphine; Delpierre, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    Although pain and dyspnoea are common symptoms in pleural diseases, there are few studies on the sensory innervation of the pleura. Using rabbits, after removal of all muscles in the intercostal space to be studied, we investigated the afferents of the internal intercostal nerve by applying to the internal thoracic wall pieces of gauze soaked in warmed (37°C), buffered saline (mechanical stimulation) or solutions containing lactic acid, inflammatory mediators or capsaicin (chemical stimulation). The afferent conduction velocity ranged from 0.5 to 14 m s−1. Most units (97%) were activated by mechanical stimulation of the pleura (local positive pressure range = 4.5–8.5 cmH2O) and we found a linear relationship between the discharge rate of afferents and the force applied to the thoracic wall. The majority of mechanosensitive units (70%) also responded to one or several chemical agents. Thus, the afferents were activated by lactic acid (49%) and/or a mixture of inflammatory mediators (50%). Local application of capsaicin elicited an initial increased or decreased background afferent activity in 57% of the afferents, a delayed decrease in firing rate being noted in some units initially activated by capsaicin. Capsaicin blocked the afferent response to a further application of inflammatory mediators but did not affect the mechanosensitive units. Thus, sensory endings connected with thin myelinated and unmyelinated fibres in the internal intercostal nerve detect the mechanical and chemical events of pleural diseases. PMID:15975985

  17. Baicalin Activates Glycine and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptors on Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons of the Trigeminal Subsnucleus Caudalis in Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua; Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Oh, Sun Mi; Park, Soo Joung; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) receives nociceptive afferent inputs from thin-myelinated A[Formula: see text] fibers and unmyelinated C fibers and has been shown to be involved in the processing of orofacial nociceptive information. Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (Huang-Qin, SbG), one of the 50 fundamental herbs of Chinese herbology, has been used historically as anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic medicine. Baicalin, one of the major compounds of SbG, has been reported to have neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, the receptor type activated by baicalin and its precise action mechanism on the SG neurons of Vc have not yet been studied. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was performed to examine the ion channels activated by baicalin on the SG neurons of Vc. In high Cl[Formula: see text] pipette solution, the baicalin (300[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M) induced repeatable inward currents ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]pA, [Formula: see text]) without desensitization on all the SG neurons tested. Further, the inward currents showed a concentration (0.1-3[Formula: see text]mM) dependent pattern. The inward current was sustained in the presence of tetrodotoxin (0.5[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a voltage sensitive Na[Formula: see text] channel blocker. In addition, baicalin-induced inward currents were reduced in the presence of picrotoxin (50[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a GABAA receptor antagonist, flumazenil (100[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptor antagonist, and strychnine (2[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a glycine receptor antagonist, respectively. These results indicate that baicalin has inhibitory effects on the SG neurons of the Vc, which are due to the activation of GABAA and/or the glycine receptor. Our results suggest that baicalin may be a potential target for orofacial pain modulation

  18. Effects of glia metabolism inhibition on nociceptive behavioral testing in rats.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Yan; Amadio, Aurélie; Vincent, Peggy; Descheemaeker, Amélie; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Dallel, Radhouane; Voisin, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroacetate has been widely used to inhibit glia metabolism in vivo. It has yet to be shown what the effects of chronic intrathecal infusion of fluoroacetate on nociceptive behavioral testing are. The effects of chronic infusion of fluoroacetate (5 nmoles/h) for 2 weeks were examined in normal rats. Chronic intrathecal fluoroacetate did not alter mechanical threshold (von Frey filaments), responses to supra-threshold mechanical stimuli (von Frey filaments), responses to hot (hot plate) or cool (acetone test) stimuli and did not affect motor performance of the animals, which was tested with rotarod. This suggests that fluoroacetate at appropriate dose did not suppress neuronal activity in the spinal cord. PMID:26977440

  19. Effects of glia metabolism inhibition on nociceptive behavioral testing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Yan; Amadio, Aurélie; Vincent, Peggy; Descheemaeker, Amélie; Oliet, Stéphane H.R.; Dallel, Radhouane; Voisin, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroacetate has been widely used to inhibit glia metabolism in vivo. It has yet to be shown what the effects of chronic intrathecal infusion of fluoroacetate on nociceptive behavioral testing are. The effects of chronic infusion of fluoroacetate (5 nmoles/h) for 2 weeks were examined in normal rats. Chronic intrathecal fluoroacetate did not alter mechanical threshold (von Frey filaments), responses to supra-threshold mechanical stimuli (von Frey filaments), responses to hot (hot plate) or cool (acetone test) stimuli and did not affect motor performance of the animals, which was tested with rotarod. This suggests that fluoroacetate at appropriate dose did not suppress neuronal activity in the spinal cord. PMID:26977440

  20. Midbrain control of spinal nociception discriminates between responses evoked by myelinated and unmyelinated heat nociceptors in the rat.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Simon; Lumb, Bridget M

    2006-09-01

    Descending control of spinal nociception is a major determinant of normal and chronic pain. Myelinated (A-fibre) and unmyelinated (C-fibre) nociceptors convey different qualities of the pain signal (first and second pain, respectively), and they play different roles in the development and maintenance of chronic pain states. It is of considerable importance, therefore, to determine whether descending control has differential effects on the central processing of A- vs. C-nociceptive input. In anaesthetised rats, biceps femoris EMG was recorded to monitor the thresholds and encoding properties of responses evoked by fast (7.5 degrees Cs(-1)) or slow (2.5 degrees Cs(-1)) rates of skin heating of the dorsal surface of a hindpaw to preferentially activate myelinated or unmyelinated heat nociceptors, respectively. Activation of neurones in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) by microinjection of dl-homocysteic acid (DLH) or bicuculline (BIC) significantly increased response thresholds to slow rates of heating (P<0.001), but not those to fast rates of heating (P>0.05). The ability of the EMG to encode the stimulus intensity of fast rates of skin heating remained intact and unaltered (r2=0.99, P<0.001) following BIC but not DLH injection. In contrast, encoding of the stimulus intensity of slow rates of skin heating was abolished following BIC and DLH injection. The functional significance of differential descending control of the central processing of C- and A-nociceptive inputs is discussed with respect to role of the PAG in mediating antinociception as part of active coping strategies in emergency situations and the role of C- and A-nociceptive inputs in animal models of chronic pain. PMID:16650581

  1. Does the histaminergic system play a role in spinal nociception?

    PubMed

    Harasawa, K

    2000-07-01

    The author studied whether the histaminergic system is involved in spinal nociception or not. A nociception-related, slow ventral root potential of rats, which is an integrated output of motoneurons, was recorded as an index of the intensity of nociception when an electric stimulation was applied to the dorsal root. Histamine dissolved in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid caused small reduction in the potential; however, mepyramine (10 nM to 10 microM, as an H1 receptor antagonist), ranitidine (1 nM to 1 microM, as an H2 receptor antagonist), R(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (2 pM to 200 nM, as an H3 receptor agonist), and thioperamide (1 nM to 10 microM, as an H3 receptor antagonist) dose-dependently reduced the potential down to around a half of each control level. These results indicate that the histaminergic system may affect the spinal withdrawal reflex. PMID:10976407

  2. Local translation and retrograde axonal transport of CREB regulates IL-6-induced nociceptive plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of genes by cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) is essential for the maintenance of long-term memory. Moreover, retrograde axonal trafficking of CREB in response to nerve growth factor (NGF) is critical for the survival of developing primary sensory neurons. We have previously demonstrated that hindpaw injection of interleukin-6 (IL-6) induces mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming that is prevented by the local injection of protein synthesis inhibitors. However, proteins that are locally synthesized that might lead to this effect have not been identified. We hypothesized that retrograde axonal trafficking of nascently synthesized CREB might link local, activity-dependent translation to nociceptive plasticity. To test this hypothesis, we determined if IL-6 enhances the expression of CREB and if it subsequently undergoes retrograde axonal transport. IL-6 treatment of sensory neurons in vitro caused an increase in CREB protein and in vivo treatment evoked an increase in CREB in the sciatic nerve consistent with retrograde transport. Importantly, co-injection of IL-6 with the methionine analogue azido-homoalanine (AHA), to assess nascently synthesized proteins, revealed an increase in CREB containing AHA in the sciatic nerve 2 hrs post injection, indicating retrograde transport of nascently synthesized CREB. Behaviorally, blockade of retrograde transport by disruption of microtubules or inhibition of dynein or intrathecal injection of cAMP response element (CRE) consensus sequence DNA oligonucleotides, which act as decoys for CREB DNA binding, prevented the development of IL-6-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming. Consistent with previous studies in inflammatory models, intraplantar IL-6 enhanced the expression of BDNF in dorsal root ganglion (DRG). This effect was blocked by inhibition of retrograde axonal transport and by intrathecal CRE oligonucleotides. Collectively, these findings

  3. Quantitative objective assessment of peripheral nociceptive C fibre function.

    PubMed Central

    Parkhouse, N; Le Quesne, P M

    1988-01-01

    A technique is described for the quantitative assessment of peripheral nociceptive C fibre function by measurement of the axon reflex flare. Acetylcholine, introduced by electrophoresis, is used to stimulate a ring of nociceptive C fibre endings at the centre of which the increase in blood flow is measured with a laser Doppler flowmeter. This flare (neurogenic vasodilatation) has been compared with mechanically or chemically stimulated non-neurogenic cutaneous vasodilation. The flare is abolished by local anaesthetic and is absent in denervated skin. The flare has been measured on the sole of the foot of 96 healthy subjects; its size decreases with age in males, but not in females. Images PMID:3351528

  4. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  5. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spikemore » due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.« less

  6. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons.

    PubMed

    Dieni, Cristina V; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B; Kuo, Chay T; Wadiche, Jacques I; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  7. Afferent hypersensitivity in a mouse model of post-inflammatory gut dysfunction: role of altered serotonin metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Christopher; Beyak, Michael; Foley, Stephen; Singh, Gulzar; Marsden, Charles; Spiller, Robin; Grundy, David

    2008-01-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important clinical feature associated with irritable bowel syndrome which in some patients has been linked to prior infection. Here we employ an animal model in which transient infection leads to persistent gut dysfunction to investigate the role of altered 5-HT metabolism upon afferent mechanosensensitivity in the post-infected gut. Jejunal segments isolated from Trichinella spiralis-infected mice were used to assess 5-HT metabolism whilst afferent activity in T. spiralis-infected mice was studied by extracellular recordings from jejunal mesenteric afferent bundles and patch clamp recordings of isolated nodose ganglion neurons (NGNs). During acute infection, intestinal 5-HT content and release increased, 5-HT turnover decreased and afferent discharge in response to mechanical stimulation was attenuated. By day 28 post infection (PI), 5-HT turnover had normalized, but 5-HT content and release were still elevated. This was associated with afferent mechano-hypersensitivity, which persisted for 8 weeks PI and was susceptible to 5-HT3 receptor blockade. NGNs from post-infected animals were more excitable than controls but their current densities in response to 2-methyl-5-HT were lower. T. spiralis infection increased mucosal 5-HT bioavailability and affected the spontaneous activity and mechanosensitivity of gastrointestinal sensory nerves. This involved an initial hyposensitivity occurring during acute infection followed by long-term hypersensitivity in the post-infectious period that was in part mediated by 5-HT acting via 5-HT3 receptors. Functional down-regulation of 5-HT3 receptors also occurs in the post-infected animals, which may represent an adaptive response to increased mucosal 5-HT bioavailability. PMID:18653657

  8. Injury-specific functional alteration of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in synaptic transmission of primary afferent C-fibers in the rat spinal superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Keiko; Ogawa, Koichi; Minami, Kazuhisa; Shinohara, Shunji; Kato, Akira

    2016-02-01

    We investigated functional alterations of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferent A- and C-fibers after peripheral nerve injury. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of spinal cord slices with an attached dorsal root, prepared from L5 spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) rats. The effects of neuronal VGCC blockers, ω-conotoxin GVIA (ω-CgTX) for N-type channels and ω-agatoxin IVA (ω-AgaIVA) for P/Q-type channels, on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) by stimulation of A- or C-fibers were studied. Besides, electrophysiological assay using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and immunohistochemistry were done. In naïve rats, ω-CgTX (0.1-1μM) reduced more effectively A-fiber eEPSCs than C-fiber ones. After nerve injury, ω-CgTX produced great inhibition of C-fiber eEPSCs in slices with the injured L5 dorsal root of SNL model rats, as compared to sham-operated rats. By contrast, in slices with the non-injured L4 one, inhibitory effects of ω-CgTX were not changed. This occurred concurrently with increased expression of N-type VGCCs in L5 spinal dorsal horn and with enhanced Ca(2+) currents through N-type VGCCs in small-sized (C-type) L5 DRG. In terms of A-fiber eEPSCs, ω-CgTX elicited similar inhibition in nerve-injured and sham-operated rats. ω-AgaIVA (0.1μM) had less effect on A- or C-fiber eEPSCs. These results indicate that N-type, but not P/Q-type, VGCCs mainly contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission from A- and C-fibers in the spinal dorsal horn. More importantly, following nerve injury, the functional contribution of N-type VGCCs to nociceptive transmission is increased in the pre-synaptic terminals of injured C-fibers. PMID:26708163

  9. Α-Dendrotoxin-sensitive Kv1 channels contribute to conduction failure of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers from rat coccygeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Chao; Wang, Shan; Zhang, Ming; Gao, Fang; Yin, Chun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ying; Hu, San-Jue; Duan, Jian-Hong

    2016-02-01

    It is known that some patients with diabetic neuropathy are usually accompanied by abnormal painful sensations. Evidence has accumulated that diabetic neuropathic pain is associated with the hyperexcitability of peripheral nociceptors. Previously, we demonstrated that reduced conduction failure of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers and enhanced voltage-dependent sodium currents of small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons contribute to diabetic hyperalgesia. To further investigate whether and how potassium channels are involved in the conduction failure, α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX), a selective blocker of the low-threshold sustained Kv1 channel, was chosen to examine its functional capability in modulating the conduction properties of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers and the excitability of sensory neurons. We found that α-DTX reduced the conduction failure of C-fibers from coccygeal nerve in vivo accompanied by an increased initial conduction velocity but a decreased activity-dependent slowing of conduction velocity. In addition, the number of APs evoked by step currents was significantly enhanced after the treatment with α-DTX in small-diameter sensory neurons. Further study of the mechanism indicates α-DTX-sensitive K(+) current significantly reduced and the activation of this current in peak and steady state shifted to depolarization for diabetic neurons. Expression of Kv channel subunits Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 was downregulated in both small dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral C-fibers. Taken together, these results suggest that α-DTX-sensitive Kv1 channels might play an important role in regulating the conduction properties of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers and firing properties of sensory neurons. PMID:26609114

  10. Simulation studies of vestibular macular afferent-discharge patterns using a new, quasi-3-D finite volume method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Linton, S. W.; Parnas, B. R.

    2000-01-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional finite-volume numerical simulator was developed to study passive voltage spread in vestibular macular afferents. The method, borrowed from computational fluid dynamics, discretizes events transpiring in small volumes over time. The afferent simulated had three calyces with processes. The number of processes and synapses, and direction and timing of synapse activation, were varied. Simultaneous synapse activation resulted in shortest latency, while directional activation (proximal to distal and distal to proximal) yielded most regular discharges. Color-coded visualizations showed that the simulator discretized events and demonstrated that discharge produced a distal spread of voltage from the spike initiator into the ending. The simulations indicate that directional input, morphology, and timing of synapse activation can affect discharge properties, as must also distal spread of voltage from the spike initiator. The finite volume method has generality and can be applied to more complex neurons to explore discrete synaptic effects in four dimensions.

  11. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses–based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  12. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  13. Physiological and anatomical properties of intramedullary projection neurons in rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Corson, James A; Bradley, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNTS), the first-order relay of gustatory information, not only transmits sensory information to more rostral brain areas but also connects to various brain stem sites responsible for orofacial reflex activities. While much is known regarding ascending projections to the parabrachial nucleus, intramedullary projections to the reticular formation (which regulate oromotor reflexive behaviors) remain relatively unstudied. The present study examined the intrinsic firing properties of these neurons as well as their morphological properties and synaptic connectivity with primary sensory afferents. Using in vitro whole cell patch-clamp recording, we found that intramedullary projection neurons respond to depolarizing current injection with either tonic or bursting action potential trains and subsets of these groups of neurons express A-type potassium, H-like, and postinhibitory rebound currents. Approximately half of the intramedullary projection neurons tested received monosynaptic innervation from primary afferents, while the rest received polysynaptic innervation, indicating that at least a subpopulation of these neurons can be directly activated by incoming sensory information. Neuron morphological reconstructions revealed that many of these neurons possessed numerous dendritic spines and that neurons receiving monosynaptic primary afferent input have a greater spine density than those receiving polysynaptic primary afferent input. These results reveal that intramedullary projection neurons represent a heterogeneous class of rNTS neurons and, through both intrinsic voltage-gated ion channels and local circuit interactions, transform incoming gustatory information into signals governing oromotor reflexive behaviors. PMID:23741045

  14. Different tonotopic regions of the lateral superior olive receive a similar combination of afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Álvarez, Marcelo; Saldaña, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian lateral superior olive (LSO) codes disparities in the intensity of the sound that reaches the two ears by integrating ipsilateral excitation and contralateral inhibition, but it remains unclear what particular neuron types convey acoustic information to the nucleus. It is also uncertain whether the known conspicuous morphofunctional differences and gradients along the tonotopic axis of the LSO relate to qualitative and/or quantitative regional differences in its afferents. To clarify these issues, we made small, single injections of the neuroanatomical tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into different tonotopic regions of the LSO of albino rats and analyzed the neurons labeled retrogradely in brainstem auditory nuclei. We demonstrate that the LSO is innervated tonotopically by four brainstem neuron types: spherical bushy cells and planar multipolar neurons of the ipsilateral ventral cochlear nucleus, principal neurons of the ipsilateral medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, and small multipolar neurons of the contralateral ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body. Unexpectedly, the proportion of labeled neurons of each type was virtually identical in all cases, thus indicating that all tonotopic regions of the LSO receive a similar combination of inputs. Even more surprisingly, our data also suggest that the representation of frequencies in the LSO differs from that of the nuclei that innervate it: compared to the latter nuclei, the LSO seems to possess a relatively larger portion of its volume devoted to processing frequencies in the lower-middle part of the spectrum, and a relative smaller portion devoted to higher frequencies. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2230-2250, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659473

  15. A role for extraocular afferents in post-critical period reversal of monocular deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Crewther, D P; Crewther, S G; Pettigrew, J D

    1978-01-01

    1. In order to investigate the phenomenon of acute reversibility of cortical ocular dominance, pressure block of the retinal ganglion cells and local anaesthetic block of the extraocular afferents were applied to the normal eye of six monocularly deprived cats. 2. Neither pressure blinding nor retrobulbar anaesthesia alone produced a significant increase in the proportion of single neurones recorded from area 17 which could be driven by the deprived eye. 3. Following combined pressure blinding and retrobulbar blockade, sixty-four cells (54% of all encountered) could be stimulated through the deprived eye. 4. Of the sixty-four cells driven by the deprived eye following both treatments a number showed direction (thirty) and orientation (thirteen) selectivity, but the majority showed non-specific receptive field properties. 5. In four separate cases, out of the nine where the experiment could be carried out, it was possible to observe an individual neurone shift its ocular dominance. In the presence of a retrobulbar block, the four neurones could be driven first by the experienced eye alone, then by the deprived eye alone, and finally by the experienced eye again, all within a few minutes of the introduction and removal of pressure blinding. 6. These findings support previous studies which have revealed the presence of significant numbers of potentially functional cortical inputs from the deprived eye. Our new finding is that removal of tonic activity from the experienced eye, while it seems to be necessary to reveal these inputs, is not sufficient. An additional role in this phenomenon is played by extraocular afferents, possibly those involved in proprioception from the eye muscles. PMID:722518

  16. Afferent connections of the parabrachial nucleus in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokita, Kenichi; Inoue, Tomio; Boughter, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Although the mouse is an experimental model with an increasing importance in various fields of Neuroscience, the characteristics of its central gustatory pathways have not yet been well documented. Recent electrophysiological studies using the rat and hamster have revealed that taste processing in the brainstem gustatory relays is under the strong influence of inputs from forebrain gustatory structures. In the present study, we investigated the organization of afferent projections to the mouse parabrachial nucleus (PbN), which is located at a key site between the brainstem and gustatory, viscerosensory and autonomic centers in the forebrain. We made injections of the retrograde tracer Fluorogold centered around the “waist” area of the PbN, whose neurons are known to be highly responsive to taste stimuli. Retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the infralimbic, dysgranular and agranular insular cortex as well as the claustrum; the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the substantia innominata; the central nucleus of the amygdala; the lateral and medial preoptic areas, the paraventricular, the dorsomedial, the ventromedial, the arcuate, and the lateral hypothalamic areas; the periaqueductal gray, the substantia nigra pars compacta, and the ventral tegmental area; the supratrigeminal nucleus, rostral and caudal nucleus of the solitary tract; the parvicellular intermediate and gigantocellular reticular nucleus; the caudal and interpolar divisions of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, dorsomedial spinal trigeminal nucleus, and the area postrema. Numbers of labeled neurons in the main components of the gustatory system including the insular cortex, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central nucleus of the amygdala, lateral hypothalamus, and rostral nucleus of the solitary tract were quantified. These results are basically consistent with those of the previous rat and hamster studies, but some species differences were found. Functional implications of these

  17. Nociception and escape behavior in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoetz Collins, Eva-Maria

    2015-03-01

    Planarians are famous and widely studied for their regenerative capabilities. When a moving planarian is cut through the middle, the resulting head and tail pieces instantaneously retract and exhibit a characteristic escape response that differs from normal locomotion. In asexual animals, a similar reaction is observed when the planarian undergoes fission, suggesting that reproduction through self-tearing is a rather traumatic event for the animal. Using a multiscale approach, we unravel the dynamics, mechanics, and functional aspects of the planarian escape response. This musculature-driven gait was found to be a dominating response that supersedes the urge to feed or reproduce and quantitatively differs from other modes of planarian locomotion (gliding, peristalsis). We show that this escape gait constitutes the animal's pain response mediated by TRP like receptors and the neurotransmitter histamine, and that it can be induced through adverse thermal, mechanical, electrical or chemical stimuli. Ultimately, we will examine the neuronal subpopulations involved in mediating escape reflexes in planarians and how they are functionally restored during regeneration, thereby gaining mechanistic insight into the neuronal circuits required for specific behaviors. Supported by BWF CASI and Sloan Foundation.

  18. Brain potentials evoked by intraepidermal electrical stimuli reflect the central sensitization of nociceptive pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. C.; O'Neill, J.; Dickenson, A. H.; Iannetti, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitization (CS), the increased sensitivity of the central nervous system to somatosensory inputs, accounts for secondary hyperalgesia, a typical sign of several painful clinical conditions. Brain potentials elicited by mechanical punctate stimulation using flat-tip probes can provide neural correlates of CS, but their signal-to-noise ratio is limited by poor synchronization of the afferent nociceptive input. Additionally, mechanical punctate stimulation does not activate nociceptors exclusively. In contrast, low-intensity intraepidermal electrical stimulation (IES) allows selective activation of type II Aδ-mechano-heat nociceptors (II-AMHs) and elicits reproducible brain potentials. However, it is unclear whether hyperalgesia from IES occurs and coexists with secondary mechanical punctate hyperalgesia, and whether the magnitude of the electroencephalographic (EEG) responses evoked by IES within the hyperalgesic area is increased. To address these questions, we explored the modulation of the psychophysical and EEG responses to IES by intraepidermal injection of capsaicin in healthy human subjects. We obtained three main results. First, the intensity of the sensation elicited by IES was significantly increased in participants who developed robust mechanical punctate hyperalgesia after capsaicin injection (i.e., responders), indicating that hyperalgesia from IES coexists with punctate mechanical hyperalgesia. Second, the N2 peak magnitude of the EEG responses elicited by IES was significantly increased after the intraepidermal injection of capsaicin in responders only. Third, a receiver-operator characteristics analysis showed that the N2 peak amplitude is clearly predictive of the presence of CS. These findings suggest that the EEG responses elicited by IES reflect secondary hyperalgesia and therefore represent an objective correlate of CS. PMID:27098022

  19. The ultrastructure of prosternal sensory hair afferents within the locust central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Watson, A H; Pflüger, H J

    1984-01-01

    The sensory neurones innervating long prosternal hairs of Locusta migratorioides were backfilled with horseradish peroxidase through their dendrites. The neurones' central projections in and around the medial ventral tract were examined with electron microscopy. Most synapses occur on axon collaterals which ramify through the neuropile around the tract where both input and output synapses were observed. Serial sectioning methods were used to determine the relative distribution of inputs and outputs which often lie in close proximity to one another on the axon terminals. The prosternal hair terminals contain agranular synaptic vesicles approximately 37 nm in diameter. Surrounding unidentified neuropilar profiles contain vesicles which are either statistically indistinguishable in size, or are larger, 45 nm diameter agranular vesicles. Neurones which are pre- or postsynaptic to labelled terminals generally contain vesicles of the second type. Input synapses onto the central terminals of primary afferent neurones can be recognised as a widespread phenomenon in the nervous systems