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Sample records for afferent sensory neurons

  1. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception. PMID:25591866

  2. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE2 induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE2 effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE2 itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE2-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type 4 (EP4) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE2 effects. PGE2 induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE2 potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors by selectively targeting EP4 receptor/PKA pathway without interrupt prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:25446121

  3. Cholinergic neurons in the mouse rostral ventrolateral medulla target sensory afferent areas

    PubMed Central

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Macon, Conrad J.; Nguyen, Thanh M.; Coates, Melissa B.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2012-01-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) primarily regulates respiration and the autonomic nervous system. Its medial portion (mRVLM) contains many choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons of unknown function. We sought to clarify the role of these cholinergic cells by tracing their axonal projections. We first established that these neurons are neither parasympathetic preganglionic neurons nor motor neurons because they did not accumulate intraperitoneally administered Fluorogold. We traced their axonal projections by injecting a Cre-dependent vector (floxed-AAV2) expressing either GFP or mCherrry into the mRVLM of ChAT-Cre mice. Transduced neurons expressing GFP or mCherry were confined to the injection site and were exclusively ChAT-ir. Their axonal projections included the dorsal column nuclei, medullary trigeminal complex, cochlear nuclei, superior olivary complex and spinal cord lamina III. For control experiments, the floxed-AAV2 (mCherry) was injected into the RVLM of dopamine beta-hydroxylase-Cre mice. In these mice mCherry was exclusively expressed by RVLM catecholaminergic neurons. Consistent with data from rats, these catecholaminergic neurons targeted brain regions involved in autonomic and endocrine regulation. These regions were almost totally different from those innervated by the intermingled mRVLM-ChAT neurons. This study emphasizes the advantages of using Cre-driver mouse strains in combination with floxed-AAV2 to trace the axonal projections of chemically defined neuronal groups. Using this technique, we revealed previously unknown projections of mRVLM-ChAT neurons and showed that despite their close proximity to the cardiorespiratory region of the RVLM, these cholinergic neurons regulate sensory afferent information selectively and presumably have little to do with respiration or circulatory control. PMID:22460939

  4. Cholinergic neurons in the mouse rostral ventrolateral medulla target sensory afferent areas.

    PubMed

    Stornetta, Ruth L; Macon, Conrad J; Nguyen, Thanh M; Coates, Melissa B; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2013-03-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) primarily regulates respiration and the autonomic nervous system. Its medial portion (mRVLM) contains many choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons of unknown function. We sought to clarify the role of these cholinergic cells by tracing their axonal projections. We first established that these neurons are neither parasympathetic preganglionic neurons nor motor neurons because they did not accumulate intraperitoneally administered Fluorogold. We traced their axonal projections by injecting a Cre-dependent vector (floxed-AAV2) expressing either GFP or mCherrry into the mRVLM of ChAT-Cre mice. Transduced neurons expressing GFP or mCherry were confined to the injection site and were exclusively ChAT-ir. Their axonal projections included the dorsal column nuclei, medullary trigeminal complex, cochlear nuclei, superior olivary complex and spinal cord lamina III. For control experiments, the floxed-AAV2 (mCherry) was injected into the RVLM of dopamine beta-hydroxylase-Cre mice. In these mice, mCherry was exclusively expressed by RVLM catecholaminergic neurons. Consistent with data from rats, these catecholaminergic neurons targeted brain regions involved in autonomic and endocrine regulation. These regions were almost totally different from those innervated by the intermingled mRVLM-ChAT neurons. This study emphasizes the advantages of using Cre-driver mouse strains in combination with floxed-AAV2 to trace the axonal projections of chemically defined neuronal groups. Using this technique, we revealed previously unknown projections of mRVLM-ChAT neurons and showed that despite their close proximity to the cardiorespiratory region of the RVLM, these cholinergic neurons regulate sensory afferent information selectively and presumably have little to do with respiration or circulatory control. PMID:22460939

  5. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  6. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Li, Xingde; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE. PMID:25591867

  7. Divergence in Endothelin-1- and Bradykinin-Activated Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Afferent Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szteyn, Kalina; Gomez, Ruben; Berg, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and bradykinin (BK) are endogenous peptides that signal through Gαq/11-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to produce nociceptor sensitization and pain. Both peptides activate phospholipase C to stimulate Ca2+ accumulation, diacylglycerol production, and protein kinase C activation and are rapidly desensitized via a G-protein receptor kinase 2-dependent mechanism. However, ET-1 produces a greater response and longer lasting nocifensive behavior than BK in multiple models, indicating a potentially divergent signaling mechanism in primary afferent sensory neurons. Using cultured sensory neurons, we demonstrate significant differences in both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores following ET-1 and BK treatments. As intracellular store depletion may contribute to the regulation of other signaling cascades downstream of GPCRs, we concentrated our investigation on store-operated Ca2+ channels. Using pharmacological approaches, we identified transient receptor potential canonical channel 3 (TRPC3) as a dominant contributor to Ca2+ influx subsequent to ET-1 treatment. On the other hand, BK treatment stimulated Orai1 activation, with only minor input from TRPC3. Taken together, data presented here suggest that ET-1 signaling targets TRPC3, generating a prolonged Ca2+ signal that perpetuates nocifensive responses. In contrast, Orai1 dominates as the downstream target of BK receptor activation and results in transient intracellular Ca2+ increases and abridged nocifensive responses. PMID:25873305

  8. Development of inner ear afferent connections: forming primary neurons and connecting them to the developing sensory epithelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    The molecular and cellular origin of the primary neurons of the inner ear, the vestibular and spiral neurons, is reviewed including how they connect to the specific sensory epithelia and what the molecular nature of their survival is. Primary neurons of the ear depend on a single basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) protein for their formation, neurogenin 1 (ngn1). An immediate downstream gene is the bHLH gene neuronal differentiation (NeuroD). Targeted null mutations of ngn1 results in absence of primary neuron formation; targeted null mutation of NeuroD results in loss of almost all spiral and many vestibular neurons. NeuroD and a later expressed gene, Brn3a, play a role in pathfinding to and within sensory epithelia. The molecular nature of this pathfinding property is unknown. Reduction of hair cells in ngn1 null mutations suggests a clonal relationship with primary neurons. This relationship may play some role in specifying the identity of hair cells and the primary neurons that connect with them. Primary neuron neurites growth to sensory epithelia is initially independent of trophic factors released from developing sensory epithelia, but becomes rapidly dependent on those factors. Null mutations of specific neurotrophic factors lose distinct primary neuron populations which undergo rapid embryonic cell death.

  9. Cranial sensory ganglia neurons require intrinsic N-cadherin function for guidance of afferent fibers to their final targets

    PubMed Central

    LaMora, Angela; Voigt, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules, such as N-cadherin (cdh2), are essential for normal neuronal development, and as such have been implicated in an array of processes including neuronal differentiation and migration, and axon growth and fasciculation. Cdh2 is expressed in neurons of the peripheral nervous system during development, but its role in these cells during this time is poorly understood. Using the transgenic zebrafish line, tg(p2xr3.2:eGFPsl1), we have examined the involvement of cdh2 in the formation of sensory circuits by the peripheral nervous system. The tg(p2xr3.2:eGFPsl1) fish allows visualization of neurons comprising gV, gVII, gIX and gX and their axons throughout development. Reduction of cdh2 in this line was achieved by either crosses to the cdh2-mutant strain, glass onion (glo) or injection of a cdh2 morpholino (MO) into single-cell embryos. Here we show that cdh2 function is required to alter the directional vectors of growing axons upon reaching intermediate targets. The central axons enter the hindbrain appropriately but fail to turn caudally towards their final targets. Similarly, the peripheral axons extend ventrally, but fail to turn and project along a rostral/caudal axis. Furthermore, by expressing dominant negative cdh2 constructs selectively within cranial sensory ganglia (CSG) neurons, we found that cdh2 function is necessary within the axons to elicit these stereotypic turns, thus demonstrating that cdh2 acts cell autonomously. Together, our in vivo data reveal a novel role for cdh2 in the establishment of circuits by peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:19356698

  10. An ionic current model for neurons in the rat medial nucleus tractus solitarii receiving sensory afferent input.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, J H; Khushalani, S; Clark, J W; Andresen, M C; Kunze, D L; Yang, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Neurons from a horizontal slice of adult rat brainstem were examined using intracellular recording techniques. Investigations were restricted to a region within the nucleus tractus solitarii, medial to the solitary tract and centred on the obex (mNTS). Previous work has shown this restricted area of the NTS to contain the greatest concentration of aortic afferent baroreceptor terminal fields. Electrical stimulation of the tract elicited short-latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials in all neurons. 2. mNTS neurons were spontaneously active with firing frequencies ranging between 1 and 10 Hz, at resting potentials of -65 to -45 mV. These neurons did not exhibit spontaneous bursting activity. 3. Depolarizing current injection immediately evoked a finite, high-frequency spike discharge which rapidly declined to a lower steady-state level (i.e. spike frequency adaptation, SFA). Increasing depolarizations produced a marked increase in the peak instantaneous frequency but a much smaller increase in the steady-state firing level. 4. Conditioning with a hyperpolarizing prepulse resulted in a prolonged delay of up to 600 ms before the first action potential (i.e. delayed excitation, DE) with an attendant decrease in peak discharge rates. DE was modulated by both the magnitude and duration of the prestimulus hyperpolarization, as well as the magnitude of the depolarizing stimulus. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) eliminated spike discharge but had little effect on the ramp-like membrane depolarization characteristic of DE. 5. We have developed a mathematical model for mNTS neurons to facilitate our understanding of the interplay between the underlying ionic currents. It consists of a comprehensive membrane model of the Hodgkin-Huxley type coupled with a fluid compartment model describing cytoplasmic [Ca2+]i homeostasis. 6. The model suggests that (a) SFA is caused by an increase in [Ca2+]i which activates the outward K+ current, IK,Ca, and (b) DE results from the competitive

  11. Disparate cholinergic currents in rat principal trigeminal sensory nucleus neurons mediated by M1 and M2 receptors: a possible mechanism for selective gating of afferent sensory neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, Kristi A; Soja, Peter J; Kristensen, Morten P

    2006-06-01

    Neurons situated in the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (PSTN) convey orofacial sensory inputs to thalamic relay regions and higher brain centres, and the excitability of these ascending tract cells is modulated across sleep/wakefulness states and during pain conditions. Moreover, acetylcholine release changes profoundly across sleep/wakefulness states and ascending sensory neurotransmission is altered by cholinergic agonists. An intriguing possibility is, therefore, that cholinergic mechanisms mediate such state-dependent modulation of PSTN tract neurons. We tested the hypotheses that cholinergic agonists can modulate PSTN cell excitability and that such effects are mediated by muscarinic receptor subtypes, using patch-clamp methods in rat and mouse. In all examined cells, carbachol elicited an electrophysiological response that was independent of action potential generation as it persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Responses were of three types: depolarization, hyperpolarization or a biphasic response consisting of hyperpolarization followed by depolarization. In voltage-clamp mode, carbachol evoked corresponding inward, outward or biphasic currents. Moreover, immunostaining for the vesicle-associated choline transporter showed cholinergic innervation of the PSTN. Using muscarinic receptor antagonists, we found that carbachol-elicited PSTN neuron hyperpolarization was mediated by M2 receptors and depolarization, in large part, by M1 receptors. These data suggest that acetylcholine acting on M1 and M2 receptors may contribute to selective excitability enhancement or depression in individual, rostrally projecting sensory neurons. Such selective gating effects via cholinergic input may play a functional role in modulation of ascending sensory transmission, including across behavioral states typified by distinct cholinergic tone, e.g. sleep/wakefulness arousal levels or neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:16820015

  12. Convergence of sensory inputs upon projection neurons of somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zarzecki, P; Wiggin, D M

    1982-01-01

    Cortico-cortical neurons and pyramidal tract neurons of the cat were tested for convergent inputs from forelimb afferents. Neurons were recorded in cortical areas 1, 2, and 3a. Consideration was given to both suprathreshold and subthreshold inputs evoked by electrical stimulation of forelimb nerves. Individual cortico-cortical neurons and also pyramidal tract neurons were characterized by convergence of multiple somatosensory inputs from different regions of skin, from several muscle groups, and between group I deep afferents and low threshold cutaneous afferents. Certain patterns of afferent input varied with cytoarchitectonic area. There was, however, no difference between area 3a and areas 1-2 in the incidence of cross-modality convergence in the form of input from cutaneous and also deep nerves. Many of the inputs were subthreshold. Arguments are presented that these inputs, though subthreshold, must be considered for a role in cortical information processing. The convergent nature of the sensory inputs is discussed in relation to the proposed specificities of cortical columns. The patterns of afferent inputs reaching cortico-cortical neurons seem to be appropriate for them to have a role in the formation of sensory fields of motor cortex neurons. PT neurons of somatosensory cortex have possible roles as modifiers of ascending sensory systems, however, the convergent input which these PT neurons receive argues against a simple relationship between the modality of peripheral stimuli influencing them and the modality of the ascending tract neurons under their descending control. PMID:7140889

  13. Breadth of tuning in taste afferent neurons varies with stimulus strength.

    PubMed

    Wu, An; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory stimuli are detected by taste buds and transmitted to the hindbrain via sensory afferent neurons. Whether each taste quality (sweet, bitter and so on) is encoded by separate neurons ('labelled lines') remains controversial. We used mice expressing GCaMP3 in geniculate ganglion sensory neurons to investigate taste-evoked activity. Using confocal calcium imaging, we recorded responses to oral stimulation with prototypic taste stimuli. Up to 69% of neurons respond to multiple tastants. Moreover, neurons tuned to a single taste quality at low concentration become more broadly tuned when stimuli are presented at higher concentration. Responses to sucrose and monosodium glutamate are most related. Although mice prefer dilute NaCl solutions and avoid concentrated NaCl, we found no evidence for two separate populations of sensory neurons that encode this distinction. Altogether, our data suggest that taste is encoded by activity in patterns of peripheral sensory neurons and challenge the notion of strict labelled line coding. PMID:26373451

  14. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at -68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at -60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  15. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses–based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  16. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  17. Morphologic diversity of cutaneous sensory afferents revealed by genetically directed sparse labeling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Williams, John; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of cutaneous sensory afferents has been studied by many investigators using behavioral, physiologic, molecular, and genetic approaches. Largely missing, thus far, is an analysis of the complete morphologies of individual afferent arbors. Here we present a survey of cutaneous sensory arbor morphologies in hairy skin of the mouse using genetically-directed sparse labeling with a sensory neuron-specific alkaline phosphatase reporter. Quantitative analyses of 719 arbors, among which 77 were fully reconstructed, reveal 10 morphologically distinct types. Among the two types with the largest arbors, one contacts ∼200 hair follicles with circumferential endings and a second is characterized by a densely ramifying arbor with one to several thousand branches and a total axon length between one-half and one meter. These observations constrain models of receptive field size and structure among cutaneous sensory neurons, and they raise intriguing questions regarding the cellular and developmental mechanisms responsible for this morphological diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00181.001 PMID:23256042

  18. Transcriptional changes in sensory ganglia associated with primary afferent axon collateral sprouting in spared dermatome model

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Benjamin J.; Venkat, Gayathri; Hutson, Thomas; Rau, Kristofer K.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Mendell, Lorne M.; Gage, Fred H.; Johnson, Richard D.; Hill, Caitlin; Rouchka, Eric C.; Moon, Lawrence; Petruska, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Primary afferent collateral sprouting is a process whereby non-injured primary afferent neurons respond to some stimulus and extend new branches from existing axons. Neurons of both the central and peripheral nervous systems undergo this process, which contributes to both adaptive and maladaptive plasticity (e.g., [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]). In the model used here (the “spared dermatome” model), the intact sensory neurons respond to the denervation of adjacent areas of skin by sprouting new axon branches into that adjacent denervated territory. Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Consequently, it can be used to develop treatments to promote functional recovery for spinal cord injury and other similar conditions. This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact (“naïve”) sensory ganglia. Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551). PMID:26697387

  19. Transcriptional changes in sensory ganglia associated with primary afferent axon collateral sprouting in spared dermatome model.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Benjamin J; Venkat, Gayathri; Hutson, Thomas; Rau, Kristofer K; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Mendell, Lorne M; Gage, Fred H; Johnson, Richard D; Hill, Caitlin; Rouchka, Eric C; Moon, Lawrence; Petruska, Jeffrey C

    2015-12-01

    Primary afferent collateral sprouting is a process whereby non-injured primary afferent neurons respond to some stimulus and extend new branches from existing axons. Neurons of both the central and peripheral nervous systems undergo this process, which contributes to both adaptive and maladaptive plasticity (e.g., [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]). In the model used here (the "spared dermatome" model), the intact sensory neurons respond to the denervation of adjacent areas of skin by sprouting new axon branches into that adjacent denervated territory. Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Consequently, it can be used to develop treatments to promote functional recovery for spinal cord injury and other similar conditions. This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact ("naïve") sensory ganglia. Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551). PMID:26697387

  20. Follistatin-like 1 suppresses sensory afferent transmission by activating Na+,K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-Cheng; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Li, Chang-Lin; Wang, Feng; Yu, Ming-Yan; Zhong, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Kai-Hua; Lu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Qiong; Ma, Xiao-Li; Yao, Jun-Ru; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Lin, Li-Bo; Han, Mei; Zhang, Yu-Qiu; Kuner, Rohini; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Bao, Lan; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Xu

    2011-03-10

    Excitatory synaptic transmission is modulated by inhibitory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. We found that the synaptic transmission of somatic sensory afferents can be rapidly regulated by a presynaptically secreted protein, follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1), which serves as a direct activator of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA). The FSTL1 protein is highly expressed in small-diameter neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). It is transported to axon terminals via small translucent vesicles and secreted in both spontaneous and depolarization-induced manners. Biochemical assays showed that FSTL1 binds to the α1 subunit of NKA and elevates NKA activity. Extracellular FSTL1 induced membrane hyperpolarization in cultured cells and inhibited afferent synaptic transmission in spinal cord slices by activating NKA. Genetic deletion of FSTL1 in small DRG neurons of mice resulted in enhanced afferent synaptic transmission and sensory hypersensitivity, which could be reduced by intrathecally applied FSTL1 protein. Thus, FSTL1-dependent activation of NKA regulates the threshold of somatic sensation. PMID:21382556

  1. The afferent signaling complex: Regulation of type I spiral ganglion neuron responses in the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Reijntjes, Daniël O J; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-06-01

    The spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the first action potential generating neurons in the auditory pathway. The type I SGNs contact the sensory inner hair cells via their peripheral dendrites and relay auditory information to the brainstem via their central axon fibers. Individual afferent fibers show differences in response properties that are essential for normal hearing. The mechanisms that give rise to the heterogeneity of afferent responses are very poorly understood but are likely already in place at the peripheral dendrites where synapses are formed and action potentials are generated. To identify these molecular mechanisms, this review synthesizes a variety of literature and comprehensively outlines the cellular and molecular components positioned to regulate SGN afferent dendrite excitability, especially following glutamate release. These components include 1) proteins of the SGN postsynapses and neighboring supporting cells that together shape glutamatergic signaling, 2) the ion channels and transporters that determine the intrinsic excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites, and 3) the neurotransmitter receptors that extrinsically modify this excitability via synaptic input from the lateral olivocochlear efferents. This cellular and molecular machinery, together with presynaptic specializations of the inner hair cells, can be collectively referred to as the type I afferent signaling complex. As this review underscores, interactions of this signaling complex determine excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites and the afferent fiber responses. Moreover, this complex establishes the environmental milieu critical for the development and maintenance of the SGN afferent dendrites and synapses. Motivated by these important functions, this review also indicates areas of future research to elucidate the contributions of the afferent signaling complex to both normal hearing and also hearing loss. PMID:27018296

  2. Afferent neurons of the hypoglossal nerve of the rat as demonstrated by horseradish peroxidase tracing.

    PubMed

    Neuhuber, W; Mysicka, A

    1980-01-01

    Cell bodies of sensory neurons of the rat's hypoglossal nerve were demonstrated by the somatopetal horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transport technique. Labelled perikarya were found within the second and third cervical spinal ganglia and in the vagal sensory ganglia. After application of HRP to the cut peripheral trunk of the hypoglossal nerve about 200 labelled cell bodies were counted in each animal. The vast majority of the axons from cervical spinal ganglion cells reach the hypoglossal nerve via the descending ramus (N. descendens hypoglossi). However, there may exist an additional pathway, probably via the cervical sympathetic trunk. Application of HPR to the medial and lateral end branches led to a labelling of much fewer spinal ganglion cells while the number of labelled vegal sensory neurons remained unchanged. Thus, it is suggested that the majority of the cervical afferents of the hypoglossal nerve originates within the extrinsic tongue musculature and the geniohyoid muscle, whereas the vagal afferents may perhaps derive exclusively from the intrinsic muslces. Histograms of the mean diameters of labelled cell bodies show a predominance of very small perikarya. This contrasts with the diameter distribution of sensory perikarya labelled after HRP application to nerves supplying other skeletal muscles. It is therefore assumed that the afferent component of the hypoglossal nerve is composed mainly of small-calibre axons. PMID:7356184

  3. Breadth of tuning in taste afferent neurons varies with stimulus strength

    PubMed Central

    Wu, An; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory stimuli are detected by taste buds and transmitted to the hindbrain via sensory afferent neurons. Whether each taste quality (sweet, bitter and so on) is encoded by separate neurons (‘labelled lines') remains controversial. We used mice expressing GCaMP3 in geniculate ganglion sensory neurons to investigate taste-evoked activity. Using confocal calcium imaging, we recorded responses to oral stimulation with prototypic taste stimuli. Up to 69% of neurons respond to multiple tastants. Moreover, neurons tuned to a single taste quality at low concentration become more broadly tuned when stimuli are presented at higher concentration. Responses to sucrose and monosodium glutamate are most related. Although mice prefer dilute NaCl solutions and avoid concentrated NaCl, we found no evidence for two separate populations of sensory neurons that encode this distinction. Altogether, our data suggest that taste is encoded by activity in patterns of peripheral sensory neurons and challenge the notion of strict labelled line coding. PMID:26373451

  4. The ultrastructure of prosternal sensory hair afferents within the locust central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Watson, A H; Pflüger, H J

    1984-01-01

    The sensory neurones innervating long prosternal hairs of Locusta migratorioides were backfilled with horseradish peroxidase through their dendrites. The neurones' central projections in and around the medial ventral tract were examined with electron microscopy. Most synapses occur on axon collaterals which ramify through the neuropile around the tract where both input and output synapses were observed. Serial sectioning methods were used to determine the relative distribution of inputs and outputs which often lie in close proximity to one another on the axon terminals. The prosternal hair terminals contain agranular synaptic vesicles approximately 37 nm in diameter. Surrounding unidentified neuropilar profiles contain vesicles which are either statistically indistinguishable in size, or are larger, 45 nm diameter agranular vesicles. Neurones which are pre- or postsynaptic to labelled terminals generally contain vesicles of the second type. Input synapses onto the central terminals of primary afferent neurones can be recognised as a widespread phenomenon in the nervous systems of both invertebrates and vertebrates which will allow a fine degree of control of sensory inflow into the central nervous system. PMID:6709188

  5. Spatiotemporal processing of linear acceleration: primary afferent and central vestibular neuron responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Spatiotemporal convergence and two-dimensional (2-D) neural tuning have been proposed as a major neural mechanism in the signal processing of linear acceleration. To examine this hypothesis, we studied the firing properties of primary otolith afferents and central otolith neurons that respond exclusively to horizontal linear accelerations of the head (0.16-10 Hz) in alert rhesus monkeys. Unlike primary afferents, the majority of central otolith neurons exhibited 2-D spatial tuning to linear acceleration. As a result, central otolith dynamics vary as a function of movement direction. During movement along the maximum sensitivity direction, the dynamics of all central otolith neurons differed significantly from those observed for the primary afferent population. Specifically at low frequencies (neurons peaked in phase with linear velocity, in contrast to primary afferents that peaked in phase with linear acceleration. At least three different groups of central response dynamics were described according to the properties observed for motion along the maximum sensitivity direction. "High-pass" neurons exhibited increasing gains and phase values as a function of frequency. "Flat" neurons were characterized by relatively flat gains and constant phase lags (approximately 20-55 degrees ). A few neurons ("low-pass") were characterized by decreasing gain and phase as a function of frequency. The response dynamics of central otolith neurons suggest that the approximately 90 degrees phase lags observed at low frequencies are not the result of a neural integration but rather the effect of nonminimum phase behavior, which could arise at least partly through spatiotemporal convergence. Neither afferent nor central otolith neurons discriminated between gravitational and inertial components of linear acceleration. Thus response sensitivity was indistinguishable during 0.5-Hz pitch oscillations and fore-aft movements

  6. Endothelin-1 induced desensitization in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terika P.; Smith, Sherika N.; Sweitzer, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a known algogen that causes acute pain and sensitization in humans and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors when injected into the periphery in rats, and is elevated during vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Previously, our lab has shown that a priming dose of ET-1 produces sensitization to capsaicin-induce secondary hyperalgesia. The goal of this study was to determine if the sensitization induced by ET-1 priming is occurring at the level of the primary afferent neuron. Calcium imaging in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was utilized to examine the effects of ET-1 on primary afferent neurons. ET-1 induces [Ca2+]i transients in unprimed cells. ET-1 induced [Ca2+]i transients are attenuated by priming with ET-1. This priming effect occurs whether the priming dose is given 0-4 days prior to the challenge dose. Similarly, ET-1 priming decreases capsaicin-induced [Ca2+]i transients. At the level of the primary afferent neuron, ET-1 priming has a desensitizing effect on challenge exposures to ET-1 and capsaicin. PMID:25220703

  7. Type II spiral ganglion afferent neurons drive medial olivocochlear reflex suppression of the cochlear amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Froud, Kristina E.; Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Cederholm, Jennie M. E.; Klugmann, Matthias; Sandow, Shaun L.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F.; Housley, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic adjustment of hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity is mediated by the medial olivocochlear efferent reflex, which suppresses the gain of the ‘cochlear amplifier' in each ear. Such efferent feedback is important for promoting discrimination of sounds in background noise, sound localization and protecting the cochleae from acoustic overstimulation. However, the sensory driver for the olivocochlear reflex is unknown. Here, we resolve this longstanding question using a mouse model null for the gene encoding the type III intermediate filament peripherin (Prph). Prph(−/−) mice lacked type II spiral ganglion neuron innervation of the outer hair cells, whereas innervation of the inner hair cells by type I spiral ganglion neurons was normal. Compared with Prph(+/+) controls, both contralateral and ipsilateral olivocochlear efferent-mediated suppression of the cochlear amplifier were absent in Prph(−/−) mice, demonstrating that outer hair cells and their type II afferents constitute the sensory drive for the olivocochlear efferent reflex. PMID:25965946

  8. Impact of the Sensory Neurons on Melanoma Growth In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Keskinov, Anton A; Tapias, Victor; Watkins, Simon C; Ma, Yang; Shurin, Michael R; Shurin, Galina V

    2016-01-01

    Nerve endings are often identified within solid tumors, but their impact on the tumor growth and progression remains poorly understood. Emerging data suggests that the central nervous system may affect cancer development and spreading via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomous nervous system. However, the role of the afferent sensory neurons in tumor growth is unclear, except some reports on perineural invasion in prostate and pancreatic cancer and cancer-related pain syndrome. Here, we provide the results of primary testing of the concept that the interaction between melanoma cells and sensory neurons may induce the formation of tumor-supporting microenvironment via attraction of immune regulatory cells by the tumor-activated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We report that despite DRG cells not directly up-regulating proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro, presence of DRG neurons allows tumors to grow significantly faster in vivo. This effect has been associated with increased production of chemokines by tumor-activated DRG neurons and attraction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells both in vitro and in vivo. These initial proof-of-concept results justify further investigations of the sensory (afferent) nervous system in the context of tumorigenesis and the local protumorigenic immunoenvironment. PMID:27227315

  9. Impact of the Sensory Neurons on Melanoma Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Victor; Watkins, Simon C.; Ma, Yang; Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.

    2016-01-01

    Nerve endings are often identified within solid tumors, but their impact on the tumor growth and progression remains poorly understood. Emerging data suggests that the central nervous system may affect cancer development and spreading via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomous nervous system. However, the role of the afferent sensory neurons in tumor growth is unclear, except some reports on perineural invasion in prostate and pancreatic cancer and cancer-related pain syndrome. Here, we provide the results of primary testing of the concept that the interaction between melanoma cells and sensory neurons may induce the formation of tumor-supporting microenvironment via attraction of immune regulatory cells by the tumor-activated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We report that despite DRG cells not directly up-regulating proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro, presence of DRG neurons allows tumors to grow significantly faster in vivo. This effect has been associated with increased production of chemokines by tumor-activated DRG neurons and attraction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells both in vitro and in vivo. These initial proof-of-concept results justify further investigations of the sensory (afferent) nervous system in the context of tumorigenesis and the local protumorigenic immunoenvironment. PMID:27227315

  10. Receptors for sensory neuropeptides in human inflammatory diseases: Implications for the effector role of sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, P.W.; Catton, M.D.; Boehmer, C.G.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Maggio, J.E.; Vigna, S.R. )

    1989-05-01

    Glutamate and several neuropeptides are synthesized and released by subpopulations of primary afferent neurons. These sensory neurons play a role in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography we have explored what changes occur in the location and concentration of receptor binding sites for sensory neurotransmitters in the colon in two human inflammatory diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The sensory neurotransmitter receptors examined included bombesin, calcitonin gene related peptide-alpha, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, neurokinin A (substance K), substance P, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Of the nine receptor binding sites examined only substance P binding sites associated with arterioles, venules and lymph nodules were dramatically up-regulated in the inflamed tissue. These data suggest that substance P is involved in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in human inflammatory diseases and indicate a specificity of efferent action for each sensory neurotransmitter in peripheral tissues.

  11. B1 bradykinin receptors and sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. L.; Naeem, S.; Phagoo, S. B.; Campbell, E. A.; Urban, L.; Burgess, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The location of the B1 bradykinin receptors involved in inflammatory hyperalgesia was investigated. 2. No specific binding of the B1 bradykinin receptor ligand [3H]-des-Arg10-kallidin was detected in primary cultures of rat dorsal root ganglion neurones, even after treatment with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1). 3. In dorsal root ganglion neurones, activation of B2 bradykinin receptors stimulated polyphosphoinositidase C. In contrast, B1 bradykinin receptor agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM) failed to activate polyphosphoinositidase C, even in neurones that had been treated with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1), prostaglandin E2 (1 microM) or prostaglandin I2 (1 microM). 4. Dorsal root ganglion neurones removed from rats (both neonatal and 14 days old) that had been pretreated with inflammatory mediators (Freund's complete adjuvant, or carrageenan) failed to respond to B1 bradykinin receptor selective agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM). 5. Bradykinin (25 nM to 300 nM) evoked ventral root responses when applied to peripheral receptive fields or central terminals of primary afferents in the neonatal rat spinal cord and tail preparation. In contrast, des-Arg9-bradykinin (50 nM to 500 nM) failed to evoke ventral root depolarizations in either control rats or in animals that developed inflammation following ultraviolet irradiation of the tail skin. 6. The results of the present study imply that the B1 bradykinin receptors that contribute to hypersensitivity in models of persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia are located on cells other than sensory neurones where they may be responsible for releasing mediators that sensitize or activate the nociceptors. PMID:8832074

  12. State-space receptive fields of semicircular canal afferent neurons in the bullfrog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulin, M. G.; Hoffman, L. F.

    2001-01-01

    Receptive fields are commonly used to describe spatial characteristics of sensory neuron responses. They can be extended to characterize temporal or dynamical aspects by mapping neural responses in dynamical state spaces. The state-space receptive field of a neuron is the probability distribution of the dynamical state of the stimulus-generating system conditioned upon the occurrence of a spike. We have computed state-space receptive fields for semicircular canal afferent neurons in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded spike times during broad-band Gaussian noise rotational velocity stimuli, computed the frequency distribution of head states at spike times, and normalized these to obtain conditional pdfs for the state. These state-space receptive fields quantify what the brain can deduce about the dynamical state of the head when a single spike arrives from the periphery. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonlinear high-order mode locking in stochastic sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Michael; Afghan, Muhammad; Neiman, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    Excitable systems demonstrate various mode locking regimes when driven by periodic external signals. With noise taken into account, such regimes represent complex nonlinear responses which depend crucially on the frequency and amplitude of the periodic drive as well as on the noise intensity. We study this using a computational model of a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron in combination with the turtle vestibular sensory system as an experimental model. A bifurcation analysis of the model is performed. Extracellular recordings from primary vestibular afferent neurons with two types of stimuli are used in the experimental study. First, mechanical stimuli applied to the labyrinth allow us to study the responses of the entire system, including transduction by the hair cells and spike generation in the primary afferents. Second, a galvanic stimuli applied directly to an afferent are used to study the responses of afferent spike generator directly. The responses to galvanic stimuli reveal multiple high-order mode locking regimes which are well reproduced in numerical simulation. Responses to mechanical stimulation are characterized by larger variability so that fewer mode-locking regimes can be observed.

  14. The Sensory Neurons of Touch

    PubMed Central

    Abraira, Victoria E.; Ginty, David D.

    2013-01-01

    The somatosensory system decodes a wide range of tactile stimuli and thus endows us with a remarkable capacity for object recognition, texture discrimination, sensory-motor feedback and social exchange. The first step leading to perception of innocuous touch is activation of cutaneous sensory neurons called low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMRs). Here, we review the properties and functions of LTMRs, emphasizing the unique tuning properties of LTMR subtypes and the organizational logic of their peripheral and central axonal projections. We discuss the spinal cord neurophysiological representation of complex mechanical forces acting upon the skin and current views of how tactile information is processed and conveyed from the spinal cord to the brain. An integrative model in which ensembles of impulses arising from physiologically distinct LTMRs are integrated and processed in somatotopically aligned mechanosensory columns of the spinal cord dorsal horn underlies the nervous system’s enormous capacity for perceiving the richness of the tactile world. PMID:23972592

  15. Corneal afferents differentially target thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Sue A.; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal horn neurons send ascending projections to both thalamic nuclei and parabrachial nuclei; these pathways are thought to be critical pathways for central processing of nociceptive information. Afferents from the corneal surface of the eye mediate nociception from this tissue which is susceptible to clinically important pain syndromes. This study examined corneal afferents to the trigeminal dorsal horn and compared inputs to thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons. We used anterograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit to identify corneal afferent projections to trigeminal dorsal horn, and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold to identify projection neurons. Studies were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our analysis was conducted at two distinct levels of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) which receive corneal afferent projections. We found that corneal afferents project more densely to the rostral pole of Vc than the caudal pole. We also quantified the number of thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in the regions of Vc that receive corneal afferents. Corneal afferent inputs to both groups of projection neurons were also more abundant in the rostral pole of Vc. Finally, by comparing the frequency of corneal afferent appositions to thalamic- versus parabrachial-projecting neurons, we found that corneal afferents preferentially target parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal dorsal horn. These results suggest that nociceptive pain from the cornea may be primarily mediated by a non-thalamic ascending pathway. PMID:23201828

  16. Outputs of radula mechanoafferent neurons in Aplysia are modulated by motor neurons, interneurons, and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rosen, S C; Miller, M W; Cropper, E C; Kupfermann, I

    2000-03-01

    The gain of sensory inputs into the nervous system can be modulated so that the nature and intensity of afferent input is variable. Sometimes the variability is a function of other sensory inputs or of the state of motor systems that generate behavior. A form of sensory modulation was investigated in the Aplysia feeding system at the level of a radula mechanoafferent neuron (B21) that provides chemical synaptic input to a group of motor neurons (B8a/b, B15) that control closure and retraction movements of the radula, a food grasping structure. B21 has been shown to receive both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs from a variety of neuron types. The current study investigated the morphological basis of these heterosynaptic inputs, whether the inputs could serve to modulate the chemical synaptic outputs of B21, and whether the neurons producing the heterosynaptic inputs were periodically active during feeding motor programs that might modulate B21 outputs in a phase-specific manner. Four cell types making monosynaptic connections to B21 were found capable of heterosynaptically modulating the chemical synaptic output of B21 to motor neurons B8a and B15. These included the following: 1) other sensory neurons, e.g. , B22; 2) interneurons, e.g., B19; 3) motor neurons, e.g., B82; and 4) multifunction neurons that have sensory, motor, and interneuronal functions, e.g., B4/5. Each cell type was phasically active in one or more feeding motor programs driven by command-like interneurons, including an egestive motor program driven by CBI-1 and an ingestive motor program driven by CBI-2. Moreover, the phase of activity differed for each of the modulator cells. During the motor programs, shifts in B21 membrane potential were related to the activity patterns of some of the modulator cells. Inhibitory chemical synapses mediated the modulation produced by B4/5, whereas excitatory and/or electrical synapses were involved in the other instances. The data indicate that

  17. Functional and topographic segregation of glomeruli revealed by local staining of antennal sensory neurons in the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Michiko; Mizunami, Makoto; Yokohari, Fumio

    2009-07-10

    In the primary olfactory center of animals, glomeruli are the relay stations where sensory neurons expressing cognate odorant receptors converge onto interneurons. In cockroaches, moths, and honeybees, sensory afferents from sensilla on the anterodorsal surface and the posteroventral surface of the flagellum form two nerves of almost equal thicknesses. In this study, double labeling of the two nerves, or proximal/distal regions of the nerves, with fluorescent dyes was used to investigate topographic organization of sensory afferents in the honeybee. The sensory neurons of ampullaceal sensilla responsive to CO2, coelocapitular sensilla responsive to hygrosensory, and thermosensory stimuli and coeloconic sensilla of unknown function were characterized with large somata and supplied thick axons exclusively to the ventral nerve. Correspondingly, all glomeruli innervated by sensory tract (T) 4 received thick axonal processes exclusively from the ventral nerve. Almost all T1-3 glomeruli received a similar number of sensory afferents from the two nerves. In the macroglomerular complexes of the drone, termination fields of afferents from the two nerves almost completely overlapped; this differs from moths and cockroaches, which show heterogeneous terminations in the glomerular complex. In T1-3 glomeruli, sensory neurons originating from more distal flagellar segments tended to terminate within the inner regions of the cortical layer. These results suggest that some degree of somatotopic organization of sensory afferents exist in T1-3 glomeruli, and part of T4 glomeruli serve for processing of hygro- and thermosensory signals. PMID:19412930

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in developing sensory relay neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, A; Kunze, D L; Katz, D M

    2000-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed by many primary sensory neurons that no longer require neurotrophins for survival, indicating that BDNF may be used as a signaling molecule by the afferents themselves. Because many primary afferents also express glutamate, we investigated the possibility that BDNF modulates glutamatergic AMPA responses of newborn second-order sensory relay neurons. Perforated-patch, voltage-clamp recordings were made from dissociated neurons of the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS), a region that receives massive primary afferent input from BDNF-containing neurons in the nodose and petrosal cranial sensory ganglia. Electrophysiological analysis was combined in some experiments with anterograde labeling of primary afferent terminals to specifically analyze responses of identified second-order neurons. Our data demonstrate that BDNF strongly inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in a large subset of nTS cells. Specifically, AMPA responses were either completely abolished or markedly inhibited by BDNF in 73% of postnatal day (P0) cells and in 82% of identified P5 second-order sensory relay neurons. This effect of BDNF is mimicked by NT-4, but not NGF, and blocked by the Trk tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a, consistent with a requirement for TrkB receptor activation. Moreover, analysis of TrkB expression in culture revealed a close correlation between the percentage of nTS neurons in which BDNF inhibits AMPA currents and the percentage of neurons that exhibit TrkB immunoreactivity. These data document a previously undefined mechanism of acute modulation of AMPA responses by BDNF and indicate that BDNF may regulate glutamatergic transmission at primary afferent synapses. PMID:10684891

  19. Functional dopamine D2 receptors on rat vagal afferent neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A J; Krstew, E; Jarrott, B

    1995-01-01

    1. In the present study in vitro electrophysiology and receptor autoradiography were used to determine whether rat vagal afferent neurones possess dopamine D2 receptors. 2. Dopamine (10-300 microM) elicited a temperature- and concentration-dependent depolarization of the rat isolated nodose ganglion preparation. When applied to the tissue 15 min prior to agonist, raclopride (10 microM), clozapine (10 microM) or a mixture of raclopride and clozapine (10 microM each) all produced a threefold parallel shift to the right of the dopamine concentration-response curve. In contrast, SCH 23390 (100 nM), phentolamine and propranolol (1 microM each) failed to antagonize the dopamine-mediated depolarization. 3. [125I]-NCQ 298 (0.5 nM), a D2 selective radioligand, bound topographically to sections of rat brainstem. Densitometric quantification of autoradiograms revealed 93.8 +/- 0.5% specific binding of this salicylamide radioligand, as determined by raclopride (10 microM, n = 10 animals). Binding was highest in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), particularly the medial and gelatinous subnuclei. In addition, specific binding was also observed in the interpolar spinal trigeminal nucleus and the inferior olive. 4. Unilateral nodose ganglionectomy caused a 36.6 +/- 3.0% reduction in specific binding in the denervated NTS compared to the contralateral NTS. Furthermore, the loss of binding was confined to the dorsal aspect of the medial subnucleus of the NTS. Sham surgery had no effect on the binding of [125I]-NCQ 298 in rat brainstem. 5. The present data provide evidence for the presence of functionally relevant dopamine D2 receptors on both the soma and central terminals of rat vagal afferent neurones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 PMID:7606337

  20. State-space decoding of primary afferent neuron firing rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. B.; Ventura, V.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Kinematic state feedback is important for neuroprostheses to generate stable and adaptive movements of an extremity. State information, represented in the firing rates of populations of primary afferent (PA) neurons, can be recorded at the level of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Previous work in cats showed the feasibility of using DRG recordings to predict the kinematic state of the hind limb using reverse regression. Although accurate decoding results were attained, reverse regression does not make efficient use of the information embedded in the firing rates of the neural population. In this paper, we present decoding results based on state-space modeling, and show that it is a more principled and more efficient method for decoding the firing rates in an ensemble of PA neurons. In particular, we show that we can extract confounded information from neurons that respond to multiple kinematic parameters, and that including velocity components in the firing rate models significantly increases the accuracy of the decoded trajectory. We show that, on average, state-space decoding is twice as efficient as reverse regression for decoding joint and endpoint kinematics.

  1. Enhanced release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation: involvement of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Liu, X J; White, T D; Sawynok, J

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of endogenous adenosine levels by inhibition of adenosine metabolism produces a peripheral antinociceptive effect in a neuropathic pain model. The present study used microdialysis to investigate the neuronal mechanisms modulating extracellular adenosine levels in the rat hind paw following tight ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves. Subcutaneous injection of 50 microl saline into the nerve-injured paw induced a rapid and short-lasting increase in extracellular adenosine levels in the subcutaneous tissues of the rat hind paw ipsilateral to the nerve injury. Saline injection did not increase adenosine levels in sham-operated rats or non-treated rats. The adenosine kinase inhibitor 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine and the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin, at doses producing a peripheral antinociceptive effect, did not further enhance subcutaneous adenosine levels in the nerve-injured paw. Systemic pretreatment with capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for small-diameter sensory afferents, markedly reduced the saline-evoked release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation. Systemic pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine, a neurotoxin selective for sympathetic afferent nerves, did not affect release. These results suggest that following nerve injury, peripheral capsaicin-sensitive primary sensory afferent nerve terminals are hypersensitive, and are able to release adenosine following a stimulus that does not normally evoke release in sham-operated or intact rats. Sympathetic postganglionic afferents do not appear to be involved in such release. The lack of effect on such release by the inhibitors of adenosine metabolism suggests an altered peripheral adenosine system following spinal nerve ligation. PMID:12204207

  2. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander; Liao, James C

    2015-01-15

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  3. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  4. Identification of Specific Sensory Neuron Populations for Study of Expressed Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie; Elmslie, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons transmit signals from various parts of the body to the central nervous system. The soma for these neurons are located in the dorsal root ganglia that line the spinal column. Understanding the receptors and channels expressed by these sensory afferent neurons could lead to novel therapies for disease. The initial step is to identify the specific subset of sensory neurons of interest. Here we describe a method to identify afferent neurons innervating the muscles by retrograde labeling using a fluorescent dye DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate). Understanding the contribution of ion channels to excitation of muscle afferents could help to better control excessive excitability induced by certain disease states such as peripheral vascular disease or heart failure. We used two approaches to identify the voltage dependent ion channels expressed by these neurons, patch clamp electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. While electrophysiology plus pharmacological blockers can identify functional ion channel types, we used immunocytochemistry to identify channels for which specific blockers were unavailable and to better understand the ion channel distribution pattern in the cell population. These techniques can be applied to other areas of the nervous system to study specific neuronal groups. PMID:24430510

  5. Genetic and pharmacological evidence for low-abundance TRPV3 expression in primary vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaw-Wen; Lindberg, Jonathan E M; Peters, James H

    2016-05-01

    Primary vagal afferent neurons express a multitude of thermosensitive ion channels. Within this family of ion channels, the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) greatly influences vagal afferent signaling by determining the threshold for action-potential initiation at the peripheral endings, while controlling temperature-sensitive forms of glutamate release at central vagal terminals. Genetic deletion of TRPV1 does not completely eliminate these temperature-dependent effects, suggesting involvement of additional thermosensitive ion channels. The warm-sensitive, calcium-permeable, ion channel TRPV3 is commonly expressed with TRPV1; however, the extent to which TRPV3 is found in vagal afferent neurons is unknown. Here, we begin to characterize the genetic and functional expression of TRPV3 in vagal afferent neurons using molecular biology (RT-PCR and RT-quantitative PCR) in whole nodose and isolated neurons and fluorescent calcium imaging on primary cultures of nodose ganglia neurons. We confirmed low-level TRPV3 expression in vagal afferent neurons and observed direct activation with putative TRPV3 agonists eugenol, ethyl vanillin (EVA), and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Agonist activation stimulated neurons also containing TRPV1 and was blocked by ruthenium red. FPP sensitivity overlapped with EVA and eugenol but represented the smallest percentage of vagal afferent neurons, and it was the only agonist that did not stimulate neurons from TRPV3(-/-1) mice, suggesting FPP has the highest selectivity. Further, FPP was predictive of enhanced responses to capsaicin, EVA, and eugenol in rats. From our results, we conclude TRPV3 is expressed in a discrete subpopulation of vagal afferent neurons and may contribute to vagal afferent signaling either directly or in combination with TRPV1. PMID:26843581

  6. Identification of different functional types of spinal afferent neurons innervating the mouse large intestine using a novel CGRPα transgenic reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Kestell, Garreth R; Kyloh, Melinda A; Brookes, Simon J H; Wattchow, David A; Spencer, Nick J

    2016-04-15

    Spinal afferent neurons detect noxious and physiological stimuli in visceral organs. Five functional classes of afferent terminals have been extensively characterized in the colorectum, primarily from axonal recordings. Little is known about the corresponding somata of these classes of afferents, including their morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology. To address this, we made intracellular recordings from somata in L6/S1 dorsal root ganglia and applied intraluminal colonic distensions. A transgenic calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα)-mCherry reporter mouse, which enabled rapid identification of soma neurochemistry and morphology following electrophysiological recordings, was developed. Three distinct classes of low-threshold distension-sensitive colorectal afferent neurons were characterized; an additional group was distension-insensitive. Two of three low-threshold classes expressed CGRPα. One class expressing CGRPα discharged phasically, with inflections on the rising phase of their action potentials, at low frequencies, to both physiological (<30 mmHg) and noxious (>30 mmHg) distensions. The second class expressed CGRPα and discharged tonically, with smooth, briefer action potentials and significantly greater distension sensitivity than phasically firing neurons. A third class that lacked CGRPα generated the highest-frequency firing to distension and had smaller somata. Thus, CGRPα expression in colorectal afferents was associated with lower distension sensitivity and firing rates and larger somata, while colorectal afferents that generated the highest firing frequencies to distension had the smallest somata and lacked CGRPα. These data fill significant gaps in our understanding of the different classes of colorectal afferent somata that give rise to distinct functional classes of colorectal afferents. In healthy mice, the majority of sensory neurons that respond to colorectal distension are low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range afferents

  7. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. Conclusion This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties

  8. Electrophysiological and neurochemical techniques to investigate sensory neurons in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Babes, Alexandru; Fischer, Michael J M; Reid, Gordon; Sauer, Susanne K; Zimmermann, Katharina; Reeh, Peter W

    2010-01-01

    The primary afferent nociceptive neuron has recently attracted major research interest because of the cloning of very selectively expressed and well-conserved ion channel genes. All parts of the neuron, sensory terminals, axon and cell body, are accessible to validated research techniques in vitro using various isolated tissues or cells taken from laboratory animals. Single-unit recording and measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release as well as patch-clamping and calcium imaging of cultured sensory neurons provide different kinds of information, and no model alone answers all questions. In combination, however, consistent results and complementary evidence form a solid basis for translational research to follow. PMID:20336427

  9. Origin of primary sensory neurons innervating the buccal stretch receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Onozuka, M; Nagasaki, S; Watanabe, K; Ozono, S

    1999-01-01

    The primary sensory neurons innervating mechanoreceptors in oro-facial regions have their cell bodies in either the trigeminal ganglion or the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve. The buccal stretch receptor (BSR), a type of mechanoreceptor in the jaw of rodents, has recently been recognized as signaling the position of the mandible. The location of the primary afferent neurons innervating this receptor is unknown. To investigate the cell bodies of the BSR afferent neurons in rats, we applied wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) to the proximal stump of the severed nerve branch of the buccal nerve that supplied the BSR. HRP-labeled cell bodies were observed in the posterolateral portion of the ipsilateral trigeminal ganglion. None was found in the contralateral trigeminal ganglion or in the brainstem. All labeled cell bodies were oval or round and closely resembled pseudo-unipolar neurons. The mean diameter of the labeled somata ranged between 25.5 and 52.5 microm, with small (< or = 30 microm), medium (from 31 to 40 microm), and large somata (> or = 41 microm) accounting for 8.8%, 54.9%, and 36.3%, respectively. Among the myelinated nerve fibers in the branch in which WGA-HRP was applied, 78.5% terminated in the BSR and had larger fiber diameters than the rest, indicating that most of the medium and large HRP-labeled cell bodies were BSR afferents. From these results and the ontogenetic origin of this receptor, it is suggested that the BSR differentiated from the mechanoreceptors in the oral mucosa or the fascia of masticatory muscles. PMID:10065945

  10. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system. PMID:24509431

  11. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  12. Neuronal soma-satellite glial cell interactions in sensory ganglia and the participation of purinergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanping; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Li, GuangWen; Wang, Cong Ying; Huang, Li-Yen Mae

    2011-01-01

    It has been known for some time that the somata of neurons in sensory ganglia respond to electrical or chemical stimulation and release transmitters in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The function of the somatic release has not been well delineated. A unique characteristic of the ganglia is that each neuronal soma is tightly enwrapped by satellite glial cells (SGCs). The somatic membrane of a sensory neuron rarely makes synaptic contact with another neuron. As a result, the influence of somatic release on the activity of adjacent neurons is likely to be indirect and/or slow. Recent studies of neuron-SGC interactions have demonstrated that ATP released from the somata of dorsal root ganglion neurons activates SGCs. They in turn exert complex excitatory and inhibitory modulation of neuronal activity. Thus, SGCs are actively involved in the processing of afferent information. In this review, we summarize our understanding of bidirectional communication between neuronal somata and SGCs in sensory ganglia and its possible role in afferent signaling under normal and injurious conditions. The participation of purinergic receptors is emphasized because of their dominant roles in the communication. PMID:20604979

  13. 5-HT1B receptors inhibit glutamate release from primary afferent terminals in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Choi, I-S; Cho, J-H; An, C-H; Jung, J-K; Hur, Y-K; Choi, J-K; Jang, I-S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although 5-HT1B receptors are expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons, it is still not known whether these receptors can modulate nociceptive transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique under a voltage-clamp condition. KEY RESULTS CP93129, a selective 5-HT1B receptor agonist, reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, CP93129 reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by GR55562, a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, but not LY310762, a 5-HT1D receptor antagonist. Sumatriptan, an anti-migraine drug, also decreased EPSC amplitude, and this effect was partially blocked by either GR55562 or LY310762. On the other hand, primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were mediated by the Ca2+ influx passing through both presynaptic N-type and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by ω-conotoxin GVIA, an N-type Ca2+ channel blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results suggest that the activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors reduces glutamate release from primary afferent terminals onto medullary dorsal horn neurons, and that 5-HT1B receptors could be, at the very least, a potential target for the treatment of pain from orofacial tissues. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Connor, pp. 353–355 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.01963.x PMID:22462474

  14. Unmyelinated type II afferent neurons report cochlear damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian cochlea, acoustic information is carried to the brain by the predominant (95%) large-diameter, myelinated type I afferents, each of which is postsynaptic to a single inner hair cell. The remaining thin, unmyelinated type II afferents extend hundreds of microns along the cochlear duct to contact many outer hair cells. Despite this extensive arbor, type II afferents are weakly activated by outer hair cell transmitter release and are insensitive to sound. Intriguingly, type II afferents remain intact in damaged regions of the cochlea. Here, we show that type II afferents are activated when outer hair cells are damaged. This response depends on both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors, binding ATP released from nearby supporting cells in response to hair cell damage. Selective activation of P2Y receptors increased type II afferent excitability by the closure of KCNQ-type potassium channels, a potential mechanism for the painful hypersensitivity (that we term “noxacusis” to distinguish from hyperacusis without pain) that can accompany hearing loss. Exposure to the KCNQ channel activator retigabine suppressed the type II fiber’s response to hair cell damage. Type II afferents may be the cochlea’s nociceptors, prompting avoidance of further damage to the irreparable inner ear. PMID:26553995

  15. Thyroid hormone is required for the pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Balasubbu, S; Mustapha, M

    2016-01-15

    Afferent connections to the sensory inner (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) in the cochlea refine and functionally mature during the thyroid hormone (TH)-critical period of inner ear development that occurs perinatally in rodents. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypothyroidism on afferent type II innervation to outer hair cells using the Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1(dw)). Using a transgenic approach to specifically label type II spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), we found that lack of TH causes persistence of excess type II SGN connections to the OHCs, as well as continued expression of the hair cell functional marker, otoferlin (OTOF), in the OHCs beyond the maturation period. We also observed a concurrent delay in efferent attachment to the OHCs. Supplementing with TH during the early postnatal period from postnatal day (P) 3 to P4 reversed the defect in type II SGN pruning but did not alter OTOF expression. Our results show that hypothyroidism causes a defect in the large-scale pruning of afferent type II SGNs in the cochlea, and a delay in efferent attachment and the maturation of OTOF expression. Our data suggest that the state of maturation of hair cells, as determined by OTOF expression, may not regulate the pruning of their afferent innervation. PMID:26592716

  16. Microstimulation of the lumbar DRG recruits primary afferent neurons in localized regions of lower limb.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Christopher A; Fisher, Lee E; Gaunt, Robert A; Weber, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Patterned microstimulation of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) has been proposed as a method for delivering tactile and proprioceptive feedback to amputees. Previous studies demonstrated that large- and medium-diameter afferent neurons could be recruited separately, even several months after implantation. However, those studies did not examine the anatomical localization of sensory fibers recruited by microstimulation in the DRG. Achieving precise recruitment with respect to both modality and receptive field locations will likely be crucial to create a viable sensory neuroprosthesis. In this study, penetrating microelectrode arrays were implanted in the L5, L6, and L7 DRG of four isoflurane-anesthetized cats instrumented with nerve cuff electrodes around the proximal and distal branches of the sciatic and femoral nerves. A binary search was used to find the recruitment threshold for evoking a response in each nerve cuff. The selectivity of DRG stimulation was characterized by the ability to recruit individual distal branches to the exclusion of all others at threshold; 84.7% (n = 201) of the stimulation electrodes recruited a single nerve branch, with 9 of the 15 instrumented nerves recruited selectively. The median stimulation threshold was 0.68 nC/phase, and the median dynamic range (increase in charge while stimulation remained selective) was 0.36 nC/phase. These results demonstrate the ability of DRG microstimulation to achieve selective recruitment of the major nerve branches of the hindlimb, suggesting that this approach could be used to drive sensory input from localized regions of the limb. This sensory input might be useful for restoring tactile and proprioceptive feedback to a lower-limb amputee. PMID:27052583

  17. Two psychophysical channels of whisker deflection in rats align with two neuronal classes of primary afferents.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, Maik C; Rüter, Johannes; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2006-07-26

    The rat whisker system has evolved into in an excellent model system for sensory processing from the periphery to cortical stages. However, to elucidate how sensory processing finally relates to percepts, methods to assess psychophysical performance pertaining to precise stimulus kinematics are needed. Here, we present a head-fixed, behaving rat preparation that allowed us to measure detectability of a single whisker deflection as a function of amplitude and peak velocity. We found that velocity thresholds for detection of small-amplitude stimuli (<3 degrees) were considerably higher than for detection of large-amplitude stimuli (>3 degrees). This finding suggests the existence of two psychophysical channels mediating detection of whisker deflection: one channel exhibiting high amplitude and low velocity thresholds (W1), and the other channel exhibiting high velocity and low amplitude thresholds (W2). The correspondence of W1 to slowly adapting (SA) and W2 to rapidly adapting (RA) neuronal classes in the trigeminal ganglion was revealed in acute neurophysiological experiments. Neurometric plots of SA and RA cells were closely aligned to psychophysical performance in the corresponding W1 and W2 parameter ranges. Interestingly, neurometric data of SA cells fit the behavior best if it was based on a short time window integrating action potentials during the initial phasic response, in contrast to integrating across the tonic portion of the response. This suggests that detection performance in both channels is based on the assessment of very few spikes in their corresponding groups of primary afferents. PMID:16870738

  18. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  19. Contribution of opioid receptors on primary afferent versus sympathetic neurons to peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Zhang, Q; Stein, C; Schäfer, M

    1998-08-01

    Opioid receptors are synthesized in dorsal root ganglia and transported into peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. Activation of such receptors results in antinociceptive effects that are most prominent in inflammation. In addition, opioid receptors located on sympathetic postganglionic neuron terminals may be involved in these effects. This study investigates the peripheral analgesic efficacy of the mu, delta and kappa receptor agonists [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin, [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin and trans-(+/-)3, 4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]-benzeneacetamid e, the effective number of peripheral mu, delta and kappa receptors in relation to the development of inflammation and the contribution of sympathetic vs. sensory neurons by use of capsaicin and 6-hydroxydopamine, respectively. In Wistar rats with Freund's adjuvant-induced hindpaw inflammation, antinociceptive effects of intraplantar [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (1.0-32 microg), [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin (10-100 microg) and trans-(+/-)3, 4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(l-pyrrolidiny)-cyclohexyl]-benzeneace tam ide (10-100 microg) were evaluated by paw pressure test. These effects increased linearly between 6 and 24 hr, but did not change between 24 and 96 hr of inflammation, whereas the doses of the irreversible antagonists beta-funaltrexamine, [D-Ala2,Leu5,Cys6]enkephalin or (+/-)-(5beta,7a,8beta)-3, 4-dichloro-N-[3-methylene-2-oxo-8-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspir[4, 5]dec-7-yl]benzeneacetamide required to abolish the respective agonist effects increased between 12 and 96 hr. Pretreatment with capsaicin (30, 50, 70 mg/kg s.c. over 3 days) but not with 6-hydroxydopamine (75 mg/kg i.p. over 3 days) reversed the hyperalgesia in inflamed paws and almost abolished antinociceptive effects of all three agonists. These results suggest that the increased opioid agonist efficacy is due to an increased number of peripheral opioid receptors at later stages of inflammation and that

  20. Extended secondhand tobacco smoke exposure induces plasticity in nucleus tractus solitarius second-order lung afferent neurons in young guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sekizawa, Shin-Ichi; Chen, Chao-Yin; Bechtold, Andrea G; Tabor, Jocelyn M; Bric, John M; Pinkerton, Kent E; Joad, Jesse P; Bonham, Ann C

    2008-08-01

    Infants and young children experiencing extended exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) have an increased occurrence of asthma, as well as increased cough, wheeze, mucus production and airway hyper-reactivity. Plasticity in lung reflex pathways has been implicated in causing these symptoms, as have changes in substance P-related mechanisms. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings and immunohistochemistry in brainstem slices containing anatomically identified second-order lung afferent nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons, we determined whether extended SHS exposure during the equivalent period of human childhood modified evoked or spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission, and whether those modifications were altered by endogenous substance P. SHS exposure enhanced evoked synaptic transmission between sensory afferents and the NTS second-order neurons by eliminating synaptic depression of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs), an effect reversed by the neurokinin-1-receptor antagonist (SR140333). The recruitment of substance P in enhancing evoked synaptic transmission was further supported by an increased number of substance P-expressing lung afferent central terminals synapsing onto the second-order lung afferent neurons. SHS exposure did not change background spontaneous EPSCs. The data suggest that substance P in the NTS augments evoked synaptic transmission of lung sensory input following extended exposure to a pollutant. The mechanism may help to explain some of the exaggerated respiratory responses of children exposed to SHS. PMID:18657181

  1. Primary sensory neurones and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Donnerer, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The C-fibre-evoked depressor reflex following i.a. injection of capsaicin and the wiping movements following chemical irritation of the cornea by capsaicin were both found to be augmented in the naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal phase. 2. The in vitro capsaicin-evoked release of substance P from central terminals of C-fibre afferents in the spinal cord was decreased in morphine-treated rats. Following naloxone, the release in the morphine-treated group was as large as in the control group. 3. The C-fibre mediated plasma extravasation in the rat paw after naloxone was found to be the same in morphine-treated and control rats. 4. It is concluded that C-fibre-evoked reflex reactions are augmented during morphine withdrawal, but that the mechanisms responsible are either located postsynaptically to the primary sensory neurone or further centrally. PMID:2472843

  2. Three-Dimensional Distribution of Sensory Stimulation-Evoked Neuronal Activity of Spinal Dorsal Horn Neurons Analyzed by In Vivo Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Wataru; Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn comprises heterogeneous populations of interneurons and projection neurons, which form neuronal circuits crucial for processing of primary sensory information. Although electrophysiological analyses have uncovered sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of various spinal dorsal horn neurons, monitoring these activities from large ensembles of neurons is needed to obtain a comprehensive view of the spinal dorsal horn circuitry. In the present study, we established in vivo calcium imaging of multiple spinal dorsal horn neurons by using a two-photon microscope and extracted three-dimensional neuronal activity maps of these neurons in response to cutaneous sensory stimulation. For calcium imaging, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based calcium indicator protein, Yellow Cameleon, which is insensitive to motion artifacts of living animals was introduced into spinal dorsal horn neurons by in utero electroporation. In vivo calcium imaging following pinch, brush, and heat stimulation suggests that laminar distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity in the spinal dorsal horn largely corresponds to that of primary afferent inputs. In addition, cutaneous pinch stimulation elicited activities of neurons in the spinal cord at least until 2 spinal segments away from the central projection field of primary sensory neurons responsible for the stimulated skin point. These results provide a clue to understand neuronal processing of sensory information in the spinal dorsal horn. PMID:25100083

  3. Increasing cutaneous afferent feedback improves proprioceptive accuracy at the knee in patients with sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Goulding, Niamh; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Fuente Mora, Cristina; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (HSAN III) features disturbed proprioception and a marked ataxic gait. We recently showed that joint angle matching error at the knee is positively correlated with the degree of ataxia. Using intraneural microelectrodes, we also documented that these patients lack functional muscle spindle afferents but have preserved large-diameter cutaneous afferents, suggesting that patients with better proprioception may be relying more on proprioceptive cues provided by tactile afferents. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing cutaneous sensory feedback by stretching the skin at the knee joint using unidirectional elasticity tape could improve proprioceptive accuracy in patients with a congenital absence of functional muscle spindles. Passive joint angle matching at the knee was used to assess proprioceptive accuracy in 25 patients with HSAN III and 9 age-matched control subjects, with and without taping. Angles of the reference and indicator knees were recorded with digital inclinometers and the absolute error, gradient, and correlation coefficient between the two sides calculated. Patients with HSAN III performed poorly on the joint angle matching test [mean matching error 8.0 ± 0.8° (±SE); controls 3.0 ± 0.3°]. Following application of tape bilaterally to the knee in an X-shaped pattern, proprioceptive performance improved significantly in the patients (mean error 5.4 ± 0.7°) but not in the controls (3.0 ± 0.2°). Across patients, but not controls, significant increases in gradient and correlation coefficient were also apparent following taping. We conclude that taping improves proprioception at the knee in HSAN III, presumably via enhanced sensory feedback from the skin. PMID:26655817

  4. Opioids inhibit visceral afferent activation of catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cui, R J; Roberts, B L; Zhao, H; Andresen, M C; Appleyard, S M

    2012-10-11

    Brainstem A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) influence many homeostatic functions, including food intake, stress, respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. They also play a role in both opioid reward and withdrawal. Injections of opioids into the NTS modulate many autonomic functions influenced by catecholamine neurons including food intake and cardiac function. We recently showed that NTS-CA neurons are directly activated by incoming visceral afferent inputs. Here we determined whether opioid agonists modulate afferent activation of NTS-CA neurons using transgenic mice with EGFP expressed under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. The opioid agonist Met-enkephalin (Met-Enk) significantly attenuated solitary tract-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs) in NTS TH-EGFP neurons by 80%, an effect reversed by wash or the mu opioid receptor-specific antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP). Met-Enk had a significantly greater effect to inhibit afferent inputs onto TH-EGFP-positive neurons than EGFP-negative neurons, which were only inhibited by 50%. The mu agonist, DAMGO, also inhibited the ST-EPSC in TH-EGFP neurons in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, neither the delta agonist DPDPE, nor the kappa agonist, U69,593, consistently inhibited the ST-EPSC amplitude. Met-Enk and DAMGO increased the paired pulse ratio, decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of mini-EPSCs and had no effect on holding current, input resistance or current-voltage relationships in TH-EGFP neurons, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action on afferent terminals. Met-Enk significantly reduced both the basal firing rate of NTS TH-EGFP neurons and the ability of afferent stimulation to evoke an action potential. These results suggest that opioids inhibit NTS-CA neurons by reducing an excitatory afferent drive onto these neurons through presynaptic inhibition of

  5. Capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons contribute to the detection of pathogenic bacterial colonization in the gut.

    PubMed

    Riley, T P; Neal-McKinney, J M; Buelow, D R; Konkel, M E; Simasko, S M

    2013-04-15

    Vagal activation can reduce inflammation and disease activity in various animal models of intestinal inflammation via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. In the current model of this pathway, activation of descending vagal efferents is dependent on a signal initiated by stimulation of vagal afferents. However, little is known about how vagal afferents are activated, especially in the context of subclinical or clinical pathogenic bacterial infection. To address this question, we first determined if selective lesions of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents altered c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) after mice were inoculated with either Campylobacter jejuni or Salmonella typhimurium. Our results demonstrate that the activation of nTS neurons by intraluminal pathogenic bacteria is dependent on intact, capsaicin sensitive vagal afferents. We next determined if inflammatory mediators could cause the observed increase in c-Fos expression in the nTS by a direct action on vagal afferents. This was tested by the use of single-cell calcium measurements in cultured vagal afferent neurons. We found that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly activate cultured vagal afferent neurons and that almost all TNFα and LPS responsive neurons were sensitive to capsaicin. We conclude that activation of the afferent arm of the parasympathetic neuroimmune reflex by pathogenic bacteria in the gut is dependent on capsaicin sensitive vagal afferent neurons and that the release of inflammatory mediators into intestinal tissue can be directly sensed by these neurons. PMID:23481698

  6. Capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons contribute to the detection of pathogenic bacterial colonization in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Riley, T.P.; Neal-McKinney, J.M.; Buelow, D.R.; Konkel, M.E.; Simasko, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Vagal activation can reduce inflammation and disease activity in various animal models of intestinal inflammation via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. In the current model of this pathway, activation of descending vagal efferents is dependent on a signal initiated by stimulation of vagal afferents. However, little is known about how vagal afferents are activated, especially in the context of subclinical or clinical pathogenic bacterial infection. To address this question, we first determined if selective lesions of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents altered c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) after mice were inoculated with either Campylobacter jejuni or Salmonella typhimurium. Our results demonstrate that the activation of nTS neurons by intraluminal pathogenic bacteria is dependent on intact, capsaicin sensitive vagal afferents. We next determined if inflammatory mediators could cause the observed increase in c-Fos expression in the nTS by a direct action on vagal afferents. This was tested by the use of single-cell calcium measurements in cultured vagal afferent neurons. We found that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly activate cultured vagal afferent neurons and that almost all TNFα and LPS responsive neurons were sensitive to capsaicin. We conclude that activation of the afferent arm of the parasympathetic neuroimmune reflex by pathogenic bacteria in the gut is dependent on capsaicin sensitive vagal afferent neurons and that the release of inflammatory mediators into intestinal tissue can be directly sensed by these neurons. PMID:23481698

  7. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording to study the acid responsiveness and action potential (AP) configuration of capsaicin-sensitive neurons innervating to gastrocnemius muscle. Here we showed that IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons are heterogeneous in terms of cell size, resting membrane potential, AP configuration, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistance, and acid-induced current (Iacid), as well as capsaicin-induced current (Icap). TRPV1-expressing neurons were all acid-sensitive and could be divided into two acid-sensitive groups depending on an acid-induced sustained current (type I) or an acid-induced biphasic ASIC3-like current (type II). Type I TRPV1-expressing neurons were distinguishable from type II TRPV1-expressing neurons in AP overshoot, after-hyperpolarization duration, and all Iacid parameters, but not in AP threshold, TTX-resistance, resting membrane potential, and Icap parameters. These differential biophysical properties of TRPV1-expressing neurons might partially annotate their different roles involved in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. PMID:27493509

  8. Differential ATF3 expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons reveals the profile of primary afferents engaged by diverse noxious chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, João M.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    Although transgenic and knockout mice have helped delineate the mechanisms of action of diverse noxious compounds, it is still difficult to determine unequivocally the subpopulations of primary afferent nociceptor that these molecules engage. As most noxious stimuli lead to tissue and/or nerve injury, here we used induction of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a reliable marker of nerve injury, to assess the populations of primary afferent fibers that are activated after peripheral administration of noxious chemical stimuli. In wild-type mice, hindpaw injections of capsaicin, formalin, mustard oil or menthol induce expression of ATF3 in distinct subpopulations of sensory neurons. Interestingly, even though these noxious chemicals are thought to act through subtypes of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, all compounds also induced ATF3 in neurons that appear not to express the expected TRP channel subtypes. On the other hand, capsaicin failed to induce ATF3 in mice lacking TRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 is required for both the direct and indirect induction of ATF3 in sensory neurons. By contrast, only low doses of formalin or mustard oil failed to induce ATF3 in TRPA1 null mice, indicating that injections of high doses (>0.5%) of formalin or mustard oil recruit both TRPA1 and non-TRPA1 expressing primary afferent fibers. Finally, peripheral injection of menthol, a TRPM8 receptor agonist, induced ATF3 in a wide variety of sensory neurons, but in a TRPM8-independent manner. We conclude that purportedly selective agonists can activate a heterogeneous population of sensory neurons, which ultimately could contribute to the behavioral responses evoked. PMID:20605331

  9. Heart failure induces changes in acid-sensing ion channels in sensory neurons innervating skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, David D; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-10-15

    Heart failure is associated with diminished exercise capacity, which is driven, in part, by alterations in exercise-induced autonomic reflexes triggered by skeletal muscle sensory neurons (afferents). These overactive reflexes may also contribute to the chronic state of sympathetic excitation, which is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are highly expressed in muscle afferents where they sense metabolic changes associated with ischaemia and exercise, and contribute to the metabolic component of these reflexes. Therefore, we tested if ASICs within muscle afferents are altered in heart failure. We used whole-cell patch clamp to study the electrophysiological properties of acid-evoked currents in isolated, labelled muscle afferent neurons from control and heart failure (induced by myocardial infarction) mice. We found that the percentage of muscle afferents that displayed ASIC-like currents, the current amplitudes, and the pH dose-response relationships were not altered in mice with heart failure. On the other hand, the biophysical properties of ASIC-like currents were significantly different in a subpopulation of cells (40%) from heart failure mice. This population displayed diminished pH sensitivity, altered desensitization kinetics, and very fast recovery from desensitization. These unique properties define these channels within this subpopulation of muscle afferents as being heteromeric channels composed of ASIC2a and -3 subunits. Heart failure induced a shift in the subunit composition of ASICs within muscle afferents, which significantly altered their pH sensing characteristics. These results might, in part, contribute to the changes in exercise-mediated reflexes that are associated with heart failure. PMID:26314284

  10. Regulation of Piezo2 Mechanotransduction by Static Plasma Membrane Tension in Primary Afferent Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanfeng; Ikeda, Ryo; Ling, Jennifer; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Gu, Jianguo G

    2016-04-22

    The Piezo2 channel is a newly identified mammalian mechanical transducer that confers rapidly adapting mechanically activated (RA-MA) currents in primary afferent neurons. The Piezo2 channels sense rapid membrane displacement, but it is not clear whether they are sensitive to osmotic swelling, which slowly increases static plasma membrane tension (SPMT). Here, we show that SPMT exerts a profound impact on the mechanical sensitivity of RA-MA channels in primary afferent neurons. RA-MA currents are greatly enhanced, and the mechanical threshold was reduced in both primary afferent neurons of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2 when these cells undergo osmotic swelling to increase SPMT. Osmotic swelling switches the kinetics of RA-MA currents to the slowly adapting type in both cultured DRG neurons and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2. The potentiation of RA-MA currents is abolished when cultured DRG neurons are treated with cytochalasin D, an actin filament disruptor that prevents SPMT of cultured DRG neurons from an increase by osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling significantly increases DRG neuron mechano-excitability such that a subthreshold mechanical stimulus can result in action potential firing. Behaviorally, the mechanical hind paw withdrawal threshold in rats is reduced following the injection of a hypotonic solution, but this osmotic effect is abolished when cytochalasin D or Gd(3+) is co-administered with the hypo-osmotic solution. Taken together, our findings suggest that Piezo2-mediated mechanotransduction is regulated by SPMT in primary afferent neurons. Because SPMT can be changed by multiple biological factors, our findings may have broad implications in mechanical sensitivity under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26929410

  11. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herrity, April N.; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Stirling, David P.; Rau, Kristofer K.

    2015-01-01

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  12. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Rau, Kristofer K; Hubscher, Charles H

    2015-06-15

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  13. Deep-tissue confocal imaging of the central projections of ovipositor sensory afferents in the Egyptian cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Seada, Mervat A; Ghaninia, Majid

    2016-03-01

    The pre-ovipositon behavior of moths is largely dependent upon the cues that a gravid female perceives while assessing potential oviposition sites. Assessment of such sites is accomplished, at least in part, by mechanosensory and gustatory sensilla located on the ovipositor whose sensory neurons project into the terminal abdominal ganglion (TAG). Using anterograde backfill staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and three dimensional reconstruction, we traced and analyzed the central projections of the sensory neurons housed in the sensilla located on the ovipositor papillae and explored the neuropilar composition of the TAG in the Egyptian cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis. The TAG consists of three fused neuromeres (6-8th Ner) associated with the 6-8th abdominal segments. Within the TAG, and specifically in the 8th neuromere, four unstructured neuropilar compartments are present; the dorso-ipsilateral motor neuropil (MN), the medio-ipsilateral mechanosensory neuropil (MchN), the medio-ipsilateral small gustatory neuropil (GN), and the medio-contralateral posterior ovipositor glomerulus (Og). The Og appears quite compact, with a hollow core free of terminal arborizations. The MchN is further subdivided into 4 unstructured glomeruli in the 8th neuromere, whose afferents are subsequently extended into 3 glomeruli in the 7th and 6th neuromeres. Few neurites of the Og are populated with large dense varicosities reminiscent of neurosecretory vesicles. Given that all ovipositor nerves converge into a common ganglionic center, the TAG, we assume that this ganglion may be a center for coordination of oviposition behaviors, including movements of the ovipositor during assessment of oviposition substrates and egg laying in S. littoralis. PMID:26774745

  14. Sensory Neurons that Detect Stretch and Nutrients in the Digestive System.

    PubMed

    Williams, Erika K; Chang, Rui B; Strochlic, David E; Umans, Benjamin D; Lowell, Bradford B; Liberles, Stephen D

    2016-06-30

    Neural inputs from internal organs are essential for normal autonomic function. The vagus nerve is a key body-brain connection that monitors the digestive, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. Within the gastrointestinal tract, vagal sensory neurons detect gut hormones and organ distension. Here, we investigate the molecular diversity of vagal sensory neurons and their roles in sensing gastrointestinal inputs. Genetic approaches allowed targeted investigation of gut-to-brain afferents involved in homeostatic responses to ingested nutrients (GPR65 neurons) and mechanical distension of the stomach and intestine (GLP1R neurons). Optogenetics, in vivo ganglion imaging, and genetically guided anatomical mapping provide direct links between neuron identity, peripheral anatomy, central anatomy, conduction velocity, response properties in vitro and in vivo, and physiological function. These studies clarify the roles of vagal afferents in mediating particular gut hormone responses. Moreover, genetic control over gut-to-brain neurons provides a molecular framework for understanding neural control of gastrointestinal physiology. PMID:27238020

  15. Phrenic nerve afferent activation of neurons in the cat SI cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Paul W; Reep, Roger L; Thompson, Floyd J

    2010-03-01

    Stimulation of respiratory afferents elicits neural activity in the somatosensory region of the cerebral cortex in humans and animals. Respiratory afferents have been stimulated with mechanical loads applied to breathing and electrical stimulation of respiratory nerves and muscles. It was hypothesized that stimulation of the phrenic nerve myelinated afferents will activate neurons in the 3a and 3b region of the somatosensory cortex. This was investigated in cats with electrical stimulation of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve and C(5) root of the phrenic nerve. The somatosensory cortical response to phrenic afferent stimulation was recorded from the cortical surface, contralateral to the phrenic nerve, ispilateral to the phrenic nerve and with microelectrodes inserted into the cortical site of the surface dipole. Short-latency, primary cortical evoked potentials (1 degrees CEP) were recorded with stimulation of myelinated afferents of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve in the contralateral post-cruciate gyrus of all animals (n = 42). The mean onset and peak latencies were 8.5 +/- 5.7 ms and 21.8 +/- 9.8 ms, respectively. The rostro-caudal surface location of the 1 degrees CEP was found between the rostral edge of the post-cruciate dimple (PCD) and the rostral edge of the ansate sulcus, medio-lateral location was between 2 mm lateral to the sagittal sulcus and the lateral end of the cruciate sulcus. Histological examination revealed that the 1 degrees CEP sites were recorded over areas 3a and 3b of the SI somatosensory cortex. Intracortical activation of 16 neurons with two patterns of neural activity was recorded: (1) short-latency, short-duration activation of neurons and (2) long-latency, long-duration activation of neurons. Short-latency neurons had a mean onset latency of 10.4 +/- 3.1 ms and mean burst duration of 10.1 +/- 3.2 ms. The short-latency units were recorded at an average depth of 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm below the cortical surface. The long-latency neurons had a

  16. Some Rat Sensory Neurons in Culture Express Characteristics of Differentiated Pain Sensory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Hogan, Patrick G.

    1983-01-01

    Sensory neurons were dissociated from trigeminal ganglia or from dorsal root ganglia of rats, grown in culture, and examined for expression of properties of pain sensory cells. Many sensory neurons in culture are excited by low concentrations of capsaicin, reportedly a selective stimulus for pain sensory neurons. Many are excited by bradykinin, sensitized by prostaglandin E2, or specifically stained by an antiserum against substance P. These experiments provide a basis for the study of pain mechanisms in cell culture.

  17. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  18. Botulinum Toxin B in the Sensory Afferent: Transmitter release, Spinal activation and Pain Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Marc J.; Terashima, Tetsuji; Steinauer, Joanne J.; Eddinger, Kelly A.; Yaksh, Tony L.; Xu, Qinghao

    2014-01-01

    We addressed the hypothesis that intraplantar Botulinum toxin B (rimabotulinumtoxin B: BoNT-B) has an early local effect upon peripheral afferent terminal releasing function and over time will be transported to the central terminals of the primary afferent. Once in the terminals it will cleave synaptic protein, block spinal afferent transmitter release and thereby prevent spinal nociceptive excitation and behavior. In mice, C57Bl/6 males, intraplantar BoNT-B (1U), given unilaterally into the hind paw had no effect upon survival or motor function but ipsilaterally decreased: i) intraplantar formalin evoked flinching; ii) intraplantar capsaicin evoked plasma extravasation in the hindpaw measured by Evans blue in the paw; iii) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn SP release (NK1 receptor internalization); iv) intraplantar formalin evoked dorsal horn neuronal activation (cFos); v) ipsilateral DRG VAMP; vi) ipsilateral SP release otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal capsaicin; vii) ipsilateral activation of cFos otherwise evoked bilaterally by intrathecal substance P. These results indicate that BoNT-B after unilateral intraplantar delivery is taken up by the peripheral terminal, is locally active (blocking plasma extravasation), is transported to the ipsilateral DRG to cleave VAMP and is acting presynaptically to block release from the spinal peptidergic terminal. The observations following intrathecal SP offer evidence for a possible transsynaptic effect of intraplantar BoNT. These results provide robust evidence that peripheral BoNT-B can alter peripheral and central terminal release from a nociceptor and attenuate downstream nociceptive processing via a presynaptic effect, with further evidence suggesting a possible postsynaptic effect. PMID:24333775

  19. Competition with Primary Sensory Afferents Drives Remodeling of Corticospinal Axons in Mature Spinal Motor Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Zaaimi, Boubker

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the mature motor system drives significant spontaneous axonal sprouting instead of axon regeneration. Knowing the circuit-level determinants of axonal sprouting is important for repairing motor circuits after injury to achieve functional rehabilitation. Competitive interactions are known to shape corticospinal tract axon outgrowth and withdrawal during development. Whether and how competition contributes to reorganization of mature spinal motor circuits is unclear. To study this question, we examined plastic changes in corticospinal axons in response to two complementary proprioceptive afferent manipulations: (1) enhancing proprioceptive afferents activity by electrical stimulation; or (2) diminishing their input by dorsal rootlet rhizotomy. Experiments were conducted in adult rats. Electrical stimulation produced proprioceptive afferent sprouting that was accompanied by significant corticospinal axon withdrawal and a decrease in corticospinal connections on cholinergic interneurons in the medial intermediate zone and C boutons on motoneurons. In contrast, dorsal rootlet rhizotomy led to a significant increase in corticospinal connections, including those on cholinergic interneurons; C bouton density increased correspondingly. Motor cortex-evoked muscle potentials showed parallel changes to those of corticospinal axons, suggesting that reciprocal corticospinal axon changes are functional. Using the two complementary models, we showed that competitive interactions between proprioceptive and corticospinal axons are an important determinant in the organization of mature corticospinal axons and spinal motor circuits. The activity- and synaptic space-dependent properties of the competition enables prediction of the remodeling of spared corticospinal connection and spinal motor circuits after injury and informs the target-specific control of corticospinal connections to promote functional recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroplasticity is limited in maturity

  20. A Method to Target and Isolate Airway-innervating Sensory Neurons in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kaelberer, Melanie Maya; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory nerves transduce thermal, mechanical, chemical, and noxious stimuli caused by both endogenous and environmental agents. The cell bodies of these afferent neurons are located within the sensory ganglia. Sensory ganglia innervate a specific organ or portion of the body. For instance, the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are located in the vertebral column and extend processes throughout the body and limbs. The trigeminal ganglia are located in the skull and innervate the face, and upper airways. Vagal afferents of the nodose ganglia extend throughout the gut, heart, and lungs. The nodose neurons control a diverse array of functions such as: respiratory rate, airway irritation, and cough reflexes. Thus, to understand and manipulate their function, it is critical to identify and isolate airway specific neuronal sub-populations. In the mouse, the airways are exposed to a fluorescent tracer dye, Fast Blue, for retrograde tracing of airway-specific nodose neurons. The nodose ganglia are dissociated and fluorescence activated cell (FAC) sorting is used to collect dye positive cells. Next, high quality ribonucleic acid (RNA) is extracted from dye positive cells for next generation sequencing. Using this method airway specific neuronal gene expression is determined. PMID:27168016

  1. Cortical and subcortical plasticity in the brains of humans, primates, and rats after damage to sensory afferents in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaas, Jon H.; Qi, Hui-Xin; Burish, Mark; Gharbawie, Omar; Onifer, Stephen M.; Massey, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The failure of injured axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury deprives brain neurons of their normal sources of activation. These injuries also result in the reorganization of affected areas of the central nervous system that is thought to drive both the ensuing recovery of function and the formation of maladaptive neuronal circuitry. Better understanding of the physiological consequences of novel synaptic connections produced by injury and the mechanisms that control their formation are important to the development of new successful strategies for the treatment of patients with spinal cord injuries. Here we discuss the anatomical, physiological and behavioral changes that take place in response to injury-induced plasticity after damage to the dorsal column pathway in rats and monkeys. Complete section of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord at a high cervical level in monkeys and rats interrupts the ascending axon branches of low threshold mechanoreceptor afferents subserving the forelimb and the rest of the lower body. Such lesions render the corresponding part of the somatotopic representation of primary somatosensory cortex totally unresponsive to tactile stimuli. There are also behavioral consequences of the sensory loss, including an impaired use of the hand/forelimb in manipulating small objects. In monkeys, if some of the afferents from the hand remain intact after dorsal column lesions, these remaining afferents extensively reactivate portions of somatosensory cortex formerly representing the hand. This functional reorganization develops over a postoperative period of one month, during which hand use rapidly improves. These recoveries appear to be mediated, at least in part, by the sprouting of preserved afferents within the cuneate nucleus of the dorsal column-trigeminal complex. In rats, such functional collateral sprouting has been promoted by the post-lesion digestion of the perineuronal net in the cuneate nucleus. Thus, this and other

  2. Activity-dependent silencing reveals functionally distinct itch-generating sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, David P.; Gudes, Sagi; Sprague, Jared M.; Patoski, Haley A. W.; Robson, Victoria K.; Blasl, Felix; Duan, Bo; Oh, Seog Bae; Bean, Bruce P.; Ma, Qiufu

    2013-01-01

    The peripheral terminals of primary sensory neurons detect histamine and non-histamine itch-provoking ligands through molecularly distinct transduction mechanisms. It remains unclear, however, whether these distinct pruritogens activate the same or different afferent fibers. We utilized a strategy of reversibly silencing specific subsets of murine pruritogen-sensitive sensory axons by targeted delivery of a charged sodium-channel blocker and found that functional blockade of histamine itch did not affect the itch evoked by chloroquine or SLIGRL-NH2, and vice versa. Notably, blocking itch-generating fibers did not reduce pain-associated behavior. However, silencing TRPV1+ or TRPA1+ neurons allowed AITC or capsaicin respectively to evoke itch, implying that certain peripheral afferents may normally indirectly inhibit algogens from eliciting itch. These findings support the presence of functionally distinct sets of itch-generating neurons and suggest that targeted silencing of activated sensory fibers may represent a clinically useful anti-pruritic therapeutic approach for histaminergic and non-histaminergic pruritus. PMID:23685721

  3. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Deletion in Efferent Olivocochlear Neurons Perturbs Afferent Synaptic Maturation and Reduces the Dynamic Range of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Tyler T.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Normal hearing requires proper differentiation of afferent ribbon synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) that carry acoustic information to the brain. Within individual IHCs, presynaptic ribbons show a size gradient with larger ribbons on the modiolar face and smaller ribbons on the pillar face. This structural gradient is associated with a gradient of spontaneous rates and threshold sensitivity, which is essential for a wide dynamic range of hearing. Despite their importance for hearing, mechanisms that direct ribbon differentiation are poorly defined. We recently identified adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) as a key regulator of interneuronal synapse maturation. Here, we show that APC is required for ribbon size heterogeneity and normal cochlear function. Compared with wild-type littermates, APC conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit decreased auditory brainstem responses. The IHC ribbon size gradient is also perturbed. Whereas the normal-developing IHCs display ribbon size gradients before hearing onset, ribbon sizes are aberrant in APC cKOs from neonatal ages on. Reporter expression studies show that the CaMKII-Cre used to delete the floxed APC gene is present in efferent olivocochlear (OC) neurons, not IHCs or SGNs. APC loss led to increased volumes and numbers of OC inhibitory dopaminergic boutons on neonatal SGN fibers. Our findings identify APC in efferent OC neurons as essential for regulating ribbon heterogeneity, dopaminergic terminal differentiation, and cochlear sensitivity. This APC effect on auditory epithelial cell synapses resembles interneuronal and nerve–muscle synapses, thereby defining a global role for APC in synaptic maturation in diverse cell types. Significance Statement This study identifies novel molecules and cellular interactions that are essential for the proper maturation of afferent ribbon synapses in sensory cells of the inner ear, and for normal hearing. PMID:26085645

  4. Dynamic synchronization of ongoing neuronal activity across spinal segments regulates sensory information flow

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, E; Chávez, D; Rudomin, P

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the correlation between spontaneous cord dorsum potentials recorded in the lumbar spinal segments of anaesthetized cats suggested the operation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that modulates, in a differential manner, transmission along pathways mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition and pathways mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. In order to gain further insight into the possible neuronal mechanisms that underlie this process, we have measured changes in the correlation between the spontaneous activity of individual dorsal horn neurones and the cord dorsum potentials associated with intermittent activation of these inhibitory pathways. We found that high levels of neuronal synchronization within the dorsal horn are associated with states of incremented activity along the pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition relative to pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that ongoing changes in the patterns of functional connectivity within a distributed ensemble of dorsal horn neurones play a relevant role in the state-dependent modulation of impulse transmission along inhibitory pathways, among them those involved in the central control of sensory information. This feature would allow the same neuronal network to be involved in different functional tasks. Key points We have examined, in the spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat, the relationship between ongoing correlated fluctuations of dorsal horn neuronal activity and state-dependent activation of inhibitory reflex pathways. We found that high levels of synchronization between the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones occur in association with the preferential activation of spinal pathways leading to primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition relative to activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that changes in synchronization of ongoing activity within a

  5. Sensori-sensory afferent conditioning with leg movement: gain control in spinal reflex and ascending paths.

    PubMed

    Brooke, J D; Cheng, J; Collins, D F; McIlroy, W E; Misiaszek, J E; Staines, W R

    1997-03-01

    synaptic input onto target neurons from these kinesthetic receptors, which are powerfully activated by the movement, perhaps to retain the opportunity for target neuron modulation from other control sources. PMID:9106899

  6. Turn Down That Noise: Synaptic Encoding of Afferent SNR in a Single Spiking Neuron.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Saeed; George, Libin; Thakur, Chetan Singh; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André; de Chazal, Philip; Hamilton, Tara Julia

    2015-04-01

    We have added a simplified neuromorphic model of Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) to the previously described Synapto-dendritic Kernel Adapting Neuron (SKAN), a hardware efficient neuron model capable of learning spatio-temporal spike patterns. The resulting neuron model is the first to perform synaptic encoding of afferent signal-to-noise ratio in addition to the unsupervised learning of spatio-temporal spike patterns. The neuron model is particularly suitable for implementation in digital neuromorphic hardware as it does not use any complex mathematical operations and uses a novel shift-based normalization approach to achieve synaptic homeostasis. The neuron's noise compensation properties are characterized and tested on random spatio-temporal spike patterns as well as a noise corrupted subset of the zero images of the MNIST handwritten digit dataset. Results show the simultaneously learning common patterns in its input data while dynamically weighing individual afferents based on their signal to noise ratio. Despite its simplicity the interesting behaviors of the neuron model and the resulting computational power may also offer insights into biological systems. PMID:25910252

  7. How can single sensory neurons predict behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Pitkow, Xaq; Liu, Sheng; Angelaki, Dora E.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.; Pouget, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Summary Single sensory neurons can be surprisingly predictive of behavior in discrimination tasks. We propose this is possible because sensory information extracted from neural populations is severely restricted, either by near-optimal decoding of a population with information-limiting correlations or suboptimal decoding that is blind to correlations. These have different consequences for choice correlations, the correlations between neural responses and behavioral choices. In the vestibular and cerebellar nuclei and the dorsal medial superior temporal area, we found that choice correlations during heading discrimination are consistent with near-optimal decoding of neuronal responses corrupted by information-limiting correlations. In the ventral intraparietal area, the choice correlations are also consistent with the presence of information-limiting correlations, but this area does not appear to influence behavior although the choice correlations are particularly large. These findings demonstrate how choice correlations can be used to assess the efficiency of the downstream read-out and detect the presence of information-limiting correlations. PMID:26182422

  8. The TTX-Resistant Sodium Channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3): Expression and Correlation with Membrane Properties in Rat Nociceptive Primary Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Djouhri, Laiche; Fang, Xin; Okuse, Kenji; Wood, John N; Berry, Carol M; Lawson, Sally N

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the sensory neuron-specific Na+ channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) in nociceptive and non-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and whether its distribution is related to neuronal membrane properties. Nav1.8-like immunoreactivity (Nav1.8-LI) was examined with an affinity purified polyclonal antiserum (SNS11) in rat DRG neurons that were classified according to sensory receptive properties and by conduction velocity (CV) as C-, Aδ- or Aα/β. A significantly higher proportion of nociceptive than low threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) neurons showed Nav1.8-LI, and nociceptive neurons had significantly more intense immunoreactivity in their somata than LTM neurons. Results showed that 89, 93 and 60 % of C-, Aδ- and Aα/β-fibre nociceptive units respectively and 88 % of C-unresponsive units were positive. C-unresponsive units had electrical membrane properties similar to C-nociceptors and were considered to be nociceptive-type neurons. Weak positive Nav1.8-LI was also present in some LTM units including a C LTM, all Aδ LTM units (D hair), about 10 % of cutaneous LTM Aα/β-units, but no muscle spindle afferent units. Nav1.8-LI intensity was negatively correlated with soma size (all neurons) and with dorsal root CVs in A- but not C-fibre neurons. Nav1.8-LI intensity was positively correlated with action potential (AP) duration (both rise and fall time) in A-fibre neurons and with AP rise time only in positive C-fibre neurons. It was also positively correlated with AP overshoot in positive neurons. Thus high levels of Nav1.8 protein may contribute to the longer AP durations (especially in A-fibre neurons) and larger AP overshoots that are typical of nociceptors. PMID:12794175

  9. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons. PMID:26423360

  10. Primary afferents with TRPM8 and TRPA1 profiles target distinct subpopulations of rat superficial dorsal horn neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wrigley, Paul J; Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, transient receptor potential melastatin-1 (TRPM8) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), are expressed in subpopulations of sensory neurones and have been proposed to mediate innocuous and noxious cold sensation respectively. The aim of this study was to compare TRPM8 and TRPA1 modulation of glutamatergic afferent transmission within the spinal dorsal horn. Experimental approach: Whole cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat spinal cord slices in vitro to examine the effect of TRP agonists and temperature on glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Key results: Icilin (3 or 100 µmol·L−1), menthol (200 µmol·L−1) and capsaicin (1 µmol·L−1) reduced the amplitude of primary afferent evoked EPSCs in subpopulations of lamina I and II neurones. In a subpopulation of superficial neurones, innocuous cold (threshold 29°C), 3 µmol·L−1 icilin (EC50 1.5 µmol·L−1) and menthol (EC50 263 µmol·L−1) increased the rate of spontaneous miniature EPSCs. In the majority of lamina I and II neurones, 100 µmol·L−1 icilin (EC50 79 µmol·L−1), allyl isothiocyanate (EC50 226 µmol·L−1), cinnamaldehyde (EC50 38 µmol·L−1) and capsaicin (1 µmol·L−1) increased miniature EPSC rate. The response to 100 µmol·L−1, but not 3 µmol·L−1 icilin, was abolished by ruthenium red, while neither was affected by iodoresiniferatoxin. Responsiveness to 3 µmol·L−1, but not to 100 µmol·L−1 icilin, was highly predictive of innocuous cold responsiveness. Neurones responding to 3 µmol·L−1 icilin and innocuous cold were located more superficially than those responding to 100 µmol·L−1 icilin. Conclusions and implications: Activation of TRPM8 and TRPA1 presynaptically modulated glutamatergic transmission onto partially overlapping but distinct populations of superficial dorsal horn neurones. Spinal TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels may therefore provide

  11. Stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates glutamatergic neurons in the parabrachial nucleus: relation to neurons containing nNOS.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Moazzami, Ali R; Longhurst, John C

    2005-08-16

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates neurons in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), a region known to play a role in central integration of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes. However, phenotypes of these activated neurons have not been well identified. Glutamate, an important excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is involved in PBN-mediated cardiovascular responses. Recent identification of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) has provided a novel and unique marker to locate distinctive perikarya of neurons that use glutamate as a neurotransmitter. The action of glutamate in the brain is influenced by nitric oxide. Thus, using triple immunofluorescent labeling, the present study examined expression of c-Fos, an immediate early gene, in the neurons containing VGLUT3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the PBN following stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. In anesthetized cats with bilateral barodenervation and cervical vagotomy, topical application of bradykinin (BK, 1-10 microg/ml, 50 microl, n = 6) on the left ventricle was performed six times, every 20 min. Repeated administration of BK elicited consistent increases in blood pressure over a 100 min period while no changes were noted in the animals treated with the vehicle for BK (0.9% saline, n=5). Compared to control cats, c-Fos expression was increased significantly in the cell bodies containing VGLUT3 as well as both VGLUT3 and nNOS in the external lateral PBN (elPBN) in BK-treated animals (all P < 0.01). In addition, using similar triple-staining method, we noted that fibers of activated neurons containing nNOS in the elPBN co-localized with vesicular glutamate transporter 2 following BK stimulation. These data suggest that glutamatergic neurons represent a cell type in the PBN that is activated by stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. Nitric oxide has the potential to influence the action of glutamatergic neurons in

  12. The Feline Dorsal Nerve of the Penis Arises from the Deep Perineal Nerve and Not the Sensory Afferent Branch

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, T. Y.; Boger, A. S.; Gustafson, K. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cat has been used extensively as an animal model for urogenital studies involving the pudendal nerve. However, discrepancies persist in the literature regarding the origin of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP). This study used gross dissections and serial histological cross sections to demonstrate that the DNP arises from the deep perineal nerve and not the sensory afferent branch as previously reported. This finding indicates a better than previously appreciated neuroanatomical homology between the cat and human. PMID:18479311

  13. Direct targeting of peptidergic amygdalar neurons by noradrenergic afferents: linking stress-integrative circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Kravets, J. L.; Reyes, B. A. S.; Unterwald, E. M.; Van Bockstaele, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalar norepinephrine (NE) plays a key role in regulating neural responses to emotionally arousing stimuli and is involved in memory consolidation of emotionally charged events. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and dynorphin (DYN), two neuropeptides that mediate the physiological and behavioral responses to stress, are abundant in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and directly innervate brainstem noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. Whether the CRF- and DYN-containing amygdalar neurons receive direct noradrenergic innervation has not yet been elucidated. The present study sought to define cellular substrates underlying noradrenergic modulation of CRF- and DYN-containing neurons in the CeA using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that NE-labeled axon terminals form synapses with CRF- and DYN-containing neurons in the CeA. Semi-quantitative analysis showed that approximately 31% of NET-labeled axon terminals targeted CeA neurons that co-expressed DYN and CRF. As a major source of CRF innervation to the LC, it is also not known whether CRF-containing CeA neurons are directly targeted by noradrenergic afferents. To test this, retrograde tract-tracing using FluoroGold (FG) from the LC was combined with immunocytochemical detection of CRF and NET in the CeA. Our results revealed a population of LC-projecting CRF-containing CeA neurons that are directly innervated by NE afferents. Analysis showed that approximately 34% of NET-labeled axon terminals targeted LC-projecting CeA neurons that contain CRF. Taken together, these results indicate significant interactions between NE, CRF, and DYN in this critical limbic region and reveal direct synaptic interactions of NE with amygdalar CRF that influence the LC-NE arousal system. PMID:24271021

  14. Changes in Aβ non-nociceptive primary sensory neurons in a rat model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain is a major debilitating factor in osteoarthritis (OA), yet few mechanism-based therapies are available. To address the need to understand underlying mechanisms the aim of the present study was to determine changes in sensory neurons in an animal model of OA pain. Results The model displayed typical osteoarthritis pathology characterized by cartilage degeneration in the knee joint and also manifested knee pathophysiology (edema and increased vasculature permeability of the joint) and altered nociception of the affected limb (hind paw tenderness and knee articulation-evoked reduction in the tail flick latency). Neurons included in this report innervated regions throughout the entire hind limb. Aβ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors exhibited a slowing of the dynamics of action potential (AP) genesis, including wider AP duration and slower maximum rising rate, and muscle spindle neurons were the most affected subgroup. Only minor AP configuration changes were observed in either C- or Aδ-fiber nociceptors. Conclusion Thus, at one month after induction of the OA model Aβ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors but not C- or Aδ-fiber nociceptors had undergone changes in electrophysiological properties. If these changes reflect a change in functional role of these neurons in primary afferent sensory processing, then Aβ-fiber non-nociceptive primary sensory neurons may be involved in the pathogenesis of OA pain. Further, it is important to point out that the patterns of the changes we observed are consistent with observations in models of peripheral neuropathy but not models of peripheral inflammation. PMID:20594346

  15. Detection of explosives by olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Corcelli, Angela; Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Dibattista, Michele; Araneda, Ricardo; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-03-15

    The response of olfactory sensory neurons to TNT and RDX as well as to some volatile organic compounds present in the vapors of antipersonnel landmines has been studied both in the pig and in the rat. GC/MS analyses of different plastic components of six different kinds of landmines were performed in order to identify the components of the "perfume" of mines. Studies on rat olfactory mucosa were carried out with electro-olfactogram and calcium imaging techniques, while changes in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels following exposure to odorants and explosives were used as a criterion to evaluate the interaction of TNT and RDX with olfactory receptors in a preparation of isolated pig olfactory cilia. These studies indicate that chemical compounds associated with explosives and explosive devices can activate mammalian olfactory receptors. PMID:19913995

  16. Ginger and Its Pungent Constituents Non-Competitively Inhibit Serotonin Currents on Visceral Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Kim, Sojin; Park, Cheung-Seog; Park, Yong Seek

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and emesis are a major side effect and obstacle for chemotherapy in cancer patients. Employ of antiemetic drugs help to suppress chemotherapy-induced emesis in some patients but not all patients. Ginger, an herbal medicine, has been traditionally used to treat various kinds of diseases including gastrointestinal symptoms. Ginger is effective in alleviating nausea and emesis, particularly, for cytotoxic chemotherapy drug-induced emesis. Ginger-mediated antiemetic effect has been attributed to its pungent constituents-mediated inhibition of serotonin (5-HT) receptor activity but its cellular mechanism of action is still unclear. Emetogenic chemotherapy drugs increase 5-HT concentration and activate visceral vagal afferent nerve activity. Thus, 5-HT mediated vagal afferent activation is essential to provoke emesis during chemotherapy. In this experiment, water extract of ginger and its three major pungent constituent's effect on 5-HT-evoked responses were tested on acutely dispersed visceral afferent neurons with patch-clamp methods. The ginger extract has similar effects to antiemetic drug ondansetron by blocking 5-HT-evoked responses. Pungent constituents of the ginger, [6]-shogaol, [6]-gingerol, and zingerone inhibited 5-HT responses in a dose dependent manner. The order of inhibitory potency for these compounds were [6]-shogaol>[6]-gingerol>zingerone. Unlike well-known competitive 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron, all tested ginger constituents acted as non-competitive antagonist. Our results imply that ginger and its pungent constituents exert antiemetic effects by blocking 5-HT-induced emetic signal transmission in vagal afferent neurons. PMID:24757377

  17. Ginger and its pungent constituents non-competitively inhibit serotonin currents on visceral afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Kim, Sojin; Park, Cheung-Seog; Park, Yong Seek; Jin, Young-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Nausea and emesis are a major side effect and obstacle for chemotherapy in cancer patients. Employ of antiemetic drugs help to suppress chemotherapy-induced emesis in some patients but not all patients. Ginger, an herbal medicine, has been traditionally used to treat various kinds of diseases including gastrointestinal symptoms. Ginger is effective in alleviating nausea and emesis, particularly, for cytotoxic chemotherapy drug-induced emesis. Ginger-mediated antiemetic effect has been attributed to its pungent constituents-mediated inhibition of serotonin (5-HT) receptor activity but its cellular mechanism of action is still unclear. Emetogenic chemotherapy drugs increase 5-HT concentration and activate visceral vagal afferent nerve activity. Thus, 5-HT mediated vagal afferent activation is essential to provoke emesis during chemotherapy. In this experiment, water extract of ginger and its three major pungent constituent's effect on 5-HT-evoked responses were tested on acutely dispersed visceral afferent neurons with patch-clamp methods. The ginger extract has similar effects to antiemetic drug ondansetron by blocking 5-HT-evoked responses. Pungent constituents of the ginger, [6]-shogaol, [6]-gingerol, and zingerone inhibited 5-HT responses in a dose dependent manner. The order of inhibitory potency for these compounds were [6]-shogaol>[6]-gingerol>zingerone. Unlike well-known competitive 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron, all tested ginger constituents acted as non-competitive antagonist. Our results imply that ginger and its pungent constituents exert antiemetic effects by blocking 5-HT-induced emetic signal transmission in vagal afferent neurons. PMID:24757377

  18. The RNA binding and transport proteins staufen and fragile X mental retardation protein are expressed by rat primary afferent neurons and localize to peripheral and central axons.

    PubMed

    Price, T J; Flores, C M; Cervero, F; Hargreaves, K M

    2006-09-15

    Neuronal proteins have been traditionally viewed as being derived solely from the soma; however, accumulating evidence indicates that dendritic and axonal sites are capable of a more autonomous role in terms of new protein synthesis. Such extra-somal translation allows for more rapid, on-demand regulation of neuronal structure and function than would otherwise be possible. While mechanisms of dendritic RNA transport have been elucidated, it remains unclear how RNA is trafficked into the axon for this purpose. Primary afferent neurons of the dorsal root (DRG) and trigeminal (TG) ganglia have among the longest axons in the neuraxis and such axonal protein synthesis would be advantageous, given the greater time involved for protein trafficking to occur via axonal transport. Therefore, we hypothesized that these primary sensory neurons might express proteins involved in RNA transport. Rat DRG and TG neurons expressed staufen (stau) 1 and 2 (detected at the mRNA level) and stau2 and fragile x mental retardation protein (FMRP; detected at the protein level). Stau2 mRNA was also detected in human TG neurons. Stau2 and FMRP protein were localized to the sciatic nerve and dorsal roots by immunohistochemistry and to dorsal roots by Western blot. Stau2 and FMRP immunoreactivities colocalized with transient receptor potential channel type 1 immunoreactivity in sensory axons of the sciatic nerve and dorsal root, suggesting that these proteins are being transported into the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive sensory axons. Based on these findings, we propose that stau2 and FMRP proteins are attractive candidates to subserve RNA transport in sensory neurons, linking somal transcriptional events to axonal translation. PMID:16809002

  19. Development of nNOS-positive neurons in the rat sensory ganglia after capsaicin treatment.

    PubMed

    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin Y; Korzina, Marina B; Porseva, Valentina V

    2015-08-27

    To gain a better understanding of the neuroplasticity of afferent neurons during postnatal ontogenesis, the distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was studied in the nodose ganglion (NG) and Th2 and L4 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from vehicle-treated and capsaicin-treated female Wistar rats at different ages (10-day-old, 20-day-old, 30-day-old, and two-month-old). The percentage of nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons decreased after capsaicin treatment in all studied ganglia in first 20 days of life, from 55.4% to 36.9% in the Th2 DRG, from 54.6% to 26.1% in the L4 DRG and from 37.1% to 15.0% in the NG. However, in the NG, the proportion of nNOS-IR neurons increased after day 20, from 11.8% to 23.9%. In the sensory ganglia of all studied rats, a high proportion of nNOS-IR neurons bound isolectin B4. Approximately 90% of the sensory nNOS-IR neurons bound to IB4 in the DRG and approximately 80% in the NG in capsaicin-treated and vehicle-treated rats. In 10-day-old rats, a large number of nNOS-IR neurons also expressed TrkA, and the proportion of nNOS(+)/TrkA(+) neurons was larger in the capsaicin-treated rats compared with the vehicle-treated animals. During development, the percentage of nNOS(+)/TrkA(+) cells decreased in the first month of life in both groups. The information provided here will also serve as a basis for future studies investigating mechanisms of sensory neuron development. PMID:26054303

  20. Hydrogen sulfide prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Jand Venes R; Bezerra, Víctor H; Gomes, Antoniella S; Barbosa, André Luiz R; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Soares, Pedro Marcos G; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Souza, Marcellus H L P

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in mice and the influence of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferent neurons, and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 receptors on such an effect. Saline and L-cysteine alone or with propargylglycine, sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), or Lawesson's reagent were administrated for testing purposes. For other experiments, mice were pretreated with glibenclamide, neurotoxic doses of capsaicin, or capsazepine. Afterward, mice received L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent. After 30 min, 50% ethanol was administrated by gavage. After 1 h, mice were sacrificed, and gastric damage was evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic analyses. L-cysteine, NaHS, and Lawesson's reagent treatment prevented ethanol-induced macroscopic and microscopic gastric damage in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of propargylglycine, an inhibitor of endogenous H(2)S synthesis, reversed gastric protection induced by L-cysteine. Glibenclamide reversed L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent gastroprotective effects against ethanol-induced macroscopic damage in a dose-dependent manner. Chemical ablation of sensory afferent neurons by capsaicin reversed gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine or H(2)S donors (NaHS or Lawesson's reagent) in ethanol-induced macroscopic gastric damage. Likewise, in the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, the gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent were also abolished. Our results suggest that H(2)S prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage. Although there are many mechanisms through which this effect can occur, our data support the hypothesis that the activation of K(ATP) channels and afferent neurons/TRPV1 receptors is of primary importance. PMID:19491326

  1. Sensory Neuron Development in Mouse Coccygeal Vertebrae and Its Relationship to Tail Biopsies for Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jerald; Hendricks, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    A common method of genotyping mice is via tissue obtained from tail biopsies. However, there is no available information on the temporal development of sensory neurons in the tail and how their presence or absence might affect the age for performing tail biopsies. The goals of this study were to determine if afferent sensory neurons, and in particular nociceptive neurons, are present in the coccygeal vertebrae at or near the time of birth and if not, when they first can be visualized on or in those vertebrae. Using toluidine blue neuronal staining, transmission electron microscopy, and calcitonin-related gene peptide immunostaining, we found proximal to distal maturation of coccygeal nerve growth in the C57BL/6J mouse. Single nerve bundles were first seen on postpartum day (PPD) 0. On PPD 3 presumptive nociceptive sensory nerve fibers were seen entering the vertebral perichondrium. Neural development continued through the last time point (PPD 7) but at no time were neural fibers seen entering the body of the vertebrae. The effect of age on the development of pain perception in the neonatal mouse is discussed. PMID:24505409

  2. Sensory afferent segregation in three-eared frogs resemble the dominance columns observed in three-eyed frogs

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Karen L.; Houston, Douglas W.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The formation of proper sensory afferent connections during development is essential for brain function. Activity-based competition is believed to drive ocular dominance columns (ODC) in mammals and in experimentally-generated three-eyed frogs. ODC formation is thus a compromise of activity differences between two eyes and similar molecular cues. To gauge the generality of graphical map formation in the brain, we investigated the inner ear projection, known for its well-defined and early segregation of afferents from vestibular and auditory endorgans. In analogy to three eyed-frogs, we generated three-eared frogs to assess to what extent vestibular afferents from two adjacent ears could segregate. Donor ears were transplanted either in the native orientation or rotated by 90 degrees. These manipulations should result in either similar or different induced activity between both ears, respectively. Three-eared frogs with normal orientation showed normal swimming whereas those with a rotated third ear showed aberrant behaviors. Projection studies revealed that only afferents from the rotated ears segregated from those from the native ear within the vestibular nucleus, resembling the ocular dominance columns formed in three-eyed frogs. Vestibular segregation suggests that mechanisms comparable to those operating in the ODC formation of the visual system may act on vestibular projection refinements. PMID:25661240

  3. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance. PMID:25979201

  4. Selective conversion of fibroblasts into peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Joel W; Eade, Kevin T; Szűcs, Attila; Sardo, Valentina Lo; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Williams, Daniel; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2015-01-01

    Humans and mice detect pain, itch, temperature, pressure, stretch and limb position via signaling from peripheral sensory neurons. These neurons are divided into three functional classes (nociceptors/pruritoceptors, mechanoreceptors and proprioceptors) that are distinguished by their selective expression of TrkA, TrkB or TrkC receptors, respectively. We found that transiently coexpressing Brn3a with either Ngn1 or Ngn2 selectively reprogrammed human and mouse fibroblasts to acquire key properties of these three classes of sensory neurons. These induced sensory neurons (iSNs) were electrically active, exhibited distinct sensory neuron morphologies and matched the characteristic gene expression patterns of endogenous sensory neurons, including selective expression of Trk receptors. In addition, we found that calcium-imaging assays could identify subsets of iSNs that selectively responded to diverse ligands known to activate itch- and pain-sensing neurons. These results offer a simple and rapid means for producing genetically diverse human sensory neurons suitable for drug screening and mechanistic studies. PMID:25420069

  5. Coupled Activation of Primary Sensory Neurons Contributes to Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Shin; Anderson, Michael; Park, Kyoungsook; Zheng, Qin; Agarwal, Amit; Gong, Catherine; Saijilafu; Young, LeAnne; He, Shaoqiu; LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Zhou, Fengquan; Bergles, Dwight; Hanani, Menachem; Guan, Yun; Spray, David C; Dong, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    Primary sensory neurons in the DRG play an essential role in initiating pain by detecting painful stimuli in the periphery. Tissue injury can sensitize DRG neurons, causing heightened pain sensitivity, often leading to chronic pain. Despite the functional importance, how DRG neurons function at a population level is unclear due to the lack of suitable tools. Here we developed an imaging technique that allowed us to simultaneously monitor the activities of >1,600 neurons/DRG in live mice and discovered a striking neuronal coupling phenomenon that adjacent neurons tend to activate together following tissue injury. This coupled activation occurs among various neurons and is mediated by an injury-induced upregulation of gap junctions in glial cells surrounding DRG neurons. Blocking gap junctions attenuated neuronal coupling and mechanical hyperalgesia. Therefore, neuronal coupling represents a new form of neuronal plasticity in the DRG and contributes to pain hypersensitivity by "hijacking" neighboring neurons through gap junctions. PMID:27568517

  6. GABAergic Afferents activate both GABAA and GABAB receptors in mouse substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brazhnik, Elena; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Most in vivo electrophysiological studies of substantia nigra have employed rats. With the recent proliferation of the use of mice for in vitro neurophysiological studies due to the availability of various genetically modified strains to identify the roles of various channels and proteins in neuronal function, it is crucial to obtain data on in vivo responses in mice to verify that the in vitro results reflect functioning of systems comparable to those that have been well studied in rat. Inhibitory responses of rat nigral dopaminergic neurons by stimulation of afferents from striatum, globus pallidus or pars reticulata have been shown to be mediated predominantly or exclusively by GABAA receptors. This is puzzling given the substantial expression of GABAB receptors and the ubiquitous appearance of GABAB synaptic responses in rat dopaminergic neurons in vitro. In the present study we studied electrically evoked GABAergic inhibition in nigral dopaminergic neurons in C57BL/6J mice. Stimulation of the three major GABAergic inputs elicited stronger and longer lasting inhibitory responses than those seen in rats. The early inhibition was GABAA mediated, whereas the later component, absent in rats, was GABAB mediated and selectively enhanced by GABA uptake inhibition. Striatal-evoked inhibition exhibited a slower onset and a weaker initial component compared to inhibition from globus pallidus or substantia nigra pars reticulata. These results are discussed with respect to differences in the size and neuronal density of the rat and mouse brain, and the different sites of synaptic contact of the synapses from the three GABAergic afferents. PMID:18842898

  7. Activation of TRPV4 Regulates Respiration through Indirect Activation of Bronchopulmonary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Qihai (David); Moss, Charles R.; Kettelhut, Kristen L.; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Hu, Hongzhen

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 4 (TRPV4) is a calcium-permeable non-selective cation channel implicated in numerous physiological and pathological functions. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TRPV4 activation on respiration and to explore the potential involvement of bronchopulmonary sensory neurons. Potent TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A was injected into right atrium in anesthetized spontaneously breathing rats and the changes in breathing were measured. Patch-clamp recording was performed to investigate the effect of GSK1016790A or another TRPV4 activator 4α-PDD on cultured rat vagal bronchopulmonary sensory neurons. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to determine the TRPV4-expressing cells in lung slices obtained from TRPV4-EGFP mice. Our results showed, that right-atrial injection of GSK1016790A evoked a slow-developing, long-lasting rapid shallow breathing in anesthetized rats. Activation of TRPV4 also significantly potentiated capsaicin-evoked chemoreflex responses. The alteration in ventilation induced by GSK1016790A was abolished by cutting or perineural capsaicin treatment of both vagi, indicating the involvement of bronchopulmonary afferent neurons. The stimulating and sensitizing effects of GSK1016790A were abolished by a selective TRPV4 antagonist GSK2193874 and also by inhibiting cyclooxygenase with indomethacin. Surprising, GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD did not activate isolated bronchopulmonary sensory neurons, nor did they modulate capsaicin-induced inward currents in these neurons. Furthermore, TRPV4 expression was found in alveolar macrophages, alveolar epithelial, and vascular endothelial cells. Collectively, our results suggest that GSK1016790A regulates the respiration through an indirect activation of bronchopulmonary sensory neurons, likely via its stimulation of other TRPV4-expressing cells in the lungs and airways. PMID:26973533

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid and signaling in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Bolier, Ruth; Beuers, Ulrich H

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid is a potent signaling lipid molecule that has initially been characterized as a growth factor. However, later studies have revealed many more functions such as modulation of cell shape, cell migration, prevention of apoptosis, platelet aggregation, wound healing, osteoclast differentiation, vasopressor activity, embryo implantation, angiogenesis, lung fibrosis, hair growth and more. The molecule mainly acts through the activation of a set of at least 6 G-protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6), but intracellular LPA was also shown to signal through the activation of the nuclear receptor PPARγ. In this short review we discuss the recent observations which suggest that in pathological conditions LPA also modulates signaling in sensory neurons. Thus, LPA has been shown to play a role in the initiation of neuropathic pain and, more recently, a relation was observed between increased LPA levels in the circulation and cholestatic itch. The mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. PMID:25218302

  9. Sensory integration: neuronal filters for polarized light patterns.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Holger G

    2014-09-22

    Animal and human behaviour relies on local sensory signals that are often ambiguous. A new study shows how tuning neuronal responses to celestial cues helps locust navigation, demonstrating a common principle of sensory information processing: the use of matched filters. PMID:25247356

  10. Chronic recruitment of primary afferent neurons by microstimulation in the feline dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lee E.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Ciollaro, Mattia; Ventura, Valérie; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. This study describes results of primary afferent neural microstimulation experiments using microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of four cats. The goal was to test the stability and selectivity of these microelectrode arrays as a potential interface for restoration of somatosensory feedback after damage to the nervous system such as amputation. Approach. A five-contact nerve-cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve was used to record the antidromic compound action potential response to DRG microstimulation (2-15 µA biphasic pulses, 200 µs cathodal pulse width), and the threshold for eliciting a response was tracked over time. Recorded responses were segregated based on conduction velocity to determine thresholds for recruiting Group I and Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers. Main results. Thresholds were initially low (5.1 ± 2.3 µA for Group I and 6.3 ± 2.0 µA for Group II/Aβ) and increased over time. Additionally the number of electrodes with thresholds less than or equal to 15 µA decreased over time. Approximately 12% of tested electrodes continued to elicit responses at 15 µA up to 26 weeks after implantation. Higher stimulation intensities (up to 30 µA) were tested in one cat at 23 weeks post-implantation yielding responses on over 20 additional electrodes. Within the first six weeks after implantation, approximately equal numbers of electrodes elicited only Group I or Group II/Aβ responses at threshold, but the relative proportion of Group II/Aβ responses decreased over time. Significance. These results suggest that it is possible to activate Group I or Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers in isolation with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in the DRG, and that those responses can be elicited up to 26 weeks after implantation, although it may be difficult to achieve a consistent response day-to-day with currently available electrode technology. The DRG are compelling targets

  11. Modulation of the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) by cyclic nucleotides in guinea-pig primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, S L; Williams, J T

    1996-01-01

    1. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from dissociated guinea-pig nodose and trigeminal ganglion neurons in culture to study second messenger mechanisms of the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) modulation. 2. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and forskolin modulate Ih in primary afferents by shifting the activation curve in the depolarizing direction and increasing the maximum amplitude. 3. The cAMP analogues, RP-cAMP-S (an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA)) and SP-cAMP-S (an activator of PKA), both shifted the activation curve of Ih to more depolarized potentials and occluded the effects of forskolin. These results suggest that Ih is modulated by a direct action of the cAMP analogues. 4. Superfusion of other cyclic nucleotide analogues (8-Br-cAMP, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP) mimicked the actions of forskolin and PGE2, but dibutyryl cGMP, 5'-AMP and adenosine had no effect on Ih. 8-Br-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP had similar concentration response profiles, suggesting that Ih has little nucleotide selectivity. 5. The inhibitor peptide (PKI), the catalytic subunit of PKA (C subunit) and phosphatase inhibitors (microcystin and okadaic acid) had no effect on forskolin modulation of Ih. 6. These results indicate that Ih is regulated by cyclic nucleotides in sensory neurons. Positive regulation of Ih by prostaglandins produced during inflammation may lead to depolarization and facilitation of repetitive activity, and thus contribute to sensitization to painful stimuli. PMID:8730586

  12. Phenotyping the Function of TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Neurons by Targeted Axonal Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirós, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1+ afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1−/− mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1+ sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1+ axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  13. Evidence that antidromically stimulated vagal afferents activate inhibitory neurones innervating guinea-pig trachealis.

    PubMed Central

    Canning, B J; Undem, B J

    1994-01-01

    -selective agonist, acetyl-[Arg6, Sar9, Met (O2)11]-SP(6-11), elicited oesophagus-dependent relaxations of the trachealis that were abolished by oesophagus removal. Furthermore, pretreatment with the NK1-selective antagonists, CP 96345 and CP 99994, or pretreatment with a concentration of SR 48968 that also blocks NK3 receptors, markedly attenuated relaxations elicited by stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive vagal pathways. 6. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that relaxations elicited by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents involve tachykinin-mediated activation of peripheral NANC inhibitory neurones that are in some way associated with the oesophagus. The data also indicate that airway smooth muscle tone might be regulated by peripheral reflexes initiated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibres. PMID:7869272

  14. Sensory neurons and circuits mediating itch

    PubMed Central

    LaMotte, Robert H.; Dong, Xinzhong; Ringkamp, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chemicals used experimentally to evoke itch elicit activity in diverse subpopulations of cutaneous pruriceptive neurons, all of which also respond to painful stimuli. However, itch is distinct from pain: it evokes different behaviors, such as scratching, and originates from the skin or certain mucosae but not from muscle, joints or viscera. New insights regarding the neurons that mediate the sensation of itch have been gained from experiments in which gene expression has been manipulated in different types of pruriceptive neurons as well as from comparisons between psychophysical measurements of itch and the neuronal discharges and other properties of peripheral and central pruriceptive neurons. PMID:24356071

  15. [Postsynaptic reactions of cerebral cortex neurons, activated by nociceptive afferents during stimulation of the Raphe nuclei].

    PubMed

    Labakhua, T Sh; Dzhanashiia, T K; Gedevanishvili, G I; Dzhokhadze, L D; Tkemaladze, T T; Abzianidze, I V

    2012-01-01

    On cats, we studied the influence of stimulation of the Raphe nuclei (RN) on postsynaptic processes evoked in neurons of the somatosensory cortex by stimulation of nociceptive (intensive stimulation of the tooth pulp) and non-nociceptive (moderate stimulation of the ventroposteromedial--VPN--nucleus of the thalamus) afferent inputs. 6 cells, selectively excited by stimulation of nocciceptors and 9 cells, activated by both the above nociceptive and non-nociceptive influences (nociceptive and convergent neurons, respectively) were recorded intracellular. In neurons of both groups, responses to nociceptive stimulation (of sufficient intensity) looked like an EPSP-spike-IPSP (the letter of significant duration, up to 200-300 ms) compleх. Conditioning stimulation of the RN which preceded test stimulus applied to the tooth pulp or VPM nucleus by 100 to 800 ms, induced 40-60 % decrease of the IPSP amplitude only, while maхimal effect of influence, in both cases, was noted within intervals of 300-800 ms between conditioning and test stimulus. During stimulation of the RN, serotonin released via receptor and second messengers, provides postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic system, decreasing the IPSP amplitude which occurs after stimulation of both the tooth pulp and VPM thalamic nucleus. This process may be realized trough either pre- or postsynaptic mechanisms. PMID:22392784

  16. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  17. Control of central synaptic specificity in insect sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Blagburn, Jonathan M; Bacon, Jonathan P

    2004-01-01

    Synaptic specificity is the culmination of several processes, beginning with the establishment of neuronal subtype identity, followed by navigation of the axon to the correct subdivision of neuropil, and finally, the cell-cell recognition of appropriate synaptic partners. In this review we summarize the work on sensory neurons in crickets, cockroaches, moths, and fruit flies that establishes some of the principles and molecular mechanisms involved in the control of synaptic specificity. The identity of a sensory neuron is controlled by combinatorial expression of transcription factors, the products of patterning and proneural genes. In the nervous system, sensory axon projections are anatomically segregated according to modality, stimulus quality, and cell-body position. A variety of cell-surface and intracellular signaling molecules are used to achieve this. Synaptic target recognition is also controlled by transcription factors such as Engrailed and may be, in part, mediated by cadherin-like molecules. PMID:15217325

  18. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zun-Yi; McDowell, Thomas; Wang, Peiqing; Alvarez, Roxanne; Gomez, Timothy; Bjorling, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100 ng/ml) for 30 minutes significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10 nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling. PMID:25088915

  19. Subcellular localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract in relation to vagal afferent inputs.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, L; Batten, T F C; Corbett, E K A; Sinfield, J K; Deuchars, J

    2003-01-01

    In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), nitric oxide (NO) modulates neuronal circuits controlling autonomic functions. A proposed source of this NO is via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) present in vagal afferent fibre terminals, which convey visceral afferent information to the NTS. Here, we first determined with electron microscopy that neuronal NOS (nNOS) is present in both presynaptic and postsynaptic structures in the NTS. To examine the relationship of nNOS to vagal afferent fibres the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the nodose ganglion and detected in brainstem sections using peroxidase-based methods. nNOS was subsequently visualised using a pre-embedding immunogold procedure. Ultrastructural examination revealed nNOS immunoreactivity in dendrites receiving vagal afferent input. However, although nNOS-immunoreactive terminals were frequently evident in the NTS, none were vagal afferent in origin. Dual immunofluorescence also confirmed lack of co-localisation. Nevertheless, nNOS immunoreactivity was observed in vagal afferent neurone cell bodies of the nodose ganglion. To determine if these labelled cells in the nodose ganglion were indeed vagal afferent neurones nodose ganglion sections were immunostained following application of cholera toxin B subunit to the heart. Whilst some cardiac-innervating neurones were also nNOS immunoreactive, nNOS was never detected in the central terminals of these neurones. These data show that nNOS is present in the NTS in both pre- and postsynaptic structures. However, these presynaptic structures are unlikely to be of vagal afferent origin. The lack of nNOS in vagal afferent terminals in the NTS, yet the presence in some vagal afferent cell bodies, suggests it is selectively targeted to specific regions of the same neurones. PMID:12676143

  20. Postnatal Experience Modulates Functional Properties of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiwei; Tian, Huikai; Lee, Anderson C.; Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Early experience considerably modulates the organization and function of all sensory systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, deprivation of the sensory inputs via neonatal, unilateral naris closure has been shown to induce structural, molecular, and functional changes from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb and cortex. However, it remains unknown how early experience shapes functional properties of individual olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary odor detectors in the nose. To address this question, we examined odorant response properties of mouse OSNs in both the closed and open nostril after four weeks of unilateral naris closure with age-matched untreated animals as control. Using patch-clamp technique on genetically-tagged OSNs with defined odorant receptors (ORs), we found that sensory deprivation increased the sensitivity of MOR23 neurons in the closed side while overexposure caused the opposite effect in the open side. We next analyzed the response properties including rise time, decay time, and adaptation induced by repeated stimulation in MOR23 and M71 neurons. Even though these two types of neurons showed distinct properties in dynamic range and response kinetics, sensory deprivation significantly slowed down the decay phase of odorant-induced transduction events in both types. Using western blotting and antibody staining, we confirmed upregulation of several signaling proteins in the closed side as compared with the open side. This study suggests that early experience modulates functional properties of OSNs, probably via modifying the signal transduction cascade. PMID:22703547

  1. The role of trigeminal nasal TRPM8-expressing afferent neurons in the antitussive effects of menthol.

    PubMed

    Plevkova, J; Kollarik, M; Poliacek, I; Brozmanova, M; Surdenikova, L; Tatar, M; Mori, N; Canning, B J

    2013-07-15

    The cold-sensitive cation channel TRPM8 is a target for menthol, which is used routinely as a cough suppressant and as an additive to tobacco and food products. Given that cold temperatures and menthol activate neurons through gating of TRPM8, it is unclear how menthol actively suppresses cough. In this study we describe the antitussive effects of (-)-menthol in conscious and anesthetized guinea pigs. In anesthetized guinea pigs, cough evoked by citric acid applied topically to the tracheal mucosa was suppressed by menthol only when it was selectively administered as vapors to the upper airways. Menthol applied topically to the tracheal mucosa prior to and during citric acid application or administered continuously as vapors or as an aerosol to the lower airways was without effect on cough. These actions of upper airway menthol treatment were mimicked by cold air delivered to the upper airways but not by (+)-menthol, the inactive isomer of menthol, or by the TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist icilin administered directly to the trachea. Subsequent molecular analyses confirmed the expression of TRPM8 in a subset of nasal trigeminal afferent neurons that do not coincidently express TRPA1 or TRPV1. We conclude that menthol suppresses cough evoked in the lower airways primarily through a reflex initiated from the nose. PMID:23640596

  2. 5,6-EET Is Released upon Neuronal Activity and Induces Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity via TRPA1 on Central Afferent Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Park, Chul-Kyu; Angioni, Carlo; Zhang, Dong Dong; von Hehn, Christian; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kumaran, Vigneswara; Lu, Ruirui; Grant, Andrew; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidtko, Achim; Reeh, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus; Brenneis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450-epoxygenase-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid that act as endogenous signaling molecules in multiple biological systems. Here we have investigated the specific contribution of 5,6-EET to transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation in nociceptor neurons and its consequence for nociceptive processing. We found that, during capsaicin-induced nociception, 5,6-EET levels increased in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the dorsal spinal cord, and 5,6-EET is released from activated sensory neurons in vitro. 5,6-EET potently induced a calcium flux (100 nm) in cultured DRG neurons that was completely abolished when TRPA1 was deleted or inhibited. In spinal cord slices, 5,6-EET dose dependently enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons that also responded to mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate), indicating a presynaptic action. Furthermore, 5,6-EET-induced enhancement of sEPSC frequency was abolished in TRPA1-null mice, suggesting that 5,6-EET presynaptically facilitated spinal cord synaptic transmission by TRPA1. Finally, in vivo intrathecal injection of 5,6-EET caused mechanical allodynia in wild-type but not TRPA1-null mice. We conclude that 5,6-EET is synthesized on the acute activation of nociceptors and can produce mechanical hypersensitivity via TRPA1 at central afferent terminals in the spinal cord. PMID:22553041

  3. Cracking Taste Codes by Tapping into Sensory Neuron Impulse Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marion E.; Lundy, Robert F.; Contreras, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Insights into the biological basis for mammalian taste quality coding began with electrophysiological recordings from “taste” nerves and this technique continues to produce essential information today. Chorda tympani (geniculate ganglion) neurons, which are particularly involved in taste quality discrimination, are specialists or generalists. Specialists respond to stimuli characterized by a single taste quality as defined by behavioral cross-generalization in conditioned taste tests. Generalists respond to electrolytes that elicit multiple aversive qualities. Na+-salt (N) specialists in rodents and sweet-stimulus (S) specialists in multiple orders of mammals are well-characterized. Specialists are associated with species’ nutritional needs and their activation is known to be malleable by internal physiological conditions and contaminated external caloric sources. S specialists, associated with the heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptor: T1R, and N specialists, associated with the epithelial sodium channel: ENaC, are consistent with labeled line coding from taste bud to afferent neuron. Yet, S-specialist neurons and behavior are less specific thanT1R2-3 in encompassing glutamate and E generalist neurons are much less specific than a candidate, PDK TRP channel, sour receptor in encompassing salts and bitter stimuli. Specialist labeled lines for nutrients and generalist patterns for aversive electrolytes may be transmitting taste information to the brain side by side. However, specific roles of generalists in taste quality coding may be resolved by selecting stimuli and stimulus levels found in natural situations. T2Rs, participating in reflexes via the glossopharynygeal nerve, became highly diversified in mammalian phylogenesis as they evolved to deal with dangerous substances within specific environmental niches. Establishing the information afferent neurons traffic to the brain about natural taste stimuli imbedded in dynamic complex mixtures will

  4. Dopaminergic Modulation of the Voltage-Gated Sodium Current in the Cochlear Afferent Neurons of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Baizabal, Catalina; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA) plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway. PMID:25768433

  5. A sensory labeled-line for cold: TRPM8-expressing sensory neurons define the cellular basis for cold, cold pain, and cooling-mediated analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Wendy M.; Palkar, Radhika; Lippoldt, Erika K.; McCoy, Daniel D.; Baluch, Farhan; Chen, Jessica; McKemy, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Many primary sensory neurons are polymodal, responding to multiple stimulus modalities (chemical, thermal, or mechanical), yet each modality is recognized differently. While polymodality implies that stimulus encoding occurs in higher centers such as the spinal cord or brain, recent sensory neuron ablation studies find that behavioral responses to different modalities require distinct subpopulations, suggesting the existence of modality-specific labeled-lines at the level of the sensory afferent. Here we provide evidence that neurons expressing TRPM8, a cold- and menthol-gated channel required for normal cold responses in mammals, represents a labeled-line solely for cold sensation. We examined the behavioral significance of conditionally ablating TRPM8+ neurons in adult mice, finding that, like animals lacking TRPM8 channels (Trpm8−/−), animals depleted of TRPM8 neurons (ablated) are insensitive to cool to painfully cold temperatures. Ablated animals showed little aversion to noxious cold and did not distinguish between cold and a preferred warm temperature, a phenotype more profound than that of Trpm8−/− mice which exhibit only partial cold avoidance and preference behaviors. In addition to acute responses, cold pain associated with inflammation and nerve injury was significantly attenuated in ablated and Trpm8−/− mice. Moreover, cooling-induced analgesia after nerve injury was abolished in both genotypes. Lastly, heat, mechanical, and proprioceptive behaviors were normal in ablated mice, demonstrating that TRPM8 neurons are dispensable for other somatosensory modalities. Together these data show that while some limited cold sensitivity remains in Trpm8−/− mice, TRPM8 neurons are required for the breadth of behavioral responses evoked by cold temperatures. PMID:23407943

  6. Rabies virus infection of cultured rat sensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Lycke, E; Tsiang, H

    1987-01-01

    The axonal transport of rabies virus (challenge virus strain of fixed virus) was studied in differentiated rat embryonic dorsal root ganglion cells. In addition, we observed the attachment of rabies virus to neuronal extensions and virus production by infected neurons. A compartmentalized cell culture system was used, allowing infection and manipulation of neuronal extensions without exposing the neural soma to the virus. The cultures consisted of 60% large neuronal cells whose extensions exhibited neurofilament structures. Rabies virus demonstrated high binding affinity to unmyelinated neurites, as suggested by assays of virus adsorption and immunofluorescence studies. The rate of axoplasmic transport of virus was 12 to 24 mm/day, including the time required for internalization of the virus into neurites. The virus transport could be blocked by cytochalasin B, vinblastine, and colchicine, none of which negatively affected the production of virus in cells once the infection was established. It was concluded that, for the retrograde transfer of rabies virus by neurites from the periphery to the neuronal soma, the integrity of tubulin- and actin-containing structures is essential. The rat sensory neurons were characterized as permissive, moderately susceptible, but low producers of rabies virus. These neurons were capable of harboring rabies virus for long periods of time and able to release virus into the culture medium without showing any morphological alterations. The involvement of sensory neurons in rabies virus pathogenesis, both in viral transport and as a site for persistent viral infection, is discussed. Images PMID:2441076

  7. Human sensory neurons: Membrane properties and sensitization by inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingming; Page, Guy; Ghetti, Andrea; Gereau, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Biological differences in sensory processing between human and model organisms may present significant obstacles to translational approaches in treating chronic pain. To better understand the physiology of human sensory neurons, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from 141 human dorsal root ganglion (hDRG) neurons from five young adult donors without chronic pain. Nearly all small diameter hDRG neurons (<50 μm) displayed an inflection on the descending slope of the action potential, a defining feature of rodent nociceptive neurons. A high proportion of hDRG neurons were responsive to the algogens allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and ATP, as well as the pruritogens histamine and chloroquine. We show that a subset of hDRG neurons responded to the inflammatory compounds bradykinin and prostaglandin E2 with action potential discharge and show evidence of sensitization including lower rheobase. Compared to electrically-evoked action potentials, chemically-induced action potentials were triggered from less depolarized thresholds and showed distinct after-hyperpolarization kinetics. These data indicate that most small/medium hDRG neurons can be classified as nociceptors, that they respond directly to compounds that produce pain and itch, and can be activated and sensitized by inflammatory mediators. The use of hDRG neurons as preclinical vehicles for target validation is discussed. PMID:24973718

  8. [The mirror neuron system in motor and sensory rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Oouchida, Yutaka; Izumi, Shinichi

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of the mirror neuron system has dramatically changed the study of motor control in neuroscience. The mirror neuron system provides a conceptual framework covering the aspects of motor as well as sensory functions in motor control. Previous studies of motor control can be classified as studies of motor or sensory functions, and these two classes of studies appear to have advanced independently. In rehabilitation requiring motor learning, such as relearning movement after limb paresis, however, sensory information of feedback for motor output as well as motor command are essential. During rehabilitation from chronic pain, motor exercise is one of the most effective treatments for pain caused by dysfunction in the sensory system. In rehabilitation where total intervention unifying the motor and sensory aspects of motor control is important, learning through imitation, which is associated with the mirror neuron system can be effective and suitable. In this paper, we introduce the clinical applications of imitated movement in rehabilitation from motor impairment after brain damage and phantom limb pain after limb amputation. PMID:24899347

  9. Influences of sensory input from the limbs on feline corticospinal neurons during postural responses

    PubMed Central

    Karayannidou, A; Deliagina, T G; Tamarova, Z A; Sirota, M G; Zelenin, P V; Orlovsky, G N; Beloozerova, I N

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal-side-up body posture of standing quadrupeds is maintained by coordinated activity of all limbs. Somatosensory input from the limbs evokes postural responses when the supporting surface is perturbed. The aim of this study was to reveal the contribution of sensory inputs from individual limbs to the posture-related modulation of pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) arising in the primary motor cortex. We recorded the activity of PTNs from the limb representation of motor cortex in the cat maintaining balance on a platform periodically tilted in the frontal plane. Each PTN was recorded during standing on four limbs, and when two or three limbs were lifted from the platform and thus did not signal its displacement to motor cortex. By comparing PTN responses to tilts in different tests we found that the amplitude and the phase of the response in the majority of them were determined primarily by the sensory input from the corresponding contralateral limb. In a portion of PTNs, this input originated from afferents of the peripheral receptive field. Sensory input from the ipsilateral limb, as well as input from limbs of the other girdle made a much smaller contribution to the PTN modulation. These results show that, during postural activity, a key role of PTNs is the feedback control of the corresponding contralateral limb and, to a lesser extent, the coordination of posture within a girdle and between the two girdles. PMID:17974591

  10. Peripheral oxytocin activates vagal afferent neurons to suppress feeding in normal and leptin-resistant mice: a route for ameliorating hyperphagia and obesity.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusaku; Maejima, Yuko; Suyama, Shigetomo; Yoshida, Masashi; Arai, Takeshi; Katsurada, Kenichi; Kumari, Parmila; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-03-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt), a neuropeptide produced in the hypothalamus, is implicated in regulation of feeding. Recent studies have shown that peripheral administration of Oxt suppresses feeding and, when infused subchronically, ameliorates hyperphagic obesity. However, the route through which peripheral Oxt informs the brain is obscure. This study aimed to explore whether vagal afferents mediate the sensing and anorexigenic effect of peripherally injected Oxt in mice. Intraperitoneal Oxt injection suppressed food intake and increased c-Fos expression in nucleus tractus solitarius to which vagal afferents project. The Oxt-induced feeding suppression and c-Fos expression in nucleus tractus solitarius were blunted in mice whose vagal afferent nerves were blocked by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or capsaicin treatment. Oxt induced membrane depolarization and increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in single vagal afferent neurons. The Oxt-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases were markedly suppressed by Oxt receptor antagonist. These Oxt-responsive neurons also responded to cholecystokinin-8 and contained cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript. In obese diabetic db/db mice, leptin failed to increase, but Oxt increased [Ca(2+)]i in vagal afferent neurons, and single or subchronic infusion of Oxt decreased food intake and body weight gain. These results demonstrate that peripheral Oxt injection suppresses food intake by activating vagal afferent neurons and thereby ameliorates obesity in leptin-resistant db/db mice. The peripheral Oxt-regulated vagal afferent neuron provides a novel target for treating hyperphagia and obesity. PMID:25540101

  11. Weak signal amplification and detection by higher-order sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sarah N; Longtin, Andre; Maler, Leonard

    2016-04-01

    Sensory systems must extract behaviorally relevant information and therefore often exhibit a very high sensitivity. How the nervous system reaches such high sensitivity levels is an outstanding question in neuroscience. Weakly electric fish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus/albifrons) are an excellent model system to address this question because detailed background knowledge is available regarding their behavioral performance and its underlying neuronal substrate. Apteronotus use their electrosense to detect prey objects. Therefore, they must be able to detect electrical signals as low as 1 μV while using a sensory integration time of <200 ms. How these very weak signals are extracted and amplified by the nervous system is not yet understood. We studied the responses of cells in the early sensory processing areas, namely, the electroreceptor afferents (EAs) and pyramidal cells (PCs) of the electrosensory lobe (ELL), the first-order electrosensory processing area. In agreement with previous work we found that EAs cannot encode very weak signals with a spike count code. However, PCs can encode prey mimic signals by their firing rate, revealing a huge signal amplification between EAs and PCs and also suggesting differences in their stimulus encoding properties. Using a simple leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model we predict that the target neurons of PCs in the midbrain torus semicircularis (TS) are able to detect very weak signals. In particular, TS neurons could do so by assuming biologically plausible convergence rates as well as very simple decoding strategies such as temporal integration, threshold crossing, and combining the inputs of PCs. PMID:26843601

  12. Activation of Six1 Expression in Vertebrate Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shigeru; Yajima, Hiroshi; Furuta, Yasuhide; Ikeda, Keiko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    SIX1 homeodomain protein is one of the essential key regulators of sensory organ development. Six1-deficient mice lack the olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organs, cochlea, vestibule and vestibuloacoustic ganglion, and also show poor neural differentiation in the distal part of the cranial ganglia. Simultaneous loss of both Six1 and Six4 leads to additional abnormalities such as small trigeminal ganglion and abnormal dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The aim of this study was to understand the molecular mechanism that controls Six1 expression in sensory organs, particularly in the trigeminal ganglion and DRG. To this end, we focused on the sensory ganglia-specific Six1 enhancer (Six1-8) conserved between chick and mouse. In vivo reporter assays using both animals identified an important core region comprising binding consensus sequences for several transcription factors including nuclear hormone receptors, TCF/LEF, SMAD, POU homeodomain and basic-helix-loop-helix proteins. The results provided information on upstream factors and signals potentially relevant to Six1 regulation in sensory neurons. We also report the establishment of a new transgenic mouse line (mSix1-8-NLSCre) that expresses Cre recombinase under the control of mouse Six1-8. Cre-mediated recombination was detected specifically in ISL1/2-positive sensory neurons of Six1-positive cranial sensory ganglia and DRG. The unique features of the mSix1-8-NLSCre line are the absence of Cre-mediated recombination in SOX10-positive glial cells and central nervous system and ability to induce recombination in a subset of neurons derived from the olfactory placode/epithelium. This mouse model can be potentially used to advance research on sensory development. PMID:26313368

  13. Activation of Six1 Expression in Vertebrate Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeru; Yajima, Hiroshi; Furuta, Yasuhide; Ikeda, Keiko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    SIX1 homeodomain protein is one of the essential key regulators of sensory organ development. Six1-deficient mice lack the olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organs, cochlea, vestibule and vestibuloacoustic ganglion, and also show poor neural differentiation in the distal part of the cranial ganglia. Simultaneous loss of both Six1 and Six4 leads to additional abnormalities such as small trigeminal ganglion and abnormal dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The aim of this study was to understand the molecular mechanism that controls Six1 expression in sensory organs, particularly in the trigeminal ganglion and DRG. To this end, we focused on the sensory ganglia-specific Six1 enhancer (Six1-8) conserved between chick and mouse. In vivo reporter assays using both animals identified an important core region comprising binding consensus sequences for several transcription factors including nuclear hormone receptors, TCF/LEF, SMAD, POU homeodomain and basic-helix-loop-helix proteins. The results provided information on upstream factors and signals potentially relevant to Six1 regulation in sensory neurons. We also report the establishment of a new transgenic mouse line (mSix1-8-NLSCre) that expresses Cre recombinase under the control of mouse Six1-8. Cre-mediated recombination was detected specifically in ISL1/2-positive sensory neurons of Six1-positive cranial sensory ganglia and DRG. The unique features of the mSix1-8-NLSCre line are the absence of Cre-mediated recombination in SOX10-positive glial cells and central nervous system and ability to induce recombination in a subset of neurons derived from the olfactory placode/epithelium. This mouse model can be potentially used to advance research on sensory development. PMID:26313368

  14. Habituation of human limbic neuronal response to sensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C L; Babb, T L; Halgren, E; Wang, M L; Crandall, P H

    1984-04-01

    Hippocampal, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdalar neuronal responses to visual and acoustic stimuli were analyzed during trains of several hundred stimulus repetitions as part of an investigation of sensory pathways to medial temporal lobe structures in complex-partial epilepsy patients who were being monitored with depth electrodes. Ten percent of more than 500 single and multiple units tested were responsive to simple sensory stimuli. The majority of the responsive units were recorded in the posterior parahippocampal gyrus (HG) during visual stimulation. Although neurons in pes hippocampi (PH; Ammons's horn) were also responsive to photic stimuli, no visually responsive units were found in amygdala. Very few units were responsive to acoustic stimuli, and these were found only in PH and amygdala, and not in HG. Significant trends of increase or decrease in response amplitude during trains of stimuli were found in all acoustically responsive units. Significant trends of visual response amplitude increase or decrease were found in 20% of PH units, and in 44% of HG units. Mean latencies of acoustically responsive units were longer than those of visually responsive units, and latencies of PH sensory units showing decremental response were longer than nondecremental PH units. Rate of response decrement was usually linear for acoustic responses and exponential for visual responses. The response dynamics of medial temporal lobe neurons are compared with those described in the animal limbic system and are related to habituation of human sensory evoked scalp potentials. PMID:6705888

  15. Diverse coupling of neurons to populations in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Michael; Steinmetz, Nicholas; Cossell, Lee; Iacaruso, M. Florencia; Ko, Ho; Barthó, Péter; Moore, Tirin; Hofer, Sonja B.; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    A large population of neurons can in principle produce an astronomical number of distinct firing patterns. In cortex however, these patterns lie in a space of lower dimension1-4, as if individual neurons were “obedient members of a huge orchestra”5. Here we use recordings from the visual cortex of mouse and monkey to investigate the relationship between individual neurons and the population, and to establish the underlying circuit mechanisms. We show that neighbouring neurons can differ in their coupling to the overall firing of the population, ranging from strongly coupled “choristers” to weakly coupled “soloists”. Population coupling is largely independent of sensory preferences, and it is a fixed cellular attribute, invariant to stimulus conditions. Neurons with high population coupling are more strongly affected by non-sensory behavioural variables such as motor intention. Population coupling reflects a causal relationship, predicting a neuron’s response to optogenetically-driven increases in local activity. Moreover, population coupling indicates synaptic connectivity: a neuron’s population coupling, measured in vivo, predicted subsequent in vitro estimates of the number of synapses received from its neighbours. Finally, population coupling provides a compact summary of population activity: knowledge of the population couplings of N neurons predicts a substantial portion of their N2 pairwise correlations. Population coupling therefore represents a novel, simple measure that characterises each neuron’s relationship to a larger population, explaining seemingly complex network firing patterns in terms of basic circuit variables. PMID:25849776

  16. Serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neurons in the antenna of the cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Shimohigashi, Miki; Yokohari, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    The antennae of insects contain a vast array of sensory neurons that process olfactory, gustatory, mechanosensory, hygrosensory, and thermosensory information. Except those with multimodal functions, most sensory neurons use acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter. Using immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde staining of antennal sensory neurons in the cockroach Periplaneta americana, we found serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neurons in the antenna. These were selectively distributed in chaetic and scolopidial sensilla and in the scape, the pedicel, and first 15 segments of the flagellum. In a chaetic sensillum, A single serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neuron cohabited with up to four serotonin-negative sensory neurons. Based on their morphological features, serotonin-immunopositive and -negative sensory neurons might process mechanosensory and contact chemosensory modalities, respectively. Scolopidial sensilla constitute the chordotonal and Johnston's organs within the pedicel and process antennal vibrations. Immunoelectron microscopy clearly revealed that serotonin-immunoreactivities selectively localize to a specific type of mechanosensory neuron, called type 1 sensory neuron. In a chordotonal scolopidial sensillum, a serotonin-immunoreactive type 1 neuron always paired with a serotonin-negative type 1 neuron. Conversely, serotonin-immunopositive and -negative type 1 neurons were randomly distributed in Johnston's organ. In the deutocerebrum, serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neuron axons formed three different sensory tracts and those from distinct types of sensilla terminated in distinct brain regions. Our findings indicate that a biogenic amine, serotonin, may act as a neurotransmitter in peripheral mechanosensory neurons. PMID:23852943

  17. Stable human standing with lower-limb muscle afferents providing the only sensory input.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, R; Rogers, D K; McCloskey, D I

    1994-01-01

    1. This study investigated the sources of sensory information upon which normal subjects' ability to stand depends. 2. An 'equivalent body' was used to simulate the physical properties of each subject's body during standing. The modulation of ankle torque required to support the equivalent body in an upright position was similar to that required to support the subject's own body when standing. However, when balancing the equivalent body, vestibular inputs were excluded from directing the appropriate changes in ankle torque. Thus, stability of stance could be studied with (normal stance) and without (balancing equivalent body) modulation by vestibular inputs. Vision could be excluded by closing the eyes. Sensory input from the feet and ankles could be removed by local anaesthesia from prolonged ischaemia, induced by occluding blood flow with inflated pneumatic cuffs just above the ankles. With vestibular, visual and peripheral sensory inputs negated, standing could rely only upon remaining sensory inputs, notably those from sensory receptors in the leg muscles. 3. Unlike the human body, the equivalent body used to negate vestibular inputs is not segmented. Therefore, the effects on stability of having a segmented body were determined by splinting subjects during standing so that only ankle movement was possible. This was done in the presence and absence of visual stabilization. 4. For each experimental task, either standing or balancing the equivalent body, sway was recorded while posture was unperturbed. Root mean square values of sway amplitude and power spectra were used to compare conditions. 5. Every subject could balance the equivalent body in a stable way when the eyes were closed, and when the feet were anaesthetized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7869254

  18. Axotomy Depletes Intracellular Calcium Stores in Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, Marcel; Gemes, Geza; Weyker, Paul D.; Cruikshank, James M.; Kawano, Takashi; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2010-01-01

    Background The cellular mechanisms of neuropathic pain are inadequately understood. Previous investigations have revealed disrupted Ca2+ signaling in primary sensory neurons after injury. We therefore examined the effect of injury on intracellular Ca2+ stores of the endoplasmic reticulum, which critically regulate the Ca2+ signal and neuronal function. Methods Intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured with Fura-2 or mag-Fura-2 microfluorometry in axotomized fifth lumbar (L5) dorsal root ganglion neurons and adjacent L4 neurons isolated from hyperalgesic rats following L5 spinal nerve ligation, compared to neurons from control animals. Results Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores released by the ryanodine-receptor agonist caffeine decreased by 46% in axotomized small neurons. This effect persisted in Ca2+-free bath solution that removes the contribution of store-operated membrane Ca2+ channels, and after blockade of both the mitochondrial, sarco-endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase, and the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase pathways. Ca2+ released by the sarco-endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase blocker thapsigargin and by the Ca2+-ionophore ionomycin was also diminished by 25% and 41%, respectively. In contrast to control neurons, Ca2+ stores in axotomized neurons were not expanded by neuronal activation by K+ depolarization, and the proportionate rate of refilling by sarco-endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase was normal. Luminal Ca2+ concentration was also reduced by 38% in axotomized neurons in permeabilized neurons. The adjacent neurons of the L4 dorsal root ganglia showed modest and inconsistent changes after L5 spinal nerve ligation. Conclusions Painful nerve injury leads to diminished releasable endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores and a reduced luminal Ca2+ concentration. Depletion of Ca2+ stores may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. PMID:19602958

  19. A role for Runx transcription factor signaling in dorsal root ganglion sensory neuron diversification.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Ina; Sigrist, Markus; de Nooij, Joriene C; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Jessell, Thomas M; Arber, Silvia

    2006-02-01

    Subpopulations of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) can be characterized on the basis of sensory modalities that convey distinct peripheral stimuli, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie sensory neuronal diversification remain unclear. Here, we have used genetic manipulations in the mouse embryo to examine how Runx transcription factor signaling controls the acquisition of distinct DRG neuronal subtype identities. Runx3 acts to diversify an Ngn1-independent neuronal cohort by promoting the differentiation of proprioceptive sensory neurons through erosion of TrkB expression in prospective TrkC+ sensory neurons. In contrast, Runx1 controls neuronal diversification within Ngn1-dependent TrkA+ neurons by repression of neuropeptide CGRP expression and controlling the fine pattern of laminar termination in the dorsal spinal cord. Together, our findings suggest that Runx transcription factor signaling plays a key role in sensory neuron diversification. PMID:16446142

  20. Role of calcium ions in the positive interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in bronchopulmonary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Chun; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2015-06-15

    Both transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are abundantly expressed in bronchopulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves and can be activated by a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators. A recent study has reported a synergistic effect of simultaneous TRPA1 and TRPV1 activations in vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents in anesthetized rats, but its underlying mechanism was not known. This study aimed to characterize a possible interaction between these two TRP channels and to investigate the potential role of Ca(2+) as a mediator of this interaction in isolated rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. Using the perforated patch-clamp recording technique, our study demonstrated a distinct positive interaction occurring abruptly between TRPA1 and TRPV1 when they were activated simultaneously by their respective agonists, capsaicin (Cap) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), at near-threshold concentrations in these neurons. AITC at this low concentration evoked only minimal or undetectable responses, but it markedly amplified the Cap-evoked current in the same neurons. This potentiating effect was eliminated when either AITC or Cap was replaced by non-TRPA1 and non-TRPV1 chemical activators of these neurons, demonstrating the selectivity of the interaction between these two TRP channels. Furthermore, when Ca(2+) was removed from the extracellular solution, the synergistic effect of Cap and AITC on pulmonary sensory neurons was completely abrogated, clearly indicating a critical role of Ca(2+) in mediating the action. These results suggest that this TRPA1-TRPV1 interaction may play a part in regulating the sensitivity of pulmonary sensory neurons during airway inflammatory reaction. PMID:25858491

  1. Miniature EPSPs and sensory encoding in the primary afferents of the vestibular lagena of the toadfish, Opsanus tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R.; Vautrin, J.; Highstein, S.

    1999-01-01

    The synaptic activity transmitted from vestibular hair cells of the lagena to primary afferent neurons was recorded in vitro using sharp, intracellular microelectrodes. At rest, the activity was composed of miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSPs) at frequencies from 5 to 20/s and action potentials (APs) at frequencies betwen 0 and 10/s. mEPSPs recorded from a single fiber displayed a large variability. For mEPSPs not triggering APs, amplitudes exhibited an average coefficient of variance (CV) of 0.323 and rise times an average CV of 0.516. APs were only triggered by mEPSPs with larger amplitudes (estimated 4-6 mV) and/or steeper maximum rate of rise (10.9 mV/ms, +/- 3.7 SD, n=4 experiments) compared to (3.50 mV/ms, +/-0.07 SD, n=6 experiments) for nontriggering mEPSPs. The smallest mEPSPs showed a fast rise time (0.99 ms between 10% and 90% of peak amplitude) and limited variability across fibers (CV:0.18) confirming that they were not attenuated signals, but rather represented single-transmitter discharges (TDs). The mEPSP amplitude and rise-time relationship suggests that many mEPSPs represented several, rather than a single pulse of secretion of TDs. According to the estimated overall TD frequency, the coincidence of TDs contributing to the same mEPSP were not statistically independent, indicating a positive interaction between TDs that is reminiscent of the way subminiature signals group to form miniature signals at the neuromuscular junction. Depending on the duration and intensity of efferent stimulation, a complete block of AP initiation occurred either immediately or after a delay of a few seconds. Efferent stimulation did not significantly change AP threshold level, but abruptly decreased mEPSP frequency to a near-complete block that followed the block of APs. Maximum mEPSP rate of rise decreased during, and recovered progressively after, efferent stimulation. After termination of efferent stimulation, mEPSP amplitude did not recover

  2. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain. PMID:26520849

  3. Photostimulation of sensory neurons of the rat vagus nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Albert Y.; Li, Gong; Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-02-01

    We studied the effect of infrared (IR) stimulation on rat sensory neurons. Primary sensory neurons were prepared by enzymatic dissociation of the inferior (or "nodose") ganglia from the vagus nerves of rats. The 1.85-μm output of a diode laser, delivered through a 200-μm silica fiber, was used for photostimulation. Nodose neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, which is a non-selective cation channel that opens in response to significant temperature jumps above 37 C. Opening TRPV1 channels allows entry of cations, including calcium (Ca 2+), into the cell to cause membrane depolarization. Therefore, to monitor TRPV1 activation consequent to photostimulation, we used fura-2, a fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator, to monitor the rise in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+]i). Brief trains of 2-msec IR pulses activated TRPV1 rapidly and reversibly, as evidenced by transient rises in [Ca 2+]i (referred to as Ca 2+ transients). Consistent with the Ca 2+ transients arising from influx of Ca 2+, identical photostimulation failed to evoke Ca 2+ responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+. Furthermore, the photo-induced Ca 2+ signals were abolished by capsazepine, a specific blocker of TRPV1, indicating that the responses were indeed mediated by TRPV1. We discuss the feasibility of using focal IR stimulation to probe neuronal circuit properties in intact neural tissue, and compare IR stimulation with another photostimulation technique-focal photolytic release of "caged" molecules.

  4. Bacteria activate sensory neurons that modulate pain and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Heesters, Balthasar A.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Von Hehn, Christian A.; Zhao, Fan; Tran, Johnathan; Wainger, Brian; Strominger, Amanda; Muralidharan, Sriya; Horswill, Alexander R.; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck; Hwang, Sun Wook; Carroll, Michael C.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nociceptor sensory neurons are specialized to detect potentially damaging stimuli, protecting the organism by initiating the sensation of pain and eliciting defensive behaviors. Bacterial infections produce pain by unknown molecular mechanisms, although they are presumed secondary to immune activation. Here we demonstrate that bacteria directly activate nociceptors, and that the immune response mediated through TLR2, MyD88, T cells, B cells, and neutrophils/monocytes is not necessary for Staphylococcus aureus induced pain in mice. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia parallels live bacterial load rather than tissue swelling or immune activation. Bacteria induce calcium flux and action potentials in nociceptor neurons, in part via bacterial N-formylated peptides and the pore-forming toxin alpha-hemolysin through distinct mechanisms. Specific ablation of Nav1.8-lineage neurons, which include nociceptors, abrogated pain during bacterial infection, but concurrently increased local immune infiltration and lymphadenopathy of the draining lymph node. Thus, bacterial pathogens produce pain by directly activating sensory neurons that modulate inflammation, an unsuspected role for the nervous system in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23965627

  5. Making sense of the sensory regulation of hunger neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiming; Knight, Zachary A

    2016-04-01

    AgRP and POMC neurons are two key cell types that regulate feeding in response to hormones and nutrients. Recently, it was discovered that these neurons are also rapidly modulated by the mere sight and smell of food. This rapid sensory regulation "resets" the activity of AgRP and POMC neurons before a single bite of food has been consumed. This surprising and counterintuitive discovery challenges longstanding assumptions about the function and regulation of these cells. Here we review these recent findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of feeding behavior. We propose several alternative hypotheses for how these new observations might be integrated into a revised model of the feeding circuit, and also highlight some of the key questions that remain to be answered. PMID:26898524

  6. Ontogeny of Excitatory Spinal Neurons Processing Distinct Somatic Sensory Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Lopes, Claudia; Wende, Hagen; Guo, Zhen; Cheng, Leping; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal cues govern the genesis of a diverse array of neurons located in the dorsal spinal cord, including dI1-dI6, dILA, and dILB subtypes, but their physiological functions are poorly understood. Here we generated a new line of conditional knock-out (CKO) mice, in which the homeobox gene Tlx3 was removed in dI5 and dILB cells. In these CKO mice, development of a subset of excitatory neurons located in laminae I and II was impaired, including itch-related GRPR-expressing neurons, PKCγ-expressing neurons, and neurons expressing three neuropeptide genes: somatostatin, preprotachykinin 1, and the gastrin-releasing peptide. These CKO mice displayed marked deficits in generating nocifensive motor behaviors evoked by a range of pain-related or itch-related stimuli. The mutants also failed to exhibit escape response evoked by dynamic mechanical stimuli but retained the ability to sense innocuous cooling and/or warm. Thus, our studies provide new insight into the ontogeny of spinal neurons processing distinct sensory modalities. PMID:24027274

  7. Mu Opioid Receptors on Primary Afferent Nav1.8 Neurons Contribute to Opiate-Induced Analgesia: Insight from Conditional Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Wood, John N.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund’s Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain. PMID:24069332

  8. Identifying Temporal Codes in Spontaneously Active Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Alexander B.; Russell, David F.; Rowe, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    The manner in which information is encoded in neural signals is a major issue in Neuroscience. A common distinction is between rate codes, where information in neural responses is encoded as the number of spikes within a specified time frame (encoding window), and temporal codes, where the position of spikes within the encoding window carries some or all of the information about the stimulus. One test for the existence of a temporal code in neural responses is to add artificial time jitter to each spike in the response, and then assess whether or not information in the response has been degraded. If so, temporal encoding might be inferred, on the assumption that the jitter is small enough to alter the position, but not the number, of spikes within the encoding window. Here, the effects of artificial jitter on various spike train and information metrics were derived analytically, and this theory was validated using data from afferent neurons of the turtle vestibular and paddlefish electrosensory systems, and from model neurons. We demonstrate that the jitter procedure will degrade information content even when coding is known to be entirely by rate. For this and additional reasons, we conclude that the jitter procedure by itself is not sufficient to establish the presence of a temporal code. PMID:22087303

  9. Excitation by irritant chemical substances of sensory afferent units in the cat's cornea.

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, C; Gallar, J; Pozo, M A; Rebollo, I

    1991-01-01

    1. Single-unit electrical activity was recorded from thin myelinated sensory nerve fibres innervating the cornea of deeply anaesthetized cats. 2. Based on their responses to mechanical (calibrated von Frey hairs), chemical (10 mM-acetic acid and/or 616 mM-NaCl) and thermal (ice-cold or heat up to 51 degrees C) stimuli, corneal A delta fibres were classified as polymodal nociceptors (63%), high-threshold mechanoceptors (22%) and mechano-heat nociceptors (15%). Thin myelinated fibres responding only to cold were found in the limbus of the eye. 3. Application of 10 mM-acetic acid on the corneal surface for 30 s evoked in polymodal fibres a brisk discharge of impulses often followed by a low-frequency impulse activity. NaCl (616 mM) produced a more gradual and sustained firing response. 4. The responses of polymodal fibres to acid were proportional to extracellular pH values (pH range: 4.5-6.0). After sensitization to repeated heating, most mechano-heat units developed a sensitivity to acidic stimulation. 5. Topical 0.33 mM-capsaicin excited polymodal nociceptors of the cornea; 5 min after capsaicin about 15% of these fibres were inactivated to all subsequent stimuli. In the rest of the fibres, chemical and thermal sensitivity disappeared after 0.33-3.3 mM-capsaicin, but mechanosensitivity was preserved. 6. Corneal mechanoceptors and limbal cold receptors were not affected by capsaicin (up to 33 mM). 7. These experiments demonstrate that the cornea of the cat is innervated by polymodal as well as mechanoceptive A delta nociceptors. In polymodal nociceptive fibres, mechanical and chemical sensitivities appear to be subserved by separate transduction mechanisms. PMID:1890657

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury and Neuronal Functionality Changes in Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Carron, Simone F.; Alwis, Dasuni S.; Rajan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), caused by direct blows to the head or inertial forces during relative head-brain movement, can result in long-lasting cognitive and motor deficits which can be particularly consequential when they occur in young people with a long life ahead. Much is known of the molecular and anatomical changes produced in TBI but much less is known of the consequences of these changes to neuronal functionality, especially in the cortex. Given that much of our interior and exterior lives are dependent on responsiveness to information from and about the world around us, we have hypothesized that a significant contributor to the cognitive and motor deficits seen after TBI could be changes in sensory processing. To explore this hypothesis, and to develop a model test system of the changes in neuronal functionality caused by TBI, we have examined neuronal encoding of simple and complex sensory input in the rat’s exploratory and discriminative tactile system, the large face macrovibrissae, which feeds to the so-called “barrel cortex” of somatosensory cortex. In this review we describe the short-term and long-term changes in the barrel cortex encoding of whisker motion modeling naturalistic whisker movement undertaken by rats engaged in a variety of tasks. We demonstrate that the most common form of TBI results in persistent neuronal hyperexcitation specifically in the upper cortical layers, likely due to changes in inhibition. We describe the types of cortical inhibitory neurons and their roles and how selective effects on some of these could produce the particular forms of neuronal encoding changes described in TBI, and then generalize to compare the effects on inhibition seen in other forms of brain injury. From these findings we make specific predictions as to how non-invasive extra-cranial electrophysiology can be used to provide the high-precision information needed to monitor and understand the temporal evolution of changes in neuronal

  11. Modulation, individual variation and the role of lingual sensory afferents in the control of prey transport in the lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Schaerlaeken, Vicky; Herrel, Anthony; Meyers, J J

    2008-07-01

    Most organisms feed on a variety of food items that may differ dramatically in their physical and behavioural characteristics (e.g. mobility, mass, texture, etc.). Thus the ability to modulate prey transport behaviour in accordance with the characteristics of the food appears crucial. Consequently, prey reduction and transport movements must be adjusted to the natural variation in material properties of the food, between and within feeding sequences and transport cycles. Here we describe an investigation of (1) the ability of the agamid lizard Pogona vitticeps to modulate prey transport kinematics when feeding on a range of food items differing in their physical characteristics and (2) the role of sensory feedback in controlling jaw and tongue movements by bilateral transection of the lingual trigeminal sensory afferents. Our findings demonstrate that P. vitticeps modulates the kinematics of its feeding behaviour in response to the mechanical demands imposed by different food types. In addition, transection of the trigeminal sensory afferents has an effect on the movements of jaws and tongue during transport, and increases the duration of transport cycles needed to process a given food type. However, after transection, transport cycles were still different for different food types suggesting that other sources of sensory information are also used to modulate prey transport in the lizard P. vitticeps. PMID:18552296

  12. Bilateral sensory deprivation of trigeminal afferent fibres on corticomotor control of human tongue musculature: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M; Baad-Hansen, L; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has demonstrated changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in human limb muscles following modulation of sensory afferent inputs. The aim of this study was to determine whether bilateral local anaesthesia (LA) of the lingual nerve affects the excitability of the tongue motor cortex (MI) as measured by TMS. The effect on MEPs after bilateral LA of the lingual nerve was studied, while the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle served as a control in ten healthy participants. MEPs were measured on the right side of the tongue dorsum in four different conditions: (i) immediately prior to anaesthesia (baseline), (ii) during bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve, (iii) after anaesthesia had subjectively subsided (recovery) and (iv) 3 h after bilateral lingual block injection. MEPs were assessed using stimulus-response curves in steps of 10% of motor threshold (T). Eight stimuli were given at each stimulus level. The amplitudes of the tongue MEPs were significantly influenced by the stimulus intensity (P < 0·001) but not by condition (P = 0·186). However, post hoc tests showed that MEPS were statistically significantly higher during bilateral LA block condition compared with baseline at T + 40%, T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·028) and also compared with recovery at T + 60% (P = 0·010) as well as at 3 h after injection at T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·029). Bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve seems to be associated with a facilitation of the corticomotor pathways related to the tongue musculature. PMID:27265155

  13. Sensory neuron response to emission from a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, V. A.; Petukhov, V. O.; Yachnev, I. L.; Penniyainen, V. A.; Lopatina, E. V.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2010-07-01

    We have built a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser meeting the requirements for low-intensity laser therapy. At λ = 10.57 μm and 9.24 μm, we observe a physiological effect detectable from the change in the extent of neurite outgrowth from sensory neurons. This makes it possible to study molecular mechanisms for interaction of low-intensity radiation with tissues in a living body. The ATP molecule is considered as the specific molecular target for the action of the radiation.

  14. Coarse topographic organization of pheromone-sensitive afferents from different antennal surfaces in the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Kamimura, Itsuro; Yokohari, Fumio; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-05-19

    In contrast to visual, auditory, taste, and mechanosensory neuropils, in which sensory afferents are topographically organized on the basis of their peripheral soma locations, axons of cognate sensory neurons from different locations of the olfactory sense organ converge onto a small spherical neuropil (glomerulus) in the first-order olfactory center. In the cockroach Periplaneta americana, sex pheromone-sensitive afferents with somata in the antero-dorsal and postero-ventral surfaces of a long whip-like antenna are biased toward the anterior and posterior regions of a macroglomerulus, respectively. In each region, afferents with somata in the more proximal antenna project to more proximal region, relative to the axonal entry points. However, precise topography of afferents in the macroglomerulus has remained unknown. Using single and multiple neuronal stainings, we showed that afferents arising from anterior, dorsal, ventral and posterior surfaces of the proximal regions of an antenna were biased progressively from the anterior to posterior region of the macroglomerulus, reflecting chiasmatic axonal re-arrangements that occur immediately before entering the antennal lobe. Morphologies of individual afferents originating from the proximal antenna matched results of mass neuronal stainings, but their three-dimensional origins in the antenna were hardly predictable on the basis of the projection patterns. Such projection biases made by neuronal populations differ from strict somatotopic projections of antennal mechanosensory neurons in the same species, suggesting a unique sensory mechanism to process information about odor location and direction on a single antenna. PMID:25849528

  15. Peripheral Sensory Neurons Expressing Melanopsin Respond to Light.

    PubMed

    Matynia, Anna; Nguyen, Eileen; Sun, Xiaoping; Blixt, Frank W; Parikh, Sachin; Kessler, Jason; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Habib, Samer; Kim, Paul; Wang, Zhe Z; Rodriguez, Allen; Charles, Andrew; Nusinowitz, Steven; Edvinsson, Lars; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C; Gorin, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    The ability of light to cause pain is paradoxical. The retina detects light but is devoid of nociceptors while the trigeminal sensory ganglia (TG) contain nociceptors but not photoreceptors. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are thought to mediate light-induced pain but recent evidence raises the possibility of an alternative light responsive pathway independent of the retina and optic nerve. Here, we show that melanopsin is expressed in both human and mouse TG neurons. In mice, they represent 3% of small TG neurons that are preferentially localized in the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve and are likely nociceptive C fibers and high-threshold mechanoreceptor Aδ fibers based on a strong size-function association. These isolated neurons respond to blue light stimuli with a delayed onset and sustained firing, similar to the melanopsin-dependent intrinsic photosensitivity observed in ipRGCs. Mice with severe bilateral optic nerve crush exhibit no light-induced responses including behavioral light aversion until treated with nitroglycerin, an inducer of migraine in people and migraine-like symptoms in mice. With nitroglycerin, these same mice with optic nerve crush exhibit significant light aversion. Furthermore, this retained light aversion remains dependent on melanopsin-expressing neurons. Our results demonstrate a novel light-responsive neural function independent of the optic nerve that may originate in the peripheral nervous system to provide the first direct mechanism for an alternative light detection pathway that influences motivated behavior. PMID:27559310

  16. Peripheral Sensory Neurons Expressing Melanopsin Respond to Light

    PubMed Central

    Matynia, Anna; Nguyen, Eileen; Sun, Xiaoping; Blixt, Frank W.; Parikh, Sachin; Kessler, Jason; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Habib, Samer; Kim, Paul; Wang, Zhe Z.; Rodriguez, Allen; Charles, Andrew; Nusinowitz, Steven; Edvinsson, Lars; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Gorin, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of light to cause pain is paradoxical. The retina detects light but is devoid of nociceptors while the trigeminal sensory ganglia (TG) contain nociceptors but not photoreceptors. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are thought to mediate light-induced pain but recent evidence raises the possibility of an alternative light responsive pathway independent of the retina and optic nerve. Here, we show that melanopsin is expressed in both human and mouse TG neurons. In mice, they represent 3% of small TG neurons that are preferentially localized in the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve and are likely nociceptive C fibers and high-threshold mechanoreceptor Aδ fibers based on a strong size-function association. These isolated neurons respond to blue light stimuli with a delayed onset and sustained firing, similar to the melanopsin-dependent intrinsic photosensitivity observed in ipRGCs. Mice with severe bilateral optic nerve crush exhibit no light-induced responses including behavioral light aversion until treated with nitroglycerin, an inducer of migraine in people and migraine-like symptoms in mice. With nitroglycerin, these same mice with optic nerve crush exhibit significant light aversion. Furthermore, this retained light aversion remains dependent on melanopsin-expressing neurons. Our results demonstrate a novel light-responsive neural function independent of the optic nerve that may originate in the peripheral nervous system to provide the first direct mechanism for an alternative light detection pathway that influences motivated behavior. PMID:27559310

  17. Dynorphin-Dependent Reduction of Excitability and Attenuation of Inhibitory Afferents of NPS Neurons in the Pericoerulear Region of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jüngling, Kay; Blaesse, Peter; Goedecke, Lena; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    The Neuropeptide S system, consisting of the 20-amino acid peptide neuropeptide S (NPS) and its G-protein coupled receptor (NPSR), modulates arousal, wakefulness, anxiety, and fear-extinction in mice. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the NPS system attenuates stress-dependent impairment of fear extinction, and that NPS-expressing neurons in close proximity to the locus coeruleus region (LC; pericoerulear, periLC) are activated by stress. Furthermore, periLC NPS neurons receive afferents from neurons of the centrolateral nucleus of the amygdala (CeL), of which a substantial population expresses the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) ligand precursor prodynorphin. This study aims to identify the effect of the dynorphinergic system on NPS neurons in the periLC via pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. Using electrophysiological recordings in mouse brain slices, we provide evidence that NPS neurons in the periLC region are directly inhibited by dynorphin A (DynA) via activation of κ-opioid receptor 1 (KOR1) and a subsequent increase of potassium conductances. Thus, the dynorphinergic system is suited to inactivate NPS neurons in the periLC. In addition to this direct, somatic effect, DynA reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses on NPS neurons via KOR1 and KOR2. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the interaction of the NPS and the kappa opioid system in the periLC. Therefore, the endogenous opioid dynorphin is suited to inhibit NPS neurons with a subsequent decrease in NPS release in putative target regions leading to a variety of physiological consequences such as increased anxiety or vulnerability to stress exposure. PMID:27013974

  18. Estradiol rapidly modulates odor responses in mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Cherian, S; Wai Lam, Y; McDaniels, I; Struziak, M; Delay, R J

    2014-06-01

    In rodents, many social behaviors are driven by the sense of smell. The vomeronasal organ (VNO), part of the accessory olfactory system mediates many of these chemically driven behaviors. The VNO is heavily vascularized, and is readily accessible to circulating peptide or steroid hormones. Potentially, this allows circulating hormones to alter behavior through modulating the output of the primary sensory neurons in the VNO, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Based on this, we hypothesized that steroid hormones, in particular 17β-estradiol, would modulate activity of VSNs. In this paper, we show that the estrogen receptors, GPR30 and ERα, were present in VSNs and that estradiol may be synthesized locally in the VNO. Our results also showed that 17β-estradiol decreased responses of isolated VSNs to dilute urine, a potent natural stimulus, with respect to current amplitudes and depolarization. Further, 17β-estradiol increased the latency of the first action potential (AP) and the AP amplitude. Additionally, calcium responses to sulfated steroids (present in the low molecular weight fraction of urine) that act as ligands for apical vomeronasal receptors were decreased by 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, we show that estradiol modulates odorant responses mediated by VSNs and hence paves the way for future studies to better understand the mechanisms by which odorant mediated behavior is altered by endocrine status of the animal. PMID:24680884

  19. Differences in electrophysiological properties of functionally identified nociceptive sensory neurons in an animal model of cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong Fang; Ungard, Robert; Seidlitz, Eric; Zacal, Natalie; Huizinga, Jan; Henry, James L

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone cancer pain is often severe, yet little is known about mechanisms generating this type of chronic pain. While previous studies have identified functional alterations in peripheral sensory neurons that correlate with bone tumours, none has provided direct evidence correlating behavioural nociceptive responses with properties of sensory neurons in an intact bone cancer model. Results In a rat model of prostate cancer-induced bone pain, we confirmed tactile hypersensitivity using the von Frey test. Subsequently, we recorded intracellularly from dorsal root ganglion neurons in vivo in anesthetized animals. Neurons remained connected to their peripheral receptive terminals and were classified on the basis of action potential properties, responses to dorsal root stimulation, and to mechanical stimulation of the respective peripheral receptive fields. Neurons included C-, Aδ-, and Aβ-fibre nociceptors, identified by their expression of substance P. We suggest that bone tumour may induce phenotypic changes in peripheral nociceptors and that these could contribute to bone cancer pain. Conclusions This work represents a significant technical and conceptual advance in the study of peripheral nociceptor functions in the development of cancer-induced bone pain. This is the first study to report that changes in sensitivity and excitability of dorsal root ganglion primary afferents directly correspond to mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia behaviours following prostate cancer cell injection into the femur of rats. Furthermore, our unique combination of techniques has allowed us to follow, in a single neuron, mechanical pain-related behaviours, electrophysiological changes in action potential properties, and dorsal root substance P expression. These data provide a more complete understanding of this unique pain state at the cellular level that may allow for future development of mechanism-based treatments for cancer-induced bone pain. PMID:27030711

  20. A population of glomerular glutamatergic neurons controls sensory information transfer in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Roberta; Seal, Rebecca P.; Edwards, Robert H.; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In sensory systems, peripheral organs convey sensory inputs to relay networks where information is shaped by local microcircuits before being transmitted to cortical areas. In the olfactory system, odorants evoke specific patterns of sensory neuron activity which are transmitted to output neurons in olfactory bulb glomeruli. How sensory information is transferred and shaped at this level remains still unclear. Here we employ mouse genetics, 2-photon microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, to identify a novel population of glutamatergic neurons (VGLUT3+) in the glomerular layer of the adult mouse olfactory bulb as well as several of their synaptic targets. Both peripheral and serotoninergic inputs control VGLUT3+ neurons firing. Furthermore, we show that VGLUT3+ neurons photostimulation in vivo strongly suppresses both spontaneous and odor-evoked firing of bulbar output neurons. In conclusion, we identify and characterize here a microcircuit controlling the transfer of sensory information at an early stage of the olfactory pathway. PMID:24804702

  1. Large Intercalated Neurons of Amygdala Relay Noxious Sensory Information

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenu, Thomas C.M.; Busti, Daniela; Micklem, Benjamin R.; Mansouri, Mahnaz; Magill, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Various GABAergic neuron types of the amygdala cooperate to control principal cell firing during fear-related and other behaviors, and understanding their specialized roles is important. Among GABAergic neurons, the so-called intercalated cells (ITCcs) are critically involved in the expression and extinction of fear memory. Tightly clustered small-sized spiny neurons constitute the majority of ITCcs, but they are surrounded by sparse, larger neurons (L-ITCcs) for which very little information is known. We report here a detailed neurochemical, structural and physiological characterization of rat L-ITCcs, as identified with juxtacellular recording/labeling in vivo. We supplement these data with anatomical and neurochemical analyses of nonrecorded L-ITCcs. We demonstrate that L-ITCcs are GABAergic, and strongly express metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α and GABAA receptor α1 subunit, together with moderate levels of parvalbumin. Furthermore, L-ITCcs are innervated by fibers enriched with metabotropic glutamate receptors 7a and/or 8a. In contrast to small-sized spiny ITCcs, L-ITCcs possess thick, aspiny dendrites, have highly branched, long-range axonal projections, and innervate interneurons in the basolateral amygdaloid complex. The axons of L-ITCcs also project to distant brain areas, such as the perirhinal, entorhinal, and endopiriform cortices. In vivo recorded L-ITCcs are strongly activated by noxious stimuli, such as hindpaw pinches or electrical footshocks. Consistent with this, we observed synaptic contacts on L-ITCc dendrites from nociceptive intralaminar thalamic nuclei. We propose that, during salient sensory stimulation, L-ITCcs disinhibit local and distant principal neurons, acting as “hub cells,” to orchestrate the activity of a distributed network. PMID:25653362

  2. Illuminating the Gap: Neuronal Cross-Talk within Sensory Ganglia and Persistent Pain.

    PubMed

    Seal, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    How primary sensory neurons contribute to persistent pain remains unclear. A novel imaging technique introduced here by Kim et al. (2016) in this issue of Neuron to view the activities of large numbers of ganglion neurons simultaneously analyzes the importance of neuronal cross-talk in pain transmission. PMID:27608756

  3. ERK2 Alone Drives Inflammatory Pain But Cooperates with ERK1 in Sensory Neuron Survival

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Daniel E.; Alter, Benedict J.; Satomoto, Maiko; Morgan, Clinton D.; Davidson, Steve; Vogt, Sherri K.; Norman, Megan E.; Gereau, Graydon B.; Demaro, Joseph A.; Landreth, Gary E.; Golden, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) are highly homologous yet distinct components of signal transduction pathways known to regulate cell survival and function. Recent evidence indicates an isoform-specific role for ERK2 in pain processing and peripheral sensitization. However, the function of ERK2 in primary sensory neurons has not been directly tested. To dissect the isoform-specific function of ERK2 in sensory neurons, we used mice with Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of ERK2 in Nav1.8+ sensory neurons that are predominantly nociceptors. We find that ERK2, unlike ERK1, is required for peripheral sensitization and cold sensation. We also demonstrate that ERK2, but not ERK1, is required to preserve epidermal innervation in a subset of peptidergic neurons. Additionally, deletion of both ERK isoforms in Nav1.8+ sensory neurons leads to neuron loss not observed with deletion of either isoform alone, demonstrating functional redundancy in the maintenance of sensory neuron survival. Thus, ERK1 and ERK2 exhibit both functionally distinct and redundant roles in sensory neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT ERK1/2 signaling affects sensory neuron function and survival. However, it was not clear whether ERK isoform-specific roles exist in these processes postnatally. Previous work from our laboratory suggested either functional redundancy of ERK isoforms or a predominant role for ERK2 in pain; however, the tools to discriminate between these possibilities were not available at the time. In the present study, we use new genetic knock-out lines to demonstrate that ERK2 in sensory neurons is necessary for development of inflammatory pain and for postnatal maintenance of peptidergic epidermal innervation. Interestingly, postnatal loss of both ERK isoforms leads to a profound loss of sensory neurons. Therefore, ERK1 and ERK2 display both functionally distinct and redundant roles in sensory neurons. PMID:26109671

  4. Chronic itch development in sensory neurons requires BRAF signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhong-Qiu; Huo, Fu-Quan; Jeffry, Joseph; Hampton, Lori; Demehri, Shadmehr; Kim, Seungil; Liu, Xian-Yu; Barry, Devin M.; Wan, Li; Liu, Zhong-Chun; Li, Hui; Turkoz, Ahu; Ma, Kaijie; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Kopan, Raphael; Battey, James F.; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Zhou-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Chronic itch, or pruritus, is associated with a wide range of skin abnormalities. The mechanisms responsible for chronic itch induction and persistence remain unclear. We developed a mouse model in which a constitutively active form of the serine/threonine kinase BRAF was expressed in neurons gated by the sodium channel Nav1.8 (BRAFNav1.8 mice). We found that constitutive BRAF pathway activation in BRAFNav1.8 mice results in ectopic and enhanced expression of a cohort of itch-sensing genes, including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and MAS-related GPCR member A3 (MRGPRA3), in nociceptors expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). BRAFNav1.8 mice showed de novo neuronal responsiveness to pruritogens, enhanced pruriceptor excitability, and heightened evoked and spontaneous scratching behavior. GRP receptor expression was increased in the spinal cord, indicating augmented coding capacity for itch subsequent to amplified pruriceptive inputs. Enhanced GRP expression and sustained ERK phosphorylation were observed in sensory neurons of mice with allergic contact dermatitis– or dry skin–elicited itch; however, spinal ERK activation was not required for maintaining central sensitization of itch. Inhibition of either BRAF or GRP signaling attenuated itch sensation in chronic itch mouse models. These data uncover RAF/MEK/ERK signaling as a key regulator that confers a subset of nociceptors with pruriceptive properties to initiate and maintain long-lasting itch sensation. PMID:24216512

  5. In Vivo Analysis of the Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Afferent Regulation of Chick Cochlear Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Carzoli, Kathryn L.; Hyson, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of approximately 20-30% of neurons in the chick nucleus magnocellularis (NM). One early event in NM neuronal degradation is the disruption of their ribosomes. This can be visualized in the first few hours following cochlea removal using Y10B, an antibody that recognizes ribosomal RNA. Previous studies using a brain slice preparation suggest that maintenance of ribosomal integrity in NM neurons requires metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation. Isolating the brain slice in vitro, however, may eliminate other potential sources of trophic support and only allows for evaluation of the early changes that occur in NM neurons following deafferentation. Consequently, it is not known if mGluR activation is truly required for the maintenance of NM neurons in the intact system. The current experiments evaluated the importance of mGluRs in vivo. The effects of short-term receptor blockade were assessed through Y10B labeling and the effects of long-term blockade were assessed through stereological counting of NM neurons in Nissl-stained tissue. mGluR antagonists or vehicle were administered intracerebroventricularly following unilateral cochlea removal. Vehicle-treated subjects replicated the previously reported effects of cochlea removal, showing lighter Y10B-labeling and fewer Nissl-stained NM neurons on the deafened side of the brain. Blockade of mGluRs prevented the rapid activity-dependent difference in Y10B labeling, and in some cases, had the reverse effect, yielding lighter labeling of NM neurons on the intact side of the brain. Similarly, mGluR blockade over longer survival periods resulted in a reduction in number of cells on both intact and deafferented sides of the brain, and in some cases, yielded a reverse effect of fewer neurons on the intact side versus deafened side. These data are consistent with in vitro findings and suggest that mGluR activation plays a vital role in the afferent maintenance of NM neurons. PMID

  6. A New Regulatory Mechanism for Kv7.2 Protein During Neuropathy: Enhanced Transport from the Soma to Axonal Terminals of Injured Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Elsa; Roza, Carolina; Jackson, Nieka; López-García, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Kv7.2 channel expression has been reported to decrease in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following the induction of a peripheral neuropathy while other experiments show that Kv7.2 accumulates in peripheral neuromas. The mechanisms underlying these novel expression patterns are poorly understood. Here we use immunofluorescence methods to analyze Kv7.2 protein expression changes in sensory neurons following peripheral axotomy and the potential role of axonal transport. Results indicate that DRG neurons express Kv7.2 in ~16% of neurons and that this number decreases by about 65% after axotomy. Damaged neurons were identified in DRG by application of the tracer Fluoro-ruby at the site of injury during surgery. Reduction of Kv7.2 expression was particularly strong in damaged neurons although some loss was also found in putative uninjured neurons. In parallel to the decrease in the soma of axotomized sensory neurons, Kv7.2 accumulated at neuromatose fiber endings. Blockade of axonal transport with either vinblastine (VLB) or colchicine (COL) abolished Kv7.2 redistribution in neuropathic animals. Channel distribution rearrangements did not occur following induction of inflammation in the hind paw. Behavioral tests indicate that protein rearrangements within sensory afferents are essential to the development of allodynia under neuropathic conditions. These results suggest that axotomy enhances axonal transport in injured sensory neurons, leading to a decrease of somatic expression of Kv7.2 protein and a concomitant accumulation in damaged fiber endings. Localized changes in channel expression patterns under pathological conditions may create novel opportunities for Kv7.2 channel openers to act as analgesics. PMID:26696829

  7. A New Regulatory Mechanism for Kv7.2 Protein During Neuropathy: Enhanced Transport from the Soma to Axonal Terminals of Injured Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Elsa; Roza, Carolina; Jackson, Nieka; López-García, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Kv7.2 channel expression has been reported to decrease in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following the induction of a peripheral neuropathy while other experiments show that Kv7.2 accumulates in peripheral neuromas. The mechanisms underlying these novel expression patterns are poorly understood. Here we use immunofluorescence methods to analyze Kv7.2 protein expression changes in sensory neurons following peripheral axotomy and the potential role of axonal transport. Results indicate that DRG neurons express Kv7.2 in ~16% of neurons and that this number decreases by about 65% after axotomy. Damaged neurons were identified in DRG by application of the tracer Fluoro-ruby at the site of injury during surgery. Reduction of Kv7.2 expression was particularly strong in damaged neurons although some loss was also found in putative uninjured neurons. In parallel to the decrease in the soma of axotomized sensory neurons, Kv7.2 accumulated at neuromatose fiber endings. Blockade of axonal transport with either vinblastine (VLB) or colchicine (COL) abolished Kv7.2 redistribution in neuropathic animals. Channel distribution rearrangements did not occur following induction of inflammation in the hind paw. Behavioral tests indicate that protein rearrangements within sensory afferents are essential to the development of allodynia under neuropathic conditions. These results suggest that axotomy enhances axonal transport in injured sensory neurons, leading to a decrease of somatic expression of Kv7.2 protein and a concomitant accumulation in damaged fiber endings. Localized changes in channel expression patterns under pathological conditions may create novel opportunities for Kv7.2 channel openers to act as analgesics. PMID:26696829

  8. Analysis of HSV viral reactivation in explants of sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Anne-Marie W.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    As with all Herpesviruses, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has both a lytic replication phase and a latency-reactivation cycle. During lytic replication, there is an ordered cascade of viral gene expression that leads to the synthesis of infectious viral progeny. In contrast, latency is characterized by the lack of significant lytic gene expression and the absence of infectious virus. Reactivation from latency is characterized by the re-entry of the virus into the lytic replication cycle and the production of recurrent disease. This unit describes the establishment of the mouse sensory neuron model of HSV-1 latency-reactivation as a useful in vivo system for the analysis of mechanisms involved in latency and reactivation. Assays including the determination of viral yields, immunohistochemical/immunofluorescent detection of viral antigens, and mRNA quantitation are used in experiments designed to investigate the network of cellular and viral proteins regulating HSV-1 lytic infection, latency, and reactivation. PMID:25367271

  9. Identification of motor neurons and a mechanosensitive sensory neuron in the defecation circuitry of Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Bingxue; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2014-01-01

    Defecation allows the body to eliminate waste, an essential step in food processing for animal survival. In contrast to the extensive studies of feeding, its obligate counterpart, defecation, has received much less attention until recently. In this study, we report our characterizations of the defecation behavior of Drosophila larvae and its neural basis. Drosophila larvae display defecation cycles of stereotypic frequency, involving sequential contraction of hindgut and anal sphincter. The defecation behavior requires two groups of motor neurons that innervate hindgut and anal sphincter, respectively, and can excite gut muscles directly. These two groups of motor neurons fire sequentially with the same periodicity as the defecation behavior, as revealed by in vivo Ca2+ imaging. Moreover, we identified a single mechanosensitive sensory neuron that innervates the anal slit and senses the opening of the intestine terminus. This anus sensory neuron relies on the TRP channel NOMPC but not on INACTIVE, NANCHUNG, or PIEZO for mechanotransduction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03293.001 PMID:25358089

  10. Mutant SOD1 accumulation in sensory neurons does not associate with endoplasmic reticulum stress features: Implications for differential vulnerability of sensory and motor neurons to SOD1 toxicity.

    PubMed

    Taiana, Michela; Sassone, Jenny; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previous papers showed that mutant SOD1 accumulates and undergoes misfolding in motor neurons and that the specific interaction of mutant SOD1 with derlin-1 leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Because evidence shows that mutant SOD1 expression also damages sensory neurons, we hypothesized that, similarly to motor neurons, the sensory neurons of ALS mouse model SOD1(G93A) accumulate mutant/misfolded SOD1 and suffer from ER stress and UPR activation. Our results reveal that SOD1(G93A) sensory neurons accumulate mutant/misfolded SOD1 but, surprisingly, do not suffer from ER stress and UPR activation. Moreover, the sensory neurons do not express detectable levels of the SOD1 interactor derlin-1. These results suggest a potential molecular mechanism underlying the differential vulnerability of motor and sensory neurons to mutant SOD1 toxicity. PMID:27241719

  11. Nociceptive sensory neurons drive interleukin-23-mediated psoriasiform skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Paust, Silke; Wood, John N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2014-06-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbours specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17-producing γδ T (γδT17) cells, the aberrant activation of which by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibres. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear. We exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod, which induces IL-23-dependent psoriasis-like inflammation. Here we show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and Nav1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in imiquimod-exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23-dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were markedly reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response. These findings indicate that TRPV1(+)Nav1.8(+) nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  12. Nociceptive Sensory Neurons Drive Interleukin-23 Mediated Psoriasiform Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Wood, John N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbors specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17 producing γδ T cells (γδT17), whose aberrant activation by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation1–4. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibers. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear5,6. Here, we have exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod (IMQ), which induces IL-23 dependent psoriasis-like inflammation7,8. We show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and NaV1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors9–11, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in IMQ exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23 dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were dramatically reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response12. These findings indicate that TRPV1+NaV1.8+ nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  13. Distinct signaling of Drosophila chemoreceptors in olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li-Hui; Jing, Bi-Yang; Yang, Dong; Zeng, Xiankun; Shen, Ying; Tu, Yuhai; Luo, Dong-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) rely primarily on two types of chemoreceptors, odorant receptors (Ors) and ionotropic receptors (Irs), to convert odor stimuli into neural activity. The cellular signaling of these receptors in their native OSNs remains unclear because of the difficulty of obtaining intracellular recordings from Drosophila OSNs. Here, we developed an antennal preparation that enabled the first recordings (to our knowledge) from targeted Drosophila OSNs through a patch-clamp technique. We found that brief odor pulses triggered graded inward receptor currents with distinct response kinetics and current–voltage relationships between Or- and Ir-driven responses. When stimulated with long-step odors, the receptor current of Ir-expressing OSNs did not adapt. In contrast, Or-expressing OSNs showed a strong Ca2+-dependent adaptation. The adaptation-induced changes in odor sensitivity obeyed the Weber–Fechner relation; however, surprisingly, the incremental sensitivity was reduced at low odor backgrounds but increased at high odor backgrounds. Our model for odor adaptation revealed two opposing effects of adaptation, desensitization and prevention of saturation, in dynamically adjusting odor sensitivity and extending the sensory operating range. PMID:26831094

  14. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of Sensory Neurons Alters Neuronal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Martha F.; Cook, W. James; Roth, Frederick P.; Zhu, Jia; Holman, Holly; Knipe, David M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2003-01-01

    The persistence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the diseases that it causes in the human population can be attributed to the maintenance of a latent infection within neurons in sensory ganglia. Little is known about the effects of latent infection on the host neuron. We have addressed the question of whether latent HSV infection affects neuronal gene expression by using microarray transcript profiling of host gene expression in ganglia from latently infected versus mock-infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. 33P-labeled cDNA probes from pooled ganglia harvested at 30 days postinfection or post-mock infection were hybridized to nylon arrays printed with 2,556 mouse genes. Signal intensities were acquired by phosphorimager. Mean intensities (n = 4 replicates in each of three independent experiments) of signals from mock-infected versus latently infected ganglia were compared by using a variant of Student's t test. We identified significant changes in the expression of mouse neuronal genes, including several with roles in gene expression, such as the Clk2 gene, and neurotransmission, such as genes encoding potassium voltage-gated channels and a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We confirmed the neuronal localization of some of these transcripts by using in situ hybridization. To validate the microarray results, we performed real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses for a selection of the genes. These studies demonstrate that latent HSV infection can alter neuronal gene expression and might provide a new mechanism for how persistent viral infection can cause chronic disease. PMID:12915567

  15. Functional properties of monkey motor cortex neurones receiving afferent input from the hand and fingers

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    1. Records have been made from area 4 of the cerebral cortex in five conscious monkeys. The properties of 216 neurones responsive to natural stimulation of the hand and fingers have been investigated. 2. 46% of these neurones responded only to cutaneous stimulation (especially light brushing across the glabrous skin) and a further 38% responded only to movement of the digits. 4% responded to brief prods of the hand. 12% of the sample responded to more than one stimulus modality. 3. Many hand-input neurones, including pyramidal tract neurones, responded at short-latency (8-15 msec) to light mechanical stimulation of the hand and to weak electrical stimulation of the median nerve. 4. Responsive neurones were found at all depths of the cortical grey matter. Responses of shortest latency were encountered in neurones probably located in layers IV and V. 5. The behaviour of eighty hand-input neurones was analysed during a simple, stereotyped task which involved pulling a lever and collecting a food reward from a small well. For comparison, the activity of 117 neurones with inputs from the wrist, elbow or shoulder was also analysed. 6. Nearly all hand-input neurones modulated their activity either before (48/80) or during (29/80) the retrieval of the reward which required precision grip between index finger and thumb. Many were silent during proximal arm movements and some displayed activity patterns independent of these movements. 7. By contrast, the activity of many neurones with proximal arm (elbow, shoulder) inputs was unrelated to food retrieval and manipulation, but well related to arm movements. 8. Forty-three of the eighty neurones had cutaneous input from the hand. Twenty-seven were active before hand contact. Thirty-five modulated their discharge when contact was made (twenty-one excitation, fourteen inhibition). 9. Most hand-input neurones were more active during fractionated movements of the hand or fingers than during power or ball grips requiring

  16. Morphology and Intrinsic Excitability of Regenerating Sensory and Motor Neurons Grown on a Line Micropattern

    PubMed Central

    Benzina, Ouafa; Cloitre, Thierry; Martin, Marta; Raoul, Cédric; Gergely, Csilla; Scamps, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Axonal regeneration is one of the greatest challenges in severe injuries of peripheral nerve. To provide the bridge needed for regeneration, biological or synthetic tubular nerve constructs with aligned architecture have been developed. A key point for improving axonal regeneration is assessing the effects of substrate geometry on neuronal behavior. In the present study, we used an extracellular matrix-micropatterned substrate comprising 3 µm wide lines aimed to physically mimic the in vivo longitudinal axonal growth of mice peripheral sensory and motor neurons. Adult sensory neurons or embryonic motoneurons were seeded and processed for morphological and electrical activity analyses after two days in vitro. We show that micropattern-guided sensory neurons grow one or two axons without secondary branching. Motoneurons polarity was kept on micropattern with a long axon and small dendrites. The micro-patterned substrate maintains the growth promoting effects of conditioning injury and demonstrates, for the first time, that neurite initiation and extension could be differentially regulated by conditioning injury among DRG sensory neuron subpopulations. The micro-patterned substrate impacts the excitability of sensory neurons and promotes the apparition of firing action potentials characteristic for a subclass of mechanosensitive neurons. The line pattern is quite relevant for assessing the regenerative and developmental growth of sensory and motoneurons and offers a unique model for the analysis of the impact of geometry on the expression and the activity of mechanosensitive channels in DRG sensory neurons. PMID:25329060

  17. Influence of nasotrigeminal afferents on medullary respiratory neurones and upper airway patency in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dutschmann, M; Paton, J F R

    2002-05-01

    Noxious stimulation of the nasal mucosa evokes a nasotrigeminal reflex (diving response), consisting of apnoea, bradycardia and vasoconstriction. However, the central mechanisms underlying the respiratory component remain unclear. Here, we describe the influence of nasotrigeminal stimulation (NS) on different types of ventral medullary respiratory neurones and upper airway patency in the rat. In an arterially perfused working heart-brainstem preparation (WHBP), NS was induced by either irrigation of the nasal passage with cold saline (100-200 microl) or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ethmoidal nerve (EN5, 20 Hz, 10 s, 100 micros, 0.5-2 V). Both stimuli evoked apnoea, bradycardia, a pressor response, persistent discharge in the recurrent laryngeal nerve and marked glottal adduction (P<0.001). NS evoked a distinct pattern of response in respiratory neurones: inspiratory (I) neurones ceased firing and hyperpolarized (n=19), while postinspiratory neurones depolarized (n=10) and discharged persistently. The latency of EN5-evoked synaptic responses (excitatory to postinspiratory neurones 12.3+/-2.8 ms, n=10; inhibitory to inspiratory neurones 11.8+/-1.9 ms; n=19) was comparable. During the NS-evoked apnoea burst discharges were superimposed on a maintained level of tonic activity recorded from both the recurrent laryngeal nerve (n=4) and some postinspiratory neurones (n=7). The physiological significance of these "apnoeic rhythms" is discussed. We conclude that the cardiorespiratory components of the diving response are mediated by activation of distinct sets of postinspiratory respiratory neurones. PMID:11976936

  18. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Sam M; Andresen, Michael C; Aicher, Sue A

    2016-03-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  19. Persistent Adaptations in Afferents to Ventral Tegmental Dopamine Neurons after Opiate Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kaufling, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Protracted opiate withdrawal is accompanied by altered responsiveness of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, including a loss of DA cell response to morphine, and by behavioral alterations, including affective disorders. GABAergic neurons in the tail of the ventral tegmental area (tVTA), also called the rostromedial tegmental nucleus, are important for behavioral responses to opiates. We investigated the tVTA–VTA circuit in rats after chronic morphine exposure to determine whether tVTA neurons participate in the loss of opiate-induced disinhibition of VTA DA neurons observed during protracted withdrawal. In vivo recording revealed that VTA DA neurons, but not tVTA GABAergic neurons, are tolerant to morphine after 2 weeks of withdrawal. Optogenetic stimulation of tVTA neurons inhibited VTA DA neurons similarly in opiate-naive and long-term withdrawn rats. However, tVTA inactivation increased VTA DA activity in opiate-naive rats, but not in withdrawn rats, resembling the opiate tolerance effect in DA cells. Thus, although inhibitory control of DA neurons by tVTA is maintained during protracted withdrawal, the capacity for disinhibitory control is impaired. In addition, morphine withdrawal reduced both tVTA neural activity and tonic glutamatergic input to VTA DA neurons. We propose that these changes in glutamate and GABA inputs underlie the apparent tolerance of VTA DA neurons to opiates after chronic exposure. These alterations in the tVTA–VTA DA circuit could be an important factor in opiate tolerance and addiction. Moreover, the capacity of the tVTA to inhibit, but not disinhibit, DA cells after chronic opiate exposure may contribute to long-term negative affective states during withdrawal. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopaminergic (DA) cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are the origin of a brain reward system and are critically involved in drug abuse. Morphine has long been known to affect VTA DA cells via GABAergic interneurons. Recently, GABAergic neurons

  20. Temporal resolution of general odor pulses by olfactory sensory neurons in American cockroaches

    PubMed

    Lemon; Getz

    1997-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological evidence indicates that insect pheromone sensory neurons are able to resolve pulses of pheromone concentration as they occur downwind from a point source, but the abilities of insect sensory neurons that are sensitive to general odors to respond to pulsatile stimuli are unknown. The temporal response characteristics of olfactory sensory neurons of female American cockroaches Periplaneta americana in response to general odors were measured using a series of short odor pulses (20­400 ms). Odor pulses were delivered to olfactory sensilla in a moving airstream controlled by electromagnetic valves. The responses of sensory neurons were recorded using a tungsten electrode placed at the base of the sensillum. The temporal responses of sensory neurons followed the temporal changes in stimulus concentration, which were estimated by replacing the odorant with oil smoke and measuring the concentration of smoke passing through a light beam. Spike frequency varied with odorant concentration with surprisingly fine temporal resolution. Cockroach olfactory sensory neurons were able reliably to follow 25 ms pulses of the pure odorant 1-hexanol and 50 ms pulses of the complex odor blend coconut oil. Lower concentrations of odorants elicited responses with lower peak spike frequencies that still retained the temporal resolution of the stimulus pulses. Thus, responses of olfactory sensory neurons can reflect the fine structures of non-uniform distributions of general odorants in a turbulent odor plume as well as the average odorant concentration. PMID:9319720

  1. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release

    PubMed Central

    Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Hu, Zhitao; Schafer, William R.; Kaplan, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus) and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH), touch sensitive (ALM and PLM), and stretch sensing (DVA) neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states. PMID:26154367

  2. Dopaminergic Presynaptic Modulation of Nigral Afferents: Its Role in the Generation of Recurrent Bursting in Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata Neurons

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Aceves, José; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernández, Ricardo; Plata, Víctor; Ibañez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown the functions associated with activation of dopamine presynaptic receptors in some substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) afferents: (i) striatonigral terminals (direct pathway) posses presynaptic dopamine D1-class receptors whose action is to enhance inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and GABA transmission. (ii) Subthalamonigral terminals posses D1- and D2-class receptors where D1-class receptor activation enhances and D2-class receptor activation decreases excitatory postsynaptic currents. Here we report that pallidonigral afferents posses D2-class receptors (D3 and D4 types) that decrease inhibitory synaptic transmission via presynaptic modulation. No action of D1-class agonists was found on pallidonigral synapses. In contrast, administration of D1-receptor antagonists greatly decreased striatonigral IPSCs in the same preparation, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels help in maintaining the function of the striatonigral (direct) pathway. When both D3 and D4 type receptors were blocked, pallidonigral IPSCs increased in amplitude while striatonigral connections had no significant change, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels are repressing a powerful inhibition conveyed by pallidonigral synapses (a branch of the indirect pathway). We then blocked both D1- and D2-class receptors to acutely decrease direct pathway (striatonigral) and enhance indirect pathways (subthalamonigral and pallidonigral) synaptic force. The result was that most SNr projection neurons entered a recurrent bursting firing mode similar to that observed during Parkinsonism in both patients and animal models. These results raise the question as to whether the lack of dopamine in basal ganglia output nuclei is enough to generate some pathological signs of Parkinsonism. PMID:21347219

  3. Oxytocin hyperpolarizes cultured duodenum myenteric intrinsic primary afferent neurons by opening BK(Ca) channels through IP₃ pathway.

    PubMed

    Che, Tongtong; Sun, Hui; Li, Jingxin; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Dexiao; Xue, Bing; Liu, Kejing; Zhang, Min; Kunze, Wolfgang; Liu, Chuanyong

    2012-05-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is clinically important in gut motility and constitutively reduces duodenum contractility. Intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs), whose physiological classification is as AH cells, are the 1st neurons of the peristaltic reflex pathway. We set out to investigate if this inhibitory effect is mediated by IPANs and to identify the ion channel(s) and intracellular signal transduction pathway that are involved in this effect. Myenteric neurons were isolated from the longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparation of rat duodenum and cultured for 16-24 h before electrophysiological recording in whole cell mode and AH cells identified by their electrophysiological characteristics. The cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺](i) ) of isolated neurons was measured using calcium imaging. The concentration of IP(3) in the LMMP and the OT secreted from the LMMP were measured using ELISA. The oxytocin receptor (OTR) and large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels, as well as the expression of OT and the IPAN marker calbindin 28 K, on the myenteric plexus neurons were localized using double-immunostaining techniques. We found that administration of OT (10⁻⁷ to 10⁻⁵ M) dose dependently hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the total outward current. The OTR antagonist atosiban or the BK(Ca) channel blocker iberiotoxin (IbTX) blocked the effects of OT suggesting that the increased outward current resulted from BK(Ca) channel opening. OTR and the BK(Ca) α subunit were co-expressed on a subset of myenteric neurons at the LMMP. NS1619 (10⁻⁵ M, a BK(Ca) channel activator) increased the outward current similar to the effect of OT. OT administration also increased [Ca²⁺](i) and the OT-evoked outward current was significantly attenuated by thapsigargin (10⁻⁶ M) or CdCl₂. The effect of OT on the BK(Ca) current was also blocked by pre-treatment with the IP₃ receptor antagonist 2-APB (10⁻⁴ M

  4. Painful nerve injury increases plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in axotomized sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) is the principal means by which sensory neurons expel Ca2+ and thereby regulate the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and the processes controlled by this critical second messenger. We have previously found that painful nerve injury decreases resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and activity-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ accumulation in axotomized sensory neurons. Here we examine the contribution of PMCA after nerve injury in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Results PMCA function was isolated in dissociated sensory neurons by blocking intracellular Ca2+ sequestration with thapsigargin, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration was recorded with Fura-2 fluorometry. Compared to control neurons, the rate at which depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients resolved was increased in axotomized neurons after spinal nerve ligation, indicating accelerated PMCA function. Electrophysiological recordings showed that blockade of PMCA by vanadate prolonged the action potential afterhyperpolarization, and also decreased the rate at which neurons could fire repetitively. Conclusion We found that PMCA function is elevated in axotomized sensory neurons, which contributes to neuronal hyperexcitability. Accelerated PMCA function in the primary sensory neuron may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain, and thus its modulation could provide a new pathway for peripheral treatment of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. PMID:22713297

  5. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  6. Membrane stiffening by STOML3 facilitates mechanosensation in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanmei; Andolfi, Laura; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Lazzarino, Marco; Hu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Sensing force is crucial to maintain the viability of all living cells. Despite its fundamental importance, how force is sensed at the molecular level remains largely unknown. Here we show that stomatin-like protein-3 (STOML3) controls membrane mechanics by binding cholesterol and thus facilitates force transfer and tunes the sensitivity of mechano-gated channels, including Piezo channels. STOML3 is detected in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. In mouse sensory neurons, depletion of cholesterol and deficiency of STOML3 similarly and interdependently attenuate mechanosensitivity while modulating membrane mechanics. In heterologous systems, intact STOML3 is required to maintain membrane mechanics to sensitize Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels. In C57BL/6N, but not STOML3−/− mice, tactile allodynia is attenuated by cholesterol depletion, suggesting that membrane stiffening by STOML3 is essential for mechanical sensitivity. Targeting the STOML3–cholesterol association might offer an alternative strategy for control of chronic pain. PMID:26443885

  7. Activity-dependent genes in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Fischl, Adrian M; Heron, Paula M; Stromberg, Arnold J; McClintock, Timothy S

    2014-06-01

    Activity-dependent survival of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) may allow animals to tune their olfactory systems to match their odor environment. Activity-dependent genes should play important roles in this process, motivating experiments to identify them. Both unilateral naris occlusion of mice for 6 days and genetic silencing of OSNs decreased S100A5, Lrrc3b, Kirrel2, Slc17a6, Rasgrp4, Pcp4l1, Plcxd3, and Kcnn2 while increasing Kirrel3. Naris occlusion also decreased Eml5, Ptprn, and Nphs1. OSN number was unchanged and stress-response mRNAs were unaffected after 6 days of naris occlusion. This leaves odor stimulation as the most likely cause of differential abundance of these mRNAs, but through a mechanism that is slow or indirect for most because 30-40 min of odor stimulation increased only 3 of 11 mRNAs decreased by naris occlusion: S100A5, Lrrc3b, and Kirrel2. Odorant receptor (OR) mRNAs were significantly more variable than the average mRNA, consistent with difficulty in reliably detecting changes in these mRNAs after 6 days of naris occlusion. One OR mRNA, Olfr855, was consistently decreased, however. These results suggest that the latency from the cessation of odor stimulation to effects on activity-dependent OSN survival must be a week or more in juvenile mice. PMID:24692514

  8. Activity-Dependent Genes in Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Activity-dependent survival of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) may allow animals to tune their olfactory systems to match their odor environment. Activity-dependent genes should play important roles in this process, motivating experiments to identify them. Both unilateral naris occlusion of mice for 6 days and genetic silencing of OSNs decreased S100A5, Lrrc3b, Kirrel2, Slc17a6, Rasgrp4, Pcp4l1, Plcxd3, and Kcnn2 while increasing Kirrel3. Naris occlusion also decreased Eml5, Ptprn, and Nphs1. OSN number was unchanged and stress-response mRNAs were unaffected after 6 days of naris occlusion. This leaves odor stimulation as the most likely cause of differential abundance of these mRNAs, but through a mechanism that is slow or indirect for most because 30–40min of odor stimulation increased only 3 of 11 mRNAs decreased by naris occlusion: S100A5, Lrrc3b, and Kirrel2. Odorant receptor (OR) mRNAs were significantly more variable than the average mRNA, consistent with difficulty in reliably detecting changes in these mRNAs after 6 days of naris occlusion. One OR mRNA, Olfr855, was consistently decreased, however. These results suggest that the latency from the cessation of odor stimulation to effects on activity-dependent OSN survival must be a week or more in juvenile mice. PMID:24692514

  9. Extracellular pH regulates excitability of vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Cichy, Annika; Ackels, Tobias; Tsitoura, Chryssanthi; Kahan, Anat; Gronloh, Nina; Söchtig, Melanie; Engelhardt, Corinna H; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Müller, Frank; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) plays a critical role in semiochemical detection and social communication. Vomeronasal stimuli are typically secreted in various body fluids. Following direct contact with urine deposits or other secretions, a peristaltic vascular pump mediates fluid entry into the recipient's VNO. Therefore, while vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) sample various stimulatory semiochemicals dissolved in the intraluminal mucus, they might also be affected by the general physicochemical properties of the "solvent." Here, we report cycle stage-correlated variations in urinary pH among female mice. Estrus-specific pH decline is observed exclusively in urine samples from sexually experienced females. Moreover, patch-clamp recordings in acute VNO slices reveal that mouse VSNs reliably detect extracellular acidosis. Acid-evoked responses share the biophysical and pharmacological hallmarks of the hyperpolarization-activated current Ih. Mechanistically, VSN acid sensitivity depends on a pH-induced shift in the voltage-dependence of Ih activation that causes the opening of HCN channels at rest, thereby increasing VSN excitability. Together, our results identify extracellular acidification as a potent activator of vomeronasal Ih and suggest HCN channel-dependent vomeronasal gain control of social chemosignaling. Our data thus reveal a potential mechanistic basis for stimulus pH detection in rodent chemosensory communication. PMID:25740530

  10. Sensory experience regulates cortical inhibition by inducing IGF1 in VIP neurons.

    PubMed

    Mardinly, A R; Spiegel, I; Patrizi, A; Centofante, E; Bazinet, J E; Tzeng, C P; Mandel-Brehm, C; Harmin, D A; Adesnik, H; Fagiolini, M; Greenberg, M E

    2016-03-17

    Inhibitory neurons regulate the adaptation of neural circuits to sensory experience, but the molecular mechanisms by which experience controls the connectivity between different types of inhibitory neuron to regulate cortical plasticity are largely unknown. Here we show that exposure of dark-housed mice to light induces a gene program in cortical vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons that is markedly distinct from that induced in excitatory neurons and other subtypes of inhibitory neuron. We identify Igf1 as one of several activity-regulated genes that are specific to VIP neurons, and demonstrate that IGF1 functions cell-autonomously in VIP neurons to increase inhibitory synaptic input onto these neurons. Our findings further suggest that in cortical VIP neurons, experience-dependent gene transcription regulates visual acuity by activating the expression of IGF1, thus promoting the inhibition of disinhibitory neurons and affecting inhibition onto cortical pyramidal neurons. PMID:26958833

  11. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Chih H.; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K+ channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance, but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  12. L-glutamate may be the fast excitatory transmitter of Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, N; Kandel, E R

    1993-01-01

    Although modulation of synaptic transmission between Aplysia mechanosensory and motor neurons has been an important model for processes thought to underlie simple forms of learning and memory, the nature of the fast excitatory transmitter utilized by the sensory neurons has remained obscure. To identify the sensory neuron transmitter, we first examined the detailed properties of the synaptic response evoked in motor neurons cocultured with pleural sensory neurons. The excitatory postsynaptic current had a nonlinear current-voltage relation with a reversal potential between 0 and 10 mV and a plateau region between -40 and -70 mV. When the concentration of Mg2+ in the artificial sea water was lowered to 5 mM, the current-voltage relation of the excitatory postsynaptic current became linear, suggesting that Mg2+ blocks the postsynaptic receptor in a voltage-dependent manner. After screening a variety of small molecules, we found that L-glutamate could mimic the actions of the sensory neuron transmitter: responses to L-glutamate also had a reversal potential between 0 and 10 mV and a nonlinear current-voltage relation that could be made linear by lowering external Mg2+. To demonstrate further similarity of action between L-glutamate and the endogenous transmitter, we utilized four antagonists (kynurenate, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, D-aspartate, and D-glutamate) to block in a dose-dependent manner the actions of L-glutamate and the natural transmitter. We therefore suggest that the sensory neurons use a glutamate-like transmitter and favor L-glutamate itself, because no other naturally occurring amino acid that we have studied has had similar actions. As the postsynaptic receptor for the sensory neuron transmitter is weakly blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by Mg2+, the excitatory receptors innervated by the Aplysia sensory neuron may represent a distant precursor of the vertebrate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. PMID:8102205

  13. Neuropeptide profile changes in sensory neurones after partial prepyloric resection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Rytel, L; Całka, J

    2016-07-01

    This report details the first identification of the sources of sensory innervation of the porcine stomach prepyloric region. The Fast Blue (FB) retrograde tracing technique detected the sensory prepyloric neurons in the bilateral nodose ganglia (NGs) as well as thoracic dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). Double-labelling immunofluorescence demonstrated expression of substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and galanin (GAL) in both NGs and DRGs. Additionally, we found that partial resection of the stomach prepyloric area increased expression of the SP, CGRP, NOS, VIP and GAL in the prepyloric sensory neurons. In the control left NGs, both a higher total number of FB-positive perikarya as well as a higher percentage of the peptides expressing prepyloric neurons were visualized than in the right NGs. However, compared to the control group, prepyloric resection evoked greater increases in peptide expression in the right-side NGs sensory neurons. In the ganglia of this side, the proportion of the SP-IR perikarya increased by approximately 15%, while CGRP-IR increased by 28%, NOS-IR 14%, VIP-IR 43% and GAL-IR 13%. On the opposite left side, the ganglia proportion of the CGRP-IR perikarya increased by approximately 10%, while NOS-IR increased by 3%, VIP-IR 36% and GAL-IR by 2%. The only decrease (by 5%) was observed in the case of SP expression. We also found that 92% of the sensory neurons originated from NGs and 8% from DRGs. Our results indicate that, in the pig, SP, CGRP, NOS, VIP and GAL participate in the vagal sensory transduction from the stomach prepyloric area. Moreover, increased expression of the peptides and neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase in the sensory neurons following transection of their peripheral dendrites suggests their possible participation in the neuronal recovery and/or reinnervation process. PMID:27142347

  14. Limb-state information encoded by peripheral and central somatosensory neurons: Implications for an afferent interface

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Douglas J.; London, Brian M.; Hokanson, James A.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Torres, Ricardo R.; Zaaimi, Boubker; Miller, Lee E.

    2013-01-01

    A major issue to be addressed in the development of neural interfaces for prosthetic control is the need for somatosensory feedback. Here, we investigate two possible strategies: electrical stimulation of either dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or primary somatosensory cortex (S1). In each approach, we must determine a model that reflects the representation of limb state in terms of neural discharge. This model can then be used to design stimuli that artificially activate the nervous system to convey information about limb state to the subject. Electrically activating DRG neurons using naturalistic stimulus patterns, modeled on recordings made during passive limb movement, evoked activity in S1 that was similar to that of the original movement. We also found that S1 neural populations could accurately discriminate different patterns of DRG stimulation across a wide range of stimulus pulse-rates. In studying the neural coding of limb-state in S1, we also decoded the kinematics of active limb movement using multi-electrode recordings in the monkey. Neurons having both proprioceptive and cutaneous receptive fields contributed equally to this decoding. Some neurons were most informative of limb state in the recent past, but many others appeared to signal upcoming movements suggesting that they also were modulated by an efference copy signal. Finally, we show that a monkey was able to detect stimulation through a large percentage of electrodes implanted in area 2. We discuss the design of appropriate stimulus paradigms for conveying time-varying limb state information, and the relative merits and limitations of central and peripheral approaches. PMID:21878419

  15. Pontomesencephalic Tegmental Afferents to VTA Non-dopamine Neurons Are Necessary for Appetitive Pavlovian Learning.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Wang, Dong V; Tsou, Jen-Hui; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Billy T; Deisseroth, Karl; Ikemoto, Satoshi; Bonci, Antonello

    2016-09-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) receives phenotypically distinct innervations from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg). While PPTg-to-VTA inputs are thought to play a critical role in stimulus-reward learning, direct evidence linking PPTg-to-VTA phenotypically distinct inputs in the learning process remains lacking. Here, we used optogenetic approaches to investigate the functional contribution of PPTg excitatory and inhibitory inputs to the VTA in appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. We show that photoinhibition of PPTg-to-VTA cholinergic or glutamatergic inputs during cue presentation dampens the development of anticipatory approach responding to the food receptacle during the cue. Furthermore, we employed in vivo optetrode recordings to show that photoinhibition of PPTg cholinergic or glutamatergic inputs significantly decreases VTA non-dopamine (non-DA) neural activity. Consistently, photoinhibition of VTA non-DA neurons disrupts the development of cue-elicited anticipatory approach responding. Taken together, our study reveals a crucial regulatory mechanism by PPTg excitatory inputs onto VTA non-DA neurons during appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. PMID:27568569

  16. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  17. Response properties of whisker-associated primary afferent neurons following infraorbital nerve transection with microsurgical repair in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Zanoun, Rami R; Carvell, George E; Simons, Daniel J; Washington, Kia M

    2016-03-01

    The rodent whisker/trigeminal system, characterized by high spatial and temporal resolution, provides an experimental model for developing new therapies for improving sensory functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, we use controlled whisker stimulation and single-unit recordings of trigeminal ganglion cells to examine in detail the nature and time course of functional recovery of mechanoreceptive afferents following nerve transection with microsurgical repair of the infraorbital nerve (ION) branch of the trigeminal nerve in adult rats. Response measures include rapid vs. slow adaptation, firing rate, interspike intervals, latency, and angular (directional) tuning. Whisker-evoked responses, readily observable by 3 wk post-transection, recover progressively for at least the next 5 wk. All cells in transected animals, as in control cases, responded to deflections of single whiskers only, but topography within the ganglion was clearly disrupted. The time course and extent of recovery of quantitative response measures were receptor dependent. Cells displaying slowly adapting (SA) properties recovered more quickly than rapidly adapting (RA) populations, and for some response measures-notably evoked firing rates-closely approached or attained control levels by 8 wk post-transection. Angular tuning of RA cells was slightly better than control units, whereas SA tuning did not differ from control values. Nerve conduction times and refractory periods, examined separately using electrical stimulation of the ION, were slower than normal in all transected animals and poorly reflected recovery of whisker-evoked response latencies and interspike intervals. Results underscore the need for multiple therapeutic strategies that target different aspects of functional restitution following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26792886

  18. An In Vitro Adult Mouse Muscle-nerve Preparation for Studying the Firing Properties of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joy A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn; Wilkinson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sensory neurons innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs encode length and force changes essential to proprioception. Additional afferent fibers monitor other characteristics of the muscle environment, including metabolite buildup, temperature, and nociceptive stimuli. Overall, abnormal activation of sensory neurons can lead to movement disorders or chronic pain syndromes. We describe the isolation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and nerve for in vitro study of stretch-evoked afferent responses in the adult mouse. Sensory activity is recorded from the nerve with a suction electrode and individual afferents can be analyzed using spike sorting software. In vitro preparations allow for well controlled studies on sensory afferents without the potential confounds of anesthesia or altered muscle perfusion. Here we describe a protocol to identify and test the response of muscle spindle afferents to stretch. Importantly, this preparation also supports the study of other subtypes of muscle afferents, response properties following drug application and the incorporation of powerful genetic approaches and disease models in mice. PMID:25285602

  19. Inputs from regularly and irregularly discharging vestibular nerve afferents to secondary neurons in squirrel monkey vestibular nuclei. III. Correlation with vestibulospinal and vestibuloocular output pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Goldberg, J. M.; Highstein, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. A previous study measured the relative contributions made by regularly and irregularly discharging afferents to the monosynaptic vestibular nerve (Vi) input of individual secondary neurons located in and around the superior vestibular nucleus of barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Here, the analysis is extended to more caudal regions of the vestibular nuclei, which are a major source of both vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways. As in the previous study, antidromic stimulation techniques are used to classify secondary neurons as oculomotor or spinal projecting. In addition, spinal-projecting neurons are distinguished by their descending pathways, their termination levels in the spinal cord, and their collateral projections to the IIIrd nucleus. 2. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded intracellularly from secondary neurons as shocks of increasing strength were applied to Vi. Shocks were normalized in terms of the threshold (T) required to evoke field potentials in the vestibular nuclei. As shown previously, the relative contribution of irregular afferents to the total monosynaptic Vi input of each secondary neuron can be expressed as a %I index, the ratio (x100) of the relative sizes of the EPSPs evoked by shocks of 4 x T and 16 x T. 3. Antidromic stimulation was used to type secondary neurons as 1) medial vestibulospinal tract (MVST) cells projecting to spinal segments C1 or C6; 2) lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST) cells projecting to C1, C6; or L1; 3) vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) cells projecting both to the IIIrd nucleus and by way of the MVST to C1 or C6; and 4) vestibuloocular (VOR) neurons projecting to the IIIrd nucleus but not to the spinal cord. Most of the neurons were located in the lateral vestibular nucleus (LV), including its dorsal (dLV) and ventral (vLV) divisions, and adjacent parts of the medial (MV) and descending nuclei (DV). Cells receiving quite different proportions of their direct inputs

  20. The evolutionarily conserved transcription factor PRDM12 controls sensory neuron development and pain perception.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Vanja; Cole, Tiffany; Van Campenhout, Claude; Khoung, Thang M; Leung, Calvin; Vermeiren, Simon; Novatchkova, Maria; Wenzel, Daniel; Cikes, Domagoj; Polyansky, Anton A; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Meixner, Arabella; Bellefroid, Eric J; Neely, G Gregory; Penninger, Josef M

    2015-01-01

    PR homology domain-containing member 12 (PRDM12) belongs to a family of conserved transcription factors implicated in cell fate decisions. Here we show that PRDM12 is a key regulator of sensory neuronal specification in Xenopus. Modeling of human PRDM12 mutations that cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) revealed remarkable conservation of the mutated residues in evolution. Expression of wild-type human PRDM12 in Xenopus induced the expression of sensory neuronal markers, which was reduced using various human PRDM12 mutants. In Drosophila, we identified Hamlet as the functional PRDM12 homolog that controls nociceptive behavior in sensory neurons. Furthermore, expression analysis of human patient fibroblasts with PRDM12 mutations uncovered possible downstream target genes. Knockdown of several of these target genes including thyrotropin-releasing hormone degrading enzyme (TRHDE) in Drosophila sensory neurons resulted in altered cellular morphology and impaired nociception. These data show that PRDM12 and its functional fly homolog Hamlet are evolutionary conserved master regulators of sensory neuronal specification and play a critical role in pain perception. Our data also uncover novel pathways in multiple species that regulate evolutionary conserved nociception. PMID:25891934

  1. Selective silencing of NaV1.7 decreases excitability and conduction in vagal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Muroi, Yukiko; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Canning, Brendan J; Hughes, Stephen A; Walsh, Stacey; Sigg, Martin; Carr, Michael J; Undem, Bradley J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract There has been much information learned in recent years about voltage gated sodium channel (NaV) subtypes in somatosensory pain signalling, but much less is known about the role of specific sodium channel subtypes in the vagal sensory system. In this study, we developed a technique using adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to directly introduce shRNA against NaV1.7 subtype gene into the vagal sensory ganglia of guinea pigsin vivo. NaV1.7 gene expression in nodose ganglia was effectively and selectively reduced without influencing the expression of other sodium channel subtype genes including NaV1.1, 1.2, 1.3 1.6, 1.8, or 1.9. Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, this effect on NaV1.7 gene expression coincided with a reduction in tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current, a requirement for much larger depolarizing stimulus to initiate action potentials, and reduction in repetitive action potential discharge. Extracellular recordings in the isolated vagus nerve revealed that the conduction of action potentials in sensory A- and C-fibres in many neurons was effectively abolished after NaV1.7 shRNA introduction. Moreover, bilateral NaV1.7 shRNA injected animals survived for several months and the vagal reflex behaviour, exemplified by citric acid-induced coughing, was significantly suppressed. These data indicate that selectively silencing NaV1.7 ion channel expression leads to a substantial decrease in neural excitability and conduction block in vagal afferent nerves. PMID:22005676

  2. Opening of pannexin- and connexin-based channels increases the excitability of nodose ganglion sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Mauricio A; Alcayaga, Julio; Verdugo, Christian A; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc; Sáez, Pablo J; Fernández, Ricardo; León, Luis E; Sáez, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) are the main glia in sensory ganglia. They surround neuronal bodies and form a cap that prevents the formation of chemical or electrical synapses between neighboring neurons. SGCs have been suggested to establish bidirectional paracrine communication with sensory neurons. However, the molecular mechanism involved in this cellular communication is unknown. In the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes present connexin43 (Cx43) hemichannels and pannexin1 (Panx1) channels, and the opening of these channels allows the release of signal molecules, such as ATP and glutamate. We propose that these channels could play a role in glia-neuron communication in sensory ganglia. Therefore, we studied the expression and function of Cx43 and Panx1 in rat and mouse nodose-petrosal-jugular complexes (NPJcs) using confocal immunofluorescence, molecular and electrophysiological techniques. Cx43 and Panx1 were detected in SGCs and in sensory neurons, respectively. In the rat and mouse, the electrical activity of vagal nerve increased significantly after nodose neurons were exposed to a Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-free solution, a condition that increases the open probability of Cx hemichannels. This response was partially mimicked by a cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the last 10 amino acids of Cx43 (TAT-Cx43CT). Enhanced neuronal activity was reduced by Cx hemichannel, Panx1 channel and P2X7 receptor blockers. Moreover, the role of Panx1 was confirmed in NPJc, because in those from Panx1 knockout mice showed a reduced increase of neuronal activity induced by Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-free extracellular conditions. The data suggest that Cx hemichannels and Panx channels serve as paracrine communication pathways between SGCs and neurons by modulating the excitability of sensory neurons. PMID:24999316

  3. Opening of pannexin- and connexin-based channels increases the excitability of nodose ganglion sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Alcayaga, Julio; Verdugo, Christian A.; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc; Sáez, Pablo J.; Fernández, Ricardo; León, Luis E.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) are the main glia in sensory ganglia. They surround neuronal bodies and form a cap that prevents the formation of chemical or electrical synapses between neighboring neurons. SGCs have been suggested to establish bidirectional paracrine communication with sensory neurons. However, the molecular mechanism involved in this cellular communication is unknown. In the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes present connexin43 (Cx43) hemichannels and pannexin1 (Panx1) channels, and the opening of these channels allows the release of signal molecules, such as ATP and glutamate. We propose that these channels could play a role in glia-neuron communication in sensory ganglia. Therefore, we studied the expression and function of Cx43 and Panx1 in rat and mouse nodose-petrosal-jugular complexes (NPJcs) using confocal immunofluorescence, molecular and electrophysiological techniques. Cx43 and Panx1 were detected in SGCs and in sensory neurons, respectively. In the rat and mouse, the electrical activity of vagal nerve increased significantly after nodose neurons were exposed to a Ca2+/Mg2+-free solution, a condition that increases the open probability of Cx hemichannels. This response was partially mimicked by a cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the last 10 amino acids of Cx43 (TAT-Cx43CT). Enhanced neuronal activity was reduced by Cx hemichannel, Panx1 channel and P2X7 receptor blockers. Moreover, the role of Panx1 was confirmed in NPJc, because in those from Panx1 knockout mice showed a reduced increase of neuronal activity induced by Ca2+/Mg2+-free extracellular conditions. The data suggest that Cx hemichannels and Panx channels serve as paracrine communication pathways between SGCs and neurons by modulating the excitability of sensory neurons. PMID:24999316

  4. Isolation of Sensory Neurons of Aplysia californica for Patch Clamp Recordings of Glutamatergic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Fieber, Lynne A.; Carlson, Stephen L.; Kempsell, Andrew T.; Greer, Justin B.; Schmale, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The marine gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica has a venerable history as a model of nervous system function, with particular significance in studies of learning and memory. The typical preparations for such studies are ones in which the sensory and motoneurons are left intact in a minimally dissected animal, or a technically elaborate neuronal co-culture of individual sensory and motoneurons. Less common is the isolated neuronal preparation in which small clusters of nominally homogeneous neurons are dissociated into single cells in short term culture. Such isolated cells are useful for the biophysical characterization of ion currents using patch clamp techniques, and targeted modulation of these conductances. A protocol for preparing such cultures is described. The protocol takes advantage of the easily identifiable glutamatergic sensory neurons of the pleural and buccal ganglia, and describes their dissociation and minimal maintenance in culture for several days without serum. PMID:23892672

  5. Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis in Sensory Neurons of Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Hamid Reza; Soleimani Mehranjani, Malek; Shariatzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Haddadi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) undergo apoptosis after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to investigate sensory neuron death and the mechanism involved in the death of these neurons in cultured DRG. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, L5 DRG from adult mouse were dissected and incubated in culture medium for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Freshly dissected and cultured DRG were then fixed and sectioned using a cryostat. Morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis were investigated using fluorescent staining (Propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342) and the terminal Deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method respectively. To study the role of caspases, general caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD.fmk, 100 μM) and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 were used. Results: After 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in culture, sensory neurons not only displayed morphological features of apoptosis but also they appeared TUNEL positive. The application of Z-VAD.fmk inhibited apoptosis in these neurons over the same time period. In addition, intense activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found both in the cytoplasm and the nuclei of these neurons after 24 and 48 hours. Conclusion: Results of the present study show caspase-dependent apoptosis in the sensory neurons of cultured DRG from adult mouse. PMID:24027661

  6. Spinal sensory projection neuron responses to spinal cord stimulation are mediated by circuits beyond gate control

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhe C.; Janik, John J.; Peters, Ryan V.; Chen, Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a therapy used to treat intractable pain with a putative mechanism of action based on the Gate Control Theory. We hypothesized that sensory projection neuron responses to SCS would follow a single stereotyped response curve as a function of SCS frequency, as predicted by the Gate Control circuit. We recorded the responses of antidromically identified sensory projection neurons in the lumbar spinal cord during 1- to 150-Hz SCS in both healthy rats and neuropathic rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). The relationship between SCS frequency and projection neuron activity predicted by the Gate Control circuit accounted for a subset of neuronal responses to SCS but could not account for the full range of observed responses. Heterogeneous responses were classifiable into three additional groups and were reproduced using computational models of spinal microcircuits representing other interactions between nociceptive and nonnociceptive sensory inputs. Intrathecal administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, increased spontaneous and evoked activity in projection neurons, enhanced excitatory responses to SCS, and reduced inhibitory responses to SCS, suggesting that GABAA neurotransmission plays a broad role in regulating projection neuron activity. These in vivo and computational results challenge the Gate Control Theory as the only mechanism underlying SCS and refine our understanding of the effects of SCS on spinal sensory neurons within the framework of contemporary understanding of dorsal horn circuitry. PMID:25972582

  7. Histochemical localization of galactose-containing glycoconjugates in sensory neurons and their processes in the central and peripheral nervous system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Streit, W J; Schulte, B A; Balentine, D J; Spicer, S S

    1985-10-01

    We studied the distribution of sugar residues in the oligosaccharide chains of complex carbohydrates in tissue sections of rat spinal cord, brainstem, and sensory ganglia using twelve lectin-horseradish peroxidase conjugates. Glycoconjugates containing terminal galactose residues were localized apparently in the Golgi apparatus in a population of predominantly small B-type neurons in spinal and trigeminal ganglia. Large A-type neurons rarely showed reactivity with galactose-binding lectins. A cells stained for glycoconjugates with N-glycosidically linked oligosaccharides and glycogen. The central and peripheral processes of the small neurons, mostly unmyelinated C fibers in sensory roots and spinal nerves, contained an abundance of glycoconjugates with terminal alpha-galactose residues. The central projections and terminals of small to medium-sized primary sensory neurons in the spinal and trigeminal ganglia were visualized in Lissauer's tract and the substantia gelatinosa in the spinal cord, and in the spinal trigeminal tract and the nucleus trigeminus in the lower medulla with lectins specific for terminal alpha-galactose residues. In addition, fibers of the solitary system and the area postrema were reactive with these lectins. The peripheral and central nervous system elements with affinity for galactopyranosyl-specific lectins correspond in distribution with neuroanatomical regions thought to be involved in the transmission and relay of somatic and visceral afferent inputs such as pain and temperature. Such specific localization of a glycosubstance to a distinct subpopulation of neurons and their peripheral and central processes suggests that the particular glycoconjugate may be of physiological significance. PMID:4045182

  8. Ketamine-mediated afferent-specific presynaptic transmission blocks in low-threshold and sex-specific subpopulation of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons of rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Yin, Lei; Fan, Yao; Wang, Ye; Chen, Wei-Ran; Chen, Pei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Xiao-Long; Sun, Hong-Li; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine enhances autonomic activity, and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptor afferents are more susceptible to be blocked by ketamine than myelinated A-types. However, the presynaptic transmission block in low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) is not elucidated. Methods Action potentials (APs) and excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were investigated in BRNs/barosensitive neurons identified by conduction velocity (CV), capsaicin-conjugated with Iberiotoxin-sensitivity and fluorescent dye using intact nodose slice and brainstem slice in adult female rats. The expression of mRNA and targeted protein for NMDAR1 was also evaluated. Results Ketamine time-dependently blocked afferent CV in Ah-types in nodose slice with significant changes in AP discharge. The concentration-dependent inhibition of ketamine on AP discharge profiles were also assessed and observed using isolated Ah-type BRNs with dramatic reduction in neuroexcitability. In brainstem slice, the 2nd-order capsaicin-resistant EPSCs were identified and ∼50% of them were blocked by ketamine concentration-dependently with IC50 estimated at 84.4 μM compared with the rest (708.2 μM). Interestingly, the peak, decay time constant, and area under curve of EPSCs were significantly enhanced by 100 nM iberiotoxin in ketamine-more sensitive myelinated NTS neurons (most likely Ah-types), rather than ketamine-less sensitive ones (A-types). Conclusions These data have demonstrated, for the first time, that low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type BRNs in nodose and Ah-type barosensitive neurons in NTS are more susceptible to ketamine and may play crucial roles in not only mean blood pressure regulation but also buffering dynamic changes in pressure, as well as the ketamine-mediated cardiovascular dysfunction through sexual-dimorphic baroreflex afferent pathway. PMID:26675761

  9. VGLUT2-Dependent Sensory Neurons in the TRPV1 Population Regulate Pain and Itch

    PubMed Central

    Lagerström, Malin C.; Rogoz, Katarzyna; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Persson, Emma; Reinius, Björn; Nordenankar, Karin; Ölund, Caroline; Smith, Casey; Mendez, José Alfredo; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Wood, John N.; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa; Kullander, Klas

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The natural response to itch sensation is to scratch, which relieves the itch through an unknown mechanism. Interaction between pain and itch has been frequently demonstrated, and the selectivity hypothesis of itch, based on data from electrophysiological and behavioral experiments, postulates the existence of primary pain afferents capable of repressing itch. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 2 in a subpopulation of neurons partly overlapping with the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) primary afferents resulted in a dramatic increase in itch behavior accompanied by a reduced responsiveness to thermal pain. The increased itch behavior was reduced by administration of antihistaminergic drugs and by genetic deletion of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, demonstrating a dependence on VGLUT2 to maintain normal levels of both histaminergic and nonhistaminergic itch. This study establishes that VGLUT2 is a major player in TRPV1 thermal nociception and also serves to regulate a normal itch response. PMID:21040852

  10. The loss of scents: do defects in olfactory sensory neuron development underlie human disease?

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2015-06-01

    The olfactory system is a fascinating and beguiling sensory system: olfactory sensory neurons detect odors underlying behaviors essential for mate choice, food selection, and escape from predators, among others. These sensory neurons are unique in that they have dendrites contacting the outside world, yet their first synapse lies in the central nervous system. The information entering the central nervous system is used to create odor memories that play a profound role in recognition of individuals, places, and appropriate foods. Here, the structure of the olfactory epithelium is given as an overview to discuss the origin of the olfactory placode, the plasticity of the olfactory sensory neurons, and finally the origins of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuroendocrine cells. For the purposes of this review, the development of the peripheral sensory system will be analyzed, incorporating recently published studies highlighting the potential novelties in development mechanisms. Specifically, an emerging model where the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb develop simultaneously from a continuous neurectoderm patterned at the end of gastrulation, and the multiple origins of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuroendocrine cells associated with the olfactory sensory system development will be presented. Advances in the understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying olfactory sensory system development allows for a more thorough understanding of the potential causes of human disease. PMID:26111003

  11. Identification of bladder and colon afferents in the nodose ganglia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Hubscher, Charles H

    2014-11-01

    The sensory neurons innervating the urinary bladder and distal colon project to similar regions of the central nervous system and often are affected simultaneously by various diseases and disorders, including spinal cord injury. Anatomical and physiological commonalities between the two organs involve the participation of shared spinally derived pathways, allowing mechanisms of communication between the bladder and colon. Prior electrophysiological data from our laboratory suggest that the bladder also may receive sensory innervation from a nonspinal source through the vagus nerve, which innervates the distal colon as well. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether anatomical evidence exists for vagal innervation of the male rat urinary bladder and to assess whether those vagal afferents also innervate the colon. Additionally, the relative contribution to bladder and colon sensory innervation of spinal and vagal sources was determined. By using lipophilic tracers, neurons that innervated the bladder and colon in both the nodose ganglia (NG) and L6/S1 and L1/L2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were quantified. Some single vagal and spinal neurons provided dual innervation to both organs. The proportions of NG afferents labeled from the bladder did not differ from spinal afferents labeled from the bladder when considering the collective population of total neurons from either group. Our results demonstrate evidence for vagal innervation of the bladder and colon and suggest that dichotomizing vagal afferents may provide a neural mechanism for cross-talk between the organs. PMID:24845615

  12. Environmental Enrichment Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury: Induced Neuronal Hyperexcitability in Supragranular Layers of Sensory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Alwis, Dasuni Sathsara; Yan, Edwin Bingbing; Johnstone, Victoria; Carron, Simone; Hellewell, Sarah; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina; Rajan, Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces significant long-term neuronal hyperexcitability in supragranular layers of sensory cortex, coupled with persistent sensory deficits. Hence, we aimed to investigate whether brain plasticity induced by environmental enrichment (EE) could attenuate abnormal neuronal and sensory function post-TBI. TBI (n = 22) and sham control (n = 21) animals were randomly assigned housing in either single or enriched conditions for 7-9 weeks. Then, in terminal experiments, extracellular recordings were obtained from barrel cortex neurons in response to whisker motion, including those mimicking motion in awake animals undertaking different tasks. Long-term EE exposure (6 weeks) attenuated TBI-induced hyperexcitability in layers 2-3, such that neuronal activity in TBI animals exposed to EE was restored to control levels. Little to no EE-induced changes in population neuronal responses occurred in input layer 4 and output layer 5. However, single-cell responses demonstrated EE-induced hypoexcitation in L4 post-TBI. EE was also able to fully ameliorate sensory hypersensitivity post-TBI, although it was not found to improve motor function. Long-term enrichment post-TBI induces changes at both the population and single-cell level in the sensory cortex, where EE may act to restore the excitation/inhibition balance in supragranular cortical layers. PMID:26715144

  13. Monosynaptic convergence of somatic and visceral C-fiber afferents on projection and local circuit neurons in lamina I: a substrate for referred pain

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Liliana L.; Fernandes, Elisabete C.; Sivado, Miklos; Kokai, Eva; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Referred pain is a phenomenon of feeling pain at a site other than the site of the painful stimulus origin. It arises from a pathological mixing of nociceptive processing pathways for visceral and somatic inputs. Despite numerous studies based on unit recordings from spinal and supraspinal neurons, the exact mechanism and site of this mixing within the central nervous system are not known. Here, we selectively recorded from lamina I neurons, using a visually guided patch-clamp technique, in thoracic spinal cord preparation with preserved intercostal (somatic) and splanchnic (visceral) nerves. We show that somatic and visceral C fibers converge monosynaptically onto a group of lamina I neurons, which includes both projection and local circuit neurons. Other groups of lamina I neurons received inputs from either somatic or visceral afferents. We have also identified a population of lamina I local circuit neurons showing overall inhibitory responses upon stimulation of both nerves. Thus, the present data allow us to draw two major conclusions. First, lamina I of the spinal cord is the first site in the central nervous system where somatic and visceral pathways directly converge onto individual projection and local circuit neurons. Second, the mechanism of somatovisceral convergence is complex and based on functional integration of monosynaptic and polysynaptic excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs in specific groups of neurons. This complex pattern of convergence provides a substrate for alterations in the balance between visceral and somatic inputs causing referred pain. PMID:26098437

  14. Changes induced by peripheral nerve injury in the morphology and nanomechanics of sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Szabo, Vivien; Lucas, Olivier; Saab, Marie-belle; Cloitre, Thierry; Scamps, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Martin, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury in vivo promotes a regenerative growth in vitro characterized by an improved neurite regrowth. Knowledge of the conditioning injury effects on both morphology and mechanical properties of live sensory neurons could be instrumental to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this regenerative growth. In the present study, we use differential interference contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, does not increase somatic size of sensory neurons from adult mice lumbar dorsal root ganglia but promotes the appearance of longer and larger neurites and growth cones. AFM on live neurons is also employed to investigate changes in morphology and membrane mechanical properties of somas of conditioned neurons following sciatic nerve injury. Mechanical analysis of the soma allows distinguishing neurons having a regenerative growth from control ones, although they show similar shapes and sizes.

  15. Neuro-fuzzy decoding of sensory information from ensembles of simultaneously recorded dorsal root ganglion neurons for functional electrical stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigosa, J.; Weber, D. J.; Prochazka, A.; Stein, R. B.; Micera, S.

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is used to improve motor function after injury to the central nervous system. Some FES systems use artificial sensors to switch between finite control states. To optimize FES control of the complex behavior of the musculo-skeletal system in activities of daily life, it is highly desirable to implement feedback control. In theory, sensory neural signals could provide the required control signals. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of deriving limb-state estimates from the firing rates of primary afferent neurons recorded in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These studies used multiple linear regression (MLR) methods to generate estimates of limb position and velocity based on a weighted sum of firing rates in an ensemble of simultaneously recorded DRG neurons. The aim of this study was to test whether the use of a neuro-fuzzy (NF) algorithm (the generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks (GD-FNN)) could improve the performance, robustness and ability to generalize from training to test sets compared to the MLR technique. NF and MLR decoding methods were applied to ensemble DRG recordings obtained during passive and active limb movements in anesthetized and freely moving cats. The GD-FNN model provided more accurate estimates of limb state and generalized better to novel movement patterns. Future efforts will focus on implementing these neural recording and decoding methods in real time to provide closed-loop control of FES using the information extracted from sensory neurons.

  16. Altered Ion Channel/Receptor Expression and Function in Extrinsic Sensory Neurons: The Cause of and Solution to Chronic Visceral Pain?

    PubMed

    Brierley, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is unique in that it is innervated by several distinct populations of neurons, whose cell bodies are either intrinsic (enteric, viscerofugal) or extrinsic (sympathetic, sensory afferents) to the wall of the gut. We are usually completely unaware of the continuous, complicated orchestra of functions that these neurons conduct. However, for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) or functional gastrointestinal disorders, such as Functional Dyspepsia (FD) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) altered gastrointestinal motility, discomfort and pain are common, debilitating symptoms. Whilst bouts of inflammation underlie the symptoms associated with IBD, over the past few years there is increased pre-clinical and clinical evidence that infection and inflammation are key risk factors for the development of several functional gastrointestinal disorders, in particular IBS. There is a strong correlation between prior exposure to gut infection and symptom occurrence; with the duration and severity of the initial illness the strongest associated risk factors. This review discusses the current body of evidence for neuroplasticity during inflammation and how in many cases fails to reset back to normal, long after healing of the damaged tissues. Recent evidence suggests that the altered expression and function of key ion channels and receptors within extrinsic sensory neurons play fundamental roles in the aberrant pain sensation associated with these gastrointestinal diseases and disorders. PMID:27379637

  17. CHRONIC INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA AFFECTS INTEGRATION OF SENSORY INPUT BY NEURONS IN THE NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII

    PubMed Central

    Kline, David D.

    2010-01-01

    The autonomic nervous and respiratory systems, as well as their coupling, adapt over a wide range of conditions. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a model for recurrent apneas and induces alterations in breathing and increases in sympathetic nerve activity which may ultimately result in hypertension if left untreated. These alterations are believed to be due to increases in the carotid body chemoreflex pathway. Here we present evidence that the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), the central brainstem termination site of chemoreceptor afferents, expresses a form of synaptic plasticity that increases overall nTS activity following intermittent hypoxia. Following CIH, an increase in presynaptic spontaneous neurotransmitter release occurs under baseline conditions. Furthermore, during and following afferent stimulation there is an augmentation of spontaneous transmitter release that occurs out of synchrony with sensory stimulation. On the other hand, afferent evoked synchronous transmitter release is attenuated. Overall, this shift from synchronous to asynchronous transmitter release enhances nTS cellular discharge. The role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in CIH-induced plasticity is also discussed. Dopamine attenuates synaptic transmission in nTS cells by blockade of N-type calcium channels, and this mechanism occurs tonically following normoxia and CIH. This dopaminergic pathway, however, is not altered in CIH. Taken together, alterations in nTS synaptic activity may play a role in the changes of chemoreflex function and cardiorespiratory activity in the CIH apnea model. PMID:20416405

  18. NKCC1 Activation Is Required for Myelinated Sensory Neurons Regeneration through JNK-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mòdol, Laura; Santos, Daniel; Cobianchi, Stefano; González-Pérez, Francisco; López-Alvarez, Víctor; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-05-13

    After peripheral nerve injury, axons are able to regenerate, although specific sensory reinnervation and functional recovery are usually worse for large myelinated than for small sensory axons. The mechanisms that mediate the regeneration of different sensory neuron subpopulations are poorly known. The Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) is particularly relevant in setting the intracellular chloride concentration. After axotomy, increased NKCC1 phosphorylation has been reported to be important for neurite outgrowth of sensory neurons; however, the mechanisms underlying its effects are still unknown. In the present study we used in vitro and in vivo models to assess the differential effects of blocking NKCC1 activity on the regeneration of different types of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) neurons after sciatic nerve injury in the rat. We observed that blocking NKCC1 activity by bumetanide administration induces a selective effect on neurite outgrowth and regeneration of myelinated fibers without affecting unmyelinated DRG neurons. To further study the mechanism underlying NKCC1 effects, we also assessed the changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling under NKCC1 modulation. The inhibition of NKCC1 activity in vitro and in vivo modified pJNK1/2/3 expression in DRG neurons. Together, our study identifies a mechanism selectively contributing to myelinated axon regeneration, and point out the role of Cl(-) modulation in DRG neuron regeneration and in the activation of MAPKs, particularly those belonging to the JNK family. PMID:25972170

  19. Effects of afferent volleys from the limbs on the discharge patterns of interpositus neurones in cats anaesthetized with alpha-chloralose.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, D M; Cogdell, B; Harvey, R

    1975-01-01

    that the short latency responses of the interpositus neurones were a result of synaptic excitation via cerebellar afferents, while the ensuing inhibition was a result of post-synaptic inhibition resulting from the Purkinje cell excitation due to the afferent volleys. It is suggested that the long latency excitation is due to the afferent volleys. It is suggested that the long latency excitation is due at least in part to disinhibition resulting from long pauses in Purkinje cell firing following their activation by climbing fibre afferents. 9. The possibility that these long latency responses have a physiological significance in relation to locomotion is discussed. PMID:1151794

  20. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Grier, Bryce D; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E J

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  1. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Bryce D.; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  2. Dopamine regulates two classes of primate prefrontal neurons that represent sensory signals.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Simon N; Ott, Torben; Nieder, Andreas

    2013-08-21

    The lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), a hub of higher-level cognitive processing, is strongly modulated by midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons. The cellular mechanisms have been comprehensively studied in the context of short-term memory, but little is known about how DA regulates sensory inputs to PFC that precede and give rise to such memory activity. By preparing recipient cortical circuits for incoming signals, DA could be a powerful determinant of downstream cognitive processing. Here, we tested the hypothesis that prefrontal DA regulates the representation of sensory signals that are required for perceptual decisions. In rhesus monkeys trained to report the presence or absence of visual stimuli at varying levels of contrast, we simultaneously recorded extracellular single-unit activity and applied DA to the immediate vicinity of the neurons by micro-iontophoresis. We found that DA modulation of prefrontal neurons is not uniform but tailored to specialized neuronal classes. In one population of neurons, DA suppressed activity with high temporal precision but preserved signal/noise ratio. Neurons in this group had short visual response latencies and comprised all recorded narrow-spiking, putative interneurons. In a distinct population, DA increased excitability and enhanced signal/noise ratio by reducing response variability. These neurons had longer visual response latencies and were composed exclusively of broad-spiking, putative pyramidal neurons. By gating sensory inputs to PFC and subsequently strengthening the representation of sensory signals, DA might play an important role in shaping how the PFC initiates appropriate behavior in response to changes in the sensory environment. PMID:23966694

  3. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD. PMID:24595534

  4. Responses to sulfated steroids of female mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Celsi, Fulvio; D'Errico, Anna; Menini, Anna

    2012-11-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays an important role in many social behaviors. Using the calcium imaging technique with the dye fluo-4 we measured intracellular calcium concentration changes induced by the application of sulfated steroids to neurons isolated from the vomeronasal organ of female mice. We found that a mix of 10 sulfated steroids from the androgen, estrogen, pregnanolone, and glucocorticoid families induced a calcium response in 71% of neurons. Moreover, 31% of the neurons responded to a mix composed of 3 glucocorticoid-derived compounds, and 28% responded to a mix composed of 3 pregnanolone-derived compounds. Immunohistochemistry showed that neurons responding to sulfated steroids expressed phosphodiesterase 4A, a marker specific for apical neurons expressing V1R receptors. None of the neuron that responded to 1 mix responded also to the other, indicating a specificity of the responses. Some neurons responded to more than 1 individual component of the glucocorticoid-derived mix tested at high concentration, suggesting that these neurons are broadly tuned, although they still displayed strong specificity, remaining unresponsive to high concentrations of the ineffective compounds. PMID:22923146

  5. Mathematical Relationships between Neuron Morphology and Neurite Growth Dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster Larva Class IV Sensory Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Liang, Xin; Grace, Michael; Lee, Daniel; Howard, Jonathon

    The morphology of neurons is diverse and reflects the diversity of neuronal functions, yet the principles that govern neuronal morphogenesis are unclear. In an effort to better understand neuronal morphogenesis we will be focusing on the development of the dendrites of class IV sensory neuron in Drosophila melanogaster. In particular we attempt to determine how the the total length, and the number of branches of dendrites are mathematically related to the dynamics of neurite growth and branching. By imaging class IV neurons during early embryogenesis we are able to measure the change in neurite length l (t) as a function of time v (t) = dl / dt . We found that the distribution of v (t) is well characterized by a hyperbolic secant distribution, and that the addition of new branches per unit time is well described by a Poisson process. Combining these measurements with the assumption that branching occurs with equal probability anywhere along the dendrite we were able to construct a mathematical model that provides reasonable agreement with the observed number of branches, and total length of the dendrites of the class IV sensory neuron.

  6. A 3'UTR pumilio-binding element directs translational activation in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Julia A; Rose, Natalie C; Goldsworthy, Brett; Goga, Andrei; L'Etoile, Noelle D

    2009-01-15

    Prolonged stimulation leads to specific and stable changes in an animal's behavior. In interneurons, this plasticity requires spatial and temporal control of neuronal protein synthesis. Whether such translational control occurs in sensory neurons is not known. Adaptation of the AWC olfactory sensory neurons of C. elegans requires the cGMP-dependent protein kinase EGL-4. Here, we show that the RNA-binding PUF protein FBF-1 is required in the adult AWC for adaptation. In the odor-adapted animal, it increases translation via binding to the egl-4 3' UTR. Further, the PUF protein may localize translation near the sensory cilia and cell body. Although the RNA-binding PUF proteins have been shown to promote plasticity in development by temporally and spatially repressing translation, this work reveals that in the adult nervous system, they can work in a different way to promote experience-dependent plasticity by activating translation in response to environmental stimulation. PMID:19146813

  7. elPBN neurons regulate rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections during activation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Longhurst, John C; Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu

    2016-08-01

    The external lateral parabrachial nucleus (elPBN) within the pons and rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) contributes to central processing of excitatory cardiovascular reflexes during stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves (CSAN). However, the importance of elPBN cardiovascular neurons in regulation of rVLM activity during CSAN activation remains unclear. We hypothesized that CSAN stimulation excites the elPBN cardiovascular neurons and, in turn, increases rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections. Compared with controls, in rats subjected to microinjection of retrograde tracer into the rVLM, the numbers of elPBN neurons double-labeled with c-Fos (an immediate early gene) and the tracer were increased after CSAN stimulation (P < 0.05). The majority of these elPBN neurons contain vesicular glutamate transporter 3. In cats, epicardial bradykinin and electrical stimulation of CSAN increased the activity of elPBN cardiovascular neurons, which was attenuated (n = 6, P < 0.05) after blockade of glutamate receptors with iontophoresis of kynurenic acid (Kyn, 25 mM). In separate cats, microinjection of Kyn (1.25 nmol/50 nl) into the elPBN reduced rVLM activity evoked by both bradykinin and electrical stimulation (n = 5, P < 0.05). Excitation of the elPBN with microinjection of dl-homocysteic acid (2 nmol/50 nl) significantly increased basal and CSAN-evoked rVLM activity. However, the enhanced rVLM activity induced by dl-homocysteic acid injected into the elPBN was reversed following iontophoresis of Kyn into the rVLM (n = 7, P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiac sympathetic afferent stimulation activates cardiovascular neurons in the elPBN and rVLM sequentially through a monosynaptic (glutamatergic) excitatory elPBN-rVLM pathway. PMID:27225950

  8. TRPA1 is a major oxidant sensor in murine airway sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bessac, Bret F.; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A.; Escalera, Jasmine; Cohn, Lauren; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the airways are finely tuned to respond to reactive chemicals threatening airway function and integrity. Nasal trigeminal nerve endings are particularly sensitive to oxidants formed in polluted air and during oxidative stress as well as to chlorine, which is frequently released in industrial and domestic accidents. Oxidant activation of airway neurons induces respiratory depression, nasal obstruction, sneezing, cough, and pain. While normally protective, chemosensory airway reflexes can provoke severe complications in patients affected by inflammatory airway conditions like rhinitis and asthma. Here, we showed that both hypochlorite, the oxidizing mediator of chlorine, and hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, activated Ca2+ influx and membrane currents in an oxidant-sensitive subpopulation of chemosensory neurons. These responses were absent in neurons from mice lacking TRPA1, an ion channel of the transient receptor potential (TRP) gene family. TRPA1 channels were strongly activated by hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide in primary sensory neurons and heterologous cells. In tests of respiratory function, Trpa1–/– mice displayed profound deficiencies in hypochlorite- and hydrogen peroxide–induced respiratory depression as well as decreased oxidant-induced pain behavior. Our results indicate that TRPA1 is an oxidant sensor in sensory neurons, initiating neuronal excitation and subsequent physiological responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18398506

  9. TRPA1 is a major oxidant sensor in murine airway sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bessac, Bret F; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A; Escalera, Jasmine; Cohn, Lauren; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-05-01

    Sensory neurons in the airways are finely tuned to respond to reactive chemicals threatening airway function and integrity. Nasal trigeminal nerve endings are particularly sensitive to oxidants formed in polluted air and during oxidative stress as well as to chlorine, which is frequently released in industrial and domestic accidents. Oxidant activation of airway neurons induces respiratory depression, nasal obstruction, sneezing, cough, and pain. While normally protective, chemosensory airway reflexes can provoke severe complications in patients affected by inflammatory airway conditions like rhinitis and asthma. Here, we showed that both hypochlorite, the oxidizing mediator of chlorine, and hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, activated Ca(2+) influx and membrane currents in an oxidant-sensitive subpopulation of chemosensory neurons. These responses were absent in neurons from mice lacking TRPA1, an ion channel of the transient receptor potential (TRP) gene family. TRPA1 channels were strongly activated by hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide in primary sensory neurons and heterologous cells. In tests of respiratory function, Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed profound deficiencies in hypochlorite- and hydrogen peroxide-induced respiratory depression as well as decreased oxidant-induced pain behavior. Our results indicate that TRPA1 is an oxidant sensor in sensory neurons, initiating neuronal excitation and subsequent physiological responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18398506

  10. Response properties of temporomandibular joint mechanosensitive neurons in the trigeminal sensory complex of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osuke; Tsuboi, Akito; Tabata, Takayoshi; Takafuji, Yasuo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto

    2012-10-01

    The neurophysiological properties of neurons sensitive to TMJ movement (TMJ neurons) in the trigeminal sensory complex (Vcomp) during passive movement of the isolated condyle were examined in 46 rabbits. Discharges of TMJ neurons from the rostral part of the Vcomp were recorded with a microelectrode when the isolated condyle was moved manually and with a computer-regulated mechanostimulator. A total of 443 neurons responding to mechanical stimulation of the face and oral cavity were recorded from the brainstem. Twenty-one TMJ neurons were detected rostrocaudally from the dorsal part of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (NVsnpr), subnucleus oralis of the trigeminal spinal nucleus, and reticular formation surrounding the trigeminal motor nucleus. Most of the TMJ neurons were located in the dorso-rostral part of the NVsnpr. Of the TMJ units recorded, 90 % were slowly adapting and 26 % had an accompanying resting discharge. The majority (86 %) of the TMJ units responded to the movement of the isolated condyle in the anterior and/or ventral directions, and half were sensitive to the condyle movement in a single direction. The discharge frequencies of TMJ units increased as the condyle displacement and constant velocity (5 mm/s) increased within a 5-mm anterior displacement of the isolated condyle. Based on these results, we conclude that sensory information is processed by TMJ neurons encoding at least joint position and displacement in the physiological range of mandibular displacement. PMID:22855309

  11. Ca2+-Dependent Regulation of Ca2+ Currents in Rat Primary Afferent Neurons: Role of CaMKII and the Effect of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qingbo; Bangaru, Madhavi Latha Yadav; Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Wu, Hsiang-En; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory J.; McCallum, J. Bruce; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Currents through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (ICa) may be regulated by cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c), producing Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) or facilitation (CDF). Since ICa regulates sensory neuron excitability, altered CDI or CDF could contribute to pain generation after peripheral nerve injury. We explored this by manipulating [Ca2+]c while recording ICa in rat sensory neurons. In uninjured neurons, elevating [Ca2+]c with a conditioning prepulse (−15 mV, 2 s) inactivated ICa measured during subsequent test pulses (−15 mV, 5 ms). This inactivation was Ca2+-dependent (CDI), since it was decreased with elimination of Ca2+ influx by depolarization to above the ICa reversal potential, with high intracellular Ca2+ buffering (EGTA 10 mm or BAPTA 20 mm), and with substitution of Ba2+ for extracellular Ca2+, revealing a residual voltage-dependent inactivation. At longer latencies after conditioning (>6 s), ICa recovered beyond baseline. This facilitation also proved to be Ca2+-dependent (CDF) using the protocols limiting cytoplasmic Ca2+ elevation. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockers applied by bath (KN-93, myristoyl-AIP) or expressed selectively in the sensory neurons (AIP) reduced CDF, unlike their inactive analogues. Protein kinase C inhibition (chelerythrine) had no effect. Selective blockade of N-type Ca2+ channels eliminated CDF, whereas L-type channel blockade had no effect. Following nerve injury, CDI was unaffected, but CDF was eliminated in axotomized neurons. Excitability of sensory neurons in intact ganglia from control animals was diminished after a similar conditioning pulse, but this regulation was eliminated by injury. These findings indicate that ICa in sensory neurons is subject to both CDI and CDF, and that hyperexcitability following injury-induced loss of CDF may result from diminished CaMKII activity. PMID:22915116

  12. Central changes in primary afferent fibers following peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Lekan, H A; Doubell, T P; Allchorne, A; Woolf, C J

    1997-04-01

    Cutting or crushing rat sciatic nerve does not significantly reduce the number of central myelinated sensory axons in the dorsal roots entering the fourth and fifth lumbar segments even over very extended periods of time. Unmyelinated axons were reduced by approximately 50%, but only long after sciatic nerve lesions (four to eight months), and reinnervation of the peripheral target did not rescue these axons. This indicates that a peripheral nerve lesion sets up a slowly developing but major shift towards large afferent fiber domination of primary afferent input into the spinal cord. In addition, since myelinated axons are never lost, this is good evidence that the cells that give rise to these fibers are also not lost. If this is the case, this would indicate that adult primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons do not depend on peripheral target innervation for survival. PMID:9130791

  13. Contaminant-specific targeting of olfactory sensory neuron classes: connecting neuron class impairment with behavioural deficits.

    PubMed

    Dew, William A; Azizishirazi, Ali; Pyle, Greg G

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system of fish comprises several classes of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). The odourants L-alanine and taurocholic acid (TCA) specifically activate microvillous or ciliated OSNs, respectively, in fish. We recorded electro-olfactograms (EOG) in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; a laboratory-reared model species) and wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) whose olfactory chambers were perfused with either L-alanine or TCA to determine if OSN classes were differentially vulnerable to contaminants, in this case copper or nickel. Results were consistent in both species and demonstrated that nickel targeted and impaired microvillous OSN function, while copper targeted and impaired ciliated OSN function. This result suggests that contaminant-specific effects observed in model laboratory species extrapolate to wild fish populations. Moreover, fathead minnows exposed to copper failed to perceive a conspecific alarm cue in a choice maze, whereas those exposed to nickel could respond to the same conspecific cue. These results demonstrate that fathead minnows perceive conspecific, damage-released alarm cue by ciliated, but not microvillous, OSNs. Fish living in copper-contaminated environments may be more vulnerable to predation than those in clean lakes owing to targeted effects on ciliated OSNs. PMID:24630454

  14. Calcium-activated chloride current expression in axotomized sensory neurons: what for?

    PubMed Central

    Boudes, Mathieu; Scamps, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride currents (CaCCs) are activated by an increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Peripheral nerve injury induces the expression of CaCCs in a subset of adult sensory neurons in primary culture including mechano- and proprioceptors, though not nociceptors. Functional screenings of potential candidate genes established that Best1 is a molecular determinant for CaCC expression among axotomized sensory neurons, while Tmem16a is acutely activated by inflammatory mediators in nociceptors. In nociceptors, such CaCCs are preferentially activated under receptor-induced calcium mobilization contributing to cell excitability and pain. In axotomized mechano- and proprioceptors, CaCC activation does not promote electrical activity and prevents firing, a finding consistent with electrical silencing for growth competence of adult sensory neurons. In favor of a role in the process of neurite growth, CaCC expression is temporally correlated to neurons displaying a regenerative mode of growth. This perspective focuses on the molecular identity and role of CaCC in axotomized sensory neurons and the future directions to decipher the cellular mechanisms regulating CaCC during neurite (re)growth. PMID:22461766

  15. Injury-Associated PACAP Expression in Rat Sensory and Motor Neurons Is Induced by Endogenous BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Lina M. E.; Geremia, Nicole M.; Ying, Zhengxin; Verge, Valerie M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury results in dramatic upregulation in pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) expression in adult rat dorsal root ganglia and spinal motor neurons mirroring that described for the neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, we posited that injury-associated alterations in BDNF expression regulate the changes in PACAP expression observed in the injured neurons. The role of endogenous BDNF in induction and/or maintenance of PACAP mRNA expression in injured adult rat motor and sensory neurons was examined by intrathecally infusing or intraperitoneally injecting BDNF-specific antibodies or control IgGs immediately at the time of L4-L6 spinal nerve injury, or in a delayed fashion one week later for 3 days followed by analysis of impact on PACAP expression. PACAP mRNA in injured lumbar sensory and motor neurons was detected using in situ hybridization, allowing quantification of relative changes between experimental groups, with ATF-3 immunofluorescence serving to identify the injured subpopulation of motor neurons. Both the incidence and level of PACAP mRNA expression were dramatically reduced in injured sensory and motor neurons in response to immediate intrathecal anti-BDNF treatment. In contrast, neither intraperitoneal injections nor delayed intrathecal infusions of anti-BDNF had any discernible impact on PACAP expression. This impact on PACAP expression in response to BDNF immunoneutralization in DRG was confirmed using qRT-PCR or by using BDNF selective siRNAs to reduce neuronal BDNF expression. Collectively, our findings support that endogenous injury-associated BDNF expression is critically involved in induction, but not maintenance, of injury-associated PACAP expression in sensory and motor neurons. PMID:24968020

  16. Ventral tegmental area afferents to the prefrontal cortex maintain membrane potential 'up' states in pyramidal neurons via D(1) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B L; O'Donnell, P

    2000-12-01

    The electrophysiological nature of dopamine actions has been controversial for years, with data supporting both inhibitory and excitatory actions. In this study, we tested whether stimulation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the source of the dopamine innervation of the prefrontal cortex, would exert different responses depending on the membrane potential states that pyramidal neurons exhibit when recorded in vivo, and whether VTA stimulation would have a role in controlling transitions between these states. Prefrontal cortical neurons have a very negative resting membrane potential (down state) interrupted by plateau depolarizations (up state). Although the up state had been shown to be dependent on hippocampal afferents in nucleus accumbens neurons, our results indicate that neither hippocampal nor thalamic inputs are sufficient to drive up events in prefrontal cortical neurons. Electrical VTA stimulation resulted in a variety of actions, in many cases depending on the neuron membrane potential state. Trains of stimuli resembling burst firing evoked a long-lasting transition to the up state, an effect blocked by a D(1) antagonist and mimicked by chemical VTA stimulation. These results indicate that projections from the VTA to the prefrontal cortex may be involved in controlling membrane potential states that define assemblies of activable pyramidal neurons in this region. PMID:11073866

  17. Sensory effects of intravenous cocaine on dopamine and non-dopamine ventral tegmental area neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P. Leon; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous (iv) cocaine mimics salient somato-sensory stimuli in their ability to induce rapid physiological effects, which appear to involve its action on peripherally located neural elements and fast neural transmission via somato-sensory pathways. To further clarify this mechanism, single-unit recording with fine glass electrodes was used in awake rats to examine responses of ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons, both presumed dopamine (DA) and non-DA, to iv cocaine and tail-press, a typical somato-sensory stimulus. To exclude the contribution of DA mechanisms to the observed neuronal responses to sensory stimuli and cocaine, recordings were conducted during full DA receptor blockade (SCH23390+eticloptide). Iv cocaine (0.25 mg/kg delivered over 10 s) induces significant excitations of ~63% of long-spike (presumed DA) and ~70% of short-spike (presumed non-DA) VTA neurons. In both subgroups, neuronal excitations occurred with short latencies (4–8 s), peaked at 10–20 s (30–40% increase over baseline) and disappeared at 30–40 s after the injection onset. Most long- (67%) and short-spike (89%) VTA neurons also showed phasic responses to tail-press (5-s). All responsive long-spike cells were excited by tail-press; excitations were very rapid (peak at 1 s) and strong (100% rate increase over baseline) but brief (2–3 s). In contrast, both excitations (60%) and inhibitions (29%) were seen in short-spike cells. These responses were also rapid and transient, but excitations of short-spike units were more prolonged and sustained (10–15 s) than in long-spike cells. These data suggest that in awake animals iv cocaine, like somato-sensory stimuli, rapidly and transiently excites VTA neurons of different subtypes. Therefore, along with direct action on specific brain substrates, central effects of cocaine may occur via indirect mechanism, involving peripheral neural elements, visceral sensory nerves and rapid neural transmission. Via this mechanism, cocaine, like

  18. Sperm Affects Head Sensory Neuron in Temperature Tolerance of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Satoru; Ohta, Akane; Maruo, Ayana; Ujisawa, Tomoyo; Kuhara, Atsushi

    2016-06-28

    Tolerance to environmental temperature change is essential for the survival and proliferation of animals. The process is controlled by various body tissues, but the orchestration of activity within the tissue network has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we show that sperm affects the activity of temperature-sensing neurons (ASJ) that control cold tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic impairment of sperm caused abnormal cold tolerance, which was unexpectedly restored by impairment of temperature signaling in ASJ neurons. Calcium imaging revealed that ASJ neuronal activity in response to temperature was decreased in sperm mutant gsp-4 with impaired protein phosphatase 1 and rescued by expressing gsp-4 in sperm. Genetic analysis revealed a feedback network in which ASJ neuronal activity regulates the intestine through insulin and a steroid hormone, which then affects sperm and, in turn, controls ASJ neuronal activity. Thus, we propose that feedback between sperm and a sensory neuron mediating temperature tolerance. PMID:27320929

  19. Sensory neuron-specific GPCRs Mrgprs are itch receptors mediating chloroquine-induced pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Tang, Zongxiang; Surdenikova, Lenka; Kim, Seungil; Patel, Kush N.; Kim, Andrew; Ru, Fei; Guan, Yun; Weng, Hao-Jui; Geng, Yixun; Undem, Bradley J.; Kollarik, Marian; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Anderson, David J.; Dong, Xinzhong

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating histamine-independent itch in primary sensory neurons are largely unknown. Itch induced by chloroquine (CQ) is a common side-effect of this widely used anti-malarial drug. Here we show that Mrgprs, a family of G protein-coupled receptors expressed exclusively in peripheral sensory neurons, function as itch receptors. Mice lacking a cluster of Mrgpr genes display significant deficits in itch induced by CQ but not histamine. CQ directly excites sensory neurons in an Mrgpr-dependent manner. CQ specifically activates mouse MrgprA3 and human MrgprX1. Loss- and gain-of-function studies demonstrate that MrgprA3 is required for CQ responsiveness in mice. Furthermore, MrgprA3-expressing neurons respond to histamine and co-express Gastrin-Releasing Peptide, a peptide involved in itch sensation, and MrgprC11. Activation of these neurons with MrgprC11-specific agonist BAM8-22 induces itch in wild-type but not mutant mice. Therefore, Mrgprs may provide molecular access to itch-selective neurons and constitute novel targets for itch therapeutics. PMID:20004959

  20. Sensory neuron-specific GPCR Mrgprs are itch receptors mediating chloroquine-induced pruritus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Tang, Zongxiang; Surdenikova, Lenka; Kim, Seungil; Patel, Kush N; Kim, Andrew; Ru, Fei; Guan, Yun; Weng, Hao-Jui; Geng, Yixun; Undem, Bradley J; Kollarik, Marian; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Anderson, David J; Dong, Xinzhong

    2009-12-24

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating histamine-independent itch in primary sensory neurons are largely unknown. Itch induced by chloroquine (CQ) is a common side effect of this widely used antimalarial drug. Here, we show that Mrgprs, a family of G protein-coupled receptors expressed exclusively in peripheral sensory neurons, function as itch receptors. Mice lacking a cluster of Mrgpr genes display significant deficits in itch induced by CQ but not histamine. CQ directly excites sensory neurons in an Mrgpr-dependent manner. CQ specifically activates mouse MrgprA3 and human MrgprX1. Loss- and gain-of-function studies demonstrate that MrgprA3 is required for CQ responsiveness in mice. Furthermore, MrgprA3-expressing neurons respond to histamine and coexpress gastrin-releasing peptide, a peptide involved in itch sensation, and MrgprC11. Activation of these neurons with the MrgprC11-specific agonist BAM8-22 induces itch in wild-type but not mutant mice. Therefore, Mrgprs may provide molecular access to itch-selective neurons and constitute novel targets for itch therapeutics. PMID:20004959

  1. Cannabinoid receptor-independent actions of the aminoalkylindole WIN 55,212-2 on trigeminal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Patwardhan, Amol; Akopian, Armen N; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Flores, Christopher M

    2004-01-01

    The prototypical aminoalkylindole cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2) has been shown to produce antihyperalgesia through a peripheral mechanism of action. However, it is not known whether WIN-2 exerts this action directly via cannabinoid receptors located on primary afferents or if other, perhaps indirect or noncannabinoid, mechanisms are involved. To address this question, we have examined the specific actions of WIN-2 on trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in vitro by quantifying its ability to modulate the evoked secretion of the proinflammatory neuropeptide CGRP as well as the inflammatory mediator-induced generation of cAMP. WIN-2 evoked CGRP release from TG neurons in vitro (EC50=26 μM) in a concentration- and calcium-dependent manner, which was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor-inactive enantiomer WIN 55,212-3 (WIN-3). Moreover, WIN-2-evoked CGRP release was attenuated by the nonselective cation channel blocker ruthenium red but not by the vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine, suggesting that, unlike certain endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids, WIN-2 is not a TRPV1 agonist but rather acts at an as yet unidentified cation channel. The inhibitory effects of WIN-2 on TG neurons were also examined. WIN-2 neither inhibited capsaicin-evoked CGRP release nor did it inhibit forskolin-, isoproteranol- or prostaglandin E2-stimulated cAMP accumulation. On the other hand, WIN-2 significantly inhibited (EC50=1.7 μM) 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release by approximately 70%. WIN-2 inhibition of 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release was not reversed by antagonists of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor, but was mimicked in magnitude and potency (EC50=2.7 μM) by its cannabinoid-inactive enantiomer WIN-3. These findings indicate that WIN-2 exerts both excitatory and inhibitory effects on TG neurons, neither of which appear to be mediated by CB1, CB2 or TRPV1 receptors, but by a novel calcium-dependent mechanism. The ramifications of these results are discussed in relation

  2. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  3. SPARCL1-containing neurons in the human brainstem and sensory ganglion.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Sato, Tadasu; Yajima, Takehiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sato, Ayumi; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Shimada, Yusuke; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is a member of the osteonectin family of proteins. In this study, immunohistochemistry for SPARCL1 was performed to obtain its distribution in the human brainstem, cervical spinal cord, and sensory ganglion. SPARCL1-immunoreactivity was detected in neuronal cell bodies including perikarya and proximal dendrites, and the neuropil. The motor nuclei of the IIIrd, Vth, VIth, VIIth, IXth, Xth, XIth, and XIIth cranial nerves and spinal nerves contained many SPARCL1-immunoreactive (-IR) neurons with medium-sized to large cell bodies. Small and medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons were distributed in sensory nuclei of the Vth, VIIth, VIIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial nerves. In the medulla oblongata, the dorsal column nuclei also had small to medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons. In addition, SPARCL1-IR neurons were detected in the nucleus of the trapezoid body and pontine nucleus within the pons and the arcuate nucleus in the medulla oblongata. In the cervical spinal cord, the ventral horn contained some SPARCL1-IR neurons with large cell bodies. These findings suggest that SPARCL1-containing neurons function to relay and regulate motor and sensory signals in the human brainstem. In the dorsal root (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG), primary sensory neurons contained SPARCL1-immunoreactivity. The proportion of SPARCL1-IR neurons in the TG (mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 2.4%) was higher than in the DRG (30.6 ± 2.1%). SPARCL1-IR neurons were mostly medium-sized to large (mean ± SD, 1494.5 ± 708.3 μm(2); range, 320.4-4353.4 μm(2)) in the DRG, whereas such neurons were of various cell body sizes in the TG (mean ± SD, 1291.2 ± 532.8 μm(2); range, 209.3-4326.4 μm(2)). There appears to be a SPARCL1-containing sensory pathway in the ganglion and brainstem of the spinal and trigeminal nervous systems. PMID:27357901

  4. Sensory and autonomic innervation of the rat eyelid: neuronal origins and peptide phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Simons, E; Smith, P G

    1994-07-01

    Neuronal origins, peptide phenotypes and target distributions were determined for sensory and autonomic nerves projecting to the eyelid. The retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Ruby, was injected into the superior tarsal muscle and meibomian gland of Sprague-Dawley rats. Labelled neurons were observed within the pterygopalatine (31 +/- 6 of a total of 8238 +/- 1610 ganglion neurons), trigeminal (173 +/- 43 of 62,082 +/- 5869) and superior cervical ganglia (184 +/- 35 of 21,900 +/- 1741). Immunostaining revealed vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity (VIP-ir) in nearly all Fluoro-Ruby-labelled pterygopalatine ganglion neurons (86 +/- 5%) but only rarely in trigeminal (0.3 +/- 0.3%) or superior cervical (1.4 +/- 1.4%) ganglion neurons. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-ir was not observed in pterygopalatine or superior cervical ganglion somata, but was present in 24 +/- 4% of trigeminal neurons. Bright dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunofluorescence was observed in the majority of eyelid-projecting neurons within the superior cervical ganglia (65 +/- 5%) and lighter staining was detected in pterygopalatine neurons (63 +/- 3%), but no DBH-ir was observed in trigeminal neurons. Examination of eyelid sections revealed dense VIP-ir innervation of meibomian gland acini and vasculature and modest distribution within tarsal muscle. CGRP-ir fibers surrounded ductal and vascular elements of the meibomian gland and the perimeter of tarsal muscle. DBH-ir fibers were associated with meibomian gland blood vessels and acini, and were more densely distributed within tarsal muscle. This study provides evidence for prominent meibomian gland innervation by parasympathetic pterygopalatine ganglion VIP-ir neurons, with more restricted innervation by sensory trigeminal CGRP-ir and sympathetic neurons. Tarsal muscle receives abundant sympathetic innervation, as well as moderate parasympathetic and sensory CGRP-ir projections. The eyelid contains substantial non-CGRP-ir sensory

  5. Bradykinin Controls Pool Size of Sensory Neurons Expressing Functional δ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pettinger, Louisa; Gigout, Sylvain; Linley, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Analgesics targeting the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) may lead to fewer side effects than conventional opioid drugs, which mainly act on μ-opioid receptors (MOR), because of the less abundant expression of DOR in the CNS compared with MOR. Analgesic potential of DOR agonists increases after inflammation, an effect that may be mediated by DOR expressed in the peripheral sensory fibers. However, the expression of functional DOR at the plasma membrane of sensory neurons is controversial. Here we have used patch-clamp recordings and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to study the functional expression of DOR in sensory neurons from rat trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Real-time total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that treatment of TG and DRG cultures with the inflammatory mediator bradykinin (BK) caused robust trafficking of heterologously expressed GFP-tagged DOR to the plasma membrane. By contrast, treatment of neurons with the DOR agonist [d-Ala2, d-Leu5]-enkephalin (DADLE) caused a decrease in the membrane abundance of DOR, suggesting internalization of the receptor after agonist binding. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that DADLE inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in 23% of small-diameter TG neurons. Pretreatment with BK resulted in more than twice as many DADLE responsive neurons (54%) but did not affect the efficacy of VGCC inhibition by DADLE. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediator-induced membrane insertion of DOR into the plasma membrane of peripheral sensory neurons may underlie increased DOR analgesia in inflamed tissue. Furthermore, the majority of BK-responsive TG neurons may have a potential to become responsive to DOR ligands in inflammatory conditions. PMID:23804098

  6. Effects of Odor Stimulation on Antidromic Spikes in Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Sherrill, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Spikes were evoked in rat olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) populations by electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb nerve layer in pentobarbital anesthetized rats. The latencies and recording positions for these compound spikes showed that they originated in olfactory epithelium. Dual simultaneous recordings indicated conduction velocities in the C-fiber range, around 0.5 m/s. These spikes are concluded to arise from antidromically activated olfactory sensory neurons. Electrical stimulation at 5 Hz was used to track changes in the size and latency of the antidromic compound population spike during the odor response. Strong odorant stimuli suppressed the spike size and prolonged its latency. The latency was prolonged throughout long odor stimuli, indicating continued activation of olfactory receptor neuron axons. The amounts of spike suppression and latency change were strongly correlated with the electroolfactogram (EOG) peak size evoked at the same site across odorants and across stimulus intensities. We conclude that the curve of antidromic spike suppression gives a reasonable representation of spiking activity in olfactory sensory neurons driven by odorants and that the correlation of peak spike suppression with the peak EOG shows the accuracy of the EOG as an estimate of intracellular potential in the population of olfactory sensory neurons. In addition, these results have important implications about traffic in olfactory nerve bundles. We did not observe multiple peaks corresponding to stimulated and unstimulated receptor neurons. This suggests synchronization of spikes in olfactory nerve, perhaps by ephaptic interactions. The long-lasting effect on spike latency shows that action potentials continue in the nerve throughout the duration of an odor stimulus in spite of many reports of depolarization block in olfactory receptor neuron cell bodies. Finally, strong odor stimulation caused almost complete block of antidromic spikes. This indicates that a very

  7. Effects of odor stimulation on antidromic spikes in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Sherrill, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Spikes were evoked in rat olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) populations by electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb nerve layer in pentobarbital anesthetized rats. The latencies and recording positions for these compound spikes showed that they originated in olfactory epithelium. Dual simultaneous recordings indicated conduction velocities in the C-fiber range, around 0.5 m/s. These spikes are concluded to arise from antidromically activated olfactory sensory neurons. Electrical stimulation at 5 Hz was used to track changes in the size and latency of the antidromic compound population spike during the odor response. Strong odorant stimuli suppressed the spike size and prolonged its latency. The latency was prolonged throughout long odor stimuli, indicating continued activation of olfactory receptor neuron axons. The amounts of spike suppression and latency change were strongly correlated with the electroolfactogram (EOG) peak size evoked at the same site across odorants and across stimulus intensities. We conclude that the curve of antidromic spike suppression gives a reasonable representation of spiking activity in olfactory sensory neurons driven by odorants and that the correlation of peak spike suppression with the peak EOG shows the accuracy of the EOG as an estimate of intracellular potential in the population of olfactory sensory neurons. In addition, these results have important implications about traffic in olfactory nerve bundles. We did not observe multiple peaks corresponding to stimulated and unstimulated receptor neurons. This suggests synchronization of spikes in olfactory nerve, perhaps by ephaptic interactions. The long-lasting effect on spike latency shows that action potentials continue in the nerve throughout the duration of an odor stimulus in spite of many reports of depolarization block in olfactory receptor neuron cell bodies. Finally, strong odor stimulation caused almost complete block of antidromic spikes. This indicates that a very

  8. Calcium-activated chloride currents in olfactory sensory neurons from mice lacking bestrophin-2

    PubMed Central

    Pifferi, Simone; Dibattista, Michele; Sagheddu, Claudia; Boccaccio, Anna; Al Qteishat, Ahmed; Ghirardi, Filippo; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons use a chloride-based signal amplification mechanism to detect odorants. The binding of odorants to receptors in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons activates a transduction cascade that involves the opening of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels and the entry of Ca2+ into the cilia. Ca2+ activates a Cl− current that produces an efflux of Cl− ions and amplifies the depolarization. The molecular identity of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels is still elusive, although some bestrophins have been shown to function as Ca2+-activated Cl− channels when expressed in heterologous systems. In the olfactory epithelium, bestrophin-2 (Best2) has been indicated as a candidate for being a molecular component of the olfactory Ca2+-activated Cl− channel. In this study, we have analysed mice lacking Best2. We compared the electrophysiological responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorant stimulation, as well as the properties of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents in wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice for Best2. Our results confirm that Best2 is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, while odorant responses and Ca2+-activated Cl− currents were not significantly different between WT and KO mice. Thus, Best2 does not appear to be the main molecular component of the olfactory channel. Further studies are required to determine the function of Best2 in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. PMID:19622610

  9. Role of primary afferents in the developmental regulation of motor axon synapse numbers on Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Siembab, Valerie C; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Rotterman, Travis M; Shneider, Neil A; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2016-06-15

    Motor function in mammalian species depends on the maturation of spinal circuits formed by a large variety of interneurons that regulate motoneuron firing and motor output. Interneuron activity is in turn modulated by the organization of their synaptic inputs, but the principles governing the development of specific synaptic architectures unique to each premotor interneuron are unknown. For example, Renshaw cells receive, at least in the neonate, convergent inputs from sensory afferents (likely Ia) and motor axons, raising the question of whether they interact during Renshaw cell development. In other well-studied neurons, such as Purkinje cells, heterosynaptic competition between inputs from different sources shapes synaptic organization. To examine the possibility that sensory afferents modulate synaptic maturation on developing Renshaw cells, we used three animal models in which afferent inputs in the ventral horn are dramatically reduced (ER81(-/-) knockout), weakened (Egr3(-/-) knockout), or strengthened (mlcNT3(+/-) transgenic). We demonstrate that increasing the strength of sensory inputs on Renshaw cells prevents their deselection and reduces motor axon synaptic density, and, in contrast, absent or diminished sensory afferent inputs correlate with increased densities of motor axons synapses. No effects were observed on other glutamatergic inputs. We conclude that the early strength of Ia synapses influences their maintenance or weakening during later development and that heterosynaptic influences from sensory synapses during early development regulates the density and organization of motor inputs on mature Renshaw cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1892-1919, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660356

  10. The Role of the Paratrigeminal Nucleus in Vagal Afferent Evoked Respiratory Reflexes: A Neuroanatomical and Functional Study in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Alexandria K.; Farrell, Michael J.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; McGovern, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory tree receives sensory innervation from the jugular and nodose vagal sensory ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia are derived from embryologically distinct origins and as such demonstrate differing molecular, neurochemical and physiological phenotypes. Furthermore, whereas nodose afferent neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS), recent neuroanatomical studies in rats suggest that jugular neurons have their central terminations in the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5). In the present study we confirm that guinea pigs demonstrate a comparable distinction between the brainstem terminations of nodose and jugular ganglia afferents. Thus, microinjection of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CT-B) neural tracers into the caudal nTS and Pa5 resulted in highly specific retrograde labeling of neurons in the nodose and jugular ganglia, respectively. Whereas, nodose neurons more often expressed 160 KD neurofilament proteins and the alpha3 subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase, significantly more jugular neurons expressed the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and, especially, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP). Indeed, terminal fibers in the Pa5 compared to the nTS were characterized by their significantly greater expression of CGRP, further supporting the notion that jugular afferents project to trigeminal-related brainstem regions. Electrical stimulation of the guinea pig larynx following selective surgical denervation of the nodose afferent innervation to the larynx (leaving intact the jugular innervation) resulted in stimulus dependent respiratory slowing and eventual apnea. This jugular ganglia neuron mediated response was unaffected by bilateral microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into the nTS, but was abolished by muscimol injected into the Pa5. Taken together these data confirm that jugular and nodose vagal ganglia afferent neurons innervate distinct central circuits and support the notion that multiple peripheral and central pathways

  11. Galanin-expression and galanin-dependent sensory neurons are not required for itch

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Galanin is a key modulator of nociception, and it is also required for the developmental survival of a subset of C-fibre sensory neurons which are critical to the mediation of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the potential modulatory roles played by galanin, or the galanin-dependent neurons, in pruritoceptive mechanisms underlying the sensation of itch have not been investigated. Findings Here we report that mice carrying a loss-of-function mutation in the galanin gene (Gal-KO) show no differences in spontaneous behavioural itch responses compared to wild-type (WT) controls. Similarly, the responses to a range of pruritogens are not significantly different between the two genotypes. Conclusions These results suggest that neither galanin expression, nor the galanin-dependent subpopulation of sensory neurons is required for itch-related behaviours. PMID:23216829

  12. Cellular mechanisms of activity-dependent BDNF expression in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, A; Khanjian, R A; Balkowiec, A

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is abundantly expressed by both developing and adult rat visceral sensory neurons from the nodose ganglion (NG) in vivo and in vitro. We have previously shown that BDNF is released from neonatal NG neurons by activity and regulates dendritic development in their postsynaptic targets in the brainstem. The current study was carried out to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of activity-dependent BDNF expression in neonatal rat NG neurons, using our established in vitro model of neuronal activation by electrical field stimulation with patterns that mimic neuronal activity in vivo. We show that BDNF mRNA (transcript 4) increases over threefold in response to a 4-h tonic or bursting pattern delivered at the frequency of 6 Hz, which corresponds to the normal heart rate of a newborn rat. No significant increase in BDNF expression was observed following stimulation at 1 Hz. The latter effect suggests a frequency-dependent mechanism of regulated BDNF expression. In addition to BDNF transcript 4, which is known to be regulated by activity, transcript 1 also showed significant upregulation. The increases in BDNF mRNA were followed by BDNF protein upregulation of a similar magnitude after 24h of stimulation at 6 Hz. Electrical stimulation-evoked BDNF expression was inhibited by pretreating neurons with the blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels tetrodotoxin and by removing extracellular calcium. Moreover, our data show that repetitive stimulation-evoked BDNF expression requires calcium influx through N-, but not L-type, channels. Together, our study reveals novel mechanisms through which electrical activity stimulates de novo synthesis of BDNF in sensory neurons, and points to the role of N-type calcium channels in regulating BDNF expression in sensory neurons in response to repetitive stimulation. PMID:26459016

  13. Kv2 dysfunction after peripheral axotomy enhances sensory neuron responsiveness to sustained input.

    PubMed

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; Zhu, Lan; Yip, Ping; Grist, John; Michael, Gregory J; McMahon, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries caused by trauma are associated with increased sensory neuron excitability and debilitating chronic pain symptoms. Axotomy-induced alterations in the function of ion channels are thought to largely underlie the pathophysiology of these phenotypes. Here, we characterise the mRNA distribution of Kv2 family members in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and describe a link between Kv2 function and modulation of sensory neuron excitability. Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 were amply expressed in cells of all sizes, being particularly abundant in medium-large neurons also immunoreactive for neurofilament-200. Peripheral axotomy led to a rapid, robust and long-lasting transcriptional Kv2 downregulation in the DRG, correlated with the onset of mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity. The consequences of Kv2 loss-of-function were subsequently investigated in myelinated neurons using intracellular recordings on ex vivo DRG preparations. In naïve neurons, pharmacological Kv2.1/Kv2.2 inhibition by stromatoxin-1 (ScTx) resulted in shortening of action potential (AP) after-hyperpolarization (AHP). In contrast, ScTx application on axotomized neurons did not alter AHP duration, consistent with the injury-induced Kv2 downregulation. In accordance with a shortened AHP, ScTx treatment also reduced the refractory period and improved AP conduction to the cell soma during high frequency stimulation. These results suggest that Kv2 downregulation following traumatic nerve lesion facilitates greater fidelity of repetitive firing during prolonged input and thus normal Kv2 function is postulated to limit neuronal excitability. In summary, we have profiled Kv2 expression in sensory neurons and provide evidence for the contribution of Kv2 dysfunction in the generation of hyperexcitable phenotypes encountered in chronic pain states. PMID:24252178

  14. Calcium-activated chloride channels in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Amjad, Asma; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Sagheddu, Claudia; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2012-07-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays a crucial role in several social behaviors. Detection of pheromones or other emitted signaling molecules occurs in the dendritic microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, where the binding of molecules to vomeronasal receptors leads to the influx of sodium and calcium ions mainly through the transient receptor potential canonical 2 (TRPC2) channel. To investigate the physiological role played by the increase in intracellular calcium concentration in the apical region of these neurons, we produced localized, rapid, and reproducible increases in calcium concentration with flash photolysis of caged calcium and measured calcium-activated currents with the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. On average, a large inward calcium-activated current of -261 pA was measured at -50 mV, rising with a time constant of 13 ms. Ion substitution experiments showed that this current is anion selective. Moreover, the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid partially inhibited the calcium-activated current. These results directly demonstrate that a large chloride current can be activated by calcium in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. Furthermore, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the calcium-activated chloride channels TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 are present in the apical layer of the vomeronasal epithelium, where they largely colocalize with the TRPC2 transduction channel. Immunocytochemistry on isolated vomeronasal sensory neurons showed that TMEM16A and TMEM16B coexpress in the neuronal microvilli. Therefore, we conclude that microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons have a high density of calcium-activated chloride channels that may play an important role in vomeronasal transduction. PMID:22732308

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of Chemically-Induced Sensory Neuron Ablation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jane A.; Zhang, Bo; Pope, Holly M.; Voigt, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral glia are known to have a critical role in the initial response to axon damage and degeneration. However, little is known about the cellular responses of non-myelinating glia to nerve injury. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptomes of wild-type and mutant (lacking peripheral glia) zebrafish larvae that were treated with metronidazole. This treatment allowed us to conditionally and selectively ablate cranial sensory neurons whose axons are ensheathed only by non-myelinating glia. While transcripts representing over 27,000 genes were detected by RNAseq, only a small fraction (~1% of genes) were found to be differentially expressed in response to neuronal degeneration in either line at either 2 hrs or 5 hrs of metronidazole treatment. Analysis revealed that most expression changes (332 out of the total of 458 differentially expressed genes) occurred over a continuous period (from 2 to 5 hrs of metronidazole exposure), with a small number of genes showing changes limited to only the 2 hr (55 genes) or 5 hr (71 genes) time points. For genes with continuous alterations in expression, some of the most meaningful sets of enriched categories in the wild-type line were those involving the inflammatory TNF-alpha and IL6 signaling pathways, oxidoreductase activities and response to stress. Intriguingly, these changes were not observed in the mutant line. Indeed, cluster analysis indicated that the effects of metronidazole treatment on gene expression was heavily influenced by the presence or absence of glia, indicating that the peripheral non-myelinating glia play a significant role in the transcriptional response to sensory neuron degeneration. This is the first transcriptome study of metronidazole-induced neuronal death in zebrafish and the response of non-myelinating glia to sensory neuron degeneration. We believe this study provides important insight into the mechanisms by which non-myelinating glia react to neuronal death and degeneration in sensory

  16. Single tactile afferents outperform human subjects in a vibrotactile intensity discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, Ehsan; Clifford, Colin W G; Harris, Justin A; Mahns, David A; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2014-11-15

    We simultaneously compared the sensitivity of single primary afferent neurons supplying the glabrous skin of the hand and the psychophysical amplitude discrimination thresholds in human subjects for a set of vibrotactile stimuli delivered to the receptive field. All recorded afferents had a dynamic range narrower than the range of amplitudes across which the subjects could discriminate. However, when the vibration amplitude was chosen to be within the steepest part of the afferent's stimulus-response function the response of single afferents, defined as the spike count over the vibration duration (500 ms), was often more sensitive in discriminating vibration amplitude than the perceptual judgment of the participants. We quantified how the neuronal performance depended on the integration window: for short windows the neuronal performance was inferior to the performance of the subject. The neuronal performance progressively improved with increasing spike count duration and reached a level significantly above that of the subjects when the integration window was 250 ms or longer. The superiority in performance of individual neurons over observers could reflect a nonoptimal integration window or be due to the presence of noise between the sensory periphery and the cortical decision stage. Additionally, it could indicate that the range of perceptual sensitivity comes at the cost of discrimination through pooling across neurons with different response functions. PMID:25143540

  17. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals) plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1) expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy) produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71%) also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking), in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:21527011

  18. Exposure to Zinc Sulfate Results in Differential Effects on Olfactory Sensory Neuron Subtypes in Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hentig, James T; Byrd-Jacobs, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    Zinc sulfate is a known olfactory toxicant, although its specific effects on the olfactory epithelium of zebrafish are unknown. Olfactory organs of adult zebrafish were exposed to zinc sulfate and, after 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 or 14 days, fish were processed for histological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and behavioral analyses. Severe morphological disruption of the olfactory organ was observed two days following zinc sulfate exposure, including fusion of lamellae, epithelial inflammation, and significant loss of anti-calretinin labeling. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the apical surface of the sensory region was absent of ciliated structures, but microvilli were still present. Behavioral analysis showed significant loss of the ability to perceive bile salts and some fish also had no response to amino acids. Over the next several days, olfactory organ morphology, epithelial structure, and anti-calretinin labeling returned to control-like conditions, although the ability to perceive bile salts remained lost until day 14. Thus, exposure to zinc sulfate results in rapid degeneration of the olfactory organ, followed by restoration of morphology and function within two weeks. Zinc sulfate appears to have a greater effect on ciliated olfactory sensory neurons than on microvillous olfactory sensory neurons, suggesting differential effects on sensory neuron subtypes. PMID:27589738

  19. Dopaminergic Modulation of Lateral Amygdala Neuronal Activity: Differential D1 and D2 Receptor Effects on Thalamic and Cortical Afferent Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Background: In auditory fear conditioning, the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) integrates a conditioned stimulus (CS) from the auditory thalamus (MGN) and the auditory association cortex (Te3) with an aversive unconditioned stimulus. The thalamic input provides a basic version of the CS, while the cortical input provides a processed representation of the stimulus. Dopamine (DA) is released in the LA under heightened arousal during the presentation of the CS. Methods: In this study we examined how D1 or D2 receptor activation affects LA afferent-driven neuronal firing using in vivo extracellular single-unit recordings with local micro-iontophoretic drug application in anesthetized rats. LA neurons that were responsive (~50%) to electrical stimulation in either the MGN or the Te3 were tested by iontophoresis of either the D1 agonist, SKF38393, or the D2 agonist, quinpirole. Results: We found that most of the LA projection neurons exhibited either facilitatory or attenuating effects (changes in evoked probability >15% relative to baseline) on afferent input by activation of D1 or D2 receptors. In general, it required significantly higher stimulation current to evoke ~50% baseline responses to the cortical input. Activation of the D1 receptor showed no difference in modulation between the thalamic or cortical pathways. On the other hand, activation of the D2 receptor had a stronger inhibitory modulation of the cortical pathway, but a stronger excitatory modulation of the thalamic pathway. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a shift in balance favoring the thalamic pathway in response to DA acting via the D2 receptor. PMID:25716776

  20. Activation of μ-opioid receptors inhibits calcium-currents in the vestibular afferent neurons of the rat through a cAMP dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Seseña, Emmanuel; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors are expressed in the vestibular endorgans (afferent neurons and hair cells) and are activated by the efferent system, which modulates the discharge of action potentials in vestibular afferent neurons (VANs). In mammals, VANs mainly express the μ opioid-receptor, but the function of this receptors activation and the cellular mechanisms by which they exert their actions in these neurons are poorly studied. To determine the actions of μ opioid receptor (MOR) and cell signaling mechanisms in VANs, we made perforated patch-clamp recordings of VANs that were obtained from postnatal days 7 to 10 (P7–10) rats and then maintained in primary culture. The MOR agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited the total voltage-gated outward current; this effect was prevented by the perfusion of a Ca2+-free extracellular solution. We then studied the voltage-gated calcium current (Ica) and found that DAMGO Met-enkephalin or endomorphin-1 inhibited the ICa in a dose-response fashion. The effects of DAMGO were prevented by the MOR antagonist (CTAP) or by pertussis toxin (PTX). The use of specific calcium channel blockers showed that MOR activation inhibited T-, L- and N-type ICa. The use of various enzyme activators and inhibitors and of cAMP analogs allowed us to demonstrate that the MOR acts through a cAMP dependent signaling mechanism. In current clamp experiments, MOR activation increased the duration and decreased the amplitude of the action potentials and modulated the discharge produced by current injection. Pre-incubation with PTX occluded MOR activation effect. We conclude that MOR activation inhibits the T-, L- and N-type ICa through activation of a Gαi/o protein that involves a decrease in AC-cAMP-PKA activity. The modulation of ICa may have an impact on the synaptic integration, excitability, and neurotransmitter release from VANs. PMID:24734002

  1. The Relationship of Neuronal Activity within the Sensori-Motor Region of the Subthalamic Nucleus to Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter; Montgomery, Erwin B., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Microelectrode recordings of human sensori-motor subthalamic neuronal activity during spoken sentence and syllable-repetition tasks provided an opportunity to evaluate the relationship between changes in neuronal activities and specific aspects of these vocal behaviors. Observed patterns of neuronal activity included a build up of activity in…

  2. Capsaicin-induced reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 in sensory neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Wilcox, Christine L

    2003-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) produces a life-long latent infection in neurons of the peripheral nervous system, primarily in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Neurons of these ganglia express high levels of the capsaicin receptor, also known as the vanilloid receptor-1 (VR-1). VR-1 is a non-selective ion channel, found on sensory neurons, that primarily fluxes Ca(2+) ions in response to various stimuli, including physiologically acidic conditions, heat greater than 45 degrees C and noxious compounds such as capsaicin. Using an in vitro neuronal model to study HSV-1 latency and reactivation, we found that agonists of the VR-1 channel - capsaicin and heat - resulted in reactivation of latent HSV-1. Capsaicin-induced reactivation of HSV-1 latently infected neurons was dose-dependent. Additionally, activation of VR-1 at its optimal temperature of 46 degrees C caused a significant increase in virus titres, which could be attenuated with the VR-1 antagonist, capsazepine. VR-1 activation that resulted in HSV-1 reactivation was calcium-dependent, since the calcium chelator BAPTA significantly reduced reactivation following treatment with caspsaicin and forskolin. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the VR-1 channel, often associated with increases in intracellular calcium, results in HSV-1 reactivation in sensory neurons. PMID:12692270

  3. Positional differences of axon growth rates between sensory neurons encoded by runx3

    PubMed Central

    Lallemend, Francois; Sterzenbach, Ulrich; Hadjab-Lallemend, Saida; Aquino, Jorge B; Castelo-Branco, Goncalo; Sinha, Indranil; Villaescusa, J Carlos; Levanon, Ditsa; Wang, Yiqiao; Franck, Marina C M; Kharchenko, Olga; Adameyko, Igor; Linnarsson, Sten; Groner, Yoram; Turner, Eric; Ernfors, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    The formation of functional connectivity in the nervous system is governed by axon guidance that instructs nerve growth and branching during development, implying a similarity between neuronal subtypes in terms of nerve extension. We demonstrate the molecular mechanism of another layer of complexity in vertebrates by defining a transcriptional program underlying growth differences between positionally different neurons. The rate of axon extension of the early subset of embryonic dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons is encoded in neurons at different axial levels. This code is determined by a segmental pattern of axial levels of Runx family transcription factor Runx3. Runx3 in turn determines transcription levels of genes encoding cytoskeletal proteins involved in axon extension, including Rock1 and Rock2 which have ongoing activities determining axon growth in early sensory neurons and blocking Rock activity reverses axon extension deficits of Runx3−/− neurons. Thus, Runx3 acts to regulate positional differences in axon extension properties apparently without affecting nerve guidance and branching, a principle that could be relevant to other parts of the nervous system. PMID:22903063

  4. Evidence for regulatory diversity and auto-regulation at the TAC1 locus in sensory neurones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance-P (SP) is expressed from the TAC1 gene in sensory neurones where it acts as a key modulator of neurogenic inflammation. The promoter of TAC1 (TAC1prom) plays a central role in the regulation of the TAC1 gene but requires the presence of a second regulatory element; ECR2, to support TAC1 expression in sensory neurones and to respond appropriately to signalling pathways such as MAPkinases and noxious induction by capsaicin. We examined whether the effect of capsaicin on ECR2-TAC1prom activity in larger diameter neurones was cell autonomous or non- cell autonomous. We demonstrate that TRPV1 is not expressed in all the same cells as SP following capsaicin induction suggesting the presence of a non-cell autonomous mechanism for TAC1 up-regulation following capsaicin induction. In addition, we demonstrate that induction of SP and ECR1-TAC1prom activity in these larger diameter neurones can be induced by potassium depolarisation suggesting that, in addition to capsaicin induction, transgene activity may be modulated by voltage gated calcium channels. Furthermore, we show that NK1 is expressed in all SP- expressing cells after capsaicin induction and that an agonist of NK1 can activate both SP and the transgene in larger diameter neurones. These observations suggest the presence of an autocrine loop that controls the expression of the TAC1 promoter in sensory neurones. In contrast, induction of the TAC1 promoter by LPS was not dependent on ECR2 and did not occur in large diameter neurones. These studies demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms modulating the activity of the TAC1 promoter and provide novel directions for the development of new anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:21294877

  5. A cellular and molecular mosaic establishes growth and differentiation states for cranial sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Karpinski, Beverly A; A Bryan, Corey; Paronett, Elizabeth M; Baker, Jennifer L; Fernandez, Alejandra; Horvath, Anelia; Maynard, Thomas M; Moody, Sally A; LaMantia, Anthony-S

    2016-07-15

    We compared apparent origins, cellular diversity and regulation of initial axon growth for differentiating cranial sensory neurons. We assessed the molecular and cellular composition of the developing olfactory and otic placodes, and cranial sensory ganglia to evaluate contributions of ectodermal placode versus neural crest at each site. Special sensory neuron populations-the olfactory and otic placodes, as well as those in vestibulo-acoustic ganglion- are entirely populated with cells expressing cranial placode-associated, rather than neural crest-associated markers. The remaining cranial sensory ganglia are a mosaic of cells that express placode-associated as well as neural crest-associated markers. We found two distinct populations of neural crest in the cranial ganglia: the first, as expected, is labeled by Wnt1:Cre mediated recombination. The second is not labeled by Wnt1:Cre recombination, and expresses both Sox10 and FoxD3. These populations-Wnt1:Cre recombined, and Sox10/Foxd3-expressing- are proliferatively distinct from one another. Together, the two neural crest-associated populations are substantially more proliferative than their placode-associated counterparts. Nevertheless, the apparently placode- and neural crest-associated populations are similarly sensitive to altered signaling that compromises cranial morphogenesis and differentiation. Acute disruption of either Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) or Retinoic acid (RA) signaling alters axon growth and cell death, but does not preferentially target any of the three distinct populations. Apparently, mosaic derivation and diversity of precursors and early differentiating neurons, modulated uniformly by local signals, supports early cranial sensory neuron differentiation and growth. PMID:26988119

  6. NT-3 modulates NPY expression in primary sensory neurons following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    STERNE, G. D.; BROWN, R. A.; GREEN, C. J.; TERENGHI, G.

    1998-01-01

    Peripheral nerve transection induces significant changes in neuropeptide expression and content in injured primary sensory neurons, possibly due to loss of target derived neurotrophic support. This study shows that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) delivery to the injured nerve influences neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression within dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. NT-3 was delivered by grafting impregnated fibronectin (500 ng/ml; NT group) in the axotomised sciatic nerve. Animals grafted with plain fibronectin mats (FN) or nerve grafts (NG) were used as controls. L4 and L5 DRG from operated and contralateral sides were harvested between 5 and 240 d. Using immunohistochemistry and computerised image analysis the percentage, diameter and optical density of neurons expressing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and NPY were quantified. Sciatic nerve axotomy resulted in significant reduction in expression of CGRP and SP, and significant upregulation of VIP and NPY (P<0.05 for ipsilateral vs contralateral DRG). By d 30, exogenous NT-3 and nerve graft attenuated the upregulation of NPY (P<0.05 for NT and NG vs FN). However, NT-3 administration did not influence the expression of CGRP, SP or VIP. The mean cell diameter of NPY immunoreactive neurons was significantly smaller in the NT-3 group (P<0.05 for NT vs FN and NG) suggesting a differential influence of NT-3 on larger neurons. The optical densities of NPY immunoreactive neurons of equal size were the same in each group at any time point, indicating that the neurons responding to NT-3 downregulate NPY expression to levels not detectable by immunohistochemistry. These results demonstrate that targeted administration of NT-3 regulates the phenotype of a NPY-immunoreactive neuronal subpopulation in the dorsal root ganglia, a further evidence of the trophic role of neurotrophins on primary sensory neurons. PMID:9827642

  7. Linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Narusuye, K; Kawai, F; Matsuzaki, K; Miyachi, E

    2005-02-01

    Linalool is a major component of essential oils and possesses various biological effects in sensory or central nervous systems. To investigate the pharmacological and biophysical effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons, we used the whole-cell patch clamp and the Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Under the voltage clamp, membrane depolarization generated time- and voltage-dependent current responses in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Linalool significantly and reversibly suppressed the voltage-gated currents in ORCs. The dose-suppression relation of linalool for the voltage-gated Na(+) current could be fitted by the Hill equation with a half-blocking concentration of 0.56 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.2. To test whether linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in ORCs specifically or suppresses currents in other neurons generally, we next examined the effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in newt retinal neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. Linalool suppressed the voltage-gated currents not only in retinal horizontal cells and ganglion cells but also in Purkinje cells. Furthermore, bath application of linalool inhibited the KCl-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response of ORCs, suggesting that linalool suppresses Ca(2+) currents in ORCs. These results suggest that linalool non-selectively suppresses the voltage-gated currents in newt sensory neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:15365786

  8. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24283624

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A165b prevents diabetic neuropathic pain and sensory neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Richard P; Beazley-Long, Nicholas; Ved, Nikita; Bestall, Samuel M; Riaz, Hamza; Singhal, Priya; Ballmer Hofer, Kurt; Harper, Steve J; Bates, David O; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects up to half of diabetic patients. This neuronal damage leads to sensory disturbances, including allodynia and hyperalgesia. Many growth factors have been suggested as useful treatments for prevention of neurodegeneration, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. VEGF-A is generated as two alternative splice variant families. The most widely studied isoform, VEGF-A165a is both pro-angiogenic and neuroprotective, but pro-nociceptive and increases vascular permeability in animal models. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats develop both hyperglycaemia and many of the resulting diabetic complications seen in patients, including peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, we show that the anti-angiogenic VEGF-A splice variant, VEGF-A165b, is also a potential therapeutic for diabetic neuropathy. Seven weeks of VEGF-A165b treatment in diabetic rats reversed enhanced pain behaviour in multiple behavioural paradigms and was neuroprotective, reducing hyperglycaemia-induced activated caspase 3 (AC3) levels in sensory neuronal subsets, epidermal sensory nerve fibre loss and aberrant sciatic nerve morphology. Furthermore, VEGF-A165b inhibited a STZ-induced increase in Evans Blue extravasation in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), saphenous nerve and plantar skin of the hind paw. Increased transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel activity is associated with the onset of diabetic neuropathy. VEGF-A165b also prevented hyperglycaemia-enhanced TRPA1 activity in an in vitro sensory neuronal cell line indicating a novel direct neuronal mechanism that could underlie the anti-nociceptive effect observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that in a model of Type I diabetes VEGF-A165b attenuates altered pain behaviour and prevents neuronal stress, possibly through an effect on TRPA1 activity. PMID:26201024

  10. Entropy driven artificial neuronal networks and sensorial representation; A proposal

    SciTech Connect

    VanHulle, M.M. )

    1989-04-01

    A hierarchical Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN) is proposed as a model senosorium wherein feedback is allowed to modify the categorization abilities of the system. In this way, the original representation, being abstract and precategorical, is refined, yielding a more concrete representation. As thermodynamical entropy is a hierarchical invariant and an explicitly time dependent and compact measure of state dynamics, it is chosen as feedback measure. The main features of the network are shown to be plausible from the point of view of the physiology and anatomy of the visual system of cats and primates and one of these, double-layered maps performing combinatorial processing and evaluation, respectively, is illustrated by simulations in the orientation domain.

  11. Subthreshold membrane conductances enhance directional selectivity in vertebrate sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Chacron, Maurice J; Fortune, Eric S

    2010-07-01

    Directional selectivity, in which neurons respond preferentially to one "preferred" direction of movement over the opposite "null" direction, is a critical computation that is found in the central nervous systems of many animals. Such responses are generated using two mechanisms: spatiotemporal convergence via pathways that differ in the timing of information from different locations on the receptor array and the nonlinear integration of this information. Previous studies have showed that various mechanisms may act as nonlinear integrators by suppressing the response in the null direction. Here we show, through a combination of mathematical modeling and in vivo intracellular recordings, that subthreshold membrane conductances can act as a nonlinear integrator by increasing the response in the preferred direction of motion only, thereby enhancing the directional bias. Such subthreshold conductances are ubiquitous in the CNS and therefore may be used in a wide array of computations that involve the enhancement of an existing bias arising from differential spatiotemporal filtering. PMID:20445028

  12. The Sensory Impact of Nicotine on Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons of the Nicotine Reward - Addiction Neurocircuitry

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jed E; Dehkordi, Ozra; Manaye, Kebreten F; Millis, Richard M; Cianaki, Salman Ameri; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2016-01-01

    The sensory experience of smoking is a key component of nicotine addiction known to result, in part, from stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at peripheral sensory nerve endings. Such stimulation of nAChRs is followed by activation of neurons at multiple sites in the mesocorticolimbic reward pathways. However, the neurochemical profiles of CNS cells that mediate the peripheral sensory impact of nicotine remain unknown. In the present study in mice, we first used c-Fos immunohistochemistry to identify CNS cells stimulated by nicotine (NIC, 40 μg/kg, IP) and by a peripherally-acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (NIC-PM, 30 μg/kg, IP). Sequential double-labelling was then performed to determine whether noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons of the nicotine reward-addiction circuitry were primary targets of NIC and NIC-PM. Double-labelling of NIC and/or NIC-PM activated c-Fos immunoreactive cells with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) showed no apparent c-Fos expression by the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). With the exception of sparse numbers of TH immunoreactive D11 cells, dopamine-containing neurons in other areas of the reward-addiction circuitry, namely periaqueductal gray, and dorsal raphe, were also devoid of c-Fos immunoreactivity. Noradrenergic neurons of locus coeruleus (LC), known to innervate VTA, were activated by both NIC and NIC-PM. These results demonstrate that noradrenergic neurons of LC are among the first structures that are stimulated by single acute IP injection of NIC and NIC-PM. Dopaminergic neurons of VTA and other CNS sites, did not respond to acute IP administration of NIC or NIC-PM by induction of c-Fos. PMID:27347434

  13. Increased acid responsiveness in vagal sensory neurons in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Youtian; Liu, Zhenyu; Yu, Xiaoyun; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Undem, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized with eosinophils and mast cells predominated allergic inflammation in the esophagus and present with esophageal dysfunctions such as dysphagia, food impaction, and heartburn. However, the underlying mechanism of esophageal dysfunctions is unclear. This study aims to determine whether neurons in the vagal sensory ganglia are modulated in a guinea pig model of EoE. Animals were actively sensitized by ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with aerosol OVA inhalation for 2 wk. This results in a mild esophagitis with increases in mast cells and eosinophils in the esophageal wall. Vagal nodose and jugular neurons were disassociated, and their responses to acid, capsaicin, and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist AMG-9810 were studied by calcium imaging and whole cell patch-clamp recording. Compared with naïve animals, antigen challenge significantly increased acid responsiveness in both nodose and jugular neurons. Their responses to capsaicin were also increased after antigen challenge. AMG-9810, at a concentration that blocked capsaicin-evoked calcium influx, abolished the increase in acid-induced activation in both nodose and jugular neurons. Vagotomy strongly attenuated those increased responses of nodose and jugular neurons to both acid and capsaicin induced by antigen challenge. These data for the first time demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge significantly increases acid responsiveness in vagal nodose and jugular ganglia neurons. This sensitization effect is mediated largely through TRPV1 and initiated at sensory nerve endings in the peripheral tissues. Allergen-induced enhancement of responsiveness to noxious stimulation by acid in sensory nerve may contribute to the development of esophageal dysfunctions such as heartburn in EoE. PMID:24875100

  14. [Peptide components of Geolycosa spider venom modulate P2X receptor activity of rat sensory neurons].

    PubMed

    Savchenko, H A; Vasylevs'kyĭ, A A; Pluzhnykov, K A; Korol'kova, Iu V; Mamenko, M V; Volkova, T M; Maksymiuk, O P; Boĭchuk, Ia A; Hrishyn, Ie V; Kryshtal', O O

    2009-01-01

    Almost each natural venom comprises a considerable combinatorial library of bioactive substances that have been optimized during evolution. Particular attention is devoted currently on a search for new modulators of ion channels from the venoms of arthropods. We have studied the effect of peptidous compounds of the Lycosa spider venom on the activity of P2X receptors in DRG neurons of rats. As a result, at least 7 proteins modulating various P2X receptor-operated ionic currents in the sensory neurons of rats have been found. PMID:19526843

  15. Depletion of Calcium Stores in Injured Sensory Neurons: Anatomic and Functional Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Weyker, Paul D.; Abram, Stephen E.; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Poroli, Mark; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Painful nerve injury leads to disrupted Ca2+ signaling in primary sensory neurons, including decreased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ storage. The present study examines potential causes and functional consequences of Ca2+ store limitation after injury. Methods Neurons were dissociated from axotomized fifth lumbar (L5) and the adjacent L4 dorsal root ganglia following L5 spinal nerve ligation that produced hyperalgesia, and were compared to neurons from control animals. Intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured with Fura-2 microfluorometry, and ER was labeled with probes or antibodies. Ultrastructural morphology was analyzed by electron microscopy of nondissociated dorsal root ganglia, and intracellular electrophysiological recordings were obtained from intact ganglia. Results Live neuron staining with BODIPY FL-X thapsigargin (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) revealed a 40% decrease in sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase binding in axotomized L5 neurons and a 34% decrease in L4 neurons. Immunocytochemical labeling for the ER Ca2+-binding protein calreticulin was unaffected by injury. Total length of ER profiles in electron micrographs was reduced by 53% in small axotomized L5 neurons, but increased in L4 neurons. Cisternal stacks of ER and aggregation of ribosomes occurred less frequently in axotomized neurons. Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, examined by microfluorometry with dantrolene, was eliminated in axotomized neurons. Pharmacologic blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release with dantrolene produced hyperexcitability in control neurons, confirming its functional importance. Conclusions After axotomy, ER Ca2+ stores are reduced by anatomic loss and possibly diminished sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. The resulting disruption of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and protein synthesis may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain. PMID:19602957

  16. Loss of the liver X receptor LXRα/β in peripheral sensory neurons modifies energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Mansuy-Aubert, Virginie; Gautron, Laurent; Lee, Syann; Bookout, Angie L; Kusminski, Christine M; Sun, Kai; Zhang, Yuan; Scherer, Philipp E; Mangelsdorf, David J; Elmquist, Joel K

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neural sensory mechanisms play a crucial role in metabolic regulation but less is known about the mechanisms underlying vagal sensing itself. Recently, we identified an enrichment of liver X receptor alpha and beta (LXRα/β) in the nodose ganglia of the vagus nerve. In this study, we show mice lacking LXRα/β in peripheral sensory neurons have increased energy expenditure and weight loss when fed a Western diet (WD). Our findings suggest that the ability to metabolize and sense cholesterol and/or fatty acids in peripheral neurons is an important requirement for physiological adaptations to WDs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06667.001 PMID:26076474

  17. A Functional Role for VEGFR1 Expressed in Peripheral Sensory Neurons in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Deepitha; Gangadharan, Vijayan; Michalski, Christoph W.; Kurejova, Martina; Stösser, Sebastian; Srivastava, Kshitij; Schweizerhof, Matthias; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ferrara, Napoleone; Heppenstall, Paul; Shibuya, Masabumi; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer pain is a debilitating disorder and a primary determinant of the poor quality of life. Here, we report a non-vascular role for ligands of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) family in cancer pain. Tumor-derived VEGF-A, PLGF-2, and VEGF-B augment pain sensitivity through selective activation of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) expressed in sensory neurons in human cancer and mouse models. Sensory-neuron-specific genetic deletion/silencing or local or systemic blockade of VEGFR1 prevented tumor-induced nerve remodeling and attenuated cancer pain in diverse mouse models in vivo. These findings identify a therapeutic potential for VEGFR1-modifying drugs in cancer pain and suggest a palliative effect for VEGF/VEGFR1-targeting anti-angiogenic tumor therapies. PMID:26058077

  18. Sensory roles of neuronal cilia: cilia development, morphogenesis, and function in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Kyung; Barr, Maureen M

    2008-01-01

    In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cilia are found on the dendritic endings of sensory neurons. C. elegans cilia are classified as 'primary' or 'sensory' according to the '9+0' axonemal ultrastructure (nine doublet outer microtubules with no central microtubule pair) and lack of motility, characteristics of '9+2' cilia. The C. elegans ciliated nervous system allows the animal to perceive environmental stimuli and make appropriate developmental, physiological, and behavioral decisions. In vertebrates, the biological significance of primary cilia had been largely neglected. Recent findings have placed primary/sensory cilia in the center of cellular signaling and developmental processes. Studies using genetic model organisms such as C. elegans identified the link between ciliary dysfunction and human ciliopathies. Future studies in the worm will address important basic questions regarding ciliary development, morphogenesis, specialization, and signaling functions. PMID:18508635

  19. Aromatase inhibitors augment nociceptive behaviors in rats and enhance the excitability of sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Robarge, Jason D; Duarte, Djane B; Shariati, Behzad; Wang, Ruizhong; Flockhart, David A; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Although aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are commonly used therapies for breast cancer, their use is limited because they produce arthralgia in a large number of patients. To determine whether AIs produce hypersensitivity in animal models of pain, we examined the effects of the AI, letrozole, on mechanical, thermal, and chemical sensitivity in rats. In ovariectomized (OVX) rats, administering a single dose of 1 or 5mg/kg letrozole significantly reduced mechanical paw withdrawal thresholds, without altering thermal sensitivity. Repeated injection of 5mg/kg letrozole in male rats produced mechanical, but not thermal, hypersensitivity that extinguished when drug dosing was stopped. A single dose of 5mg/kg letrozole or daily dosing of letrozole or exemestane in male rats also augmented flinching behavior induced by intraplantar injection of 1000nmol of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). To determine whether sensitization of sensory neurons contributed to AI-induced hypersensitivity, we evaluated the excitability of neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia of male rats chronically treated with letrozole. Both small and medium-diameter sensory neurons isolated from letrozole-treated rats were more excitable, as reflected by increased action potential firing in response to a ramp of depolarizing current, a lower resting membrane potential, and a lower rheobase. However, systemic letrozole treatment did not augment the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from spinal cord slices, suggesting that the enhanced nociceptive responses were not secondary to an increase in peptide release from sensory endings in the spinal cord. These results provide the first evidence that AIs modulate the excitability of sensory neurons, which may be a primary mechanism for the effect of these drugs to augment pain behaviors in rats. PMID:27072527

  20. Rootletin organizes the ciliary rootlet to achieve neuron sensory function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ling-Rong; Jana, Swadhin C.; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Mendonça, Susana; Cabrera, Oscar A.; Singh, Priyanka; Cabernard, Clemens; Eberl, Daniel F.; Bettencourt-Dias, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are essential for cell signaling and sensory perception. In many cell types, a cytoskeletal structure called the ciliary rootlet links the cilium to the cell body. Previous studies indicated that rootlets support the long-term stability of some cilia. Here we report that Drosophila melanogaster Rootletin (Root), the sole orthologue of the mammalian paralogs Rootletin and C-Nap1, assembles into rootlets of diverse lengths among sensory neuron subtypes. Root mutant neurons lack rootlets and have dramatically impaired sensory function, resulting in behavior defects associated with mechanosensation and chemosensation. Root is required for cohesion of basal bodies, but the cilium structure appears normal in Root mutant neurons. We show, however, that normal rootlet assembly requires centrioles. The N terminus of Root contains a conserved domain and is essential for Root function in vivo. Ectopically expressed Root resides at the base of mother centrioles in spermatocytes and localizes asymmetrically to mother centrosomes in neuroblasts, both requiring Bld10, a basal body protein with varied functions. PMID:26483560

  1. Injured sensory neuron-derived CSF1 induces microglia proliferation and DAP12-dependent pain

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhonghui; Kuhn, Julia A.; Wang, Xidao; Colquitt, Bradley; Solorzano, Carlos; Vaman, Smitha; Guan, Andrew K.; Evans-Reinsch, Zoe; Braz, Joao; Devor, Marshall; Abboud-Werner, Sherry L.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Lomvardas, Stavros; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although microglia are implicated in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, how injured sensory neurons engage microglia is unclear. Here we demonstrate that peripheral nerve injury induces de novo expression of colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) in injured sensory neurons. The CSF1 is transported to the spinal cord where it targets the microglial CSF1 receptor (CSF1R). Cre-mediated sensory neuron deletion of Csf1 completely prevented nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and reduced microglia activation and proliferation. In contrast, intrathecal injection of CSF1 induces mechanical hypersensitivity and microglial proliferation. Nerve injury also upregulated CSF1 in motoneurons, where it is required for ventral horn microglial activation and proliferation. Downstream of CSF1R, we found that the microglial membrane adapter protein DAP12 is required for both nerve injury- and intrathecal CSF1-induced upregulation of pain-related microglial genes and the ensuing pain, but not for microglia proliferation. Thus, both CSF1 and DAP12 are potential targets for the pharmacotherapy of neuropathic pain. PMID:26642091

  2. Beta 8 integrins mediate interactions of chick sensory neurons with laminin-1, collagen IV, and fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Venstrom, K; Reichardt, L

    1995-01-01

    Integrins are major receptors used by cells to interact with extracellular matrices. In this paper, we identify the first ligands for the beta 8 family of integrins, presenting evidence that integrin heterodimers containing the beta 8 subunit mediate interactions of chick sensory neurons with laminin-1, collagen IV, and fibronectin. A polyclonal antibody, anti-beta 8-Ex, was prepared to a bacterial fusion protein expressing an extracellular portion of the chicken beta 8 subunit. In nonreducing conditions, this antibody immunoprecipitated from surface-labeled embryonic dorsal root ganglia neurons a M(r) 100 k protein, the expected M(r) of the beta 8 subunit, and putative alpha subunit(s) of M(r) 120 k. Affinity-purified anti-beta 8-Ex strongly inhibited sensory neurite outgrowth on laminin-1, collagen IV, and fibronectin-coated substrata. Binding sites were identified in a heat-resistant domain in laminin-1 and in the carboxyl terminal, 40-kDa fibronectin fragment. On substrates coated with the carboxyl terminal fragment of fibronectin, antibodies to beta 1 and beta 8 were only partially effective alone, but were completely effective in combination, at inhibiting neurite outgrowth. Results thus indicate that the integrin beta 8 subunit in association with one or more alpha subunits forms an important set of extracellular matrix receptors on sensory neurons. Images PMID:7542940

  3. Measuring Physiological Responses of Drosophila Sensory Neurons to Lipid Pheromones Using Live Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shruti; Calvert, Meredith E K; Yew, Joanne Y

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, insects such as Drosophila have multiple taste organs. The chemosensory neurons on the legs, proboscis, wings and ovipositor of Drosophila express gustatory receptors(1,2), ion channels(3-6), and ionotropic receptors(7) that are involved in the detection of volatile and non-volatile sensory cues. These neurons directly contact tastants such as food, noxious substances and pheromones and therefore influence many complex behaviors such as feeding, egg-laying and mating. Electrode recordings and calcium imaging have been widely used in insects to quantify the neuronal responses evoked by these tastants. However, electrophysiology requires specialized equipment and obtaining measurements from a single taste sensillum can be technically challenging depending on the cell-type, size, and position. In addition, single neuron resolution in Drosophila can be difficult to achieve since taste sensilla house more than one type of chemosensory neuron. The live calcium imaging method described here allows responses of single gustatory neurons in live flies to be measured. This method is especially suitable for imaging neuronal responses to lipid pheromones and other ligand types that have low solubility in water-based solvents. PMID:27168110

  4. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  5. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

    PubMed

    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  6. Induction of sensory neurons from neuroepithelial stem cells by the ISX9 small molecule

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rouknuddin Qasim; Blomberg, Evelina; Falk, Anna; Ährlund-Richter, Lars; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Hearing impairment most often involves loss of sensory hair cells and auditory neurons. As this loss is permanent in humans, a cell therapy approach has been suggested to replace damaged cells. It is thus of interest to generate lineage restricted progenitor cells appropriate for cell based therapies. Human long-term self-renewing neuroepithelial stem (lt-NES) cell lines exhibit in vitro a developmental potency to differentiate into CNS neural lineages, and importantly lack this potency in vivo, i.e do not form teratomas. Small-molecules-driven differentiation is today an established route obtain specific cell derivatives from stem cells. In this study, we have investigated the effects of three small molecules SB431542, ISX9 and Metformin to direct differentiation of lt-NES cells into sensory neurons. Exposure of lt-NES cells to Metformin or SB431542 did not induce any marked induction of markers for sensory neurons. However, a four days exposure to the ISX9 small molecule resulted in reduced expression of NeuroD1 mRNA as well as enhanced mRNA levels of GATA3, a marker and important player in auditory neuron specification and development. Subsequent culture in the presence of the neurotrophic factors BDNF and NT3 for another seven days yielded a further increase of mRNA expression for GATA3. This regimen resulted in a frequency of up to 25-30% of cells staining positive for Brn3a/Tuj1. We conclude that an approach with ISX9 small molecule induction of lt-NES cells into auditory like neurons may thus be an attractive route for obtaining safe cell replacement therapy of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:27335699

  7. Microstimulation of primary afferent neurons in the L7 dorsal root ganglia using multielectrode arrays in anesthetized cats: thresholds and recruitment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, R. A.; Hokanson, J. A.; Weber, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    Current research in motor neural prosthetics has focused primarily on issues related to the extraction of motor command signals from the brain (e.g. brain-machine interfaces) to direct the motion of prosthetic limbs. Patients using these types of systems could benefit from a somatosensory neural interface that conveys natural tactile and kinesthetic sensations for the prosthesis. Electrical microstimulation within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been proposed as one method to accomplish this, yet little is known about the recruitment properties of electrical microstimulation in activating nerve fibers in this structure. Current-controlled microstimulation pulses in the range of 1-15 µA (200 µs, leading cathodic pulse) were delivered to the L7 DRG in four anesthetized cats using penetrating microelectrode arrays. Evoked responses and their corresponding conduction velocities (CVs) were measured in the sciatic nerve with a 5-pole nerve cuff electrode arranged as two adjacent tripoles. It was found that in 76% of the 69 electrodes tested, the stimulus threshold was less than or equal to 3 µA, with the lowest recorded threshold being 1.1 µA. The CVs of afferents recruited at threshold had a bimodal distribution with peaks at 70 m s-1 and 85 m s-1. In 53% of cases, the CV of the response at threshold was slower (i.e. smaller diameter fiber) than the CVs of responses observed at increasing stimulation amplitudes. In summary, we found that microstimulation applied through penetrating microelectrodes in the DRG provides selective recruitment of afferent fibers from a range of sensory modalities (as identified by CVs) at very low stimulation intensities. We conclude that the DRG may serve as an attractive location from which to introduce surrogate somatosensory feedback into the nervous system.

  8. The effects of 5-HT on sensory, central and motor neurons driving the abdominal superficial flexor muscles in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Strawn, J R; Neckameyer, W S; Cooper, R L

    2000-12-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces a variety of physiological and behavioral effects in crustaceans. However, the mechanisms employed by 5-HT to effect behavioral changes are not fully understood. Among the mechanisms by which these changes might occur are alterations in synaptic drive and efficacy of sensory, interneurons and motor neurons, as well as direct effects on muscles. We investigated these aspects with the use of a defined sensory-motor system, which is entirely contained within a single abdominal segment and consists of a 'cuticular sensory neurons segmental ganglia abdominal superficial flexor motor neurons-muscles' circuit. Our studies address the role of 5-HT in altering (1) the activity of motor neurons induced by sensory stimulation; (2) the inherent excitability of superficial flexor motor neurons; (3) transmitter release properties of the motor nerve terminal and (4) input resistance of the muscle. Using en passant recordings from the motor nerve, with and without sensory stimulation, and intracellular recordings from the muscle, we show that 5-HT enhances sensory drive and output from the ventral nerve cord resulting in an increase in the firing frequency of the motor neurons. Also, 5-HT increases transmitter release at the neuromuscular junction, and alters input resistance of the muscle fibers. PMID:11281271

  9. A neuron autonomous role for the familial dysautonomia gene ELP1 in sympathetic and sensory target tissue innervation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Marisa Z.; Gruner, Katherine A.; Qin, Charles; Tourtellotte, Warren G.

    2014-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is characterized by severe and progressive sympathetic and sensory neuron loss caused by a highly conserved germline point mutation of the human ELP1/IKBKAP gene. Elp1 is a subunit of the hetero-hexameric transcriptional elongator complex, but how it functions in disease-vulnerable neurons is unknown. Conditional knockout mice were generated to characterize the role of Elp1 in migration, differentiation and survival of migratory neural crest (NC) progenitors that give rise to sympathetic and sensory neurons. Loss of Elp1 in NC progenitors did not impair their migration, proliferation or survival, but there was a significant impact on post-migratory sensory and sympathetic neuron survival and target tissue innervation. Ablation of Elp1 in post-migratory sympathetic neurons caused highly abnormal target tissue innervation that was correlated with abnormal neurite outgrowth/branching and abnormal cellular distribution of soluble tyrosinated α-tubulin in Elp1-deficient primary sympathetic and sensory neurons. These results indicate that neuron loss and physiologic impairment in FD is not a consequence of abnormal neuron progenitor migration, differentiation or survival. Rather, loss of Elp1 leads to neuron death as a consequence of failed target tissue innervation associated with impairments in cytoskeletal regulation. PMID:24917501

  10. Multimodal stimulus coding by a gustatory sensory neuron in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    van Giesen, Lena; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Delasoie-Baranek, Sophie; Colombo, Martino; Renaud, Philippe; Bruggmann, Rémy; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-01-01

    Accurate perception of taste information is crucial for animal survival. In adult Drosophila, gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) perceive chemical stimuli of one specific gustatory modality associated with a stereotyped behavioural response, such as aversion or attraction. We show that GRNs of Drosophila larvae employ a surprisingly different mode of gustatory information coding. Using a novel method for calcium imaging in the larval gustatory system, we identify a multimodal GRN that responds to chemicals of different taste modalities with opposing valence, such as sweet sucrose and bitter denatonium, reliant on different sensory receptors. This multimodal neuron is essential for bitter compound avoidance, and its artificial activation is sufficient to mediate aversion. However, the neuron is also essential for the integration of taste blends. Our findings support a model for taste coding in larvae, in which distinct receptor proteins mediate different responses within the same, multimodal GRN. PMID:26864722

  11. Multimodal stimulus coding by a gustatory sensory neuron in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    van Giesen, Lena; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Delasoie-Baranek, Sophie; Colombo, Martino; Renaud, Philippe; Bruggmann, Rémy; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate perception of taste information is crucial for animal survival. In adult Drosophila, gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) perceive chemical stimuli of one specific gustatory modality associated with a stereotyped behavioural response, such as aversion or attraction. We show that GRNs of Drosophila larvae employ a surprisingly different mode of gustatory information coding. Using a novel method for calcium imaging in the larval gustatory system, we identify a multimodal GRN that responds to chemicals of different taste modalities with opposing valence, such as sweet sucrose and bitter denatonium, reliant on different sensory receptors. This multimodal neuron is essential for bitter compound avoidance, and its artificial activation is sufficient to mediate aversion. However, the neuron is also essential for the integration of taste blends. Our findings support a model for taste coding in larvae, in which distinct receptor proteins mediate different responses within the same, multimodal GRN. PMID:26864722

  12. Inflammatory mediator bradykinin increases population of sensory neurons expressing functional T-type Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Zhang, Fan; Men, Hongchao; Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Hailin

    2016-04-29

    T-type Ca(2+) channels are important regulators of peripheral sensory neuron excitability. Accordingly, T-type Ca(2+) currents are often increased in various pathological pain conditions, such as inflammation or nerve injury. Here we investigated effects of inflammation on functional expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels in small-diameter cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that overnight treatment of DRG cultures with a cocktail of inflammatory mediators bradykinin (BK), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), norepinephrine (NE) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) strongly increased the population size of the small-diameter neurons displaying low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) currents while having no effect on the peak LVA current amplitude. When applied individually, BK and ATP also increased the population size of LVA-positive neurons while NE and PGE2 had no effect. The PLC inhibitor U-73122 and B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe-140, both abolished the increase of the population of LVA-positive DRG neurons. Inflammatory treatment did not affect CaV3.2 mRNA or protein levels in DRG cultures. Furthermore, an ubiquitination inhibitor, MG132, did not increase the population of LVA-positive neurons. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediators BK and ATP increase the abundance of LVA-positive DRG neurons in total neuronal population by stimulating the recruitment of a 'reserve pool' of CaV3.2 channels, particularly in neurons that do not display measurable LVA currents under control conditions. PMID:26944020

  13. Inflammatory mediator bradykinin increases population of sensory neurons expressing functional T-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Zhang, Fan; Men, Hongchao; Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Hailin

    2016-01-01

    T-type Ca2+ channels are important regulators of peripheral sensory neuron excitability. Accordingly, T-type Ca2+ currents are often increased in various pathological pain conditions, such as inflammation or nerve injury. Here we investigated effects of inflammation on functional expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in small-diameter cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that overnight treatment of DRG cultures with a cocktail of inflammatory mediators bradykinin (BK), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), norepinephrine (NE) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) strongly increased the population size of the small-diameter neurons displaying low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) Ca2+ currents while having no effect on the peak LVA current amplitude. When applied individually, BK and ATP also increased the population size of LVA-positive neurons while NE and PGE2 had no effect. The PLC inhibitor U-73122 and B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe-140, both abolished the increase of the population of LVA-positive DRG neurons. Inflammatory treatment did not affect CaV3.2 mRNA or protein levels in DRG cultures. Furthermore, an ubiquitination inhibitor, MG132, did not increase the population of LVA-positive neurons. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediators BK and ATP increase the abundance of LVA-positive DRG neurons in total neuronal population by stimulating the recruitment of a ‘reserve pool’ of CaV3.2 channels, particularly in neurons that do not display measurable LVA currents under control conditions. PMID:26944020

  14. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Coordinates Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Sensitization of Peripheral Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szteyn, Kalina; Rowan, Matthew P.; Gomez, Ruben; Du, Junhui; Carlton, Susan M.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate serves as the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nervous system. Previous studies have identified a role for glutamate and group I metabotropic receptors as targets for study in peripheral inflammatory pain. However, the coordination of signaling events that transpire from receptor activation to afferent neuronal sensitization has not been explored. Herein, we identify that scaffolding protein A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 (AKAP150) coordinates increased peripheral thermal sensitivity following group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR5) activation. In both acute and persistent models of thermal somatosensory behavior, we report that mGluR5 sensitization requires AKAP150 expression. Furthermore, electrophysiological approaches designed to record afferent neuronal activity reveal that mGluR5 sensitization also requires functional AKAP150 expression. In dissociated primary afferent neurons, mGluR5 activation increases TRPV1 responses in an AKAP dependent manner through a mechanism that induces AKAP association with TRPV1. Experimental results presented herein identify a mechanism of receptor-driven scaffolding association with ion channel targets. Importantly, this mechanism could prove significant in the search for therapeutic targets that repress episodes of acute pain from becoming chronic in nature. PMID:26172554

  15. Localization of NADPH Oxidase in Sympathetic and Sensory Ganglion Neurons and Perivascular Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xian; Demel, Stacie L.; Quinn, Mark T.; Galligan, James J.; Kreulen, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide anion (O2−•) production was previously reported to be increased in celiac ganglia (CG) during DOCA-salt hypertension, possibly via activation of the reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. This suggested a role for neuronal NADPH oxidase in autonomic neurovascular control. However, the expression and localization of NADPH oxidase in the peripheral neurons is not fully known. The purpose of this study was to examine the subcellular localization of NADPH oxidase in sympathetic and sensory ganglion neurons and perivascular nerve fibers. In rat CG, p22phox and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were colocalized in all neurons. P22phox was also localized to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that contain calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). In mesenteric arteries, p22phox and p47phox were colocalized with NPY or CGRP in perivascular nerve terminals. A similar pattern of nerve terminal staining of p22phox and p47phox was also found in cultured CG neurons and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized localization of NADPH oxidase in perivascular nerve fibers. The presence of a O2−• – generating enzyme in close vicinity to the sites of neurotransmitter handling in the nerve fibers suggests the possibility of novel redox-mediated mechanisms in peripheral neurovascular control. PMID:19716351

  16. Experimental and computational evidence for an essential role of NaV1.6 in spike initiation at stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; La, Jun-Ho; Wills, Zachary P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferents comprise ∼33% of the pelvic nerve innervation of mouse colorectum, which are activated by colorectal distension and encode visceral nociception. Stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings respond tonically to stepped or ramped colorectal stretch, whereas dissociated colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons generally fail to spike repetitively upon stepped current stimulation. The present study investigated this difference in the neural encoding characteristics between the soma and afferent ending using pharmacological approaches in an in vitro mouse colon-nerve preparation and complementary computational simulations. Immunohistological staining and Western blots revealed the presence of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) 1.6 and NaV1.7 at sensory neuronal endings in mouse colorectal tissue. Responses of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferent endings were significantly reduced by targeting NaV1.6 using selective antagonists (μ-conotoxin GIIIa and μ-conotoxin PIIIa) or tetrodotoxin. In contrast, neither selective NaV1.8 (A803467) nor NaV1.7 (ProTX-II) antagonists attenuated afferent responses to stretch. Computational simulation of a colorectal afferent ending that incorporated independent Markov models for NaV1.6 and NaV1.7, respectively, recapitulated the experimental findings, suggesting a necessary role for NaV1.6 in encoding tonic spiking by stretch-sensitive afferents. In addition, computational simulation of a dorsal root ganglion soma showed that, by adding a NaV1.6 conductance, a single-spiking neuron was converted into a tonic spiking one. These results suggest a mechanism/channel to explain the difference in neural encoding characteristics between afferent somata and sensory endings, likely caused by differential expression of ion channels (e.g., NaV1.6) at different parts of the neuron. PMID:25652923

  17. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  18. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  19. Satellite Glial Cells Surrounding Primary Afferent Neurons Are Activated and Proliferate during Monoarthritis in Rats: Is There a Role for ATF3?

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Diana Sofia Marques; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel; Neto, Fani Lourença Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Joint inflammatory diseases are debilitating and very painful conditions that still lack effective treatments. Recently, glial cells were shown to be crucial for the development and maintenance of chronic pain, constituting novel targets for therapeutic approaches. At the periphery, the satellite glial cells (SGCs) that surround the cell bodies of primary afferents neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) display hypertrophy, proliferation, and activation following injury and/or inflammation. It has been suggested that the expression of neuronal injury factors might initially trigger these SGCs-related events. We then aimed at evaluating if SGCs are involved in the establishment/maintenance of articular inflammatory pain, by using the monoarthritis (MA) model, and if the neuronal injury marker activating transcriptional factor 3 (ATF3) is associated with these SGCs' reactive changes. Western Blot (WB) analysis of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was performed in L4-L5 DRGs from control non-inflamed rats and MA animals at different time-points of disease (4, 7, and 14d, induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection into the left hind paw ankle joint). Data indicate that SGCs activation is occurring in MA animals, particularly after day 7 of disease evolution. Additionally, double-immunostaining for ATF3 and GFAP in L5 DRG sections shows that SGCs's activation significantly increases around stressed neurons at 7d of disease, when compared with control animals. The specific labelling of GFAP in SGCs rather than in other cell types was also confirmed by immunohistochemical labeling. Finally, BrdU incorporation indicates that proliferation of SGCs is also significantly increased after 7 days of MA. Data indicate that SGCs play an important role in the mechanisms of articular inflammation, with 7 days of disease being a critical time-point in the MA model, and suggest that ATF3 might be involved in SGCs' reactive changes such as activation. PMID

  20. Neuronal RNA granule contains ApCPEB1, a novel cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein, in Aplysia sensory neuron.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yeon-Su; Lee, Seung-Hee; Cheang, Ye-Hwang; Lee, Nuribalhae; Rim, Young-Soo; Jang, Deok-Jin; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2010-01-31

    The cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE)-binding protein (CPEB) binds to CPE containing mRNAs on their 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). This RNA binding protein comes out many important tasks, especially in learning and memory, by modifying the translational efficiency of target mRNAs via poly (A) tailing. Overexpressed CPEB has been reported to induce the formation of stress granules (SGs), a sort of RNA granule in mammalian cell lines. RNA granule is considered to be a potentially important factor in learning and memory. However, there is no study about RNA granule in Aplysia. To examine whether an Aplysia CPEB, ApCPEB1, forms RNA granules, we overexpressed ApCPEB1-EGFP in Aplysia sensory neurons. Consistent with the localization of mammalian CPEB, overexpressed ApCPEB1 formed granular structures, and was colocalized with RNAs and another RNA binding protein, ApCPEB, showing that ApCPEB1 positive granules are RNA-protein complexes. In addition, ApCPEB1 has a high turnover rate in RNA granules which were mobile structures. Thus, our results indicate that overexpressed ApCPEB1 is incorporated into RNA granule which is a dynamic structure in Aplysia sensory neuron. We propose that ApCPEB1 granule might modulate translation, as other RNA granules do, and furthermore, influence memory. PMID:19887896

  1. Phasic Dopamine Modifies Sensory-Driven Output of Striatal Neurons through Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Sebastian; Schindler, Sebastian; Huber, Cathrin; Köhr, Georg; Oswald, Manfred J; Kelsch, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    Animals are facing a complex sensory world in which only few stimuli are relevant to guide behavior. Value has to be assigned to relevant stimuli such as odors to select them over concurring information. Phasic dopamine is involved in the value assignment to stimuli in the ventral striatum. The underlying cellular mechanisms are incompletely understood. In striatal projection neurons of the ventral striatum in adult mice, we therefore examined the features and dynamics of phasic dopamine-induced synaptic plasticity and how this plasticity may modify the striatal output. Phasic dopamine is predicted to tag inputs that occur in temporal proximity. Indeed, we observed D1 receptor-dependent synaptic potentiation only when odor-like bursts and optogenetically evoked phasic dopamine release were paired within a time window of <1 s. Compatible with predictions of dynamic value assignment, the synaptic potentiation persisted after the phasic dopamine signal had ceased, but gradually reversed when odor-like bursts continued to be presented. The synaptic plasticity depended on the sensory input rate and was input specific. Importantly, synaptic plasticity amplified the firing response to a given olfactory input as the dendritic integration and the firing threshold remained unchanged during synaptic potentiation. Thus, phasic dopamine-induced synaptic plasticity can change information transfer through dynamic increases of the output of striatal projection neurons to specific sensory inputs. This plasticity may provide a neural substrate for dynamic value assignment in the striatum. PMID:26156995

  2. Physiological and anatomical properties of intramedullary projection neurons in rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Corson, James A; Bradley, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNTS), the first-order relay of gustatory information, not only transmits sensory information to more rostral brain areas but also connects to various brain stem sites responsible for orofacial reflex activities. While much is known regarding ascending projections to the parabrachial nucleus, intramedullary projections to the reticular formation (which regulate oromotor reflexive behaviors) remain relatively unstudied. The present study examined the intrinsic firing properties of these neurons as well as their morphological properties and synaptic connectivity with primary sensory afferents. Using in vitro whole cell patch-clamp recording, we found that intramedullary projection neurons respond to depolarizing current injection with either tonic or bursting action potential trains and subsets of these groups of neurons express A-type potassium, H-like, and postinhibitory rebound currents. Approximately half of the intramedullary projection neurons tested received monosynaptic innervation from primary afferents, while the rest received polysynaptic innervation, indicating that at least a subpopulation of these neurons can be directly activated by incoming sensory information. Neuron morphological reconstructions revealed that many of these neurons possessed numerous dendritic spines and that neurons receiving monosynaptic primary afferent input have a greater spine density than those receiving polysynaptic primary afferent input. These results reveal that intramedullary projection neurons represent a heterogeneous class of rNTS neurons and, through both intrinsic voltage-gated ion channels and local circuit interactions, transform incoming gustatory information into signals governing oromotor reflexive behaviors. PMID:23741045

  3. Decision-related activity in sensory neurons may depend on the columnar architecture of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Nienborg, Hendrikje; Cumming, Bruce G

    2014-03-01

    Many studies have reported correlations between the activity of sensory neurons and animals' judgments in discrimination tasks. Here, we suggest that such neuron-behavior correlations may require a cortical map for the task relevant features. This would explain why studies using discrimination tasks based on disparity in area V1 have not found these correlations: V1 contains no map for disparity. This scheme predicts that activity of V1 neurons correlates with decisions in an orientation-discrimination task. To test this prediction, we trained two macaque monkeys in a coarse orientation discrimination task using band-pass-filtered dynamic noise. The two orientations were always 90° apart and task difficulty was controlled by varying the orientation bandwidth of the filter. While the trained animals performed this task, we recorded from orientation-selective V1 neurons (n = 82, n = 31 for Monkey 1, n = 51 for Monkey 2). For both monkeys, we observed significant correlation (quantified as "choice probabilities") of the V1 activity with the monkeys' perceptual judgments (mean choice probability 0.54, p = 10(-5)). In one of these animals, we had previously measured choice probabilities in a disparity discrimination task in V1, which had been at chance (0.49, not significantly different from 0.5). The choice probabilities in this monkey for the orientation discrimination task were significantly larger than those for the disparity discrimination task (p = 0.032). These results are predicted by our suggestion that choice probabilities are only observed for cortical sensory neurons that are organized in maps for the task-relevant feature. PMID:24599457

  4. In vivo imaging of axonal transport in murine motor and sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Katherine L.; Kalmar, Bernadett; Sleigh, James N.; Greensmith, Linda; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Background Axonal transport is essential for neuronal function and survival. Defects in axonal transport have been identified as an early pathological feature in several disorders of the nervous system. The visualisation and quantitative analysis of axonal transport in vivo in rodent models of neurological disease is therefore crucial to improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and for the identification of novel therapeutics. New method Here, we describe a method for the in vivo imaging of axonal transport of signalling endosomes in the sciatic nerve of live, anaesthetised mice. Results This method allows the multiparametric, quantitative analysis of in vivo axonal transport in motor and sensory neurons of adult mice in control conditions and during disease progression. Comparison with existing methods Previous in vivo imaging of the axonal transport of signalling endosomes has been limited to studies in nerve explant preparations or non-invasive approaches using magnetic resonance imaging; techniques that are hampered by major drawbacks such as tissue damage and low temporal and spatial resolution. This new method allows live imaging of the axonal transport of single endosomes in the sciatic nerve in situ and a more sensitive analysis of axonal transport kinetics than previous approaches. Conclusions The method described in this paper allows an in-depth analysis of the characteristics of axonal transport in both motor and sensory neurons in vivo. It enables the detailed study of alterations in axonal transport in rodent models of neurological diseases and can be used to identify novel pharmacological modifiers of axonal transport. PMID:26424507

  5. Flash Photolysis of Caged Compounds in the Cilia of Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccio, Anna; Sagheddu, Claudia; Menini, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Photolysis of caged compounds allows the production of rapid and localized increases in the concentration of various physiologically active compounds1. Caged compounds are molecules made physiologically inactive by a chemical cage that can be broken by a flash of ultraviolet light. Here, we show how to obtain patch-clamp recordings combined with photolysis of caged compounds for the study of olfactory transduction in dissociated mouse olfactory sensory neurons. The process of olfactory transduction (Figure 1) takes place in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, where odorant binding to receptors leads to the increase of cAMP that opens cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels2. Ca entry through CNG channels activates Ca-activated Cl channels. We show how to dissociate neurons from the mouse olfactory epithelium3 and how to activate CNG channels or Ca-activated Cl channels by photolysis of caged cAMP4 or caged Ca5. We use a flash lamp6,7 to apply ultraviolet flashes to the ciliary region to uncage cAMP or Ca while patch-clamp recordings are taken to measure the current in the whole-cell voltage-clamp configuration8-11. PMID:22064384

  6. Synaptic diversity enables temporal coding of coincident multi-sensory inputs in single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chabrol, François P.; Arenz, Alexander; Wiechert, Martin T.; Margrie, Troy W.; DiGregorio, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the brain to rapidly process information from multiple pathways is critical for reliable execution of complex sensory-motor behaviors, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying a neuronal representation of multimodal stimuli are poorly understood. Here we explored the possibility that the physiological diversity of mossy fiber (MF) to granule cell (GC) synapses within the mouse vestibulocerebellum may contribute to the processing of coincident multisensory information at the level of individual GCs. We found that the strength and short-term dynamics of individual MF-GC synapses can act as biophysical signatures for primary vestibular, secondary vestibular and visual input pathways. The majority of GCs receive inputs from different modalities, which when co-activated, produced enhanced GC firing rates and distinct first spike latencies. Thus, pathway-specific synaptic response properties permit temporal coding of correlated multisensory input by single GCs, thereby enriching sensory representation and facilitating pattern separation. PMID:25821914

  7. Substrate Three-Dimensionality Induces Elemental Morphological Transformation of Sensory Neurons on a Physiologic Timescale

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Andreia; Vargo, Shelby; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    The natural environment of a neuron is the three-dimensional (3D) tissue. In vivo, embryonic sensory neurons transiently express a bipolar morphology with two opposing neurites before undergoing cytoplasmic and cytoskeletal rearrangement to a more mature pseudo-unipolar axonal arbor before birth. The unipolar morphology is crucial in the adult for correct information transmission from the periphery to the central nervous system. On two-dimensional (2D) substrates this transformation is delayed significantly or absent. We report that a 3D culture platform can invoke the characteristic transformation to the unipolar axonal arbor within a time frame similar to in vivo, overcoming the loss of this essential milestone in 2D substrates. Additionally, 3D substrates alone provided an environment that promoted axonal branching features that reflect morphological patterns observed in vivo. We have also analyzed the involvement of soluble cues in these morphogenic processes by culturing the neurons in the presence and absence of nerve growth factor (NGF), a molecule that plays distinct roles in the development of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Without NGF, both 2D and 3D cultures had significant decreases in the relative population of unipolar neurons as well as shorter neurite lengths and fewer branch points compared to cultures with NGF. Interestingly, branching features of neurons cultured in 3D without NGF resemble those of neurons cultured in 2D with NGF. Therefore, neurons cultured in 3D without NGF lost the ability to differentiate into unipolar neurons, suggesting that this morphological hallmark requires not only presentation of soluble cues like NGF, but also the surrounding 3D presentation of adhesive ligands to allow for realization of the innate morphogenic program. We propose that in a 3D environment, various matrix and soluble cues are presented toward all surfaces of the cell; this optimized milieu allows neurons to elaborate their genuine

  8. Serotonin increases intracellular Ca2+ transients in voltage-clamped sensory neurons of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, M B; Klein, M; Smith, S J; Kandel, E R

    1984-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the tail of Aplysia californica produces behavioral sensitization; it enhances several related defensive reflexes. This reflex enhancement involves heterosynaptic facilitation of transmitter release from sensory neurons of the reflex. The facilitation is stimulated by serotonin (5-HT) and involves suppression of a 5-HT-sensitive K+ current (the S current). Suppression of the S current broadens the action potential of the sensory neurons and is thought to enhance transmitter release by prolonging entry of Ca2+ in the presynaptic terminals. We now report a component of enhanced Ca2+ accumulation that is independent of changes in spike shape. We have measured intracellular free Ca2+ transients during long depolarizing steps in voltage-clamped sensory neuron cell bodies injected with the Ca2+-sensitive dye arsenazo III. The free Ca2+ transients elicited by a range of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps increase in amplitude by 75% following application of 5-HT. Since it is observed under voltage-clamp conditions, this increase in the free Ca2+ transients is not merely secondary to the changes in K+ current but must reflect an additional mechanism, an intrinsic change in the handling of Ca2+ by the cell. We have not yet determined whether this change in Ca2+ handling reflects an increase in Ca2+ influx, a reduction in intracellular Ca2+ uptake, or a release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, however, it seems possible that the enhancement of Ca2+ accumulation and the reduction in K+ current act synergistically in producing short-term presynaptic facilitation. Alternatively, this additional modulation of Ca2+ by 5-HT might contribute to processes such as classical conditioning or long-term sensitization that may depend on Ca2+. PMID:6594707

  9. Functional selectivity of kappa opioid receptor agonists in peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Raehannah J; Jacobs, Blaine A; Sullivan, Laura C; Chavera, Teresa A; Saylor, Rachel M; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Clarke, William P; Berg, Kelly A

    2015-11-01

    Activation of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) expressed by peripheral sensory neurons that respond to noxious stimuli (nociceptors) can reduce neurotransmission of pain stimuli from the periphery to the central nervous system. We have previously shown that the antinociception dose-response curve for peripherally restricted doses of the KOR agonist (-)-(trans)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide (U50488) has an inverted U shape. Here, we found that the downward phase of the U50488 dose-response curve was blocked by an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation U0126. Local administration of the selective KOR agonist salvinorin A (Sal-A), also resulted in an inverted U-shaped curve; however, the downward phase was insensitive to U0126. By contrast, inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) partially blocked the downward phase of the dose-response curve to Sal-A, suggesting a role for JNK. In cultures of peripheral sensory neurons, U50488 and Sal-A inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity with similar efficacies; however, their ability to activate ERK and JNK differed. Whereas U50488 activated ERK but not JNK, Sal-A activated JNK but not ERK. Moreover, although both U50488 and Sal-A produced homologous desensitization, desensitization to U50488 was blocked by inhibition of ERK activation, whereas desensitization to Sal-A was blocked by inhibition of JNK. Substitution of an ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A reduced stimulation of JNK, prevented desensitization by ethoxymethyl ether for the C2 position acetyl group of Sal-A, and resulted in a monotonic antinociception dose-response curve. Collectively, these data demonstrate the functional selectivity of KOR ligands for signaling in peripheral sensory neurons, which results in differential effects on behavioral responses in vivo. PMID:26297384

  10. Uptake of nerve growth factor along peripheral and spinal axons of primary sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P.M.; Riopelle, R.J.

    1984-07-01

    To investigate the distribution of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on peripheral and central axons, (/sup 125/I)NGF was injected into the sciatic nerve or spinal cord of adult rats. Accumulation of (/sup 125/I)NGF in lumbar dorsal root ganglia was monitored by gamma emission counting and radioautography. (/sup 125/I)NGF, injected endoneurially in small quantities, was taken into sensory axons by a saturable process and was transported retrogradely to their cell bodies at a maximal rate of 2.5 to 7.5 mm/hr. Because very little (/sup 125/I)NGF reached peripheral terminals, the results were interpreted to indicate that receptors for NGF are present on nonterminal segments of sensory axons. The specificity and high affinity of NGF uptake were illustrated by observations that negligible amounts of gamma activity accumulated in lumbar dorsal root ganglia after comparable intraneural injection of (/sup 125/I) cytochrome C or (/sup 125/I)oxidized NGF. Similar techniques were used to demonstrate avid internalization and retrograde transport of (/sup 125/I)NGF by intraspinal axons arising from dorsal root ganglia. Following injection of (/sup 125/I)NGF into lumbar or cervical regions of the spinal cord, neuronal perikarya were clearly labeled in radioautographs of lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Sites for NGF uptake on primary sensory neurons in the adult rat are not restricted to peripheral axon terminals but are extensively distributed along both peripheral and central axons. Receptors on axons provide a mechanism whereby NGF supplied by glia could influence neuronal maintenance or axonal regeneration.

  11. Odorant receptors activated by amino acids in sensory neurons of the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T T; Caprio, J

    1993-12-01

    Odorant receptors activated by amino acids were investigated with patch-clamp techniques in olfactory receptor neurons of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The L-isomers of alanine, norvaline, arginine, and glutamate, known to act predominantly on different olfactory receptor sites, activated nondesensitizing inward currents with amplitudes of -2.5 to -280 pA in olfactory neurons voltage-clamped at membrane potentials of -72 or -82 mV. Different amino acids were shown to induce responses in the same sensory neurons; however, the amplitude and the kinetics of the observed whole cell currents differed among the stimuli and may therefore reflect activation of different amino acid receptor types or combinations of receptor types in these cells. Amino acid-induced currents appeared to have diverse voltage dependence and could also be classified according to the amplitude of the spontaneous channel fluctuations underlying the macroscopic currents. A mean single-channel conductance (gamma) of 360 fS was estimated from small noise whole-cell currents evoked by arginine within the same olfactory neuron in which a mean gamma value of 23.6 pS was estimated from 'large noise' response to norvaline. Quiescent olfactory neurons fired bursts of action potentials in response to either amino acid stimulation or application of 8-Br-cyclic GMP (100 microM), and voltage-gated channels underlying generation of action potentials were similar in these neurons. However, in whole-cell voltage-clamp, 8-Br-cyclic GMP evoked large rectangular current pulses, and single-channel conductances of 275, 220, and 110 pS were obtained from the discrete current levels. These results suggest that in addition to the cyclic nucleotide-gated transduction channels, olfactory neurons of the channel catfish possess a variety of odor receptors coupled to different types of transduction channels. PMID:8133240

  12. The Acquisition of Specificity in Cutaneous Sensory Neurons: A Reconsideration of the Integumental Specification Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Sklar, Joseph H.; Hunt, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    Neuronal specificity in cutaneous sensory nerve cells has been postulated to arise from “inductive interactions” between the cell's randomly outgrown peripheral neurite and local biochemical markers in the skin. Here was apply this integumental specification hypothesis to data recently obtained on the wiping-reflex behavior of frogs skin-grafted at various times during larval life. Deductions are generated about the developmental time course of the postulated nerve-skin interactions and two predictions are formulated and tested. Because the results of serial skin rotation experiments contradict the predictions, we conclude that the currently held hypothesis must be seriously questioned. Images PMID:4587258

  13. The acquisition of specificity in cutaneous sensory neurons: a reconsideration of the integumental specification hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sklar, J H; Hunt, R K

    1973-12-01

    Neuronal specificity in cutaneous sensory nerve cells has been postulated to arise from "inductive interactions" between the cell's randomly outgrown peripheral neurite and local biochemical markers in the skin. Here was apply this integumental specification hypothesis to data recently obtained on the wiping-reflex behavior of frogs skin-grafted at various times during larval life. Deductions are generated about the developmental time course of the postulated nerve-skin interactions and two predictions are formulated and tested. Because the results of serial skin rotation experiments contradict the predictions, we conclude that the currently held hypothesis must be seriously questioned. PMID:4587258

  14. Predicting the response of olfactory sensory neurons to odor mixtures from single odor response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Addolorata; de Paris, Alessandro; Migliore, Michele

    2016-04-01

    The response of olfactory receptor neurons to odor mixtures is not well understood. Here, using experimental constraints, we investigate the mathematical structure of the odor response space and its consequences. The analysis suggests that the odor response space is 3-dimensional, and predicts that the dose-response curve of an odor receptor can be obtained, in most cases, from three primary components with specific properties. This opens the way to an objective procedure to obtain specific olfactory receptor responses by manipulating mixtures in a mathematically predictable manner. This result is general and applies, independently of the number of odor components, to any olfactory sensory neuron type with a response curve that can be represented as a sigmoidal function of the odor concentration.

  15. Predicting the response of olfactory sensory neurons to odor mixtures from single odor response

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Addolorata; De Paris, Alessandro; Migliore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The response of olfactory receptor neurons to odor mixtures is not well understood. Here, using experimental constraints, we investigate the mathematical structure of the odor response space and its consequences. The analysis suggests that the odor response space is 3-dimensional, and predicts that the dose-response curve of an odor receptor can be obtained, in most cases, from three primary components with specific properties. This opens the way to an objective procedure to obtain specific olfactory receptor responses by manipulating mixtures in a mathematically predictable manner. This result is general and applies, independently of the number of odor components, to any olfactory sensory neuron type with a response curve that can be represented as a sigmoidal function of the odor concentration. PMID:27053070

  16. A possible molecular mechanism for the interaction of defensin with the sensory neuron membrane.

    PubMed

    Plakhova, V B; Shchegolev, B F; Rogachevskii, I V; Nozdrachev, A D; Krylov, B V; Podzorova, S A; Kokryakov, V N

    2002-01-01

    A local membrane potential clamping method was used to study the effects of defensin NP-1 on the membranes of rat spinal ganglion neurons. NP-1 led to decreases in the effective charge for the activation gating system. This process depended on the NP-1 concentration. Use of the Hill equation showed that Kd was 2.10(-12) M and the Hill coefficient was 0.9. The structure of the defensin molecule was optimized using quantum chemical calculations based on a molecular mechanics method. The results obtained from these calculations suggested that a single hydroxyl group directed towards the outer part of thedefensin molecule and forming the carboxyl group of amino acid Glu14 could form a hydrogen bond with the active center of the membrane receptor. This explains the experimentally observed 1:1 stoichiometry of the ligand-receptor binding interaction between the defensin and the sensory neuron membrane. PMID:12243262

  17. Aging in Sensory and Motor Neurons Results in Learning Failure in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Kempsell, Andrew T; Fieber, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and molecular mechanisms of age-related memory loss are complicated by the complexity of vertebrate nervous systems. This study takes advantage of a simple neural model to investigate nervous system aging, focusing on changes in learning and memory in the form of behavioral sensitization in vivo and synaptic facilitation in vitro. The effect of aging on the tail withdrawal reflex (TWR) was studied in Aplysia californica at maturity and late in the annual lifecycle. We found that short-term sensitization in TWR was absent in aged Aplysia. This implied that the neuronal machinery governing nonassociative learning was compromised during aging. Synaptic plasticity in the form of short-term facilitation between tail sensory and motor neurons decreased during aging whether the sensitizing stimulus was tail shock or the heterosynaptic modulator serotonin (5-HT). Together, these results suggest that the cellular mechanisms governing behavioral sensitization are compromised during aging, thereby nearly eliminating sensitization in aged Aplysia. PMID:25970633

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Murine Olfactory Sensory Neurons during Development Using Single Cell RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Paul; Kalbe, Benjamin; Jansen, Fabian; Altmueller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Mohrhardt, Julia; Schreiner, Benjamin; Gisselmann, Guenter; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian odor reception is achieved by highly specialized olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) located in the nasal cavity. Despite their importance for the daily survival of most mammals, the gene expression and regulatory profiles of these single neurons are poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation of individual GFP-labeled OSNs from Olfr73-GFP mice at different developmental stages followed by Next Generation Sequencing, thereby analyzing the detailed transcriptome for the first time. We characterized the repertoire of olfactory receptors (ORs) and found that in addition to the highly and predominant detectable Olfr73, 20 additional ORs were stably detectable at lower transcript levels in adult mice. Additionally, OSNs collected from mice of earlier developmental stages did not show any stable OR patterns. However, more than one predominant OR per OSN was detectable. PMID:26839357

  19. Efferent Control of Hair Cell and Afferent Responses in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Richard; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Highstein, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The sensations of sound and motion generated by the inner ear are controlled by the brain through extensive centripetal innervation originating within the brain stem. In the semicircular canals, brain stem efferent neurons make synaptic contacts with mechanosensory hair cells and with the dendrites of afferent neurons. Here, we examine the relative contributions of efferent action on hair cells and afferents. Experiments were performed in vivo in the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. The efferent system was activated via electrical pulses to the brain stem and sensory responses to motion stimuli were quantified by simultaneous voltage recording from afferents and intracellular current- and/or voltage-clamp recordings from hair cells. Results showed synaptic inputs to both afferents and hair cells leading to relatively long-latency intracellular signaling responses: excitatory in afferents and inhibitory in hair cells. Generally, the net effect of efferent action was an increase in afferent background discharge and a simultaneous decrease in gain to angular motion stimuli. Inhibition of hair cells was likely the result of a ligand-gated opening of a major basolateral conductance. The reversal potential of the efferent-evoked current was just below the hair cell resting potential, thus resulting in a small hyperpolarization. The onset latency averaged about 90 ms and latency to peak response was 150–400 ms. Hair cell inhibition often outlasted afferent excitation and, in some cases, latched hair cells in the “off” condition for >1 s following cessation of stimulus. These features endow the animal with a powerful means to adjust the sensitivity and dynamic range of motion sensation. PMID:19571186

  20. Functional analysis of ultra high information rates conveyed by rat vibrissal primary afferents

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, André M.; Theis, Lucas; Sengupta, Biswa; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Bethge, Matthias; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Sensory receptors determine the type and the quantity of information available for perception. Here, we quantified and characterized the information transferred by primary afferents in the rat whisker system using neural system identification. Quantification of “how much” information is conveyed by primary afferents, using the direct method (DM), a classical information theoretic tool, revealed that primary afferents transfer huge amounts of information (up to 529 bits/s). Information theoretic analysis of instantaneous spike-triggered kinematic stimulus features was used to gain functional insight on “what” is coded by primary afferents. Amongst the kinematic variables tested—position, velocity, and acceleration—primary afferent spikes encoded velocity best. The other two variables contributed to information transfer, but only if combined with velocity. We further revealed three additional characteristics that play a role in information transfer by primary afferents. Firstly, primary afferent spikes show preference for well separated multiple stimuli (i.e., well separated sets of combinations of the three instantaneous kinematic variables). Secondly, neurons are sensitive to short strips of the stimulus trajectory (up to 10 ms pre-spike time), and thirdly, they show spike patterns (precise doublet and triplet spiking). In order to deal with these complexities, we used a flexible probabilistic neuron model fitting mixtures of Gaussians to the spike triggered stimulus distributions, which quantitatively captured the contribution of the mentioned features and allowed us to achieve a full functional analysis of the total information rate indicated by the DM. We found that instantaneous position, velocity, and acceleration explained about 50% of the total information rate. Adding a 10 ms pre-spike interval of stimulus trajectory achieved 80–90%. The final 10–20% were found to be due to non-linear coding by spike bursts. PMID:24367295

  1. Expression of K2P channels in sensory and motor neurons of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cadaveira-Mosquera, Alba; Pérez, Montse; Reboreda, Antonio; Rivas-Ramírez, Paula; Fernández-Fernández, Diego; Lamas, J Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Several types of neurons within the central and peripheral somatic nervous system express two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels, providing them with resting potassium conductances. We demonstrate that these channels are also expressed in the autonomic nervous system where they might be important modulators of neuronal excitability. We observed strong mRNA expression of members of the TRESK and TREK subfamilies in both the mouse superior cervical ganglion (mSCG) and the mouse nodose ganglion (mNG). Motor mSCG neurons strongly expressed mRNA transcripts for TRESK and TREK-2 subunits, whereas TASK-1 and TASK-2 subunits were only moderately expressed, with only few or very few transcripts for TREK-1 and TRAAK (TRESK ≈ TREK-2 > TASK-2 ≈ TASK-1 > TREK-1 > TRAAK). Similarly, the TRESK and TREK-1 subunits were the most strongly expressed in sensorial mNG neurons, while TASK-1 and TASK-2 mRNAs were moderately expressed, and fewer TREK-2 and TRAAK transcripts were detected (TRESK ≈ TREK-1 > TASK-1 ≈ TASK-2 > TREK-2 > TRAAK). Moreover, cell-attached single-channel recordings showed a major contribution of TRESK and TREK-1 channels in mNG. As the level of TRESK mRNA expression was not statistically different between the ganglia analysed, the distinct expression of TREK-1 and TREK-2 subunits was the main difference observed between these structures. Our results strongly suggest that TRESK and TREK channels are important modulators of the sensorial and motor information flowing through the autonomic nervous system, probably exerting a strong influence on vagal reflexes. PMID:22544515

  2. Connectivity from OR37 expressing olfactory sensory neurons to distinct cell types in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Bader, Andrea; Klein, Bettina; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) which express a member from the OR37 subfamily of odorant receptor (OR) genes are wired to the main olfactory bulb (MOB) in a unique monoglomerular fashion; from these glomeruli an untypical connectivity into higher brain centers exists. In the present study we have investigated by DiI and transsynaptic tracing approaches how the connection pattern from these glomeruli into distinct hypothalamic nuclei is organized. The application of DiI onto the ventral domain of the bulb which harbors the OR37 glomeruli resulted in the labeling of fibers within the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SO) of the hypothalamus; some of these fibers were covered with varicose-like structures. No DiI-labeled cell somata were detectable in these nuclei. The data indicate that projection neurons which originate in the OR37 region of the MOB form direct connections into these nuclei. The cells that were labeled by the transsynaptic tracer WGA in these nuclei were further characterized. Their distribution pattern in the paraventricular nucleus was reminiscent of cells which produce distinct neuropeptides. Double labeling experiments confirmed that they contained vasopressin, but not the related neuropeptide oxytocin. Morphological analysis revealed that they comprise of magno- and parvocellular cells. A comparative investigation of the WGA-positive cells in the SO demonstrated that these were vasopressin-positive, as well, whereas oxytocin-producing cells of this nucleus also contained no transsynaptic tracer. Together, the data demonstrates a connectivity from OR37 expressing sensory neurons to distinct hypothalamic neurons with the same neuropeptide content. PMID:23162434

  3. Connectivity from OR37 expressing olfactory sensory neurons to distinct cell types in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Andrea; Klein, Bettina; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) which express a member from the OR37 subfamily of odorant receptor (OR) genes are wired to the main olfactory bulb (MOB) in a unique monoglomerular fashion; from these glomeruli an untypical connectivity into higher brain centers exists. In the present study we have investigated by DiI and transsynaptic tracing approaches how the connection pattern from these glomeruli into distinct hypothalamic nuclei is organized. The application of DiI onto the ventral domain of the bulb which harbors the OR37 glomeruli resulted in the labeling of fibers within the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SO) of the hypothalamus; some of these fibers were covered with varicose-like structures. No DiI-labeled cell somata were detectable in these nuclei. The data indicate that projection neurons which originate in the OR37 region of the MOB form direct connections into these nuclei. The cells that were labeled by the transsynaptic tracer WGA in these nuclei were further characterized. Their distribution pattern in the paraventricular nucleus was reminiscent of cells which produce distinct neuropeptides. Double labeling experiments confirmed that they contained vasopressin, but not the related neuropeptide oxytocin. Morphological analysis revealed that they comprise of magno- and parvocellular cells. A comparative investigation of the WGA-positive cells in the SO demonstrated that these were vasopressin-positive, as well, whereas oxytocin-producing cells of this nucleus also contained no transsynaptic tracer. Together, the data demonstrates a connectivity from OR37 expressing sensory neurons to distinct hypothalamic neurons with the same neuropeptide content. PMID:23162434

  4. The microRNA bantam functions in epithelial cells to regulate scaling growth of dendrite arbors in Drosophila sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Jay Z.; Xu, Peizhang; Kim, Charles C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2009-01-01

    Summary In addition to establishing dendritic coverage of the receptive field, neurons need to adjust their dendritic arbors to match changes of the receptive field. Here we show that dendrite arborization (da) sensory neurons establish dendritic coverage of the body wall early in Drosophila larval development and then grow in precise proportion to their substrate, the underlying body wall epithelium, as the larva more than triples in length. This phenomenon, referred to as scaling growth of dendrites, requires the function of the microRNA (miRNA) bantam (ban) in the epithelial cells rather than the da neurons themselves. We further show that ban in epithelial cells dampens Akt kinase activity in adjacent neurons to influence dendrite growth. This signaling between epithelial cells and neurons receiving sensory input from the body wall synchronizes their growth to ensure proper dendritic coverage of the receptive field. PMID:19778508

  5. Nerve Injury Diminishes Opioid Analgesia through Lysine Methyltransferase-mediated Transcriptional Repression of μ-Opioid Receptors in Primary Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Chen, Shao-Rui; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-15

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR, encoded by Oprm1) agonists are the mainstay analgesics for treating moderate to severe pain. Nerve injury causes down-regulation of MORs in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and diminishes the opioid effect on neuropathic pain. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the diminished MOR expression caused by nerve injury are not clear. G9a (encoded by Ehmt2), a histone 3 at lysine 9 methyltransferase, is a key chromatin regulator responsible for gene silencing. In this study, we determined the role of G9a in diminished MOR expression and opioid analgesic effects in animal models of neuropathic pain. We found that nerve injury in rats induced a long-lasting reduction in the expression level of MORs in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Nerve injury consistently increased the enrichment of the G9a product histone 3 at lysine 9 dimethylation in the promoter of Oprm1 in the DRG. G9a inhibition or siRNA knockdown fully reversed MOR expression in the injured DRG and potentiated the morphine effect on pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In mice lacking Ehmt2 in DRG neurons, nerve injury failed to reduce the expression level of MORs and the morphine effect. In addition, G9a inhibition or Ehmt2 knockout in DRG neurons normalized nerve injury-induced reduction in the inhibitory effect of the opioid on synaptic glutamate release from primary afferent nerves. Our findings indicate that G9a contributes critically to transcriptional repression of MORs in primary sensory neurons in neuropathic pain. G9a inhibitors may be used to enhance the opioid analgesic effect in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26917724

  6. Prodynorphine opioid peptides and aspartate aminotransferase studied in spinal cord and sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetnam, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    An objective of this research was to obtain evidence for the synthesis and release of newly discovered opioid peptides, such as dynorphin, in spinal cord and sensory neurons. Several specific antisera were used to visualize dynorphin and related peptides in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion neurons in dissociated cell culture. Antisera specific for the midportion of the dynorphin molecule revealed a subpopulation of spinal cord neurons with dense immunoreactive dynorphin in cell perikarya, but none in their associated neurites. Antisera specific for either the amino or carboxy terminal sequences of the molecule produced intense immunoreactivity in both cell perikarya and neurites of spinal neurons. These data suggest the cleavage products of dynorphin and not the complete molecule are possible neurotransmitters in the spinal cord. Additional evidence in support of this hypothesis was derived from radioimmunoassays of these cells and their culture medium following depolarization induced by elevated extracellular potassium. Antisera against aspartate aminotransferase revealed no differentially elevated immunoreactive aspartate aminotransferase in tissue sections of spinal cord or dorsal root ganglia.

  7. Calsyntenin-1 Regulates Axon Branching and Endosomal Trafficking during Sensory Neuron Development In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ponomareva, Olga Y.; Holmen, Ian C.; Sperry, Aiden J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Precise regulation of axon branching is crucial for neuronal circuit formation, yet the mechanisms that control branch formation are not well understood. Moreover, the highly complex morphology of neurons makes them critically dependent on protein/membrane trafficking and transport systems, although the functions for membrane trafficking in neuronal morphogenesis are largely undefined. Here we identify a kinesin adaptor, Calsyntenin-1 (Clstn-1), as an essential regulator of axon branching and neuronal compartmentalization in vivo. We use morpholino knockdown and a Clstn-1 mutant to show that Clstn-1 is required for formation of peripheral but not central sensory axons, and for peripheral axon branching in zebrafish. We used live imaging of endosomal trafficking in vivo to show that Clstn-1 regulates transport of Rab5-containing endosomes from the cell body to specific locations of developing axons. Our results suggest a model in which Clstn-1 patterns separate axonal compartments and define their ability to branch by directing trafficking of specific endosomes. PMID:25009257

  8. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals distinct injury responses in different types of DRG sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ganlu; Huang, Kevin; Hu, Youjin; Du, Guizhen; Xue, Zhigang; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to various injury-induced responses in sensory neurons including physiological pain, neuronal cell death, and nerve regeneration. In this study, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis of mouse nonpeptidergic nociceptors (NP), peptidergic nociceptors (PEP), and large myelinated sensory neurons (LM) under both control and injury conditions at 3 days after sciatic nerve transection (SNT). After performing principle component and weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we categorized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into different subtypes and discovered co-regulated injury-response genes including novel regeneration associated genes (RAGs) in association with neuronal development, protein translation and cytoplasm transportation. In addition, we found significant up-regulation of the genes associated with cell death such as Pdcd2 in a subset of NP neurons after axotomy, implicating their actions in neuronal cell death upon nerve injury. Our study revealed the distinctive and sustained heterogeneity of transcriptomic responses to injury at single neuron level, implicating the involvement of different gene regulatory networks in nerve regeneration, neuronal cell death and neuropathy in different population of DRG neurons. PMID:27558660

  9. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals distinct injury responses in different types of DRG sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ganlu; Huang, Kevin; Hu, Youjin; Du, Guizhen; Xue, Zhigang; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to various injury-induced responses in sensory neurons including physiological pain, neuronal cell death, and nerve regeneration. In this study, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis of mouse nonpeptidergic nociceptors (NP), peptidergic nociceptors (PEP), and large myelinated sensory neurons (LM) under both control and injury conditions at 3 days after sciatic nerve transection (SNT). After performing principle component and weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we categorized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into different subtypes and discovered co-regulated injury-response genes including novel regeneration associated genes (RAGs) in association with neuronal development, protein translation and cytoplasm transportation. In addition, we found significant up-regulation of the genes associated with cell death such as Pdcd2 in a subset of NP neurons after axotomy, implicating their actions in neuronal cell death upon nerve injury. Our study revealed the distinctive and sustained heterogeneity of transcriptomic responses to injury at single neuron level, implicating the involvement of different gene regulatory networks in nerve regeneration, neuronal cell death and neuropathy in different population of DRG neurons. PMID:27558660

  10. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    PubMed

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection. PMID:1733359

  11. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  12. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  13. Odor-induced cAMP production in Drosophila melanogaster olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Miazzi, Fabio; Hansson, Bill S; Wicher, Dieter

    2016-06-15

    Insect odorant receptors are seven transmembrane domain proteins that form cation channels, whose functional properties such as receptor sensitivity are subject to regulation by intracellular signaling cascades. Here, we used the cAMP fluorescent indicator Epac1-camps to investigate the occurrence of odor-induced cAMP production in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of Drosophila melanogaster We show that stimulation of the receptor complex with an odor mixture or with the synthetic agonist VUAA1 induces a cAMP response. Moreover, we show that while the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration influences cAMP production, the OSN-specific receptor OrX is necessary to elicit cAMP responses in Ca(2+)-free conditions. These results provide direct evidence of a relationship between odorant receptor stimulation and cAMP production in olfactory sensory neurons in the fruit fly antenna and show that this method can be used to further investigate the role that this second messenger plays in insect olfaction. PMID:27045092

  14. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  15. Identification and localization of two sensory neuron membrane proteins from Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Wang, Gui-Rong

    2015-03-01

    Sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs), which are located on the dendritic membrane of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), are proposed to be associated with odor reception in insects. Recent studies have demonstrated that SNMP1 is essential for electrophysiological responses of OSNs to the sex pheromone, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) in Drosophila melanogaster. To investigate the function of Lepidoptera SNMPs, we cloned two SNMP genes, SlituSNMP1 and SltiuSNMP2, from Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that both genes bear the general characteristics of SNMPs, including six conserved cysteine residues and two transmembrane domains. Further expression profile experiments showed that SlituSNMP1 is mainly expressed in the antenna, while SlituSNMP2 is broadly expressed in various tissues. By in situ hybridization experiments, it was found that SlituSNMP1 expressing cells are surrounded by the SlituSNMP2 expressing cells in the pheromone sensitive sensilla, suggesting different functions of the two SNMPs in insect olfaction. PMID:24757100

  16. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  17. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Doubell, T P; Leslie, T; Woolf, C J

    1996-11-28

    Pain is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold A(delta) and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of A(delta) and C fibres at the site of inflammation. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold A(beta) fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P. Here we show that inflammation results in A(beta) fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. A(beta) fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli. PMID:8934522

  18. The effects of serotonin and ecdysone on primary sensory neurons in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Robin L; Ward, Elizabeth; Braxton, Recennah; Li, Hao; Warren, Wendy M

    2003-02-15

    The overall behaviors and motivational states observed during social interactions and throughout the molting cycle of crayfish have been linked to the effects of humoral neuromodulators. Both serotonin (5-HT) and a molt-related hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE), are known to be present in the hemolymph of crustaceans. To determine if they alter the activity of a primary sensory neuron that monitors proprioceptive information, we examined their effects on the activity of the slow-adapting muscle receptor organ (MRO) of the crayfish abdomen, a model sensory system that has been extensively studied. 5-HT within the range of 100 nM to 1 microM, increases the firing frequency of the neuron during sustained stimulation. In experiments in which 20-HE was added alone, an increase in the firing frequency also occurred, although to a lesser degree than that for 5-HT at the same concentrations. When the MRO is first exposed to 20-HE, followed sequentially by 5-HT, the activity increases to about the same degree as in the reverse order of exposure. This outcome indicates that mixtures of these endogenous neuromodulators, at various levels, are more important in alternating behavior than the absolute level of any one of them introduced alone. PMID:12539163

  19. Ablation of sensory neurons in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma slows initiation and progression of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saloman, Jami L.; Albers, Kathryn M.; Li, Dongjun; Hartman, Douglas J.; Crawford, Howard C.; Muha, Emily A.; Rhim, Andrew D.; Davis, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an exuberant inflammatory desmoplastic response. The PDAC microenvironment is complex, containing both pro- and antitumorigenic elements, and remains to be fully characterized. Here, we show that sensory neurons, an under-studied cohort of the pancreas tumor stroma, play a significant role in the initiation and progression of the early stages of PDAC. Using a well-established autochthonous model of PDAC (PKC), we show that inflammation and neuronal damage in the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) occurs as early as the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 2 stage. Also at the PanIN2 stage, pancreas acinar-derived cells frequently invade along sensory neurons into the spinal cord and migrate caudally to the lower thoracic and upper lumbar regions. Sensory neuron ablation by neonatal capsaicin injection prevented perineural invasion (PNI), astrocyte activation, and neuronal damage, suggesting that sensory neurons convey inflammatory signals from Kras-induced pancreatic neoplasia to the CNS. Neuron ablation in PKC mice also significantly delayed PanIN formation and ultimately prolonged survival compared with vehicle-treated controls (median survival, 7.8 vs. 4.5 mo; P = 0.001). These data establish a reciprocal signaling loop between the pancreas and nervous system, including the CNS, that supports inflammation associated with oncogenic Kras-induced neoplasia. Thus, pancreatic sensory neurons comprise an important stromal cell population that supports the initiation and progression of PDAC and may represent a potential target for prevention in high-risk populations. PMID:26929329

  20. Ablation of sensory neurons in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma slows initiation and progression of cancer.

    PubMed

    Saloman, Jami L; Albers, Kathryn M; Li, Dongjun; Hartman, Douglas J; Crawford, Howard C; Muha, Emily A; Rhim, Andrew D; Davis, Brian M

    2016-03-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an exuberant inflammatory desmoplastic response. The PDAC microenvironment is complex, containing both pro- and antitumorigenic elements, and remains to be fully characterized. Here, we show that sensory neurons, an under-studied cohort of the pancreas tumor stroma, play a significant role in the initiation and progression of the early stages of PDAC. Using a well-established autochthonous model of PDAC (PKC), we show that inflammation and neuronal damage in the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) occurs as early as the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 2 stage. Also at the PanIN2 stage, pancreas acinar-derived cells frequently invade along sensory neurons into the spinal cord and migrate caudally to the lower thoracic and upper lumbar regions. Sensory neuron ablation by neonatal capsaicin injection prevented perineural invasion (PNI), astrocyte activation, and neuronal damage, suggesting that sensory neurons convey inflammatory signals from Kras-induced pancreatic neoplasia to the CNS. Neuron ablation in PKC mice also significantly delayed PanIN formation and ultimately prolonged survival compared with vehicle-treated controls (median survival, 7.8 vs. 4.5 mo; P = 0.001). These data establish a reciprocal signaling loop between the pancreas and nervous system, including the CNS, that supports inflammation associated with oncogenic Kras-induced neoplasia. Thus, pancreatic sensory neurons comprise an important stromal cell population that supports the initiation and progression of PDAC and may represent a potential target for prevention in high-risk populations. PMID:26929329

  1. Systemic Chemical Desensitization of Peptidergic Sensory Neurons with Resiniferatoxin Inhibits Experimental Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Breivik, Torbjørn; Gundersen, Yngvar; Gjermo, Per; Fristad, Inge; Opstad, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective: The immune system is an important player in the pathophysiology of periodontitis. The brain controls immune responses via neural and hormonal pathways, and brain-neuro-endocrine dysregulation may be a central determinant for pathogenesis. Our current knowledge also emphasizes the central role of sensory nerves. In line with this, we wanted to investigate how desensitization of peptidergic sensory neurons influences the progression of ligature-induced periodontitis, and, furthermore, how selected cytokine and stress hormone responses to Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation are affected. Material and methods: Resiniferatoxin (RTX; 50 μg/kg) or vehicle was injected subcutaneously on days 1, 2, and 3 in stress high responding and periodontitis-susceptible Fischer 344 rats. Periodontitis was induced 2 days thereafter. Progression of the disease was assessed after the ligatures had been in place for 20 days. Two h before decapitation all rats received LPS (150 μg/kg i.p.) to induce a robust immune and stress response. Results: Desensitization with RTX significantly reduced bone loss as measured by digital X-rays. LPS provoked a significantly higher increase in serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but lower serum levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and the stress hormone corticosterone. Conclusions: In this model RTX-induced chemical desensitization of sensory peptidergic neurons attenuated ligature-induced periodontitis and promoted a shift towards stronger pro-inflammatory cytokine and weaker stress hormone responses to LPS. The results may partly be explained by the attenuated transmission of immuno-inflammatory signals to the brain. In turn, this may weaken the anti-inflammatory brain-derived pathways. PMID:21339860

  2. Expression of messenger RNAs for peptides and tyrosine hydroxylase in primary sensory neurons that innervate arterial baroreceptors and chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1991-08-01

    Retrograde fiber tracing and in situ hybridization were used to determine expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin A (ppTA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), preproenkephalin A (ENK), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) as well as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the petrosal ganglia primary sensory neurons which innervate carotid sinus baroreceptors and carotid body chemoreceptors. Perfusion of the carotid sinus with the retrogradely transported dye (Fluoro-Gold) labeled primary sensory neurons in petrosal ganglion. Numerous somata in the petrosal ganglion labeled with dye contained mRNAs for all the above peptides, except SOM. Moreover, TH mRNA was found in a substantial number of retrogradely labeled cells in the petrosal ganglion. This study provides information concerning which of the numerous peptides identified in sensory neurons of petrosal ganglion may be involved in modulation of the arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:1681484

  3. Lack of Neurotrophin-3 Results in Death of Spinal Sensory Neurons and Premature Differentiation of Their Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Fariñas, Isabel; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Backus, Carey; Reichardt, Louis F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary To understand mechanisms resulting in the absence of two-thirds of spinal sensory neurons in mice lacking NT-3, we have compared dorsal root ganglia development in normal and mutant embryos. The reduction in neurons, achieved by E13, results from several deficits: first, elevated neuronal apoptosis significantly reduces neuronal numbers; second, elevated neurogenesis between E11 and E12, without changes in rates of precursor proliferation or apoptosis, depletes the precursor pool; consequently, the reduced precursor pool prevents increases in neuronal numbers between E12 and E13, when most neurons are born in normal animals. Although deficits occur before final target innervation, we show that NT-3 is expressed at all stages in regions accessible to these neurons or their axons and is only restricted to final targets after innervation. PMID:8982156

  4. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels Expression, Identity and Role in the Excitability of the Cochlear Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    González-Garrido, Antonia; Vega, Rosario; Mercado, Francisco; López, Iván A.; Soto, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are activated by an increase in the extracellular proton concentration. There are four genes (ASIC1-4) that encode six subunits, and they are involved in diverse neuronal functions, such as mechanosensation, learning and memory, nociception, and modulation of retinal function. In this study, we characterize the ASIC currents of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). These ASIC currents are primarily carried by Na+, exhibit fast activation and desensitization, display a pH50 of 6.2 and are blocked by amiloride, indicating that these are ASIC currents. The ASIC currents were further characterized using several pharmacological tools. Gadolinium and acetylsalicylic acid reduced these currents, and FMRFamide, zinc (at high concentrations) and N,N,N’,N’–tetrakis-(2-piridilmetil)-ethylenediamine increased them, indicating that functional ASICs are composed of the subunits ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3. Neomycin and streptomycin reduced the desensitization rate of the ASIC current in SGNs, indicating that ASICs may contribute to the ototoxic action of aminoglycosides. RT-PCR of the spiral ganglion revealed significant expression of all ASIC subunits. By immunohistochemistry the expression of the ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3 subunits was detected in SGNs. Although only a few SGNs exhibited action potential firing in response to an acidic stimulus, protons in the extracellular solution modulated SGN activity during sinusoidal stimulation. Our results show that protons modulate the excitability of SGNs via ASICs. PMID:26733809

  5. Neuronal detection thresholds during vestibular compensation: contributions of response variability and sensory substitution

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Mohsen; Mitchell, Diana E; Dale, Alexis; Carriot, Jerome; Sadeghi, Soroush G; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for processing self-motion, allowing normal subjects to discriminate the direction of rotational movements as slow as 1–2 deg s−1. After unilateral vestibular injury patients’ direction–discrimination thresholds worsen to ∼20 deg s−1, and despite some improvement thresholds remain substantially elevated following compensation. To date, however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this recovery have not been addressed. Here, we recorded from first-order central neurons in the macaque monkey that provide vestibular information to higher brain areas for self-motion perception. Immediately following unilateral labyrinthectomy, neuronal detection thresholds increased by more than two-fold (from 14 to 30 deg s−1). While thresholds showed slight improvement by week 3 (25 deg s−1), they never recovered to control values – a trend mirroring the time course of perceptual thresholds in patients. We further discovered that changes in neuronal response variability paralleled changes in sensitivity for vestibular stimulation during compensation, thereby causing detection thresholds to remain elevated over time. However, we found that in a subset of neurons, the emergence of neck proprioceptive responses combined with residual vestibular modulation during head-on-body motion led to better neuronal detection thresholds. Taken together, our results emphasize that increases in response variability to vestibular inputs ultimately constrain neural thresholds and provide evidence that sensory substitution with extravestibular (i.e. proprioceptive) inputs at the first central stage of vestibular processing is a neural substrate for improvements in self-motion perception following vestibular loss. Thus, our results provide a neural correlate for the patient benefits provided by rehabilitative strategies that take advantage of the convergence of these multisensory cues. PMID:24366259

  6. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  7. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  8. Bilateral Neuropathy of Primary Sensory Neurons by the Chronic Compression of Multiple Unilateral DRGs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ya-Bin; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Ying; Song, Kai; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Fan-Cheng; Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Yang-Song; Kuang, Fang; You, Si-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To mimic multilevel nerve root compression and intervertebral foramina stenosis in human, we established a new animal model of the chronic compression of unilateral multiple lumbar DRGs (mCCD) in the rat. A higher occurrence of signs of spontaneous pain behaviors, such as wet-dog shaking and spontaneous hind paw shrinking behaviors, was firstly observed from day 1 onward. In the meantime, the unilateral mCCD rat exhibited significant bilateral hind paw mechanical and cold allodynia and hyperalgesia, as well as a thermal preference to 30°C plate between 30 and 35°C. The expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral all-sized DRG neurons after the mCCD. And the expression of CGRP was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral large- and medium-sized DRG neurons. ATF3 and CGRP expressions correlated to evoked pain hypersensitivities such as mechanical and cold allodynia on postoperative day 1. The results suggested that bilateral neuropathy of primary sensory neurons might contribute to bilateral hypersensitivity in the mCCD rat. PMID:26819761

  9. Bilateral Neuropathy of Primary Sensory Neurons by the Chronic Compression of Multiple Unilateral DRGs

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ya-Bin; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Ying; Song, Kai; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Fan-Cheng; Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Yang-Song; Kuang, Fang; You, Si-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To mimic multilevel nerve root compression and intervertebral foramina stenosis in human, we established a new animal model of the chronic compression of unilateral multiple lumbar DRGs (mCCD) in the rat. A higher occurrence of signs of spontaneous pain behaviors, such as wet-dog shaking and spontaneous hind paw shrinking behaviors, was firstly observed from day 1 onward. In the meantime, the unilateral mCCD rat exhibited significant bilateral hind paw mechanical and cold allodynia and hyperalgesia, as well as a thermal preference to 30°C plate between 30 and 35°C. The expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral all-sized DRG neurons after the mCCD. And the expression of CGRP was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral large- and medium-sized DRG neurons. ATF3 and CGRP expressions correlated to evoked pain hypersensitivities such as mechanical and cold allodynia on postoperative day 1. The results suggested that bilateral neuropathy of primary sensory neurons might contribute to bilateral hypersensitivity in the mCCD rat. PMID:26819761

  10. H2S-induced HCO3- secretion in the rat stomach--involvement of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ise, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Kento; Aihara, Eitaro; Hayashi, Shusaku

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be an important gaseous mediator that affects various functions under physiological and pathological conditions. We examined the effects of NaHS, a H2S donor, on HCO3(-) secretion in rat stomachs and investigated the mechanism involved in this response. Under urethane anesthesia, rat stomachs were mounted on an ex vivo chamber and perfused with saline. Acid secretion had been inhibited by omeprazole. The secretion of HCO3(-) was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by the addition of 10 mM HCl. NaHS (0.5-10 mM) was perfused in the stomach for 5 min. Indomethacin or L-NAME was administered s.c. before NaHS treatment, while glibenclamide (a KATP channel blocker), ONO-8711 (an EP1 antagonist), or propargylglycine (a cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor) was given i.p. before. The mucosal perfusion of NaHS dose-dependently increased the secretion of HCO3(-), and this effect was significantly attenuated by indomethacin, L-NAME, and sensory deafferentation, but not by glibenclamide or ONO-8711. The luminal output of nitric oxide, but not the mucosal production of prostaglandin E2, was increased by the perfusion of NaHS. Mucosal acidification stimulated HCO3(-) secretion, and this response was inhibited by sensory deafferentation, indomethacin, L-NAME, and ONO-8711, but not by propargylglycine. These results suggested that H2S increased HCO3(-) secretion in the stomach, and this effect was mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and dependent on nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Further study is needed to define the role of endogenous H2S in the mechanism underlying acid-induced gastric HCO3(-) secretion. PMID:25460323

  11. Identification of Different Types of Spinal Afferent Nerve Endings That Encode Noxious and Innocuous Stimuli in the Large Intestine Using a Novel Anterograde Tracing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  12. Effect of low frequency transcutaneous magnetic stimulation on sensory and motor transmission.

    PubMed

    Leung, Albert; Shukla, Shivshil; Lee, Jacquelyn; Metzger-Smith, Valerie; He, Yifan; Chen, Jeffrey; Golshan, Shahrokh

    2015-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injury diminishes fast conducting large myelinated afferent fibers transmission but enhances smaller pain transmitting fibers firing. This aberrant afferent neuronal behavior contributes to development of chronic post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain (PTP-NP). Non-invasive dynamic magnetic flux stimulation has been implicated in treating PTP-NP, a condition currently not adequately addressed by other therapies including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current study assessed the effect of low frequency transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (LFTMS) on peripheral sensory thresholds, nerve conduction properties, and TENS induced fast afferent slowing effect as measured by motor and sensory conduction studies in the ulnar nerve. Results indicated sham LFTMS with TENS (Sham + TENS) significantly (P = 0.02 and 0.007, respectively) reduces sensory conduction velocity (CV) and increases sensory onset latency (OL), and motor peak latency (PL) whereas, real LFTMS with TENS (Real + TENS) reverses effects of TENS on sensory CV and OL, and significantly (P = 0.036) increases the sensory PL. LFTMS alone significantly (P < 0.05) elevates sensory PL and onset-to-peak latency. LFTMS appears to reverse TENS slowing effect on fast conducting fibers and casts a selective peripheral modulatory effect on slow conducting pain afferent fibers. PMID:25989482

  13. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    PubMed

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve. PMID:2719524

  14. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  15. Inhibition of M current in sensory neurons by exogenous proteases: a signaling pathway mediating inflammatory nociception.

    PubMed

    Linley, John E; Rose, Kirstin; Patil, Mayur; Robertson, Brian; Akopian, Armen N; Gamper, Nikita

    2008-10-29

    Inflammatory pain is thought to be mediated in part through the action of inflammatory mediators on membrane receptors of peripheral nerve terminals, however, the downstream signaling events which lead to pain are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the nociceptive pathways induced by activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in damage-sensing (nociceptive) neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We found that activation of PAR-2 in these cells strongly inhibited M-type potassium currents (conducted by Kv7 potassium channels). Such inhibition caused depolarization of the neuronal resting membrane potential leading, ultimately, to nociception. Consistent with this mechanism, injection of the specific M channel blocker XE991 into rat paw induced nociception in a concentration-dependent manner. Injection of a PAR-2 agonist peptide also induced nociception but coinjection of XE991 and the PAR-2 agonist did not result in summation of nociception, suggesting that the action of both agents may share a similar mechanism. We also studied the signaling pathway of M current inhibition by PAR-2 using patch-clamp and fluorescence imaging of DRG neurons. These experiments revealed that the PAR-2 effect was mediated by phospholipase C (PLC). Further experiments demonstrated that M current inhibition required concurrent rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and depletion of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). We propose that PLC- and Ca(2+)/PIP(2)-mediated inhibition of M current in sensory neurons may represent one of the general mechanisms underlying pain produced by inflammatory mediators, and may therefore open up a new therapeutic window for treatment of this major clinical problem. PMID:18971466

  16. Kinesin-1 Acts with Netrin and DCC to Maintain Sensory Neuron Position in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin J.; Miller, Kristine M.; Vargas, Christopher T.; Thomas, Anthony B.; Park, Joori; Bremer, Martina; Jarecki, Jessica L.; VanHoven, Miri K.

    2013-01-01

    The organization of neurons and the maintenance of that arrangement are critical to brain function. Failure of these processes in humans can lead to severe birth defects, mental retardation, and epilepsy. Several kinesins have been shown to play important roles in cell migration in vertebrate systems, but few upstream and downstream pathway members have been identified. Here, we utilize the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to elucidate the pathway by which the C. elegans Kinesin-1 Heavy Chain (KHC)/KIF5 ortholog UNC-116 functions to maintain neuronal cell body position in the PHB sensory neurons. We find that UNC-116/KHC acts in part with the cell and axon migration molecules UNC-6/Netrin and UNC-40/DCC in this process, but in parallel to SAX-3/Robo. We have also identified several potential adaptor, cargo, and regulatory proteins that may provide insight into the mechanism of UNC-116/KHC’s function in this process. These include the cargo receptor UNC-33/CRMP2, the cargo adaptor protein UNC-76/FEZ and its regulator UNC-51/ULK, the cargo molecule UNC-69/SCOCO, and the actin regulators UNC-44/Ankyrin and UNC-34/Enabled. These genes also act in cell migration and axon outgrowth; however, many proteins that function in these processes do not affect PHB position. Our findings suggest an active posterior cell migration mediated by UNC-116/KHC occurs throughout development to maintain proper PHB cell body position and define a new pathway that mediates maintenance of neuronal cell body position. PMID:23475988

  17. G protein-coupled odorant receptors underlie mechanosensitivity in mammalian olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Timothy; Yu, Yiqun; Grosmaitre, Xavier; Wang, Jue; Santarelli, Lindsey C.; Savigner, Agnes; Qiao, Xin; Wang, Zhenshan; Storm, Daniel R.; Ma, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive cells are essential for organisms to sense the external and internal environments, and a variety of molecules have been implicated as mechanical sensors. Here we report that odorant receptors (ORs), a large family of G protein-coupled receptors, underlie the responses to both chemical and mechanical stimuli in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Genetic ablation of key signaling proteins in odor transduction or disruption of OR–G protein coupling eliminates mechanical responses. Curiously, OSNs expressing different OR types display significantly different responses to mechanical stimuli. Genetic swap of putatively mechanosensitive ORs abolishes or reduces mechanical responses of OSNs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of an OR restores mechanosensitivity in loss-of-function OSNs. Lastly, heterologous expression of an OR confers mechanosensitivity to its host cells. These results indicate that certain ORs are both necessary and sufficient to cause mechanical responses, revealing a previously unidentified mechanism for mechanotransduction. PMID:25550517

  18. Spike propagation through the dorsal root ganglia in an unmyelinated sensory neuron: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Sundt, Danielle; Gamper, Nikita; Jaffe, David B

    2015-12-01

    Unmyelinated C-fibers are a major type of sensory neurons conveying pain information. Action potential conduction is regulated by the bifurcation (T-junction) of sensory neuron axons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Understanding how C-fiber signaling is influenced by the morphology of the T-junction and the local expression of ion channels is important for understanding pain signaling. In this study we used biophysical computer modeling to investigate the influence of axon morphology within the DRG and various membrane conductances on the reliability of spike propagation. As expected, calculated input impedance and the amplitude of propagating action potentials were both lowest at the T-junction. Propagation reliability for single spikes was highly sensitive to the diameter of the stem axon and the density of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. A model containing only fast voltage-gated Na(+) and delayed-rectifier K(+) channels conducted trains of spikes up to frequencies of 110 Hz. The addition of slowly activating KCNQ channels (i.e., KV7 or M-channels) to the model reduced the following frequency to 30 Hz. Hyperpolarization produced by addition of a much slower conductance, such as a Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current, was needed to reduce the following frequency to 6 Hz. Attenuation of driving force due to ion accumulation or hyperpolarization produced by a Na(+)-K(+) pump had no effect on following frequency but could influence the reliability of spike propagation mutually with the voltage shift generated by a Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current. These simulations suggest how specific ion channels within the DRG may contribute toward therapeutic treatments for chronic pain. PMID:26334005

  19. Spike propagation through the dorsal root ganglia in an unmyelinated sensory neuron: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Sundt, Danielle; Gamper, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Unmyelinated C-fibers are a major type of sensory neurons conveying pain information. Action potential conduction is regulated by the bifurcation (T-junction) of sensory neuron axons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Understanding how C-fiber signaling is influenced by the morphology of the T-junction and the local expression of ion channels is important for understanding pain signaling. In this study we used biophysical computer modeling to investigate the influence of axon morphology within the DRG and various membrane conductances on the reliability of spike propagation. As expected, calculated input impedance and the amplitude of propagating action potentials were both lowest at the T-junction. Propagation reliability for single spikes was highly sensitive to the diameter of the stem axon and the density of voltage-gated Na+ channels. A model containing only fast voltage-gated Na+ and delayed-rectifier K+ channels conducted trains of spikes up to frequencies of 110 Hz. The addition of slowly activating KCNQ channels (i.e., KV7 or M-channels) to the model reduced the following frequency to 30 Hz. Hyperpolarization produced by addition of a much slower conductance, such as a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, was needed to reduce the following frequency to 6 Hz. Attenuation of driving force due to ion accumulation or hyperpolarization produced by a Na+-K+ pump had no effect on following frequency but could influence the reliability of spike propagation mutually with the voltage shift generated by a Ca2+-dependent K+ current. These simulations suggest how specific ion channels within the DRG may contribute toward therapeutic treatments for chronic pain. PMID:26334005

  20. TRPM7 is required within zebrafish sensory neurons for the activation of touch-evoked escape behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Low, Sean E.; Amburgey, Kimberly; Horstick, Eric; Linsley, Jeremy; Sprague, Shawn M.; Cui, Wilson W.; Zhou, Weibin; Hirata, Hiromi; Saint-Amant, Louis; Hume, Richard I.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding TRPM7 (trpm7), a member of the TRP superfamily of cation channels that possesses an enzymatically active kinase at its carboxyl terminus, cause the touch-unresponsive zebrafish mutant touchdown. We identified and characterized a new allele of touchdown, as well as two previously reported alleles, and found that all three alleles harbor mutations which abolish channel activity. Through the selective restoration of TRPM7 expression in sensory neurons we found that TRPM7’s kinase activity, and selectivity for divalent cations over monovalent cations, were dispensable for touch-evoked activation of escape behaviors in zebrafish. Additional characterization revealed that sensory neurons were present and capable of responding to tactile stimuli in touchdown mutants, indicating that TRPM7 is not required for sensory neuron survival or mechanosensation. Finally, exposure to elevated concentrations of divalent cations was found to restore touch-evoked behaviors in touchdown mutants. Collectively these findings are consistent with a role for zebrafish TRPM7 within sensory neurons in the modulation of neurotransmitter release at central synapses, similar to that proposed for mammalian TRPM7 at peripheral synapses. PMID:21832193

  1. Surgical extraction of human dorsal root ganglia from organ donors and preparation of primary sensory neuron cultures.

    PubMed

    Valtcheva, Manouela V; Copits, Bryan A; Davidson, Steve; Sheahan, Tayler D; Pullen, Melanie Y; McCall, Jordan G; Dikranian, Krikor; Gereau, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    Primary cultures of rodent sensory neurons are widely used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pain, itch, nerve injury and regeneration. However, translation of these preclinical findings may be greatly improved by direct validation in human tissues. We have developed an approach to extract and culture human sensory neurons in collaboration with a local organ procurement organization (OPO). Here we describe the surgical procedure for extraction of human dorsal root ganglia (hDRG) and the necessary modifications to existing culture techniques to prepare viable adult human sensory neurons for functional studies. Dissociated sensory neurons can be maintained in culture for >10 d, and they are amenable to electrophysiological recording, calcium imaging and viral gene transfer. The entire process of extraction and culturing can be completed in <7 h, and it can be performed by trained graduate students. This approach can be applied at any institution with access to organ donors consenting to tissue donation for research, and is an invaluable resource for improving translational research. PMID:27606776

  2. Genes That Act Downstream of Sensory Neurons to Influence Longevity, Dauer Formation, and Pathogen Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongyeop; Kenyon, Cynthia; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    The sensory systems of multicellular organisms are designed to provide information about the environment and thus elicit appropriate changes in physiology and behavior. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sensory neurons affect the decision to arrest during development in a diapause state, the dauer larva, and modulate the lifespan of the animals in adulthood. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we identified transcripts whose levels are altered by mutations in the intraflagellar transport protein daf-10, which result in impaired development and function of many sensory neurons in C. elegans. In agreement with existing genetic data, the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO was affected by daf-10 mutations. In addition, we found altered expression of transcriptional targets of the DAF-12/nuclear hormone receptor in the daf-10 mutants and showed that this pathway influences specifically the dauer formation phenotype of these animals. Unexpectedly, pathogen-responsive genes were repressed in daf-10 mutant animals, and these sensory mutants exhibited altered susceptibility to and behavioral avoidance of bacterial pathogens. Moreover, we found that a solute transporter gene mct-1/2, which was induced by daf-10 mutations, was necessary and sufficient for longevity. Thus, sensory input seems to influence an extensive transcriptional network that modulates basic biological processes in C. elegans. This situation is reminiscent of the complex regulation of physiology by the mammalian hypothalamus, which also receives innervations from sensory systems, most notably the visual and olfactory systems. PMID:23284299

  3. Spindle-F Is the Central Mediator of Ik2 Kinase-Dependent Dendrite Pruning in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Chiang, Kai-Wen; Hsieh, Hsin-Lun; Wu, Yi-Ping; Ke, Jian-Ming; Lee, Myong-Chol; Liao, Shih-Sian; Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Tang, Chiou-Yang; Yang, Shi-Bing; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    During development, certain Drosophila sensory neurons undergo dendrite pruning that selectively eliminates their dendrites but leaves the axons intact. How these neurons regulate pruning activity in the dendrites remains unknown. Here, we identify a coiled-coil protein Spindle-F (Spn-F) that is required for dendrite pruning in Drosophila sensory neurons. Spn-F acts downstream of IKK-related kinase Ik2 in the same pathway for dendrite pruning. Spn-F exhibits a punctate pattern in larval neurons, whereas these Spn-F puncta become redistributed in pupal neurons, a step that is essential for dendrite pruning. The redistribution of Spn-F from puncta in pupal neurons requires the phosphorylation of Spn-F by Ik2 kinase to decrease Spn-F self-association, and depends on the function of microtubule motor dynein complex. Spn-F is a key component to link Ik2 kinase to dynein motor complex, and the formation of Ik2/Spn-F/dynein complex is critical for Spn-F redistribution and for dendrite pruning. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for dendrite pruning achieved by temporal activation of Ik2 kinase and dynein-mediated redistribution of Ik2/Spn-F complex in neurons. PMID:26540204

  4. PACS-1 Mediates Phosphorylation-Dependent Ciliary Trafficking of the CNG Channel in Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Paul M.; Zhang, Lian; Thomas, Gary; Martens, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Impaired ciliary protein transport in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) leads to anosmia, and is a newly recognized clinical manifestation of a class of human disorders called ciliopathies. Surprisingly little is known regarding the mechanisms controlling trafficking to this unique neuronal compartment. Here, we show a novel role for phosphofurin acidic cluster-sorting protein 1 (PACS-1) in the ciliary trafficking of the olfactory CNG channel. PACS-1 is an intracellular sorting protein that mediates its effects through the binding of acidic clusters on cargo protein. This interaction is dependent on CK2 phosphorylation of both PACS-1 and its cargo. We show that CNGB1b contains two putative PACS-1 binding sites, which are phosphorylated by the serine/threonine protein kinase, CK2. Additionally, we show that PACS-1 is expressed in OSNs and interacts in complex with the CNG channel. CK2 inhibition in native OSNs causes a loss of CNG channel from cilia and subsequent olfactory dysfunction, while adenoviral expression of mutant PACS-1 causes similar mislocalization. These results provide a mechanism for the subunit-dependent ciliary trafficking of the CNG channel and offer insight into the mechanisms of ciliary transport. PMID:19710307

  5. Expression Patterns of Odorant Receptors and Response Properties of Olfactory Sensory Neurons in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anderson C.; Tian, Huikai; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    The sense of smell deteriorates in normal aging, but the underling mechanisms are still elusive. Here we investigated age-related alterations in expression patterns of odorant receptor (OR) genes and functional properties of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs)—2 critical factors that define the odor detection threshold in the olfactory epithelium. Using in situ hybridization for 9 representative OR genes, we compared the cell densities of each OR in coronal nose sections at different ages (3–27 months). The cell density for different ORs peaked at different time points and a decline was observed for 6 of 9 ORs at advanced ages. Using patch clamp recordings, we then examined the odorant responses of individual OSNs coexpressing a defined OR (MOR23) and green fluorescent protein. The MOR23 neurons recorded from aged animals maintained a similar sensitivity and dynamic range in response to the cognate odorant (lyral) as those from younger mice. The results indicate that although the cell densities of OSNs expressing certain types of ORs decline at advanced ages, individual OSNs can retain their sensitivity. The implications of these findings in age-related olfactory deterioration are discussed. PMID:19759360

  6. Auto-oxidation products of epigallocatechin gallate activate TRPA1 and TRPV1 in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kurogi, Mako; Kawai, Yasushi; Nagatomo, Katsuhiro; Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The sensation of astringency is elicited by catechins and their polymers in wine and tea. It has been considered that catechins in green tea are unstable and auto-oxidized to induce more astringent taste. Here, we examined how mammalian transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) and TRPA1, which are nociceptive sensors, are activated by green tea catechins during the auto-oxidation process. Neither TRPV1 nor TRPA1 could be activated by any of the freshly prepared catechin. When one of the major catechin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), was preincubated for 3h in Hank's balanced salt solution, it significantly activated both TRP channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Even after incubation, other catechins showed much less effects. Results suggest that only oxidative products of EGCG activate both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons were also activated by the incubated EGCG through TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that theasinensins A and D are formed during incubation of EGCG. We found that purified theasinensin A activates both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and that it stimulates DRG neurons through TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. Results suggested a possibility that TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels are involved in the sense of astringent taste of green tea. PMID:25422365

  7. Transcriptional control of Rohon-Beard sensory neuron development at the neural plate border

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Christy Cortez; Kaji, Takao; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2009-01-01

    Rohon-Beard (RB) mechanosensory neurons are among the first sensory neurons to develop, and the process by which they adopt their fate is not completely understood. RBs form at the neural plate border (NPB), the junction between neural and epidermal ectoderm, and require the transcription factor prdm1a. Here, we show that prior to RB differentiation, prdm1a overlaps extensively with the epidermal marker dlx3b but shows little overlap with the neuroectodermal markers sox3 and sox19a. Birthdating analysis reveals that the majority of RBs are born during gastrulation in zebrafish, suggesting that it is during this period that RBs become specified. Expression analysis in prdm1a and neurogenin1 mutant and dlx3b/dlx4b morpholino-injected embryos suggests that prdm1a is upstream of dlx3b, dlx4b, and neurogenin1 at the NPB. mRNA for neurogenin1 or dlx3b/dlx4b can rescue the lack of RBs in prdm1a. Based on these data we suggest a preliminary gene regulatory network for RBs development. PMID:19301392

  8. In vitro and intrathecal siRNA mediated KV1.1 knock-down in primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mark D.; Chen, Ya-Chun; Shah, Syed U.; Okuse, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    KV1.1 is a Shaker homologue K+ channel that contributes to the juxta-paranodal membrane conductance in myelinated axons, and is blocked by fampridine (4-aminopyridine), used to treat the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The present experiments investigate KV1.1 function in primary sensory neurons and A-fibres, and help define its characteristics as a drug-target using sequence specific small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). siRNA (71 nM) was used to knock-down functional expression of KV1.1 in sensory neurons (> 25 μm in apparent diameter) in culture, and was also delivered intrathecally in vivo (9.3 μg). K+ channel knock-down in sensory neurons was found to make the voltage-threshold for action potential generation significantly more negative than in control (p = 0.02), led to the breakdown of accommodation and promoted spontaneous action potential firing. Exposure to dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K, 10–100 nM) also selectively abolished K+ currents at negative potentials and made voltage-threshold more negative, consistent with KV1.1 controlling excitability close to the nominal resting potential of the neuron cell body, near − 60 mV. Introduction of one working siRNA sequence into the intrathecal space in vivo was associated with a small increase in the amplitude of the depolarising after-potential in sacral spinal roots (p < 0.02), suggesting a reduction in the number of working K+ channels in internodal axon membrane. Our study provides evidence that KV1.1 contributes to the control of peripheral sensory nerve excitability, and suggests that its characteristics as a putative drug target can be assessed by siRNA transfection in primary sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21903165

  9. Anatomical and molecular consequences of Unilateral Naris Closure on two populations of olfactory sensory neurons expressing defined odorant receptors.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Adrien; Aoudé, Imad; Soubeyre, Vanessa; Tazir, Bassim; Cadiou, Hervé; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2016-07-28

    Mammalian olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary elements of the olfactory system, are located in the olfactory epithelium lining the nasal cavity. Exposed to the environment, their lifespan is short. Consequently, OSNs are regularly regenerated and several reports show that activity strongly modulates their development and regeneration: the peripheral olfactory system can adjust to the amount of stimulus through compensatory mechanisms. Unilateral naris occlusion (UNO) was frequently used to investigate this mechanism at the entire epithelium level. However, there is little data regarding the effects of UNO at the cellular level, especially on individual neuronal populations expressing a defined odorant receptor. Here, using UNO during the first three postnatal weeks, we analyzed the anatomical and molecular consequences of sensory deprivation in OSNs populations expressing the MOR23 and M71 receptors. The density of MOR23-expressing neurons is decreased in the closed side while UNO does not affect the density of M71-expressing neurons. Using Real Time qPCR on isolated neurons, we observed that UNO modulates the transcript levels for transduction pathway proteins (odorant receptors, CNGA2, PDE1c). The transcripts modulated by UNO will differ between populations depending on the receptor expressed. These results suggest that sensory deprivation will have different effects on different OSNs' populations. As a consequence, early experience will shape the functional properties of OSNs differently depending on the type of odorant receptor they express. PMID:27189720

  10. The integrin receptor alpha 8 beta 1 mediates interactions of embryonic chick motor and sensory neurons with tenascin-C.

    PubMed

    Varnum-Finney, B; Venstrom, K; Muller, U; Kypta, R; Backus, C; Chiquet, M; Reichardt, L F

    1995-06-01

    This paper identifies a neuronal receptor for tenascin-C (tenascin/cytotactin), an extracellular matrix protein that has previously been detected in developing sensory and motor neuron pathways and has been shown to regulate cell migration in the developing CNS. Antibodies specific for each subunit of the integrin alpha 8 beta 1 are used to demonstrate that alpha 8 beta 1 mediates neurite outgrowth of embryonic sensory and motor neurons on this extracellular matrix protein. In addition, expression of alpha 8 in K562 cells results in surface expression of alpha 8 beta 1 heterodimers that are shown to promote attachment of this cell line to tenascin. The major domain in tenascin that mediates neurite outgrowth is shown to be localized to fibronectin type III repeats 6-8. PMID:7541634

  11. The molecular basis of neurosensory cell formation in ear development: a blueprint for hair cell and sensory neuron regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Beisel, Kirk W.; Hansen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Summary The inner ear of mammals uses neurosensory cells derived from the embryonic ear for mechanoelectric transduction of vestibular and auditory stimuli (the hair cells) and conducts this information to the brain via sensory neurons. As with most other neurons of mammals, lost hair cells and sensory neurons are not spontaneously replaced and result instead in age-dependent progressive hearing loss. We review the molecular basis of neurosensory development in the mouse ear to provide a blueprint for possible enhancement of therapeutically useful transformation of stem cells into lost neurosensory cells. We identify several readily available adult sources of stem cells that express, like the ectoderm-derived ear, genes known to be essential for ear development. Use of these stem cells combined with molecular insights into neurosensory cell specification and proliferation regulation of the ear, might allow for neurosensory regeneration of mammalian ears in the near future. PMID:17120192

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans male sensory-motor neurons and dopaminergic support cells couple ejaculation and post-ejaculatory behaviors.

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Correa, Paola; Jee, Changhoon; García, L René

    2014-01-01

    The circuit structure and function underlying post-coital male behaviors remain poorly understood. Using mutant analysis, laser ablation, optogenetics, and Ca2+ imaging, we observed that following C. elegans male copulation, the duration of post-coital lethargy is coupled to cellular events involved in ejaculation. We show that the SPV and SPD spicule-associated sensory neurons and the spicule socket neuronal support cells function with intromission circuit components, including the cholinergic SPC and PCB and the glutamatergic PCA sensory-motor neurons, to coordinate sex muscle contractions with initiation and continuation of sperm movement. Our observations suggest that the SPV and SPD and their associated dopamine-containing socket cells sense the intrauterine environment through cellular endings exposed at the spicule tips and regulate both sperm release into the hermaphrodite and the recovery from post-coital lethargy. PMID:24915976

  13. Axon growth and guidance genes identify nascent, immature, and mature olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Jeremy C; Titlow, William B; McClintock, Timothy S

    2010-11-15

    Neurogenesis of projection neurons requires that axons be initiated, extended, and connected. Differences in the expression of axon growth and guidance genes must drive these events, but comprehensively characterizing these differences in a single neuronal type has not been accomplished. Guided by a catalog of gene expression in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that Cxcr4 and Dbn1, two axon initiation genes, marked the developmental transition from basal progenitor cells to immature OSNs in the olfactory epithelium. The CXCR4 immunoreactivity of these nascent OSNs overlapped partially with markers of proliferation of basal progenitor cells and partially with immunoreactivity for GAP43, the canonical marker of immature OSNs. Intracellular guidance cue signaling transcripts Ablim1, Crmp1, Dypsl2, Dpysl3, Dpysl5, Gap43, Marcskl1, and Stmn1-4 were specific to, or much more abundant in, the immature OSN layer. Receptors that mediate axonal inhibition or repulsion tended to be expressed in both immature and mature OSNs (Plxna1, Plxna4, Nrp2, Efna5) or specifically in mature OSNs (Plxna3, Unc5b, Efna3, Epha5, Epha7), although some were specific to immature OSNs (Plxnb1, Plxnb2, Plxdc2, Nrp1). Cell adhesion molecules were expressed either by both immature and mature OSNs (Dscam, Ncam1, Ncam2, Nrxn1) or solely by immature OSNs (Chl1, Nfasc1, Dscaml1). Given the loss of intracellular signaling protein expression, the continued expression of guidance cue receptors in mature OSNs is consistent with a change in the role of these receptors, perhaps to sending signals back to the cell body and nucleus. PMID:20882566

  14. Identification and characterization of two sensory neuron membrane proteins from Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Zhang, Yan-Ru; Zhou, Wen-Wu; Liang, Qing-Mei; Yuan, Xin; Cheng, Jiaan; Zhu, Zeng-Rong; Gong, Zhong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs), which are located on the dendritic membrane of olfactory neurons, were considered as important components involved in pheromone reception in insects. In Drosophila melanogaster, mutants without SNMP are unable to evoke neuronal activities in the presence of pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA). So deeply understanding the SNMPs functions may help to develop pheromone-mediated insect pest management tactics. The present study reports the identification and characterization of CmedSNMP1 and CmedSNMP2, two candidate SNMPs in the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, one of the serious rice insect pests in Asia. The comparison of amino acid sequences shows that CmedSNMP1 and CmedSNMP2 are very similar to the previously reported SNMPs isolated from moths such as Ostrinia nubilalis and O. furnacalis, respectively, but the two CmedSNMPs share low identity with each other. The distribution patterns of two CmedSNMPs in different tissues of adult moths were examined using RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR. Although the two genes are expressed not only in antennae but also in nonolfactory tissues such as wings, legs, and body; the relative transcription level shows both CmedSNMP1 and CmedSNMP2 are highly enriched in antennae. The dN/dS ratios of the two CmedSNMPs indicate that the two genes are all subject to purifying selection and evolved to be functional genes. This work presents for the first time a study on the SNMPs of C. medinalis, which may help in providing guidance to future functional research of moth SNMPs. PMID:23027616

  15. Transcriptional mechanisms underlying sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons by Granulocyte-/Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-associated pain is a major cause of poor quality of life in cancer patients and is frequently resistant to conventional therapy. Recent studies indicate that some hematopoietic growth factors, namely granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), are abundantly released in the tumor microenvironment and play a key role in regulating tumor-nerve interactions and tumor-associated pain by activating receptors on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Moreover, these hematopoietic factors have been highly implicated in postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain and osteoarthritic pain. However, the molecular mechanisms via which G-/GMCSF bring about nociceptive sensitization and elicit pain are not known. Results In order to elucidate G-/GMCSF mediated transcriptional changes in the sensory neurons, we performed a comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of changes in the transcriptome of DRG neurons brought about by exposure to GMCSF or GCSF. We present complete information on regulated genes and validated profiling analyses and report novel regulatory networks and interaction maps revealed by detailed bioinformatics analyses. Amongst these, we validate calpain 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and a RhoGTPase Rac1 as well as Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as transcriptional targets of G-/GMCSF and demonstrate the importance of MMP9 and Rac1 in GMCSF-induced nociceptor sensitization. Conclusion With integrative approach of bioinformatics, in vivo pharmacology and behavioral analyses, our results not only indicate that transcriptional control by G-/GMCSF signaling regulates a variety of established pain modulators, but also uncover a large number of novel targets, paving the way for translational analyses in the context of pain disorders. PMID:24067145

  16. Role of GnRH Neurons and Their Neuronal Afferents as Key Integrators between Food Intake Regulatory Signals and the Control of Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive function is regulated by a plethora of signals that integrate physiological and environmental information. Among others, metabolic factors are key components of this circuit since they inform about the propitious timing for reproduction depending on energy availability. This information is processed mainly at the hypothalamus that, in turn, modulates gonadotropin release from the pituitary and, thereby, gonadal activity. Metabolic hormones, such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, act as indicators of the energy status and convey this information to the reproductive axis regulating its activity. In this review, we will analyse the central mechanisms involved in the integration of this metabolic information and their contribution to the control of the reproductive function. Particular attention will be paid to summarize the participation of GnRH, Kiss1, NPY, and POMC neurons in this process and their possible interactions to contribute to the metabolic control of reproduction. PMID:24101924

  17. Role of GnRH Neurons and Their Neuronal Afferents as Key Integrators between Food Intake Regulatory Signals and the Control of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive function is regulated by a plethora of signals that integrate physiological and environmental information. Among others, metabolic factors are key components of this circuit since they inform about the propitious timing for reproduction depending on energy availability. This information is processed mainly at the hypothalamus that, in turn, modulates gonadotropin release from the pituitary and, thereby, gonadal activity. Metabolic hormones, such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, act as indicators of the energy status and convey this information to the reproductive axis regulating its activity. In this review, we will analyse the central mechanisms involved in the integration of this metabolic information and their contribution to the control of the reproductive function. Particular attention will be paid to summarize the participation of GnRH, Kiss1, NPY, and POMC neurons in this process and their possible interactions to contribute to the metabolic control of reproduction. PMID:24101924

  18. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  19. Heightened motor and sensory (mirror-touch) referral induced by nerve block or topical anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Gosavi, Radhika; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-08-01

    Mirror neurons allow us to covertly simulate the sensation and movement of others. If mirror neurons are sensory and motor neurons, why do we not actually feel this simulation- like "mirror-touch synesthetes"? Might afferent sensation normally inhibit mirror representations from reaching consciousness? We and others have reported heightened sensory referral to phantom limbs and temporarily anesthetized arms. These patients, however, had experienced illness or injury of the deafferented limb. In the current study we observe heightened sensory and motor referral to the face after unilateral nerve block for routine dental procedures. We also obtain double-blind, quantitative evidence of heightened sensory referral in healthy participants completing a mirror-touch confusion task after topical anesthetic cream is applied. We suggest that sensory and motor feedback exist in dynamic equilibrium with mirror representations; as feedback is reduced, the brain draws more upon visual information to determine- perhaps in a Bayesian manner- what to feel. PMID:23791606

  20. Pharmacological reversal of a pain phenotype in iPSC-derived sensory neurons and patients with inherited erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lishuang; McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Nitzsche, Anja; Alexandrou, Aristos; Saintot, Pierre-Philippe; Loucif, Alexandre J C; Brown, Adam R; Young, Gareth; Mis, Malgorzata; Randall, Andrew; Waxman, Stephen G; Stanley, Philip; Kirby, Simon; Tarabar, Sanela; Gutteridge, Alex; Butt, Richard; McKernan, Ruth M; Whiting, Paul; Ali, Zahid; Bilsland, James; Stevens, Edward B

    2016-04-20

    In common with other chronic pain conditions, there is an unmet clinical need in the treatment of inherited erythromelalgia (IEM). TheSCN9Agene encoding the sodium channel Nav1.7 expressed in the peripheral nervous system plays a critical role in IEM. A gain-of-function mutation in this sodium channel leads to aberrant sensory neuronal activity and extreme pain, particularly in response to heat. Five patients with IEM were treated with a new potent and selective compound that blocked the Nav1.7 sodium channel resulting in a decrease in heat-induced pain in most of the patients. We derived induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from four of five subjects and produced sensory neurons that emulated the clinical phenotype of hyperexcitability and aberrant responses to heat stimuli. When we compared the severity of the clinical phenotype with the hyperexcitability of the iPSC-derived sensory neurons, we saw a trend toward a correlation for individual mutations. The in vitro IEM phenotype was sensitive to Nav1.7 blockers, including the clinical test agent. Given the importance of peripherally expressed sodium channels in many pain conditions, our approach may have broader utility for a wide range of pain and sensory conditions. PMID:27099175

  1. Tissue engineering the mechanosensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc: sensory neuron innervation of intrafusal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Rumsey, John W; Das, Mainak; Bhalkikar, Abhijeet; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J

    2010-01-01

    The sensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc, composed of specialized intrafusal muscle fibers and type Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons, converts mechanical information regarding muscle length and stretch to electrical action potentials and relays them to the central nervous system. Utilizing a non-biological substrate, surface patterning photolithography and a serum-free medium formulation a co-culture system was developed that facilitated functional interactions between intrafusal muscle fibers and sensory neurons. The presence of annulospiral wrappings (ASWs) and flower spray endings (FSEs), both physiologically relevant morphologies in sensory neuron-intrafusal fiber interactions, were demonstrated and quantified using immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, two proposed components of the mammalian mechanosensory transduction system, BNaC1 and PICK1, were both identified at the ASWs and FSEs. To verify functionality of the mechanoreceptor elements the system was integrated with a MEMS cantilever device, and Ca2+ currents were imaged along the length of an axon innervating an intrafusal fiber when stretched by cantilever deflection. This system provides a platform for examining the role of this mechanosensory complex in the pathology of myotonic and muscular dystrophies, peripheral neuropathy, and spasticity inducing diseases like Parkinson's. These studies will also assist in engineering fine motor control for prosthetic devices by improving our understanding of mechanosensitive feedback. PMID:20708792

  2. Microsecond-Scale Timing Precision in Rodent Trigeminal Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Campagner, Dario; Erskine, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the nervous system occurs by spikes: the timing precision with which spikes are fired is a fundamental limit on neural information processing. In sensory systems, spike-timing precision is constrained by first-order neurons. We found that spike-timing precision of trigeminal primary afferents in rats and mice is limited both by stimulus speed and by electrophysiological sampling rate. High-speed video of behaving mice revealed whisker velocities of at least 17,000°/s, so we delivered an ultrafast “ping” (>50,000°/s) to single whiskers and sampled primary afferent activity at 500 kHz. Median spike jitter was 17.4 μs; 29% of neurons had spike jitter < 10 μs. These results indicate that the input stage of the trigeminal pathway has extraordinary spike-timing precision and very high potential information capacity. This timing precision ranks among the highest in biology. PMID:25878266

  3. Extrinsic Sensory Innervation of the Gut: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Simon; Chen, Nan; Humenick, Adam; Spencer, Nick J; Costa, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Extrinsic sensory neurons play a key role in the function of the gastrointestinal tract. They are responsible for the sensations that arise in the gut and can initiate automatic reflexes. In some cases, disordered sensation is clinically problematic-pain, bloating, excessive urgency and nausea are well-known examples. Major advances have been made in understanding the function of somatic sensory neurons in the last 50 years. However, the sensory neurons that mediate sensations from the viscera remain less well understood. This is partly because viscera receive a dense autonomic innervation that can be difficult to separate from extrinsic sensory neurons. A key requirement to understand the genesis of sensation is to distinguish the different classes of sensory neurons and the types of stimuli which they encode. The aim of this short paper is to summarise what was known about these matters 30 years ago and highlight some of the major advances in the understanding of the types of extrinsic sensory neurons to the gut. Necessarily, the choice of papers is somewhat idiosyncratic, but they illustrate the range of advances that have been made in distinguishing the different classes of gastrointestinal afferent nerves. PMID:27379635

  4. Sensory neuroanatomy of a passively ingested nematode parasite, Haemonchus contortus: amphidial neurons of the first stage larva.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Ashton, F T; Gamble, H R; Schad, G A

    2000-02-14

    When infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus (a highly pathogenic, economically important, gastric parasite of ruminants) are ingested by grazing hosts, they are exposed to environmental changes in the rumen, which stimulate resumption of development. Presumably, resumption is controlled by sensory neurons in sensilla known as amphids. Neuronal function can be determined by ablation of specifically recognized neurons in hatchling larvae (L1) in which neuronal cell bodies are easily visualized using differential interference microscopy. Using three-dimensional reconstructions from electron micrographs of serial transverse sections, amphidial structure of the L1 is described. Each amphid of H. contortus is innervated by 12 neurons. The ciliated dendritic processes of 10 neurons lie in the amphidial channel. Three of these end in double processes, resulting in 13 sensory cilia in the channel. One process, that of the so-called finger cell, ends in a number of digitiform projections. Another specialized dendrite enters the amphidial channel, but leaves it to end within the sheath cell, a hollow, flask-shaped cell that forms the base of the amphidial channel. Although not flattened, this process is otherwise similar to the wing cells in Caenorhabditis elegans; we consider it AWC of this group. Two other neurons, ASA and ADB, appear to be homologs of wing cells AWA and AWB in C. elegans, although they end as ciliated processes in the amphidial channel, rather than as flattened endings seen in C. elegans. Each of the 12 amphidial neurons was traced to its cell body in the lateral ganglion, posterior to the worm's nerve ring. The positions of these bodies were similar to their counterparts in C. elegans; they were named accordingly. A map for identifying the amphidial cell bodies in the living L1 was prepared, so that laser microbeam ablation studies can be conducted. These will determine which neurons are involved in the infective process, as well as others important in

  5. Mmp25β facilitates elongation of sensory neurons during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Bryan D; Po, Michelle D; Saranyan, Pillai V; Forsberg, Daniel; Schulz, Richard; Pilgrim, Dave B

    2014-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a large and complex family of zinc-dependent endoproteinases widely recognized for their roles in remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) during embryonic development, wound healing, and tissue homeostasis. Their misregulation is central to many pathologies, and they have therefore been the focus of biomedical research for decades. These proteases have also recently emerged as mediators of neural development and synaptic plasticity in vertebrates, however, understanding of the mechanistic basis of these roles and the molecular identities of the MMPs involved remains far from complete. We have identified a zebrafish orthologue of mmp25 (a.k.a. leukolysin; MT6-MMP), a membrane-type, furin-activated MMP associated with leukocytes and invasive carcinomas, but which we find is expressed by a subset of the sensory neurons during normal embryonic development. We detect high levels of Mmp25β expression in the trigeminal, craniofacial, and posterior lateral line ganglia in the hindbrain, and in Rohon-Beard cells in the dorsal neural tube during the first 48 h of embryonic development. Knockdown of Mmp25β expression with morpholino oligonucleotides results in larvae that are uncoordinated and insensitive to touch, and which exhibit defects in the development of sensory neural structures. Using in vivo zymography, we observe that Mmp25β morphant embryos show reduced Type IV collagen degradation in regions of the head traversed by elongating axons emanating from the trigeminal ganglion, suggesting that Mmp25β may play a pivotal role in mediating ECM remodeling in the vicinity of these elongating axons. PMID:25074687

  6. Facilitation of TRPV4 by TRPV1 is required for itch transmission in some sensory neuron populations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungil; Barry, Devin M; Liu, Xian-Yu; Yin, Shijin; Munanairi, Admire; Meng, Qing-Tao; Cheng, Wei; Mo, Ping; Wan, Li; Liu, Shen-Bin; Ratnayake, Kasun; Zhao, Zhong-Qiu; Gautam, Narasimhan; Zheng, Jie; Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Chen, Zhou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) respond to chemical irritants and temperature. TRPV1 responds to the itch-inducing endogenous signal histamine, and TRPA1 responds to the itch-inducing chemical chloroquine. We showed that, in sensory neurons, TRPV4 is important for both chloroquine- and histamine-induced itch and that TRPV1 has a role in chloroquine-induced itch. Chloroquine-induced scratching was reduced in mice in which TRPV1 was knocked down or pharmacologically inhibited. Both TRPV4 and TRPV1 were present in some sensory neurons. Pharmacological blockade of either TRPV4 or TRPV1 significantly attenuated the Ca(2+) response of sensory neurons exposed to histamine or chloroquine. Knockout of Trpv1 impaired Ca(2+) responses and reduced scratching behavior evoked by a TRPV4 agonist, whereas knockout of Trpv4 did not alter TRPV1-mediated capsaicin responses. Electrophysiological analysis of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells coexpressing TRPV4 and TRPV1 revealed that the presence of both channels enhanced the activation kinetics of TRPV4 but not of TRPV1. Biochemical and biophysical studies suggested a close proximity between TRPV4 and TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons and in cultured cells. Thus, our studies identified TRPV4 as a channel that contributes to both histamine- and chloroquine-induced itch and indicated that the function of TRPV4 in itch signaling involves TRPV1-mediated facilitation. TRP facilitation through the formation of heteromeric complexes could be a prevalent mechanism by which the vast array of somatosensory information is encoded in sensory neurons. PMID:27436359

  7. Chronic inflammatory pain upregulates expression of P2Y2 receptor in small-diameter sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiqin; Yu, Yi; Zheng, Lingyan; Wang, Lu; Li, Chenli; Yu, Jiangyuan; Wei, Jing; Wang, Chuang; Zhang, Junfang; Xu, Shujun; Wei, Xiaofei; Cui, Wei; Wang, Qinwen; Chen, Xiaowei

    2015-12-01

    Roles of ionotropic purinergic (P2X) receptors in chronic pain have been intensively investigated. However, the contribution of metabotropic purinergic (P2Y) receptors to pathological pain is controversial. In the present study, using single cell RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) and single cell nested-PCR techniques, we examined the expression of P2X(2), P2X(3), P2Y(1) and P2Y(2) mRNA transcripts in retrogradely labeled cutaneous sensory neurons from mouse lumber dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) following peripheral inflammation. The percentage of cutaneous sensory neurons expressing P2Y(2) mRNA transcripts increased after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) treatment. Particularly, the P2Y(2) mRNA transcripts were more frequently detected in small-diameter cutaneous neurons from CFA-treated mice than those from control mice. Coexpression of P2Y(2) and P2X (P2X(2) or P2X(3)) mRNAs was more frequently observed in cutaneous sensory neurons from CFA-treated mice relative to controls. Pain behavioral tests showed that the blockade of P2Y receptors by suramin attenuated mechanical allodynia evoked either by CFA or uridine triphosphate (UTP), an endogenous P2Y(2) and P2Y(4) agonist. These results suggest that chronic inflammatory pain enhances expression of P2Y(2) receptor in peripheral sensory neurons that innervate the injured tissue and the activation of P2Y receptors contributes to mechanical allodynia following inflammation. PMID:26062804

  8. ATP excites mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons through activation of P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Vick, J S; Delay, R J

    2012-09-18

    Purinergic signaling through activation of P2X and P2Y receptors is critically important in the chemical senses. In the mouse main olfactory epithelium (MOE), adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) elicits an increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](I)) and reduces the responsiveness of olfactory sensory neurons to odorants through activation of P2X and P2Y receptors. We investigated the role of purinergic signaling in vomeronasal sensory neuron (VSN)s from the mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO), an olfactory organ distinct from the MOE that responds to many conspecific chemical cues. Using a combination of calcium imaging and patch-clamp electrophysiology with isolated VSNs, we demonstrated that ATP elicits an increase in [Ca(2+)](I) and an inward current with similar EC(50)s. Neither adenosine nor the P2Y receptor ligands adenosine 5'-diphosphate, uridine 5'-triphosphate, and uridine-5'-disphosphate could mimic either effect of ATP. Moreover, the increase in [Ca(2+)](I) required the presence of extracellular calcium and the inward current elicited by ATP was partially blocked by the P2X receptor antagonists pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonate and 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Consistent with the activation of P2X receptors, we detected gene expression of the P2X1 and 3 receptors in the VNO by Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). When co-delivered with dilute urine, a natural stimulus, ATP significantly increased the inward current above that elicited by dilute urine or ATP alone. Mechanical stimulation of the VNO induced the release of ATP, detected by luciferin-luciferase luminometry, and this release of ATP was completely abolished in the presence of the connexin/pannexin hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone. We conclude that the release of ATP could occur during the activity of the vasomotor pump that facilitates the movement of chemicals into the VNO for detection by VSNs. This mechanism could lead to a

  9. Neuroanatomy of extrinsic afferents supplying the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Blackshaw, L A; Brookes, S J H; Grundy, D

    2004-04-01

    Here we discuss the neuroanatomy of extrinsic gastrointestinal (GI) afferent neurones, the relationship between structure and function and the role of afferents in disease. Three pathways connect the gut to the central nervous system: vagal afferents signal mainly from upper GI regions, pelvic afferents mainly from the colorectal region and splanchnic afferents from throughout. Vagal afferents mediate reflex regulation of gut function and behaviour, operating mainly at physiological levels. There are two major functional classes - tension receptors, responding to muscular contraction and distension, and mucosal receptors. The function of vagal endings correlates well with their anatomy: tracing studies show intramuscular arrays (IMAs) and intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs); IGLEs are now known to respond to tension. Functional mucosal receptors correlate with endings traced to the lamina propria. Pelvic afferents serve similar functions to vagal afferents, and additionally mediate both innocuous and noxious sensations. Splanchnic afferents comprise mucosal and stretch-sensitive afferents with low thresholds in addition to high-threshold serosal/mesenteric afferents suggesting diverse roles. IGLEs, probably of pelvic origin, have been identified recently in the rectum and respond similarly to gastric vagal IGLEs. Gastrointestinal afferents may be sensitized or inhibited by chemical mediators released from several cell types. Whether functional changes have anatomical correlates is not known, but it is likely that they underlie diseases involving visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:15066001

  10. Pain-enhancing mechanism through interaction between TRPV1 and anoctamin 1 in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Yasunori; Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is activated by various noxious stimuli, and the stimuli are converted into electrical signals in primary sensory neurons. It is believed that cation influx through TRPV1 causes depolarization, leading to the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, followed by the generation of action potential. Here we report that the capsaicin-evoked action potential could be induced by two components: a cation influx-mediated depolarization caused by TRPV1 activation and a subsequent anion efflux-mediated depolarization via activation of anoctamin 1 (ANO1), a calcium-activated chloride channel, resulting from the entry of calcium through TRPV1. The interaction between TRPV1 and ANO1 is based on their physical binding. Capsaicin activated the chloride currents in an extracellular calcium-dependent manner in HEK293T cells expressing TRPV1 and ANO1. Similarly, in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, capsaicin-activated inward currents were inhibited significantly by a specific ANO1 antagonist, T16Ainh-A01 (A01), in the presence of a high concentration of EGTA but not in the presence of BAPTA [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid]. The generation of a capsaicin-evoked action potential also was inhibited by A01. Furthermore, pain-related behaviors in mice treated with capsaicin, but not with αβ-methylene ATP, were reduced significantly by the concomitant administration of A01. These results indicate that TRPV1–ANO1 interaction is a significant pain-enhancing mechanism in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25848051

  11. Noise in any frequency range can enhance information transmission in a sensory neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Jacob E.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of noise on the neural encoding of broadband signals was investigated in the cricket cercal system, a mechanosensory system sensitive to small near-field air particle disturbances. Known air current stimuli were presented to the cricket through audio speakers in a controlled environment in a variety of background noise conditions. Spike trains from the second layer of neuronal processing, the primary sensory interneurons, were recorded with intracellular Electrodes and the performance of these neurons characterized with the tools of information theory. SNR, mutual information rates, and other measures of encoding accuracy were calculated for single frequency, narrowband, and broadband signals over the entire amplitude sensitivity range of the cells, in the presence of uncorrelated noise background also spanning the cells' frequency and amplitude sensitivity range. Significant enhancements of transmitted information through the addition of external noise were observed regardless of the frequency range of either the signal or noise waveforms, provided both were within the operating range of the cell. Considerable improvements in signal encoding were observed for almost an entire order of magnitude of near-threshold signal amplitudes. This included sinusoidal signals embedded in broadband white noise, broadband signals in broadband noise, and even broadband signals presented with narrowband noise in a completely non-overlapping frequency range. The noise related increases in mutual information rate for broadband signals were as high as 150%, and up to 600% increases in SNR were observed for sinusoidal signals. Additionally, it was shown that the amount of information about the signal carried, on average, by each spike was INCREASED for small signals when presented with noise—implying that added input noise can, in certain situations, actually improve the accuracy of the encoding process itself.

  12. Transcriptomic analyses of genes and tissues in inherited sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sapio, Matthew R; Goswami, Samridhi C; Gross, Jacklyn R; Mannes, Andrew J; Iadarola, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Inherited sensory neuropathies are caused by mutations in genes affecting either primary afferent neurons, or the Schwann cells that myelinate them. Using RNA-Seq, we analyzed the transcriptome of human and rat DRG and peripheral nerve, which contain sensory neurons and Schwann cells, respectively. We subdivide inherited sensory neuropathies based on expression of the mutated gene in these tissues, as well as in mouse TRPV1 lineage DRG nociceptive neurons, and across 32 human tissues from the Human Protein Atlas. We propose that this comprehensive approach to neuropathy gene expression leads to better understanding of the involved cell types in patients with these disorders. We also characterize the genetic "fingerprint" of both tissues, and present the highly tissue-specific genes in DRG and sciatic nerve that may aid in the development of gene panels to improve diagnostics for genetic neuropathies, and may represent specific drug targets for diseases of these tissues. PMID:27343803

  13. Distinct requirements for TrkB and TrkC signaling in target innervation by sensory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postigo, Antonio; Calella, Anna Maria; Fritzsch, Bernd; Knipper, Marlies; Katz, David; Eilers, Andreas; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewin, Gary R.; Klein, Rudiger; Minichiello, Liliana

    2002-01-01

    Signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via the TrkB receptor, or by neurotrophin-3 (NT3) through the TrkC receptor support distinct populations of sensory neurons. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by Trk (tyrosine kinase) receptors, which in vivo promote neuronal survival and target innervation, are not well understood. Using mice with TrkB or TrkC receptors lacking the docking site for Shc adaptors (trkB(shc/shc) and trkC(shc/shc) mice), we show that TrkB and TrkC promote survival of sensory neurons mainly through Shc site-independent pathways, suggesting that these receptors use similar pathways to prevent apoptosis. In contrast, the regulation of target innervation appears different: in trkB(shc/shc) mice neurons lose target innervation, whereas in trkC(shc/shc) mice the surviving TrkC-dependent neurons maintain target innervation and function. Biochemical analysis indicates that phosphorylation at the Shc site positively regulates autophosphorylation of TrkB, but not of TrkC. Our findings show that although TrkB and TrkC signals mediating survival are largely similar, TrkB and TrkC signals required for maintenance of target innervation in vivo are regulated by distinct mechanisms.

  14. Optimal Information Representation and Criticality in an Adaptive Sensory Recurrent Neuronal Network

    PubMed Central

    Shriki, Oren; Yellin, Dovi

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent connections play an important role in cortical function, yet their exact contribution to the network computation remains unknown. The principles guiding the long-term evolution of these connections are poorly understood as well. Therefore, gaining insight into their computational role and into the mechanism shaping their pattern would be of great importance. To that end, we studied the learning dynamics and emergent recurrent connectivity in a sensory network model based on a first-principle information theoretic approach. As a test case, we applied this framework to a model of a hypercolumn in the visual cortex and found that the evolved connections between orientation columns have a "Mexican hat" profile, consistent with empirical data and previous modeling work. Furthermore, we found that optimal information representation is achieved when the network operates near a critical point in its dynamics. Neuronal networks working near such a phase transition are most sensitive to their inputs and are thus optimal in terms of information representation. Nevertheless, a mild change in the pattern of interactions may cause such networks to undergo a transition into a different regime of behavior in which the network activity is dominated by its internal recurrent dynamics and does not reflect the objective input. We discuss several mechanisms by which the pattern of interactions can be driven into this supercritical regime and relate them to various neurological and neuropsychiatric phenomena. PMID:26882372

  15. Odorant receptors regulate the final glomerular coalescence of olfactory sensory neuron axons

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Gil, Diego J.; Bartel, Dianna L.; Jaspers, Austin W.; Mobley, Arie S.; Imamura, Fumiaki; Greer, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Odorant receptors (OR) are strongly implicated in coalescence of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axons and the formation of olfactory bulb (OB) glomeruli. However, when ORs are first expressed relative to basal cell division and OSN axon extension is unknown. We developed an in vivo fate-mapping strategy that enabled us to follow OSN maturation and axon extension beginning at basal cell division. In parallel, we mapped the molecular development of OSNs beginning at basal cell division, including the onset of OR expression. Our data show that ORs are first expressed around 4 d following basal cell division, 24 h after OSN axons have reached the OB. Over the next 6+ days the OSN axons navigate the OB nerve layer and ultimately coalesce in glomeruli. These data provide a previously unidentified perspective on the role of ORs in homophilic OSN axon adhesion and lead us to propose a new model dividing axon extension into two phases. Phase I is OR-independent and accounts for up to 50% of the time during which axons approach the OB and begin navigating the olfactory nerve layer. Phase II is OR-dependent and concludes as OSN axons coalesce in glomeruli. PMID:25902488

  16. Co-expression of anoctamins in cilia of olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Bastian; Drose, Daniela R; Ackels, Tobias; Oberland, Sonja; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M

    2015-02-01

    Vertebrates can sense and identify a vast array of chemical cues. The molecular machinery involved in chemodetection and transduction is expressed within the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. Currently, there is only limited information available on the distribution and density of individual signaling components within the ciliary compartment. Using super-resolution microscopy, we show here that cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels and calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin family are localized to discrete microdomains in the ciliary membrane. In addition to ANO2, a second anoctamin, ANO6, also localizes to ciliary microdomains. This observation, together with the fact that ANO6 and ANO2 co-localize, indicates a role for ANO6 in olfactory signaling. We show that both ANO2 and ANO6 can form heteromultimers and that this heteromerization alters the recombinant channels' physiological properties. Thus, we provide evidence for interaction of ANO2 and ANO6 in olfactory cilia, with possible physiological relevance for olfactory signaling. PMID:25500808

  17. Olfactory marker protein (OMP) gene deletion causes altered physiological activity of olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Buiakova, O I; Baker, H; Scott, J W; Farbman, A; Kream, R; Grillo, M; Franzen, L; Richman, M; Davis, L M; Abbondanzo, S; Stewart, C L; Margolis, F L

    1996-01-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) is an abundant, phylogentically conserved, cytoplasmic protein of unknown function expressed almost exclusively in mature olfactory sensory neurons. To address its function, we generated OMP-deficient mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. We report that these OMP-null mice are compromised in their ability to respond to odor stimull, providing insight to OMP function. The maximal electroolfactogram response of the olfactory neuroepithelium to several odorants was 20-40% smaller in the mutants compared with controls. In addition, the onset and recovery kinetics following isoamyl acetate stimulation are prolonged in the null mice. Furthermore, the ability of the mutants to respond to the second odor pulse of a pair is impaired, over a range of concentrations, compared with controls. These results imply that neural activity directed toward the olfactory bulb is also reduced. The bulbar phenotype observed in the OMP-null mouse is consistent with this hypothesis. Bulbar activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis, and content of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin are reduced by 65% and 50%, respectively. This similarity to postsynaptic changes in gene expression induced by peripheral olfactory deafferentation or naris blockade confirms that functional neural activity is reduced in both the olfactory neuroepithelium and the olfactory nerve projection to the bulb in the OMP-null mouse. These observations provide strong support for the conclusion that OMP is a novel modulatory component of the odor detection/signal transduction cascade. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8790421

  18. Phosphodiesterase 1C is dispensable for rapid response termination of olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cygnar, Katherine D.; Zhao, Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    In the nose, odorants are detected on the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), where a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway transforms odor stimulation into electrical responses. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in OSN cilia was long thought to account for rapid response termination by degrading odor-induced cAMP. Two PDEs with distinct cellular localization have been found in OSNs: PDE1C in cilia; PDE4A throughout the cell but absent from cilia. We disrupted both genes in mice and performed electroolfactogram analysis. Unexpectedly, eliminating PDE1C did not prolong response termination. Prolonged termination occurred only in mice lacking both PDEs, suggesting that cAMP degradation by PDE1C in cilia is not a rate-limiting factor for response termination in wildtype. Pde1c−/− OSNs instead displayed reduced sensitivity and attenuated adaptation to repeated stimulation, suggesting potential roles for PDE1C in regulating sensitivity and adaptation. These observations provide new perspectives in regulation of olfactory transduction. PMID:19305400

  19. Olfactory marker protein (OMP) gene deletion causes altered physiological activity of olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Buiakova, O I; Baker, H; Scott, J W; Farbman, A; Kream, R; Grillo, M; Franzen, L; Richman, M; Davis, L M; Abbondanzo, S; Stewart, C L; Margolis, F L

    1996-09-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) is an abundant, phylogentically conserved, cytoplasmic protein of unknown function expressed almost exclusively in mature olfactory sensory neurons. To address its function, we generated OMP-deficient mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. We report that these OMP-null mice are compromised in their ability to respond to odor stimull, providing insight to OMP function. The maximal electroolfactogram response of the olfactory neuroepithelium to several odorants was 20-40% smaller in the mutants compared with controls. In addition, the onset and recovery kinetics following isoamyl acetate stimulation are prolonged in the null mice. Furthermore, the ability of the mutants to respond to the second odor pulse of a pair is impaired, over a range of concentrations, compared with controls. These results imply that neural activity directed toward the olfactory bulb is also reduced. The bulbar phenotype observed in the OMP-null mouse is consistent with this hypothesis. Bulbar activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis, and content of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin are reduced by 65% and 50%, respectively. This similarity to postsynaptic changes in gene expression induced by peripheral olfactory deafferentation or naris blockade confirms that functional neural activity is reduced in both the olfactory neuroepithelium and the olfactory nerve projection to the bulb in the OMP-null mouse. These observations provide strong support for the conclusion that OMP is a novel modulatory component of the odor detection/signal transduction cascade. PMID:8790421

  20. Kymographic Analysis of Transport in an Individual Neuronal Sensory Cilium in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Robert; Barr, Maureen M

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) is driven by molecular motors that travel upon microtubule-based ciliary axonemes. In the single-celled alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, movement of a single anterograde IFT motor, heterotrimeric kinesin-II, is required to generate two identical motile flagella. The function of this canonical anterograde IFT motor is conserved among all eukaryotes, yet multicellular organisms can generate cilia of diverse structures and functions, ranging from simple threadlike non-motile primary cilia to the elaborate cilia that make up rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. An emerging theme is that additional molecular motors modulate the canonical IFT machinery to give rise to differing ciliary morphologies. Therefore, a complete understanding of the trafficking of ciliary receptors, as well as the biogenesis, maintenance, specialization, and function of cilia, requires the characterization of motor molecules.Here, we describe in detail our method for measuring the motility of proteins in cilia or dendrites of C. elegans male-specific CEM ciliated sensory neurons using time-lapse microscopy and kymography of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged motors, receptors, and cargos. We describe, as a specific example, OSM-3::GFP puncta moving in cilia, but also include (Fig. 1) with settings that have worked well for us measuring movement of heterotrimeric kinesin-II, IFT particles, and the polycystin TRP channel PKD-2. PMID:27514919

  1. Physiological organization and topographic mapping of the antennal olfactory sensory neurons in female hawkmoths, Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Ghaninia, Majid; Olsson, Shannon B; Hansson, Bill S

    2014-10-01

    The hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, has been a keystone system for developmental, neurobiological, and ecological studies for several decades. Because many of its behaviors are driven by olfactory cues, a thorough understanding of the Manduca olfactory system is essential to studying its biology. With the aim of functionally characterizing single antennal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and determining their detailed topographic location, we performed systematic single-sensillum recordings on 4 morphological types of olfactory sensilla: trichoid-A and -B and basiconic-A and -B. We were able to unambiguously differentiate the colocalized cells associated with single sensilla based on their spike amplitudes. Using a panel of 61 biologically relevant compounds established in behavioral and gas chromatography-electrophysiology experiments, we made 223 recordings from these sensilla. Based on the response spectra of 187 responding OSNs, the sensilla fell into 12 distinct functional classes encompassing 29 OSNs. Selectivity of the 25 responding OSNs varied from narrowly tuned (responding to only one or a subset of compounds), to very broadly tuned (responding to multiple compounds), in a concentration-dependent manner. Four OSNs, however, did not respond to the tested components. Topographic mapping of the sensilla revealed that some physiological sensillum types are confined to particular locations on the antennal surface while other classes are more or less irregularly scattered all over the antennal annuli. Such information will prove beneficial for future receptor deorphanization, in situ hybridization, and molecular manipulation experiments. PMID:25092901

  2. Differential expression of axon-sorting molecules in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Naoki; Nakashima, Ai; Hoshina, Naosuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takeuchi, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    In the mouse olfactory system, the axons of olfactory sensory neurons that express the same type of odorant receptor (OR) converge to a specific set of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). It is widely accepted that expressed OR molecules instruct glomerular segregation by regulating the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Although the relationship between the expression of axon-sorting molecules and OR types has been analyzed in detail, those between the expressions of axon-sorting molecules remain to be elucidated. Here we collected the expression profiles of four axon-sorting molecules from a large number of glomeruli in the OB. These molecules demonstrated position-independent mosaic expressions, but their patterns were not identical in the OB. Comparing their expressions identified positive and negative correlations between several pairs of genes even though they showed various expressions. Furthermore, the principal component analysis revealed that the factor loadings in the principal component 1, which explain the largest amount of variation, were most likely to reflect the degree of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel dependence on the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Thus, neural activity generated through the CNG channel is a major component in the generation of a wide variety of expressions of axon-sorting molecules in glomerular segregation. PMID:27207328

  3. Untypical connectivity from olfactory sensory neurons expressing OR37 into higher brain centers visualized by genetic tracing.

    PubMed

    Bader, Andrea; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    The OR37 subfamily of odorant receptors(ORs) exists exclusively in mammals. In contrast to ORs in general, they are highly conserved within and across species.These unique features raise the question, whether olfactory information gathered by the OR37 sensory cells is processed in specially designated brain areas. To elucidate the wiring of projection neurons from OR37 glomeruli into higher brain areas, tracing experiments were performed.The application of DiI onto the ventral area of the olfactory bulb, which harbors the OR37 glomeruli, led to the labeling of fibers not only in the typical olfactory cortical regions,but also in the medial amygdala and the hypothalamus. To visualize the projections from a defined OR37 glomerulus more precisely, transgenic mice were studied in which olfactory sensory neurons co-express the receptor subtype OR37C and the transsynaptic tracer wheat germ agglutinin(WGA). WGA became visible not only in the OR37C sensory neurons and the corresponding OR37C glomerulus,but also in cell somata located in the mitral/tufted cell layer adjacent to the OR37C glomerulus, indicating a transfer of WGA onto projection neurons. In the brain, WGA immunoreactivity was not detectable in typical olfactory cortical areas, but instead in distinct areas of the medial amygdala.Detailed mapping revealed that the WGA immunoreactivity was restricted to the posterior-dorsal subnucleus of the medial amygdala. In addition, WGA immunoreactivity was visible in some well-circumscribed areas of the hypothalamus.These results are indicative for a unique connectivity from OR37C sensory cells into higher brain centers. PMID:22294261

  4. Environmental enrichment causes a global potentiation of neuronal responses across stimulus complexity and lamina of sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Alwis, Dasuni S.; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Enriched social and physical housing produces many molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological and behavior benefits even in adult animals. Much less is known of its effects on cortical electrophysiology, especially in how sensory cortex encodes the altered environment, and extant studies have generally been restricted to neurons in input laminae in sensory cortex. To extend the understanding of how an enriched environment alters the way in which cortex views the world, we investigated enrichment-induced changes in neuronal encoding of sensory stimuli across all laminae of the rat barrel cortex receiving input from the face whisker tactile system. Animals were housed in Enriched (n = 13) or Isolated housing (n = 13) conditions for 8 weeks before extracellular recordings were obtained from barrel cortex in response to simple whisker deflections and whisker motions modeling movements seen in awake animals undertaking a variety of different tasks. Enrichment resulted in increases in neuronal responses to all stimuli, ranging from those modeling exploratory behavior through to discrimination behaviors. These increases were seen throughout the cortex from supragranular layers through to input Layer 4 and for some stimuli, in infragranular Layer 5. The observed enrichment-induced effect is consistent with the postulate that enrichment causes shift in cortical excitatory/inhibitory balance, and we demonstrate this is greatest in supragranular layers. However, we also report that the effects are non-selective for stimulus parameters across a range of stimuli except for one modeling the likely use of whiskers by the rats in the enriched housing. PMID:23964199

  5. Regulation of ASIC channels by a stomatin/STOML3 complex located in a mobile vesicle pool in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lapatsina, Liudmila; Jira, Julia A.; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Poole, Kate; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Bilbao, Daniel; Lewin, Gary R.; Heppenstall, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    A complex of stomatin-family proteins and acid-sensing (proton-gated) ion channel (ASIC) family members participate in sensory transduction in invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we have examined the role of the stomatin-family protein stomatin-like protein-3 (STOML3) in this process. We demonstrate that STOML3 interacts with stomatin and ASIC subunits and that this occurs in a highly mobile vesicle pool in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and Chinese hamster ovary cells. We identify a hydrophobic region in the N-terminus of STOML3 that is required for vesicular localization of STOML3 and regulates physical and functional interaction with ASICs. We further characterize STOML3-containing vesicles in DRG neurons and show that they are Rab11-positive, but not part of the early-endosomal, lysosomal or Rab14-dependent biosynthetic compartment. Moreover, uncoupling of vesicles from microtubules leads to incorporation of STOML3 into the plasma membrane and increased acid-gated currents. Thus, STOML3 defines a vesicle pool in which it associates with molecules that have critical roles in sensory transduction. We suggest that the molecular features of this vesicular pool may be characteristic of a ‘transducosome’ in sensory neurons. PMID:22773952

  6. Mitotoxicity in distal symmetrical sensory peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary J.; Doyle, Timothy; Salvemini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Chronic distal symmetrical sensory peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological complication of cancer chemotherapy, HIV treatment and diabetes. Although aetiology-specific differences in presentation are evident, the clinical signs and symptoms of these neuropathies are clearly similar. Data from animal models of neuropathic pain suggest that the similarities have a common cause: mitochondrial dysfunction in primary afferent sensory neurons. Mitochondrial dysfunction is caused by mitotoxic effects of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs of several chemical classes, HIV-associated viral proteins, and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor treatment, as well as the (possibly both direct and indirect) effects of excess glucose. The mitochondrial injury results in a chronic neuronal energy deficit, which gives rise to spontaneous nerve impulses and a compartmental neuronal degeneration that is first apparent in the terminal receptor arbor—that is, intraepidermal nerve fibres—of cutaneous afferent neurons. Preliminary data suggest that drugs that prevent mitochondrial injury or improve mitochondrial function could be useful in the treatment of these conditions. PMID:24840972

  7. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, Robert P.; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C.; Boyle, Kieran A.; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to “unclassified” cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn. PMID:25972186

  8. Mechanisms of Transient Signaling via Short and Long Prolactin Receptor Isoforms in Female and Male Sensory Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Belugin, Sergei; Diogenes, Anibal R.; Patil, Mayur J.; Ginsburg, Erika; Henry, Michael A.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) regulates activity of nociceptors and causes hyperalgesia in pain conditions. PRL enhances nociceptive responses by rapidly modulating channels in nociceptors. The molecular mechanisms underlying PRL-induced transient signaling in neurons are not well understood. Here we use a variety of cell biology and pharmacological approaches to show that PRL transiently enhanced capsaicin-evoked responses involve protein kinase C ϵ (PKCϵ) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in female rat trigeminal (TG) neurons. We next reconstituted PRL-induced signaling in a heterologous expression system and TG neurons from PRL receptor (PRLR)-null mutant mice by expressing rat PRLR-long isoform (PRLR-L), PRLR-short isoform (PRLR-S), or a mix of both. Results show that PRLR-S, but not PRLR-L, is capable of mediating PRL-induced transient enhancement of capsaicin responses in both male and female TG neurons. However, co-expression of PRLR-L with PRLR-S (1:1 ratio) leads to the inhibition of the transient PRL actions. Co-expression of PRLR-L deletion mutants with PRLR-S indicated that the cytoplasmic site adjacent to the trans-membrane domain of PRLR-L was responsible for inhibitory effects of PRLR-L. Furthermore, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry data indicate that in normal conditions, PRLR-L is expressed mainly in glia with little expression in rat sensory neurons (3–5%) and human nerves. The predominant PRLR form in TG neurons/nerves from rats and humans is PRLR-S. Altogether, PRL-induced transient signaling in sensory neurons is governed by PI3K or PKCϵ, mediated via the PRLR-S isoform, and transient effects mediated by PRLR-S are inhibited by presence of PRLR-L in these cells. PMID:24142695

  9. Herpes simplex virus 1 tropism for human sensory ganglion neurons in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model of neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zerboni, Leigh; Che, Xibing; Reichelt, Mike; Qiao, Yanli; Gu, Haidong; Arvin, Ann

    2013-03-01

    The tropism of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) for human sensory neurons infected in vivo was examined using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) xenografts maintained in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). In contrast to the HSV-1 lytic infectious cycle in vitro, replication of the HSV-1 F strain was restricted in human DRG neurons despite the absence of adaptive immune responses in SCID mice, allowing the establishment of neuronal latency. At 12 days after DRG inoculation, 26.2% of human neurons expressed HSV-1 protein and 13.1% expressed latency-associated transcripts (LAT). Some infected neurons showed cytopathic changes, but HSV-1, unlike varicella-zoster virus (VZV), only rarely infected satellite cells and did not induce fusion of neuronal and satellite cell plasma membranes. Cell-free enveloped HSV-1 virions were observed, indicating productive infection. A recombinant HSV-1-expressing luciferase exhibited less virulence than HSV-1 F in the SCID mouse host, enabling analysis of infection in human DRG xenografts for a 61-day interval. At 12 days after inoculation, 4.2% of neurons expressed HSV-1 proteins; frequencies increased to 32.1% at 33 days but declined to 20.8% by 61 days. Frequencies of LAT-positive neurons were 1.2% at 12 days and increased to 40.2% at 33 days. LAT expression remained at 37% at 61 days, in contrast to the decline in neurons expressing viral proteins. These observations show that the progression of HSV-1 infection is highly restricted in human DRG, and HSV-1 genome silencing occurs in human neurons infected in vivo as a consequence of virus-host cell interactions and does not require adaptive immune control. PMID:23269807

  10. Endomorphin-2 is Released from Newborn Rat Primary Sensory Neurons in a Frequency- and Calcium- Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Scanlin, Heather L.; Carroll, Elizabeth A.; Jenkins, Victoria K.; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that endomorphins, endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, modulate synaptic transmission in both somatic and visceral sensory pathways. Here we show that endomorphin-2 (END-2) is expressed in newborn rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and nodose-petrosal ganglion complex (NPG) neurons, and rarely co-localizes with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In order to examine activity-dependent release of END-2 from neurons, we established a model using dispersed cultures of DRG and NPG cells activated by patterned electrical field stimulation. To detect release of END-2, we developed a novel rapid capture ELISA, in which END-2 capture antibody was added to neuronal cultures shortly before their electrical stimulation. The conventional assay was effective at reliably detecting END-2 only when the cells were stimulated in the presence of CTAP, a MOR-selective antagonist. This suggests that the strength of the novel assay is related primarily to rapid capture of released END-2 before it binds to endogenous MORs. Using the rapid capture ELISA, we found that stimulation protocols known to induce plastic changes at sensory synapses were highly effective at releasing END-2. Removal of extracellular calcium or blocking voltage-activated calcium channels significantly reduced the release. Together, our data provide the first evidence that END-2 is expressed by newborn DRG neurons of all sizes found in this age group, and can be released from these, as well as from NPG neurons, in an activity-dependent manner. These results point to END-2 as a likely mediator of activity-dependent plasticity in sensory pathways. PMID:18513316

  11. Endomorphin-2 is released from newborn rat primary sensory neurons in a frequency- and calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Scanlin, Heather L; Carroll, Elizabeth A; Jenkins, Victoria K; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2008-05-01

    Recent evidence indicates that endomorphins, endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, modulate synaptic transmission in both somatic and visceral sensory pathways. Here we show that endomorphin-2 (END-2) is expressed in newborn rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and nodose-petrosal ganglion complex (NPG) neurons, and rarely co-localizes with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In order to examine activity-dependent release of END-2 from neurons, we established a model using dispersed cultures of DRG and NPG cells activated by patterned electrical field stimulation. To detect release of END-2, we developed a novel rapid capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in which END-2 capture antibody was added to neuronal cultures shortly before their electrical stimulation. The conventional assay was effective at reliably detecting END-2 only when the cells were stimulated in the presence of CTAP, a MOR-selective antagonist. This suggests that the strength of the novel assay is related primarily to rapid capture of released END-2 before it binds to endogenous MORs. Using the rapid capture ELISA, we found that stimulation protocols known to induce plastic changes at sensory synapses were highly effective at releasing END-2. Removal of extracellular calcium or blocking voltage-activated calcium channels significantly reduced the release. Together, our data provide the first evidence that END-2 is expressed by newborn DRG neurons of all sizes found in this age group, and can be released from these, as well as from NPG neurons, in an activity-dependent manner. These results point to END-2 as a likely mediator of activity-dependent plasticity in sensory pathways. PMID:18513316

  12. Conditional knockout of TMEM16A/anoctamin1 abolishes the calcium-activated chloride current in mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Asma; Hernandez-Clavijo, Andres; Pifferi, Simone; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Boccaccio, Anna; Franzot, Jessica; Rock, Jason; Menini, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Pheromones are substances released from animals that, when detected by the vomeronasal organ of other individuals of the same species, affect their physiology and behavior. Pheromone binding to receptors on microvilli on the dendritic knobs of vomeronasal sensory neurons activates a second messenger cascade to produce an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Here, we used whole-cell and inside-out patch-clamp analysis to provide a functional characterization of currents activated by Ca(2+) in isolated mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons in the absence of intracellular K(+). In whole-cell recordings, the average current in 1.5 µM Ca(2+) and symmetrical Cl(-) was -382 pA at -100 mV. Ion substitution experiments and partial blockade by commonly used Cl(-) channel blockers indicated that Ca(2+) activates mainly anionic currents in these neurons. Recordings from inside-out patches from dendritic knobs of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons confirmed the presence of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels in the knobs and/or microvilli. We compared the electrophysiological properties of the native currents with those mediated by heterologously expressed TMEM16A/anoctamin1 or TMEM16B/anoctamin2 Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, which are coexpressed in microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons, and found a closer resemblance to those of TMEM16A. We used the Cre-loxP system to selectively knock out TMEM16A in cells expressing the olfactory marker protein, which is found in mature vomeronasal sensory neurons. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the specific ablation of TMEM16A in vomeronasal neurons. Ca(2+)-activated currents were abolished in vomeronasal sensory neurons of TMEM16A conditional knockout mice, demonstrating that TMEM16A is an essential component of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents in mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. PMID:25779870

  13. PROS-1/Prospero Is a Major Regulator of the Glia-Specific Secretome Controlling Sensory-Neuron Shape and Function in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Sean W; Singhvi, Aakanksha; Liang, Yupu; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-04-19

    Sensory neurons are an animal's gateway to the world, and their receptive endings, the sites of sensory signal transduction, are often associated with glia. Although glia are known to promote sensory-neuron functions, the molecular bases of these interactions are poorly explored. Here, we describe a post-developmental glial role for the PROS-1/Prospero/PROX1 homeodomain protein in sensory-neuron function in C. elegans. Using glia expression profiling, we demonstrate that, unlike previously characterized cell fate roles, PROS-1 functions post-embryonically to control sense-organ glia-specific secretome expression. PROS-1 functions cell autonomously to regulate glial secretion and membrane structure, and non-cell autonomously to control the shape and function of the receptive endings of sensory neurons. Known glial genes controlling sensory-neuron function are PROS-1 targets, and we identify additional PROS-1-dependent genes required for neuron attributes. Drosophila Prospero and vertebrate PROX1 are expressed in post-mitotic sense-organ glia and astrocytes, suggesting conserved roles for this class of transcription factors. PMID:27068465

  14. PROS-1/Prospero Is a Major Regulator of the Glia-Specific Secretome Controlling Sensory-Neuron Shape and Function in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Sean W.; Singhvi, Aakanksha; Liang, Yupu; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensory neurons are an animal’s gateway to the world, and their receptive endings, the sites of sensory signal transduction, are often associated with glia. While glia are known to promote sensory-neuron functions, the molecular bases of these interactions are poorly explored. Here we describe a post-developmental glial role for the PROS-1/Prospero/PROX1 homeodomain protein in sensory-neuron function in C. elegans. Using glia expression profiling, we demonstrate that, unlike previously characterized cell fate roles, PROS-1 functions post-embryonically to control sense-organ glia-specific secretome expression. PROS-1 functions cell autonomously to regulate glial secretion and membrane structure, and non-cell autonomously to control the shape and function of the receptive endings of sensory neurons. Known glial genes controlling sensory-neuron function are PROS-1 targets, and we identify additional PROS-1-dependent genes required for neuron attributes. Drosophila Prospero and vertebrate PROX1 are expressed in post-mitotic sense-organ glia and in astrocytes, suggesting conserved roles for this class of transcription factors. PMID:27068465

  15. Cis- and Trans-Regulatory Mechanisms of Gene Expression in the ASJ Sensory Neuron of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    González-Barrios, María; Fierro-González, Juan Carlos; Krpelanova, Eva; Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Peñate, Xenia; Chavez, Sebastián; Swoboda, Peter; Jansen, Gert; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The identity of a given cell type is determined by the expression of a set of genes sharing common cis-regulatory motifs and being regulated by shared transcription factors. Here, we identify cis and trans regulatory elements that drive gene expression in the bilateral sensory neuron ASJ, located in the head of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. For this purpose, we have dissected the promoters of the only two genes so far reported to be exclusively expressed in ASJ, trx-1 and ssu-1. We hereby identify the ASJ motif, a functional cis-regulatory bipartite promoter region composed of two individual 6 bp elements separated by a 3 bp linker. The first element is a 6 bp CG-rich sequence that presumably binds the Sp family member zinc-finger transcription factor SPTF-1. Interestingly, within the C. elegans nervous system SPTF-1 is also found to be expressed only in ASJ neurons where it regulates expression of other genes in these neurons and ASJ cell fate. The second element of the bipartite motif is a 6 bp AT-rich sequence that is predicted to potentially bind a transcription factor of the homeobox family. Together, our findings identify a specific promoter signature and SPTF-1 as a transcription factor that functions as a terminal selector gene to regulate gene expression in C. elegans ASJ sensory neurons. PMID:25769980

  16. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersensitivity remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of the GDNF family receptor α-3 (GFRα3) signaling in visceral hypersensitivity by quantifying visceromotor responses (VMR) to colorectal distension before and after intracolonic treatment with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baseline responses to colorectal distension did not differ between C57BL/6 and GFRα3 knockout (KO) mice. Relative to intracolonic saline treatment, TNBS significantly enhanced the VMR to colorectal distension in C57BL/6 mice 2, 7, 10, and 14 days posttreatment, whereas TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed in GFRα3 KO mice. The proportion of GFRα3 immunopositive thoracolumbar and lumbosacral colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly elevated 2 days after TNBS treatment. In single fiber recordings, responses to circumferential stretch of colorectal afferent endings in C57BL/6 mice were significantly increased (sensitized) after exposure to an inflammatory soup, whereas responses to stretch did not sensitize in GFRα3 KO mice. These findings suggest that enhanced GFRα3 signaling in visceral afferents may contribute to development of colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:21193524

  17. Energy deficit in parvalbumin neurons leads to circuit dysfunction, impaired sensory gating and social disability.

    PubMed

    Inan, Melis; Zhao, Mingrui; Manuszak, Monica; Karakaya, Cansu; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Pickel, Virginia M; Schwartz, Theodore H; Goldstein, Peter A; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Parvalbumin-expressing, fast spiking interneurons have high-energy demands, which make them particularly susceptible to energy impairment. Recent evidence suggests a link between mitochondrial dysfunction in fast spiking cortical interneurons and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction restricted to parvalbumin interneurons has not been directly addressed in vivo. To investigate the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in parvalbumin interneurons in vivo, we generated conditional knockout mice with a progressive decline in oxidative phosphorylation by deleting cox10 gene selectively in parvalbumin neurons (PV-Cox10 CKO). Cox10 ablation results in defective assembly of cytochrome oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the electron transfer chain, and leads to mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction. PV-Cox10 CKO mice showed a progressive loss of cytochrome oxidase in cortical parvalbumin interneurons. Cytochrome oxidase protein levels were significantly reduced starting at postnatal day 60, and this was not associated with a change in parvalbumin interneuron density. Analyses of intrinsic electrophysiological properties in layer 5 primary somatosensory cortex revealed that parvalbumin interneurons could not sustain their typical high frequency firing, and their overall excitability was enhanced. An increase in both excitatory and inhibitory input onto parvalbumin interneurons was observed in PV-Cox10 CKO mice, resulting in a disinhibited network with an imbalance of excitation/inhibition. Investigation of network oscillations in PV-Cox10 CKO mice, using local field potential recordings in anesthetized mice, revealed significantly increased gamma and theta frequency oscillation power in both medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. PV-Cox10 CKO mice did not exhibit muscle strength or gross motor activity deficits in the time frame of the experiments, but displayed impaired sensory gating and sociability. Taken together, these data

  18. Temporal response dynamics of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons depends on receptor type and response polarity

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, Merid N.; Wicher, Dieter; Hansson, Bill S.; Olsson, Shannon B.

    2012-01-01

    Insect olfactory sensory neurons (OSN) express a diverse array of receptors from different protein families, i.e. ionotropic receptors (IR), gustatory receptors (GR) and odorant receptors (OR). It is well known that insects are exposed to a plethora of odor molecules that vary widely in both space and time under turbulent natural conditions. In addition to divergent ligand specificities, these different receptors might also provide an increased range of temporal dynamics and sensitivities for the olfactory system. To test this, we challenged different Drosophila OSNs with both varying stimulus durations (10–2000 ms), and repeated stimulus pulses of key ligands at various frequencies (1–10 Hz). Our results show that OR-expressing OSNs responded faster and with higher sensitivity to short stimulations as compared to IR- and Gr21a-expressing OSNs. In addition, OR-expressing OSNs could respond to repeated stimulations of excitatory ligands up to 5 Hz, while IR-expressing OSNs required ~5x longer stimulations and/or higher concentrations to respond to similar stimulus durations and frequencies. Nevertheless, IR-expressing OSNs did not exhibit adaptation to longer stimulations, unlike OR- and Gr21a-OSNs. Both OR- and IR-expressing OSNs were also unable to resolve repeated pulses of inhibitory ligands as fast as excitatory ligands. These differences were independent of the peri-receptor environment in which the receptors were expressed and suggest that the receptor expressed by a given OSN affects both its sensitivity and its response to transient, intermittent chemical stimuli. OR-expressing OSNs are better at resolving low dose, intermittent stimuli, while IR-expressing OSNs respond more accurately to long-lasting odor pulses. This diversity increases the capacity of the insect olfactory system to respond to the diverse spatiotemporal signals in the natural environment. PMID:23162431

  19. Expression of ionotropic receptors in terrestrial hermit crab's olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Groh-Lunow, Katrin C.; Getahun, Merid N.; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    Coenobitidae are one out of at least five crustacean lineages which independently succeeded in the transition from water to land. This change in lifestyle required adaptation of the peripheral olfactory organs, the antennules, in order to sense chemical cues in the new terrestrial habitat. Hermit crab olfactory aesthetascs are arranged in a field on the distal segment of the antennular flagellum. Aesthetascs house approximately 300 dendrites with their cell bodies arranged in spindle-like complexes of ca. 150 cell bodies each. While the aesthetascs of aquatic crustaceans have been shown to be the place of odor uptake and previous studies identified ionotropic receptors (IRs) as the putative chemosensory receptors expressed in decapod antennules, the expression of IRs besides the IR co-receptors IR25a and IR93a in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) has not been documented yet. Our goal was to reveal the expression and distribution pattern of non-co-receptor IRs in OSNs of Coenobita clypeatus, a terrestrial hermit crab, with RNA in situ hybridization. We expanded our previously published RNAseq dataset, and revealed 22 novel IR candidates in the Coenobita antennules. We then used RNA probes directed against three different IRs to visualize their expression within the OSN cell body complexes. Furthermore we aimed to characterize ligand spectra of single aesthetascs by recording local field potentials and responses from individual dendrites. This also allowed comparison to functional data from insect OSNs expressing antennal IRs. We show that this orphan receptor subgroup with presumably non-olfactory function in insects is likely the basis of olfaction in terrestrial hermit crabs. PMID:25698921

  20. Identification of the Sensory Neuron Specific Regulatory Region for the Mouse Gene Encoding the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.8

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are critical membrane components that participate in the electrical activity of excitable cells. The type one VGSC family includes the tetrodotoxin insensitive sodium channel, Nav1.8, encoded by the Scn10a gene. Nav1.8 expression is restricted to small and medium diameter nociceptive sensory neurons of the dorsal root (DRG) and cranial sensory ganglia. In order to understand the stringent transcriptional regulation of the Scn10a gene, the sensory neuron specific promoter was functionally identified. While identifying the mRNA 5’ end, alternative splicing within the 5’ UTR was observed to create heterogeneity in the RNA transcript. Four kilobases of upstream genomic DNA was cloned and the presence of tissue specific promoter activity was tested by microinjection and adenoviral infection of fluorescent protein reporter constructs into primary mouse and rat neurons, and cell lines. The region contained many putative transcription factor binding sites and strong homology with the predicted rat ortholog. Homology to the predicted human ortholog was limited to the proximal end and several conserved cis elements were noted. Two regulatory modules were identified by microinjection of reporter constructs into DRG and superior cervical ganglia neurons: a neuron specific proximal promoter region between −1.6 and −0.2kb of the transcription start site cluster, and a distal sensory neuron switch region beyond −1.6kb that restricted fluorescent protein expression to a subset of primary sensory neurons. PMID:18466327

  1. Identification and Characterization of Two “Sensory Neuron Membrane Proteins” (SNMPs) of the Desert Locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xingcong; Pregitzer, Pablo; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive neurons of insects not only require specific receptors but in addition several auxiliary components, including the “sensory neuron membrane protein,” SNMP. Accordingly, SNMP is considered as a marker for neurons responding to pheromones. For the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, it is known that the behavior, including aggregation behavior and courtship inhibition, is largely controlled by pheromones. However, little is known about pheromones, their receptors, and the pheromone-responsive cells in locusts. In this study, we have identified two SNMP subtypes, SNMP1 and SNMP2, and compared their phylogenetic relationship and primary structure motifs with SNMPs from other species. Both SNMPs were found in chemosensory tissues, especially the antennae. Employing double in situ hybridization, we identified and localized the SNMP-expressing cells in the antennae. Cells expressing SNMP1 were localized to sensilla trichodea but also to sensilla basiconica, which in locust respond to pheromones. One or a few cells express SNMP1 within the multineuron clusters from sensilla basiconica, whereas the SNMP2 subtype was expressed in cells surrounding the neuron clusters, possibly supporting cells. Based on the finding that SNMP1 is expressed in distinct neurons under chemosensory sensilla, it is conceivable that these cells may represent pheromone-responsive neurons of the desert locust. PMID:27012870

  2. Identification and Characterization of Two "Sensory Neuron Membrane Proteins" (SNMPs) of the Desert Locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingcong; Pregitzer, Pablo; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive neurons of insects not only require specific receptors but in addition several auxiliary components, including the "sensory neuron membrane protein," SNMP. Accordingly, SNMP is considered as a marker for neurons responding to pheromones. For the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, it is known that the behavior, including aggregation behavior and courtship inhibition, is largely controlled by pheromones. However, little is known about pheromones, their receptors, and the pheromone-responsive cells in locusts. In this study, we have identified two SNMP subtypes, SNMP1 and SNMP2, and compared their phylogenetic relationship and primary structure motifs with SNMPs from other species. Both SNMPs were found in chemosensory tissues, especially the antennae. Employing double in situ hybridization, we identified and localized the SNMP-expressing cells in the antennae. Cells expressing SNMP1 were localized to sensilla trichodea but also to sensilla basiconica, which in locust respond to pheromones. One or a few cells express SNMP1 within the multineuron clusters from sensilla basiconica, whereas the SNMP2 subtype was expressed in cells surrounding the neuron clusters, possibly supporting cells. Based on the finding that SNMP1 is expressed in distinct neurons under chemosensory sensilla, it is conceivable that these cells may represent pheromone-responsive neurons of the desert locust. PMID:27012870

  3. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Séguéla, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8(+) primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2(+)-Arch(+) mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8(+) afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  4. TRPA1 Is Functionally Expressed Primarily by IB4-Binding, Non-Peptidergic Mouse and Rat Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Stucky, Cheryl