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Sample records for affiliated teaching hospitals

  1. Cost awareness among doctors in an Irish university-affiliated teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tiong, William H.C.; O'Shaughnessy, Michael; O'Sullivan, Sean T.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies in USA and Canada have found that physicians and physicians in training have a limited understanding of medical care costs. In this study, we set out to survey all grades of doctors in the surgical department, emergency department, and anaesthetic department in a university-affiliated, Irish teaching hospital. Open-ended questionnaires on cost of 25 routinely used items in the hospital were sent to each department. The aims of the study were to assess the present knowledge of cost among the various grades of doctors, and to evaluate the level of professional experience on cost awareness and their confidence in their estimates. We had an overall response rate of 56.8% with 68.5% of doctors admitted to have estimated more than 90% of their responses. Ninety three percent of doctors have no confidence in their estimates on cost of listed items. We found that the lack of cost awareness was universal among doctors of all grades (P = 0.236). The doctors in our study population showed a high level of inaccuracy on their estimates of cost of routinely used items with 84% of the items overestimated. Our results were discouraging and demonstrated that considerable educational activity will be necessary if doctors are to be more cost effective in meeting the national health care budget. PMID:24765391

  2. The relationship of centralization, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Nasirpour, Amir Ashkan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza; Moradi, Saied

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30). Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals Tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval). Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no significant

  3. Teaching Responsibility to Gang-Affiliated Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckle, Michael E.; Walsh, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching youths who affiliate with a gang can be a daunting task. Risk factors for gang membership often compound across life domains and affect pro-social connectedness, cause feelings of marginalization, and hinder life-skill development. Sports and physical activities that are structured within a positive youth-development framework provide an…

  4. Urban-rural hospital affiliations: assessing control, fit, and stakeholder issues strategically.

    PubMed

    Savage, G T; Blair, J D; Benson, M J; Hale, B

    1992-01-01

    Urban-rural hospital affiliations are an outgrowth of both the external pressures on rural hospitals to survive and the need for urban hospitals to maintain or increase their share of the tertiary referral market. This article discusses the significant role of stakeholders in these affiliations, develops a fourfold typology of urban-rural hospital affiliations based on the notions of organizational control and fit, suggests four generic strategies for forming affiliations, and analyzes four actual cases of affiliation.

  5. Changes in Admissions, Length of Stay, and Discharge Diagnoses at a Major University-Affiliated Teaching Hospital: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosevear, G. Craig; Gary, Nancy E.

    1989-01-01

    A study of changes in hospital care suggests that for medical students and residents to be exposed to the same case mix of clinical disorders seen in the hospital in 1980, they must have experience in the ambulatory setting. (Author/MSE)

  6. Hospital-affiliated and hospital-owned retail clinics: strategic opportunities and operational challenges.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer

    2010-01-01

    Retail clinics have experienced an exponential growth in the last few years. While the majority of retail clinics are freestanding, venture-backed companies affiliated with retail hosts, an increasing number of hospital systems have decided to develop their own retail clinics or partner with existing national companies. Using a stakeholder approach, the purpose of this article is to assess the strategic considerations behind these decisions and the operational challenges associated with them and to use the results to develop a questionnaire that can be applied in future research in a national sample of healthcare executives. We conducted eight in-depth interviews with administrative and clinical leaders in seven hospital systems across the United States that have or had a relationship with retail clinics in the last three years. Our findings show that the hospital systems' association with retail clinics involves two main models: an affiliation with retail chains that operate the clinics and ownership of the clinics with an arms-length relationship with the retail chain. Hospital systems are engaging in these relationships for several strategic reasons: to increase market share through enhanced referrals to physician offices and hospitals, to become closer to consumers, and to experiment with nontraditional ways of delivering health care. Operational challenges included physician resistance and skepticism, poor financial performance, people's perception of retail clinics, staffing issues, and the newness of the business model. Six out of eight respondents thought that hospital affiliation with/ownership of retail clinics is a trend that is here to stay, although many provided caveats and stipulations. Further research is needed to provide more evidence about this emerging way of healthcare delivery. PMID:21077582

  7. Affiliation and Its Benefits to the Hospital and Community.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    As a result of the Affordable Care Act, innovative strategies must be developed and initiated to work with the Affordable Care Act in order to diminish fragmentation of care delivery and thereby improve quality and reduce costs. It is imperative for health care organizations to explore options from mergers and acquisitions to affiliation agreements in order to prepare for business transformation. Since financial strength combined with independent governance and retention of cultural identity may be optimal, a legal transactional structure such as an affiliation is sometimes the best course of action for a health system. This article explores the affiliation process for health care organizations. PMID:27584895

  8. Independent versus system-affiliated hospitals: a comparative analysis of financial performance, cost, and productivity.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, G S; Brooke, P P

    1985-01-01

    This article analyzes differences in the financial performance, cost, and productivity between system-affiliated and independent hospitals. Data for the study were obtained from the 1981 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals for the State of Iowa and included 94 nonstate or nonfederal short-term hospitals without long-term care units. An interpretation of the results indicated that system-affiliated hospitals are more profitable, have better access to capital markets, are more effective price setters, and experience higher costs per case which are related to longer lengths of stay and less productive use of plant and equipment in generating revenues. PMID:4019214

  9. Information Technologies in Florida's Rural Hospitals: Does System Affiliation Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menachemi, Nir; Burke, Darrell; Clawson, Art; Brooks, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Context: The recent explosive growth of information technology in hospitals promises to improve hospital and patient outcomes. Financial barriers may cause rural hospitals to lag in adoption of information technology, however, formal studies that examine rural hospital adoption of information technology are lacking. Purpose: To determine the…

  10. Hospital affiliations, co-branding, and consumer impact.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Claypool, Joe O; Karpf, Michael; Britt, Jason; Birdwhistell, Mark; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Taylor, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Alliances, affiliations, and partnerships continue to grow as one way for health care organizations to better serve their customers and compete with other organizations and networks. These organizational relationships are often promoted through co-branding joint programs and services. A study of consumers was conducted and shows that these organizational relationships positively affect consumer future behavior and benefit the organizations involved. Most importantly, the benefits of these organizational relationships grow as familiarity and understanding of the "new" partner in the market increases.

  11. Hospital affiliations, co-branding, and consumer impact.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Claypool, Joe O; Karpf, Michael; Britt, Jason; Birdwhistell, Mark; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Taylor, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Alliances, affiliations, and partnerships continue to grow as one way for health care organizations to better serve their customers and compete with other organizations and networks. These organizational relationships are often promoted through co-branding joint programs and services. A study of consumers was conducted and shows that these organizational relationships positively affect consumer future behavior and benefit the organizations involved. Most importantly, the benefits of these organizational relationships grow as familiarity and understanding of the "new" partner in the market increases. PMID:24617723

  12. Capital Investment by Independent and System-Affiliated Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Nathan W; Smith, Dean G; Wheeler, John R C

    2015-01-01

    Capital expenditures are a critical part of hospitals' efforts to maintain quality of patient care and financial stability. Over the past 20 years, finding capital to fund these expenditures has become increasingly challenging for hospitals, particularly independent hospitals. Independent hospitals struggling to find ways to fund necessary capital investment are often advised that their best strategy is to join a multi-hospital system. There is scant empirical evidence to support the idea that system membership improves independent hospitals' ability to make capital expenditures. Using data from the American Hospital Association and Medicare Cost Reports, we use difference-in-difference methods to examine changes in capital expenditures for independent hospitals that joined multi-hospital systems between 1997 and 2008. We find that in the first 5 years after acquisition, capital expenditures increase by an average of almost $16,000 per bed annually, as compared with non-acquired hospitals. In later years, the difference in capital expenditure is smaller and not statistically significant. Our results do not suggest that increases in capital expenditures vary by asset age or the size of the acquiring system.

  13. Factors Contributing to the Variability of Direct Costs for Graduate Medical Education in Teaching Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boex, James R.

    1992-01-01

    A national survey of 69 teaching hospitals (principally affiliated community teaching hospitals) found much variation in direct graduate medical education pass-through costs, supported by Medicare. Analysis suggested variations may be a result of the faculty expenses component, economies of scale, and the contribution of volunteers. Tables and…

  14. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive program are required to identify... qualifying MA EPs or potentially qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive...) are not meaningful users of certified EHR technology. (b) Identification of qualifying MA EPs...

  15. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive program are required to identify... qualifying MA EPs or potentially qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive...) are not meaningful users of certified EHR technology. (b) Identification of qualifying MA EPs...

  16. Unplanned Readmissions after Hospitalization for Severe Sepsis at Academic Medical Center-Affiliated Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, John P.; Hohmann, Samuel F.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the United States (US), national efforts to reduce hospital readmissions have been enacted, including the application of substantial insurance reimbursement penalties for hospitals with elevated rates. Readmissions after severe sepsis remain under-studied and could possibly signify lapses in care and missed opportunities for intervention. We sought to characterize 7- and 30-day readmission rates following hospital admission for severe sepsis as well as institutional variations in readmission. DESIGN Retrospective analysis of 345,657 severe sepsis discharges from University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) hospitals in 2012. SETTING US PATIENTS We applied the commonly cited method described by Angus, et al. for identification of severe sepsis, including only discharges with sepsis present on admission. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS We identified unplanned, all-cause readmissions within 7- and 30-days of discharge using claims-based algorithms. Using mixed effects logistic regression, we determined factors associated with 30-day readmission. We used risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRRs) to assess institutional variations. Among 216,328 eligible severe sepsis discharges, there were 14,932 readmissions within 7 days (6.9%; 95% CI 6.8–7.0) and 43,092 within 30 days (19.9%; 95% CI 19.8–20.1). Among those readmitted within 30 days, 66.9% had an infection and 40.3% had severe sepsis on readmission. Patient severity, length of stay, and specific diagnoses were associated with increased odds of 30-day readmission. Observed institutional 7-day readmission rates ranged from 0–12.3%, 30-day rates from 3.6–29.1%, and 30-day RSRRs from 14.1–31.1%. Greater institutional volume, teaching status, trauma services, location in the Northeast and lower ICU rates were associated with poor RSRR performance. CONCLUSIONS Severe sepsis readmission places a substantial burden on the healthcare system, with one-in-fifteen and one-in-five severe sepsis discharges

  17. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions are common, expensive, and a key target of the Medicare Value Based Purchasing (VBP) program. Risk assessment tools have been developed to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission so they can be targeted for interventions aimed at reducing the rate of readmission. One such tool is the HOSPITAL score that uses seven readily available clinical variables to predict the risk of readmission within 30 days of discharge. The HOSPITAL score has been internationally validated in large academic medical centers. This study aims to determine if the HOSPITAL score is similarly useful in a moderate sized university affiliated hospital in the midwestern United States. Materials and Methods All adult medical patients discharged from the SIU-SOM Hospitalist service from Memorial Medical Center (MMC) from October 15, 2015 to March 16, 2016, were studied retrospectively to determine if the HOSPITAL score was a significant predictor of hospital readmission within 30 days. Results During the study period, 998 discharges were recorded for the hospitalist service. The analysis includes data for the 931 discharges. Patients who died during the hospital stay, were transferred to another hospital, or left against medical advice were excluded. Of these patients, 109 (12%) were readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days. The patients who were readmitted were more likely to have a length of stay greater than or equal to 5 days (55% vs. 41%, p = 0.005) and were more likely to have been admitted more than once to the hospital within the last year (100% vs. 49%, p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the HOSPITAL score for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.77 (95% CI [0.73–0.81]), indicating good discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the HOSPITAL score in this setting was 0.10, indicating good overall performance. The Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness of fit test shows a χ2 value of 1

  18. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions are common, expensive, and a key target of the Medicare Value Based Purchasing (VBP) program. Risk assessment tools have been developed to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission so they can be targeted for interventions aimed at reducing the rate of readmission. One such tool is the HOSPITAL score that uses seven readily available clinical variables to predict the risk of readmission within 30 days of discharge. The HOSPITAL score has been internationally validated in large academic medical centers. This study aims to determine if the HOSPITAL score is similarly useful in a moderate sized university affiliated hospital in the midwestern United States. Materials and Methods All adult medical patients discharged from the SIU-SOM Hospitalist service from Memorial Medical Center (MMC) from October 15, 2015 to March 16, 2016, were studied retrospectively to determine if the HOSPITAL score was a significant predictor of hospital readmission within 30 days. Results During the study period, 998 discharges were recorded for the hospitalist service. The analysis includes data for the 931 discharges. Patients who died during the hospital stay, were transferred to another hospital, or left against medical advice were excluded. Of these patients, 109 (12%) were readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days. The patients who were readmitted were more likely to have a length of stay greater than or equal to 5 days (55% vs. 41%, p = 0.005) and were more likely to have been admitted more than once to the hospital within the last year (100% vs. 49%, p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the HOSPITAL score for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.77 (95% CI [0.73–0.81]), indicating good discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the HOSPITAL score in this setting was 0.10, indicating good overall performance. The Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness of fit test shows a χ2 value of 1

  19. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. 495.204 Section 495.204 Public Health CENTERS FOR...-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. (a) General rule. A qualifying MA organization receives an incentive payment for its qualifying MA-EPs and its qualifying MA-eligible hospitals. The incentive...

  20. General Practice Teaching--Within the Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, M.

    1976-01-01

    A program of integrated teaching by consultants and general practitioners is described. The teaching took place in the hospitals used for the purpose by the Medical Faculty of the University of Birmingham. (Author)

  1. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. 495.202 Section 495.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Advantage (MA) Organizations § 495.202 Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA... in June 2011 (for plan year 2012), MA organizations seeking reimbursement for qualifying MA EPs...

  2. A growing opportunity: Community gardens affiliated with US hospitals and academic health centers

    PubMed Central

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Hanson, Ryan; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community gardens can reduce public health disparities through promoting physical activity and healthy eating, growing food for underserved populations, and accelerating healing from injury or disease. Despite their potential to contribute to comprehensive patient care, no prior studies have investigated the prevalence of community gardens affiliated with US healthcare institutions, and the demographic characteristics of communities served by these gardens. Methods In 2013, national community garden databases, scientific abstracts, and public search engines (e.g., Google Scholar) were used to identify gardens. Outcomes included the prevalence of hospital-based community gardens by US regions, and demographic characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, education, household income, and obesity rates) of communities served by gardens. Results There were 110 healthcare-based gardens, with 39 in the Midwest, 25 in the South, 24 in the Northeast, and 22 in the West. Compared to US population averages, communities served by healthcare-based gardens had similar demographic characteristics, but significantly lower rates of obesity (27% versus 34%, P < .001). Conclusions Healthcare-based gardens are located in regions that are demographically representative of the US population, and are associated with lower rates of obesity in communities they serve. PMID:25599017

  3. Rate of Medical Errors in Affiliated Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Ranjbar, Mansour; Siamian, Hasan; Azar, Masoud Shayeste; Asghari, Zolikah; Motamed, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Health care organizations are highly specialized and complex. Thus we may expect the adverse events will inevitably occur. Building a medical error reporting system to analyze the reported preventable adverse events and learn from their results can help to prevent the repeat of these events. The medical errors which were reported to the Clinical Governance’s office of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS) in years 2011-2012 were analyzed. Methods and Materials: This is a descriptive retrospective study in which 18 public hospitals were participated. The instrument of data collection was checklist that was designed by the Ministry of Health of Iran. Variables were type of hospital, unit of hospital, season, severity of event and type of error. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results: Of 317966 admissions 182 cases, about 0.06%, medical error reported of which most of the reports (%51.6) were from non- teaching hospitals. Among various units of hospital, the highest frequency of medical error was related to surgical unit (%42.3). The frequency of medical error according to the type of error was also evaluated of which the highest frequency was related to inappropriate and no care (totally 37%) and medication error 28%. We also analyzed the data with respect to the effect of the error on a patient of which the highest frequency was related to minor effect (44.5%). Conclusion: The results showed that a wide variety of errors. Encourage and revision of the reporting process will be result to know more data for prevention of them. PMID:25870528

  4. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation.

    PubMed

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Because faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the prerequisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care. PMID:26200577

  5. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation.

    PubMed

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Because faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the prerequisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care.

  6. Moral Distress in Physicians Practicing in Hospitals Affiliated to Medical Sciences Universities

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Mahmoud; Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Kiani, Mehrzad; Borhani, Fariba; Bazmi, Shabnam; Nazari Tavaokkoli, Saeid; Rasouli, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Researchers have regarded moral distress as a major concern in the health care system. Symptoms associated with moral distress may manifest as frustration, dissatisfaction, and anxiety and may lead to burnout, job leaving, and finally, failure to provide safe and competent care to patients. Proper management of this phenomenon can be fulfilled through study of its causes at different levels of health services and taking necessary measures to solve them. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the status of moral distress in physicians practicing in hospitals affiliated to Medical Sciences Universities in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out using the Standard Hamric Scale to collect data after modification and evaluation of its reliability and validity. A total of 399 physicians responded to the scale. Data analysis was performed using descriptive and correlation statistics with respect to the variables. Results: Results showed that the frequency of moral distress of physicians was 1.24 ± 0.63 and the intensity of moral distress and composite score of moral distress were 2.14 ± 0.80 and 2.94 ± 2.38, respectively. A significant negative correlation existed between age and frequency and composite score (r = -0.15, P < 0.01 and r = -0.16, P < 0.01, respectively) as well as years of experience and composite score (r = -0.11, P = 0.04). Moral distress composite score in adults specialists was higher than pediatricians (P = 0.002), but lower in physicians participated in medical ethics training courses compared to those not participated. Conclusions: Physicians may encounter moral distress during their practice; therefore, the common causes of distress should be identified in order to prevent its occurrence. PMID:25558387

  7. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  8. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction.

  9. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  10. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... purpose than to compute the amount of EHR incentive payment due the MA organization. (c) Amount payable to... compute payments for qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital... used under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital incentive program in § 495.104 of this part in...

  11. Survey and analysis of the current state of residency training in medical-school-affiliated hospitals in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since the global standards for postgraduate medical education (PGME) were published in January 2003, they have gained worldwide attention. The current state of residency training programs in medical-school-affiliated hospitals throughout China was assessed in this study. Methods Based on the internationally recognized global standards for PGME, residents undergoing residency training at that time and the relevant residency training instructors and management personnel from 15 medical-school-affiliated hospitals throughout China were recruited and surveyed regarding the current state of residency training programs. A total of 938 questionnaire surveys were distributed between June 30, 2006 and July 30, 2006; of 892 surveys collected, 841 were valid. Results For six items, the total proportions of “basically meets standards” and “completely meets standards” were <70% for the basic standards. These items were identified in the fields of “training settings and educational resources”, “evaluation of training process”, and “trainees”. In all fields other than “continuous updates”, the average scores of the western regions were significantly lower than those of the eastern regions for both the basic and target standards. Specifically, the average scores for the basic standards on as many as 25 of the 38 items in the nine fields were significantly lower in the western regions. There were significant differences in the basic standards scores on 13 of the 38 items among trainees, instructors, and managers. Conclusions The residency training programs have achieved satisfactory outcomes in the hospitals affiliated with various medical schools in China. However, overall, the programs remain inadequate in certain areas. For the governments, organizations, and institutions responsible for PGME, such global standards for PGME are a very useful self-assessment tool and can help identify problems, promote reform, and ultimately standardize PGME

  12. Projecting a Teaching Hospital's Future Utilization: A Dynamic Simulation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Gary B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A "system dynamics" model was developed by the University of Vermont's Division of Health Sciences and the Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, the division's affiliated hospital, to anticipate the hospital's utilization by patients in order to plan for future medical students and house staff. The model has proven a useful planning tool because of…

  13. Pharmacy Information Systems in Teaching Hospitals: A Multi-dimensional Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Alireza; Moghaddasi, Hamid; Deimazar, Ghasem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In hospitals, the pharmacy information system (PIS) is usually a sub-system of the hospital information system (HIS). The PIS supports the distribution and management of drugs, shows drug and medical device inventory, and facilitates preparing needed reports. In this study, pharmacy information systems implemented in general teaching hospitals affiliated to medical universities in Tehran (Iran) were evaluated using a multi-dimensional tool. Methods This was an evaluation study conducted in 2015. To collect data, a checklist was developed by reviewing the relevant literature; this checklist included both general and specific criteria to evaluate pharmacy information systems. The checklist was then validated by medical informatics experts and pharmacists. The sample of the study included five PIS in general-teaching hospitals affiliated to three medical universities in Tehran (Iran). Data were collected using the checklist and through observing the systems. The findings were presented as tables. Results Five PIS were evaluated in the five general-teaching hospitals that had the highest bed numbers. The findings showed that the evaluated pharmacy information systems lacked some important general and specific criteria. Among the general evaluation criteria, it was found that only two of the PIS studied were capable of restricting repeated attempts made for unauthorized access to the systems. With respect to the specific evaluation criteria, no attention was paid to the patient safety aspect. Conclusions The PIS studied were mainly designed to support financial tasks; little attention was paid to clinical and patient safety features. PMID:27525164

  14. A Study of the Relationship Between Nurses’ Professional Self-Concept and Professional Ethics in Hospitals Affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Parandavar, Nehleh; Rahmanian, Afifeh; Jahromi, Zohreh Badiyepeymaie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Commitment to ethics usually results in nurses’ better professional performance and advancement. Professional self-concept of nurses refers to their information and beliefs about their roles, values, and behaviors. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between nurses’ professional self-concept and professional ethics in hospitals affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross sectional-analytical study was conducted in 2014. The 270 participants were practicing nurses and head-nurses at the teaching hospitals of Peimanieh and Motahari in Jahrom University of Medical Science. Sampling was based on sencus method. Data was collected using Cowin's Nurses’ self-concept questionnaire (NSCQ) and the researcher-made questionnaire of professional ethics. Results: The average of the sample's professional self-concept score was 6.48±0.03 out of 8. The average of the sample's commitment to professional ethics score was 4.08±0.08 out of 5. Based on Pearson's correlation test, there is a significant relationship between professional ethics and professional self-concept (P=0.01, r=0.16). Conclusion: In view of the correlation between professional self-concept and professional ethics, it is recommended that nurses’ self-concept, which can boost their commitment to ethics, be given more consideration. PMID:26573035

  15. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. Results: No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Conclusion: Based on the students’ perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered. PMID:27683645

  16. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. Results: No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Conclusion: Based on the students’ perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered.

  17. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. 495.204 Section 495.204 Public Health CENTERS FOR... Medicare Advantage (MA) Organizations § 495.204 Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for...

  18. Rediscovering university teaching hospitals for Australia.

    PubMed

    Penington, David G

    2008-09-15

    Partnership between research and health services has a long history in other countries, but has been relatively recent in Australia, with several models arising in the 1960s and 1970s as research-based specialties developed. Since the implementation of Medibank, which became Medicare, Australian Health Care Agreements have been primarily crafted on the basis of transactional numbers, ignoring the need for links with teaching and research and the need to implement new developments. Education and research have been seen as the responsibility of the federal government, and hospitals are progressively less recognised or funded for these functions by the states. Australia's teaching hospitals are in danger of falling seriously behind those in other countries and losing their capacity to monitor quality, to innovate and to branch into new strategies in partnership with primary care services. We should look at initiatives in other countries such as the United Kingdom and Canada, which are making big strides in tackling similar issues. University hospitals hold the key, if appropriately linked with other services. The current Australian Health Care Agreements are on hold. A new agency is needed to support clinical and service-related research, with a new structure and track for federal government funding, and providing oversight of research and development, of clinical governance and quality of outcomes in health care, linked with new strategies for prevention and treatment. A component of the foreshadowed additional federal government funding for health should be sequestered to set up such an agency. PMID:18803539

  19. Urban Problems: Social Security and the Teaching Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallez, Gabriel

    1973-01-01

    Social security can stifle the teaching hospital's development through increasing expenses and budgetary considerations. These problems are discussed in relation to the hospital organization and university structure in Paris, France. (Author/PG)

  20. Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay: comparing teaching and non-teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd T

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify variables of Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay, compare the phenomena of interest in teaching and non-teaching hospitals, and correlate the two concepts of nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay. A convenience sample of 433 nurses was obtained from three teaching hospitals and two non-teaching hospitals. Nurses were "neither satisfied nor dissatisfied" and were "neutral" in reporting their intent to stay at their current jobs. Nurses who were working in non-teaching hospitals reported higher job satisfaction and intent to stay rates than those working in teaching hospitals. Nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay were at the borderlines, which require the immediate attention of nursing and hospital administrators. Nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay, particularly in teaching hospitals, have to be promoted; thus, interventions have to be effectively initiated and maintained at the unit and organizational levels. PMID:17540315

  1. Variations in Implementation of Acute Care Surgery: Results from a national survey of university-affiliated hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Santry, Heena P.; Madore, John C.; Collins, Courtney E.; Ayturk, M. Didem; Velmahos, George C.; Britt, LD; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To date, no studies have reported nationwide adoption of Acute Care Surgery (ACS) or identified structural and/or process variations for the care of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients within such models. METHODS We surveyed surgeons responsible for EGS coverage at University HealthSystems Consortium hospitals using an 8-page postal/email questionnaire querying respondents on hospital and EGS structure/process measures. Survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, univariate comparisons, and multivariable regression models. RESULTS 258 of 319 (81%) potential respondents completed surveys. 81 hospitals (31%) had implemented ACS while 134 (52%) had a traditional general surgeon on-call model (GSOC). 38 (15%) hospitals had another model (HYBRID). Larger bed, university-based, teaching hospitals with Level 1 trauma center verification status located in urban areas were more likely to have adopted ACS. In multivariable modeling, hospital type, setting, and trauma center verification predicted ACS implementation. EGS processes of care varied with 28% GSOC having block time vs 67% ACS (p<0.0001); 45% GSOC providing ICU care to EGS patients in a surgical/trauma ICU vs 93% ACS (p<0.0001); GSOC sharing call among 5.7 (+/− 3.2) surgeons vs 7.9 (+/−2.3) ACS surgeons (p<0.0001); and 13% GSOC taking in-house EGS call vs 75% ACS (p<0.0001). Among ACS hospitals there were variations in patient cohorting (25% EGS patients alone; 21% EGS+trauma; 17% EGS+elective; 30% EGS+trauma+elective), data collection (26% had prospective EGS registries), and patient handoffs (56% had attending surgeon presence), call responsibilities (averaging 4.8 (+/− 1.3) calls per month with 60% providing extra call stipend and 40% with no post-call clinical duties). CONCLUSION The potential of the ACS on the national crisis in access to EGS care is not fully met. Variations in EGS processes of care among adopters of ACS suggest that standardized criteria for ACS

  2. Technical efficiency of teaching hospitals in Iran: the use of Stochastic Frontier Analysis, 1999–2011

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Reza; Pourreza, Abolghasem; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Askari, Roohollah; Mahdavi, Mahdi; Moghri, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hospitals are highly resource-dependent settings, which spend a large proportion of healthcare financial resources. The analysis of hospital efficiency can provide insight into how scarce resources are used to create health values. This study examines the Technical Efficiency (TE) of 12 teaching hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) between 1999 and 2011. Methods: The Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) method was applied to estimate the efficiency of TUMS hospitals. A best function, referred to as output and input parameters, was calculated for the hospitals. Number of medical doctors, nurses, and other personnel, active beds, and outpatient admissions were considered as the input variables and number of inpatient admissions as an output variable. Results: The mean level of TE was 59% (ranging from 22 to 81%). During the study period the efficiency increased from 61 to 71%. Outpatient admission, other personnel and medical doctors significantly and positively affected the production (P< 0.05). Concerning the Constant Return to Scale (CRS), an optimal production scale was found, implying that the productions of the hospitals were approximately constant. Conclusion: Findings of this study show a remarkable waste of resources in the TUMS hospital during the decade considered. This warrants policy-makers and top management in TUMS to consider steps to improve the financial management of the university hospitals. PMID:25114947

  3. Hospital management principles applicable to the veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Harris, Donna L; Lloyd, James W; Marrinan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The Skills, Knowledge, Aptitude, and Attitude (SKA) Subcommittee of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI) has identified the need for veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) to be at the forefront of progressive business management to serve as a model for both students and practitioners to emulate. To provide a foundation for developing a model, this study reviewed pertinent literature applicable to the management of a VTH. Much of the literature relevant to VTH management relates to work completed for the human side of medicine (academic health centers, or AHCs) or to the private sector. This review explores management practices in strategic planning, financial management, human resource management, marketing, pricing, operations, and legal issues. It is concluded that strategic management is important to provide the foundation for success in the VTH. In addition, periodic financial reports are recommended, as are the development and use of benchmarks for financial management. Establishing positive, motivating human resource practices is also suggested, along with development of a marketing plan based on a clear understanding of VTH core competencies and the market's specific needs. PMID:15510343

  4. Planned Parenthood services in teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    1973-06-01

    As a contribution to the continuing discussion stimulated by the WHO Study Group on education and training for family planning in health services (December 1971, Geneva), the Regional Medical Executive Committee of IPPF commissioned articles on planned parenthood services and training in the university hospital context in both Austria and Belgium. In Vienna, Graz, and Innsbruck medical students receive regular instruction in the physiology and pathology of reproduction and contraceptive methods. Training in methods of fertility regulation is integrated into the gynecology curriculum in both lectures and group discussion. Planned parenthood and social medicine are at present not essential examination subjects. In obligatory practical work in gynecology clinics there are only 2 periods of 6 days in which the student can obtain only a very superficial picture of gynecology and obstetrics. If a qualified physician remains in a university clinic to specialize in these fields, instruction includes complete training in family planning with the possibility of comprehensive practical experience. In Belgium the introduction of planned parenthood into departmental policy and the attainment of national uniformity in thinking and application are recent, due mainly to the coincidence the present chairmen of most departments of obstetrics and gynecology regard planned parenthood as socially indispensable. It is imperative that the education and training of both providers and users be not limited to technical knowledge but expanded to include the all- important psychological, socioeconomic, and health aspects and implications of sexuality. The theory and practice of family planning must be transmitted to the mediical profession, the paramedical professions, and such nonmedical professions as pharmacy. It is noted that the most important new accomplishments of the teaching hospitals lie in the provision of planned parenthood service.

  5. Geriatric assessment unit in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, D.; Christ, L. W.; Stalder, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A geriatric assessment unit has been in operation in a Canadian teaching hospital since October 1979. In the first 15 months of operation there were 203 admissions involving 153 persons aged 65 years or older, many of whom were impaired both physically and mentally.In many cases these patients could be discharged back to the community following assessment and rehabilitation. Only a few had to be placed immediately in extended care facilities. The mean stay in the unit was less than 3 weeks. There was a mortality of 3% among patients in the unit. For older persons who present with complex health problems a geriatric assessment unit provides an environment for comprehensive assessment, treatment and rehabilitation. A thorough assessment at, or preferably before, the point at which their health breaks down enables older people to return to and remain in the community and helps to prevent them from being admitted to an institution while they are still able to function with reasonable independence. PMID:7074507

  6. Perspective of midwives working at hospitals affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences regarding medical errors

    PubMed Central

    Valiani, Mahboubeh; Majidi, Jamileh; Beigi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Committing an error is part of the human nature. No health care provider, despite the mastery of their skills, is immune from committing it. Medical error in the labor and obstetrics wards as well as other health units is inevitable and reduces the quality of health care, leading to accident. Sometimes these events, like the death of mother, fetus, and newborn, would be beyond repair. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspective of gynecological ward providers about medical errors. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive–analytical study. Sample size was 94 participants selected using census sampling. The study population included all midwives of four hospitals (Al-Zahra, Beheshti, Isa Ben Maryam, and Amin). Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: This study shows that three factors (human, structural, and managerial) have affected medical errors in the labor and obstetrics wards. From the midwifery perspective, human factors were the most important factors with an average score of 73.26% and the lowest score was related to structural factors with an average score of 65.36%. Intervention strategies to reduce errors, service training program tailored to the needs of the service provider, distribution of the tasks at different levels, and attempts to reform the system instead of punishing the wrongdoer were set in priority list. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study on the perspectives of participants, among the three factors of medical errors (human factors, structural factors, and management factors), human factors are the biggest threat in committing medical errors. Modification in the pattern of teaching by the midwifery professors and their presence in the hospitals, creating a no-blame culture, and sharing of alerts in medical errors are among appropriate actions in the dimensions of human, structural, and managerial factors. PMID:26457089

  7. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. Results: The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Conclusion: Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals. PMID:26478878

  8. The facilitating factors and barriers encountered in the adoption of a humanized birth care approach in a highly specialized university affiliated hospital

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Considering the fact that a significant proportion of high-risk pregnancies are currently referred to tertiary level hospitals; and that a large proportion of low obstetric risk women still seek care in these hospitals, it is important to explore the factors that influence the childbirth experience in these hospitals, particularly, the concept of humanized birth care. The aim of this study was to explore the organizational and cultural factors, which act as barriers or facilitators in the provision of humanized obstetrical care in a highly specialized, university-affiliated hospital in Quebec province, in Canada. Methods A single case study design was chosen. The study sample included 17 professionals and administrators from different disciplines, and 157 women who gave birth in the hospital during the study. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews, field notes, participant observations, a self-administered questionnaire, documents, and archives. Both descriptive and qualitative deductive content analyses were performed and ethical considerations were respected. Results Both external and internal dimensions of a highly specialized hospital can facilitate or be a barrier to the humanization of birth care practices in such institutions, whether independently, or altogether. The greatest facilitating factors found were: caring and family- centered model of care, professionals' and administrators' ambient for the provision of humanized birth care besides the medical interventional care which is tailored to improve safety, assurance, and comfort for women and their children, facilities to provide a pain-free birth, companionship and visiting rules, dealing with the patients' spiritual and religious beliefs. The most cited barriers were: the shortage of health care professionals, the lack of sufficient communication among the professionals, the stakeholders' desire for specialization rather than humanization, over estimation of medical

  9. 42 CFR 415.190 - Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching hospitals. 415.190 Section 415.190 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... in Teaching Settings § 415.190 Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals. (a... schedule basis for the services of an assistant at surgery in a teaching hospital. This section is based...

  10. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  11. Impact of teaching intensity and academic status on medical resource utilization by teaching hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2012-11-01

    Teaching hospitals require excess medical resources to maintain high-quality care and medical education. To evaluate the appropriateness of such surplus costs, we examined the impact of teaching intensity defined as activities for postgraduate training, and academic status as functions of medical research and undergraduate teaching on medical resource utilization. Administrative data for 47,397 discharges from 40 academic and 12 non-academic teaching hospitals in Japan were collected. Hospitals were classified into three groups according to intern/resident-to-bed (IRB) ratio. Resource utilization of medical services was estimated using fee-for-service charge schedules and normalized with case mix grouping. 15-24% more resource utilization for laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications were observed in hospitals with higher IRB ratios. With multivariate adjustment for case mix and academic status, higher IRB ratios were associated with 10-15% more use of radiological imaging, injections, and medications; up to 5% shorter hospital stays; and not with total resource utilization. Conversely, academic status was associated with 21-33% more laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications; 13% longer hospital stays; and 10% more total resource utilization. While differences in medical resource utilization by teaching intensity may not be associated with indirect educational costs, those by academic status may be. Therefore, academic hospitals may need efficiency improvement and financial compensation.

  12. [Teaching and research in high specialty hospitals].

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Education and research are strategic activities leading to development and progress of a hospital, so planning on this matter is fundamental, both in terms of structure and infrastructure. Investment on faculty development and on researchers should be considered beyond the short term. Education should respond to the necessities and research to health priorities through formal agreements with universities and institutes.

  13. Dealing with the complex dynamics of teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Tiuri R; Scheele, Fedde; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Sluiter, Henk E; Heyligers, Ide C

    2016-04-05

    Innovation and change in postgraduate medical education programs affects teaching hospital organizations, since medical education and clinical service are interrelated.Recent trends towards flexible, time-independent and individualized educational programs put pressure on this relationship. This pressure may lead to organizational uncertainty, unbalance and friction making it an important issue to analyze.The last decade was marked by a transition towards outcome-based postgraduate medical education. During this transition competency-based programs made their appearance. Although competency-based medical education has the potential to make medical education more efficient, the effects are still under debate. And while this debate continues, the field of medical education is already introducing next level innovations: flexible and individualized training programs. Major organizational change, like the transition to flexible education programs, can easily lead to friction and conflict in teaching hospital organizations.This article analyses the organizational impact of postgraduate medical education innovations, with a particular focus on flexible training and competency based medical education. The characteristics of teaching hospital organizations are compared with elements of innovation and complexity theory.With this comparison the article argues that teaching hospital organizations have complex characteristics and behave in a non-linear way. This perspective forms the basis for further discussion and analysis of this unexplored aspect of flexible and competency based education.

  14. Dealing with the complex dynamics of teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Tiuri R; Scheele, Fedde; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Sluiter, Henk E; Heyligers, Ide C

    2016-01-01

    Innovation and change in postgraduate medical education programs affects teaching hospital organizations, since medical education and clinical service are interrelated.Recent trends towards flexible, time-independent and individualized educational programs put pressure on this relationship. This pressure may lead to organizational uncertainty, unbalance and friction making it an important issue to analyze.The last decade was marked by a transition towards outcome-based postgraduate medical education. During this transition competency-based programs made their appearance. Although competency-based medical education has the potential to make medical education more efficient, the effects are still under debate. And while this debate continues, the field of medical education is already introducing next level innovations: flexible and individualized training programs. Major organizational change, like the transition to flexible education programs, can easily lead to friction and conflict in teaching hospital organizations.This article analyses the organizational impact of postgraduate medical education innovations, with a particular focus on flexible training and competency based medical education. The characteristics of teaching hospital organizations are compared with elements of innovation and complexity theory.With this comparison the article argues that teaching hospital organizations have complex characteristics and behave in a non-linear way. This perspective forms the basis for further discussion and analysis of this unexplored aspect of flexible and competency based education. PMID:27048264

  15. Innovative Model for Information Assurance Curriculum: A Teaching Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goel, Sanjay; Pon, Damira; Bloniarz, Peter; Bangert-Drowns, Robert; Berg, George; Delio, Vince; Iwan, Laura; Hurbanek, Thomas; Schuman, Sandoor P.; Gangolly, Jagdish; Baykal, Adnan; Hobbs, Jon

    2006-01-01

    A novel idea for information security education created by the New York State Center for Information Forensics and Assurance (CIFA) is presented. This new approach incorporates a teaching hospital model originally developed for medical training. In this model, information security problems from industry and government are solved and abstracted…

  16. Assessing Governance Alternatives for University-Owned Public Teaching Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Evangeline L.

    The governance options matrix is provided to offer a way for state and university policymakers to examine the functioning environments of specific university-owned public teaching hospitals. With it, they can consider the benefits and problems involved with different options for governance. The issues related to the environmental factors affecting…

  17. Responsibly managing the medical school--teaching hospital power relationship.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2005-07-01

    The relationship between medical schools and their teaching hospitals involves a complex and variable mixture of monopoly and monopsony power, which has not been previously been ethically analyzed. As a consequence, there is currently no ethical framework to guide leaders of both institutions in the responsible management of this complex power relationship. The authors define these two forms of power and, using economic concepts, analyze the nature of such power in the medical school-teaching hospital relationship, emphasizing the potential for exploitation. Using concepts from both business ethics and medical ethics, the authors analyze the nature of transparency and co-fiduciary responsibility in this relationship. On the basis of both rational self-interest, drawn from business ethics, and co-fiduciary responsibility, drawn from medical ethics, they argue for the centrality of transparency in the medical school-teaching hospital relationship. Understanding the ethics of monopoly and monopsony power is essential for the responsible management of the complex relationship between medical schools and their teaching hospitals and can assist the leadership of academic health centers in carrying out one of their major responsibilities: to prevent the exploitation of monopoly power and monopsony power in this relationship.

  18. Financial Pressures Prompt Teaching Hospitals to Cut Costs, Raising Fears about Medical Education and Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassmuck, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Financial pressures are forcing the closure of some teaching hospitals and retrenchment using such strategies as development of ambulatory care and satellite facilities, merging with or acquiring other hospitals, and shortening patient hospital stays. A table lists revenues and profit margins for the 20 largest university-owned teaching hospitals.…

  19. Changing trend of antimicrobial resistance among pathogens isolated from lower respiratory tract at a university-affiliated hospital of China, 2006-2010

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenying; Chen, Yi; Mei, Yaning; Wang, Tong; Liu, Genyan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution and the antimicrobial resistance of pathogens in lower respiratory tract infection from 2006 to 2010. Methods The sputum specimens from inpatients with lower respiratory tract infection in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University during the past five years were cultured and identified; the antimicrobial resistance was analyzed by the software WHONET 5.4. Results A total of 12,191 isolates were characterized in sputum samples: 73.5% were Gram-negative bacteria, 13.7% were Gram-positive bacteria, and 12.8% were fungi. The isolation rate of Acinetobacter was significantly increasing from 12.8% in 2006 to 26.4% in 2010. The Gram-negative bacterial resistance rate to the second and third generation cephalosporin increased year by year. Decreasing trend, 78.7% in 2006 decreased to 63.5% in 2010 (R2=0.93 and P<0.01), in resistance to clindamycin against Staphylococcus aureus was observed. Worth noting is the drug resistance of Acinetobacter and Klebsiella pneumoniae to carbapenem significantly increased (R2>0.3 and P≤0.05). Conclusions The antimicrobial resistance of pathogens in lower respiratory tract infection increased in recent years. The hospitals and government departments should strengthen management of the use of some antibiotics, such as the second/third generation cephalosporin and carbapenem, in order to enhance the effectiveness of medication. PMID:22754667

  20. A film program in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Meiboom, E

    1973-10-01

    The Martland Hospital Medical Library has for more than a year been conducting a 16mm film program for interns, residents, attending physicians, and nurses as an adjunct to continuing education. It was possible to run this project on a minimal budget because many films are available at little or no cost from governmental agencies, pharmaceutical companies, medical associations, and universities. The program is run on a departmental basis. Films for a department are selected by the chief resident in that department from a list which the librarian has prepared of available films in the specialty involved. The library orders and publicizes the films and transacts all business in connection with them. Films pertinent to clinical practice are preferred. The administration of this program is described in this paper, and a number of film catalogs are evaluated. Criteria for film selection are discussed.

  1. A Film Program in a Teaching Hospital *

    PubMed Central

    Meiboom, Esther

    1973-01-01

    The Martland Hospital Medical Library has for more than a year been conducting a 16mm film program for interns, residents, attending physicians, and nurses as an adjunct to continuing education. It was possible to run this project on a minimal budget because many films are available at little or no cost from governmental agencies, pharmaceutical companies, medical associations, and universities. The program is run on a departmental basis. Films for a department are selected by the chief resident in that department from a list which the librarian has prepared of available films in the specialty involved. The library orders and publicizes the films and transacts all business in connection with them. Films pertinent to clinical practice are preferred. The administration of this program is described in this paper, and a number of film catalogs are evaluated. Criteria for film selection are discussed. PMID:4800293

  2. Teaching and hospital production: the use of regression estimates.

    PubMed

    Lehner, L A; Burgess, J F

    1995-01-01

    Medicare's Prospective Payment System pays U.S. teaching hospitals for the indirect costs of medical education based on a regression coefficient in a cost function. In regression studies using health care data, it is common for explanatory variables to be measured imperfectly, yet the potential for measurement error is often ignored. In this paper, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs data is used to examine issues of health care production estimation and the use of regression estimates like the teaching adjustment factor. The findings show that measurement error and persistent multicollinearity confound attempts to have a large degree of confidence in the precise magnitude of parameter estimates.

  3. Point prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in two teaching hospitals of Amhara region in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Yallew, Walelegn Worku; Kumie, Abera; Yehuala, Feleke Moges

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hospital-acquired infection (HAI) is a major safety issue affecting the quality of care of hundreds of millions of patients every year, in both developed and developing countries, including Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, there is no comprehensive research that presents the whole picture of HAIs in hospitals. The objective of this study was to examine the nature and extent of HAIs in Ethiopia. Methods A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted in two teaching hospitals. All eligible inpatients admitted for at least 48 hours on the day of the survey were included. The survey was conducted in dry and wet seasons of Ethiopia, that is, in March to April and July 2015. Physicians and nurses collected the data according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of HAIs. Coded and cleaned data were transferred to SPSS 21 and STATA 13 for analysis. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the prevalence of HAIs and relationship between explanatory and outcome variables. Results A total of 908 patients were included in this survey, the median age of the patients was 27 years (interquartile range: 16–40 years). A total of 650 (71.6%) patients received antimicrobials during the survey. There were 135 patients with HAI, with a mean prevalence of 14.9% (95% confidence interval 12.7–17.1). Culture results showed that Klebsiella spp. (22.44%) and Staphylococcus aureus (20.4%) were the most commonly isolated HAI-causing pathogens in these hospitals. The association of patient age and hospital type with the occurrence of HAI was statistically significant. Conclusion It was observed that the prevalence of HAI was high in the teaching hospitals. Surgical site infections and pneumonia were the most common types of HAIs. Hospital management should give more attention to promoting infection prevention practice for better control of HAIs in teaching hospitals.

  4. Point prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in two teaching hospitals of Amhara region in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Yallew, Walelegn Worku; Kumie, Abera; Yehuala, Feleke Moges

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hospital-acquired infection (HAI) is a major safety issue affecting the quality of care of hundreds of millions of patients every year, in both developed and developing countries, including Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, there is no comprehensive research that presents the whole picture of HAIs in hospitals. The objective of this study was to examine the nature and extent of HAIs in Ethiopia. Methods A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted in two teaching hospitals. All eligible inpatients admitted for at least 48 hours on the day of the survey were included. The survey was conducted in dry and wet seasons of Ethiopia, that is, in March to April and July 2015. Physicians and nurses collected the data according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of HAIs. Coded and cleaned data were transferred to SPSS 21 and STATA 13 for analysis. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the prevalence of HAIs and relationship between explanatory and outcome variables. Results A total of 908 patients were included in this survey, the median age of the patients was 27 years (interquartile range: 16–40 years). A total of 650 (71.6%) patients received antimicrobials during the survey. There were 135 patients with HAI, with a mean prevalence of 14.9% (95% confidence interval 12.7–17.1). Culture results showed that Klebsiella spp. (22.44%) and Staphylococcus aureus (20.4%) were the most commonly isolated HAI-causing pathogens in these hospitals. The association of patient age and hospital type with the occurrence of HAI was statistically significant. Conclusion It was observed that the prevalence of HAI was high in the teaching hospitals. Surgical site infections and pneumonia were the most common types of HAIs. Hospital management should give more attention to promoting infection prevention practice for better control of HAIs in teaching hospitals. PMID:27601932

  5. An investigation on occupational stress of the operating room staffs in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and its association with some factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Soheila; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress is a nonspecific reaction to everything the body needs. Although occupational stress exists in every occupation, it is seen with more frequency and intensity amongst those occupations related to human health. In this study, we aimed to investigate the level of occupational stress in operating room staffs working in the hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and its association with some factors. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive co-relational study conducted in summer 2010. The population studied comprised 100 OP staffs working in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The data were collected by a questionnaire including two sections of personal information and Toft-Anderson Standard occupational stress inventory. The first section contained 13 questions and the second included 34 questions on stressful factors, measured through Likert's scale in which the scores of 0-33 indicated mild stress, 34-66 indicated moderate stress, and 67-100 indicated acute stress. The data were analyzed through SPSS. The statistical tests of Pearson correlation, variance analysis, and independent t-test were employed to analyze the data (P < 0 0.05 was considered significant). Results: Based on the findings, mean score of staffs’ stress (out of 100) was 32.3 (12.9) and was in the range of 1-65. The highest frequencies were for mild stress (57.4%) and moderate stress (42.6). In addition, mean score of stress was not the same in different domains. There was a significant inverse association between the score of stress and monthly working hours (r = -0.21, P = 0.049). Mean score of stress was 28.1 (12.3) among those with average income and 33.8 (12.8) for the low-income subjects, showing a significant difference (P = 0.048). Discussion and Conclusion: The present study showed that most of the subjects suffer from mild stress. Since the highest level of stress was for work overload, it is suggested to reduce

  6. Teaching and Research Nexuses across Faculty Career Stage, Ability and Affiliated Discipline in a South Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jung Cheol

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between teaching and research is a controversial issue in higher education research. Many empirical studies have reported a near zero relationship although academics believe that teaching and research are related in diverse ways. This study focused on how the relationship differs by faculty characteristics (career stage and their…

  7. Factors affecting the informal payments in public and teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Aboutorabi, Ali; Ghiasipour, Maryam; Rezapour, Aziz; Pourreza, Abolghasem; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Tanoomand, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Informal payments in the health sector of many developing countries are considered as a major impediment to health care reforms. Informal payments are a form of systemic fraud and have adverse effects on the performance of the health system. In this study, the frequency and extent of informal payments as well as the determinants of these payments were investigated in general hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 300 discharged patients were selected using multi-stage random sampling method. First, three hospitals were selected randomly; then, through a simple random sampling, we recruited 300 discharged patients from internal, surgery, emergency, ICU & CCU wards. All data were collected by structured telephone interviews and questionnaire. We analyzed data using Chi- square, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The results indicated that 21% (n=63) of individuals paid informally to the staff. About 4% (n=12) of the participants were faced with informal payment requests from hospital staff. There was a significant relationship between frequency of informal payments with marital status of participants and type of hospitals. According to our findings, none of the respondents had informal payments to physicians. The most frequent informal payments were in cash and were made to the hospitals’ housekeeping staff to ensure more and better services. There was no significant relationship between the informal payments with socio-demographic characteristics, residential area and insurance status. Conclusion: Our findings revealed that many strategies can be used for both controlling and reducing informal payments. These include training patients and hospitals’ staff, increasing income levels of employees, improving the quantity and quality of health services and changing the entrenched beliefs that necessitate informal payments. PMID:27390685

  8. Teaching hospital performance: towards a community of shared values?

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marianna; Cardamone, Emma; Cavallaro, Giusy; Minvielle, Etienne; Rania, Francesco; Sicotte, Claude; Trotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the performance dimensions of Italian teaching hospitals (THs) by considering the multiple constituent model approach, using measures that are subjective and based on individual ideals and preferences. Our research replicates a study of a French TH and deepens it by adjusting it to the context of an Italian TH. The purposes of this research were as follows: to identify emerging views on the performance of teaching hospitals and to analyze how these views vary among hospital stakeholders. We conducted an in-depth case study of a TH using a quantitative survey method. The survey uses a questionnaire based on Parsons' social system action theory, which embraces the major models of organizational performance and covers three groups of internal stakeholders: physicians, caregivers and administrative staff. The questionnaires were distributed between April and September 2011. The results confirm that hospital performance is multifaceted and includes the dimensions of efficiency, effectiveness and quality of care, as well as organizational and human features. There is a high degree of consensus among all observed stakeholder groups about these values, and a shared view of performance is emerging. Our research provides useful information for defining management priorities to improve the performance of THs. PMID:24560230

  9. Transfusion monitoring: care practice analysis in a public teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Valesca Nunes; Paixão, Isabella Bertolin; Perrone, Ana Carolina Amaral de São José; Monteiro, Maria Inês; dos Santos, Kelli Borges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the process of recording transfusion monitoring at a public teaching hospital. Methods A descriptive and retrospective study with a quantitative approach, analyzing the instruments to record transfusion monitoring at a public hospital in a city in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). Data were collected on the correct completion of the instrument, time elapsed from transfusions, records of vital signs, type of blood component more frequently transfused, and hospital unit where transfusion was performed. Results A total of 1,012 records were analyzed, and 53.4% of them had errors in filling in the instruments, 6% of transfusions started after the recommended time, and 9.3% of patients had no vital signs registered. Conclusion Failures were identified in the process of recording transfusion monitoring, and they could result in more adverse events related to the administration of blood components. Planning and implementing strategies to enhance recording and to improve care delivered are challenging. PMID:27074233

  10. 42 CFR 415.190 - Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in... in Teaching Settings § 415.190 Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals. (a... schedule basis for the services of an assistant at surgery in a teaching hospital. This section is based...

  11. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcome: results from affiliated hospitals of Catholic University of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwok, S-K; Moon, S-J; Ju, J H; Park, K-S; Kim, W-U; Cho, C-S; Kim, H-Y; Park, S-H

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate clinical characteristics of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to determine risk factors and clinical outcomes of DAH in SLE patients. Among the 1521 patients with SLE admitted between January 1993 and June 2009 to affiliated hospitals of Catholic University of Korea, 21 SLE were admitted for DAH. The inclusion criteria for DAH was defined as new infiltrates on chest radiographs, an acute hemoglobin drop of at least 1.5 g/dl in the absence of an obvious source of bleeding, and one or more of the following signs: hemoptysis, hypoxemia, bronchoscopic or biopsy evidence of DAH. Included as disease controls were 83 SLE patients, matched for age and sex, who were admitted for other manifestations. Data based on medical records were analyzed retrospectively. There were no significantly differing demographic characteristics between SLE patients with DAH and those with other manifestations. Multivariate analysis demonstrated coexisting neuropsychiatric lupus (p = 0.002) and high SLE disease activity index scores (SLEDAI > 10) as independent risk factors in the development of DAH (p = 0.029). Among the 21 SLE patients with DAH, 13 died during the admission period (in-hospital mortality rate: 61.9%). Mortality was associated with infection and requirements of mechanical ventilation. Collectively, SLE patients who have neuropsychiatric manifestations or are in the active stage of the disease have an increased risk for developing DAH. Due to the high mortality of SLE patients with DAH, early recognition of risk factors and appropriate intervention is essential.

  12. A comparative analysis of the CVP structure of nonprofit teaching and for-profit non-teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Lin; Forgione, Dana A; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2012-01-01

    Due to the market turbulence facing the hospital industry, the financial viability of teaching hospitals has been severely threatened. Their missions of education, research, and patient care even strengthen this crisis. Therefore, the objective of this study is to conduct a comparative analysis of the cost, volume, and profit (CVP) structure between large nonprofit urban teaching hospitals and small for-profit rural/suburban non-teaching hospitals. The following two hypotheses were developed: (1) large nonprofit urban teaching hospitals tend to have higher fixed cost, lower variable cost, lower total revenue adjusted by case mix index (CMI), and lower return on total assets (ROA); and (2) small for-profit rural/suburban non-teaching hospitals tend to have lower fixed cost, higher variable cost, higher total revenue adjusted by CMI, and higher ROA. Using 117 teaching hospitals and 102 non-teaching hospitals selected from the Medicare Cost Report database in 2005, the results from multiple regression indicated that large nonprofit teaching hospitals located in urban areas are more likely to have higher fixed cost and lower variable cost. While such cost structure doesn't necessarily affect their total revenue adjusted by CMI, it does lead to a lower return on hospitals' total assets. The results support our hypotheses in terms of fixed cost percentage, variable cost percentage, and ROA, but not total revenue adjusted by CMI. The results suggest that cost structure is significantly associated with hospitals' performance. Also, as teaching hospitals' portfolios of services and programs increase (e.g., provision of uncompensated care to Medicare and Medicaid patients and doing research), it becomes strategically necessary and critical to manage the allocation of resources or investments into the fixed capital that supports the business. PMID:23155742

  13. A comparative analysis of the CVP structure of nonprofit teaching and for-profit non-teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Lin; Forgione, Dana A; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2012-01-01

    Due to the market turbulence facing the hospital industry, the financial viability of teaching hospitals has been severely threatened. Their missions of education, research, and patient care even strengthen this crisis. Therefore, the objective of this study is to conduct a comparative analysis of the cost, volume, and profit (CVP) structure between large nonprofit urban teaching hospitals and small for-profit rural/suburban non-teaching hospitals. The following two hypotheses were developed: (1) large nonprofit urban teaching hospitals tend to have higher fixed cost, lower variable cost, lower total revenue adjusted by case mix index (CMI), and lower return on total assets (ROA); and (2) small for-profit rural/suburban non-teaching hospitals tend to have lower fixed cost, higher variable cost, higher total revenue adjusted by CMI, and higher ROA. Using 117 teaching hospitals and 102 non-teaching hospitals selected from the Medicare Cost Report database in 2005, the results from multiple regression indicated that large nonprofit teaching hospitals located in urban areas are more likely to have higher fixed cost and lower variable cost. While such cost structure doesn't necessarily affect their total revenue adjusted by CMI, it does lead to a lower return on hospitals' total assets. The results support our hypotheses in terms of fixed cost percentage, variable cost percentage, and ROA, but not total revenue adjusted by CMI. The results suggest that cost structure is significantly associated with hospitals' performance. Also, as teaching hospitals' portfolios of services and programs increase (e.g., provision of uncompensated care to Medicare and Medicaid patients and doing research), it becomes strategically necessary and critical to manage the allocation of resources or investments into the fixed capital that supports the business.

  14. THE TEACHING PROFESSION AND THE WORLD-WIDE LITERACY PROGRAMME, A HANDBOOK FOR LEADERS OF WCOTP AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession, Morges (Switzerland).

    A LITERACY HANDBOOK PREPARED BY THE WORLD CONFEDERATION OF ORGANIZATIONS OF THE TEACHING PROFESSION INDICATES THE WAYS IN WHICH TEACHERS' ASSOCIATIONS, TRADITIONALLY CHILD-CENTERED, CAN EFFECTIVELY ENGAGE IN ADULT EDUCATION. A 1966 CASE STUDY ON THE PHILIPPINE PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION, AND WCOTP SURVEYS CONDUCTED DURING 1965 IN KENYA…

  15. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997: its impact on U.S. teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dickler, R; Shaw, G

    2000-05-16

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 had a profound impact on the financing and organization of many health care services. The Act disproportionately affected U.S. teaching hospitals, leading to substantial budget reductions in many institutions and the threat of cuts in major programs and services that teaching hospitals provide to communities. This paper examines the overall financial and organizational impact of the Balanced Budget Act on teaching hospitals and considers its effect on residency education. It also discusses to what degree the Balanced Budget Refinement Act of 1999 will mitigate these effects and posits other solutions to the serious financial issues facing teaching hospitals in the United States. PMID:10819706

  16. Syntax Score and Major Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: Results from a Cohort Study in a University-Affiliated Hospital in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Felipe C.; Ribeiro, Jorge P.; Fuchs, Flávio D.; Wainstein, Marco V.; Bergoli, Luis C.; Wainstein, Rodrigo V.; Zen, Vanessa; Kerkhoff, Alessandra C.; Moreira, Leila B.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The importance of coronary anatomy in predicting cardiovascular events is well known. The use of traditional anatomical scores in routine angiography, however, has not been incorporated to clinical practice. SYNTAX score (SXscore) is a scoring system that estimates the anatomical extent of coronary artery disease (CAD). Its ability to predict outcomes based on a baseline diagnostic angiography has not been tested to date. Objective: To evaluate the performance of the SXscore in predicting major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in patients referred for diagnostic angiography. Methods: Prospective cohort of 895 patients with suspected CAD referred for elective diagnostic coronary angiography from 2008 to 2011, at a university-affiliated hospital in Brazil. They had their SXscores calculated and were stratified in three categories: no significant CAD (n = 495), SXscoreLOW-INTERMEDIATE: < 23 (n = 346), and SXscoreHIGH: ≥ 23 (n = 54). Primary outcome was a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and late revascularization. Secondary endpoints were the components of MACE and death from any cause. Results: On average, patients were followed up for 1.8 ± 1.4 years. The primary outcome occurred in 2.2%, 15.3%, and 20.4% in groups with no significant CAD, SXscoreLOW-INTERMEDIATE, and SXscoreHIGH, respectively (p < 0.001). All-cause death was significantly higher in the SXscoreHIGH compared with the 'no significant CAD' group, 16.7% and 3.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. After adjustment for confounding factors, all outcomes remained associated with the SXscore. Conclusions: SXscore independently predicts MACE in patients submitted to diagnostic coronary angiography. Its routine use in this setting could identify patients with worse prognosis. PMID:27509092

  17. Increasing resistance rate to carbapenem among blood culture isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a university-affiliated hospital in China, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Gu, Bing; Mei, Yaning; Wen, Yi; Xia, Wenying

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the profile of antimicrobial resistance of Gram-negative bacteria in blood cultures from 2004-2011. Pathogens from positive blood cultures were subcultured, and identified in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from January 2004 to December 2011. The antibiotic resistance pattern was analyzed by WHONET 5.4. A total of 1224 cases of Gram-negative bacterial isolates were documented, accounting for 38.6% of the total pathogens isolated from positive blood cultures in the 8-year period. The isolation rates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii increased nearly three times over the same time span. Most Gram-negative bacteria isolates, except the isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, showed a significantly increased resistance rate to cephalosporins (in particular third/fourth generation cephalosporins). Noteworthy, the antimicrobial resistance of K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates to carbapenem (imipenem and meropenem) was significantly increased and the resistant rate to carbapenem was >80.0% in A. baumannii in 2011. The results from PCR detection for carbapenemases were as follows: 82.8% (24/29) isolates of K. pneumoniae carried the kpc-2 gene; only three metallo-beta-lactamase-positive P. aeruginosa isolates were detected; and 93.1% (67/72) A. baumannii isolates were blaOXA-23 positive. The antimicrobial resistance rate of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from blood cultures significantly increased from 2004 to 2011, with significant resistance to the third/fourth generation cephalosporins and carbapenem.

  18. Knowledge and risk perception of measles and factors associated with vaccination decisions in subjects consulting university affiliated public hospitals in Lyon, France, after measles infection.

    PubMed

    Toure, Abdoulaye; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Floret, Daniel; Lina, Bruno; Casalegno, Jean-Sebastien; Vanhems, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, a large number of European countries faced measles outbreaks, France accounting for more than half of the reported cases. The Rhône-Alpes region, located in south-east France, was one of the most affected provinces, with an incidence rate of 97.9 cases per 100 000 inhabitants. We conducted a retrospective survey of adults and parents of children consulting university affiliated public hospitals because of measles infections between January 1, 2010 and September 2012 in Lyon, France. Our main objectives were to evaluate (1) the level of study population knowledge of measles, (2) vaccination practices, and (3) changes in opinion with regard to measles vaccination after disease onset. Overall, 73.64% of patients were not vaccinated or partially vaccinated. The main reason for non-vaccination in children was inappropriate age while among non-vaccinated adults, 29.3% could not give any reason. In total, 29.1% of the responding parents and 24.2% of adult cases were opposed to vaccination "in principle." A large number of patients did not recognize measles as a serious illness and were unaware of its complications. Among parents of infected children, knowledge of transmission mode (odds ratio [OR] = 5.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.64-21.26), perceived severity of measles (OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.06-2.13), and absence of hepatitis B vaccination (OR = 0.17; 95% CI: 0.04-0.65) were independently associated with a more positive opinion about measles vaccination after disease onset. In adult patients, low education level (OR = 3.39; 95% CI: 1.03-11.11) and lack of knowledge of sequelae (OR = 10.19; 95% CI: 1.14-91.31) were linked with a more positive opinion. Individuals affected by vaccine-preventable diseases are interesting populations to study disease impact on vaccine perception.

  19. The effects of reflexology on chronic low back pain intensity in nurses employed in hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Eghbali, Maryam; Safari, Reza; Nazari, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Samereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Humans have been involved with the phenomena of pain and pain relief from the ancient times. Back pain is the most common pain. In fact, eight out of ten people experience it in their lifetime. However, individuals with specific jobs, including nurses, are faced with this problem more. Nursing is in the top ten careers suffering from the most severe musculoskeletal injuries. There are non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments to relieve back pain. One of the non-medical treatments of pain is called reflexology which is a branch of complementary and alternative therapies. This research has been conducted to investigate the effect of reflexology on chronic low back pain intensity. Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blind clinical trial. The study population consisted of 50 female and male nurses suffering from chronic low back pain working in hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The participants were divided into two groups of reflexology and non-specific massage. A questionnaire was completed through interviews and a 40 minute sessions of interventions were performed three times a week for two weeks. Pain intensity was measured by Numerical Analogue Scale for pain before and after the intervention. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including independent t-test and chi-square test, were used to analyze the data. Findings: The results showed a significantly higher reduction in pain intensity scores in the reflexology group after the intervention as compared with the non-specific massage group. However, the non-specific massage was also significantly effective in reducing pain. Conclusions: Reflexology can be effective in reducing the severity of chronic back pain, i.e. it is able to reduce pain from moderate to mild. Thus, this technique is recommended to be performed by nurses as a complementary therapy in patient care. PMID:23833620

  20. Racial, Ethnic, and Affluence Differences in Elderly Patients' Use of Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Iwashyna, Theodore J; Curlin, Farr A; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To understand the role of race, ethnicity, and affluence in elderly patients' use of teaching hospitals when they have that option. METHODS Using a novel data set of 787,587 Medicare patients newly diagnosed with serious illness in 1993, we look at how sociodemographic factors influence whether patients use a teaching hospital for their initial hospitalization for their disease. We use hierarchical linear models to take into account differences in the availability of teaching hospitals to different groups. These models look within groups of people who live in the same county and ask what demographic factors make an individual within that county more or less likely to use a teaching hospital. RESULTS We find that blacks are much more likely than whites to use teaching hospitals (odds ratio [OR], 1.75; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.73 to 1.77). However, Hispanics and Asian-Americans are less likely to use teaching hospitals than are whites (Hispanic OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.88 to 0.97; Asian-American OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.97). Medicaid patients are less likely to use teaching hospitals (given their opportunities) than are non-Medicaid recipients (OR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.90 to 0.92). And we find a curvilinear relationship with affluence, with those in the poorest and those in the wealthiest neighborhoods most likely to use a teaching hospital. CONCLUSION The use of teaching hospitals is more complex that heretofore appreciated. Understanding why some groups do not go to teaching hospitals could be important for the health of those groups and of teaching hospitals. PMID:12220366

  1. An Investigation of Antibacterial Resistance Patterns Among Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Collected from Intensive Care Units of a University-Affiliated Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Izadpour, Farrokh; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Moosavian, Mojtaba; ShahAli, Shiva; Larki, Farzaneh; Tabesh, Hamed; Morvaridi, Afrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, multidrug-resistant non-fermenting Gram-negative pathogens, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been recognized as a major cause of healthcare-associated and nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates collected from intensive care units (ICUs). Methods One hundred fifty-five clinical isolates, including 80 (51.6%) isolates of A. baumannii and 75 (48.4%) isolates of P. aeruginosa, from hospitalized patients in the ICUs of a teaching hospital in Ahvaz, Iran, were collected from January 1 to December 30, 2013. The organisms were identified with conventional bacteriological methods, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all isolates in accordance with clinical laboratory and standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results The maximum resistance rates among A. baumannii isolates were observed for ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (96.9% and 95.2%, respectively). For P. aeruginosa isolates, the maximum resistance rates were reported for ceftriaxone and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (97.2% and 92.4%, respectively). Conclusions The majority of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to commonly recommended antibiotics. Therefore, surveillance of antibiotic consumption and proper antibiotic administration guidelines are essential for preventing major outbreaks in the future. PMID:27800136

  2. [Foreign body aspiration in Kigali University Teaching Hospital, Rwanda].

    PubMed

    Van Steirteghem, S; Umuhoza, C; Casimir, G

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 12-year-old girl referred to Kigali University Teaching Hospital (KUTH) for persistent cough, fever and haemoptysis. Respiratory symptoms started acutely with a stridor at age 4. Thereafter she developed a chronic cough with intermittent fever. She was treated ambulatory in the health care centre with oral antibiotics and finally referred to the district hospital at age 7. The chest X-ray then suggested tuberculosis for which a 6 month treatment was given with no improvement. The cough persisted and haemoptysis appeared so the patient was referred to the reference hospital (KUTH). Chest X-ray showed diffuse lesions of the left lung with bronchiectasis. Bronchoscopy revealed the presence of a foreign body in the left intermediary bronchus and a piece of plastic was extracted. Symptoms rapidly disappeared with antibiotic treatment. This case illustrates how important it is to include foreign body inhalation in the differential diagnosis of respiratory disease in children. Bronchoscopy plays a key role in diagnosis and treatment. The authors point out the advantages of the joint efforts of the Belgian Development Aid Agency (BTC) and the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) in the development of this activity in the Rwandese context. PMID:24303659

  3. Council of Teaching Hospitals: Survey of Housestaff Stipends, Benefits and Funding, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alison

    This report presents the results of an annual survey of housestaff stipends, benefits, and funding for physicians at teaching hospitals in 1992. The data, presented in 48 tables and 4 figures, are based on responses from 325 members of the Council of Teaching Hospitals (COTH), an 83 percent response rate to the survey. Chapter I contains stipend…

  4. Integrating patient teaching into bedside patient care: a participant-observation study of hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Barber-Parker, Elaine D

    Today's patients are quickly discharged from hospitals and often continue complex treatments at home. Patient teaching is critical and hospital nurses are encouraged to use "every teachable moment." This study explored and described the nature of integrating patient teaching into daily patient care and the factors influencing the delivery of teaching. A fieldwork method, conducted over 12 months, used participant-observation (PO) and a focus group session to answer the research questions. Three experienced registered nurses working on the oncology unit of an acute care community hospital served as informants. Critical attributes and patterns of observed teaching events were described.

  5. Improvement of hospital processes through business process management in Qaem Teaching Hospital: A work in progress.

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Doosty, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    In a world of continuously changing business environments, organizations have no option; however, to deal with such a big level of transformation in order to adjust the consequential demands. Therefore, many companies need to continually improve and review their processes to maintain their competitive advantages in an uncertain environment. Meeting these challenges requires implementing the most efficient possible business processes, geared to the needs of the industry and market segments that the organization serves globally. In the last 10 years, total quality management, business process reengineering, and business process management (BPM) have been some of the management tools applied by organizations to increase business competiveness. This paper is an original article that presents implementation of "BPM" approach in the healthcare domain that allows an organization to improve and review its critical business processes. This project was performed in "Qaem Teaching Hospital" in Mashhad city, Iran and consists of four distinct steps; (1) identify business processes, (2) document the process, (3) analyze and measure the process, and (4) improve the process. Implementing BPM in Qaem Teaching Hospital changed the nature of management by allowing the organization to avoid the complexity of disparate, soloed systems. BPM instead enabled the organization to focus on business processes at a higher level.

  6. Improvement of hospital processes through business process management in Qaem Teaching Hospital: A work in progress.

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Doosty, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    In a world of continuously changing business environments, organizations have no option; however, to deal with such a big level of transformation in order to adjust the consequential demands. Therefore, many companies need to continually improve and review their processes to maintain their competitive advantages in an uncertain environment. Meeting these challenges requires implementing the most efficient possible business processes, geared to the needs of the industry and market segments that the organization serves globally. In the last 10 years, total quality management, business process reengineering, and business process management (BPM) have been some of the management tools applied by organizations to increase business competiveness. This paper is an original article that presents implementation of "BPM" approach in the healthcare domain that allows an organization to improve and review its critical business processes. This project was performed in "Qaem Teaching Hospital" in Mashhad city, Iran and consists of four distinct steps; (1) identify business processes, (2) document the process, (3) analyze and measure the process, and (4) improve the process. Implementing BPM in Qaem Teaching Hospital changed the nature of management by allowing the organization to avoid the complexity of disparate, soloed systems. BPM instead enabled the organization to focus on business processes at a higher level. PMID:25540784

  7. 42 CFR 415.190 - Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in... Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.190 Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching... a fee schedule basis for the services of an assistant at surgery in a teaching hospital....

  8. 42 CFR 415.190 - Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in... Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.190 Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching... a fee schedule basis for the services of an assistant at surgery in a teaching hospital....

  9. 42 CFR 415.190 - Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in... Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.190 Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching... a fee schedule basis for the services of an assistant at surgery in a teaching hospital....

  10. 24 CFR 242.13 - Parents and affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parents and affiliates. 242.13... MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.13 Parents and affiliates. As a condition of issuing a commitment, HUD may require corporate parents, affiliates, or principals of...

  11. Organizational factors associated with quality of care in US teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Lambiase, Louis R; Zhao, Mei

    2010-01-01

    This study is unique because it uses multiple regression and data envelopment analysis (DEA) to evaluate teaching hospital quality. The results support the premise that teaching hospital leadership through the effective allocation of resources can improve the quality of care. This study has managerial implications by demonstrating the positive correlation between HMO market penetration and improved clinical quality outcomes. This would suggest that improved efficiency caused by limited HMO reimbursement and tight utilization controls encourage hospitals to cut waste as well as improve their clinical care processes. Additionally, our research found that teaching hospitals with higher levels of long-term debt also had improved quality. This shows that increased investments in facilities and advanced technology at teaching hospitals can lead to enhanced quality. PMID:22329326

  12. Improvement of hospital processes through business process management in Qaem Teaching Hospital: A work in progress

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Doosty, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    In a world of continuously changing business environments, organizations have no option; however, to deal with such a big level of transformation in order to adjust the consequential demands. Therefore, many companies need to continually improve and review their processes to maintain their competitive advantages in an uncertain environment. Meeting these challenges requires implementing the most efficient possible business processes, geared to the needs of the industry and market segments that the organization serves globally. In the last 10 years, total quality management, business process reengineering, and business process management (BPM) have been some of the management tools applied by organizations to increase business competiveness. This paper is an original article that presents implementation of “BPM” approach in the healthcare domain that allows an organization to improve and review its critical business processes. This project was performed in “Qaem Teaching Hospital” in Mashhad city, Iran and consists of four distinct steps; (1) identify business processes, (2) document the process, (3) analyze and measure the process, and (4) improve the process. Implementing BPM in Qaem Teaching Hospital changed the nature of management by allowing the organization to avoid the complexity of disparate, soloed systems. BPM instead enabled the organization to focus on business processes at a higher level. PMID:25540784

  13. Evaluation of ureteroscopy outcome in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naimi, Abdulla; Alobaidy, Abdulqadir; Majzoub, Ahmad; Ibrahim, Tarek Ahmed Amin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate factors affecting semi-rigid ureteroscopy (URS) results highlighting the influence of teaching on its outcomes. Material and methods We reviewed the files of 891 adult patients who had undergone 1182 ureteroscopies at our institute during the period from July 2008 to June 2011. The outcomes of all URSs were evaluated. Outcomes were measured by stone- free rate and presence of complications, which were assessed using the Clavien-Dindo system. Patients were divided into 2 groups; Group 1 (favorable outcome) became stone- free after the first URS and had no documented complications, while Group 2 (unfavorable outcome) had residual stones and/or complications. Group 2 was subdivided according to the skill level of the operating surgeon into two subgroups. Patients belonging to subgroup A had their procedures performed by urology trainees under direct supervision of expert urologists, while those in subgroup B had their procedures performed by the expert urologists themselves. All groups were compared using univariate (chi-square and t tests) and multivariate (logistic regression) statistical tests to identify significant risk factors. All data was analyzed using SPSS. Results A total of 1182 URSs were evaluated. 958 patients had a favorable outcome (Group 1) while 224 patients had an unfavorable outcome (Group 2). Factors associated with an unfavorable outcome include location of the presenting stone (p<0.001) and presence of stone impaction (p<0.001). No statistically significant differences were detected in the overall complication rate between trainees and expert urologists. Trainees stone- free rate was comparable to that of experts; 90.3% vs. 91.1%, respectively, p=0.6. Conclusion Factors such as stone impaction and proximal location are associated with an unfavorable surgical outcome. In a high- volume teaching hospital, semi-rigid URS done by trainees under direct supervision is safe and their outcome is comparable to literature findings.

  14. Evaluation of ureteroscopy outcome in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naimi, Abdulla; Alobaidy, Abdulqadir; Majzoub, Ahmad; Ibrahim, Tarek Ahmed Amin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate factors affecting semi-rigid ureteroscopy (URS) results highlighting the influence of teaching on its outcomes. Material and methods We reviewed the files of 891 adult patients who had undergone 1182 ureteroscopies at our institute during the period from July 2008 to June 2011. The outcomes of all URSs were evaluated. Outcomes were measured by stone- free rate and presence of complications, which were assessed using the Clavien-Dindo system. Patients were divided into 2 groups; Group 1 (favorable outcome) became stone- free after the first URS and had no documented complications, while Group 2 (unfavorable outcome) had residual stones and/or complications. Group 2 was subdivided according to the skill level of the operating surgeon into two subgroups. Patients belonging to subgroup A had their procedures performed by urology trainees under direct supervision of expert urologists, while those in subgroup B had their procedures performed by the expert urologists themselves. All groups were compared using univariate (chi-square and t tests) and multivariate (logistic regression) statistical tests to identify significant risk factors. All data was analyzed using SPSS. Results A total of 1182 URSs were evaluated. 958 patients had a favorable outcome (Group 1) while 224 patients had an unfavorable outcome (Group 2). Factors associated with an unfavorable outcome include location of the presenting stone (p<0.001) and presence of stone impaction (p<0.001). No statistically significant differences were detected in the overall complication rate between trainees and expert urologists. Trainees stone- free rate was comparable to that of experts; 90.3% vs. 91.1%, respectively, p=0.6. Conclusion Factors such as stone impaction and proximal location are associated with an unfavorable surgical outcome. In a high- volume teaching hospital, semi-rigid URS done by trainees under direct supervision is safe and their outcome is comparable to literature findings

  15. Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, North-West Nigeria: Hospital-Based Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, EA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) remains a common problem worldwide and the role of douching as a predisposing factor is unclear. Aim: This study was undertaken to highlight the prevalence and predisposing factors of VVC in North-west Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective study done at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH), North-west. AKTH is a 500-bed tertiary hospital located in Kano, the most populous state in Nigeria. Ethical clearance was obtained. Three hundred patients with VVC were recruited from the gynecologic and general outpatients’ clinics of AKTH. Research structured questionnaires were used to obtain sociodemographic and clinical information. The data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA). Frequency, mean and simple percentages were used to analyze data. Result: Candida albicans was the most frequent cause of the positive high vaginal swabs constituting 84.5% (316/374) while Proteus vulgaris was the least frequent cause constituting 0.53% (2/374). Fifty-three percent (143/270) of those with VVC were aged 26–35 years; the married were 80% (216/270) and those who were unmarried were 20% (54/270). Douching was the commonest predisposing factor occurring in 42.5% (115/270) of cases. Conclusion: VVC was the most prevalent cause of vaginosis in North-west Nigeria, and douching was the commonest predisposing factor. PMID:26229716

  16. General Surgical Services at an Urban Teaching Hospital in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Elizabeth; Amado, Vanda; Jacobe, Mário; Sacks, Greg D.; Bruzoni, Matias; Mapasse, Domingos; DeUgarte, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgery becomes incorporated into global health programs, it will be critical for clinicians to take into account already existing surgical care systems within low-income countries. In order to inform future efforts to expand the local system and systems in comparable regions of the developing world, we aimed to describe current patterns of surgical care at a major urban teaching hospital in Mozambique. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all general surgery patients treated between August 2012 and August 2013 at Hospital Central Maputo in Maputo, Mozambique. We reviewed emergency and elective surgical logbooks, inpatient discharge records, and death records to report case volume, disease etiology, and mortality. Results There were 1,598 operations (910 emergency, 688 elective) and 2,606 patient discharges during our study period. The most common emergent surgeries were for non-trauma laparotomy (22%) followed by all trauma procedures (18%), while the most common elective surgery was hernia repair (31%). The majority of lower extremity amputations were above knee (69%). The most common diagnostic categories for inpatients were infectious (31%), trauma (18%), hernia (12%), neoplasm (10%), and appendicitis (5%). The mortality rate was 5.6% (146 deaths), approximately half of which were related to sepsis. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the general surgery caseload of a large, academic, urban training and referral center in Mozambique. We describe resource limitations that impact operative capacity, trauma care, and management of amputations and cancer. These findings highlight challenges that are applicable to a broad range of global surgery efforts. PMID:25940163

  17. [Teaching department of the Polish Paderewski Hospital in Edinburgh].

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, W; Tuleja, K W

    1994-01-01

    An agreement was concluded on 24.02.1941 between the University of Edinburgh and the Polish Government in Exile in London that brought into being the Polish School of Medicine at the University of Edinburgh. The School was intended for soldier-students in the Polish Forces in Gr. Britain. This agreement was meant for the time of war. With the end of the war a number of medical student-soldiers liberated from the German prisoner of war camps, applied to the Polish Medical School at the University of Edinburgh. In accord with the agreement the University discontinued the official admission of new students to the Polish School in Edinburgh. The students, numbering 37, who could not be admitted as regular students, were given facilities by Professor Jurasz, the Dean of the Polish School, to carry on their studies at the Polish Paderewski Hospital in Edinburgh (at the Western General Hospital). Thus there came into being two Schools: one regular, authorized Polish School of Medicine within the University, and the other, an unofficial School at the Paderewski Hospital, undertaking the teaching of students but with no power to grant a medical qualification. The teachers attached to the official Polish Medical School in Edinburg co-operated in the instruction of the students of the unofficial School. Nearly 20 of the 4th and 5th year students finished their courses and passed their examinations. Each of them was given a certificate that he had concluded his medical studies and had passed all the examinations which were necessary in Poland to obtain a medical diploma. A number of those who obtained the certificate applied to the Conjoint Examining Board in London and succeeded in obtaining the diploma L.R.C.P. London and M.R.C.S. England, and the licence to practice from the General Medical Council. A few third year students studied and obtained the degree at the Universities of England, Ireland and Canada; and some returned to Poland. A few settled in the U.S.A. and in

  18. Utilization of Oral Anticoagulation in a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anakwue, RC; Ocheni, S; Madu, AJ

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulation is an essential lifesaving management practice indicated for arterial, venous and intracardiac thromboembolism. Aim: This study was undertaken to examine the utilization of anticoagulation services in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu (UNTH) Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study involved assessing data from folders of subjects on anticoagulation and monitoring in UNTH, Enugu. Patients’ profile, risk factors, diagnosis, indication for oral anticoagulation, anticoagulant used; target, monitoring, outcome and complications of anticoagulation were recorded. Results: A total of 26 patients over a period of 5 years were on anticoagulation and laboratory monitoring done in UNTH. The mean age of the patients was 53.4 years and more females than males were on anticoagulation and monitoring (F14:M12). The most common indications for anticoagulation include deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation and mitral valve disease with atrial fibrillation. Desired clinical outcome was achieved in eight patients 8/26 (30.8%). Minor bleeding was the only complication reported in three patients 3/26 (11.5%). Conclusion: The absence of diagnostic tools and anticoagulation monitoring clinics and the apprehension of adverse effects have combined to make this lifesaving treatment inaccessible to many patients in Nigeria. PMID:25364603

  19. Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Ghanaian Women: The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Experience.

    PubMed

    Der, Edmund M; Gyasi, Richard K; Tettey, Yao; Edusei, Lawrence; Bayor, Marcel T; Jiagge, Evelyn; Gyakobo, Mawuli; Merajver, Sofia D; Newman, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers that have negative or extremely low expression of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and non-amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)/neu are termed triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The majority of TNBC tumors belong to the biologically aggressive basal subtype, and they cannot be managed with targeted endocrine or anti-HER2/neu agents. In western, high resource environments, risk factors for TNBC include younger age at diagnosis and hereditary susceptibility. Women of African ancestry in the United States and in continental Africa have higher frequencies of TNBC, prompting speculation that this risk may have an inherited basis and may at least partially explain breast cancer survival disparities related to racial/ethnic identity. Efforts to document and confirm the breast cancer burden of continental Africa have been hampered by the limited availability of registry and immunohistochemistry resources. Our goal was to evaluate the breast cancers diagnosed in one of the largest health care facilities in western Africa, and to compare the frequencies as well as risk factors for TNBC versus non-TNBC in this large referral tertiary hospital. The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital is affiliated with the University of Ghana and is located in Accra, the capital of Ghana. We conducted an institutional, Department of Pathology-based review of the breast cancer cases seen at this facility for the 2010 calendar year, and for which histopathologic specimens were available. The overall study population of 223 breast cancer cases had a median age of 52.4 years, and most had palpable tumors larger than 5 cm in diameter. More than half were TNBC (130; 58.3%). We observed similar age-specific frequencies, distribution of stage at diagnosis and tumor grade among cases of TNBC compared to cases of non-TNBC. Ghanaian breast cancer patients tend to have an advanced stage distribution and relatively younger age at diagnosis compared to

  20. Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Ghanaian Women: The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Experience.

    PubMed

    Der, Edmund M; Gyasi, Richard K; Tettey, Yao; Edusei, Lawrence; Bayor, Marcel T; Jiagge, Evelyn; Gyakobo, Mawuli; Merajver, Sofia D; Newman, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers that have negative or extremely low expression of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and non-amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)/neu are termed triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The majority of TNBC tumors belong to the biologically aggressive basal subtype, and they cannot be managed with targeted endocrine or anti-HER2/neu agents. In western, high resource environments, risk factors for TNBC include younger age at diagnosis and hereditary susceptibility. Women of African ancestry in the United States and in continental Africa have higher frequencies of TNBC, prompting speculation that this risk may have an inherited basis and may at least partially explain breast cancer survival disparities related to racial/ethnic identity. Efforts to document and confirm the breast cancer burden of continental Africa have been hampered by the limited availability of registry and immunohistochemistry resources. Our goal was to evaluate the breast cancers diagnosed in one of the largest health care facilities in western Africa, and to compare the frequencies as well as risk factors for TNBC versus non-TNBC in this large referral tertiary hospital. The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital is affiliated with the University of Ghana and is located in Accra, the capital of Ghana. We conducted an institutional, Department of Pathology-based review of the breast cancer cases seen at this facility for the 2010 calendar year, and for which histopathologic specimens were available. The overall study population of 223 breast cancer cases had a median age of 52.4 years, and most had palpable tumors larger than 5 cm in diameter. More than half were TNBC (130; 58.3%). We observed similar age-specific frequencies, distribution of stage at diagnosis and tumor grade among cases of TNBC compared to cases of non-TNBC. Ghanaian breast cancer patients tend to have an advanced stage distribution and relatively younger age at diagnosis compared to

  1. Improved blood culture identification by FilmArray in cultures from regional hospitals compared with teaching hospital cultures.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Bzdyl, Nicole; Chua, I-Ly Joanna; Urosevic, Nadezda M; Leung, Michael J; Geelhoed, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Rapid identification of bacteria isolated from blood cultures by direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is now in wide spread use in major centres but is not yet feasible in smaller hospital laboratories. A FilmArray multiplex PCR panel for blood culture isolate identification (BCID) provides an alternative approach to near point-of-care microbial identification in regional hospitals. We assessed the accuracy and time to identification of the BCID FilmArray in a consecutive series of 149 blood cultures from 143 patients in a teaching hospital and smaller regional hospitals, currently identified by direct MALDI-TOF and proprietary molecular methods. The BCID FilmArray contained 18 of 34 species and 20 of 23 species isolated from teaching and regional hospital, respectively. Overall, 85 % of the teaching hospital and 100 % of the regional hospital monomicrobial blood cultures were identified, compared with 60 and 68 %, respectively, for direct MALDI-TOF on the same cultures. There were no incorrect results from blood cultures containing Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterobacteriaceae. The three discrepant results were all in mixed cultures. The mean reduction in time to identification of blood culture isolates was 53 h, which did not include the time required to transport cultures from regional centres to a central laboratory. The overall performance of the BCID FilmArray is stronger in blood cultures from smaller regional hospitals that encounter a narrower range of bacterial species dominated by the commonest species. This approach is more suited to smaller clinical laboratories than the MALDI-TOF direct method.

  2. Chronic hemodialysis in a Nigerian teaching hospital: practice and costs.

    PubMed

    Agaba, E I; Lopez, A; Ma, I; Martinez, R; Tzamaloukas, R A; Vanderjagt, D J; Glew, R H; Tzamaloukas, A H

    2003-11-01

    The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is on the rise in developing countries. To identify issues related to renal replacement therapy in ESRD patients in the developing world, we analyzed the practice and costs of hemodialysis in Nigerian ESRD patients. Ten ESRD patients were dialyzed at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria, between June 15 and July 15, 2003. In these patients, we analyzed initiation, vascular access issues, frequency, duration, adequacy and economics of chronic hemodialysis. The Nigerian patients were referred to the nephrologist for the first time only when they had developed frank uremia. No patient had a permanent vascular access at the time dialysis was initiated. Only two patients had a functioning dialysis fistula, while the other eight patients were dialyzed through temporary femoral vein catheters that were removed after each dialysis. Frequency of dialysis was three times weekly in 2 patients, twice weekly in 1 patient and once weekly or less frequently in 7 patients. The duration of a dialysis session was prescribed to be 4 hours, but sessions often lasted for as long as 10 hours because of breakdowns of the antiquated dialysis machines. The urea reduction ratio was 45.3 +/- 8.6%. In every case, the cost of dialysis was borne by the patients and their families. Comparison of the cost of dialysis, with extensive re-use of supplies, to monthly incomes of Nigerians with different professions revealed that the great majority of Nigerians cannot afford three times weekly dialysis. Underdialysis in Nigerian ESRD patients is common and caused by socioeconomic factors and technologic deficits. One step towards correction of underdialysis could be sharing of the cost of dialysis by the public.

  3. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... exceed $30,000. Example No: 2. Dr. Smith received $25,000 from Hospital X for services as a department head in a teaching hospital. Dr. Smith also voluntarily furnished direct medical services to... compensated services ($25,000) exceeds the $30,000 maximum amount allowable for all of Dr. Smith's...

  4. Association between Hospital Birth Volume and Maternal Morbidity among Low-Risk Pregnancies in Rural, Urban, and Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Thao, Viengneesee; Hung, Peiyin; Tilden, Ellen; Caughey, Aaron B; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine the relationship between hospital birth volume and multiple maternal morbidities among low-risk pregnancies in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, and urban teaching hospitals, using a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Study Design Using the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 607 hospitals, we identified 508,146 obstetric deliveries meeting low-risk criteria and compared outcomes across hospital volume categories. Outcomes include postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), chorioamnionitis, endometritis, blood transfusion, severe perineal laceration, and wound infection. Results Hospital birth volume was more consistently related to PPH than to other maternal outcomes. Lowest-volume rural (< 200 births) and non-teaching (< 650 births) hospitals had 80% higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.56-2.08) and 39% higher odds (AOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.26-1.53) of PPH respectively, than those in corresponding high-volume hospitals. However, in urban teaching hospitals, delivering in a lower-volume hospital was associated with 14% lower odds of PPH (AOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.80-0.93). Deliveries in rural hospitals had 31% higher odds of PPH than urban teaching hospitals (AOR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.13-1.53). Conclusions Low birth volume was a risk factor for PPH in both rural and urban non-teaching hospitals, but not in urban teaching hospitals, where higher volume was associated with greater odds of PPH. PMID:26731180

  5. Teaching Hospital Inpatient Consultation to Psychology Trainees and Interns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabinet, Laille; Schubert, Daniel S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the value of training clinical psychologists in consultation-liaison roles for hospital patients in nonpsychiatric wards. Training would involve communication with hospital staff, the medical chart, case presentation, approach to the patient, differential diagnosis, and psychotropic medication. (KC)

  6. Sources of Construction Funds in Teaching Hospitals, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, Mary

    1981-01-01

    Data compiled from the American Hospital Association's annual surveys on the sources of funding for hospital construction are provided. The pattern of financing hospital construction in institutions shifted dramatically during the last decade with the most striking change in the use of debt financing. (MLW)

  7. Some correlates of electronic health information management system success in nigerian teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Adebowale I; Popoola, Sunday O

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, an electronic health information management system (EHIMS) is crucial for patient care in hospitals. This paper explores the aspects and elements that contribute to the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of study comprised 442 health information management personnel in five teaching hospitals that had implemented EHIMS in Nigeria. A self-developed questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. The findings revealed that there is a positive, close relationship between all the identified factors and EHIMS's success: technical factors (r = 0.564, P < 0.05); social factors (r = 0.616, P < 0.05); organizational factors (r = 0.621, P < 0.05); financial factors (r = 0.705, P < 0.05); and political factors (r = 0.589, P < 0.05). We conclude that consideration of all the identified factors was highly significant for the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals.

  8. Development of postgraduate research supervisors within a teaching hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Scott, K M; Caldwell, P H Y; Oldmeadow, W; Dale, R C; Jones, C A

    2015-08-01

    The recent trend to embed medical research at point of care has created a need for postgraduate research supervisors in hospitals who are practising clinicians and lab-based researchers. We explored the training needs of supervisors to inform the design and evaluation of a hospital-based development programme. We found that if hospital-based supervisors are to improve their practice, the programme needs to be on-site to ensure access and relevance to local issues. PMID:26220029

  9. A Statewide Strategy for Expanding Graduate Medical Education by Establishing New Teaching Hospitals and Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Michelle A; Robinson, Ben; Buckley, Peter F

    2015-09-01

    The graduate medical education (GME) system in the United States is in need of reform to ensure that the physician workforce being trained is able to meet the current and future health care needs of the population. However, GME funding to existing teaching hospitals and programs relies heavily on support from Medicare, which was capped in 1997. Thus, new, innovative models to expand GME are needed. To address physician shortages, especially in primary care and general surgery and in rural areas, the state of Georgia implemented a statewide initiative. They increased medical school enrollment by 600 students from 2000 to 2010 and committed to establishing new GME programs at new teaching hospitals to train 400 additional residents by 2018. As increasing the capacity of GME programs likely increases the number of physicians practicing in the state, these efforts aim to encourage trainees to practice in Georgia. Although new teaching hospitals, like these, are eligible for new Medicare funding, this approach to expanding GME also incorporates state funding to cover the start-up costs associated with establishing a new teaching hospital and GME program.In this article, the authors provide background on the current state of GME funding in the United States and on the physician workforce and medical education system in Georgia. They then outline the steps taken to expand GME by establishing new teaching hospitals and programs. They conclude by sharing outcomes to date as well as challenges faced and lessons learned so that others can follow this novel model.

  10. Is leadership compatible with hospitals? Lessons from 10 years of teaching leadership to hospital managers.

    PubMed

    Georges, Patrick M; Samson, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Leadership methods can be understood and applied by hospital managers in the same way teachers and the seminar's participants respect certain conventions. Each method should be discussed and adapted, recognizing its limitations for use within hospitals. This article first presents what is taught in a traditional leadership course and then, discusses ways the course can be adapted for use by hospital managers. PMID:23342760

  11. Migration of patients between five urban teaching hospitals in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Galanter, William L; Applebaum, Andrew; Boddipalli, Viveka; Kho, Abel; Lin, Michael; Meltzer, David; Roberts, Anna; Trick, Bill; Walton, Surrey M; Lambert, Bruce L

    2013-04-01

    To quantify the extent of patient sharing and inpatient care fragmentation among patients discharged from a cohort of Chicago hospitals. Admission and discharge dates and patient ZIP codes from 5 hospitals over 2 years were matched with an encryption algorithm. Admission to more than one hospital was considered fragmented care. The association between fragmentation and socio-economic variables using ZIP-code data from the 2000 US Census was measured. Using validation from one hospital, patient matching using encrypted identifiers had a sensitivity of 99.3 % and specificity of 100 %. The cohort contained 228,151 unique patients and 334,828 admissions. Roughly 2 % of the patients received fragmented care, accounting for 5.8 % of admissions and 6.4 % of hospital days. In 3 of 5 hospitals, and overall, the length of stay of patients with fragmented care was longer than those without. Fragmentation varied by hospital and was associated with the proportion of non-Caucasian persons, the proportion of residents whose income fell in the lowest quartile, and the proportion of residents with more children being raised by mothers alone in the zip code of the patient. Patients receiving fragmented care accounted for 6.4 % of hospital days. This percentage is a low estimate for our region, since not all regional hospitals participated, but high enough to suggest value in creating Health Information Exchange. Fragmentation varied by hospital, per capita income, race and proportion of single mother homes. This secure methodology and fragmentation analysis may prove useful for future analyses.

  12. Impact of a hospital-wide multifaceted programme for reducing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections in a large teaching hospital in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Viale, P; Tumietto, F; Giannella, M; Bartoletti, M; Tedeschi, S; Ambretti, S; Cristini, F; Gibertoni, C; Venturi, S; Cavalli, M; De Palma, A; Puggioli, M C; Mosci, D; Callea, E; Masina, R; Moro, M L; Lewis, R E

    2015-03-01

    We performed a quasi-experimental study of a multifaceted infection control programme for reducing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) transmission and bloodstream infections (BSIs) in a 1420-bed university-affiliated teaching hospital during 2010-2014, with 30 months of follow-up. The programme consisted of the following: (a) rectal swab cultures were performed in all patients admitted to high-risk units (intensive-care units, transplantation, and haematology) to screen for CRE carriage, or for any room-mates of CRE-positive patients in other units; (b) cohorting of carriers, managed with strict contact precautions; (c) intensification of education, cleaning and hand-washing programmes; and (d) promotion of an antibiotic stewardship programme carbapenem-sparing regimen. The 30-month incidence rates of CRE-positive rectal cultures and BSIs were analysed with Poisson regression. Following the intervention, the incidence rate of CRE BSI (risk reduction 0.96, 95% CI 0.92-0.99, p 0.03) and CRE colonization (risk reduction 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.97, p <0.0001) significantly decreased over a period of 30 months. After accounting for changes in monthly census and percentage of externally acquired cases (positive at ≤72 h), the average institutional monthly rate of compliance with CRE screening procedures was the only independent variable associated with a declining monthly incidence of CRE colonization (p 0.002). The monthly incidence of CRE carriage was predictive of BSI (p 0.01). Targeted screening and cohorting of CRE carriers and infections, combined with cleaning, education, and antimicrobial stewardship measures, significantly decreased the institutional incidence of CRE BSI and colonization, despite endemically high CRE carriage rates in the region.

  13. Impact of a hospital-wide multifaceted programme for reducing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections in a large teaching hospital in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Viale, P; Tumietto, F; Giannella, M; Bartoletti, M; Tedeschi, S; Ambretti, S; Cristini, F; Gibertoni, C; Venturi, S; Cavalli, M; De Palma, A; Puggioli, M C; Mosci, D; Callea, E; Masina, R; Moro, M L; Lewis, R E

    2015-03-01

    We performed a quasi-experimental study of a multifaceted infection control programme for reducing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) transmission and bloodstream infections (BSIs) in a 1420-bed university-affiliated teaching hospital during 2010-2014, with 30 months of follow-up. The programme consisted of the following: (a) rectal swab cultures were performed in all patients admitted to high-risk units (intensive-care units, transplantation, and haematology) to screen for CRE carriage, or for any room-mates of CRE-positive patients in other units; (b) cohorting of carriers, managed with strict contact precautions; (c) intensification of education, cleaning and hand-washing programmes; and (d) promotion of an antibiotic stewardship programme carbapenem-sparing regimen. The 30-month incidence rates of CRE-positive rectal cultures and BSIs were analysed with Poisson regression. Following the intervention, the incidence rate of CRE BSI (risk reduction 0.96, 95% CI 0.92-0.99, p 0.03) and CRE colonization (risk reduction 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.97, p <0.0001) significantly decreased over a period of 30 months. After accounting for changes in monthly census and percentage of externally acquired cases (positive at ≤72 h), the average institutional monthly rate of compliance with CRE screening procedures was the only independent variable associated with a declining monthly incidence of CRE colonization (p 0.002). The monthly incidence of CRE carriage was predictive of BSI (p 0.01). Targeted screening and cohorting of CRE carriers and infections, combined with cleaning, education, and antimicrobial stewardship measures, significantly decreased the institutional incidence of CRE BSI and colonization, despite endemically high CRE carriage rates in the region. PMID:25658534

  14. The language of "Circule": discursive construction of false referral in Iranian teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mirhosseini, Seyyed-Abdolhamid; Fattahi, Hossein

    2010-09-01

    This article explores the practice of false patient out-referral by medical students in Iranian teaching hospital emergency departments. Drawing on participant-observations and interviews during eight months in six hospitals in Tehran, we investigate how discourse is appropriated to construct and legitimate out-referrals through four general strategies of sympathy, mystification, intimidation, and procrastination. Based on a critical approach to false out-referral discourse, we revisit the medical and educational functioning of teaching hospitals in Iran: Focusing on medical students involved in false out-referrals, their discursive reproduction of deception is examined along with their legitimate challenges to institutional structures. Moreover, focusing on the institution of hospital, institutional corruption is discussed along with the problematic of covert cultural defiance faced by a modernist organizational construct in a nonmainstream cultural context. Finally, we argue that the discourse of false out-referral calls for more profound public awareness in dealing with health institutions.

  15. Incorrect author affiliation.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    Incorrect Author Affiliation: In the article titled “Effect of Human Papillomavirus on Patterns of Distant Metastatic Failure in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiotherapy,”published online March 5, 2015, and also in this issue of JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery (doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2015 .136), the Author Affiliations were incorrect. That section should have been given as follows: "Author Affiliations: Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (Trosman, Lamarre, Scharpf, Khan, Lorenz, Burkey); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (Koyfman,Ward, Greskovich); Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois (Al-Khudari); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology,Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (Nwizu, Adelstein)." This article was corrected online and in print.

  16. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and the Financial Health of Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Fryer, George E.; Chen, Frederick M.; Morgan, Sarah E.; Green, Larry A.; Valente, Ernest; Miyoshi, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND We wanted to evaluate the most recent, complete data related to the specific effects of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 relative to the overall financial health of teaching hospitals. We also define cost report variables and calculations necessary for continued impact monitoring. METHODS We undertook a descriptive analysis of hospital cost report variables for 1996, 1998, and 1999, using simple calculations of total, Medicare, prospective payment system, graduate medical education (GME), and bad debt margins, as well as the proportion with negative total operating margins. RESULTS Nearly 35% of teaching hospitals had negative operating margins in 1999. Teaching hospital total margins fell by nearly 50% between 1996 and 1999, while Medicare margins remained relatively stable. GME margins have fallen by nearly 24%, however, even as reported education costs have risen by nearly 12%. Medicare+Choice GME payments were less than 10% of those projected. CONCLUSIONS Teaching hospitals realized deep cuts in profitability between 1996 and 1999; however, these cuts were not entirely attributable to the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Medicare payments remain an important financial cushion for teaching hospitals, more than one third of which operated in the red. The role of Medicare in supporting GME has been substantially reduced and needs special attention in the overall debate. Medicare+Choice support of the medical education enterprise is 90% less than baseline projections and should be thoroughly investigated. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, which has a critical role in evaluating the effects of Medicare policy changes, should be more transparent in its methods. PMID:15053286

  17. The CCC system in two teaching hospitals: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Slack, W V; Bleich, H L

    1999-06-01

    Computing systems developed by the Center for Clinical Computing (CCC) have been in operation in Beth Israel and Brigham and Women's hospitals for over 10 years. Designed to be of direct benefit to doctors, nurses, and other clinicians in the care of their patients, the CCC systems give the results of diagnostic studies immediately upon request; offer access to the medical literature: give advice, consultation, alerts, and reminders; assist in the day-to-day practice to medicine, and participate directly in the education of medical students and house officers. The CCC systems are extensively used, even by physicians who are under no obligation to use them. Studies have shown that the systems are well received and that they help clinicians improve the quality of patient care. In addition, the CCC systems have had a beneficial impact on the finances of the two hospitals, and they have cost less than what many hospitals spend for financial computing alone. PMID:10405878

  18. Hospital–Physician Affiliations and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources Sources include the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File (ARF). Study Design A multivariate regression analysis of the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations (such as physician–hospital organizations [PHOs] or salaried employment) and the treatment of Medicare patients with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1994 and 1998. Dependent variables include whether the patient received a catheterization or angioplasty or bypass surgery; whether a patient was readmitted, or died within 90 days of initial admission; and expenditures. Independent variables include patient, admission hospital, and market characteristics, as well as hospital and year fixed effects. Principal Findings The integrated salary model form of hospital–physician affiliation is associated with slightly higher procedure rates, and higher patient expenditures. At the same time, there is little evidence that hospital–physician affiliations in the aggregate have had any measurable impact on patient treatment or outcomes. Conclusions The limited effect of hospital–physician affiliations on patient outcomes is consistent with previous research showing that affiliations have not much changed the nature of health care delivery. However, the finding that the integrated salary model is associated with higher treatment intensity suggests that affiliations may have had some impact on patients, and could have more in the future. PMID:15032954

  19. Estimates of costs by DRG in Sydney teaching hospitals: an application of the Yale cost model.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G; Aisbett, C; Fetter, R; Winchester, L; Reid, B; Rigby, E

    1991-01-01

    The results are reported of a first round of costing by DRG in seven major teaching hospital sites in Sydney using the Yale cost model. These results, when compared between the hospitals and with values of relative costs by DRG from the United States, indicate that the cost modelling procedure has produced credible and potentially useful estimates of casemix costs. The rationale and underlying theory of cost modelling is explained, and the need for further work to improve the method of allocating costs to DRGs, and to improve the cost centre definitions currently used by the hospitals, is emphasised. PMID:10117339

  20. Workload Impact of Medical Subspecialties in the Teaching Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Peenen, Hubert J.

    1973-01-01

    This paper documents, using a single test as a model, the significant increase in clinical laboratory workload which occurred in a university hospital when strong sections of nephrology, hematology-oncology, and immunology-rheumatology were added to the department of medicine. (Author)

  1. Accuracy of the Charlson Index Comorbidities Derived from a Hospital Electronic Database in a Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Adel; Alharthi, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Hospital management and researchers are increasingly using electronic databases to study utilization, effectiveness, and outcomes of healthcare provision. Although several studies have examined the accuracy of electronic databases developed for general administrative purposes, few studies have examined electronic databases created to document the care provided by individual hospitals. In this study, we assessed the accuracy of an electronic database in a major teaching hospital in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia, in documenting the 17 comorbidities constituting the Charlson index as recorded in paper charts by care providers. Using the hospital electronic database, the researchers randomly selected the data for 1,019 patients admitted to the hospital and compared the data for accuracy with the corresponding paper charts. Compared with the paper charts, the hospital electronic database did not differ significantly in prevalence for 9 conditions but differed from the paper charts for 8 conditions. The kappa (K) values of agreement ranged from a high of 0.91 to a low of 0.09. Of the 17 comorbidities, the electronic database had substantial or excellent agreement for 10 comorbidities relative to paper chart data, and only one showed poor agreement. Sensitivity ranged from a high of 100.0 percent to a low of 6.0 percent. Specificity for all comorbidities was greater than 93 percent. The results suggest that the hospital electronic database reasonably agrees with patient chart data and can have a role in healthcare planning and research. The analysis conducted in this study could be performed in individual institutions to assess the accuracy of an electronic database before deciding on its utility in planning or research. PMID:23861671

  2. Historical evidence for the origin of teaching hospital, medical school and the rise of academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Modanlou, H D

    2011-04-01

    Historical progression and the development of current teaching hospitals, medical schools and biomedical research originated from the people of many civilizations and cultures. Greeks, Indians, Syriacs, Persians and Jews, assembled first in Gondi-Shapur during the Sasanian empire in Persia, and later in Baghdad during the Golden Age of Islam, ushering the birth of current academic medicine. PMID:21233794

  3. Approaching Hospital-Bound/Home-Bound Special Education as an Opportunity for Innovation in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxically some "extreme" didactic needs, such as those of students who are unable to attend normal education regularly (e.g., hospitalized and/or homebound students), have shown themselves to be ideal for the development of a teaching style aimed at stimulating the active role of the student, at fostering a learning process based…

  4. Historical evidence for the origin of teaching hospital, medical school and the rise of academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Modanlou, H D

    2011-04-01

    Historical progression and the development of current teaching hospitals, medical schools and biomedical research originated from the people of many civilizations and cultures. Greeks, Indians, Syriacs, Persians and Jews, assembled first in Gondi-Shapur during the Sasanian empire in Persia, and later in Baghdad during the Golden Age of Islam, ushering the birth of current academic medicine.

  5. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. Methods: this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. Results: According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. Conclusion: The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction. PMID:27047262

  6. A "Prepaid Package" for Obstetrics: Effect on Teaching and Patient Care in a University Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Philip E.

    1976-01-01

    The changing social milieu has removed the charity patient but not the need for a teaching population. The University Hospital's program is described, in which patients prepaid a fixed, single fee for all obstetrics-related care through the third post partum day. (LBH)

  7. Factors Associated with Waiting Time for Breast Cancer Treatment in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedey, Florence; Wu, Lily; Ayettey, Hannah; Sanuade, Olutobi A.; Akingbola, Titilola S.; Hewlett, Sandra A.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Cole, Helen V.; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Adanu, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in Ghana. Data are limited on the predictors of poor outcomes in breast cancer patients in low-income countries; however, prolonged waiting time has been implicated. Among breast cancer patients who received treatment at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, this study…

  8. Persistence and transmission of Salmonella Infantis in a veterinary teaching hospital

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis isolates obtained from patients or the environment of a veterinary teaching hospital over a period of nine years following a nosocomial outbreak to determine whether isolates were epidemiologically related or represented ...

  9. Teaching tip: making the most of hospital rounds.

    PubMed

    Lane, India F; Cornell, Karen K

    2013-01-01

    Effective clinical teaching rounds are facilitated by adequate and specific orientation, a positive climate, interpersonal rapport, and dynamic discussions. Using fewer and better-quality questions also promotes effective learning and saves valuable time, while providing multiple opportunities for student engagement and for assessing student performance. This paper provides a brief review of these key points and offers tips and examples for clinicians or other team members leading conference room rounds sessions in veterinary settings. PMID:23697541

  10. Critical Incident Reporting System in Teaching Hospitals in Turkey: A Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Şalvız, Emine Aysu; Edipoğlu, Saadet İpek; Sungur, Mukadder Orhan; Altun, Demet; Büget, Mehmet İlke; Seyhan, Tülay Özkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Critical incident reporting systems (CIRS) and morbidity–mortality meetings (MMMs) offer the advantages of identifying potential risks in patients. They are key tools in improving patient safety in healthcare systems by modifying the attitudes of clinicians, nurses and staff (human error) and also the system (human and/or technical error) according to the analysis and the results of incidents. Methods One anaesthetist assigned to an administrative and/or teaching position from all university hospitals (UHs) and training and research hospitals (TRHs) of Turkey (n=114) was contacted. In this survey study, we analysed the facilities of anaesthetists in Turkish UHs and TRHs with respect to CIRS and MMMs and also the anaesthetists’ knowledge, experience and attitudes regarding CIs. Results Anaesthetists from 81 of 114 teaching hospitals replied to our survey. Although 96.3% of anaesthetists indicated CI reporting as a necessity, only 37% of departments/hospitals were reported to have CIRS. True definition of CI as “an unexpected /accidental event” was achieved by 23.3% of anaesthetists with CIRS. MMMs were reported in 60.5% of hospitals. Nevertheless, 96% of anaesthetists believe that CIRS and MMMs decrease the incidence of CI occurring. CI occurrence was attributed to human error as 4 [1–5]/10 and 3 [1–5]/10 in UHs and TRHs, respectively (p=0.005). In both hospital types, technical errors were evaluated as 3 [1–5]/10 (p=0.498). Conclusion This first study regarding CIRS in the Turkish anaesthesia departments/hospitals highlights the lack of CI knowledge and CIRS awareness and use in anaesthesia departments/teaching hospitals in Turkey despite a safety reporting system set up by the Turkish Ministry of Health. PMID:27366560

  11. Applying the Balanced Scorecard approach in teaching hospitals: a literature review and conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Annarita; Cardamone, Emma; Cavallaro, Giusy; Mauro, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    Teaching hospitals (THs) simultaneously serve three different roles: offering medical treatment, teaching future doctors and promoting research. The international literature recognises such organisations as 'peaks of excellence' and highlights their economic function in the health system. In addition, the literature describes the urgent need to manage the complex dynamics and inefficiency issues that threaten the survival of teaching hospitals worldwide. In this context, traditional performance measurement systems that focus only on accounting and financial measures appear to be inadequate. Given that THs are highly specific and complex, a multidimensional system of performance measurement, such as the Balanced Scorecard (BSC), may be more appropriate because of the multitude of stakeholders, each of whom seek a specific type of accountability. The aim of the paper was twofold: (i) to review the literature on the BSC and its applications in teaching hospitals and (ii) to propose a scorecard framework that is suitable for assessing the performance of THs and serving as a guide for scholars and practitioners. In addition, this research will contribute to the ongoing debate on performance evaluation systems by suggesting a revised BSC framework and proposing specific performance indicators for THs.

  12. Applying the Balanced Scorecard approach in teaching hospitals: a literature review and conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Annarita; Cardamone, Emma; Cavallaro, Giusy; Mauro, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    Teaching hospitals (THs) simultaneously serve three different roles: offering medical treatment, teaching future doctors and promoting research. The international literature recognises such organisations as 'peaks of excellence' and highlights their economic function in the health system. In addition, the literature describes the urgent need to manage the complex dynamics and inefficiency issues that threaten the survival of teaching hospitals worldwide. In this context, traditional performance measurement systems that focus only on accounting and financial measures appear to be inadequate. Given that THs are highly specific and complex, a multidimensional system of performance measurement, such as the Balanced Scorecard (BSC), may be more appropriate because of the multitude of stakeholders, each of whom seek a specific type of accountability. The aim of the paper was twofold: (i) to review the literature on the BSC and its applications in teaching hospitals and (ii) to propose a scorecard framework that is suitable for assessing the performance of THs and serving as a guide for scholars and practitioners. In addition, this research will contribute to the ongoing debate on performance evaluation systems by suggesting a revised BSC framework and proposing specific performance indicators for THs. PMID:23081849

  13. Some correlates of electronic health information management system success in nigerian teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Adebowale I; Popoola, Sunday O

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, an electronic health information management system (EHIMS) is crucial for patient care in hospitals. This paper explores the aspects and elements that contribute to the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of study comprised 442 health information management personnel in five teaching hospitals that had implemented EHIMS in Nigeria. A self-developed questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. The findings revealed that there is a positive, close relationship between all the identified factors and EHIMS's success: technical factors (r = 0.564, P < 0.05); social factors (r = 0.616, P < 0.05); organizational factors (r = 0.621, P < 0.05); financial factors (r = 0.705, P < 0.05); and political factors (r = 0.589, P < 0.05). We conclude that consideration of all the identified factors was highly significant for the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. PMID:25983557

  14. Some Correlates of Electronic Health Information Management System Success in Nigerian Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Adebowale I; Popoola, Sunday O

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, an electronic health information management system (EHIMS) is crucial for patient care in hospitals. This paper explores the aspects and elements that contribute to the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of study comprised 442 health information management personnel in five teaching hospitals that had implemented EHIMS in Nigeria. A self-developed questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. The findings revealed that there is a positive, close relationship between all the identified factors and EHIMS’s success: technical factors (r = 0.564, P < 0.05); social factors (r = 0.616, P < 0.05); organizational factors (r = 0.621, P < 0.05); financial factors (r = 0.705, P < 0.05); and political factors (r = 0.589, P < 0.05). We conclude that consideration of all the identified factors was highly significant for the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. PMID:25983557

  15. Defining teaching hospitals' GME strategy in response to new financial and market challenges.

    PubMed

    Wray, J L; Sadowski, S M

    1998-04-01

    The authors present an overview of current graduate medical education (GME) issues, particularly the financial challenges to teaching hospitals resulting from the Balanced Budget and Tax Payer Relief Acts of 1997 and other recent market-driven factors. They describe in detail the nature of Medicare GME payments before and after the 1997 legislation, with specific examples, and explain the negative financial impact of the legislation and aspects of the legislation that are designed to alleviate that impact. Other factors influencing GME program size and composition are also discussed, including oversupplies or shortages of physicians, the concern that teaching hospitals are using public funds to train international medical graduates, changing training requirements, etc. The authors also describe a recent consulting assignment during which they assisted a major teaching hospital to develop a GME strategy that was responsive to the organization's mission and patients and that took into account future GME financing challenges. Detailed explanations are given of how the consultants analyzed the hospital's GME programs and finances, developed and ranked key institution-specific program criteria (strategic, organizational and operational, and financial), and, in consultation with all key stakeholders, formulated a GME strategy specific to the institution's needs. The authors conclude by cautioning that each institution's GME strategy will be different, but that it is important for institutions to develop such strategies to better face future challenges.

  16. The Intricate Relationship Between a Medical School and a Teaching Hospital: A Case Study in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mubuuke, Aloysius Gonzaga; Businge, Francis; Mukule, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between medical schools and teaching hospitals is full of opportunities but also challenges even though they have complementary goals that could enhance each other. Although medical schools and teaching hospitals may face some similar challenges around the world, there could be context-specific observations that differ in resource-rich versus resource-limited settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that are perceived to have influenced the relationship between a medical school and a teaching hospital in Uganda, a resource-limited setting. Methods This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study in which key informant individual interviews were conducted with senior administrators and senior staff members of the Mulago Hospital and Makerere University Medical School. The interviews explored factors perceived to have favoured the working relationship between the two institutions, challenges faced and likely future opportunities. Both quantitative and qualitative data were generated. Thematic analysis was used with the qualitative data. Results Respondents reported a strained relationship between the two institutions, with unfavourable factors far outweighing the favourable factors influencing the relationship. Key negative reported factors included having different administrative set-ups, limited opportunities to share funds and to forge research collaborations, unexploited potential of sharing human resources to address staff shortages, as well as a lack of a memorandum of understanding between the two institutions. Discussion This study identifies barriers in the existing relationship between a teaching hospital and medical college in a resource-poor country. It proposes a collaborative model, rather than competitive model, for the two institutions that may work in both resource-limited and resource-rich settings. PMID:25758388

  17. Organ donation after circulatory death in a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, S; Treasure, E; Silvester, W; Opdam, H; Warrillow, S J; Jones, D

    2016-07-01

    Although organ transplantation is well established for end-stage organ failure, many patients die on waiting lists due to insufficient donor numbers. Recently, there has been renewed interest in donation after circulatory death (DCD). In a retrospective observational study we reviewed the screening of patients considered for DCD between March 2007 and December 2012 in our hospital. Overall, 148 patients were screened, 17 of whom were transferred from other hospitals. Ninety-three patients were excluded (53 immediately and 40 after review by donation staff). The 55 DCD patients were younger than those excluded (P=0.007) and they died from hypoxic brain injury (43.6%), intraparenchymal haemorrhage (21.8%) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (14.5%). Antemortem heparin administration and bronchoscopy occurred in 50/53 (94.3%) and 22/55 (40%) of cases, respectively. Forty-eight patients died within 90 minutes and proceeded to donation surgery. Associations with not dying in 90 minutes included spontaneous ventilation mode (P=0.022), absence of noradrenaline infusion (P=0.051) and higher PaO2:FiO2 ratio (P=0.052). The number of brain dead donors did not decrease over the study period. The time interval between admission and death was longer for DCD than for the 45 brain dead donors (5 [3-11] versus 2 [2-3] days; P<0.001), and 95 additional patients received organ transplants due to DCD. Introducing a DCD program can increase potential organ donors without reducing brain dead donors. Antemortem investigations appear to be acceptable to relatives when included in the consent process.

  18. Organ donation after circulatory death in a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, S; Treasure, E; Silvester, W; Opdam, H; Warrillow, S J; Jones, D

    2016-07-01

    Although organ transplantation is well established for end-stage organ failure, many patients die on waiting lists due to insufficient donor numbers. Recently, there has been renewed interest in donation after circulatory death (DCD). In a retrospective observational study we reviewed the screening of patients considered for DCD between March 2007 and December 2012 in our hospital. Overall, 148 patients were screened, 17 of whom were transferred from other hospitals. Ninety-three patients were excluded (53 immediately and 40 after review by donation staff). The 55 DCD patients were younger than those excluded (P=0.007) and they died from hypoxic brain injury (43.6%), intraparenchymal haemorrhage (21.8%) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (14.5%). Antemortem heparin administration and bronchoscopy occurred in 50/53 (94.3%) and 22/55 (40%) of cases, respectively. Forty-eight patients died within 90 minutes and proceeded to donation surgery. Associations with not dying in 90 minutes included spontaneous ventilation mode (P=0.022), absence of noradrenaline infusion (P=0.051) and higher PaO2:FiO2 ratio (P=0.052). The number of brain dead donors did not decrease over the study period. The time interval between admission and death was longer for DCD than for the 45 brain dead donors (5 [3-11] versus 2 [2-3] days; P<0.001), and 95 additional patients received organ transplants due to DCD. Introducing a DCD program can increase potential organ donors without reducing brain dead donors. Antemortem investigations appear to be acceptable to relatives when included in the consent process. PMID:27456178

  19. Teaching evidence-based practice in the hospital and the library: two different groups, one course.

    PubMed

    Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra

    2013-01-01

    Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development. PMID:23394424

  20. Imaging of gunshot injuries in a west Dublin teaching hospital--a ten year review.

    PubMed

    Murphy, I; Lavelle, L; Ni Mhurchu, E; McCarthy, R; Heffernan, E

    2014-09-01

    There has been an increase in gun-related crime in Ireland over the last decade to gangland violence, especially in west Dublin. This places a burden on hospital services not previously encountered. The aim of this study was to examine the demographics of gunshot: injuries presenting to a Dublin teaching hospital, and the impact on radiology over a ten year period. A total of 65 gunshot injuries were seen. Mortality for high velocity wounds was much higher (10/23, 43%) than for low-velocity shotgun injuries (2/34, 6%).

  1. Optimization of clinical teaching unit call schedules at the Ottawa hospital through tabu search heuristics.

    PubMed

    White, Christine A; White, George M

    2002-01-01

    The task of scheduling medical staff for evening rounds in the Clinical Teaching Unit of the Ottawa Hospital is a long complicated task due to its complexity. Three main classifications of staff, combined with various rotations, skill sets, clinical teams and vacation periods have combined to create a difficult scheduling problem. As there were no commercial packages available to solve this particular task, a study was made of heuristic scheduling and optimization techniques and a program based on a variation of the tabu search heuristic was written and tested. This system is being used to schedule medical staff at the Ottawa Hospital.

  2. Teaching evidence-based practice in the hospital and the library: two different groups, one course.

    PubMed

    Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra

    2013-01-01

    Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development.

  3. Use of potentially inappropriate medications in hospitalized elderly at a teaching hospital: A comparison between Beers 2003 and 2012 criteria

    PubMed Central

    Momin, Taufik G.; Pandya, Rushi N.; Rana, Devang A.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the prevalence and pattern of use of Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized elderly patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital using Beers 2012 criteria and to compare the same with Beers 2003 criteria. Materials and Methods: Prescriptions of the elderly patients aged 65 years and above were collected from the medicine ward and analyzed. PIMs were identified with help of Beers 2003 and Beers 2012 criteria and comparison was made between the two criteria. Predictors associated with use of PIM were identified using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 210 patients received 2,267 drugs. According to Beers 2003 criteria, 60 (28.57%) elderly patients received at least one PIM and 2.9% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. According to Beers 2012 criteria, 84 (40%) elderly received at least one PIM while 22 (10.47%) received multiple PIMs and about 5% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. The most commonly prescribed PIM was mineral oil-liquid paraffin (30, 14.3%) followed by spironolactone (25, 11.9%), digoxin (19, 9%), and benzodiazepines (14, 6.7%). There was a significant association between the number of patients receiving more than six drugs and the use of PIMs (P < 0.01). Use of more than 10 drugs was a significant predictor for use of PIMs in the elderly. Conclusion: The study shows high prevalence of prescribing PIMs in hospitalized elderly patients. Beers 2012 criteria are more effective in identifying PIMs than Beers 2003 criteria. PMID:24347769

  4. Re-engineering surgical services in a community teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M M; Wreford, M; Barnes, M; Voight, P

    1997-04-01

    The Grace Hospital Surgical Services redesign project began in December 1995 and concluded in November 1996. It was led by the Chief of Surgery, the Surgical/Anesthesia Services Director, and the Associate Director of Critical Care/Trauma. The project was undertaken in order to radically redesign the delivery of surgical services in the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Northwest Region. It encompassed the Grace Hospital Main Operating Room (10 operating theatres) and Post-Anesthesia Recovery Unit, and a satellite Ambulatory Surgery Center in Southfield, Michigan. The four areas of focus were materials management, case scheduling, patient flow/staffing, and business planning. The guiding objectives of the project were to improve upon the quality of surgical services for patients and physicians, to substantially reduce costs, and to increase case volume. Because the Grace Surgical Services redesign project was conducted in a markedly open communicative, and inclusive fashion and drew participation from a broad range of medical professionals, support staff, and management, it created positive ripple effects across the institution by raising staff cost-consciousness, satisfaction, and morale. Other important accomplishments of the project included: Introduction of block scheduling in the ORs, which improved room utilization and turnaround efficiencies, and greatly smoothed the boarding process for physicians. Centralization of all surgical boarding, upgrading of computer equipment to implement "one call" surgery scheduling, and enlarging the capacity for archiving, managing and retrieving OR data. Installation of a 23-hour, overnight recovery unit and provision of physician assistants at the Ambulatory Surgery Center, opening the doors to an expanded number of surgical procedures, and enabling higher quality care for patients. Reduction of FTE positions by 27 percent at the Ambulatory Surgery Center. This yielded a total cost reduction of +1.5 million per annum in the

  5. Needlestick injuries at a tertiary teaching hospital in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Seng, M; Sng, G K J; Zhao, X; Venkatachalam, I; Salmon, S; Fisher, D

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the incidence and risk to staff groups for sustaining needlestick injuries (NSIs) in the National University Hospital (NUH), Singapore. A retrospective cohort review of incident NSI cases was undertaken to determine the injury rate, causation, and epidemiological profile of such injuries. Analysis of the risk of sustaining recurrent NSI by occupation and location was done using the Cox proportional hazards model. There were 244 NSI cases in 5957 employees in NUH in 2014, giving an incidence rate of 4·1/100 healthcare workers (HCWs) per year. The incidence rate was highest for doctors at 21·3, and 2·7 for nurses; 40·6% of injuries occurred in wards, and 32·8% in operating theatres. There were 27 cases of repeated NSI cases. The estimated cost due to NSIs in NUH ranged from US$ 109 800 to US$ 563 152 in 2014. We conclude that creating a workplace environment where top priority is given to prevention of NSIs in HCWs, is essential to address the high incidence of reported NSIs. The data collected will be of value to inform the design of prevention programmes to reduce further the risk of NSIs in HCWs. PMID:27151164

  6. A Physician's Practice Profile: Application for a Teaching Hospital Ambulatory Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Retchin, Sheldon M.; Blish, Christine S.

    1984-01-01

    A computer generated report (Practice Profile) summarizing epidemiologic, demographic and utilization data from a general internal medicine practice, was developed and implemented in a teaching hospital setting. Using a computerized medical record system, the Profile displays individual and group practice data. It is used for enhancing the physicians' understanding of their ambulatory practices and for raising important quality assurance issues. The Practice Profile is also used for improving educational activities in the residency program and for stimulating research opportunities within the practice.

  7. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Results Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6%) was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9%) was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7%) were ready to disclose their error

  8. Nutritional risk, malnutrition and nutritional support among hospitalized patients in orthopedics/spinal surgery of a Hohhot teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Dong, Yalin; Huo, Ting; Shao, Yanqing; Xing, Wenhua; Li, Shuwen

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of nutritional status (the prevalence of nutritional risk, malnutrition, overweight and obesity) and the nutritional support of the hospitalized patients from admission to discharge or over a two-week period in orthopedics/ spinal surgery of a teaching hospital in Hohhot were investigated. 432 patients from two wards of the orthopedics/spinal surgery from Jan to Dec 2013, the traditional spinal surgery and the minimally invasive spinal surgery, were selected and detected in this study. The Nutritional Risk Score 2002 (NRS 2002) was used to determine the patients' nutritional status within 48 h after admission and during their hospitalization. The overall prevalence of nutritional risk, malnutrition, overweight and obesity at admission was 11.6%, 12.7%, 35.9% and 7.41%, respectively. Overall, there were 88.0% of the patients who were at nutritional risk received nutritional support, while 14.1% of non-risk patients received a redundant nutritional support. The overall prevalence of nutritional risk changed from 11.6% at admission to 19.4% upon discharge (p<0.05), and the prevalence of malnutrition changed from 12.7% to 20.6% (p<0.05). The prevalence of overweight and obesity, which changed from 35.9% to 31.0% and from 7.41% to 5.79% respectively, didn't experience statistically significant evolution. NRS 2002 was a feasible nutritional risk screening tool for patients in spinal surgery of orthopedics department. Patients' prevalence of nutritional risk and malnutrition increased significantly in spinal surgery of this hospital. Some inappropriate uses of nutritional support were observed in orthopedics/spinal surgery, and nutritional support guidelines or protocols should be promoted by a professional committee.

  9. Painful medicine: managed care and the fate of America's major teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Levey, S; Anderson, L

    1999-01-01

    Healthcare spending in the United States has risen steadily throughout the post-World War II period as the American healthcare system has been transformed from cottage industry to big business. The increasing rate of social investment in healthcare also transformed America's major teaching hospitals. As a case in point, the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics saw annual operating revenues rise from $1 million in 1945 to more than $350 million in 1995, which was accompanied by an extraordinary expansion in its physical facilities and in its multifaceted operations. In the 1970s and even more so in the 1980s, however, the unceasing climb in healthcare spending fueled concern among policy experts, politicians, employers, and insurers alike. In turn, the search for effective cost controls led to the current managed care revolution. While the end of that revolution is not yet in sight, managed care has, it appears, effected significant cost savings, but at no small cost to America's major teaching hospitals and their social missions of teaching, research, and patient care. Whether those missions can survive--and, if so, in what form--in a healthcare system dominated by the managed care ethos is an increasingly important concern. PMID:10539198

  10. Nosocomial Infections and Epidemiology of Antibiotic Resistance in Teaching Hospitals in South East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Mahboobeh; Abdar, Mohammad Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Aflatoonia, Mohammad Reza; Abdar, Zahra Esmaeili

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Antibiotic resistance as one of the most serious health threats worldwide leading to a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The aim of present study was to examine the prevalence of nosocomial infections (NIs) and pattern of antibiotic resistance in teaching hospitals in Iran Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in a period of one year in three teaching hospitals and all patients with suspected NIs symptoms were chooses. Among these patients who showed antibiotic resistance were included in the study. The samples for clinical test in laboratory were obtained with using standard methods and aseptic technique by trained personnel. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer’s disk diffusion method on Muller-Hinton agar (Hi Media, Mumbai, India) in accordance with the standards of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: During one year study, 561 patients with nosocomial infections were recognized and among them 340 patients (60.6%) showed some level of antibiotic resistance. The most common cause of NIs in present study was Acinetobacter and the most type of infection was respiratory system infections (52.7%). The highest resistance rate was against Ciprofloxacin (61.8%) followed by Imipenem (50.3%). Conclusion: Rate of NIs and antibiotics resistance is high in Iranian hospital. So Iranian health ministry should provide guideline and suitable programs for prevention of NIs and antibiotic therapy in hospitals. PMID:26383222

  11. Equipment and Energy Usage in a Large Teaching Hospital in Norway.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Tarald; Martinez, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a study of how equipment is used in a Norwegian University hospital and suggests ways to reduce hospital energy consumption. Analysis of energy data from Norway's newest teaching hospital showed that electricity consumption was up to 50% of the whole-building energy consumption. Much of this is due to the increasing energy intensity of hospital-specific equipment. Measured power and reported usage patterns for equipment in the studied departments show daytime energy intensity of equipment at about 28.5 kBTU/ft2 per year (90 kWh/m2 per year), compared to building code standard value of only 14.9 kBTU/ft2 (47 kWh/m2 per year) for hospitals. This article intends to fill gaps in our understanding of how users and their equipment affect the energy balance in hospitals and suggests ways in which designers and equipment suppliers can help optimize energy performance while maintaining quality in the delivery of health services. PMID:26753442

  12. Professionalism of physicians at a major teaching hospital during the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Narita, M; Tokuda, Y; Barnett, P

    2016-07-01

    It poses a serious problem if physicians leave a hospital without having a replacement or without permission. A huge earthquake followed by a devastating tsunami seriously damaged the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant. This disaster overwhelmed a major teaching hospital in the local area and many hospital employees, including some resident physicians, left the premises. Since the threat of severe radiation exposure poses a potentially greater lifetime risk to younger individuals, letting the young resident physicians leave the hospital was not only allowed, it was actually recommended by many attending physicians and hospital administrators. The hospital administrator was required to make the difficult decision of whether to make all efforts to provide the highest level of medical care, including keeping all of the physicians on the premises, or to evacuate the resident physicians in order to preserve their health and their potential future contributions to healthcare. Consideration and compassion needed to be provided to all people, regardless of the reason they wanted to leave. From an ethical perspective, the roles of performance under these complex circumstances should be understood and embraced by us as individuals, professionals, supervisors and society as a whole. PMID:27121040

  13. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  14. Hospital clonal dissemination of Enterobacter aerogenes producing carbapenemase KPC-2 in a Chinese teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaohua; Yang, Yang; Hu, Fupin; Zhu, Demei

    2014-02-01

    Carbapenems are first-line agents for the treatment of serious nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. However, resistance to carbapenems has increased dramatically among Enterobacteriaceae in our hospital. In this study, we report clonal dissemination caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes (CREA). In 2011, CREA was identified from 12 patients admitted to the neurosurgical ward. All 12 clinical isolates were non-susceptible to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefoxitin, ertapenem, imipenem or meropenem. All isolates carried the gene encoding Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-2 (KPC-2), except for the isolate E4. However, a remarkably lower expression level of the porin OmpF was detected in the non-KPC-2-producing isolate E4 on SDS-PAGE compared with the carbapenem-susceptible isolate. Epidemiological and molecular investigations showed that a single E. aerogenes strain (PFGE type A), including seven KPC-2-producing clinical isolates, was primarily responsible for the first isolation and subsequent dissemination. In a case-control study, we identified risk factors for infection/colonization with CREA. Mechanical ventilation, the changing of sickbeds and previous use of broad-spectrum antibiotics were identified as potential risk factors. Our findings suggest that further studies should focus on judicious use of available antibiotics, implementation of active antibiotic resistance surveillance and strict implementation of infection-control measures to avoid the rapid spread or clonal dissemination caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in healthcare facilities.

  15. Patient Safety in Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments of two Teaching Hospitals in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Guleria, Kiran; Arora, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: A healthy safety culture is integral to positive health care. A sound safety climate is required in Obstetrics and Gynecology to prevent adverse outcomes. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess and compare patient safety culture in two departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Materials and Methods: Using a closed-ended standard version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), respondents were asked to answer 42 survey items, grouped into 10 dimensions and two outcome variables in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Delhi. Qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test and chi-square test wherever applicable. Mean values were calculated and compared using unpaired t-test. Results: The overall survey response rate was 55%. A positive response rate of 57% was seen in the overall perception of patient safety that ranged from very good to acceptable. Sixty-four percent showed positive teamwork across hospital departments and units, while 36% gave an affirmative opinion with respect to interdepartmental handoffs. However, few adverse events (0-10) were reported in the last 12 months and only 38% of mistakes by doctors were reported. Half of the respondents agreed that their mistakes were held against them. There was no statistical difference in the safety culture between the two hospitals. Conclusions: Although the perception of patient safety and standards of patient safety were high in both the hospitals' departments, there is plenty of scope for improvement with respect to event reporting, positive feedback, and nonpunitive error. PMID:27385879

  16. Genetic characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-resistant isolates at the university teaching hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Hossein; Sadighian, Hooman; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is commonly responsible for nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to perform a genotyping analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa-resistant isolates by the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method at the university teaching hospital in Iran. Materials and Methods: Antimicrobial susceptibility was analyzed for P. aeruginosa isolates. Ceftazidime-resistant (CAZres) isolates with a positive double-disc synergy test were screened for the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding genes. Phenotypic tests to detect the metallo-β-lactamase strains of P. aeruginosa were performed on imipenem-resistant (IMPres) isolates. Selected strains were characterized by MLST. Results: Of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates, 71%, 45% and 45% of isolates were CAZres, IMPres and multidrug resistant (MDR), respectively. Fifty-seven percent of the isolates carried the blaOXAgroup-1. All the five typed isolates were ST235. Isolates of ST235 that were MDR showed a unique resistance pattern. Conclusion: This study shows a high rate of MDR P. aeruginosa isolates at the university teaching hospital in Iran. It seems MDR isolates of P. aeruginosa ST235 with unique resistance pattern disseminated in this hospital. PMID:26380241

  17. An ethics consultation service in a teaching hospital. Utilization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    La Puma, J; Stocking, C B; Silverstein, M D; DiMartini, A; Siegler, M

    1988-08-12

    A newly established formal ethics consultation service in a university teaching hospital was prospectively evaluated. A physician-ethicist interviewed and examined patients, interviewed family and others as needed, and entered a formal consultation note in the medical record. The requesting physician and the consultant independently completed structured questionnaires. Fifty-one consultation requests were received from 45 physicians from seven departments between July 1, 1986, and June 30, 1987. Seventeen (33%) of 51 patients were in the intensive care unit, and 19 patients (37%) were fully oriented at the time of consultation. Overall, 61% of the patients survived to leave the hospital. The requesting physician sought assistance with withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in 49% of cases, with resuscitation issues in 37%, and with legal issues in 31%. Assistance with more than one issue was sought in 39 cases (76%). In 36 cases (71%), the requesting physician stated that the consultation was "very important" in patient management, in clarifying ethical issues, or in learning about medical ethics. We conclude that ethics consultation performed by physician-ethicists provides useful, clinically acceptable assistance in a teaching hospital.

  18. Influence of drug promotion on prescribing habits of doctors in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Akande, T M; Aderibigbe, S A

    2007-09-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted at University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital to examine the influence of drug promotion by drug companies on the prescription habits of doctors in the hospital. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect information from 137 doctors selected across all the clinical and laboratory departments using proportionate sampling. Majority (89.0%) of the doctors had attended drug promotion forum and were exposed to 64 different branded drugs within 6 months to this study. Fifty percent of the doctors had prescribed promoted drugs for the first time within 6 months to this study and over two-thirds agreed that drug promotion materials served as incentives to prescribe promoted drugs in preference to their alternatives. More than two-thirds of the doctors did not prescribe in generic names, thus making them susceptible to prescribing promoted branded drugs. Drug promotion by drug companies influence prescription habits of doctors in this teaching hospital. This finding though beneficial to the drug companies may not necessarily be cost-effective and to the benefit of the patients. Further studies and attention on this issue in developing countries is necessary with the ultimate aim of protecting the interest of patients in the face of rising cost of pharmaceuticals. PMID:18390058

  19. Quality assessment of clinical education services in teaching hospitals located in Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi-Feyzabadi, Vahid; Gozashti, Mohammad Hossein; Komsari, Samane; Mohammadtaghizadeh, Sedigheh; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical education is one of the most important components of the resource generation function of health systems, and it has a very important role in graduates’ competency with respect to effective, practical education. This study aimed to assess the quality of clinical services in Kerman’s teaching hospitals located in southeastern Iran. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 on 303 medical students at different levels of medical education at Kerman’s teaching hospitals. A modified SERVQUAL instrument was used to collect the data after its validity and reliability were checked. The data were analyzed by SPSS 18.0 using the paired t-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and post hoc tests, when appropriate. Results In all five dimensions of quality, gaps were observed between students’ perceptions and expectations as follows: Assurance (mean = −1.18), Responsiveness (−1.56), Empathy (−1.4), Reliability (−1.27), and Tangibles (−1.21). There was a significant difference between the quality perceptions and expectations of the medical students (p < 0.001). A significant difference was observed between three educational levels, including externships, internships, and assistantships regarding the dimensions of the quality gaps (p < 0.001). Conclusion The clinical services provided by teaching hospitals in the study did not meet the students’ expectations at any of the three educational levels. As we precisely assessed the dimensions and items that had the higher quality gaps, it was apparent that, for most part, clinical education officials could improve the quality by designing interventions, which would not be very difficult to do. PMID:26767094

  20. [Hospitals' evolution through the ages].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    The predecessor institutions of modern hospitals--Byzantine nosocómeion, European hospitale and Islamic maristan--were dissimilar both in their patients and their aims. The first charitable organizations in West Europe (Rome) and in the East (Cesarea in Cappadocia) were rather hospices. After the collapse of the Western Roman Empire (476 A.D.), some monastic centers were prepared to provide medical assistance to religious and secular patients. Since the XI and XII Centuries in all of Christian Europe the charitable institutions, designated as hospitale, multiplied. Among the Italian ones, the Roman Santo Spirito (Holy Ghost) Hospital, built in the 1201-1204 period, reached a preeminet position. This one soon became the most important of the entire Christendom (archihospital), with a lot of affiliated hospitals in Europe and later in America. The first American hospital, Saint Nicholas Hospital, opened on December 29, 1503 in Santo Domingo, obtained in 1541 its affiliation to the Santo Spirito archihospital. Regarding continental America, the first health centers were established in Mexico: the Immaculate Conception Hospital and the Saint Lazarus Hospital, both established by Hernán Cortés. For its part, clinical teaching was systematized at the Saint Francis Hospital in Padua and by there moved to Leyden. In Mexico, the chair of medical clinics or practical medicine was established in 1806 at the Saint Andrew Hospital. During the XX century, Dr. Ignacio Chávez was the driving force behind the creation of the modern Mexican Health Institutes. These ones are dedicated to the treatment of poor patients, as well as to medical teaching and research.

  1. Best practice organizational effectiveness in NHS Trusts. Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. Case study.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M; Cooke, M; Whymark, J

    1999-01-01

    Measuring organisational effectiveness in a health-care delivery context is quite a challenging task. Although there are numerous performance assessment models, audit tools and managerial diagnostic tools, they all, however, tend to fall short in their attempts to scrutinize how health-care organizations deploy their capabilities to deliver optimum quality in service provision and what performance levels they achieved as a result of their approach. The project reported here attempted to address these issues, reflecting the experience of Leeds Teaching Hospitals, one of a series of Trusts whose approach to organizational effectiveness was closely examined.

  2. An assessment of internship at the teaching hospitals of the University of the Witwatersrand.

    PubMed

    Touyz, R M; Kelly, A; Tollman, S; Milne, F J

    1988-08-20

    Medical internship can be a physically exhausting and emotionally traumatic experience. This study assesses various aspects of internship, including continuing medical education, workload and stress, at the five Johannesburg teaching hospitals during 1985 and 1986. Data were analysed from a confidential questionnaire. Eighty-two interns completed the questionnaire at the end of 1985 and 120 at the end of 1986. Problem areas defined were excessive patient load, sleep deprivation and severe stress. The commonest symptoms of stress were fatigue, irritability and weight loss. In 1985, 53% of interns stated that they could not cope, and in 1986 this increased to 65%. Forty-eight per cent of 1985 and 69% of 1986 interns lost interest in medicine during their intern year. The implications of these results are discussed and the importance and impact on the medical profession and hospital services analysed.

  3. [Description of workloads and fatigue experienced among health workers in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Santana, Leni de Lima; Miranda, Fernanda Moura D'Almeida; Karino, Márcia Eiko; Baptista, Patrícia Campos Pavan; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres; Sarquis, Leila Maria Mansano

    2013-03-01

    This is an exploratory, descriptive and quantitative study, based on the following categories: work process, workloads and fatigue in a teaching hospital in Curitiba in the southern region of Brazil. The article characterizes the load and stress experienced in a university hospital, based on a previous study entitled "System for monitoring the health of nursing workers" (SIMOSTE). The results show that females were the most affected (85.9%) and the most affected professionals were nursing assistants (53.1%). The highest number of sick leaves was due to diseases of the osteoarticular system (25.2%) and the most significant loads were mechanical and physiological with 33.06% each. These results may support intervention strategies in the policies directed toward the workers' health to ensure a better quality of life and consequently improve the quality of care provided to the user. PMID:23781725

  4. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ezeome, Emmanuel R; Anarado, Agnes N

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) by cancer patients is very common and varies between populations. The referenced English literature has no local study from Africa on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and factors influencing the use of CAM by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu (UNTH-E), Nigeria Method Face-to-face interviews using semi-structured questionnaire were used to determine the use of CAM by cancer patients. All consenting cancer patients were interviewed as they presented at the core surgical units of the UNTH- E, from June 2003 to September 2005. Results 160 patients were interviewed; 68 (42.5%) were males and 94 (57.5%) were females. Ages ranged from 13–86 years. Breast, urogenital system, gastrointestinal system, and soft tissue cancers predominated. One hundred and four patients (65.0%) have used CAM at some time during their current cancer illness; 56 (35.0%) patients have not used any form of CAM. There were more females than males among the non-CAM users. The use of CAM was not affected by age, marital status, level of education, religious affiliation, or socioeconomic status. The most frequently used CAMs were herbs (51.9%), faith/prayer healing (49.4%), aloe vera (23.1%), Forever Living Products (16.3%), medicinal tea (14.4%), and Blackstone (12.5%). Over 23% of those who used CAM were satisfied, but 68.3% were disappointed. Most users (67.3%) did not see any benefit from the CAM, but 25% could describe some specific benefits. More than 21% of users reported various unwanted effects. While 86.5% of CAM users will use orthodox medicine instead of CAM in the future, 9.6% will use the two together to help each other. Most users (79.8%) will not repeat CAM or recommend its use for cancer. The majority of patients (55.8%) did not mention their use of CAM to their doctors – mostly because the doctor did not ask. Conclusion CAM use is

  5. Diversity of Bacterial Communities on Four Frequently Used Surfaces in a Large Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pereira da Fonseca, Tairacan Augusto; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Felix, Alvina Clara; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2016-02-01

    Frequently used hand-touch surfaces in hospital settings have been implicated as a vehicle of microbial transmission. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population on four frequently used surfaces using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Surface samples were collected from four sites, namely elevator buttons (EB), bank machine keyboard buttons (BMKB), restroom surfaces, and the employee biometric time clock system (EBTCS), in a large public and teaching hospital in São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, with a total of 926 bacterial families and 2832 bacterial genera. Moreover, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera, including Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The presence of these pathogens in frequently used surfaces enhances the risk of exposure to any susceptible individuals. Some of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity on these surfaces are poor personal hygiene and ineffective routine schedules of cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting. Strict standards of infection control in hospitals and increased public education about hand hygiene are recommended to decrease the risk of transmission in hospitals among patients. PMID:26805866

  6. Diversity of Bacterial Communities on Four Frequently Used Surfaces in a Large Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pereira da Fonseca, Tairacan Augusto; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Felix, Alvina Clara; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Frequently used hand-touch surfaces in hospital settings have been implicated as a vehicle of microbial transmission. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population on four frequently used surfaces using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Surface samples were collected from four sites, namely elevator buttons (EB), bank machine keyboard buttons (BMKB), restroom surfaces, and the employee biometric time clock system (EBTCS), in a large public and teaching hospital in São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, with a total of 926 bacterial families and 2832 bacterial genera. Moreover, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera, including Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The presence of these pathogens in frequently used surfaces enhances the risk of exposure to any susceptible individuals. Some of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity on these surfaces are poor personal hygiene and ineffective routine schedules of cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting. Strict standards of infection control in hospitals and increased public education about hand hygiene are recommended to decrease the risk of transmission in hospitals among patients. PMID:26805866

  7. Simulation-Based Dysphagia Training: Teaching Interprofessional Clinical Reasoning in a Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Miles, Anna; Friary, Philippa; Jackson, Bianca; Sekula, Julia; Braakhuis, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated hospital readiness and interprofessional clinical reasoning in speech-language pathology and dietetics students following a simulation-based teaching package. Thirty-one students participated in two half-day simulation workshops. The training included orientation to the hospital setting, part-task skill learning and immersive simulated cases. Students completed workshop evaluation forms. They filled in a 10-question survey regarding confidence, knowledge and preparedness for working in a hospital environment before and immediately after the workshops. Students completed written 15-min clinical vignettes at 1 month prior to training, immediately prior to training and immediately after training. A marking rubric was devised to evaluate the responses to the clinical vignettes within a framework of interprofessional education. The simulation workshops were well received by all students. There was a significant increase in students' self-ratings of confidence, preparedness and knowledge following the study day (p < .001). There was a significant increase in student overall scores in clinical vignettes after training with the greatest increase in clinical reasoning (p < .001). Interprofessional simulation-based training has benefits in developing hospital readiness and clinical reasoning in allied health students. PMID:26803776

  8. The use of sedative-hypnotic drugs in a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, R; Rusnak, C

    1990-01-01

    We reviewed the charts of 476 patients admitted to a university teaching hospital to determine whether sedative-hypnotic drugs (SHDs) were being used excessively and to examine the use of SHDs as hypnotics. The frequency of medical and surgical indications for barbiturates and benzodiazepines or other minor tranquillizers as well as the use of such drugs were compared among different groups of patients and specialty wards. Of the patients 29% had a regular order and 40% had a PRN order; only 77% of the PRN orders were administered. A total of 215 patients (45%) received an SHD during their hospital stay, and 160 (34%) received the drug as a hypnotic. Medical indications accounted for 49% of the regular orders but only 2% of the PRN orders; moreover, 89% of all the PRN orders were for insomnia. On average, patients receiving SHDs as hypnotics were older (p less than 0.05) and stayed longer in hospital (p less than 0.01) than those who did not; however, no patient on the geriatric or pediatric ward received an SHD as a hypnotic during the hospital stay. The differences in use between patient groups may have been influenced by orientation of ward staff. Physicians should review their rationale for prescribing hypnotics and avoid routine orders on admission. PMID:2369436

  9. Resistance and integron characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii in a teaching hospital in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.; Long, Q.; Qian, K.; Fu, T.; Zhang, Z.; Liao, P.; Xie, J.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 189 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were collected in 2011 from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, China. Susceptibility data showed strains carrying integrons were significantly more resistant to all tested antibiotics that strains lacking integrons. Five types of gene cassettes belonging to class I integrons were identified in this study, and for the first time two types of gene cassettes belonging to class II integrons are reported. Most of the cassettes belong to a class I integron (136/144) encoding arr3, aacA4, dfrA17, aadA5, aadB, cat, blaOXA10, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA and aacC1. Isolates contained a class I gene cassette; AadA2-HP-dfrA was the prevalent strain in this hospital. A class II integron was detected in eight strains, which contained the type IV fimbriae expression regulatory gene pilR and sulfate adenylyltransferase, suggesting a possible role in multidrug resistance. The major epidemic strains from intensive care unit patients belong to international clone 2. In conclusion, the presence of integrons was significantly associated with multiple drug resistance of A. baumannii in this hospital, and class I integron isolates bearing AadA2-HP-dfrA were the prevalent strain in this hospital. PMID:26649184

  10. An ethnographic investigation of junior doctors' capacities to practice interprofessionally in three teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Milne, Jacqueline; Greenfield, David; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative practice among early career staff is at the bedrock of interprofessional care. This study investigated factors influencing the enactment of interprofessional practice by using the day-to-day role of six junior doctors in three teaching hospitals as a gateway to understand the various professions' interactive behaviours. The contextual framework used for the study was Strauss' theory of negotiated order. Ethnographic techniques were applied to observe the actions and interactions of participants on typical working days in their hospital environments. Field notes were created and thematic analysis was applied to the data. Three themes explored were culture, communication, and collaboration. Issues identified highlight the bounded organisational and professional cultures within which junior doctors work, and systemic problems in interprofessional interaction and communication in the wards of hospitals. There are indications that early career doctors are interprofessional isolates. The constraints of short training terms and pressure from multi-faceted demands on junior doctors can interfere with the establishment of meaningful relationships with nurses and other health professionals. The realisation of sustained interprofessional practice is, therefore, practically and structurally difficult. Enabling factors supporting the sharing of expertise are outweighed by barriers associated with professional and hospital organisational cultures, poor interprofessional communication, and the pressure of competing individual task demands in the course of daily practice. PMID:25646898

  11. Night shift fatigue among anaesthesia trainees at a major metropolitan teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Lancman, B M

    2016-05-01

    Night shifts expose anaesthesia trainees to the risk of fatigue and, potentially, fatigue-related performance impairment. This study examined the workload, fatigue and coping strategies of anaesthesia trainees during night shifts. A blinded survey-based study was undertaken at a major single centre metropolitan teaching hospital in Australia. All ten anaesthesia trainees who worked night shifts participated. The survey collected data on duration of night shifts, workload, and sleep patterns. Fatigue was assessed using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). There were 93 night shifts generating data out of a potential 165. Trainees tended to sleep an increasing amount before their shift as the nights progressed from 1 to 5. Night 1 was identified as an 'at risk' night due to the amount of time spent awake before arriving at work (32% awake for U+003E8 hours); on all other nights trainees were most likely to have slept 6-8 hours. The KSS demonstrated an increase in sleepiness of 3 to 4 points on the scale from commencement to conclusion of a night shift. The Night 1 conclusion sleepiness was markedly worse than any other night with 42% falling into an 'at-risk' category. The findings demonstrate fatigue and inadequate sleep in anaesthesia trainees during night shifts in a major metropolitan teaching hospital. The data obtained may help administrators prepare safer rosters, and junior staff develop improved strategies to reduce the likelihood of fatigue.

  12. Needle-Stick Injuries Among Healthcare Workers in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Maryam; Behzadnia, Mohammad Javad; Saboori, Fatemeh; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Needle-Stick Injuries (NSIs) are among the hazards and problems that can expose health workers to infections. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the rate of NSIs in a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, analytical and descriptive study was conducted at one of the teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran, in 2013. The study population was 344 employees in various occupational groups selected via census. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using some statistical tests, including independent-samples t-test with SPSS software version 21.0. Results: The results showed that only 50.2% of injuries had been reported; 67.8% of all participants (n = 211) had at least one NSI. Most NSIs had been reported in the emergency department (33.5%). Most participants mentioned the injection syringe needles as the main cause of their injuries (71.1% of all NSIs). Among NSIs, those caused by insulin syringe needles (6.2%) were the second cause. In this study, females had NSIs more than males. There was a statistically significant relationship between sex and the rate of NSIs (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Considering the high rate of occupational injuries, further preventive measures should be implemented to prevent these injuries from occurring. Providing initial and continuing training for employees is very important. Directing special attention to emergency department employees may be effective in reducing occupational injuries. PMID:26839852

  13. The association between social capital and burnout in nurses of a trauma referral teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Farahbod, Farzin; Goudarzvand Chegini, Mehrdad; Kouchakinejad Eramsadati, Leila; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Social capital is a multi-faceted phenomenon in social sciences that massively affects many social fields. It can be a helpful factor in promoting health. Among the groups with high burnout, nurses have always shown higher levels of burnout. Studies have revealed that social capital can be an important factor affecting burnout. This study aimed to determine the extent of the effect of social capital on burnout in nurses of a trauma referral teaching hospital in Rasht. This was a descriptive correlational study conducted on 214 nurses of a trauma referral teaching hospital. Maslach standard questionnaire and the social capital questionnaire devised by Boyas and colleagues were used. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficient, and linear regression analysis to determine the extent of the effect of social capital on burnout. The study showed an inverse association between social capital and burnout. The intensity of the relationship was -0.451 (P<0.0001). Also, the linear regression model of social capital on burnout variable showed that the regression coefficient of social capital equaled -0.34. The determination coefficient of this regression model indicated that social capital explained 20% of burnout changes. The results showed high burnout in emotional exhaustion dimension and an inverse association between social capital and burnout. Thus, attempts should be made to promote social capital dimensions among nurses. Given the inevitability of job stress in a nursing environment, and managers should plan on improving the working conditions and training techniques to deal with such stress.

  14. Surveillance of ESBL producing multidrug resistant Escherichia coli in a teaching hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Shakti; Dubey, Debasmita; Sahu, Mahesh C.; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2014-01-01

    Objective To record nosocomial and community-acquired accounts of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains, isolated from clinical samples of a teaching hospital by surveillance, over a period of 39 months (November 2009-January 2013). Methods Clinical samples from nosocomial sources, i.e., wards and cabins, intensive care unit (ICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and community (outpatient department, OPD) sources of the hospital, were used for isolating strains of E. coli, which were subjected for testing for production of ‘extended spectrum beta-lactamase’-(ESBL) enzyme as well as determining antibiotic sensitivity pattern with 23 antibiotics. Results Of the total 1642 (100%) isolates, 810 (49.33%) strains were from OPD and 832 (50.66%) were from hospital settings. Occurrence of infectious E. coli strains increased in a mathematical progression in community sources, but in nosocomial infections, such values remained almost constant in each quarter. A total of 395 (24.05%) ESBL strains were isolated from the total 810 isolates of community; of the total of 464 (28.25%) isolates of wards and cabins, 199 (12.11%) were ESBL strains; and among the total of 368 (22.41%) isolates of ICU and NICU, ESBLs were 170 (10.35%); the total nosocomial ESBL isolates, 369 (22.47%) were from the nosocomial total of 832 (50.66%) isolates. Statistically, it was confirmed that ESBL strains were equally distributed in community or hospital units. Antibiogram of 23 antibiotics revealed progressive increases of drug-resistance against each antibiotic with the maximum resistance values were recorded against gentamicin: 92% and 79%, oxacillin: 94% and 69%, ceftriaxone: 85% and 58%, and norfloxacin 97% and 69% resistance, in nosocomial and community isolates, respectively. Conclusions This study revealed the daunting state of occurrence of multidrug resistant E. coli and its infection dynamics in both community and hospital settings.

  15. A quantitative summary of nutrition support services in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, S

    1991-04-01

    A full-time nutrition support service provided 1,133 consultations in a small animal teaching hospital from July 1986 to June 1988, consisting of 840 dogs, 260 cats, 23 exotic species, and 10 consultations with incomplete information. The dog and cat consultations represented 2.1 and 3.7% of canine and feline admissions, respectively. Consultations involved the determination of nutritional goals which led to recommendations of specific dietary regimens. Most frequent requests were for diet evaluation and diet formulation to meet estimated calorie and protein needs during illness and stress (23%), for specific calorie or nutrient modification given a working diagnosis (23%), and for avoidance of tissue utilization or weight loss (23%). Frequently involved single organ systems were gastrointestinal (16%), liver (12%), kidney (9%), and pancreas (4%), but multiple system involvement was more common (19%). Most frequent diagnostic categories were metabolic disorders (17%), chronic organ failure (17%), and neoplasia (12%). Enteral nutrition was preferred for 98% of consultations. Voluntary consumption was deemed adequate in 81% of consultations, and highly palatable balanced homemade diets and specialty products were recommended in 74% of these. Human hospital liquid enteral products were used in 95% of consultations recommending involuntary feeding, either fed alone, blended with petfoods, or supplemented with modules of protein or fat. The service demonstrated that full-time nutrition support can be utilized effectively in a small animal teaching hospital. Further development of such services will depend on research focused especially on determination of case-specific nutritional goals, patient responses, and cost effectiveness. PMID:2029836

  16. Factors Associated With Waiting Time for Breast Cancer Treatment in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Dedey, Florence; Wu, Lily; Ayettey, Hannah; Sanuade, Olutobi A; Akingbola, Titilola S; Hewlett, Sandra A; Tayo, Bamidele O; Cole, Helen V; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Adanu, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Background Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in Ghana. Data are limited on the predictors of poor outcomes in breast cancer patients in low-income countries; however, prolonged waiting time has been implicated. Among breast cancer patients who received treatment at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, this study evaluated duration and factors that influenced waiting time from first presentation to start of definitive treatment. Method We conducted a hospital-based retrospective study of 205 breast cancer patients starting definitive treatment at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital between May and December 2013. We used descriptive statistics to summarize patient characteristics. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests and Spearman rank correlation were performed to examine the patients, health system, and health worker factors associated with median waiting time. Poisson regression was used to examine the determinants of waiting time. Results The mean age of the patients was 51.1 ± 11.8 years. The median waiting time was 5 weeks. The determinants of waiting time were level of education, age, income, marital status, ethnicity, disease stage, health insurance status, study sites, time interval between when biopsy was requested and when results were received and receipt of adequate information from health workers. Conclusion A prolonged waiting time to treatment occurs for breast cancer patients in Ghana, particularly for older patients, those with minimal or no education, with lower income, single patients, those with late disease, those who are insured, and who did not receive adequate information from the health workers. Time to obtain biopsy reports should be shortened. Patients and providers need education on timely treatment to improve prognosis. PMID:27091222

  17. 24 CFR 242.66 - Affiliate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 242.66 Affiliate transactions. Transactions with affiliates that are arms-length are permitted as specified in the Regulatory Agreement. Transactions with affiliates that are not arms-length are...

  18. 24 CFR 242.66 - Affiliate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 242.66 Affiliate transactions. Transactions with affiliates that are arms-length are permitted as specified in the Regulatory Agreement. Transactions with affiliates that are not arms-length are...

  19. 24 CFR 242.66 - Affiliate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 242.66 Affiliate transactions. Transactions with affiliates that are arms-length are permitted as specified in the Regulatory Agreement. Transactions with affiliates that are not arms-length are...

  20. 24 CFR 242.66 - Affiliate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 242.66 Affiliate transactions. Transactions with affiliates that are arms-length are permitted as specified in the Regulatory Agreement. Transactions with affiliates that are not arms-length are...

  1. Gallstone disease in a teaching hospital, Addis Ababa: a 5-year review.

    PubMed

    Ersumo, Tessema

    2006-01-01

    There are not many studies of gallbladder disease in Africa. The disease appears to be not uncommon in Ethiopia. To determine the prevalence and evaluate the management of gallstone disease in a central teaching hospital, a 5-year retrospective study was undertaken in 747 patients surgically treated for gallbladder disease in the period 1995-99 in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa. The sex ratio (M:F) was 1:5, narrower ratio in complicated cholelithiasis. The mean age was 42 years. About 80% of patients were in the age group between 30 and 60 years. The median duration of symptoms at admission was 2 years. Abdominal pain, in 96% of cases situated in the right upper quadrant (RUQ) and usually aching type, was the most frequent presenting symptom; RUQ tenderness was the most common sign. Clinically, 29.4% of patients were categorized obese. Gallstone detection rate by ultrasound was about 96% but cholecystitis appeared to be overlooked. At operation, about 77% of cases had features of chronic cholecystitis, 2% acalculous cholecystitis. Majority of the stones were grossly cholesterol stones. Cholecystectomy was performed in 99% of cases, most often through the oblique subcostal and transverse routes. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 0.4%. Nearly 87% of cases had postoperative course without incident. The etiologic factors and the type of gallstones, we believe, are not different from that of the developed world. Cholecystectomy is a safe and most effective procedure that provides ultimate cure for symptomatic gallstone disease. PMID:17447363

  2. Factors associated with the patient safety climate at a teaching hospital1

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Raíssa Bianca; Simões, Ana Lúcia de Assis; Barichello, Elizabeth; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to investigate the association between the scores of the patient safety climate and socio-demographic and professional variables. Methods: an observational, sectional and quantitative study, conducted at a large public teaching hospital. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire was used, translated and validated for Brazil. Data analysis used the software Statistical Package for Social Sciences. In the bivariate analysis, we used Student's t-test, analysis of variance and Spearman's correlation of (α=0.05). To identify predictors for the safety climate scores, multiple linear regression was used, having the safety climate domain as the main outcome (α=0.01). Results: most participants were women, nursing staff, who worked in direct care to adult patients in critical areas, without a graduate degree and without any other employment. The average and median total score of the instrument corresponded to 61.8 (SD=13.7) and 63.3, respectively. The variable professional performance was found as a factor associated with the safety environment for the domain perception of service management and hospital management (p=0.01). Conclusion: the identification of factors associated with the safety environment permits the construction of strategies for safe practices in the hospitals. PMID:26487138

  3. Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

    2005-03-01

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

  4. A survey of digital radiography practice in four South African teaching hospitals: an illuminative study

    PubMed Central

    Nyathi, T; Chirwa, TF; van der Merwe, DG

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess radiographer familiarity and preferences with digital radiography in four teaching hospitals and thereafter make recommendations in line with the migration from screen film to digital radiography. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was designed to collect data from either qualified or student radiographers from four teaching hospitals. From the four teaching hospitals, there were a total of 205 potential respondents. Among other things, responses regarding experiences and preferences with digital radiography, quality control procedures, patient dose, advantages and disadvantages of digital radiography were sought. The information collected was based on self-reporting by the participants. The study is exploratory in nature and descriptive statistics were generated from the collected data using Microsoft Excel 2007 and StatsDirect software. Results: Sixty-three out of 205 (31%) radiographers from all the four radiology centers responded to the circulated questionnaire. Only 15% (8) of the qualified radiographers had 4 or more years of experience with digital radiography compared to 68% (36) for the same amount of experience with screen-film radiography. Sixty-one percent (38) of the participants had been exposed to digital radiography during their lectures while at university. A small proportion, 16% (10) of the respondents underwent formal training in quality control procedures on the digital X-ray units they were using. Slightly more than half (55%) of the participants felt it was easier for them to retake an image in digital radiography than in screen film radiography. Conclusion: The results of this survey showed that the participants are familiar with digital radiography and have embraced this relatively new technology as shown by the fact that they can identify both its advantages and disadvantages as applied to clinical practice. However, there are minimal quality control procedures specific to digital

  5. Nurses exposure to workplace violence in a large teaching hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Rashidian, Arash; Arab, Mohammad; Akbari-Sari, Ali; Hakimzadeh, Seyyed Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workplace violence is one of the factors which can strongly reduce job satisfaction and the quality of working life of nurses. The aim of this study was to measure nurses’ exposure to workplace violence in one of the major teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2010. Methods: We surveyed the nurses in a cross-sectional design in 2010. The questionnaire was adapted from a standardized questionnaire designed collaboratively by the International Labor Office (ILO), the International Health Organization (IHO), the International Council of Nurses (ICN), and the Public Services International (PSI). Finally, in order to analyze the relationships among different variables in the study, T-test and Chi-Square test were used. Results: Three hundred and one nurses responded to the questionnaire (a response rate of 73%). Over 70% of the nurses felt worried about workplace violence. The participants reported exposure to verbal abuse (64% CI: 59-70%), bullying-mobbing (29% CI: 24-34%) and physical violence (12% CI: 9-16%) at least once during the previous year. Relatives of hospital patients were responsible for most of the violence. Nurses working in the emergency department and outpatient clinics were more likely to report having experienced violence. Nurses were unlikely to report violence to hospital managers, and 40% of nurses were unaware of any existing policies within the hospital for reducing violence. Conclusion: We observed a considerable level of nurse exposure to workplace violence. The high rate of reported workplace violence demonstrates that the existing safeguards that aim to protect the staff from abusive patients and relatives are inadequate. PMID:25396205

  6. Study of patient satisfaction in a surgical unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, P.H.; Gupta, Shakti

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospitals have evolved from being an isolated sanatorium to a place with five star facilities. Patients and their relatives coming to the hospital not only expect world-class treatment, but also other facilities to make their stay comfortable in the hospital. This change in expectation has come due to tremendous growth of media and its exposure, as well as commercialization and improvement in facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of patient/relatives satisfaction at tertiary care teaching hospital and feedback from them for improvement of the same. Methods The study was conducted by 1. Review of available national and international literature on the subject. 2. Carrying out survey amongst 50 patients and their relatives at one of the surgical unit by using structured questionnaire. 3. By analyzing the data using appropriate statistical methods. Results Eighty two percent people were satisfied with the service at admission counter while 81% were satisfied with room preparation at the time of admission. The nursing services satisfied 80% of people while 92% were satisfied with explanation about disease and treatment by doctor. The behavior of nurses, doctors and orderlies satisfied 92, 92 and 83% of people. The cleanliness of toilets satisfied only 49% while diet services satisfied 78% of people. Conclusion The five major satisfiers were behavior of doctors, explanation about disease and treatment, courtesy of staff at admission counter, behavior and cooperation of nurses. The five major dissatisfiers were cleanliness of toilets, quality of food, explanation about rules and regulation, behavior of orderlies and sanitary attendant and room preparedness. PMID:25983455

  7. [Religious affiliation and mental health in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Dalgalarrondo, P

    1994-12-01

    Religiosity is a complex and fundamental socio-cultural phenomenon. Its possible positive or negative influence on the ethiology and treatment of mental illness remains controversial. Evangelical sects, specially the Pentecostals, have expanded dramatically in the last 40 years, in Latin America. Until now, the socio-cultural implications of this process have not been systematically studied. In the present study a group of patients admitted to a psychiatric unit in a general hospital in Campinas, Brazil, was investigated. Diagnosis distribution and length of hospital stay was related to religion affiliation. More functional psychosis and a shorter length of stay was found in the Pentecostal group. Possible implications of these findings are critically discussed.

  8. Analysis of the quality of hospital information systems in Isfahan teaching hospitals based on the DeLone and McLean model

    PubMed Central

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Saeedbakhsh, Saeed; Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Habibi, Mahboobeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quality is one of the most important criteria for the success of an information system, which refers to its desirable features of the processing system itself. The aim of this study was the analysis of system quality of hospital information systems (HIS) in teaching hospitals of Isfahan based on the DeLone and McLean model. Materials and Methods: This research was an applied and analytical-descriptive study. It was performed in teaching hospitals of Isfahan in 2010. The research population consisted of the HIS's users, system designers and hospital information technology (IT) authorities who were selected by random sampling method from users’ group (n = 228), and system designers and IT authorities (n = 52) using census method. The data collection tool was two researcher-designed questionnaires. Questionnaires’ reliability was estimated by using Cronbach's alpha was calculated. It was 97.1% for the system designers and IT authorities’ questionnaire and 92.3% for system users’ questionnaire. Results: Findings showed that the mean of system quality score in a variety of HIS and among different hospitals was significantly different and not the same (P value ≥ 0.05). In general, Kosar (new version) system and Rahavard Rayaneh system have dedicated the highest and the lowest mean scores to themselves. The system quality criterion overall mean was 59.6% for different HIS and 57.5% among different hospitals respectively. Conclusion: According to the results of the research, it can be stated that based on the applied model, the investigated systems were relatively desirable in terms of quality. Thus, in order to achieve a good optimal condition, it is necessary to pay particular attention to the improving factors of system quality, type of activity, type of specialty and hospital ownership type. PMID:25767816

  9. A profile of hospitals with leadership development programs.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jon M; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Community hospitals face increasing organizational and environmental complexities that challenge effective leadership. Hospitals are embracing leadership development programs in efforts to ensure leadership talent. While prior literature has described the intent and availability of these programs, the characteristics and performance of hospitals having such programs and their associated market characteristics have not been fully addressed. This article identifies significant differences in organizational, operational, performance, and market factors that are associated with hospitals offering a leadership development program, compared with those hospitals lacking such a program. The authors used American Hospital Association Survey data for 2008, the Area Resource File, and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid data to identify hospitals with and without leadership development programs and analyzed the differences for a number of organizational, operational, performance, and market variables. Findings indicate that hospitals having leadership development programs were large-bed-size facilities, had not-for-profit ownership, were system affiliated, were located in metropolitan statistical areas, and were teaching affiliated facilities. These hospitals also generated higher patient discharges, had higher occupancy, and had a longer average length of stay, compared with hospitals without such programs. In addition, these hospitals had higher net patient revenue per adjusted discharge and higher total profit margins relative to the comparison group. PMID:23629041

  10. Profile of diabetic ketoacidosis at a teaching hospital in Benghazi, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

    PubMed

    Elmehdawi, R R; Elmagerhei, H M

    2010-03-01

    This study describes the profile of 100 cases of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at a teaching hospital in 1 Benghazi, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. DKA was more frequent in young women with type 1 diabetes and mostly due to preventable causes, e.g., disrupted insulin treatment and/or infection. DKA also occurred in type 2 diabetics, with a higher mortality rate, as they were older patients with co-morbidity. Polyurea, fatigue, abdominal pain and vomiting were the most common clinical features, while coma was rarer. A high number of cases were first presentations of type 1 diabetes; hence this diagnosis should be considered in all patients with acute abdomen or decreased level of consciousness. The reasons for high mortality rate in this study (10%) were multifactorial. PMID:20795443

  11. An audit of letters of referral to a prosthodontic department in a dental teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Fenlon, Michael R; Glick, Shiri; Sherriff, Martyn

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality and number of letters of referral for new patients received in the Prosthodontics Department of a Dental Teaching Hospital. Letters received during the month of May 2006 were included. Each letter of referral was tested against five criteria which might be expected in an appropriate letter of referral. These were information on the following: relevant dental history, relevant medical history, teeth present, diagnosis, and treatment plan. The results showed that only 8% of letters met all five criteria and 11% met none of them. Letters requesting better information were sent to referring practitioner as a result of this audit. However a re-audit in May 2007 showed that 9% of letters met all five criteria and 15% met none of them. A need has been identifiedfor better referral letters and ways of achieving this were discussed.

  12. Maternal mortality in a teaching hospital in southern India. A 13-year study.

    PubMed

    Rao, K B

    1975-10-01

    During the 13 years 1960-1972, in a teaching hospital that serves a predominantly rural and semiurban population in southern India, there were 74,384 deliveries and 1245 maternal deaths, a maternal mortality rate of 16.7 per 1000 births. Direct obstetric factors caused 854 (65.5%) of these deaths. The leading indirect or associated causes of maternal deaths were anemia, cerebrovascular accidents, and infectious hepatitis. During the past 13 years, monthly maternal mortality meetings have helped to reduce the incidence of avoidable factors in maternal deaths among patients from the city but not among those brought from the surrounding countryside. The important causes of maternal deaths in this developing country, and their prevention, are individually discussed. PMID:1080844

  13. Epidemiology of Death in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Five U.S. Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jeffrey P.; Sellers, Deborah E.; Meyer, Elaine C.; Lewis-Newby, Mithya; Truog, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the epidemiology of death in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) at 5 geographically diverse teaching hospitals across the United States. Design, Setting, and Patients In the PICUs of five teaching hospitals across the United States, we prospectively identified 192 consecutive patients who died prior to PICU discharge. Each site enrolled between 24 and 50 patients. Each PICU had similar organizational and staffing structures. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results The overall mortality rate was 2.39% (range 1.85% to 3.38%). 133 (70%) patients died following the withholding or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments, 30 (16%) were diagnosed as brain dead, and 26 (14%) died following an unsuccessful resuscitation attempt. Fifty-seven percent of all deaths occurred within the first week of admission;these patients, who were more likely to have new onset illnesses or injuries, included the majority of those who died following unsuccessful CPR attempts or brain death diagnoses. Patients who died beyond one week length-of-stay in the PICU were more likely to have pre-existing diagnoses, to be technology dependent prior to admission, and to have died following the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. Only 64% of the patients who died following the withholding or withdrawing of life support had a formal DNR order in place at the time of their death. Conclusions The mode of death in the PICU is proportionally similar to that reported over the past two decades, while the mortality rate has nearly halved. Death is largely characterized by two fairly distinct profiles that are associated with whether death occurs within or beyond one week length-of-stay. Decisions not to resuscitate are often made in the absence of a formal DNR order. These data have implications for future quality improvement initiatives, especially around palliative care, end-of-life decision making, and organ donation. PMID:24979486

  14. Salivary gland tumours: a 15-year review at the Dental Centre Lagos University Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ladeinde, A L; Adeyemo, W L; Ogunlewe, M O; Ajayi, O F; Omitola, O G

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of tumours of the salivary gland seen at the Dental Centre, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria over a period of 15 years. All cases that were histologically diagnosed as salivary gland tumours from January 1990 to December 2004 were retrieved from the histopathology records of the Department of Oral Pathology and Biology and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. All the cases were subjected to analysis of age, sex, site of occurrence and histologic diagnosis based on 1991 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification. Salivary gland constituted 6.3% of all oro-facial tumours and tumour-like lesions. The frequency of malignant tumours was 60.8% (n = 73) and benign tumours 39.2% (n = 47). Minor salivary glands (63.3%) were mostly affected. The male-to-female ratio was 1.1:1, and most (72.5%) of the tumours occurred in the age group of 21-60 years. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most commonly occurring tumour (29.2%) followed by adenoid cystic carcinoma (19.2%). The predominant benign and malignant tumours were pleomorphic adenoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma respectively. Palate (45.8%) was the most frequently affected site. The mean.age (+/-SD) of patients with benign tumours was significantly lower than those with malignant tumours (P = 0.003). The incidence of salivary gland tumours in this study is higher than in most previous reports. Malignant tumours which occurred in older age group were the most commonly seen.

  15. Spatial distribution and accessibility to public sector tertiary care teaching hospitals in Karachi: A Geographic Information Systems application.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Masood Ali; Ali, Mir Shabbar

    2016-07-01

    Optimal utilization of specialized curative healthcare services is contingent on spatial access to tertiary-care hospitals by the targeted population. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution of public sector tertiary-care teaching hospitals in Karachi, and to use GIS and network analysis for modeling the accessibility to these hospitals for Karachi residents. Maps of three, six, and nine kilometer buffers were created around the five selected hospitals to determine which towns of Karachi are either entirely or partially covered/accessible. Most of the towns in Karachi were covered either partially or completely by the three buffers and service areas of 3,6, and 9 kilometers around the five selected hospitals. This study highlights the limitations of using publicly available data for road network, and the need for creating and making available in public domain, comprehensive road network vector dataset in conjunction with population breakdowns by administrative subdivisions. PMID:27427142

  16. Spatial distribution and accessibility to public sector tertiary care teaching hospitals in Karachi: A Geographic Information Systems application.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Masood Ali; Ali, Mir Shabbar

    2016-07-01

    Optimal utilization of specialized curative healthcare services is contingent on spatial access to tertiary-care hospitals by the targeted population. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution of public sector tertiary-care teaching hospitals in Karachi, and to use GIS and network analysis for modeling the accessibility to these hospitals for Karachi residents. Maps of three, six, and nine kilometer buffers were created around the five selected hospitals to determine which towns of Karachi are either entirely or partially covered/accessible. Most of the towns in Karachi were covered either partially or completely by the three buffers and service areas of 3,6, and 9 kilometers around the five selected hospitals. This study highlights the limitations of using publicly available data for road network, and the need for creating and making available in public domain, comprehensive road network vector dataset in conjunction with population breakdowns by administrative subdivisions.

  17. Satellite teaching hospitals and public-private collaborations in veterinary medical clinical education.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, James W; Fingland, Roger; Arighi, Mimi; Thompson, James; de Laforcade, Armelle; McManus, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Veterinary teaching hospitals (VTHs) are facing more and greater challenges than at any time in the past. Changes in demand, expanding information, improving technology, an evolving workforce, declining state support, and an increasingly diverse consumer base have combined to render many traditional VTH modes of operation obsolete. In pursuit of continued success in achieving their academic mission, VTHs are exploring new business models, including innovative collaborations with the private sector. This report provides details on existing models for public-private collaboration at several colleges and schools of veterinary medicine, including those at Kansas State University, Purdue University, the University of Florida, and Tufts University. Although each of these institutions' models is unique, several commonalities exist, related to expansion of the case load available for teaching, the potential positive impact on recruitment and retention of clinical faculty, and the potential for easing financial pressures on the associated VTH. These new models represent innovative approaches that work to meet many of the key emerging challenges facing VTHs today.

  18. Impact of a drug bulletin on prescribing oral analgesics in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Berbatis, C G; Maher, M J; Plumridge, R J; Stoelwinder, J U; Zubrick, S R

    1982-01-01

    The impact of a drug bulletin on prescribing oral analgesics in a teaching hospital was studied. Using an abbreviated time-series design, prescriptions for oral analgesics for all inpatients were surveyed one, three, and five weeks before and one, three, five, and seven weeks after the distribution of one of the hospital's regular drug bulletins. This bulletin contained guidelines for the treatment of minor, moderate, and severe pain. The 493 patients included in the study were classified by drug category, pain severity, and timer period. The drug categories were: (1) propoxyphene, (2) aspirin or acetaminophen alone or with codeine 8 mg or less, and (3) codeine alone or in combination products with more than codeine 8 mg, or other oral narcotic drugs. Each patient's pain severity was determined by interviewing attendant nursing staff; the validity of this approach was confirmed by correlating nurse and physician perception of pain at one time point. Multivariate contingency table analysis revealed that the drug bulletin significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) reduced the prescribing of propoxyphene hydrochloride across both the minor and moderate pain categories. An increased use of aspirin and acetaminophen was significant three weeks after the release of the drug bulletin. This effect, however, was not significant at other time points. Drug bulletins can be used to achieve a temporary change in physician prescribing patterns of oral analgesics. For a sustained effect, alternative strategies are needed.

  19. Broken paediatric appointments at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City.

    PubMed

    Obi, J O

    1979-06-01

    Appointment system was introduced to the University of Benin Teaching Hospital at the initial stage of the Hospital development. This is a new experience to the local community which is largely illiterate. The appointment breaking was low contrary to expectation. Indifference or negligence accounted for a high percentage of defaulting. The system was deemed to be good by 66.4 per cent of the defaulters interviewed only 1.2 per cent felt that it was bad. Efforts by the health visiting Sister to visit the defaulters at home and persuade them to attend the clinic reduced the number of broken appointments. The habit of breaking appointments by parents/guardians of children who showed indifference or negligence were more difficult to remedy. For a referral system to be effective in a largely illiterate community where referral system is new, knowledge of the reasons for breaking appointments in the community should be known and remedied. Promotion of personalized attention and intensive health education are essential.

  20. An audit of indications, complications, and justification of hysterectomies at a teaching hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Deeksha; Sehgal, Kriti; Saxena, Aashish; Hebbar, Shripad; Nambiar, Jayaram; Bhat, Rajeshwari G

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Aim of this audit was to analyze indications, complications, and correlation of preoperative diagnosis with final histopathology report of all hysterectomies, performed in a premier teaching hospital. Methods. Present study involved all patients who underwent hysterectomy at a premier university hospital in Southern India, in one year (from 1 January, 2012, to 31 December, 2012). Results. Most common surgical approach was abdominal (74.7%), followed by vaginal (17.8%), and laparoscopic (6.6%) hysterectomy. Most common indication for hysterectomy was symptomatic fibroid uterus (39.9%), followed by uterovaginal prolapse (16.3%). Overall complication rate was 8.5%. Around 84% had the same pathology as suspected preoperatively. Only 6 (5 with preoperative diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding and one with high grade premalignant cervical lesion) had no significant pathology in their hysterectomy specimen. Conclusion. Hysterectomy is used commonly to improve the quality of life; however at times it is a lifesaving procedure. As any surgical procedure is associated with a risk of complications, the indication should be carefully evaluated. With the emergence of many conservative approaches to deal with benign gynecological conditions, it is prudent to discuss available options with the patient before taking a direct decision of surgically removing her uterus.

  1. Needlestick injury among medical personnel in Accident and Emergency Department of two teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y W; Hassim, I Noor

    2007-03-01

    Needlestick injury has been recognized as one of the occupational hazards which results in transmission of bloodborne pathogens. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 136 health care workers in the Accident and Emergency Department of two teaching hospitals from August to November 2003 to determine the prevalence of cases and episodes of needlestick injury. In addition, this study also assessed the level of knowledge of blood-borne diseases and Universal Precautions, risk perception on the practice of Universal Precautions and to find out factors contributing to needlestick injury. Prevalence of needlestick injury among the health care workers in the two hospitals were found to be 31.6% (N = 43) and 52.9% (N = 87) respectively. Among different job categories, medical assistants appeared to face the highest risk of needlestick injury. Factors associated with needlestick injury included shorter tenure in one's job (p < 0.05). Findings of this study support the hypothesis that health care workers are at risk of needlestick injury while performing procedures on patients. Therefore, comprehensive infection control strategies should be applied to effectively reduce the risk of needlestick injury. PMID:17682562

  2. T cell subset profile in healthy Zambian adults at the University Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chisenga, Caroline Cleopatra; Kelly, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Symptom-free human immunodeficiency virus antibody-negative Zambian adults (51 subjects, aged 20 to 62 years, 33.3% women and 66.7% men) were studied to establish T cell subset reference ranges. Methods We carried out across sectional study at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka. Blood samples were collected from healthy donor volunteers from hospital health care staff, between February and March 2015. Immunopheno typing was undertaken to characterize Tcell subsets using the markers CD3, CD4, CD8, α4β7, Ki67, CD25, CCR7, CD54RA, CD57, CD28, CD27 and HLA-DR. Results Among 51 volunteers, Women had significantly higher absolute CD4 count (median 1042; IQR 864, 1270) than in men (671; 545, 899) (p=0.003). Women also had more CD4 cells expressing homing, naïve, effector and effector memory T cell subsets compared to men. However, in the CD8 population, only the effector cells were significantly different with women expressing more than the males. Conclusion We provide early reference range for T cell subsets in Zambian adults and conclude that among the African women some T cell subsets are higher than men. PMID:27231509

  3. Empathy from the Nurses' Viewpoint in Teaching Hospitals of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Parvan, Kobra; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Seyedrasooly, Alehe; Dadkhah, Delavar; Jabarzadeh, Faranak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Empathy is the ability to put one in the place of others and to better understand their feelings and experiences. According to researchers, there is a type of challenge in using this concept in nursing field. In most cases, the term empathy substitutes other concepts. Regarding this point, it seems quite necessary to research and discuss different dimensions of this concept in different studies. This study aimed to determine empathy regarding the nurses' point of view. Methods: In this descriptive study sample size was selected according to study population or in the other hand all the nurses in 3 general hospital was selected because they are the most important teaching hospital in Tabriz. LEP (La Monica Empathy Profile) was used as empathy tool. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver. 13.0. Results: In nonverbal behavior dimension, touching the patient was considered as the most effective methods. On the other hand, nurses could not always be able to control stress and they could not always being with patients to show their empathy. Many people believe that nurses showed very little feelings while raggedly the reflective enclosure and they occasionally had to change their schedules to talk to patients. Conclusion: In most cases the nurses support nonverbal behavior, such as reflective, close and touching encountering in establishing relationship with the patient. However, to improve this situation, planning for nurses to become familiar with the ways through which they can express their interest to show empathy would be effective PMID:25276746

  4. A review of cleft lip and palate management: Experience of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Osunde, Otasowie Daniel; Akpasa, Izegboya Olohitae

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip (CL) and palate (CLP) management is multidisciplinary. A cleft team was formed in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital to address the health needs of cleft patients in the centre. Aim: This paper aims at documenting the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) management protocol for orofacial clefts and also to review our experience with CLP surgeries performed at AKTH since our partnering with Smile Train. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all the cleft patients surgically treated from January 2006 to December 2014 under Smile Train sponsorship was undertaken. A descriptive narrative of the cleft team protocol was also given. Results: One hundred and fifty-five patients (80 males, 75 females) had surgical repairs of either the lip or palate. CL patients were 83 (53.55%), while CLP patients were 45 (29.03%) and isolated cleft palate patients were 27 (17.42%). Conclusion: The inclusion of various specialities in the cleft team is highly desirable. Poverty level amongst our patients frequently limits our management to surgical treatment sponsored by the Smile Train, despite the presence of other residual problems. PMID:26712291

  5. Patient Experience of Nursing Quality in a Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Momani, M; Al Korashy, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Examining the quality of nursing care from the patient's perspective is an important element in quality evaluation. The extent to which patients’ expectations are met will influence their perceptions and their satisfaction with the quality of care received. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among admitted patients at King Khalid Teaching Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected (from January 2011 to March 2011) from a convenience sample of 448 patients using a 42-items questionnaire assessing six dimensions of the nursing care provided to, during hospitalization. Results: On a four–point scale (4-higly agree,3-agree, 2-disagree, and 1-higly disagree). The individual items of nursing care showing the lowest means were the information received from the nurses about self-help (2.81), the information about the laboratory results (2.76) and the way the nurse shared the patient's feeling (2.72). A strong correlation existed between the overall perception level and the variables of gender (P=0.01), and the types of department (0.004). Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrate negative experiences of patients with nursing care in dimensions of information, caring behavior, and nurse competency and technical care. Awareness of the importance of these dimensions of nursing care and ongoing support to investigate patients’ perception periodically toward quality of nursing care are critical to success the philosophy of patient centered health care. PMID:23113223

  6. Antibiotic prescribing in two private sector hospitals; one teaching and one non-teaching: A cross-sectional study in Ujjain, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The worldwide increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria is of great concern. One of the main causes is antibiotic use which is likely to be high but is poorly described in India. The aim was to analyze and compare antibiotic prescribing for inpatients, in two private sector tertiary care hospitals; one Teaching and one Non-teaching, in Ujjain, India. Methods A cross-sectional study with manual data collection was carried out in 2008. Antibiotic prescribing was recorded for all inpatients throughout their hospital stay. Demographic profile of inpatients and prescribed antibiotics were compared. WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classifications for antibiotics was used and Defined Daily Doses (DDD) were calculated per patient day. Results A total of 8385 inpatients were admitted during the study period. In the Teaching hospital (TH) 82% of 3004 and in the Non-teaching hospital (NTH) 79% of 5381 patients were prescribed antibiotics. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic groups were; fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides in the TH and, 3rd generation cephalosporins and combination of antibiotics in the NTH. Of the prescriptions, 51% in the TH and 87% in the NTH (p<0.001) were for parenteral route administration. Prescribing by trade name was higher in the NTH (96%) compared with the TH (63%, p<0.001). Conclusions The results from both hospitals show extensive antibiotic prescribing. High use of combinations of antibiotics in the NTH might indicate pressure from pharmaceutical companies. There is a need to formulate and implement; based on local prescribing and resistance data; contextually appropriate antibiotic prescribing guidelines and a local antibiotic stewardship program. PMID:22788873

  7. Occurrence of qnrA-positive clinical isolates in French teaching hospitals during 2002-2005.

    PubMed

    Cambau, E; Lascols, C; Sougakoff, W; Bébéar, C; Bonnet, R; Cavallo, J-D; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Jarlier, V; Soussy, C-J; Robert, J

    2006-10-01

    Bacteria harbouring the novel qnrA plasmid-mediated mechanism of quinolone resistance have been described in different countries, but the frequency of their occurrence has not been investigated. In total, 1,468 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae with quinolone resistance or extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) phenotypes were collected from eight teaching hospitals in France during 2002-2005 and screened for qnrA. Overall, 28 isolates (22 Enterobacter cloacae, three Klebsiella pneumoniae, one Citrobacter freundii, one Klebsiella oxytoca and one Proteus mirabilis) were positive for qnrA, representing 1.9% of all isolates, 3.3% of ESBL-producing isolates (22% of the E. cloacae isolates) and 0% of non-ESBL-producing isolates. The prevalence of qnrA among consecutive ESBL-producing isolates in 2004 from the eight hospitals was 2.8% (18/639). Of the qnrA-positive isolates, 100% were intermediately-resistant or resistant to nalidixic acid, and 75% to ciprofloxacin. Twenty-one of the 22 qnrA-positive E. cloacae isolates were obtained from two hospitals in the Paris area, and molecular typing and plasmid content analysis showed clonal relationships for five, three and two isolates, respectively. The qnrA genetic environment was similar to that of the In36 integron. The remaining two isolates had qnrA variants (30 and 29 nucleotide differences, respectively, compared with the original sequence) and an unknown genetic environment. The ESBL gene associated with qnrA was bla(SHV-12) in most of the isolates, but bla(PER-1) and bla(SHV-2a) were found in two isolates. In France, it appears that qnrA-positive isolates are predominantly E. cloacae isolates producing SHV-12, and may be associated with the dissemination of an In36-like integron. PMID:16961639

  8. Study of acute transfusion reactions in a teaching hospital of Sikkim: A hemovigilance initiative

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dhruva Kumar; Datta, Supratim; Gupta, Amlan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusions are inherently associated with risks ranging in severity from minor to life-threatening. Continuous monitoring of transfusion related complications can promote understanding of factors contributing to transfusion reactions and help to formulate necessary remedial measures. This study was designed to analyze the frequency and nature of transfusion reactions reported to the blood bank of a remote North East Indian teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: All acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) reported to the blood bank over a period of 20 months (May 2013 to January 2015) were reviewed and analyzed. The risk of transfusion reactions associated with each individual component was assessed. Results: A total of 3455 units of whole blood and component transfusions were carried out of which a total of 32 (0.92%) ATRs were encountered. Packed red blood cells (PRBCs) (n = 15, P = 0.06) and whole blood (WB) (n = 13, P = 0.83) were most commonly implicated. Allergic reaction was the most frequent transfusion reaction encountered (65.6%), seen most commonly with PRBC (risk of 0.76%, P = 0.42), and WB (risk of 0.68%, P = 0.63) transfusions. This was followed by febrile reactions (28.1%), which were seen more commonly with PRBCs (risk of 0.57%, P = 0.016). No reactions were observed with platelet transfusions. Conclusion: The overall incidence of transfusion reactions in this hospital is slightly higher than those having more advanced transfusion facilities in India. The lack of leukoreduction facilities in our hospital could be a likely cause for the same. The use of leukoreduced WB and PRBCs could possibly reduce the overall incidence of ATRs in general and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in particular. PMID:26285707

  9. Metabolic syndrome and associated factors among outpatients of Jimma University Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Abda, Edris; Hamza, Leja; Tessema, Fasil; Cheneke, Waqtola

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing countries are now experiencing the epidemiologic transition, whereby the burden of chronic diseases, like metabolic syndrome, is increasing. However, no study had previously been conducted to show the status of metabolic syndrome among outpatients of Jimma University Teaching Hospital. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated factors among adult (≥20 years) patients. Methods A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted in July 2014 among adult (≥20 years) patients attending Jimma University Teaching Hospital, outpatient department. All patients attending the outpatient department and were willing to participate in the study were included. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were undertaken for all the study subjects to know the status of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was identified using the National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results A total of 225 participants were included in the study, of whom 106 (47.1%) were males and 119 (52.9%) were females. A total of 59 (26%) adults were found to have metabolic syndrome, which was seen more than twice as much in females, 42 (35%), as compared with males, 17 (16%), (P<0.01). The most frequent metabolic syndrome parameters were hypertension (45%), hyperglycemia (39%), decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (31%), central obesity (26%), and elevated triglycerides (18%). Elevated blood pressure is more common in females (44.5%) than in males (34.9%). Decreased HDL-cholesterol was observed among 37% of females versus 24% males (P<0.001) and 6% of males versus 45% females had central obesity (P<0.001). Hypertension and body mass index were significantly lower among males (35% and 14%) than females (45% and 41%) (P<0.01 and P<0.001), respectively. Conclusion It is demonstrated that metabolic syndrome is prevalent in adult outpatients in Jimma and increases as age increases; it

  10. Preferred Attachment in Affiliation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelis, Mindaugas; Götze, Friedrich

    2014-08-01

    Vertices of an affiliation network are linked to attributes and two vertices are declared adjacent whenever they share a common attribute. For example, two customers of an internet shop (or video-sharing website) are called adjacent if they have purchased (or downloaded) the same or similar items. Assuming that each newly arrived customer is linked preferentially to already popular items we obtain a preferred attachment affiliation network that evolves in time. We show that the fraction of customers having neighbours scales as for large . Here is the ratio between the two intensities: intensity of the flow of customers and that of the newly arriving items.

  11. MEDICATION HISTORY DOCUMENTATION IN REFERRAL LETTERS OF CHILDREN PRESENTING AT THE EMERGENCY UNIT OF A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN LAGOS, NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Oshikoya, K.A.; Orji, M.U.; Oreagba, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medical literature has demonstrated that referral hospitals often receive inadequate information about the care and medications their patients received from referring hospitals. Objective: This study aimed to assess the completeness of referral letters, especially the medication history, for patient presenting at the children emergency room of a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Method: A pro forma form was developed to obtain from the referral letters the demographic information of children referred to the emergency room of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Idiaraba, over a period of three months. The nature of the referring centre, tentative diagnoses made at the referring centre, duration of illness prior to referral, vital signs and physical examination findings, investigation results, and treatment given were also extracted from the letters. In addition, we extracted from the letters the name, dosage, frequency and duration of use of medicines administered at the referring centres. Parents were also interviewed about the details of medicines used prior to presentation of their child at the referring centres. Results: Among those referred with a letter, 100 patients met the inclusion criteria and constituted those evaluated in this study. Most of the patients were referred from general hospitals (31%), another tertiary hospital (29%), and private hospitals/clinics (24%). Gender (30%) and tentative diagnoses (12%) were omitted in the referral letters. However, information about the weight (82%), vital signs (57%), physical examination findings (44%), treatment given (92%), and medication history (71%) were much more omitted in the referral letters. Conclusion: Medication history as well as many other data points is infrequently reported in referral letters to a tertiary care hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Standard referral guidelines may be useful to improve documentation of medication history. PMID:27721681

  12. Bacterial bloodstream infections in HIV-infected adults attending a Lagos teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Adeleye I; Sulaiman, Akanmu A; Solomon, Bamiro B; Chinedu, Obosi A; Victor, Inem A

    2010-08-01

    An investigation was carried out during October 2005-September 2006 to determine the prevalence of bloodstream infections in patients attending the outpatient department of the HIV/AIDS clinic at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. Two hundred and one patients--86 males and 115 females--aged 14-65 years were recruited for the study. Serological diagnosis was carried out on them to confirm their HIV status. Their CD4 counts were done using the micromagnetic bead method. Twenty mL of venous blood sample collected from each patient was inoculated into a pair of Oxoid Signal blood culture bottles for 2-14 days. Thereafter, 0.1 mL of the sample was plated in duplicates on MacConkey, blood and chocolate agar media and incubated at 37 degrees C for 18-24 hours. The CD4+ counts were generally low as 67% of 140 patients sampled had < 200 cells/microL of blood. Twenty-six bacterial isolates were obtained from the blood samples and comprised 15 (58%) coagulase-negative staphylococci as follows: Staphylococcus epidermidis (7), S. cohnii cohnii (1), S. cohnii urealyticum (2), S. chromogenes (1), S. warneri (2), S. scuri (1), and S. xylosus (1). Others were 6 (23%) Gram-negative non-typhoid Salmonella spp., S. Typhimurium (4), S. Enteritidis (2); Pseudomonas fluorescens (1), Escherichia coli (1), Ochrobactrum anthropi (1), Moraxella sp. (1), and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that coagulase-negative staphylococci had good sensitivities to vancomycin and most other antibiotics screened but were resistant mainly to ampicilin and tetracycline. The Gram-negative organisms isolated also showed resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and septrin. This study demonstrates that coagulase-negative staphylococci and non-typhoidal Salmonellae are the most common aetiological agents of bacteraemia among HIV-infected adults attending the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The organisms were

  13. Clinical Setting Influences Off-Label and Unlicensed Prescribing in a Paediatric Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Bint, Lewis; Favié, Laurent; Parsons, Richard; Hughes, Jeff; Sunderland, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the prevalence of off-label and unlicensed prescribing during 2008 at a major paediatric teaching hospital in Western Australia. Methods A 12-month retrospective study was conducted at Princess Margaret Hospital using medication chart records randomly selected from 145,550 patient encounters from the Emergency Department, Inpatient Wards and Outpatient Clinics. Patient and prescribing data were collected. Drugs were classified as off-label or unlicensed based on Australian registration data. A hierarchical system of age, indication, route of administration and dosage was used. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code. Results A total of 1,037 paediatric patients were selected where 2,654 prescriptions for 330 different drugs were prescribed to 699 patients (67.4%). Most off-label drugs (n = 295; 43.3%) were from the nervous system; a majority of unlicensed drugs were systemic hormonal preparations excluding sex hormones (n = 22, 32.4%). Inpatients were prescribed more off-label drugs than outpatients or Emergency Department patients (p < 0.0001). Most off-label prescribing occurred in infants and children (31.7% and 35.9% respectively) and the highest percentage of unlicensed prescribing (7.2%) occurred in infants (p < 0.0001). There were 25.7% of off-label and 2.6% of unlicensed medications prescribed across all three settings. Common reasons for off-label prescribing were dosage (47.4%) and age (43.2%). Conclusion This study confirmed off-label and unlicensed use of drugs remains common. Further, that prevalence of both is influenced by the clinical setting, which has implications in regards to medication misadventure, and the need to have systems in place to minimise medication errors. Further, there remains a need for changes in the regulatory system in Australia to ensure that manufacturers incorporate, as it becomes available, evidence regarding efficacy and safety of their drugs in children in the

  14. Synopsis of congenital cardiac disease among children attending University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Ituku Ozalla, Enugu

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of congenital cardiac disease among children attending UNTH, Enugu, Nigeria. The nature of these abnormalities and the outcome were also considered. The exact etiology is unknown but genetic and environmental factors tend to be implicated. The difference in the pattern obtained worldwide and few studies in Nigeria could be due to genetic, environmental, socioeconomic, or ethnic origin. Methods A retrospective analysis of discharged cases in which a review of the cases of all children attending children outpatient clinics including cardiology clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu over a five year period (January 2007-June 2012) was undertaken. All the children presenting with cardiac anomalies were included in the study and the cases were investigated using ECG, X-ray and echocardiography studies. Results A total of 31,795 children attended the children outpatient clinics of the hospital over the study period. Of these, seventy one (71) had cardiac diseases. The overall prevalence of cardiac disease is 0.22%. The commonest symptoms were breathlessness, failure to thrive and cyanosis. Almost all types of congenital detects were represented, the commonest being isolated ventricular septal detect (VSD), followed by tetralogy of Fallot. One of these cardiac anomalies presented with Downs’s syndrome and another with VACTERAL association. Conclusions The results of this study show that 0.22% per cent of children who attended UNTH in Enugu State had congenital cardiac abnormalities and the commonest forms seen were those with VSD. PMID:24252233

  15. Compliance With Guideline Statements for Urethral Catheterization in an Iranian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taleschian-Tabrizi, Negar; Farhadi, Fereshteh; Madani, Neda; Mokhtarkhani, Mohaddeseh; Kolahdouzan, Kasra; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is believed that healthcare staff play an important role in minimizing complications related to urethral catheterization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not healthcare staff complied with the standards for urethral catheterization. Methods: This study was conducted in Imam Reza teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran, from July to September 2013. A total of 109 catheterized patients were selected randomly from surgical and medical wards and intensive care units (ICUs). A questionnaire was completed by healthcare staff for each patient to assess quality of care provided for catheter insertion, while catheter in situ, draining and changing catheter bags. Items of the questionnaire were obtained from guidelines for the prevention of infection. Data analysis was performed with SPSS 16. Results: The mean age of the patients was 50.54 ± 22.13. Of the 109 patients, 56.88% were admitted to ICUs. The mean duration of catheter use was 15.86 days. Among the 25 patients who had a urinalysis test documented in their hospital records, 11 were positive for urinary tract infection (UTI). The lowest rate of hand-washing was reported before bag drainage (49.52%). The closed drainage catheter system was not available at all. Among the cases who had a daily genital area cleansing, in 27.63% cases, the patients or their family members performed the washing. In 66.35% of cases, multiple-use lubricant gel was applied; single-use gel was not available. The rate of documentation for bag change was 79%. Conclusion: The majority of the guideline statements was adhered to; however, some essential issues, such as hand hygiene were neglected. And some patients were catheterized routinely without proper indication. Limiting catheter use to mandatory situations and encouraging compliance with guidelines are recommended. PMID:26673464

  16. Medicine utilization review at a university teaching hospital in New Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, M.; Bhadana, V.; Alam, M.S.; Pillai, K. K.; Kapur, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A prospective medicine usage evaluation based on prescription monitoring was conducted in the medicine OPD of our university teaching hospital to know prescribing trends of different categories of medicines. Materials and Methods: A total of 600 patients were included in the study comprising of 339 (56.5%) males and 261 (43.5%) females. The data were recorded within the OPD by a registered pharmacist on a medicine usage evaluation form, approved by The University Institutional Review Board (IRB). Results: A total of 2365 medicines were prescribed to 600 patients during the 3 months study period. The mean number of medicines per prescription were found to be 3.94. Medicines were most frequently prescribed as solid dosage forms (85.62%), especially tablets (70.82%), and liquid formulations (14.12%). Oral route (96.17%) was the most preferred mode of administration, followed by topical (2.11%) and parenteral (1.60%) routes. Combination therapy (94.33%) was more prevalent than monotherapy (5.66%). An overwhelming tendency for prescribing medicines by brand names (99%) was observed by the physicians. The most frequently prescribed class of medicines were antimicrobials > analgesics > cardiovascular > gastrointestinal agents. The most prescribed individual medicines among various therapeutic classes included isoniazid (antimicrobial), amlodipine (cardiovascular), metformin (hypoglycemic), cetirizine (antiallergic), rabeprazole (GI medicine), atorvastatin (hypolipidemic), dextromethorphan (respiratory medicine), alprazolam (sedative-hypnotic), paracetamol (analgesic). Conclusions: There is a considerable scope of improvement in the existing prescribing practice, especially prescribing by generic names, needs to be encouraged and a hospital formulary has to be developed for the purpose. The number of medicines to be included per prescription should be judged rationally and polypharmacy ought to be curbed. Use of antimicrobial also needs to be rationalized as

  17. Motorcycle-related injuries at a university teaching hospital in north central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Elachi, Itodo C.; Okunola, Benjamin B.; Yongu, Williams T.; Onyemaechi, Ndubuisi OC; Odatuwa-Omagbemi, Odoyoh D.; Ahachi, Chukwukadibia N.; Mue, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Motorcycle-related injuries lead to considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to determine the pattern and outcome of motorcycle-related injuries at Benue State University Teaching Hospital, Makurdi, Nigeria. Patients and Methods: Case records of all patients who presented to the accident and emergency department with motorcycle-related injuries between July 2012 and June 2013 were analysed for age, gender, injury host status (i.e. rider, pillion or pedestrian), nature of collision (motorcycle versus other vehicles, motorcycle versus motorcycle, motorcycle versus pedestrian or lone riders), body region injured, injury severity score (ISS) at arrival, length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality. Results: Seventy - nine patients with motorcycle-related injuries were included in the study. They consisted of 63 males (61.8%) and 16 females (15.7%). The age range was 5-65 years with a mean of 32.4 ± 14.0. Motorcycle versus vehicle collisions were the most common mechanism of injury (n = 46, 58.2%). Musculoskeletal injuries constituted the most common injuries sustained (n = 50, 47.6%) and the tibia was the most frequently fractured bone (n = 14, 35.9%). The majority of patients (57.0%) sustained mild/moderate injuries (ISS ≤ 15). There was no statistically significant difference between the sexes for sustaining mild/moderate injuries or severe/profound injuries (P > 0.05). Mortality rate was 6.3% with head injuries being involved in all cases. Conclusion: Young males were mostly injured in motorcycle-related trauma. Musculoskeletal injuries were the most common injuries sustained and head injuries were involved in all the deaths. Enforcement of motorcycle crash bars and helmet usage is recommended. PMID:25538360

  18. Awareness about biomedical waste management and infection control among dentists of a teaching hospital in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Kishore, J; Goel, P; Sagar, B; Joshi, T K

    2000-01-01

    All 64 dentists working in a teaching hospital of New Delhi participated in a survey. A pre-tested self-administered questionnaire was used to assess knowledge and practices of biomedical waste management and infection control among these dentists. The results show that not all dentists were aware of the risks they were exposed to and only half of them observed infection control practices. In addition to this, majority of them were not aware of proper hospital waste management. The dentists need to be educated on Biomedical Waste (Management & Handling) Rules, 1998 through extensive training programme.

  19. Clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated acute kidney injury patients at the university of port harcourt teaching hospital, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Emem-Chioma, Pedro Chimezie; Alasia, Datonye Dennis; Wokoma, Friday Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury in adults is a common cause of hospitalization, associated with high morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. In spite of RRT the in-hospital mortality rates remain high even in the developed countries. Though a proportion of our patients receive renal replacement therapy as part of their management, data on outcomes are sparse. Study Objective. To determine the clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated AKI in our hospital. Methods. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of all adult AKI patients treated with haemodialysis at the University of Teaching Hospital during an interrupted six-year period was conducted. Analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. Results. 34 males and 28 females with mean age of 41.3 ± 18.5 years were studied. The leading causes of AKI were sepsis (22.7%), acute glomerulonephritis (20.5%), acute gastroenteritis (15.9%), and toxic nephropathies (11.4%) and presented with mean e-GFR of 14.7 ± 5.8 mls/min/1.73 m(2). Of the 62 patients, 29 (46.8%) were discharged from the hospital, 27 (43.5%) died in hospital, while 6 (9.7%) absconded from treatment. Survivors had better Rifle grade than those who died (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Hospital mortality rate of dialysis-treated AKI patients is high and the severity of renal damage at presentation may be an important factor.

  20. [Emergency of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections in a teaching hospital in Chile].

    PubMed

    Fica, Alberto; Jemenao, María Irene; Bilbao, Paola; Ruiz, Gloria; Sakurada, Andrea; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Zúñiga, Isabel; Gompertz, Macarena

    2007-12-01

    An active surveillance of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) intestinal colonization in selected group of patients has been developed in Chile since year 2000. Nevertheless, no reports of clinical cases have been published. Aim. To describe main clinical and microbiological features of patients infected by VRE in a tertiary-level teaching Hospital. Patients and methods. Intestinal and clinical samples positive to VRE were provided by laboratory, and a retrospective analysis of potential risk factors, clinical features, treatment and outcomes was performed. Study encompassed years 2001 to 2006. Main results. 23 cases of infections were identified, all cases occurring during 2005 and 2006. Incidence rate was 0.07 and 0.09 cases per 1000 occupied bed-days, respectively. The mean age was 62.0 +/- 17 years. A significant proportion of patients had cancer (39.1%), recent surgical procedures (54.1%), were on dialysis (26.1%), or were using steroids (26.1%). Most patients had received 2 or more antimicrobial (87%), almost a third represented transfers from other hospitals and an additional 22% readmissions before 30 days of latest discharge. Patients were mainly hospitalized in the ICU (60.9%) but nearly 30% were associated exclusively to nephrological or onco-hematological wards. Clinical manifestations included bacteremia (30.4%), surgical site infections or abscesses (26.1%), urinary tract infections (26.1%) and others. . Three patients (13%) did not have symptoms. After identification was possible, all isolates were identified as E. faecium (82.6% of total), the rest as Enterococcus sp. Most strains showed intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin (66.7%). For 14 strains studied both with vancomycin and teicoplanin, , phenotype Van B was predominant (85.7%), followed by VanA (7.1%) and VanB/VanD type (7.1%). No molecular studies were performed. Fifteen patients (65.4%) received a surgical and/or medical treatment. A favorable response was observed in 80% of these

  1. [Child tuberculosis at the teaching hospital of Brazzaville from 1995 to 2003].

    PubMed

    M'Pemba Loufoua-Lemay, A B; Youndouka, J M; Pambou, B; Nzingoula, S

    2008-10-01

    In the paediatric service of the teaching hospital of Brazzaville, 582 files of children hospitalized were studied from January 1995 to December 2003. To determine tuberculosis frequency among sickle cell children and estimate the clinical and paraclinical aspects, a case-control study of tubercular patients with HIV negative serology was carried out by comparing at the same time a cohort of 75 sickle cell patients versus 125 patients without sickle cell disease. The results of these studies are as follows. The main assessment is the high frequency of tuberculosis. In 1995 the tuberculosis rate reaches 8%, in 2003 it was up to 13.6%, and 20.6% in 2000 due to the serious consequences of the recurrent wars between 1993 and 1999. Another cause of that high frequency is the rate of HIV/aids patients with a frequency of 2.5% of hospitalization ranging from 1.6 to 3.2%, among them 35% of the tubercular patients were seropositive. The tuberculosis prevalence was 7.4% among sickle cell patients versus 14.2% among control patients. Infection was more often identified in control patients (51.2%) than in sickle cell patients (24%). 68% of the parents were really poor and 18.5% of the children were evicted from their home by war. The pulmonary localizations were prevailing in groups of patients with sickle cell disease as well as in group of control patients. Pleuritis was observed in 8% of the patients with sickle cell disease versus 16.8% for control patients (P = 0.02). No patient with sickle cell disease had a miliary. Anergia to tuberculin test was reported in 35.8% sickle cell patients versus 10.4% for the control patients (P = 0.001). Tuberculosis prevalence is higher among control patients than in sickle cell patients. The high proportion of clinical and paraclinical data of tuberculosis did not significantly differ from the two groups. Evolution was good for 98% of the patients, 1.4% of them died; 74% of deceased patients were affected by HIV/aids.

  2. Clinical profile of hypertension at a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onwuchekwa, Arthur C; Chinenye, Sunday

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypertension in Nigeria is a widespread problem of immense social and economic importance because of its high prevalence and the severity of its complications. Aim: To define the morbidity and mortality pattern of hypertension at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH). Method: Records of all patients admitted to the medical wards of the UPTH over a 5-year period with essential hypertension or any of its complications were retrieved from the ward and medical records and reviewed. Result: A total of 780 hypertensive patients were reviewed, constituting 28.2% of all medical admissions. Only 424 (15.2%) had complete records and were analyzed. Record keeping was poor. There were 173 (41%) males and 251 (59%) females with a male to female ratio of 1:1.5. The ages ranged from 18 years to 100 years with a mean of 56.5 ± 16.2. Stroke was responsible for 169 (39.9%) hypertensive complications. Heart failure occurred in 97 (22%) cases while renal failure and encephalopathy accounted for 40 (9.4%) and 7 (1.7%) hypertensive complications respectively. There were 99 deaths out of which 51 (51.5%) were due to stroke, 14 (14.12%) were due to heart failure, and 12 (12.1%) were due to renal failure. Conclusion: The contribution of systemic hypertension to the morbidity and mortality of adults at UPTH is quite significant. PMID:20730067

  3. Prevalence of ESBLs-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different wards in a Chinese teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhilong; Niu, Hui; Chen, Guangyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    This study was to explore the molecular dissemination of P. aeruginosa producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) recovered from the different wards in a teaching hospital, Jilin. Among 240 isolates, 91 strains were isolated from burn wards and 149 strains from surgical wards. A total of 210 strains (87.5%) produced ESBLs, 30 strains (12.5%) didn’t produce ESBLs. All ESBLs isolates showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The genotypic prevalence of ESBLs for bla SHV-12, bla TEM-24, bla CTX-M-1, bla CTX-M-2, bla CTX-M-3, bla PER and bla VEB genes was 17.6%, 20.5%, 14.3%, 9.6%, 12.9%, 13.8% and 11.4% respectively. All P. aeruginosa strains producing ESBLs had three to six plasmids and contained class 1 integrons, which transferred resistance to E. coli C 600 by conjuation. The data indicated a high prevalence of ESBL among P. aeruginosa isolates in this region and their enzyme types were diverse. PMID:26770582

  4. The management of ultrasound equipment at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

    PubMed

    Verma, P K; Peacock, M

    2014-02-01

    Management of ultrasound equipment at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is described. The organisation and input of various stakeholders and their involvement with ultrasound equipment management and scientific ultrasound is discussed. Two important stakeholders are the Medical Equipment Management Group and the Radiation Safety Steering Committee. The Medical Equipment Management Group has a specific sub-group, the Ultrasound sub-group, and its role is to coordinate the purchase, replacement and quality assurance of ultrasound equipment in the Trust. The Radiation Safety Steering Committee has a non-ionising radiation representative and the role of this committee is to provide corporate assurance that any health and safety issues arising from the use of radiation to either patients, members of the public or staff within the Trust are being effectively managed. The Ultrasound sub-group of the Medical Equipment Management Group has successfully brought together management of all ultrasound equipment within the Trust and is in the process of fulfilling the quality assurance and training milestones set out by the Medical Equipment Management Group. Advice from the Radiation Safety Steering Committee has helped to increase awareness of ultrasound safety and good scanning practice, especially in the case of neonatal ultrasound imaging, within the Trust. In addition, the RSSC has given advice on clinical pathways for patients undergoing ionising radiation imaging while being treated by extra-corporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

  5. The management of ultrasound equipment at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, M

    2013-01-01

    Management of ultrasound equipment at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is described. The organisation and input of various stakeholders and their involvement with ultrasound equipment management and scientific ultrasound is discussed. Two important stakeholders are the Medical Equipment Management Group and the Radiation Safety Steering Committee. The Medical Equipment Management Group has a specific sub-group, the Ultrasound sub-group, and its role is to coordinate the purchase, replacement and quality assurance of ultrasound equipment in the Trust. The Radiation Safety Steering Committee has a non-ionising radiation representative and the role of this committee is to provide corporate assurance that any health and safety issues arising from the use of radiation to either patients, members of the public or staff within the Trust are being effectively managed. The Ultrasound sub-group of the Medical Equipment Management Group has successfully brought together management of all ultrasound equipment within the Trust and is in the process of fulfilling the quality assurance and training milestones set out by the Medical Equipment Management Group. Advice from the Radiation Safety Steering Committee has helped to increase awareness of ultrasound safety and good scanning practice, especially in the case of neonatal ultrasound imaging, within the Trust. In addition, the RSSC has given advice on clinical pathways for patients undergoing ionising radiation imaging while being treated by extra-corporeal shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:27433195

  6. Pharmacovigilance Knowledge among Patients at a Teaching Hospital in Lalitpur District, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Nisha; Rathore, Devendra S; Shankar, P Ravi; Gyawali, Sudesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Consumer’s knowledge and perception towards adverse drug reactions (ADR) can play an important role in ensuring a healthy lifestyle and proper use of medicines. Aims: This study aimed to assess the knowledge and perception towards pharma covigilance in general and consumer pharmacovigilance in particular among out patients in a teaching hospital of Nepal. Settings and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study using qualitative and quantitative methods was carried out from 1st May to 3 June 2013. Methods: Every fifth patient visiting the outpatient pharmacy was interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Gender, age, educational qualification, profession and ethnicity were noted. Twenty-three patients were interviewed. Results: There were 10 males and 13 females. The age of the respondents ranged from 11 to 50 years with a mean age of 27.8 (SD = 5.61) years. Seven (30.43%) respondents were students studying in different levels. Thirteen (56.52%) participants were from the Newar community. Majority of the patients (86.95%) knew ADRs may be caused by the medicines they consume and 18 (78.26%) were of the opinion that ADRs should be reported to doctors and other health care professionals including pharmacists. Conclusion: Knowledge and perception were low in certain areas. There is a need for educational interventions for improving the awareness of patients and general public for ensuring medicine safety and promoting rational use of medicines. PMID:24783073

  7. Multidrug Resistance of Acinetobacter Baumannii in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Odewale, G.; Adefioye, O. J.; Ojo, J.; Adewumi, F. A.; Olowe, O. A.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a ubiquitous pathogen that has emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated infections at Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital. Isolates were assayed according to standard protocol. The isolates were subjected to molecular techniques to detect blaOXA, blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes in strains of the A. baumannii isolates. The prevalence of A. baumannii was 8.5% and was most prevalent among patients in the age group 51–60 (36%); the male patients (63.6%) were more infected than their female counterparts. Patients (72.7%) in the intensive care unit (ICU) were most infected with this organism. The isolates showed 100% resistance to both amikacin and ciprofloxacin and 90.9% to both ceftriaxone and ceftazidime, while resistance to the other antibiotics used in this study were: piperacillin (81.8%), imipenem (72.7%), gentamycin (72.2%), and meropenem (63.6%). None of the isolates was, however, resistant to colistin. PCR results showed that blaOXA, blaTEM, and blaCTX-M genes were positive in some isolates, while blaSHV was not detected in any of the isolates. This study has revealed that the strains of A. baumannii isolated are multiple drug resistant. Regular monitoring, judicious prescription, and early detection of resistance to these antibiotics are, therefore, necessary to check further dissemination of the organism. PMID:27766173

  8. A survey of the anesthesia scavenging systems in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Soontranan, Preecha; Lertakyamanee, Jariya; Somprakit, Pradit; Surachetpong, Sudkanoung

    2002-09-01

    Pollution by anesthetic gases can be a problem in operating theaters. More than 90 per cent of this pollution can be reduced by using a scavenging system. Such systems increase the complexity, and thus the hazards of administering anesthesia. A case of pneumothorax prompted an investigation of the active scavenging systems currently used in a teaching hospital by using a pre-use check up protocol. Thirty-eight closed-reservoir active scavenging systems were included. Ten systems (26.3%) were assembled incorrectly. All systems passed a negative pressure relief valve test. Seventeen systems (44.7%) failed to pass a positive pressure relief valve test because high pressure (over 10 cmH2O) developed during an O2 flush, but direct measurement of the pressure at the scavenging interface revealed that these defects were caused by a problem with the adjustable pressure limiting (APL) valves, not with the positive pressure relief valves of the system. We suggest that routine pre-use check up together with regular maintenance of equipment should be emphasized and all personnel should be encouraged to learn more about safety precautions.

  9. Intestinal parasitosis: data analysis 2006-2011 in a teaching hospital of Ancona, Italy.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Carmela; Greganti, Gianfranco; Arzeni, Daniela; Morciano, Angela; Castelli, Pamela; Barchiesi, Francesco; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Intestinal parasites are a serious problem in developing countries, but should not be underestimated in industrialised countries either. Between January 2006 and December 2011, stool specimens and the scotch tests of 5323 Italian and non Italian patients (adults and children) attending the laboratory of our Infectious Diseases Clinic in a teaching Hospital at Ancona were analyzed specifically for intestinal parasites. The present study shows that, over a six-year period, of a total of 5323 patients 305 harboured at least one species of parasite (5.7%). Among the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia was the most common, the overall prevalence of giardiasis being 1.8 % (99/5323). Helminths were found in 0.9% of the patients (48/5323). In particular, Hymenolepis nana, Strongyloides stercoralis and Trichuris trichiura were most commonly recovered in non-Italian children, suggesting that certain intestinal parasites are restricted to endemic areas in the tropics. Eighteen of the 305 infected patients had more than one parasite in their stools. Our study demonstrates that intestinal parasites must be considered even in industrialised areas and stool examination should be supported by epidemiological data and clinical features.

  10. Screening for Imported Diseases in an Immigrant Population: Experience from a Teaching Hospital in Barcelona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Cristina; Salvador, Fernando; Sulleiro, Elena; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Pahissa, Albert; Molina, Israel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the screening for imported diseases among an immigrant population. This retrospective observational study was of all adult immigrants attended at the Tropical Medicine Unit of the Vall d'Hebron Teaching Hospital from September of 2007 to March of 2010. The screening strategy was adjusted by symptoms, country of origin, and length of residence in Europe. Overall, 927 patients were included. The median age was 34.5 years, and 42.1% of patients were male. A diagnosis was made in 419 (45.2%) patients. The most frequent diagnoses were Chagas disease, anemia, latent tuberculosis infection, intestinal parasitosis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. After screening, more diseases were identified in immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa (new diagnoses in 56.6% of patients) than patients from other geographic areas. The geographic origin and length of residence in a developed country determine the prevalence of diseases; hence, screening protocols must be based on this information. PMID:25331805

  11. Role-Reversal Exercise with Deaf Strong Hospital to Teach Communication Competency and Cultural Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Parkhill, Amy L.; Schlehofer, Deirdre A.; Starr, Matthew J.; Barnett, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement a role-reversal exercise to increase first-year pharmacy students' awareness of communication barriers in the health care setting, especially for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. Design Volunteers from the local deaf community conducted Deaf Strong Hospital, a role-reversal exercise in which students were the “patients.” Students navigated through a reception area, encounter with a physician, and having a prescription filled at a pharmacy without receiving or using any spoken language. Assessment A debriefing session was held in which small groups of students had the opportunity to ask questions of a panel of deaf and hard-of-hearing volunteers. On a survey administered to assess students' learning, 97% agreed or strongly agreed that the experience would likely impact their attitudes and behavior in future interactions with patients who did not speak English. Conclusions The role-reversal exercise was an effective method of teaching students that the delivery of health care is dependent on adequate communication between health care providers and the patient. PMID:21655407

  12. Pharmaceutical interventions in medications prescribed for administration via enteral tubes in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carolina Justus Buhrer; Plodek, Caroline Koga; Soares, Franciny Kossemba; de Andrade, Rayza Assis; Teleginski, Fernanda; da Rocha, Maria Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the impact of guidelines regarding errors in medications prescribed for administration through enteral tubes. Method: quantitative study, in three phases, undertaken in internal medicine, neurology and an intensive care unit in a general teaching hospital. In Phase 1, the following was undertaken: a protocol for dilution and unit-dose repackaging and administration for 294 medications via enteral tubes; a decision flowchart; operational-standard procedures for dilution and unit-dose repackaging of oral pharmaceutical forms and for administration of medications through enteral tubes. In phase 2, errors in 872 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 293 prescriptions for patients receiving inpatient treatment between March and June, were investigated. This was followed by training of the teams in relation to the guidelines established. In Phase 3, pharmaceutical errors and interventions in 945 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 292 prescriptions of patients receiving inpatient treatment between August and September, were investigated prospectively. The data collected, in a structured questionnaire, were compiled in the Microsoft Office Excel(r) program, and frequencies were calculated. Results: 786 errors were observed, 63.9% (502) in Phase 2, and 36.1% (284) in Phase 3. In Phase 3, a reduction was ascertained in the frequency of prescription of medications delivered via enteral tubes, medications which were contraindicated, and those for which information was not available. Conclusion: guidelines and pharmaceutical interventions were determined in the prevention of errors involving medications delivered through enteral tubes. PMID:27276019

  13. Study of drug utilization pattern in dental OPD at tertiary care teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Rehan, H S; Singh, C; Tripathi, C D; Kela, A K

    2001-01-01

    Irrational prescribing is a global phenomenon. The objective of the study was to find out the prescribing practices of dental prescribers in a tertiary care teaching hospital with special emphasis on the utilization of antimicrobial agents. A prospective study was conducted in the month of March 2000. A total of 491 prescriptions were collected randomly. Prescribing pattern was analyzed using WHO basic drug indicators. The average number of drugs for prescription was 2.4. 78.8% of all prescriptions contained antimicrobial agents. It was most commonly prescribed (40.37%) group of drugs followed by anti-inflammatory and analgesics (33.8%). Fixed dose combination of ampicillin and cloxacillin was most commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic use of AMA (78%) was more than therapeutic purpose (21.9%). Prophylactic use of antimicrobial agents was irrational in all the cases as duration for the use of antimicrobial agents was 5.1 +/- 0.5 days. Fixed dose combinations (45%), drugs by brand name (98.5%) were frequently used. Drug prescribed from Essential Drug List was maximum when one drug was prescribed. Results indicate that there is a scope for improving prescribing habits and minimizing the use of antimicrobial agents. This could be facilitated by periodic education to the prescribers.

  14. Factors associated with knowledge of the nursing staff at a teaching hospital on blood transfusion 1

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Jordânia Lumênia; Barichello, Elizabeth; Mattia, Ana Lúcia De; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to determine whether there is an association between knowledge of the nursing professionals about blood transfusion and the variables related to the professional aspects. Method: this is an observational, cross-sectional and quantitative study, carried out at a large general teaching hospital. The sample consisted of 209 nursing professionals, obtained by simple random sampling. For data collection, a checklist was used. In the univariate analysis, descriptive statistics and central trend and dispersion measures were used. In the bivariate analysis, Student's t-Test, analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation were used. To determine the predictors, multiple linear regression was applied. The Institutional Review Board (Opinion number 2434) approved the study. Results: the overall average knowledge score was 52.66%; in the Pre-transfusion Step, it corresponded to 53.38%; in the Transfusion Step 51.25% and, in the Post-transfusion Step, 62.68%. The factors related to knowledge were professional category and received training and/or guidance to accomplish the transfusion process (p<0.01). Conclusion: this study showed the influence of training and guidance on the knowledge and provided a diagnosis to identify the professionals' difficulties regarding the transfusion process. PMID:26444160

  15. Population Structure of Candida albicans from Three Teaching Hospitals in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjapong, Gloria; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies on Candida species in a clinical setting in Ghana have shown a prevalence of Candida albicans. Despite this, very little is known about the various strain types and their population genetic structure. In this study three microsatellite loci, CAI, CAIII and CAVI, were used to investigate the population genetic structure of C. albicans from clinical isolates in Ghana. In all, 240 clinically unrelated C. albicans isolates were recovered from patients reporting at three teaching hospitals. All the isolates were heterozygous for at least one of the three loci, except for one isolate, which was homozygous for all three loci. Sixty-seven unique alleles and 240 different genotypes were generated by the three polymorphic microsatellite loci, resulting in a very high discriminatory potential of approximately 0.98. There was no significant difference in allele frequencies from the small number of anatomical sites sampled, regardless of the host conditions although high genotypic diversities were observed among the isolates. There was evidence for clonal reproduction, including over-expression of observed heterozygotes across the populations. The populations deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and pair-wise genotypic linkage disequilibria comparisons across the three loci were significant, also suggesting a clonal population. The overall Wright FIS for the three loci was negative, and the overall FST value was not significantly different from zero for the three loci analyzed, indicating a clonal and homogeneous population across the three sampling locations from Ghana.

  16. The association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ravangard, Ramin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Shahsavan, Najme; Bahmaie, Jamshid; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve success in today’s competitive world, organizations should adapt to environmental changes. On the other hand, managers should have a set of values and ethical guidelines for their administrative and organizational functions. This study aimed to investigate the association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study conducted in 2013. A sample of 124 employees was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using 2 questionnaires measuring the dimensions of employees' work ethics (four dimensions) and attitudes towards organizational changes (three dimensions). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and statistical tests, including ANOVA, independent samples t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum and minimum score of work ethic dimensions were related to being cooperative (4.60 ± 0.38) and dependable (4.29 ± 0.39) respectively. On the other hand, the maximum and minimum score of attitudes towards the various dimensions of organizational changes were related to the behavioral (3.83 ± 0.70) and the affective (3.55 ± 0.88) dimensions respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between the work ethics and education levels of the employees in this study (P = 0.003). Also, among work s dimensions, only being considerate had a significant association with attitudes towards organizational changes (P = 0.014) and their cognitive dimension (P = 0.005). To improve employees' work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes, the following suggestions can be offered: training hospitals managers in participative management style and its application

  17. 34 CFR 85.905 - Affiliate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Affiliate. 85.905 Section 85.905 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.905 Affiliate. Persons are affiliates of each other if, directly or indirectly, either...

  18. 18 CFR 35.39 - Affiliate restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.39 Affiliate... authority, the conditions provided in this section, including the restriction on affiliate sales of electric... the Seller's market-based rate tariff. (b) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy...

  19. 18 CFR 35.39 - Affiliate restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.39 Affiliate... authority, the conditions provided in this section, including the restriction on affiliate sales of electric... the Seller's market-based rate tariff. (b) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy...

  20. 18 CFR 35.39 - Affiliate restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.39 Affiliate... authority, the conditions provided in this section, including the restriction on affiliate sales of electric... the Seller's market-based rate tariff. (b) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy...

  1. 7 CFR 12.8 - Affiliated persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affiliated persons. 12.8 Section 12.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.8 Affiliated persons. (a) Ineligibility of affiliated persons. Ineligibility of an individual...

  2. 7 CFR 12.8 - Affiliated persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affiliated persons. 12.8 Section 12.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.8 Affiliated persons. (a) Ineligibility of affiliated persons. Ineligibility of an individual...

  3. 7 CFR 12.8 - Affiliated persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affiliated persons. 12.8 Section 12.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.8 Affiliated persons. (a) Ineligibility of affiliated persons. Ineligibility of an individual...

  4. 7 CFR 12.8 - Affiliated persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Affiliated persons. 12.8 Section 12.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.8 Affiliated persons. (a) Ineligibility of affiliated persons. Ineligibility of an individual...

  5. Discharge against medical advice: a case study in a public teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran in 2012.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Salimi, Mohammad; Ravangard, Ramin

    2013-11-01

     Discharging against medical advice is to leave the hospital despite the advice of the doctor, which can result in complications and readmissions. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of patients' discharge against medical advice (DAMA) and their reasons in a public teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran in 2012. This was an applied and cross-sectional study in which all patients (2601 patients) who had been discharged against medical advice from the studied hospital in 2012 were studied. Required data were collected using a data collection form. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and descriptive and analytical tests including Frequencies and Fisher's Exact Test. The most and least common reasons for DAMA were, respectively, feeling complete recovery by patients (45.4%) and financial problems (1.3%). The results showed that there were significant differences between DAMA prevalence and patients' sex and age (P<0.001). The prevalence of DAMA in the studied hospital was high and according to the existence of social work units in every hospital, it is recommended that patients' consultation with the hospital social workers should be considered as an obligatory stage of the discharge against medical advice process in order to inform patients about its complications and adverse consequences.

  6. Impact of waste management training intervention on knowledge, attitude and practices of teaching hospital workers in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Somrongthong, Ratana; Ahmed, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the sustainability and effectiveness of training as an intervention to improve the knowledge, attitude and practices of hospital workers on health care waste management. Method: We conducted this quasi-experimental study in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Rawalpindi in October 2013. Training, practical demonstrations and reminders on standard waste management were given to 138 hospital workers in one hospital and compared with 137 workers from the control hospital. We collected data 18 months after intervention through a structured questionnaire to assess the impact of the intervention. We used paired t-test to compare the scores on knowledge, attitude and practices at baseline and first follow up and final impact assessment. Chi square test was used to compare group variables between intervention and control groups. Results: After 18 months since intervention the mean scores on knowledge attitude and practices differed statistically significantly since baseline and intervention group had statistically significantly better knowledge positive attitudes and good health care waste management practices (p < 0.001). Health care and sanitary workers in intervention group scored statistically significantly higher (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Trainings of health and sanitary workers on health care waste management guidelines were sustainable among the intervention group after 18 months which shows the positive impact of our intervention. It is recommended that the trainings as intervention be included in the overall policies of the public and private sector hospitals in Pakistan and other similar settings. PMID:27375718

  7. The experience of implementing the board of trustees’ policy in teaching hospitals in Iran: an example of health system decentralization

    PubMed Central

    Doshmangir, Leila; Rashidian, Arash; Ravaghi, Hamid; Takian, Amirhossein; Jafari, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2004, the health system in Iran initiated an organizational reform aiming to increase the autonomy of teaching hospitals and make them more decentralized. The policy led to the formation of a board of trustees in each hospital and significant modifications in hospitals’ financing. Since the reform aimed to improve its predecessor policy (implementation of hospital autonomy began in 1995), it expected to increase user satisfaction, as well as enhance effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare services in targeted hospitals. However, such expectations were never realized. In this research, we explored the perceptions and views of expert stakeholders as to why the board of trustees’ policy did not achieve its perceived objectives. Methods: We conducted 47 semi-structured face-to-face interviews and two focus group discussions (involving 8 and 10 participants, respectively) with experts at high, middle, and low levels of Iran’s health system, using purposive and snowball sampling. We also collected a comprehensive set of relevant documents. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically, following a mixed inductive-deductive approach. Results: Three main themes emerged from the analysis. The implementation approach (including the processes, views about the policy and the links between the policy components), using research evidence about the policy (local and global), and policy context (health system structure, health insurers capacity, hospitals’ organization and capacity and actors’ interrelationships) affected the policy outcomes. Overall, the implementation of hospital decentralization policies in Iran did not seem to achieve their intended targets as a result of assumed failure to take full consideration of the above factors in policy implementation into account. Conclusion: The implementation of the board of trustees’ policy did not achieve its desired goals in teaching hospitals in Iran. Similar decentralization

  8. Blood transfusion trends in obstetrics at the Federal Teaching Hospital in Abakaliki, South-East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lawani, Osaheni L; Iyoke, Chukwuemeka A; Onyebuchi, Azubuike K

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstetric hemorrhage has been repeatedly implicated as a leading cause of maternal mortality in Nigeria, yet there are very few studies that evaluate the practice of blood transfusion in obstetrics as a life saving measure. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the practice of obstetric blood transfusion, the mean decision-transfusion interval, and the outcome in parturients who had blood transfusions. Methods This was a prospective descriptive study conducted at the Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, South-East Nigeria, between 1st January, 2012 and 31st December, 2012. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 15.0 for Windows. Results Out of 151 parturients who received blood transfusion, 141/151 (97.4%) were knowledgeable about blood transfusion, while only 10/151 (2.6%) had no knowledge of it. The hospital was the source of information for 120/151 (80.8%) of the participants. Blood transfusion rate was 7.04% of all parturients. The mean decision-transfusion interval was 12.0 ± 4.3 hours. All participants were transfused with either whole blood or sedimented cells. The mean number of blood units transfused was 1.77 ± 0.93 units. The indications for transfusion were: anemia, 109/151 (72.2%); shock, 13/151 (8.6%); postpartum hemorrhage, 23/151 (15.2%); antepartum hemorrhage, 6 (4%). Six (4%) women died; mortality was due to renal failure in 3/6 (50%) and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy in 3/6 (50%). These deaths were due to delays and difficulty in securing blood for transfusion, while those who got transfused on time were salvaged with minimal morbidity, 21/151 (14%), or with no morbidity, 130/151 (86%). Conclusion Excessive blood loss and anemia still complicate most pregnancies in our practice and the mean decision-transfusion interval is unacceptably long with debilitating maternal morbidity and mortality that can be improved with safe and effective blood transfusion with minimal or no risk. PMID:23874125

  9. Medication Errors Among Geriatrics at the Outpatient Pharmacy in a Teaching Hospital in Kelantan

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Dellemin Che; Ibrahim, Noor Shufiza; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the medication errors among geriatrics at the outpatient pharmacy in a teaching hospital in Kelantan and the strategies to minimize the prevalence. A retrospective study was conducted that involved screening of prescription for a one-month period (March 2001). Only 15.35% (1601 prescription) of a total 10,429 prescriptions were for geriatrics. The prescriptions that were found to have medication errors was 403. Therefore, the prevalence of medication errors per day was approximately 20 cases. Generally, the errors between both genders were found to be comparable and to be the highest for Malays and at the age of 60–64 years old. Administrative errors was recorded to be the highest which included patient’s particulars and validity of the prescriptions (70.22%) and drugs that available in HUSM (16.13%). Whereas the total of prescribing errors were low. Under prescribing errors were pharmaceutical error (0.99%) and clinical error (8.68%). Sixteen cases or 3.98% had more than 1 error. The highest prevalence went to geriatrics who received more than nine drugs (32.16%), geriatrics with more than 3 clinical diagnosis (10.06%), geriatrics who visited specialist clinics (37.52%) and treated by the specialists (31.07%). The estimated cost for the 403 medication errors in March was RM9,327 or RM301 per day that included the cost of drugs and humanistic cost. The projected cost of medication errors per year was RM 111,924. In conclusion, it is very clear that the role of pharmacist is very great in preventing and minimizing the medication errors beside the needs of correct prescription writing and other strategies by all of the heath care components. PMID:22973127

  10. Proton Beam Radiotherapy for Uveal Melanomas at Nice Teaching Hospital: 16 Years' Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Mammar, Hamid; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Pinon, Fabien; Herault, Joel; Gastaud, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To present the results of uveal melanomas treated at Nice Teaching Hospital. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study included 886 consecutive patients referred to our clinic for the treatment of uveal melanomas by proton beam radiotherapy from June 1991 to December 2007. Survival rates were determined by using Kaplan-Meier estimates, and prognostic factors were evaluated using the log-rank test or Cox model. Results: The number (percent total) of subjects staged according to the TNM classification system (6th edition) of malignant tumors included 39 stage T1 (4.4%), 420 stage T2 (47.40%), 409 stage T3 (46.16%), and 18 stage T4 (2.03%) patients. The median follow-up was 63.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate at 5 years according to the sixth edition TNM classification was 92% for T1, 89% for T2, 67% for T3, and 62% for T4; and at 10 years, 86% for T1, 78% for T2, 43% for T3, and 41% for T4. Five factors were found to be associated with an increased death rate: advanced age, tumor thickness, largest tumor basal diameter, tumor volume, and tumor volume-to-eyeball volume ratio. The metastasis-free survival rates were 88.3 % at 5 years and 76.4 % at 10 years. The local control rates were 93.9% at 5 years and 92.1% at 10 years. The ocular conservation rates were 91.1% at 5 years and 87.3% at 10 years. Conclusions: We report the results of a large series of patients treated for uveal melanomas with a very long follow-up. Despite the large tumor volume treated, our results were similar to previously published findings relating to proton beam therapy.

  11. Is there a weekend effect in hip fracture patients presenting to a United Kingdom teaching hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, John Abraham; Vindlacheruvu, Madhavi; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare mortality and time-to-surgery of patients admitted with hip fracture to our teaching hospital on weekdays vs weekends. METHODS Data was prospectively collected and retrospectively analysed for 816 hip fracture patients. Multivariate logistic regression was carried out on 3 binary outcomes (time-to-surgery < 36 h; 30-d mortality; 120-d mortality), using the explanatory variables time-of-admission; age; gender; American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) grade; abbreviated mental test score (AMTS); fracture type; accommodation admitted from; walking ability outdoors; accompaniment outdoors and season. RESULTS Baseline characteristics were not statistically different between those admitted on weekdays vs weekends. Weekend admission was not associated with an increased time-to-surgery (P = 0.975), 30-d mortality (P = 0.842) or 120-d mortality (P = 0.425). Gender (P = 0.028), ASA grade (P < 0.001), AMTS (P = 0.041) and accompaniment outdoors (P = 0.033) were significant co-variates for 30-d mortality. Furthermore, age (P < 0.001), gender (P = 0.011), ASA grade (P < 0.001), AMTS (P < 0.001) and accompaniment outdoors (P = 0.033) all significantly influenced mortality at 120 d. ASA (P < 0.001) and season (P = 0.014) had significant effect on the odds of undergoing surgery in under 36 h. CONCLUSION Weekend admission was not associated with increased time-to-surgery or mortality in hip fracture patients. Demographic factors affect mortality in accordance with previous published reports. PMID:27795950

  12. Adherence to preventive medications in asthmatic children at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Md Redzuan, Adyani; Lee, Meng Soon; Mohamed Shah, Noraida

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Asthma affects an estimated 300 million people worldwide. Poor adherence to prescribed preventive medications, especially among children with asthma, leads to increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to assess the adherence and persistence levels of asthmatic children at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC), a tertiary care teaching hospital, and to determine the factors that influence adherence to prescribed preventive medications. Patients and methods Participants were asthmatic patients aged 18 years and younger with at least one prescription for a preventive medication refilled between January and December 2011. Refill records from the pharmacy dispensing database were used to determine the medication possession ratio (MPR) and continuous measure of gaps (CMG), measures of adherence and persistence levels, respectively. Results The sample consisted of 218 children with asthma from the General and Respiratory pediatric clinics at UKMMC. The overall adherence level was 38% (n=83; MPR ≥80%), and the persistence level was 27.5% (n=60; CMG ≤20%). We found a significant association between the adherence and persistence levels (r=0.483, P<0.01). The presence of comorbidities significantly predicted the adherence (odds ratio [OR] =16.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.76–33.84, P<0.01) and persistence level (OR =2.63, 95% CI: 0.13–52.79, P<0.01). Other factors, including age, sex, ethnicity, duration of asthma diagnosis, and number of prescribed preventive medications did not significantly affect adherence or persistence (P>0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, the adherence level among children with asthma at UKMMC was low. The presence of comorbidities was found to influence adherence towards preventive medications in asthmatic children. PMID:24600208

  13. The social, family and medical backgrounds of children with kwashiorkor presenting at a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Sive, A A; Subotzky, E F; Malan, H

    1993-03-01

    The social, family and medical backgrounds of 53 children hospitalised with kwashiorkor were compared with those of 106 children hospitalised for non-nutritional diseases to determine risk factors for severe nutritional disease in children presenting to a teaching hospital. The control children were matched for age, sex, race and the non-nutritional illness complicating the course of the children with kwashiorkor; in 80% of cases the reason for admission was either gastro-enteritis or pneumonia. A major difference between the groups was the educational status of the mothers. Only 57% of the mothers of the children with kwashiorkor were literate compared with 93% of the controls; 25% as opposed to 47% were married, and 36% as opposed to 72% received support from the father. There were no differences in the mothers' ages or use of contraception, or in the number of children they had. In all except 1 instance the child with kwashiorkor was the youngest or only child in the family, and the average sibling interval was 53 months. The types of dwellings occupied by the families were similar, but overcrowding was worse in the kwashiorkor group. Family income was below the household subsistence level in the vast majority of both groups, but significantly more of the kwashiorkor group had minimal cash income. Significantly fewer of the children with kwashiorkor had been breast-fed or adequately immunised, and 60% had previously been hospitalised for dehydrating diarrhoea. This study demonstrates that in an urban environment the traditional factors of large families and displacement by a younger sibling are not associated with kwashiorkor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Factors influencing heartworm, flea, and tick preventative use in patients presenting to a veterinary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Maureen C.; Nolan, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of modern heartworm, flea, and tick preventatives has provided a safe and effective means of controlling companion animal endoparasites, but achieving good owner compliance remains an ongoing challenge for the veterinary profession. Based on a sample of patients from the veterinary teaching hospital at the University of Pennsylvania, this study retrospectively examined factors associated with preventative use and areas of potential weakness in client communication. Between 1999 and 2006, records of 5,276 canine and 1,226 feline patients were searched for signalment, survey results for heartworm, flea, and tick preventative use, date of visit, presenting complaint, vaccination history, and owner zip code. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate techniques. Overall, only 13 - 23 % of patients were questioned about heartworm, flea, or tick preventative use during routine medical history taking. Patients with a prior history of parasites, younger patients, or those presenting with signs of cardiac disease were no more likely to be questioned about preventative use than healthy animals. Patients presenting to a specialty service were also less likely to be questioned. Approximately 74 - 79% of dogs and 12 – 38 % of cats in the sample were on preventative products at any given time. There was a distinct seasonality to preventative use corresponding to the heartworm transmission season from June through November in the northeastern United States. Only 50% of patients seen for a yearly physical examination in winter were reported to be using preventative products when surveyed later in the year, compared to the roughly 85% on patients in heartworm preventatives when they received their routine physical exam in spring. Month of presentation and neuter status were the only signalment factors significantly (P<0.05) associated with preventative use in the multivariate analysis. Findings from this study emphasize target areas for increasing owner

  15. Indications and Risk Factors for Complications of Lower Third Molar Surgery in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Osunde, OD; Saheeb, BD; Bassey, GO

    2014-01-01

    Background: The surgical extraction of impacted third molars is a common oral surgical procedure, and it is often associated with complications such as sensory nerve damage, dry socket, pain, swelling, trismus, infection and hemorrhage. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the surgical indications and risk factors for complications of third molar surgery at a Nigerian teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Medical records of patients referred to the Oral Surgery Clinic of our institution for surgical extraction of their impacted mandibular third molars from January 2008 to December 2010 were retrospectively examined. Information on patients’ demography, types of impaction, operative parameters and complications were obtained and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Version 13), Chicago, IL, USA. A P < 0.0.5 was considered significant. Results: A total of 330 impacted teeth were extracted from 250 patients. Male comprises (104/250 [41.6%]) and female (146/250 [58.4%]). The mesioangular (176/330 [53.4%]) and distoangular (73/330 [22.1%]) impactions were the commonest types. Recurrent pericoronitis (154/330 [46.7%]) was the most common indication for extraction. The complications were delayed healing (19/330 [5.8%]), alveolar, osteitis (9/330 [2.7%]) and injury to alveolar nerve (2/330 [0.6%]). Cigarette smoking (P < 0.001), Oral contraceptives use (P = 0.01), age of the patient (P = 0.03) and the surgeon's experience (P = 0.04) were found to be significantly associated with the development of alveolar osteitis; nerves injuries were significantly associated with the raising of a lingual flap (P < 0.001) and the technique of surgery (P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: The age of the patient, cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive use at the time of surgery are some of the factors affecting outcome in third molar surgery. PMID:25506490

  16. Evaluation of the peer teaching program at the University Children´s Hospital Essen - a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Büscher, Rainer; Weber, Dominik; Büscher, Anja; Hölscher, Maite; Pohlhuis, Sandra; Groes, Bernhard; Hoyer, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Since 1986 medical students at the University Children's Hospital Essen are trained as peers in a two week intensive course in order to teach basic paediatric examination techniques to younger students. Student peers are employed by the University for one year. Emphasis of the peer teaching program is laid on the mediation of affective and sensomotorical skills e.g. get into contact with parents and children, as well as manual paediatric examination techniques. The aim of this study is to analyse whether student peers are able to impart specific paediatric examination skills as good as an experienced senior paediatric lecturer. 123 students were randomly assigned to a group with either a senior lecturer or a student peer teacher. Following one-hour teaching-sessions in small groups students had to demonstrate the learned skills in a 10 minute modified OSCE. In comparison to a control group consisting of 23 students who never examined a child before, both groups achieved a significantly better result. Medical students taught by student peers almost reached the same examination result as the group taught by paediatric teachers (21,7±4,1 vs. 22,6±3,6 of 36 points, p=0,203). Especially the part of the OSCE where exclusively practical skills where examined revealed no difference between the two groups (7,44±2,15 vs. 7,97±1,87 of a maximum of 16 points, p=0,154). The majority of students (77%) evaluated peer teaching as stimulating and helpful. The results of this quantitative teaching study reveal that peer teaching of selected skills can be a useful addition to classical paediatric teaching classes.

  17. Evaluation of the peer teaching program at the University children´s hospital Essen – a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, Rainer; Weber, Dominik; Büscher, Anja; Hölscher, Maite; Pohlhuis, Sandra; Groes, Bernhard; Hoyer, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Since 1986 medical students at the University Children’s Hospital Essen are trained as peers in a two week intensive course in order to teach basic paediatric examination techniques to younger students. Student peers are employed by the University for one year. Emphasis of the peer teaching program is laid on the mediation of affective and sensomotorical skills e.g. get into contact with parents and children, as well as manual paediatric examination techniques. The aim of this study is to analyse whether student peers are able to impart specific paediatric examination skills as good as an experienced senior paediatric lecturer. 123 students were randomly assigned to a group with either a senior lecturer or a student peer teacher. Following one-hour teaching-sessions in small groups students had to demonstrate the learned skills in a 10 minute modified OSCE. In comparison to a control group consisting of 23 students who never examined a child before, both groups achieved a significantly better result. Medical students taught by student peers almost reached the same examination result as the group taught by paediatric teachers (21,7±4,1 vs. 22,6±3,6 of 36 points, p=0,203). Especially the part of the OSCE where exclusively practical skills where examined revealed no difference between the two groups (7,44±2,15 vs. 7,97±1,87 of a maximum of 16 points, p=0,154). The majority of students (77%) evaluated peer teaching as stimulating and helpful. The results of this quantitative teaching study reveal that peer teaching of selected skills can be a useful addition to classical paediatric teaching classes. PMID:23737922

  18. Is an urban legend true in the teaching hospital that "you will get hurt if you go to hospital at the beginning of the fiscal year"?

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoki; Abe, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Yu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2015-02-01

    An urban legend that "you will get hurt if you go to hospital at the beginning of the fiscal year" is in circulation, because people in general suppose that inexperienced newcomers start to work at clinical practice during that time period. We tried to determine whether this urban legend was true or not by using data from our operation management system. We retrospectively conducted a study to investigate whether the number of cannulation failures, which was used as an index of patient disadvantages at clinical practice, could be affected by the volume of residents in clinical participation. The number of insertion trials per case was not prominent in the first month of the fiscal year. However, the number of insertion trials per case increased in proportion to the average number of residents per day. It seems that there was no evidence to support the urban legend that "you will get hurt if you go to hospital at the beginning of the fiscal year." However, our results suggest that rather than an urban legend, we are now confronting the fact that patients may suffer from medical disadvantages in the teaching hospitals. PMID:24981561

  19. Is an urban legend true in the teaching hospital that "you will get hurt if you go to hospital at the beginning of the fiscal year"?

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoki; Abe, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Yu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2015-02-01

    An urban legend that "you will get hurt if you go to hospital at the beginning of the fiscal year" is in circulation, because people in general suppose that inexperienced newcomers start to work at clinical practice during that time period. We tried to determine whether this urban legend was true or not by using data from our operation management system. We retrospectively conducted a study to investigate whether the number of cannulation failures, which was used as an index of patient disadvantages at clinical practice, could be affected by the volume of residents in clinical participation. The number of insertion trials per case was not prominent in the first month of the fiscal year. However, the number of insertion trials per case increased in proportion to the average number of residents per day. It seems that there was no evidence to support the urban legend that "you will get hurt if you go to hospital at the beginning of the fiscal year." However, our results suggest that rather than an urban legend, we are now confronting the fact that patients may suffer from medical disadvantages in the teaching hospitals.

  20. Imagecube: an astropy affiliated package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianou, S.; Barmby, P.; Taylor, J.

    2013-09-01

    Astropy is a community python library for astronomy. Imagecube has been developed as an astropy affiliated package for processing multiwavelength (spectro)-imaging. This module automates tedious steps of image processing and analysis and delivers a science-ready image datacube. The included steps involve converting to common flux units, image registration to a common WCS, and convolution to a common resolution. Individual steps can be performed separately. We test the module using the dwarf galaxy NGC1569 by producing its observed spectral energy distribution on a pixel-by-pixel basis.

  1. Perceived versus Observed Patient Safety Measures in a Critical Care Unit from a Teaching Hospital in Southern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Jorge Hernan; Romero, Adriana Fernanda; Tejada, Paola Andrea; Olaya, Sandra Ximena; Rubiano, Andres Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patient safety is an important topic. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived versus observed patient safety measures (PSM) in critically ill patients in a teaching hospital in Latin America. Materials and Methods. The level of perceived patient safety was evaluated with the patient safety hospital survey. Three months later, a qualitative study was conducted, including video recording of procedures, graded according to adherence to PSM. Levels of adherence were scored during patient mobilization (PM), placement of central catheters (PCC), other invasive procedures (OIP), infection control (IC), and endotracheal intubation (ETI). Results. The perceived adherence of PSM in the prestudy survey was considered fair by 89.1% of the ICU staff. After the survey, 829 ICU procedures were video-recorded. Mean observed adherence for fair patient safety measures was 20.8%. Perceived adherence was higher than the real patient safety protocol measures observed in the videos. Conclusion. Perception of PSM was higher than observed in the management of critically ill patients in a teaching hospital in southern Colombia.

  2. Perceived versus Observed Patient Safety Measures in a Critical Care Unit from a Teaching Hospital in Southern Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, Jorge Hernan; Romero, Adriana Fernanda; Tejada, Paola Andrea; Olaya, Sandra Ximena; Rubiano, Andres Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patient safety is an important topic. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived versus observed patient safety measures (PSM) in critically ill patients in a teaching hospital in Latin America. Materials and Methods. The level of perceived patient safety was evaluated with the patient safety hospital survey. Three months later, a qualitative study was conducted, including video recording of procedures, graded according to adherence to PSM. Levels of adherence were scored during patient mobilization (PM), placement of central catheters (PCC), other invasive procedures (OIP), infection control (IC), and endotracheal intubation (ETI). Results. The perceived adherence of PSM in the prestudy survey was considered fair by 89.1% of the ICU staff. After the survey, 829 ICU procedures were video-recorded. Mean observed adherence for fair patient safety measures was 20.8%. Perceived adherence was higher than the real patient safety protocol measures observed in the videos. Conclusion. Perception of PSM was higher than observed in the management of critically ill patients in a teaching hospital in southern Colombia. PMID:26989508

  3. Quality of care in African-American patients admitted for congestive heart failure at a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Ilksoy, Nurcan; Moore, Renee H; Easley, Kirk; Jacobson, Terry A

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the quality of congestive heart failure (CHF) treatment for hospitalized patients varies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the compliance of physicians at a large, inner-city teaching hospital with current evidence-based guidelines. A retrospective review of the medical records of 104 patients admitted with CHF was conducted. Quality-of-care indicators were assessed, including the use of echocardiograms, the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers to appropriate patients, and lifestyle and medication counseling at discharge. The assessment of left ventricular (LV) function was documented in 96.1% of patients (n = 100). A total of 65 patients (92.8%) with systolic dysfunction were considered to be ideal candidates for ACE inhibitor therapy. Of these 65 patients, 58 (89.2%) were discharged on ACE inhibitors. Of 41 patients with LV systolic dysfunction who were considered to be ideal candidates for beta-blocker therapy, only 10 (24.4%) were discharged on beta-blocker therapy. Of all patients with CHF, 50% received discharge counseling on medication compliance, 48% received counseling on a low-salt diet, and only 9% were told to monitor daily weight. This study shows that in a major academic teaching hospital, there is a need for improvement in the use of beta-blocker therapy as well as greater emphasis on patient education strategies regarding diet, medication adherence, and monitoring daily weight. PMID:16490439

  4. Adverse incidents resulting in exposure to body fluids at a UK dental teaching hospital over a 6-year period

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A; Davies, L; Hale, R; Gallagher, JE

    2012-01-01

    Background: The safety and protection of patients and health care workers is of paramount importance in dentistry, and this includes students in training who provide clinical care. Given the nature of dental care, adverse incidents can and do occur, exposing health care workers to body fluids and putting them at risk of infection, including contracting a blood-borne virus. The aim of this research was to analyze trends in the volume, rate, nature, management, and outcome of adverse incidents reported at one dental teaching hospital from 2005 to 2010. Methods: Descriptive analysis of trends in the volume, rate, nature, management, and outcome of adverse incidents reported at one dental teaching hospital over a six-year period was undertaken in relation to the level of outpatient and day surgery activity. Results: In total, 287 incidents were reported over a six-year period, which amounted to 0.039% of outpatient or day surgery appointments. Nearly three quarters of all the incidents (n = 208, 72%) took place during treatment or whilst clearing away after the appointment. The most frequent incidents were associated with administration of local anesthetic (n = 63, 22%), followed by burs used in dental hand pieces (n = 51, 18%). Conclusion: This research confirms that adverse incidents are a feature of dental hospitals and reports the common sources. The importance of accurate and consistent reporting of data to ensure that these issues are monitored to inform action and reduce risks to staff, students, and patients are highlighted. PMID:23118545

  5. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A five - year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Belay; Muche, Abebe; Bekele, Assegedech; Reissig, Dieter; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Background In Gondar University Teaching Hospital standardized tuberculosis prevention and control programme, incorporating Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS) started in 2000. According to the proposal of World Health Organization (WHO), treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs. This study investigated the outcome of tuberculosis treatment at Gondar University Teaching Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods We analyzed the records of 4000 tuberculosis patients registered at Gondar University Teaching Hospital from September 2003 to May 2008. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control program guideline. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression model was used to analyse the association between treatment outcome and potential predictor variables. Results From the total of 4000 patients, tuberculosis type was categorized as extrapulmonary in 1133 (28.3%), smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in 2196 (54.9%) and smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 671 (16.8%) cases. Of all patients, treatment outcome was classified as successfully treated in 1181(29.5%), defaulted in 730 (18.3%), died in 403 (10.1%), treatment failed in six (0.2%) and transferred out in 1680 (42.0%) patients. Males had the trend to be more likely to experience death or default than females, and the elderly were more likely to die than younger. The proportion of default rate was increased across the years from 97(9.2%) to 228(42.9%). Being female, age group 15-24 years, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and being urban resident were associated with higher treatment success rate. Conclusion The treatment success rate of tuberculosis patients was unsatisfactorily low (29.5%). A high proportion of patients died (10.1%) or defaulted (18.3%), which is a serious public health concern that needs to be addressed urgently. PMID:19799801

  6. Teaching Cost-Conscious Medicine: Impact of a Simple Educational Intervention on Appropriate Abdominal Imaging at a Community-Based Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Matthew F.; Agan, Donna L.; Liu, Yang; Johnson, John O.; Shaw, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising costs pose a major threat to US health care. Residency programs are being asked to teach residents how to provide cost-conscious medical care. Methods An educational intervention incorporating the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria with lectures on cost-consciousness and on the actual hospital charges for abdominal imaging was implemented for residents at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, CA. We hypothesized that residents would order fewer abdominal imaging examinations for patients with complaints of abdominal pain after the intervention. We analyzed the type and number of abdominal imaging studies completed for patients admitted to the inpatient teaching service with primary abdominal complaints for 18 months before (738 patients) and 12 months following the intervention (632 patients). Results There was a significant reduction in mean abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans per patient (1.7–1.4 studies per patient, P < .001) and total abdominal radiology studies per patient (3.1–2.7 studies per patient, P  =  .02) following the intervention. The avoidance of charges solely due to the reduction in abdominal CT scans following the intervention was $129 per patient or $81,528 in total. Conclusions A simple educational intervention appeared to change the radiologic test-ordering behavior of internal medicine residents. Widespread adoption of similar interventions by residency programs could result in significant savings for the health care system. PMID:24404274

  7. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Contraception among Postpartum Women Attending Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bajracharya, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure to plan a pregnancy can adversely affect the health of the family as a whole. High parity is related to increased maternal, perinatal and infant deaths and is associated with nutritional problems of both mother and child. Hence, good knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning among women are important. This study is aimed to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception among the postpartum women attending Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital. Objective To determine the knowledge, attitude and the practice of various contraceptive methods among the postpartum women. Method A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology on 400 postpartum women (within 42 days of delivery) who delivered and came for follow-up in this institution. All the postnatal women were interviewed with pre-designed questionnaire and information on sociodemographic variable, awareness and knowledge of various contraceptive methods, previous and current use of family planning methods, source of information, utilization and reasons for use/non-use of family planning methods were obtained. Data collected were entered and analyzed using SPSS 20. The results were presented as percentages, means, tables and charts. Result Majority of the participants 363 (90.8%) were aware of contraceptive usage. Amongst 60.5% of women who had previously used contraception, OCPs were the commonest one. Maximum number of participants (60.35%) had used modern contraceptives in the past. The most common source of information on contraception was media (55.7%). The reason of using contraception was spacing between the subsequent pregnancies, while the most common reason of discontinuation or not willing to use family planning methods was husband being abroad, fear of side effects and not knowing which contraceptives to use. Conclusion The contraceptive awareness and knowledge among the postpartum women was high but

  8. Outbreak of NDM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae causing neonatal infection in a teaching hospital in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, XiaoYu; Li, XianPing; Wang, Min; Yue, HeJia; Li, PengLing; Liu, YaPing; Cao, Wei; Yao, DongMei; Liu, Li; Zhou, XiaoLan; Zheng, Rong; Bo, Tao

    2015-07-01

    The emergence and spread of bacteria carrying the bla(NDM-1) gene has become a worldwide concern. Here, we report eight cases of Klebsiella pneumoniae with bla(NDM-1) in the neonatal ward of a teaching hospital in mainland China. Multilocus sequence typing showed that seven isolates were clonally related and confirmed them as sequence type 17 (ST17). One isolate belonged to ST433. These findings suggest continuous spread of bla(NDM-1) in mainland China and emphasize the need for intensive surveillance and precautions. PMID:25941224

  9. [Evaluation of nursing care systematization through the phases of nursing process performance and registration in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Reppetto, Maria Angela; de Souza, Mariana Fernandes

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study was carried out in a teaching hospital at São Paulo city and had as objective to identify the phases performance and registration of nursing care systematization and the most frequent nursing diagnoses. Data were collected retrospectively from 135 patients records of three units: Cardiology, Adult Infectious Diseases and Neurosurgery, from January to July, 2002. The phases: history, nursing diagnoses, prescription, evolution and assessment were performed and registered in the three units, however, it was verified systematization gaps performance related to nursing diagnoses registered without the realization of nursing history and nursing prescriptions without evolution. The most frequent nursing diagnosis in the three units was risk for infection.

  10. [Burnout in healthcare workers of a university teaching hospital in Rome, Italy: a cross-sectional study].

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, Alessandro; La Torre, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Francesca; Chiaradia, Giacomina; Specchia, Maria Lucia; Ricciardi, Walter

    2008-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to assess the frequency of burnout in healthcare workers of a university teaching hospital in Rome (Italy), by means of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. In total 142 healthcare workers participated in the study. Average levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were observed in the study population. Working in emergency care services was found to be correlated with lower levels of personal accomplishment with respect to working in other services. Monitoring burnout in social service and healthcare workers is an effective tool for identifying critical situations in the workplace. PMID:18379605

  11. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kakusa, Mwanja; Kamanga, Brown; Ngalamika, Owen; Nyirenda, Soka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality. PMID:27042416

  12. Spectrum of Microbial Diseases and Resistance Patterns at a Private Teaching Hospital in Kenya: Implications for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Daniel; Omuse, Geoffrey; Revathi, Gunturu; Adam, Rodney D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate local prevalence of microbial diseases and microbial resistance data are vital for optimal treatment of patients. However, there are few reports of these data from developing countries, especially from sub-Saharan Africa. The status of Aga Khan University Hospital Nairobi as an internationally accredited hospital and a laboratory with an electronic medical record system has made it possible to analyze local prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility data and compare it with other published data. Methods We have analyzed the spectrum of microbial agents and resistance patterns seen at a 300 bed tertiary private teaching hospital in Kenya using microbial identity and susceptibility data captured in hospital and laboratory electronic records between 2010 and 2014. Results For blood isolates, we used culture collection within the first three days of hospitalization as a surrogate for community onset, and within that group, Escherichia coli was the most common, followed by Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, Candida spp. and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most common hospital onset causes of bloodstream infection. Antimicrobial resistance rates for the most commonly isolated Gram negative organisms was higher than many recent reports from Europe and North America. In contrast, Gram positive resistance rates were quite low, with 94% of S. aureus being susceptible to oxacillin and only rare isolates of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Conclusions The current report demonstrates high rates of antimicrobial resistance in Gram negative organisms, even in outpatients with urinary tract infections. On the other hand, rates of resistance in Gram positive organisms, notably S. aureus, are remarkably low. A better understanding of the reasons for these trends may contribute to ongoing efforts to combat antimicrobial resistance globally. PMID:26807811

  13. Bridging the Gap: A Framework and Strategies for Integrating the Quality and Safety Mission of Teaching Hospitals and Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Yang, Julius; Myers, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Integrating the quality and safety mission of teaching hospitals and graduate medical education (GME) is a necessary step to provide the next generation of physicians with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to participate in health system improvement. Although many teaching hospital and health system leaders have made substantial efforts to improve the quality of patient care, few have fully included residents and fellows, who deliver a large portion of that care, in their efforts. Despite expectations related to the engagement of these trainees in health care quality improvement and patient safety outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Clinical Learning Environment Review program, a structure for approaching this integration has not been described.In this article, the authors present a framework that they hope will assist teaching hospitals in integrating residents and fellows into their quality and safety efforts and in fostering a positive clinical learning environment for education and patient care. The authors define the six essential elements of this framework-organizational culture, teaching hospital-GME alignment, infrastructure, curricular resources, faculty development, and interprofessional collaboration. They then describe the organizational characteristics required for each element and offer concrete strategies to achieve integration. This framework is meant to be a starting point for the development of robust national models of infrastructure, alignment, and collaboration between GME and health care quality and safety leaders at teaching hospitals. PMID:26039138

  14. Bridging the Gap: A Framework and Strategies for Integrating the Quality and Safety Mission of Teaching Hospitals and Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Yang, Julius; Myers, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Integrating the quality and safety mission of teaching hospitals and graduate medical education (GME) is a necessary step to provide the next generation of physicians with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to participate in health system improvement. Although many teaching hospital and health system leaders have made substantial efforts to improve the quality of patient care, few have fully included residents and fellows, who deliver a large portion of that care, in their efforts. Despite expectations related to the engagement of these trainees in health care quality improvement and patient safety outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Clinical Learning Environment Review program, a structure for approaching this integration has not been described.In this article, the authors present a framework that they hope will assist teaching hospitals in integrating residents and fellows into their quality and safety efforts and in fostering a positive clinical learning environment for education and patient care. The authors define the six essential elements of this framework-organizational culture, teaching hospital-GME alignment, infrastructure, curricular resources, faculty development, and interprofessional collaboration. They then describe the organizational characteristics required for each element and offer concrete strategies to achieve integration. This framework is meant to be a starting point for the development of robust national models of infrastructure, alignment, and collaboration between GME and health care quality and safety leaders at teaching hospitals.

  15. Assessment of knowledge and practice of nutritional and life style risk factors associated with cancer among hospital workers at two university teaching hospitals in Osun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, E O; Aderounmu, A O; Lomuwagun, A F; Owolabi, O O; Fadiora, A O; Asa, S S; Bamiwuye, S O; Ihedioha, O D

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess both the predisposing and precipitating risk factors in the aetiology of any form of cancer among hospital workers at two teaching Hospitals in Osun State, Nigeria. Pre-tested and modified questionnaires were administered to 250 respondents. One hundred and seventy questionnaires were duly filled and completed. Less than 9% of the respondents consumed fruits and vegetables on a daily basis; while the highest percentage (65%) regularly consumed butter/margarine, followed with consumption of red meat. Twenty nine percent (29%) from both locations were classified as overweight and obese. Half did physical exercise twice a week. Of the 168 respondents. 34 (20.2%) did meet the criteria for completely emptying their bowels within a specified time of three minutes. It is concluded that whilst predisposing risk factors do not pose a threat to the onset of any form of cancer among respondents, precipitating factors are real major factors that need to be addressed through information, education and communication (I.E.C). Such an I.E.C. should be geared towards promotion of healthy eating and life style strategies. Alter all, 'the first step in cancer prevention is knowing the risk profile'.

  16. How I teach evidence-based epidural information in a hospital and keep my job.

    PubMed

    Tumblin, Ann

    2007-01-01

    A childbirth educator reveals her dilemma in teaching evidence-based practice in today's high-tech birth climate. She focuses on strategies to use when sharing epidural information with expectant parents. PMID:18769516

  17. 12 CFR 583.2 - Affiliate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.2 Affiliate. The term affiliate of a specified savings association means any person or company which controls, is controlled by, or is under common control...

  18. 18 CFR 35.39 - Affiliate restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.39 Affiliate... the Seller's market-based rate tariff. (b) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy or... electric energy or capacity may be made between a franchised public utility with captive customers and...

  19. 18 CFR 35.39 - Affiliate restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.39 Affiliate... the Seller's market-based rate tariff. (b) Restriction on affiliate sales of electric energy or... electric energy or capacity may be made between a franchised public utility with captive customers and...

  20. 12 CFR 347.110 - Affiliate holdings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affiliate holdings. 347.110 Section 347.110 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.110 Affiliate holdings. References in §§ 347.107, 347.108, and 347.109 to...

  1. 12 CFR 347.110 - Affiliate holdings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Affiliate holdings. 347.110 Section 347.110 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.110 Affiliate holdings. References in §§ 347.107, 347.108, and 347.109 to...

  2. 12 CFR 347.110 - Affiliate holdings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affiliate holdings. 347.110 Section 347.110 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.110 Affiliate holdings. References in §§ 347.107, 347.108, and 347.109 to...

  3. 12 CFR 347.110 - Affiliate holdings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affiliate holdings. 347.110 Section 347.110 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.110 Affiliate holdings. References in §§ 347.107, 347.108, and 347.109 to...

  4. 49 CFR 1139.5 - Affiliate data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Affiliate data. 1139.5 Section 1139.5... of General Commodities § 1139.5 Affiliate data. Each individual traffic and cost study carrier having... annual report for class I motor carriers, shall submit appropriate data and analyses reflecting...

  5. 49 CFR 1139.5 - Affiliate data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Affiliate data. 1139.5 Section 1139.5... of General Commodities § 1139.5 Affiliate data. Each individual traffic and cost study carrier having... annual report for class I motor carriers, shall submit appropriate data and analyses reflecting...

  6. 49 CFR 1139.5 - Affiliate data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Affiliate data. 1139.5 Section 1139.5... of General Commodities § 1139.5 Affiliate data. Each individual traffic and cost study carrier having... annual report for class I motor carriers, shall submit appropriate data and analyses reflecting...

  7. 49 CFR 1139.5 - Affiliate data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Affiliate data. 1139.5 Section 1139.5... of General Commodities § 1139.5 Affiliate data. Each individual traffic and cost study carrier having... annual report for class I motor carriers, shall submit appropriate data and analyses reflecting...

  8. 49 CFR 1139.5 - Affiliate data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Affiliate data. 1139.5 Section 1139.5... of General Commodities § 1139.5 Affiliate data. Each individual traffic and cost study carrier having... annual report for class I motor carriers, shall submit appropriate data and analyses reflecting...

  9. 12 CFR 347.110 - Affiliate holdings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Affiliate holdings. 347.110 Section 347.110 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.110 Affiliate holdings. References in §§ 347.107, 347.108, and 347.109 to...

  10. Occupational Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids Among Health Care Workers in a Teaching Hospital in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Singru, Samir A; Banerjee, Amitav

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to blood and body fluids is one of the hidden hazards faced by health care workers (HCWs). The objective of the present study was to estimate the incidence of such exposure in a teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study among a random sample of residents, interns, nurses and technicians (n = 830) was carried out in a teaching hospital to estimate the incidence of exposure to blood and body fluids in the preceding 12-month period. Self-reported occurrence and the circumstances of the same were recorded by face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results: The response rate to the study was 89.76%. Occupational exposure to blood and body fluids in the preceding 12 months was reported by 32.75% of the respondents. The self-reported incidence was the highest among the nurses. Needle-stick injury was the most common mode of such exposures (92.21% of total exposures). Index finger and thumb were the commonest sites of exposure. Only 50% of the affected individuals reported the occurrence to concerned hospital authorities. Less than a quarter of the exposed persons underwent post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against HIV, although the same was indicated in about 50% of the affected HCWs based on the HIV status of the source patient. Conclusions: Occupational exposure to blood and body fluids was a common occurrence in the study sample. There was gross under-reporting of such incidents leading to a lack of proper PEP against HIV in 50% of those in whom the same appeared to be indicated. PMID:19966992

  11. The rise of pathophysiologic research in the United States: the role of two Harvard hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiologic research, the major approach to understanding and treating disease, was created in the 20th century, and two Harvard-affiliated hospitals, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and Boston City Hospital, played a key role in its development. After the Flexner Report of 1910, medical students were assigned clinical clerkships in teaching hospitals. Rockefeller-trained Francis Weld Peabody, who was committed to investigative, pathophysiologic research, was a critical leader in these efforts. At the Brigham, Harvard medical students observed patients closely and asked provocative questions about their diseases. Additionally, physicians returned from World War I with questions concerning the pathophysiology of wartime injuries. At the Boston City Hospital's new Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Peabody fostered investigative question-based research by physicians. These physicians expanded pathophysiologic investigation from the 1920s. Post-war, Watson and Crick's formulation of the structure of DNA led shortly to modern molecular biology and new research approaches that are being furthered at the Boston Hospitals.

  12. Reducing red cell transfusion by audit, education and a new guideline in a large teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Garrioch, M; Sandbach, J; Pirie, E; Morrison, A; Todd, A; Green, R

    2004-02-01

    Safety concerns combined with the greatly increased costs and difficulties of maintaining the blood supply are major considerations for transfusion services. Previous local surveys demonstrated that hospital blood use at our hospital could be improved. Excessive cross-matching, unnecessary transfusion and high return rates of unused blood were commonplace. Transfusion practice was audited over a 3-month period. An education package with guidelines for transfusion was delivered to all clinician groups within the hospital, over the following 9 months. The audit was repeated exactly 1 year later at the same time period. During the second audit, inpatient hospital numbers increased by 1.02% (from n = 7262 to n = 7336) but no differences in length of stay, cardiovascular morbidity or mortality were demonstrated. Twenty percent (n = 254, 2002; n = 316, 2001) fewer patients received blood, and the number of red cell packs used reduced by 19% (from n = 1093 to n = 880). Total number of patients transfused reduced from 4.4% to 3.5% which, as an absolute difference, is a reduction of 0.9% (CI 0.3-1.5, P = 0.006). The audit, guideline and education package had a major impact on red cell use within the hospital with no adverse effects. Blood use can be improved by the implementation of a suitable education package and guideline. If it is possible to replicate the results of this education programme nationwide, the effect on blood use, with subsequent savings and enhanced patient safety could be significant.

  13. Investigation of the Relationship Between Organizational Learning and Organizational Citizen Behavior Among the Staff of Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kiaei, Mohammad Zakaria; Hasanpoor, Edris; Sokhanvar, Mobin; Mohseni, Mohammad; Ziaiifar, Hajarbibi; Moradi, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Today, the concept of organizational learning has attracted the attention of many managers and researchers in scientific and research circles as well as those in the organization-related studies. Taking the organizational learning into account might offer a means of organizational effectiveness that has gone unnoticed. Thus the present study aimed at investigating the relationship between the organizational learning in each of its four aspects as independent variables and organizational citizen behavior of the staff as constituting the dependent variable of the study. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study with a practical approach conducted in 2010. The sample included 167 staff members working in educational health centers affiliated with Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. The data were collected via both the organizational learning questionnaire and organizational citizen behavior questionnaire and analyzed by using SPSS software and Spearman test. Results: The results indicated that the mean of organizational learning indicator was 2.9±0.648 and that of organizational citizen behavior 3.78±0.413. In addition, the spearman correlation coefficient ranging from 0.058 to 0.129 between the elements of the organizational learning and the organizational citizen behavior was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The findings also indicated that the correlation between them was average among the staff of Shahid Raja’ee Educational health center (0.319), thus the relationship between the two sets of variables proved significant (p=0.031). However, the same was not true in other centers. Conclusion: It was concluded that management commitment, open space, transfer of knowledge, and systemic vision could all enhance the level of organizational learning in hospitals which calls for focus on the elements of organizational citizen behavior. PMID:25568629

  14. Molecular Diagnostics for Lassa Fever at Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: Lessons Learnt from Two Years of Laboratory Operation

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Meike; Gabriel, Martin; Ölschläger, Stephan; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Folarin, Onikepe; Phelan, Eric; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Ifeh, Veritas E.; Uyigue, Eghosasere A.; Oladapo, Yemisi T.; Muoebonam, Ekene B.; Osunde, Osagie; Dongo, Andrew; Okokhere, Peter O.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Momoh, Mojeed; Alikah, Sylvester O.; Akhuemokhan, Odigie C.; Imomeh, Peter; Odike, Maxy A. C.; Gire, Stephen; Andersen, Kristian; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Happi, Christian T.; Akpede, George O.; Günther, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. However, none of the hospitals in the endemic areas of Nigeria has the capacity to perform Lassa virus diagnostics. Case identification and management solely relies on non-specific clinical criteria. The Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) in the central senatorial district of Edo State struggled with this challenge for many years. Methodology/Principal Findings A laboratory for molecular diagnosis of Lassa fever, complying with basic standards of diagnostic PCR facilities, was established at ISTH in 2008. During 2009 through 2010, samples of 1,650 suspected cases were processed, of which 198 (12%) tested positive by Lassa virus RT-PCR. No remarkable demographic differences were observed between PCR-positive and negative patients. The case fatality rate for Lassa fever was 31%. Nearly two thirds of confirmed cases attended the emergency departments of ISTH. The time window for therapeutic intervention was extremely short, as 50% of the fatal cases died within 2 days of hospitalization—often before ribavirin treatment could be commenced. Fatal Lassa fever cases were older (p = 0.005), had lower body temperature (p<0.0001), and had higher creatinine (p<0.0001) and blood urea levels (p<0.0001) than survivors. Lassa fever incidence in the hospital followed a seasonal pattern with a peak between November and March. Lassa virus sequences obtained from the patients originating from Edo State formed—within lineage II—a separate clade that could be further subdivided into three clusters. Conclusions/Significance Lassa fever case management was improved at a tertiary health institution in Nigeria through establishment of a laboratory for routine diagnostics of Lassa virus. Data collected in two years of operation demonstrate that Lassa fever is a serious public health problem in Edo State and reveal new insights into the disease in hospitalized patients. PMID:23029594

  15. A review of opioid prescription in a teaching hospital in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Jairo; Figueras, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Review of opioid prescriptions in a hospital provides valuable information to health care professionals which may contribute to proper pain management; opioid utilization studies may help uncover factors that can be improved for better prescribing. To evaluate the use of opioid analgesics in a university hospital, a review of opioids prescribed in hospitalized patients was developed. Methods: Information was obtained from the pharmacy database and medical records. The study period was 1 month. Results: Medical records of 1156 patients admitted in July 2009 were analyzed. The most widely prescribed opioid was tramadol; the preferred administration route was intravenous; the main indication was severe pain; and major prescribers were from surgical departments. Discussion: Underutilization of potent opioids for acute and chronic pain seems to occur. Conclusion: Most prescribers prefer weak opioids, given intravenously to treat acute and chronic pain, while some patients may benefit from the prescription of more potent opioids. PMID:23049273

  16. [Antibacterial activity of antiseptics used at Military Teaching Hospital Mohamed V of Rabat].

    PubMed

    Essayagh, Touria; Elameri, Abdouelouhab; Zohoun, Alban; Miloudi, Mouhcine; Elhamzaoui, Sakina

    2010-01-01

    Antiseptics have a major role against the infections and their prevention. The good management of antiseptics allows the reduction of antibiotics use and thus the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. The evaluation of the antibacterial activity of three antiseptics (povidone iodine [PVPI], iodized alcohol and alcohol 70 degrees) used at HMIMV and taken from pharmacy was based on AFNOR method NF T 72-150. The analysis of their chemical properties were done by standardized methods (manganimetry, Bunsen's method, test to determine sodium thiosulfate levels [or sodium thiosulfate test] and Guy Lussac alcoholmeter). Our results were compared with those obtained in another two university hospitals of Rabat: Hospital of Speciality and Ibn Sina. The frequencies of resistant bacterial strains were respectively 4.6%, 30.7% and 15.4% to PVPI, alcohol iodized and alcohol 70 degrees . Our results have shown that the PVPI is the best antiseptic in our hospital.

  17. The journey of a teaching hospital to become a learning organisation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Stuart D

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes how an acute tertiary referral hospital moved away from a "culture of blame", using change management principles aligned with the concept of the learning organisation. I outline the process of change, and describe its outcomes. The result is summarised as an improvement in desired attributes of the organisation's culture, as evidenced by consistent improvement in the results of a proprietary staff survey. I conclude that the concept of the learning organisation is a useful one for hospitals that seek to improve the organisational culture. PMID:16646772

  18. Pregnancy outcome after cerclage for cervical incompetence at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt.

    PubMed

    Ikimalo, John I; Izuchukwu, Kenneth E; Inimgba, Nestor

    2012-09-01

    Cervical incompetence is often associated with mid trimester pregnancy losses and preterm labour. cervical cerclage to prevent miscarriage and preterm labour is practiced world wide. The objective of this study was to document the feto-maternal outcome following cervical cerclage for cervical incompetence. The study reviewed all case files of pregnant women who had cervical cerclage for cervical incompetence between January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008, at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. The study found an incidence of 0.17% of cervical incompetence among the antenatal population. Following cervical cerclage, miscarriage rate was 9.4%. Preterm delivery occurred in 21.8% while term pregnancy occurred in 68.8% of the women. There is improvement in pregnancy outcome after cervical cerclage for cervical incompetence hence we recommend the insertion for true cases of cervical incompetence.

  19. Cefotaxime-resistant Citrobacter freundii in isolates from blood in a tertiary teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Pan; Weng, Li-Chuan; Tseng, Hsiang-Kuang; Wang, Nai-Yu; Lee, Chun-Ming

    2007-10-01

    From January 2002 to December 2003, 12 patients in a tertiary teaching hospital in northern Taiwan had bloodstream infections caused by Citrobacter freundii. Seven of the 12 isolates were resistant to cefotaxime. Using polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, 3 of the 7 cefotaxime-resistant C. freundii isolates were found to carry extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). AmpC beta-lactamase genes were also detected in all strains of C. freundii. All strains of C. freundii with MICs >or=4 mg/L for cefepime were positive for ESBL. Rather than performing PCR on all cefotaxime-resistant C. freundii isolates, assessment of the MIC for cefepime might be a practical way to choose between treatment with cefepime or with carbapenems.

  20. 75 FR 61842 - Fair Credit Reporting Affiliate Marketing Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Fair Credit Reporting Affiliate Marketing Regulations AGENCY: Office of... concerning the following information collection. Title of Proposal: Fair Credit Reporting Affiliate Marketing... person from using certain information received from an affiliate to make a solicitation for...

  1. 75 FR 77048 - Fair Credit Reporting Affiliate Marketing Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Fair Credit Reporting Affiliate Marketing Regulations AGENCY: Office of... on the following information collection. Title of Proposal: Fair Credit Reporting Affiliate Marketing... person from using certain information received from an affiliate to make a solicitation for...

  2. 78 FR 32663 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... Care Hospital Prospective Payment System final rule (FY 2013 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule (77 FR 53434... November 24, 2010 Calendar Year (CY) 2011 Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) final rule (75 FR... comment period, a copy of the FY 2013 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule (77 FR 53434 through 53447), and a list...

  3. Hippi Care Hospital: Towards Proactive Business Processes in Emergency Room Services. Teaching Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kar Way; Shankararaman, Venky

    2014-01-01

    It was 2:35 am on a Saturday morning. Wiki Lim, process specialist from the Process Innovation Centre (PIC) of Hippi Care Hospital (HCH), desperately doodling on her notepad for ideas to improve service delivery at HCH's Emergency Department (ED). HCH has committed to the public that its ED would meet the service quality criterion of serving 90%…

  4. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Outbreak in a Veterinary Teaching Hospital: Potential Human-to-Animal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Jennifer C.; Walker, Robert D.; Caron, John P.; Kloos, Wesley E.; George, Carol G.; Hollis, Richard J.; Jones, Ronald N.; Pfaller, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    During a 13-month period, 11 equine patients visiting a veterinary teaching hospital for various diagnostic and surgical procedures developed postprocedural infections from which methicillin (oxacillin)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains were isolated. The S. aureus isolates were identified by conventional methods that included Gram staining, tests for colonial morphology, tests for clumping factor, and tests for coagulase and urease activities and were also tested with the API STAPH IDENT system. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed by the disk diffusion method. The biochemical profile and antibiogram of each isolate suggested that the isolates may have come from a common source. Because MRSA strains are very uncommon animal isolates but are rather common human isolates, a nasal swab specimen for culture was collected voluntarily from five persons associated with equine surgery and recovery in an attempt to identify a possible source of the organisms. MRSA strains were isolated from three of the five people, with one person found to be colonized with two biotypes of MRSA. The MRSA isolates from the people appeared to be identical to the isolates from horses. Further study of the isolates included SmaI and EagI macrorestriction analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis conducted in two different laboratories. The results indicated that both the equine and human isolates were members of a very closely related group which appear to have originated from a common source. On the basis of the pattern associated with the infection, it is speculated that the members of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital staff were the primary source of the infection, although the specific mode of transmission is unclear. PMID:10203505

  5. Clinico-epidemiological profile of tobacco users attending a tobacco cessation clinic in a teaching hospital in Bangalore city

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, George; Rekha, Dorothy P.; Sreedaran, Priya; Srinivasan, K.; Mony, Prem K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tobacco-attributable mortality in India is estimated to be at least 10%. Tobacco cessation is more likely to avert millions of deaths before 2050 than prevention of tobacco use initiation. Objective: To describe the clinico-epidemiological profile of attendees of a tobacco cessation clinic in a teaching hospital in Bangalore city. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study of 189 attendees seen over 2 years in the Tobacco Cessation Clinic of a tertiary-care teaching hospital in Bangalore, with information on socio demographic characteristics, tobacco-use details, nicotine dependence, family/medical history, past quit attempts, baseline stage-of-change, and treatment initiated. Results: Only 5% were ‘walk-in’ patients; 98% of attendees were smokers; 97% were males. The mean (±SD) age of attendees was 48.0 (±14.0) years. Most participants were married (88%), and predominantly urban (69%). About 62% had completed at least 8 years of schooling. Two-thirds of smokers reported high levels of nicotine dependence (Fagerström score >5/10). About 43% of patients had attempted quitting earlier. Four-fifths (79%) of tobacco-users reported a family member using tobacco. Commonly documented comorbidities included: Chronic respiratory disease (44%), hypertension (23%), diabetes (12%), tuberculosis (9%), myocardial infarction (2%), stroke (1%), sexual dysfunction (1%) and cancer (0.5%). About 52% reported concomitant alcohol use. At baseline, patients’ motivational stage was: Precontemplation (14%), contemplation (48%), preparation/action (37%) and maintenance (1%). Treatment modalities started were: Counseling alone (41%), nicotine replacement therapy alone (NRT) (34%), medication alone (13%), and NRT+medication (12%). Conclusions: This is the first study of the baseline profile of patients attending a tobacco cessation clinic located within a chest medicine department in India. Important determinants of outcome have been captured for follow-up and

  6. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2. PMID:25878341

  7. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina; Simionatto, Simone

    2015-07-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2. PMID:25878341

  8. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina; Simionatto, Simone

    2015-07-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2.

  9. Towards Producing Black Nobel Laureates Affiliated with ``African Universities''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenneth, Jude

    While Africa has produced a handful Nobel laureate in literature and peace, it has continued to shy away from producing any in the other categories. The reason is not farfetched; our university system is not up to standard. It is saddening that in this century, African countries place emphasis on certificates and not on knowledge. This has made the continent produce students that lack the intellectual capability, experimental ability, fundamental training, creativity, and motivation to excel except they get a foreign training. It is this backdrop that precipitated the research into the methods of teaching and research in universities across Africa. The study is designed to identify the problems and proffer solution to them. Two important questions immediately come to mind. (1) What factors account for the difficulty in producing Nobel laureates affiliated with African universities? (2) What strategies could be adopted to improve teaching and research in African universities? Several factors were investigated which revolve around funding, the competence of the lecturers, quality of students admitted, attitude of the students, parents and government. Nigerian universities were investigated and important deductions were made. During the study an inquiry was made on the method of instruction at various universities, from result obtained, the study therefore concluded that adequate funding, the presence of erudite scholars and brilliant minds will produce future Nobel laureate affiliated with the continent. The study therefore recommended admission and employment of only students and lecturers who have got a thing for academics into the universities and adequate funding of universities and research centres.

  10. Social traits modulate attention to affiliative cues

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah R.; Fu, Yu; Depue, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurobehavioral models of personality suggest that the salience assigned to particular classes of stimuli vary as a function of traits that reflect both the activity of neurobiological encoding and relevant social experience. In turn, this joint influence modulates the extent that salience influences attentional processes, and hence learning about and responding to those stimuli. Applying this model to the domain of social valuation, we assessed the differential effects on attentional guidance by affiliative cues of (i) a higher-order temperament trait (Social Closeness), and (ii) attachment style in a sample of 57 women. Attention to affiliative pictures paired with either incentive or neutral pictures was assessed using camera eye-tracking. Trait social closeness and attachment avoidance interacted to modulate fixation frequency on affiliative but not on incentive pictures, suggesting that both traits influence the salience assigned to affiliative cues specifically. PMID:25009524

  11. Designing and evaluating a balanced scorecard for a health information management department in a Canadian urban non-teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Nippak, Pria Md; Veracion, Julius Isidro; Muia, Maria; Ikeda-Douglas, Candace J; Isaac, Winston W

    2016-06-01

    This report is a description of a balanced scorecard design and evaluation process conducted for the health information management department at an urban non-teaching hospital in Canada. The creation of the health information management balanced scorecard involved planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of the indicators within the balanced scorecard by the health information management department and required 6 months to complete. Following the evaluation, the majority of members of the health information management department agreed that the balanced scorecard is a useful tool in reporting key performance indicators. These findings support the success of the balanced scorecard development within this setting and will help the department to better align with the hospital's corporate strategy that is linked to the provision of efficient management through the evaluation of key performance indicators. Thus, it appears that the planning and selection process used to determine the key indicators within the study can aid in the development of a balanced scorecard for a health information management department. In addition, it is important to include the health information management department staff in all stages of the balanced scorecard development, implementation, and evaluation phases.

  12. Kaposi Sarcoma among HIV Infected Patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: A 14-Year Retrospective Clinicopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Akinde, Olakanmi; Adeyemo, Titilope; Omoseebi, Oladipo; Ikeri, Nzechukwu; Okonkwo, Ikechukwu; Afolayan, Olatunji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the increased incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) resulting from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) pandemic, there is still significant underreporting of KS in this environment. Objectives. This study was aimed at determining the incidence and clinicopathologic patterns of KS among HIV infected patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Nigeria, over a 14-year period: January 2000 to December 2013. Methodology. The materials for this study included patients' hospital clinical files, duplicate copies of histopathologic reports, and tissue blocks and corresponding archival slides in the Anatomic and Molecular Pathology Department and the HIV/AIDS unit of the Department of Haematology. Results. Within the study period, 182 cases of KS were diagnosed, accounting for 1.2% of all patients managed for HIV/AIDS and 2.99% of solid malignant tumours. The male-to-female ratio and modal age group were 1 : 1.3 and 5th decade, respectively. Most cases (90%) had purely mucocutaneous involvement with the lower limb being the commonest site (65.8%). The majority of lesions were plaques (65.8%). Vascular formation was the predominant histologic type seen (43.5%). Conclusion. KS in Lagos followed the same epidemiologic trend as other centers in Nigeria, with an increasing incidence in this era of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27034839

  13. A study of occupational health and safety measures in the Laundry Department of a private tertiary care teaching hospital, Bengaluru

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Shashi; Goud, B. Ramakrishna; Joseph, Bobby

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Laundry Department plays an important role in preventing the spread of infection and continuously supplying clean linen to various departments in any hospital. Objectives of the Study: To identify existing practices and occupational safety and health (OSH) measures in the Laundry Department and to assess the use of personal protective equipments (PPEs) among health care workers. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a private tertiary care teaching hospital. An observation checklist was developed, which was partially based on occupational hazard checklist of OSHA for Laundry Department. This was field tested and validated for applicability for this study. Results: The potential biological hazards are infections through exposure to aerosols, spills and splashes during various activities, fungal infection due to wet clothes and environment and infections through fomites. The potential physical hazards are injuries due to slips and falls, exposure to heat, humidity, dust, noise, and vibration. The potential chemical hazards are contact dermatitis and allergic asthma due to exposure to detergents, phenyl solution, bleaching powder, and soap oil solution. The potential ergonomic hazards are musculoskeletal diseases and repetitive stress injuries at the shoulder, elbow, and small joints of the hands. PPEs were not used consistently in most areas of the department. PMID:25006311

  14. Designing and evaluating a balanced scorecard for a health information management department in a Canadian urban non-teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Nippak, Pria Md; Veracion, Julius Isidro; Muia, Maria; Ikeda-Douglas, Candace J; Isaac, Winston W

    2016-06-01

    This report is a description of a balanced scorecard design and evaluation process conducted for the health information management department at an urban non-teaching hospital in Canada. The creation of the health information management balanced scorecard involved planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of the indicators within the balanced scorecard by the health information management department and required 6 months to complete. Following the evaluation, the majority of members of the health information management department agreed that the balanced scorecard is a useful tool in reporting key performance indicators. These findings support the success of the balanced scorecard development within this setting and will help the department to better align with the hospital's corporate strategy that is linked to the provision of efficient management through the evaluation of key performance indicators. Thus, it appears that the planning and selection process used to determine the key indicators within the study can aid in the development of a balanced scorecard for a health information management department. In addition, it is important to include the health information management department staff in all stages of the balanced scorecard development, implementation, and evaluation phases. PMID:24948412

  15. [Safe surgery checklist: analysis of the safety and communication of teams from a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Pancieri, Ana Paula; Santos, Bruna Pegorer; de Avila, Marla Andréia Garcia; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to apply the WHO surgical safety checklist in the surgical specialties of a university hospital and to evaluate the opinion of the team regarding the influence of its application on the safety of the surgical process and on the interpersonal communication of the team. It is a descriptive, analytical qualitative field study conducted in the surgical center of a university hospital Data were collected by applying the checklist in a total of 30 surgeries. The researcher conducted its application in three phases, and then members of the surgical team were invited to voluntarily participate in the study, signifying their agreement to participate by signing an informed consent form and answering guiding questions. Bardin's Content Analysis Method was used to organize and analyze the data. The subjects did not notice any changes in their interpersonal communication when using the checklist; however, they gave suggestions and reported that its use provided greater safety to the procedure.

  16. Engaging patients and family members in better hand hygiene practices: a teaching hospital's challenge.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    It is universally agreed that healthcare workers need to wash their hands in order to help control the spread of hospital-acquired infections. However, we have to be mindful that patients and family members are a significant part of the contamination equation as well. This article details the efforts by University Health Network (UHN) to develop hand hygiene resources for use with patients and family members at all of UHN's sites.

  17. Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Veterinary Teaching Hospital During a Nonoutbreak Period

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amanda; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C.; Bateman, Shane; Hillier, Andrew; Dyce, John; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.; Wittum, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Concurrent to reports of zoonotic and nosocomial transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary settings, recent evidence indicates that the environment in veterinary hospitals may be a potential source of MRSA. The present report is a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of MRSA on specific human and animal contact surfaces at a large veterinary hospital during a nonoutbreak period. A total of 156 samples were collected using Swiffers® or premoistened swabs from the small animal, equine, and food animal sections. MRSA was isolated and identified by pre-enrichment culture and standard microbiology procedures, including growth on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with NaCl and oxacillin, and by detection of the mecA gene. Staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile were also determined. MRSA was detected in 12% (19/157) of the hospital environments sampled. The prevalence of MRSA in the small animal, equine, and food animal areas were 16%, 4%, and 0%, respectively. Sixteen of the MRSA isolates from the small animal section were classified as USA100, SCCmec type II, two of which had pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern that does not conform to any known type. The one isolate obtained from the equine section was classified as USA500, SCCmec type IV. The molecular epidemiological analysis revealed a very diverse population of MRSA isolates circulating in the hospital; however, in some instances, multiple locations/surfaces, not directly associated, had the same MRSA clone. No significant difference was observed between animal and human contact surfaces in regard to prevalence and type of isolates. Surfaces touched by multiple people (doors) and patients (carts) were frequently contaminated with MRSA. The results from this study indicate that MRSA is present in the environment even during nonoutbreak periods. This study also identified specific surfaces in

  18. Environmental methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a veterinary teaching hospital during a nonoutbreak period.

    PubMed

    Hoet, Armando E; Johnson, Amanda; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Bateman, Shane; Hillier, Andrew; Dyce, John; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Wittum, Thomas E

    2011-06-01

    Concurrent to reports of zoonotic and nosocomial transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary settings, recent evidence indicates that the environment in veterinary hospitals may be a potential source of MRSA. The present report is a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of MRSA on specific human and animal contact surfaces at a large veterinary hospital during a nonoutbreak period. A total of 156 samples were collected using Swiffers(®) or premoistened swabs from the small animal, equine, and food animal sections. MRSA was isolated and identified by pre-enrichment culture and standard microbiology procedures, including growth on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with NaCl and oxacillin, and by detection of the mecA gene. Staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile were also determined. MRSA was detected in 12% (19/157) of the hospital environments sampled. The prevalence of MRSA in the small animal, equine, and food animal areas were 16%, 4%, and 0%, respectively. Sixteen of the MRSA isolates from the small animal section were classified as USA100, SCCmec type II, two of which had pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern that does not conform to any known type. The one isolate obtained from the equine section was classified as USA500, SCCmec type IV. The molecular epidemiological analysis revealed a very diverse population of MRSA isolates circulating in the hospital; however, in some instances, multiple locations/surfaces, not directly associated, had the same MRSA clone. No significant difference was observed between animal and human contact surfaces in regard to prevalence and type of isolates. Surfaces touched by multiple people (doors) and patients (carts) were frequently contaminated with MRSA. The results from this study indicate that MRSA is present in the environment even during nonoutbreak periods. This study also identified specific surfaces in a

  19. Utilization study of antidiabetic agents in a teaching hospital of Sikkim and adherence to current standard treatment guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Sushrut Varun; Datta, Supratim; Upreti, Binu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes has gradually emerged as one of the most serious public health problems in our country. This underlines the need for timely disease detection and decisive therapeutic intervention. This prospective cross-sectional observational study aims at analyzing the utilization pattern of antidiabetic agents in a remote North-East Indian tertiary care teaching hospital in the perspective of current standard treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods: Diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic medication, both as outpatients and inpatients in our hospital over a period of 12 months (May 2013–May 2014), were included in this study. The data obtained were sorted and analyzed on the basis of gender, type of therapy, and hospital setting. Results: A total of 310 patients were included in the study. Metformin was the single most frequently prescribed antidiabetic agent (66.8%) followed by the sulfonylureas group (37.4%). Insulin was prescribed in 23.2% of the patients. Combination antidiabetic drug therapy (65.1%) was used more frequently than monotherapy (34.8%). The use of biguanides (P < 0.0001) and sulfonylureas (P = 0.02) in combination was significant as compared to their use as monotherapy. A total of 48% of all antidiabetic combinations used, comprised metformin and sulfonylureas (n = 96). Insulin use was significantly higher as monotherapy and in inpatients (P < 0.0001). The utilization of drugs from the National List of Essential Medicines was 51.2%, while 11% of antidiabetics were prescribed by generic name. Conclusion: The pattern of utilization largely conforms to the current standard treatment guidelines. Increased use of generic drugs is an area with scope for improvement. PMID:27413351

  20. Postoperative complications from primary repair of cleft lip and palate in a semi-urban Nigerian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adesina, Oluwafemi Adewale; Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Idon, Paul Ikhodaro

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper seeks to investigate the incidence of short-term postoperative complications in children and adult patients undergoing primary surgery of cleft lip and palate. Patients and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients consisting of children (below 12 years) and adult (12 years and above) who were operated for both cleft lip and palate within a 2-year period at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital were reviewed postoperatively at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year intervals, respectively. The complications encountered within the periods of the review were recorded. Results: One hundred and twenty surgeries were performed on 115 patients (85 children 30 Adults). A total of 43 complications (31 in children and 12 in adults) were recorded over the study period. Eighteen (41.9%) of these complications were noticed in unilateral cleft lip repair, while 12 (27.9%) and 13 (30.2%) complications were observed in bilateral cleft lip and cleft palate surgeries, respectively. A higher complication rate (72.0%) was recorded in children compared with adults. Major complications (13.9%) were, however, observed more in adults than children. Conclusion: Although every surgeon attempts to prevent complications during surgery, they may still occur. The high complication rate observed in our study may be due to a small sample size. General complications observed among children are due to cross infection during a hospital stay, contributing immensely to the higher rate of complications in children. Moreover, this may be reduced by short hospital stay following surgery. We also advocate early contact with children with cleft, and early surgical intervention in other to prevent some of the major complications encountered in adult patients. PMID:27397954

  1. Bacteriological Profile and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Neonatal Sepsis at a Teaching Hospital in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Peterside, Oliemen; Pondei, Kemebradikumo; Akinbami, Felix O

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sepsis is one of the most common causes of neonatal hospital admissions and is estimated to cause 26% of all neonatal deaths worldwide. While waiting for results of blood culture, it is necessary to initiate an empirical choice of antibiotics based on the epidemiology of causative agents and antibiotic sensitivity pattern in a locality. Objective: To determine the major causative organisms of neonatal sepsis at the Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital (NDUTH), as well as their antibiotic sensitivity patterns, with the aim of formulating treatment protocols for neonates. Methods: Within a 27-month period (1st of October 2011 to the 31st of December 2013), results of blood culture for all neonates screened for sepsis at the Special Care Baby Unit of the hospital were retrospectively studied. Results: Two hundred and thirty-three (49.6%) of the 450 neonates admitted were screened for sepsis. Ninety-seven (43.5%) of them were blood culture positive, with 52 (53.6%) of the isolated organisms being Gram positive and 45 (46.4%) Gram negative. The most frequently isolated organism was Staphylococcus aureus (51.5%) followed by Escherichia coli (16.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.4%). All isolated organisms demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the quinolones. Conclusion: Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity among neonates admitted at the NDUTH. There is a need for regular periodic surveillance of the causative organisms of neonatal sepsis as well as their antibiotic susceptibility pattern to inform the empirical choice of antibiotic prescription while awaiting blood culture results. PMID:26543394

  2. Bedside practice of blood transfusion in a large teaching hospital in Uganda: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, J. D.; Kajja, I.; Bimenya, G. S.; Postma, M. J.; Sibinga, C. Th.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adverse transfusion reactions can cause morbidity and death to patients who receive a blood transfusion. Blood transfusion practice in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda is analyzed to see if and when these practices play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients. Materials and Methods: An observational study on three wards of Mulago Hospital. Physicians, paramedics, nurses, medical students and nurse students were observed using two questionnaires. For comparison, a limited observational study was performed in the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG) in Groningen, The Netherlands. Results: In Mulago Hospital guidelines for blood transfusion practice were not easily available. Medical staff members work on individual professional levels. Students perform poorly due to inconsistency in their supervision. Documentation of blood transfusion in patient files is scarce. There is no immediate bedside observation, so transfusion reactions and obstructions in the blood transfusion flow are not observed. Conclusion: The poor blood transfusion practice is likely to play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients who receive a blood transfusion. There is a need for a blood transfusion policy and current practical guidelines. PMID:20808647

  3. Analysis of Laboratory Repeat Critical Values at a Large Tertiary Teaching Hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dagan; Zhou, Yunxian; Yang, Chunwei

    2013-01-01

    Context As a patient safety measure, laboratories are required to have a critical values policy by regulatory agencies. Unfortunately, little information is available on repeat critical values for the same analyte(s) on the same patient. Objective To investigate the occurrence and distribution of repeat critical values and the relationship between the frequency of such values and patient outcome to provide information for hospitals on improving reporting policies. Methods Eleven laboratory critical value lists, including chemistry and hematology analytes, were selected from a tertiary hospital in China in the year 2010. The distribution and interval time for each repeat critical value were calculated. Serum potassium and platelet count were used as examples to illustrate the relationship between the frequency of the repeat critical values and patient outcome. Results All test items on the critical value list were prone to the occurrence of repeat critical values. On average, each patient who experienced critical values had 2.10 occurrences. The median interval time for each repeat critical value varied, with most being longer than 8 hours. For those patients who had repeat critical values of serum potassium and platelet count, along with the increased frequency, the patients had a longer hospital stay and a generally worse outcome. Conclusions Patient can have a number of repeat critical values and the frequency of these values is closely related to patient outcome. A careful evaluation is warranted if a laboratory chooses to adopt a policy of not reporting each repeat critical value. PMID:23516637

  4. Organization structure and the performance of hospital emergency services.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, B S

    1985-07-01

    A comparative study of 30 hospital emergency departments (EDs) and nearly 1,500 individuals associated with them was conducted. Data were obtained from institutional records, physicians, patients, and other sources. The object was to investigate the relationship between the organization and performance of these health service systems. The study assessed the quality of medical care, the quality of nursing care, and the economic efficiency of hospital EDs. The results show substantial interinstitutional differences in these criteria. They also show a significant relationship between medical and nursing care, but not between the quality of care and economic efficiency. Differences in ED performance are related to medical staffing patterns, medical teaching affiliation, personnel training, scope of emergency services, number of patient visits processed, and hospital size and complexity. Not all of these variables, however, correlate positively with all three criteria of performance, nor are they equally important to each.

  5. Feasibility of Energy Medicine in a Community Teaching Hospital: An Exploratory Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Francois; Simmons, Bonnie; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Fleischner, Zachary; Joudeh, Ramsey; Blakeway, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Energy medicine (EM) derives from the theory that a subtle biologic energy can be influenced for therapeutic effect. EM practitioners may be trained within a specific tradition or work solo. Few studies have investigated the feasibility of solo-practitioner EM in hospitals. Objective: This study investigated the feasibility of EM as provided by a solo practitioner in inpatient and emergent settings. Design: Feasibility study, including a prospective case series. Settings: Inpatient units and emergency department. Outcome measures: To investigate the feasibility of EM, acceptability, demand, implementation, and practicality were assessed. Short-term clinical changes were documented by treating physicians. Participants: Patients, employees, and family members were enrolled in the study only if study physicians expected no or slow improvement in specific symptoms. Those with secondary gains or who could not communicate perception of symptom change were excluded. Results: EM was found to have acceptability and demand, and implementation was smooth because study procedures dovetailed with conventional clinical practice. Practicality was acceptable within the study but was low upon further application of EM because of cost of program administration. Twenty-four of 32 patients requested relief from pain. Of 50 reports of pain, 5 (10%) showed no improvement; 4 (8%), slight improvement; 3 (6%), moderate improvement; and 38 (76%), marked improvement. Twenty-one patients had issues other than pain. Of 29 non–pain-related problems, 3 (10%) showed no, 2 (7%) showed slight, 1 (4%) showed moderate, and 23 (79%) showed marked improvement. Changes during EM sessions were usually immediate. Conclusions: This study successfully implemented EM provided by a solo practitioner in inpatient and emergent hospital settings and found that acceptability and demand justified its presence. Most patients experienced marked, immediate improvement of symptoms associated

  6. Pharmacovigilance study of Ayurvedic medicine in Ayurvedic Teaching Hospital: A prospective survey study

    PubMed Central

    Ajanal, Manjunath N.; Nayak, Shradda U.; Kadam, Avinash P.; Prasad, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Though Ayurveda is practiced in the Indian subcontinent since centuries, there is a paucity of systematic documentation related to the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and other issues regarding the safety of Ayurveda medicines. Aim: To monitor and analyze the pattern and frequency of ADR to Ayurvedic medicines in an Ayurvedic hospital setup. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, ADR monitoring was done in KLE Ayurveda Secondary Care Hospital, Belgaum, Karnataka, India by spontaneous and intensive monitoring technique for a span of 1-year (June 2010 to May 2011). Data pertaining to patient demography, drug and reaction characteristics, organ system involved and reaction outcomes were collected and evaluated. The reaction severity and predisposing factors were also assessed. Results: In a span of one year, 84 adverse drug events were reported out of which 52 confirmed as ADR. The overall incidence of ADR in the patient population was 1.14%, out of which 23 (44.23%) were related to Panchakarma (detoxification process), 13 (25.00%) related to the herbal formulations and 06 (11.53%) were of Rasa Aushadhi (mineral or herbo-mineral formulations). The commonly affected organ systems were gastrointestinal system 24 (46.15%) and skin 15 (28.84%). The majority of the reactions were moderate 30 (57.69%) to mild 20 (38.46%) in severity. Most patients recovered from the incidence. Conclusion: The present work has documented the incidence and characteristic of ADR to Ayurvedic medicine in a typical Ayurveda hospital setup. This will help in developing various strategies for boosting pharmacovigilance in Ayurveda, thereby ensuring safer use of Ayurveda medicines. PMID:27011712

  7. "The City of the Hospital": On Teaching Medical Students to Write.

    PubMed

    Hellerstein, David J

    2015-12-01

    "The City of the Hospital" is a creative nonfiction writing workshop for medical students, which the author has conducted annually since 2002. Part of the required preclinical Narrative Medicine curriculum at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, this six-week intensive workshop includes close readings of literary works and in-class assignments that are then edited by fellow class members and rewritten for final submission. Over the years, students have produced a wide range of compelling essays and stories, and they describe the class as having an effect that lasts throughout their further medical training. This special section includes selected works from class members. PMID:26179365

  8. Organizational and environmental determinants of hospital EMR adoption: a national study.

    PubMed

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Ozcan, Yasar A

    2007-10-01

    The recent focus on health care quality improvement and cost containment has led some policymakers and practitioners to advocate the adoption of health information technology. One such technology is the Electronic Medical Record (EMR), which is predicted to change and improve health care in the USA. Little is known about factors that influence hospital adoption of this relatively new technology. The purpose of this paper is to determine the national prevalence of EMR adoption in acute care hospitals while examining the organizational and environmental correlates using a Resource Dependence Theoretical Perspective. Significant predictors of hospital EMR use may indicate barriers to use for some hospitals and can be used to guide policy. This study uses a non-experimental cross sectional design to examine hospital EMR use in 2004. A logistic regression approach is used to determine the correlations between hospital EMR use and organizational and environmental characteristics. Hospital EMR use was identified using the HIMSS Analytics data. Organizational and environmental variables were measured using data from the AHA, CMS (financial and case mix) and ARF. Hospital EMR adoption is significantly associated with environmental uncertainty, type of system affiliation, size, and urbanness. The effects of competition, munificence, ownership, teaching status, public payer mix, and operating margin were not statistically significant. Significant predictors of hospital EMR adoption represent barriers that may prevent certain hospitals from obtaining and using EMRs. These hospitals include those that are smaller, more rural, non-system affiliated, and in areas of low environmental uncertainty. Since EMR adoption may be an organizational survival strategy for hospitals to improve quality and efficiency, hospitals that are at risk of missing the wave of implementation should be offered services and incentives to enable them to implement and maintain EMR systems.

  9. A Spectrum of Urological Emergency Reported at a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital: An Experience

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indraneel; Teli, Ramdayal; Agarwal, Neeraj; Vyas, Nachiket; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Yadav, Shersingh; Tomar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A substantial number of urology admissions constitute of emergency cases and sizeable proportion are urology emergency referral cases. There have been few studies conducted on this aspect but there lie geographical variations in the presentations of urological emergencies. Hence, this study was conducted to analyse various urological emergency presentations and their interventions. Objective To estimate the proportion of urological emergencies and analyse the different type of urological emergencies with the required management. Materials and Methods A hospital based observational descriptive study was undertaken in our institution over a period of one year. Results A total of 11,139 cases were admitted in the urology department; of which a significant percentage (21.05%) was from emergency room. Majority of cross references came from the Department of Medicine (22.59 %). Renal colic (24.2%) happened to be the most common presentation in emergency room followed by acute urinary retention (14.7%). Among referred cases, hematuria was the leading presentation with 17.75% followed by traumatic catheterization (11.97%). Most common urological intervention in referred cases was supra pubic catheterization (27.20%) while it was percutaneous nephrostomy (32.78%) in directly admitted cases. Conclusion Urological emergencies constitute a significant proportion of total urology admissions (27.18%). The most common non-traumatic injury was renal colic whereas traumatic was traumatic catheterization in our study. Most common surgical intervention in direct admitted emergency cases was percutaneous nephrostomy whereassuprapubic catheterization in within hospital emergency referral cases. PMID:26675409

  10. Nosocomial infections by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase producing enterobacteria in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Gabriela; Hörner, Rosmari; Meneghetti, Bettina Holzschuh; Righi, Roselene Alves; Forno, Nara Lucia Frasson Dal; Salla, Adenilde

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the profile of patients with microorganisms resistant to carbapenems, and the prevalence of the enzyme Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase in interobacteriaceae. Methods Retrospective descriptive study. From the isolation in bacteriological tests ordered by clinicians, we described the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with enterobacteria resistants to carbapenems at a university hospital, between March and October 2013. Results We included 47 isolated patients in this study, all exhibiting resistance to carbapenems, including 9 patients who were confirmed as infected/colonized with K. pneumoniae carbapenemase. Isolation in tracheal aspirates (12; 25.5%) predominated. The resistance to ertapenem, meropenem, and imipenem was 91.5%, 83.0% and 80.0%, respectively. Aminoglycosides was the class of antimicrobials that showed the highest sensitivity, 91.5% being sensitive to amikacin and 57.4% to gentamicin. Conclusion The K. pneumoniae carbapenemase was an important agent in graun isotaling in hospital intection. The limited therapeutic options emphasize the need for rapid laboratory detection, as well as the implementation of measures to prevent and control the spread of these pathogens. PMID:25295446

  11. Intervention to reduce the use of unsafe abbreviations in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Alshaikh, Mashael; Mayet, Ahmed; Adam, Mansour; Ahmed, Yusuf; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effectiveness of a two-phase intervention designed to reduce the use of unsafe abbreviations. Methods An observational prospective study was conducted at the King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during May–September 2009. A list of unsafe abbreviations was formulated based on the recommendations of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. The first 7000 medication orders written at the beginning of each period were collected. Phase one of the intervention involved educating health care professionals about the dangers of using unsafe abbreviations. In the second phase of the intervention, a policy was approved that prohibited the use of unsafe abbreviations hospital-wide. Then, another educational campaign targeted toward prescribers was organized. Descriptive statistics are used in this paper to present the results. Results At baseline, we identified 1980 medication abbreviations used in 7000 medication orders (28.3%). Three months after phase one of the intervention, the number of abbreviations found in 7000 medication orders had decreased to 1489 (21.3%). Six months later, after phase two of the intervention, the number of abbreviations used had decreased to 710 (10%). During this phase, the use of all abbreviations had declined relative to the baseline and phase one use levels. The decrease in the use of abbreviations was statistically significant in all three periods (P < 0.001). Conclusion The implementation of a complex intervention program reduced the use of unsafe abbreviations by 65%. PMID:23960844

  12. Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jibum; Smith, Tom W; Kang, Jeong-han

    2015-12-01

    Very few studies have examined the effects of both religious affiliation and religiosity on mortality at the same time, and studies employing multiple dimensions of religiosity other than religious attendance are rare. Using the newly created General Social Survey-National Death Index data, our report contributes to the religion and mortality literature by examining religious affiliation and religiosity at the same time. Compared to Mainline Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and other religious groups have lower risk of death, but Black Protestants, Evangelical Protestants, and even those with no religious affiliation are not different from Mainline Protestants. While our study is consistent with previous findings that religious attendance leads to a reduction in mortality, we did not find other religious measures, such as strength of religious affiliation, frequency of praying, belief in an afterlife, and belief in God to be associated with mortality. We also find interaction effects between religious affiliation and attendance. The lowest mortality of Jews and other religious groups is more apparent for those with lower religious attendance. Thus, our result may emphasize the need for other research to focus on the effects of religious group and religious attendance on mortality at the same time. PMID:24939004

  13. Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jibum; Smith, Tom W; Kang, Jeong-han

    2015-12-01

    Very few studies have examined the effects of both religious affiliation and religiosity on mortality at the same time, and studies employing multiple dimensions of religiosity other than religious attendance are rare. Using the newly created General Social Survey-National Death Index data, our report contributes to the religion and mortality literature by examining religious affiliation and religiosity at the same time. Compared to Mainline Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and other religious groups have lower risk of death, but Black Protestants, Evangelical Protestants, and even those with no religious affiliation are not different from Mainline Protestants. While our study is consistent with previous findings that religious attendance leads to a reduction in mortality, we did not find other religious measures, such as strength of religious affiliation, frequency of praying, belief in an afterlife, and belief in God to be associated with mortality. We also find interaction effects between religious affiliation and attendance. The lowest mortality of Jews and other religious groups is more apparent for those with lower religious attendance. Thus, our result may emphasize the need for other research to focus on the effects of religious group and religious attendance on mortality at the same time.

  14. A point prevalence survey of antibiotic use in four acute-care teaching hospitals utilizing the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) audit tool.

    PubMed

    Aldeyab, M A; Kearney, M P; McElnay, J C; Magee, F A; Conlon, G; MacIntyre, J; McCullagh, B; Ferguson, C; Friel, A; Gormley, C; McElroy, S; Boyce, T; McCorry, A; Muller, A; Goossens, H; Scott, M G

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this research was to assess current patterns of hospital antibiotic prescribing in Northern Ireland and to determine targets for improving the quality of antibiotic prescribing. A point prevalence survey was conducted in four acute teaching hospitals. The most commonly used antibiotics were combinations of penicillins including β-lactamase inhibitors (33·6%), metronidazole (9·1%), and macrolides (8·1%). The indication for treatment was recorded in 84·3% of the prescribing episodes. A small fraction (3·9%) of the surgical prophylactic antibiotic prescriptions was for >24 h. The results showed that overall 52·4% of the prescribed antibiotics were in compliance with the hospital antibiotic guidelines. The findings identified the following indicators as targets for quality improvement: indication recorded in patient notes, the duration of surgical prophylaxis and compliance with hospital antibiotic guidelines. The results strongly suggest that antibiotic use could be improved by taking steps to address the identified targets for quality improvement.

  15. Gambling by Greek-Affiliated College Students: An Association between Affiliation and Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockey, Donald L.; Beason, Kim R.; Howington, Eric B.; Rockey, Christine M.; Gilbert, James D.

    2005-01-01

    This investigation compared the prevalence rates of pathological and problem gambling between Greek-affiliated and non-Greek-affiliated college students. The 954 participants volunteered to take the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS; Lesieur & Blume, 1987), which measures gambling disorders. A statistically significant association was found between…

  16. In-depth analysis of delays to patient discharge: a metropolitan teaching hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hendy, P; Patel, J H; Kordbacheh, T; Laskar, N; Harbord, M

    2012-08-01

    Delayed patient discharge will likely exacerbate bed shortages. This study prospectively determined the frequency, causes and potential cost implications of delays for 83 consecutive patients, who were inpatients for a total of 888 days. 65% of patients experienced delay whilst awaiting a service. 48% of patients experienced delays that extended their discharge date. Discharge delays accounted for 21% of the cohort's inpatient stay, at an estimated cost of 565 sterling pounds per patient; 77% of these hold-ups resulted from delays in the provision of social and therapy requirements. Discharge delays are costly for hospitals and depressing for patients. Investment is required to enable health and social-care professionals to work more closely to improve the patient journey.

  17. Interest of including trauma photography in the picture archiving and communication system of a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Bronsard, N; Chignon Sicard, B; Amoretti, N; Rottier, H; Ertz, P; de Peretti, F

    2015-05-01

    Digital imaging is a daily practice in traumatology. Such photographs should remain confidential. However, there is a need for objectivity concerning the circumstances and clinical follow-up for trauma patients. This paper describes how to conserve these photographs within the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) safely as regards identity and confidentiality. A computer converts the photographs into DICOM files. The DICOM image is associated to a reconciliation layer, validated by the physician in charge, and then included in the hospital PACS. This improves transmission from one medical team to another, both initially and after the accident if an expert medical opinion is required. The literature has demonstrated the value of photographs in modern medicine, but the technical and legal challenges are many. They enhance the computerized medical records. Identification, confidentiality and integration in the PACS are obstacles that we have now overcome.

  18. Using lean methodology to teach quality improvement to internal medicine residents at a safety net hospital.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Charlene; Suen, Winnie; Gupte, Gouri

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of this initiative was to develop a quality improvement (QI) curriculum using Lean methodology for internal medicine residents at Boston Medical Center, a safety net academic hospital. A total of 90 residents and 8 School of Public Health students participated in a series of four, 60- to 90-minute interactive and hands-on QI sessions. Seventeen QI project plans were created and conducted over a 4-month period. The curriculum facilitated internal medicine residents' learning about QI and development of positive attitudes toward QI (assessed using pre- and post-attitude surveys) and exposed them to an interprofessional team structure that duplicates future working relationships. This QI curriculum can be an educational model of how health care trainees can work collaboratively to improve health care quality.

  19. Interest of including trauma photography in the picture archiving and communication system of a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Bronsard, N; Chignon Sicard, B; Amoretti, N; Rottier, H; Ertz, P; de Peretti, F

    2015-05-01

    Digital imaging is a daily practice in traumatology. Such photographs should remain confidential. However, there is a need for objectivity concerning the circumstances and clinical follow-up for trauma patients. This paper describes how to conserve these photographs within the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) safely as regards identity and confidentiality. A computer converts the photographs into DICOM files. The DICOM image is associated to a reconciliation layer, validated by the physician in charge, and then included in the hospital PACS. This improves transmission from one medical team to another, both initially and after the accident if an expert medical opinion is required. The literature has demonstrated the value of photographs in modern medicine, but the technical and legal challenges are many. They enhance the computerized medical records. Identification, confidentiality and integration in the PACS are obstacles that we have now overcome. PMID:25817905

  20. Radiology Image Management in a Teaching Hospital Network Scenario: Initial Experience.

    PubMed

    Indrajit, I K; Souza, J D; Singh, Rajvir; Shekar, Anjanish

    2003-07-01

    INHS Asvini has the distinction of emerging as the first Armed Forces Hospital with networked radiology images, sourced principally from a recently installed Digital Substraction Angiography (DSA) machine (Siemens Polystar Top 1000 MA). In recent times, newer imaging machines offer digital images that are in DICOM format. DICOM denotes 'Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine". Image management at INHS Asvini, involves transfer of DSA images in DICOM format, their conversion into Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPG) format and subsequent transmission of JPG images through a robust networking system that connects all departments/OPD/Wards, facilitating direct access of images to a variety of specialists and specialities. Clearly, this encouraging outcome is a small but useful step heralding the concept of 'anytime anywhere' images, and has the scalable expansibility of including CT and MRI images in future. PMID:27407523

  1. Cost of providing inpatient burn care in a tertiary, teaching, hospital of North India.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Rajeev B; Goswami, Prasenjit

    2013-06-01

    There is an extreme paucity of studies examining cost of burn care in the developing world when over 85% of burns take place in low and middle income countries. Modern burn care is perceived as an expensive, resource intensive endeavour, requiring specialized equipment, personnel and facilities to provide optimum care. If 'burn burden' of low and middle income countries (LMICs) is to be tackled deftly then besides prevention and education we need to have burn centres where 'reasonable' burn care can be delivered in face of resource constraints. This manuscript calculates the cost of providing inpatient burn management at a large, high volume, tertiary burn care facility of North India by estimating all cost drivers. In this one year study (1st February to 31st January 2012), in a 50 bedded burn unit, demographic parameters like age, gender, burn aetiology, % TBSA burns, duration of hospital stay and mortality were recorded for all patients. Cost drivers included in estimation were all medications and consumables, dressing material, investigations, blood products, dietary costs, and salaries of all personnel. Capital costs, utility costs and maintenance expenditure were excluded. The burn unit is constrained to provide conservative management, by and large, and is serviced by a large team of doctors and nurses. Entire treatment cost is borne by the hospital for all patients. 797 patients (208 <12 years old) with acute burn were admitted with a mean age of 23.04 years (range 18 days to 83 years). The mean BSA burn was 42.26% (ranging from 2% to 100%). 378/797 patients (47.43%) sustained up to 30% BSA burns, 216 patients (27.1%) had between 31 and 60% BSA and 203 patients (25.47%) had >60% BSA burns. 258/797 patients died (32.37%). Of these deaths 16, 68 and 174 patients were from 0 to 30%, 31 to 60% and >60% BSA groups, respectively. The mean length of hospitalization for all admissions was 7.86 days (ranging from 1 to 62 days) and for survivors it was 8.9 days

  2. Imported Malaria over Fifteen Years in an Inner City Teaching Hospital of Washington DC

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Sinha, Archana; Sarraf-Yazdy, Mariam; Gajjala, Jhansi

    2016-01-01

    As endemic malaria is not commonly seen in the United States, most of the cases diagnosed and reported are associated with travel to and from the endemic places of malaria. As the number of imported cases of malaria has been increasing since 1973, it is important to look into these cases to study the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in the United States. In this study, we would like to share our experience in diagnosing and treating these patients at our institution. We did a retrospective chart review of 37 cases with a documented history of imported malaria from 1998 to 2012. Among them, 16 patients had complicated malaria during that study period, with a mean length of hospital stay of 3.5 days. Most common place of travel was Africa, and chemoprophylaxis was taken by only 11% of patients. Travel history plays a critical role in suspecting the diagnosis and in initiating prompt treatment. PMID:27417079

  3. Amniotic band syndrom at Bobo Dioulasso university teaching hospital (Burkina-Faso): about two cases

    PubMed Central

    Zaré, Cyprien; Traoré, Ibrahim Alain; Dakouré, Patrick Wendpuoiré Hamed; Gandéma, Salif; Sano, Bakary Gustave; Bénao, Lazard Bouma; Belemlilga, Hermann; Yabré, Nassirou

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome is a rare congenital disorder. The authors report the first cases documented at Souro Sanou University Hospital in Bobo-Dioulasso (CHUSS) in 2 male new borns. The malformations found at birth, were worn only on limbs and were in the form of skin furrow necking with a major lymphedema downstream. In both cases, the constriction furrow at member pelvic was associated with a club foot and a pseudosyndactyly in one case. Surgical treatment consisted of a section of the constrictor ring and a Z-plasty. The functional outcome was satisfactory with the acquisition of a plantar support for both children. Through these two observations, epidemiological, diagnostic, and particularities of the management of this condition are discussed in the Burkina-Faso. PMID:26918082

  4. Outpatient Waiting Time in Health Services and Teaching Hospitals: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohebbifar, Rafat; Hasanpoor, Edris; Mohseni, Mohammad; Sokhanvar, Mobin; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Isfahani, Haleh Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the most important indexes of the health care quality is patient’s satisfaction and it takes place only when there is a process based on management. One of these processes in the health care organizations is the appropriate management of the waiting time process. The aim of this study is the systematic analyzing of the outpatient waiting time. Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study conducted in 2011 is an applicable study performed in the educational and health care hospitals of one of the medical universities located in the north west of Iran. Since the distributions of outpatients in all the months were equal, sampling stage was used. 160 outpatients were studied and the data was analyzed by using SPSS software. Results: Results of the study showed that the waiting time for the outpatients of ophthalmology clinic with an average of 245 minutes for each patient allocated the maximum time among the other clinics for itself. Orthopedic clinic had the minimal waiting time including an average of 77 minutes per patient. The total average waiting time for each patient in the educational hospitals under this study was about 161 minutes. Conclusion: by applying some models, we can reduce the waiting time especially in the realm of time and space before the admission to the examination room. Utilizing the models including the one before admission, electronic visit systems via internet, a process model, six sigma model, queuing theory model and FIFO model, are the components of the intervention that reduces the outpatient waiting time. PMID:24373277

  5. Comparing the Perspectives of Managers and Employees of Teaching Hospitals About Job Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Mohebbifar, Rafat; Kiaei, Mohammad Zakaria; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Mohseni, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of career motivators and understanding of managers and employees in prioritizing them, in order to plan incentives for this understanding, can play an important role in increasing productivity and creating harmony between the goals of the organization and staff. This study was done to survey the importance of career motivating factors from perspective of employees and managers in educational hospitals of Iran. In this study 269 from a total of 1843 employees of educational hospitals in Qazvin province of Iran were selected through Quota-Random sampling and studied along with all 49 Managers. Lawrence Lindale questionnaire with 10 factors where used in order to determine motivational priorities. The results indicated that among the 10 studied motivational factors, from employees’ viewpoint; “Good wages”, “Good Working Conditions” and “Job Security” have the greatest roles in motivating employees. In the context of perspective agreement amongst employees and managers, the results showed 20 percent agreement. In this study, results of “Independent T” test showed a significant difference in comparison, between prioritizing employees’ view and prediction of managers in the factors of “Job Security” (p = 0.031) and “Interesting Work” (p = 0.001). With respect to increase disagreement in the views of managers and employees as compared to previous studies, Managers need to pay more attention to cognition of motivational factors and make their viewpoints closer to actual motivational need of their employees. Attention to this fact can be a great help to the growth and productivity of the organization, making the organizational and individual goals closer and also keeping managers safe from execution of constant and undue motivational patterns. PMID:25363113

  6. Comparing the perspectives of managers and employees of teaching hospitals about job motivation.

    PubMed

    Mohebbifar, Rafat; Zakaria Kiaei, Mohammad; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Mohseni, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Recognition of career motivators and understanding of managers and employees in prioritizing them, in order to plan incentives for this understanding, can play an important role in increasing productivity and creating harmony between the goals of the organization and staff. This study was done to survey the importance of career motivating factors from perspective of employees and managers in educational hospitals of Iran. In this study 269 from a total of 1843 employees of educational hospitals in Qazvin province of Iran were selected through Quota-Random sampling and studied along with all 49 Managers. Lawrence Lindale questionnaire with 10 factors where used in order to determine motivational priorities. The results indicated that among the 10 studied motivational factors, from employees' viewpoint; "Good wages", "Good Working Conditions" and "Job Security" have the greatest roles in motivating employees. In the context of perspective agreement amongst employees and managers, the results showed 20 percent agreement. In this study, results of "Independent T" test showed a significant difference in comparison, between prioritizing employees' view and prediction of managers in the factors of "Job Security" (p = 0/031) and "Interesting Work" (p = 0/001). With respect to increase disagreement in the views of managers and employees as compared to previous studies, Managers need to pay more attention to cognition of motivational factors and make their viewpoints closer to actual motivational need of their employees. Attention to this fact can be a great help to the growth and productivity of the organization, making the organizational and individual goals closer and also keeping managers safe from execution of constant and undue motivational patterns. PMID:25363113

  7. USG assisted and USG guided percutaneous renal biopsy at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital: a three and half years study.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, A S; Shrestha, A; Pradhan, S; Manandhar, D N; Chhetri Poudyal, P K; Rijal, A; Poudel, P; Maskey, A; Bhoomi, K K

    2014-09-01

    A prospective study was carried out from 2009 to 2013 in the Department of Radiology and Imaging of Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Attarkhel, Jorpati, Kathmandu, Nepal, in which a total of 75 patients underwent percutaneous renal biopsy with a 16 or 18 gauge needles. This was done blindly by marking a site on the skin, or, whenever there was difficulty with the blind procedure, by direct real time USG guidance. In all cases, the marking in the skin was done by the radiologist and the biopsy was performed by the Nephrologist, with the aid of the radiologist in cases of real-time USG guided renal biopsy. This study was carried out to assess the safety and efficacy of the USG aided, and USG guided renal biopsy, to see for the types and severity of complications arising from renal biopsies to determine the optimal period of observation required after the procedure. All renal biopsies were performed after the patients were admitted to the hospital at least 1 day prior to the procedure. Coagulation profile was done in all patients prior to the procedure. All patients were kept under strict complete bed rest for 24 hours post procedure. The ages of the patients ranged between 14 years to 71 years, with 42 female and 33 male patients. A mean of 21.8 glomeruli was obtained in each specimen, with absent glomerular yield seen in only 3 patients. Minimal change disease was seen in 19 patients, being the most common histopathological diagnosis followed by a spectrum of others. The overall complication rate was 4% and all of these were self-limiting needing no other intervention, or management except for observation and bed rest. Late complications were not seen. Percutaneous renal biopsy with the help of USG is a safe and efficacious procedure with less chance of minor complications.

  8. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Heteroresistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus from Bloodstream Infections in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Morgado, Priscylla Guimarães Migueres; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; Damasco, Andreia Paredes; Nouér, Simone Aranha; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed clinical and microbiological characteristics of heteroresistant (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) from bloodstream infections (BSI) in a Brazilian teaching hospital, between 2011 and 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution method and SCCmec was detected by PCR. Isolates with a vancomycin MIC ≥ 2mg/L were cultured on BHI agar with 3, 4 or 6 mg/L (BHIa3, BHIa4 or BHIa6) of vancomycin and BHIa4 with casein (BHIa4ca). Macromethod Etest® and Etest® Glicopeptides Resistance Detection were also used. VISA and hVISA isolates were confirmed by the population analysis profile then typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Medical data from the patients were obtained from their medical records. Among 110 consecutive isolates, 31 (28%) were MRSA and carried the SCCmec type II (15 isolates) or IV (16 isolates). Vancomycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. MRSA isolates had increased non-susceptibility to daptomycin (p = 0.0003). Six (5%) isolates were VISA, four of which were MRSA, three SCCmec type II/USA100/ST5 and one type IV/USA800/ST3192. One MRSA SCCmec II isolate grew on agar BHIa3, BHIa4 and BHIa4ca, and it was confirmed as hVISA. Among the six VISA isolates, five (83%) grew on BHIa3 and three (50%) on BHI4ca. Four of the six VISA isolates and the one hVISA isolate were from patients who had undergone dialysis. Thus, a possible dissemination of the SCCmec II/USA100/ST5 lineage may have occurred in the hospital comprising the VISA, hVISA and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus Brazilian isolates from health care associated bloodstream infections. PMID:27575698

  9. Reptiles with dermatological lesions: a retrospective study of 301 cases at two university veterinary teaching hospitals (1992-2008).

    PubMed

    White, Stephen D; Bourdeau, Patrick; Bruet, Vincent; Kass, Philip H; Tell, Lisa; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2011-04-01

    This retrospective study reviews the medical records of 301 reptiles with dermatological lesions that were examined at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California at Davis (VMTH-UCD) and the Unité de Dermatologie-Parasitologie-Mycologie, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Nantes (UDPM-ENVN) from 1 January 1992 to 1 July 2008. The most common reptile groups differed between the two hospitals, with lizards being the most common at the VMTH-UCD and chelonians at the UDPM-ENVN. At the VMTH-UCD, boa constrictors (Boa constrictor), ball pythons (Python regius) and other Python species were over-represented, and box turtles (Terrapene carolina) were under-represented in the dermatological lesion caseload. When institutional data were combined, 47% of all reptiles at both institutions with confirmed or suspected cases of sepsis had petechiae, with the highest association seen in chelonians at 82%. Dependent on institution and reptile group, from 29% to 64% of the cases had underlying husbandry issues. Sixty-two per cent of all cases were alive at final status. Veterinarians treating reptiles with skin disease should be aware of the following: (i) that boa constrictors and Python species may be predisposed to dermatological lesions; (ii) that client education is important for proper husbandry; and (iii) that there is a possible association between petechiae and sepsis, especially in chelonians. The conjectural association between certain skin lesions and sepsis remains to be confirmed by systematically derived data that demonstrate a causal relationship between the two.

  10. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Heteroresistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus from Bloodstream Infections in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Morgado, Priscylla Guimarães Migueres; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; Damasco, Andreia Paredes; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed clinical and microbiological characteristics of heteroresistant (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) from bloodstream infections (BSI) in a Brazilian teaching hospital, between 2011 and 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution method and SCCmec was detected by PCR. Isolates with a vancomycin MIC ≥ 2mg/L were cultured on BHI agar with 3, 4 or 6 mg/L (BHIa3, BHIa4 or BHIa6) of vancomycin and BHIa4 with casein (BHIa4ca). Macromethod Etest® and Etest® Glicopeptides Resistance Detection were also used. VISA and hVISA isolates were confirmed by the population analysis profile then typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Medical data from the patients were obtained from their medical records. Among 110 consecutive isolates, 31 (28%) were MRSA and carried the SCCmec type II (15 isolates) or IV (16 isolates). Vancomycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. MRSA isolates had increased non-susceptibility to daptomycin (p = 0.0003). Six (5%) isolates were VISA, four of which were MRSA, three SCCmec type II/USA100/ST5 and one type IV/USA800/ST3192. One MRSA SCCmec II isolate grew on agar BHIa3, BHIa4 and BHIa4ca, and it was confirmed as hVISA. Among the six VISA isolates, five (83%) grew on BHIa3 and three (50%) on BHI4ca. Four of the six VISA isolates and the one hVISA isolate were from patients who had undergone dialysis. Thus, a possible dissemination of the SCCmec II/USA100/ST5 lineage may have occurred in the hospital comprising the VISA, hVISA and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus Brazilian isolates from health care associated bloodstream infections.

  11. [Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in the pediatric teaching hospital Charles de Gaulle of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo Yugbaré, S O; Ouédraogo, R; Nenebi, A; Traoré, B; Congo, L; Yonli, F; Kima, D; Bonané, P; Yé, D; Plantier, J-C; Vabret, A; Marguet, C; Gueudin, M

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are little known in Burkina Faso. The objective of our work is to study the epidemiological and clinical aspects of RSV infections in infants in the Pediatric Teaching Hospital Charles de Gaulle of Ouagadougou. Between July 1(st) 2010 and June 30(th) 2011, we analyzed by direct immunofluorescence and PCR nasopharyngeal swabs from children from 0 to 36 months old. All in all, 210 patients among whom 74 from the external consultation (35.2%) and 136 hospitalized (64.7%) benefited from a nasopharyngeal aspiration. The motives for consultation were cough (91.7%), rhinitis (79.2%), fever (79.2%) and respiratory distress syndrome (66.7%). The evoked diagnoses were predominantly the acute bronchiolitis in 14 cases (58.3%) followed by the acute pulmonary disease in 7 patients (26.2%) then flue in 1 patient (16.7%). We detected by direct immunofluorescence the antigens of the respiratory viruses in 21 nasopharyngeal aspirations with 10 cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections (47.6%). The PCR realized on 208 samples allowed to identify 153 positive samples (73.2%) with 24 RSV, i.e. a global prevalence of 16.1% with a peak of 18 cases (75%). In October, all the patients benefited from an often multiple antibiotic treatment of at least 10 days which was not still necessary. The evolution was favorable for all patients. This study confirms the important place of the viruses which are detected in 70% of the cases. The PCR multiplex, certainly expensive but effective and successful, deserves to be used in our developing countries to avoid the irrational prescription of antibiotic.

  12. Sequential Outbreaks of Infections by Distinct Acinetobacter baumannii Strains in a Public Teaching Hospital in Houston, Texas▿

    PubMed Central

    Shelburne, Samuel A.; Singh, Kavindra V.; White, A. Clinton; Byrne, Laura; Carmer, Alexis; Austin, Celest; Graviss, Edward; Stager, Charles; Murray, Barbara E.; Atmar, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive disease due to Acinetobacter baumannii is an increasing problem in health care settings worldwide. Whether certain clones of A. baumannii are more likely to cause invasive disease in hospitalized patients is unknown. We studied all patients at a public teaching hospital in Houston, Texas, from whom the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex was isolated over a 14-month period in 2005 to 2006. One hundred seven unique patient isolates were identified, with 87 of the strains classified as being A. baumannii, the majority of which were multidrug resistant. The A. baumannii isolates were comprised of 18 unique pulsed-field types, with strains of clone A and clone B accounting for 66 of the 87 isolates. Epidemiologic analysis showed the predominance of the two A. baumannii clones at distinct time periods, with the remainder of the A. baumannii and non-A. baumannii strains being evenly distributed. Patients from whom clone A strains were isolated were more likely to be bacteremic than were patients with other A. baumannii isolates. Conversely, clone B strains were more likely to be isolated from patients with tertiary peritonitis. Patients from whom clone A was isolated had a significantly higher rate of mortality. Multilocus sequence typing demonstrated that clones A and B are related to each other and to A. baumannii strains previously isolated in Western Europe, sharing five of seven alleles. Taken together, we conclude that the outbreak of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex in our institution was due to two distinct A. baumannii clones that were associated with significantly different patient outcomes. PMID:18003801

  13. Level of awareness about legalization of abortion in Nepal: a study at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, H; Risal, A

    2010-06-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 25.0% of all pregnancies worldwide end in induced abortion, approximately 50 million each year. More than half of these abortions are performed under unsafe conditions resulting in high maternal mortality ratio specially in developing countries like Nepal. Abortion was legalized under specified conditions in March 2002 in Nepal. But still a large proportion of population are unaware of the legalization and the conditions under which it is permitted. Legal reform alone cannot reduce abortion related deaths in our country. This study was undertaken with the main objective to study the level of awareness about legalization of abortion in women attending gyne out patients department of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH), which will give a baseline knowledge for further dissemination and advocacy about abortion law. Total 200 women participated in the study. Overall 133 (66.5%) women said they were aware of legalization of abortion in Nepal. Women of age group 20-34 years, urban residents, service holders, Brahmin/Chhetri caste and with higher education were more aware about it. Majority (92.0%) of the women received information from the media. Detail knowledge about legal conditions under which abortion can be performed specially in second trimester was found to be poor. Large proportion (71.0%) of the women were still unaware of the availability of comprehensive abortion care services at our hospital, which is being provided since last seven years. Public education and advocacy campaigns are crucial to create awareness about the new legislation and availability of services. Unless the advocacy and awareness campaign reaches women, they are not likely to benefit from the legal reform and services.

  14. Clinical, Microbiological, and Genetic Characteristics of Heteroresistant Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Sabrina; Perazzi, Beatriz; Ordoñez, Andrea Martinez; De Gregorio, Stella; Foccoli, Monica; Lasala, María Beatriz; García, Susana; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) and heterogeneous VISA (hVISA) is of major concern worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence, phenotypic and molecular features of hVISA strains isolated from bacteremic patients and to determine the clinical significance of the hVISA phenotype in patients with bacteremia. A total of 104 S. aureus blood isolates were collected from a teaching hospital of Argentina between August 2009 and November 2010. No VISA isolate was recovered, and 3 out of 92 patients (3.3%) were infected with hVISA, 2 of them methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (4.5% of MRSA). Macro Etest and prediffusion method detected 3/3 and 2/3 hVISA respectively. Considering the type of bacteremia, the three cases were distributed as follows: two patients had suffered multiple episodes of bacteremia (both hVISA strains recovered in the second episode), while only one patient had suffered a single episode of bacteremia with hVISA infection. MRSA bloodstream isolates exhibiting the hVISA phenotype were related to HA-MRSA Cordobes clone (ST5-SCCmec I-spa t149) and MRSA Argentinean pediatric clone (ST100-SCCmec IVNV-spa t002), but not to CA-MRSA-ST30-SCCmec IV-spa t019 clone that was one of the most frequent in our country. Although still relatively infrequent in our hospital, hVISA strains were significantly associated with multiple episodes of bacteremia (p=0.037) and genetically unrelated. PMID:25535825

  15. The barriers to the application of the research findings from the nurses’ perspective: A case study in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Ravangard, Ramin; Mahaki, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of the nursing research findings is one of the most important indicators of development in the nursing profession, which leads to providing efficient and effective patient care and improving the quality of nursing care. According the result of some studies, transferring the evidence-based findings to the nurses’ practice and education in the world has been slow and sometimes unsuccessful. This study aimed to investigate the most important barriers to the application of research findings from the nurses’ perspective. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study conducted on a sample of 210 nurses in a teaching hospital in Tehran in 2013. The data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire consisted of two parts, including items about nurses’ demographic characteristics and 30 items to identify the most important barriers to the application of research findings from the studied nurses’ perspective. Results: “The lack of sufficient time for reading the studies,” “the lack of sufficient time to implement the new ideas,” “the lack of adequate facilities to implement the ideas,” “nurses’ little interest in conducting studies,” and “the lack of authority to change the methods and patterns of care” with, respectively, 85%, 84.6%, 83.8%, 83.4%, and 80.5% agreement with the existence of barriers were the most barriers to application of research findings from the studied nurses’ perspective. Conclusion: The lack of time was the most important barrier to the use of research findings from the perspective of studied nurses. Therefore, some effective strategies should be used by hospital managers and health policy makers to overcome this barrier. Some of these strategies can be employing new personnel and hiring skilled and efficient human resources in order to decrease the workload of nurses, organizing the nurses’ work shifts, providing right balance between patients and nurses in the wards, etc. PMID

  16. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Heteroresistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus from Bloodstream Infections in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Morgado, Priscylla Guimarães Migueres; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; Damasco, Andreia Paredes; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed clinical and microbiological characteristics of heteroresistant (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) from bloodstream infections (BSI) in a Brazilian teaching hospital, between 2011 and 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution method and SCCmec was detected by PCR. Isolates with a vancomycin MIC ≥ 2mg/L were cultured on BHI agar with 3, 4 or 6 mg/L (BHIa3, BHIa4 or BHIa6) of vancomycin and BHIa4 with casein (BHIa4ca). Macromethod Etest® and Etest® Glicopeptides Resistance Detection were also used. VISA and hVISA isolates were confirmed by the population analysis profile then typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Medical data from the patients were obtained from their medical records. Among 110 consecutive isolates, 31 (28%) were MRSA and carried the SCCmec type II (15 isolates) or IV (16 isolates). Vancomycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. MRSA isolates had increased non-susceptibility to daptomycin (p = 0.0003). Six (5%) isolates were VISA, four of which were MRSA, three SCCmec type II/USA100/ST5 and one type IV/USA800/ST3192. One MRSA SCCmec II isolate grew on agar BHIa3, BHIa4 and BHIa4ca, and it was confirmed as hVISA. Among the six VISA isolates, five (83%) grew on BHIa3 and three (50%) on BHI4ca. Four of the six VISA isolates and the one hVISA isolate were from patients who had undergone dialysis. Thus, a possible dissemination of the SCCmec II/USA100/ST5 lineage may have occurred in the hospital comprising the VISA, hVISA and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus Brazilian isolates from health care associated bloodstream infections. PMID:27575698

  17. Detecting affiliation in colaughter across 24 societies

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Gregory A.; Fessler, Daniel M. T.; Clint, Edward; Aarøe, Lene; Apicella, Coren L.; Petersen, Michael Bang; Bickham, Shaneikiah T.; Bolyanatz, Alexander; Chavez, Brenda; De Smet, Delphine; Díaz, Cinthya; Fančovičová, Jana; Fux, Michal; Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Hu, Anning; Kamble, Shanmukh V.; Kameda, Tatsuya; Li, Norman P.; Luberti, Francesca R.; Prokop, Pavol; Quintelier, Katinka; Scelza, Brooke A.; Shin, Hyun Jung; Soler, Montserrat; Stieger, Stefan; van den Hende, Ellis A.; Viciana-Asensio, Hugo; Yildizhan, Saliha Elif; Yong, Jose C.; Yuditha, Tessa; Zhou, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Laughter is a nonverbal vocal expression that often communicates positive affect and cooperative intent in humans. Temporally coincident laughter occurring within groups is a potentially rich cue of affiliation to overhearers. We examined listeners’ judgments of affiliation based on brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter between either established friends or recently acquainted strangers. In a sample of 966 participants from 24 societies, people reliably distinguished friends from strangers with an accuracy of 53–67%. Acoustic analyses of the individual laughter segments revealed that, across cultures, listeners’ judgments were consistently predicted by voicing dynamics, suggesting perceptual sensitivity to emotionally triggered spontaneous production. Colaughter affords rapid and accurate appraisals of affiliation that transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries, and may constitute a universal means of signaling cooperative relationships. PMID:27071114

  18. Detecting affiliation in colaughter across 24 societies.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Gregory A; Fessler, Daniel M T; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Clint, Edward; Aarøe, Lene; Apicella, Coren L; Petersen, Michael Bang; Bickham, Shaneikiah T; Bolyanatz, Alexander; Chavez, Brenda; De Smet, Delphine; Díaz, Cinthya; Fančovičová, Jana; Fux, Michal; Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Hu, Anning; Kamble, Shanmukh V; Kameda, Tatsuya; Li, Norman P; Luberti, Francesca R; Prokop, Pavol; Quintelier, Katinka; Scelza, Brooke A; Shin, Hyun Jung; Soler, Montserrat; Stieger, Stefan; Toyokawa, Wataru; van den Hende, Ellis A; Viciana-Asensio, Hugo; Yildizhan, Saliha Elif; Yong, Jose C; Yuditha, Tessa; Zhou, Yi

    2016-04-26

    Laughter is a nonverbal vocal expression that often communicates positive affect and cooperative intent in humans. Temporally coincident laughter occurring within groups is a potentially rich cue of affiliation to overhearers. We examined listeners' judgments of affiliation based on brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter between either established friends or recently acquainted strangers. In a sample of 966 participants from 24 societies, people reliably distinguished friends from strangers with an accuracy of 53-67%. Acoustic analyses of the individual laughter segments revealed that, across cultures, listeners' judgments were consistently predicted by voicing dynamics, suggesting perceptual sensitivity to emotionally triggered spontaneous production. Colaughter affords rapid and accurate appraisals of affiliation that transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries, and may constitute a universal means of signaling cooperative relationships.

  19. Detecting affiliation in colaughter across 24 societies.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Gregory A; Fessler, Daniel M T; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Clint, Edward; Aarøe, Lene; Apicella, Coren L; Petersen, Michael Bang; Bickham, Shaneikiah T; Bolyanatz, Alexander; Chavez, Brenda; De Smet, Delphine; Díaz, Cinthya; Fančovičová, Jana; Fux, Michal; Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Hu, Anning; Kamble, Shanmukh V; Kameda, Tatsuya; Li, Norman P; Luberti, Francesca R; Prokop, Pavol; Quintelier, Katinka; Scelza, Brooke A; Shin, Hyun Jung; Soler, Montserrat; Stieger, Stefan; Toyokawa, Wataru; van den Hende, Ellis A; Viciana-Asensio, Hugo; Yildizhan, Saliha Elif; Yong, Jose C; Yuditha, Tessa; Zhou, Yi

    2016-04-26

    Laughter is a nonverbal vocal expression that often communicates positive affect and cooperative intent in humans. Temporally coincident laughter occurring within groups is a potentially rich cue of affiliation to overhearers. We examined listeners' judgments of affiliation based on brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter between either established friends or recently acquainted strangers. In a sample of 966 participants from 24 societies, people reliably distinguished friends from strangers with an accuracy of 53-67%. Acoustic analyses of the individual laughter segments revealed that, across cultures, listeners' judgments were consistently predicted by voicing dynamics, suggesting perceptual sensitivity to emotionally triggered spontaneous production. Colaughter affords rapid and accurate appraisals of affiliation that transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries, and may constitute a universal means of signaling cooperative relationships. PMID:27071114

  20. A detailed analysis of theatre training activity in a UK teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    McIndoe, A K; Underwood, S M

    2000-05-01

    We examined the placement of anaesthetists in our department over a 2 yr period. Data were collected from an in-theatre system to provide details of caseload and supervision for 34,856 operations. There was wide variation between anaesthetic sub-specialties with overall supervision levels of 35% of cases for senior house officers (SHOs) and 32% for specialist registrars (SpRs). The consultant data showed the size and areas of teaching reserve in the department. We then examined individual logbooks in order to validate our data, and departmental rotas to put these data into perspective with previous attempts to quantify trainee supervision. Supervision data derived from the rota allocations showed that 86% of SHO lists and 62% of SpR lists were scheduled to be supervised. This study has described our training activity and facilitated departmental changes, as well as highlighting the need for great care in interpreting trainee supervision data acquired from different sources, particularly when comparisons are being made.

  1. A detailed analysis of theatre training activity in a UK teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    McIndoe, A K; Underwood, S M

    2000-05-01

    We examined the placement of anaesthetists in our department over a 2 yr period. Data were collected from an in-theatre system to provide details of caseload and supervision for 34,856 operations. There was wide variation between anaesthetic sub-specialties with overall supervision levels of 35% of cases for senior house officers (SHOs) and 32% for specialist registrars (SpRs). The consultant data showed the size and areas of teaching reserve in the department. We then examined individual logbooks in order to validate our data, and departmental rotas to put these data into perspective with previous attempts to quantify trainee supervision. Supervision data derived from the rota allocations showed that 86% of SHO lists and 62% of SpR lists were scheduled to be supervised. This study has described our training activity and facilitated departmental changes, as well as highlighting the need for great care in interpreting trainee supervision data acquired from different sources, particularly when comparisons are being made. PMID:10844835

  2. Smoking behaviour predicts tobacco control attitudes in a high smoking prevalence hospital: A cross-sectional study in a Portuguese teaching hospital prior to the national smoking ban

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have investigated attitudes to and compliance with smoking bans, but few have been conducted in healthcare settings and none in such a setting in Portugal. Portugal is of particular interest because the current ban is not in line with World Health Organization recommendations for a "100% smoke-free" policy. In November 2007, a Portuguese teaching-hospital surveyed smoking behaviour and tobacco control (TC) attitudes before the national ban came into force in January 2008. Methods Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study, including all eligible staff. Sample: 52.9% of the 1, 112 staff; mean age 38.3 ± 9.9 years; 65.9% females. Smoking behaviour and TC attitudes and beliefs were the main outcomes. Bivariable analyses were conducted using chi-squared and MacNemar tests to compare categorical variables and Mann-Whitney tests to compare medians. Multilogistic regression (MLR) was performed to identify factors associated with smoking status and TC attitudes. Results Smoking prevalence was 40.5% (95% CI: 33.6-47.4) in males, 23.5% (95% CI: 19.2-27.8) in females (p < 0.001); 43.2% in auxiliaries, 26.1% in nurses, 18.9% among physicians, and 34.7% among other non-health professionals (p = 0.024). The findings showed a very high level of agreement with smoking bans, even among smokers, despite the fact that 70.3% of the smokers smoked on the premises and 76% of staff reported being frequently exposed to second-hand smoke (SHS). In addition 42.8% reported that SHS was unpleasant and 28.3% admitted complaining. MLR showed that smoking behaviour was the most important predictor of TC attitudes. Conclusions Smoking prevalence was high, especially among the lower socio-economic groups. The findings showed a very high level of support for smoking bans, despite the pro-smoking environment. Most staff reported passive behaviour, despite high SHS exposure. This and the high smoking prevalence may contribute to low compliance with the ban and low

  3. Cut throat injuries at a university teaching hospital in northwestern Tanzania: a review of 98 cases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cut throat injuries though rarely reported in literature pose a great therapeutic challenge because multiple vital structures are vulnerable to injuries in the small, confined unprotected area. A sudden increase in the number of cut throat patients in our centre in recent years prompted the authors to analyze this problem. This study was conducted in our local setting to describe the etiology, patterns and treatment outcome of these injuries. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of cut throat injury patients who were managed at Bugando Medical Centre between February 2009 and January 2013. Statistical data analysis was done using SPSS software version 17.0. Results A total of 98 patients with cut throat injuries were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2.4: 1. The median age of patients was 26 years (range 8 to 78 years). Majority of patients (79.6%) had no employment and most of them (65.3%) came from rural community. Homicide was the commonest (55.1%) cause, followed by suicidal attempts (34.7%) and accidental (10.2%) injuries. Interpersonal conflict (24.4%) was the most common motivating factor for homicidal injury whereas psychiatric illness (16.2%) and road traffic accidents (9.2%) were the most frequent motivating factors of suicidal attempt and accidental injuries respectively. The majority of injuries were in Zone II accounting for 65.3% of cases and most of them had laryngeal (57.1%) injury. Surgical debridement, laryngeal/hypopharynx repair and tracheostomy were the most common surgical procedures performed in 93.9%, 73.5% and 70.4% of patients respectively. Postoperative complication rate was 57.1%, the commonest being surgical site infections in 28.1% of patients and it was significantly associated with late presentation and anatomical zones (P < 0.001). The overall median duration of hospitalization was 12 days. Patients who had postoperative complications stayed longer in the hospital and this was

  4. Emergency Obstetric Hysterectomy: A Retrospective Study from a Teaching Hospital in North India over Eight Years

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Jaya; Arora, D.; Paul, Mohini; Ajmani, Sangita N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the frequency, demographic characteristics, indications, and feto-maternal outcomes associated with emergency peripartum hysterectomy in an easily accessible urban center. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational, and analytical study over a period of eight years, from August 2006 to July 2014. A total of 56 cases of emergency obstetric hysterectomy (EOH) were studied in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Hospital, New Delhi. Results The incidence of EOH in our study was 30 per 100,000 following vaginal delivery and 270 per 100,000 following cesarean section. The overall incidence was 83 per 100,000 deliveries. Atonic postpartum hemorrhage (25%) was the most common indication followed by placenta accreta (21%) and uterine rupture (17.5%). The most frequent sequelae were febrile morbidity (19.2%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (13.5%). Maternal mortality was 17.7% whereas perinatal mortality was 37.5%. Conclusions A balanced approach to EOH can prove to be lifesaving at times when conservative surgical modalities fail and interventional radiology is not immediately available. Our study highlights the place of extirpative surgery in modern obstetrics in the face of rising rates of cesarean section and multiple pregnancies particularly in urban settings in developing countries. PMID:26171124

  5. Effects of Pharmacist Intervention on the Utilization of Vancomycin in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli-Ardakani, Maria; Ghassemi, Samaneh; Alizadeh, Afshin Mohammad; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Ghadiani, Mojtaba; Ghassemi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of pharmacist intervention on vancomycin use, this study was performed on all patients receiving vancomycin in the intensive care unit (ICU) and hematology-oncology ward of Taleghani Educational Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Vancomycin use was assessed during a pre- and post-intervention period in accordance with the Center of Disease Control and prevention (CDC) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines. Following the intervention, there was a significant change in appropriate initiation of vancomycin (P = 0.009) and no significant improvement was observed in adequate dosage and the duration of therapy (P = 0.15 and P = 0.54 respectively); however, informing the physician resulted in discontinuation of the drug in 50% of inappropriate cases and vancomycin dosage was adjustedin 31% of cases. Temperature charts, culture results and pre-treatment CBC tests changed significantly (P = 0.02, P = 0.009 and P = 0.04 respectively). The rate of infusion related adverse drug reactions did not decrease significantly (P = 0.06); yet in 100% of patients, these reactions were resolved after notifying the nursing team. After pharmacist intervention,vancomycin use improved in some aspects. A significant improvement in appropriate initiation of therapy was observed; however, treatments continued despite negative cultures. It is necessary to optimize the use of vancomycin by performing more educational interventions. PMID:26664398

  6. Modified supine versus prone percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Surgical outcomes from a tertiary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Madeleine Nina; Cetti, Richard; Newell, Bradley; Chu, Kevin; Harper, Matthew; Kourambas, John; McCahy, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The traditional prone positioning of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is associated with various anesthetic and logistic difficulties. We aimed to compare the surgical outcomes of PCNLs performed using our modified supine position with those performed in the standard prone position. Materials and Methods A prospective group of 236 renal units (224 patients) undergoing PCNL were included in this 2 site study: 160 were performed in the modified supine position were compared with 76 undergoing PCNL in the prone position. The outcomes of radiation dose, radiation time, stone free rate, body mass index (BMI), stone size, operative time, length of stay (LOS), in hospital and complications were compared. Chi-square and t-tests were used. Results There were no significant differences in mean radiation time, radiation dose or stone size between the modified supine and prone groups. The supine group had a higher mean BMI (31 kg/m2 vs. 28 kg/m2, p=0.03), shorter mean surgical time (93 minutes vs. 123 minutes, p<0.001), shorter mean LOS (2 days vs. 3 days, p=0.005) and higher stone free rate (70% vs. 50%, p=0.005). There were no differences in septic or bleeding complications but the prone group had a higher rate of overall complications. Conclusions Modified supine PCNL has significantly lower operative time, shorter LOS and higher stone-free rate compared with prone in our series, while remaining a safe procedure. PMID:27437536

  7. Twenty-four-hour intensivist staffing in teaching hospitals: tensions between safety today and safety tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Halpern, Scott D

    2012-05-01

    There is an inherent tension between the training needs of inexperienced clinicians and the safety of the patients for whom they are responsible. Our society has accepted this tension as a necessary trade-off to maintain a competent workforce of physicians year after year. However, recent trends in medical education have diminished resident autonomy in favor of the safety of current patients. One dramatic example is the rapid increase in the number of academic ICUs that provide coverage by attending physicians at all hours. The potential benefits of this staffing model have strong face validity: improved quality and efficiency from the constant involvement of experienced intensivists, increased family and staff satisfaction from the immediate availability of attending physicians, and reduced burn-out among intensivists from reduced on-call responsibilities. Thus, many hospitals have moved toward 24-h coverage by attending intensivist physicians without evidence that these benefits actually accrue and perhaps without full consideration of possible unintended consequences. In this article, we discuss the potential benefits and risks of nocturnal intensivist staffing, considering the needs of current and future patients. Furthermore, we suggest that there remains sufficient uncertainty about these benefits and risks that it is both necessary and ethical to study the effects in earnest.

  8. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marchiori, Paulo E; Lino, Angelina M M; Machado, Luis R; Pedalini, Livia M; Boulos, Marcos; Scaff, Milberto

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, S�o Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5±13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance. PMID:21808869

  9. Quality Control in Linen and Laundry Service at A Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dara; Qadri, GJ; Kotwal, Monica; Syed, AT; Jan, Farooq

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The clean bedding and clean clothes installs psychological confidence in the patients and the public and enhances their faith in the services rendered by the hospital. Being an important Component in the management of the patients, a study was carried out to find out the current quality status and its conformity with the known standards and identify the areas of intervention in order to further increase the patient and staff satisfaction regarding the services provided by linen and laundry department Methods: Quality control practised in the Linen and Laundry Service was studied by conducting a prospective study on the concept of Donabedian model of structure, process and outcome. Study was done by pre-designed Proforma along with observation / Interviews / Questionnaire and study of records. The input studied included physical facilities, manpower, materials, equipments and environmental factors. The various elements of manpower studied consisted of number of staff working, their qualification, training, promotion avenues, motivation and job satisfaction. Process was studied by carrying out observations in linen and laundry service through a predesigned flow chart which was supplemented by interviews with different category of staff. Patient satisfaction, staff satisfaction and microbial count of laundered linen (quality dimensions) were studied in the outcome. Results: The current study found that in spite of certain deficiencies in the equipment, manpower and process, the linen and laundry service is providing a satisfactory service to its users. However the services can be further improved by removing the present deficiencies both at structure and process level. PMID:21475509

  10. Uterine Fibroid Embolization for Symptomatic Fibroids: Study at a Teaching Hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mutai, John Kiprop; Vinayak, Sudhir; Stones, William; Hacking, Nigel; Mariara, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Characterization of magnetic (MRI) features in women undergoing uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) and identification of clinical correlates in an African population. Materials and Methods: Patients with symptomatic fibroids who are selected to undergo UFE at the hospital formed the study population. The baseline MRI features, baseline symptom score, short-term imaging outcome, and mid-term symptom scores were analyzed for interval changes. Assessment of potential associations between short-term imaging features and mid-term symptom scores was also done. Results: UFE resulted in statistically significant reduction (P < 0.001) of dominant fibroid, uterine volumes, and reduction of symptom severity scores, which were 43.7%, 40.1%, and 37.8%, respectively. Also, 59% of respondents had more than 10 fibroids. The predominant location of the dominant fibroid was intramural. No statistically significant association was found between clinical and radiological outcome. Conclusion: The response of uterine fibroids to embolization in the African population is not different from the findings reported in other studies from the west. The presence of multiple and large fibroids in this study is consistent with the case mix described in other studies of African-American populations. Patient counseling should emphasize the independence of volume reduction and symptom improvement. Though volume changes are of relevance for the radiologist in understanding the evolution of the condition and identifying potential technical treatment failures, it should not be the main basis of evaluation of treatment success. PMID:25883858

  11. Acromegaly in the developing world--a 20-year teaching hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, F J; Levitt, N S; De Villiers, J C; Soule, S G

    2001-02-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted to examine the long-term outcome of surgery, by a single pituitary surgeon and radiotherapy for acromegaly at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, using modern criteria for the definition of cure. Seventy-two patients (F/M ratio 1.3:1), aged 16-74 years, were eligible for inclusion. The mean follow-up period was 8.3 years. Macroadenomas were present in 79%, microadenomas in 15% and tumour size was not documented in 6%. Pretreatment GH levels were, > or = 40 m U/l in 56 patients. Postoperatively, 21% of patients were cured, 40% controlled and 40% had hypopituitarism. After radiotherapy (mean follow-up 8.7 years) 43% were cured, 66% controlled and 78% had hypopituitarism. At follow-up 37% of patients traced had died. The most common cause of death was vascular disease. The poor surgical results may be attributed to late presentation in the developing world setting, as evidenced by tumour size and invasiveness, and the degree of GH elevation. Emphasis on early diagnosis of non-invasive tumours is necessary to improve the cure rate and reduce mortality, PMID:11303656

  12. A Survey on the Users’ Satisfaction with the Hospital Information Systems (HISs) based on DeLone and McLean’s Model in the Medical-Teaching Hospitals in Isfahan City

    PubMed Central

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Habibi, Mahboobeh; Mirzaeian, Razieh; Nasirian, Mansoreh; Rad, Javad Sharifi

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The user’s satisfaction with information system in fact denotes the extent the user is satisfied with the system’s achievement in fulfilling his/her information requirements. This study tries to explore the users’ satisfaction with hospital information systems (HISs) based on DeLone and McLean’s model focusing on the medical-teaching hospitals of Isfahan city. Methodology: This study which was applied and descriptive-analytical in nature was carried out in the medical-teaching hospitals of Isfahan city in 2009. Research population consisted of the system users from which a sample was selected using random sampling method. The size of the sample was 228. Data collection instrument was a self-developed questionnaire produced based on the satisfaction criterion in the DeLone and McLean’s model. Its content validity was assessed based on the opinions given by the computer sciences professionals with its estimated Cronbach’s alpha found to be 92.2%. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Findings: As the findings of the study showed, the differences among the mean scores obtained for the satisfaction with different kinds of HISs in use in the hospitals were statistically significant (p value≤0.05). Generally, Kowsar System (old version) and Pouya Samaneh Diva system gained the highest and lowest mean scores for the criterion in question, respectively. The overall mean score for the satisfaction was 54.6% for different types of systems and 55.6% among the hospitals. Conclusion: Given the findings of the study, it can be argued that based on the used model, the level of users’ satisfaction with the systems in question was relatively good. However, to achieve the total optimum condition, when designing the system, the factors affecting the enhancement of the users’ satisfaction and the type of hospital activity and specialty must be given special consideration. PMID:25132711

  13. Transfusion-Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood Donors at Wolaita Sodo University Teaching Referral Hospital, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Fanuel Belayneh; Ageru, Temesgen Anjulo; Wada, Fiseha Wadilo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion-transmissible infections, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and syphilis are among the greatest threats to blood safety and pose a serious public health problem. Objective. To determine the magnitude of blood borne infections among blood donors at Wolaita Sodo University Teaching Referral Hospital. Methods and Materials. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 10/11/2015 up to 10/12/2015. 390 donors were consecutively included and data on donor's age, sex, blood type, and serum screening results were obtained by structured questionnaire and laboratory investigation. The collected data were entered into Epi Data version 1.4 and then exported to SPSS version 20.0 for analysis. Result. The seroprevalence of blood borne pathogens is 29.5% of which HCV, HBV, HIV, and syphilis account for 8.5%, 9.5%, 6.4%, and 7.5%, respectively. Multiple infections were observed among 2.8% of the infected individuals. In addition, age ≥ 30 has a significant association with HCV. Conclusion. Significantly higher prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections was identified from blood donors and they remain to be the greatest threat to blood safety, so comprehensive screening of donors' blood for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis using standard methods is highly recommended to ensure the safety of blood recipient. PMID:27597875

  14. Ovarian Tumors in Children and Adolescents: A 10-Yr Histopathologic Review in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, Patrick K; Derkyi-Kwarteng, Leonard; Quayson, Solomon E; Gyasi, Richard K; Anim, Jehoram T

    2016-07-01

    To determine the histopathologic types, frequency of occurrence, age distribution, presenting signs, and symptoms of ovarian tumors in children and adolescents diagnosed at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital all histopathology slides and request cards of ovarian tumors diagnosed in subjects aged, 0 to 19 yr over a 10-yr period (2001-2010) were reviewed. Biographical and clinical data of the patients were collected. The results were entered into Epi-info to determine the frequency of various ovarian tumors in different age groups and their association with presenting signs and symptoms. A total of 67 (9.5%) ovarian tumors were diagnosed in patients aged 0 to 19 yr of a total of 706 diagnosed in all age groups during the period. The majority [44 (65.7%)] were germ cell tumors, the commonest being mature cystic teratoma. Burkitt lymphoma was the single most common malignant tumor, comprising 6(9%) of all the tumors, although as a group malignant germ cell tumors were still the most common malignant ovarian tumors in children and adolescents. Although germ cell tumors were the most common tumors in this age group (both benign and malignant), Burkitt lymphoma, a peculiar malignant tumor in this subregion, was the single most common malignant tumor of the ovary.

  15. Phenotypic Detection of Genitourinary Candidiasis among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Attendees in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obisesan, Oluranti J.; Olowe, Olugbenga A.; Taiwo, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    The management of genitourinary candidiasis (GC) is fraught with challenges, especially, in an era of increasing antifungal resistance. This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between May 2013 and January 2014 determined the prevalence and characteristics of GC and the species of Candida among 369 attendees of a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) clinic of Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. Appropriate urogenital specimen collected from each attendee was examined by microscopy and culture for Candida, with preliminary species identification by CHROMAgar Candida and confirmation by Analytical Profile Index (API) 20C AUX. The age range of attendees was 1-80 years, mean age was 36.32 ± 11.34 years, and male to female ratio was 1 to 3. The prevalence of genitourinary candidiasis was 47.4%, with 4.9% in males and 42.5% in females (p < 0.0001). The age groups 31–45 and 16–30 have the highest prevalence of 23.3% and 16.8%, respectively. The species of Candida recovered include Candida glabrata 46.9%, Candida albicans 33.7%, Candida dubliniensis 9.7%, Candida tropicalis 5.7%, Candida krusei 1.7%, Candida lusitaniae 1.7%, and Candida utilis 0.6%. This study reported non-C. albicans Candida, especially C. glabrata, as the most frequently isolated species in GC, contrary to previous studies in this environment and elsewhere. PMID:26064140

  16. Airway accidents in critical care unit: A 3-year retrospective study in a Public Teaching Hospital of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Sugata; Singh, Shipti Shradha; Chaudhuri, Arunima; Bhattacharya, Dipasri; Choudhury, Sourav Das

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although tracheal tubes are essential devices to control and protect airway in a critical care unit (CCU), they are not free from complications. Aims: To document the incidence and nature of airway accidents in the CCU of a government teaching hospital in Eastern India. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all airway accidents in a 5-bedded (medical and surgical) CCU. The number, types, timing, and severity of airway accidents were analyzed. Results: The total accident rate was 19 in 233 intubated and/or tracheostomized patients over 1657 tube days (TDs) during 3 years. Fourteen occurred in 232 endotracheally intubated patients over 1075 endotracheal tube (ETT) days, and five occurred in 44 tracheostomized patients over 580 tracheostomy TDs. Fifteen accidents were due to blocked tubes. Rest four were unplanned extubations (UEs), all being accidental extubations. All blockages occurred during night shifts and all UEs during day shifts. Five accidents were mild, the rest moderate. No major accident led to cardiorespiratory arrest or death. All blockages occurred after 7th day of intubation. The outcome of accidents were more favorable in tracheostomy group compared to ETT group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of airway accidents was 8.2 accidents per 100 patients. Blockages were the most common accidents followed by UEs. Ten out of the 15 blockages and all 4 UEs were in endotracheally intubated patients. Tracheostomized patients had 5 blockages and no UEs. PMID:27076709

  17. An audit of operating room time utilization in a teaching hospital: is there a place for improvement?

    PubMed

    Stavrou, George; Panidis, Stavros; Tsouskas, John; Tsaousi, Georgia; Kotzampassi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To perform a thorough and step-by-step assessment of operating room (OR) time utilization, with a view to assess the efficacy of our practice and to identify areas of further improvement. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the most ordinary general surgery procedures, in terms of five intervals of OR time utilization: anaesthesia induction, surgery preparation, duration of operation, recovery from anaesthesia, and transfer to postanaesthesia care unit (PACU) or intensive care unit (ICU). According to their surgical impact, the procedures were defined as minor, moderate, and major. Results. A total of 548 operations were analyzed. The mean (SD) time in minutes for anaesthesia induction was 19 (9), for surgery preparation 13 (8), for surgery 115 (64), for recovery from anaesthesia 12 (8), and for transfer to PACU/ICU 12 (9). The time spent in each step presented an ascending escalation pattern proportional to the surgical impact (P = 0.000), which was less pronounced in the transfer to PACU/ICU (P = 0.006). Conclusions. Albeit, our study was conducted in a teaching hospital, the recorded time estimates ranged within acceptable limits. Efficient OR time usage and outliers elimination could be accomplished by a better organized transfer personnel service, greater availability of anaesthesia providers, and interdisciplinary collaboration.

  18. Ventilator-associated pneumonia in a teaching hospital in Tehran and use of the Iranian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Software.

    PubMed

    Afhami, Sh; Hadadi, A; Khorami, E; Seifi, A; Bazaz, N Esmailpour

    2013-10-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common health-care-associated infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) and computer-assisted diagnosis and surveillance is called for. The frequency of ventilator-associated pneumonia was assessed prospectively during a 6-month period in the ICUs of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran. To determine the accuracy of the Iranian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (INIS) system, patient data were input to the software and compared with physicians' judgement. The frequency of ventilator-associated pneumonia was 21.6%, or 9.96 episodes per 1000 ventilator days. The duration of admission to the ICU, duration of mechanical ventilator and number of re-intubations were significantly higher in patients who developed pneumonia. The INIS system identified 100% of cases, with no false-positive or false-negative results. Compared with developed countries, the frequency of ventilator-associated pneumonia was high in our ICUs, and INIS software was accurate in diagnosing nosocomial infection.

  19. Periodontal disease status and associated risk factors in patients attending a Dental Teaching Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Syed Akhtar Hussain; Suhail, Agha Mohammad; Malik, Abdul Razzaq; Imran, Mian Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Investigators have identified an association of socio-demographic and medical factors with periodontal risk. This study observed status and association of periodontal disease and associated risk factors/indictors. Materials and Methods: All patients attending a dental teaching hospital were interviewed for socio-demographic and medical information through a structured questionnaire. Participants were examined for periodontal status using the community periodontal index (CPI), by a single examiner during September to November 2012. An association of age, gender, smoking habit, systemic conditions, and oral hygiene measures with periodontal status ([periodontitis CPI score ≥3]/nonperiodontitis [CPI score ≤2]) was analyzed by applying Chi-square test and forward selection stepwise regression analysis. Results: One thousand nine hundred and eighteen patients were examined during the study period. The findings revealed that 63.5% of the subjects had CPI score ≤2 (nonperiodontitis), while 34.5% were found with CPI score ≥3 (periodontitis). Age, gender, occupation, smoking, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, stress, medications, and oral hygiene habits of using tooth powder or tooth brushing were significantly (P ≤ 0.037) associated with periodontal status. Regression analysis showed a significant association of age, occupation, and smoking with periodontitis. Conclusion: This study observed prevalence of periodontitis in one-fourth of study sample. The study confirmed various socio-demographic risk factors/indictors associated with increased risk of periodontitis. PMID:26941520

  20. Phenotypic Detection of Genitourinary Candidiasis among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Attendees in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obisesan, Oluranti J; Olowe, Olugbenga A; Taiwo, Samuel S

    2015-01-01

    The management of genitourinary candidiasis (GC) is fraught with challenges, especially, in an era of increasing antifungal resistance. This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between May 2013 and January 2014 determined the prevalence and characteristics of GC and the species of Candida among 369 attendees of a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) clinic of Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. Appropriate urogenital specimen collected from each attendee was examined by microscopy and culture for Candida, with preliminary species identification by CHROMAgar Candida and confirmation by Analytical Profile Index (API) 20C AUX. The age range of attendees was 1-80 years, mean age was 36.32 ± 11.34 years, and male to female ratio was 1 to 3. The prevalence of genitourinary candidiasis was 47.4%, with 4.9% in males and 42.5% in females (p < 0.0001). The age groups 31-45 and 16-30 have the highest prevalence of 23.3% and 16.8%, respectively. The species of Candida recovered include Candida glabrata 46.9%, Candida albicans 33.7%, Candida dubliniensis 9.7%, Candida tropicalis 5.7%, Candida krusei 1.7%, Candida lusitaniae 1.7%, and Candida utilis 0.6%. This study reported non-C. albicans Candida, especially C. glabrata, as the most frequently isolated species in GC, contrary to previous studies in this environment and elsewhere.

  1. Sensitivity profile of Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp. isolated from toys used in a teaching hospital playroom☆

    PubMed Central

    Boretti, Vanessa Stolf; Corrêa, Renata Nunes; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Silva, Célia Regina Gonçalves e

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the presence of microorganisms of the genus Staphylococcus and Streptococcus on toys in the playroom of a teaching hospital, as well to as analyze the antimicrobial resistance from isolated strains. Methods: Samples were collected from 60 toys, using wet swabs, soon after being used by the children. The samples were inoculated in enriched and selective agar for isolation and later identification of the microorganisms. Antibiogram testing was performed by agar diffusion technique. Results: The genus Staphylococcus was present in 87.0% (52/60) of the toys. Seventy-three strains were isolated, with 29.0% (21/73) coagulase-positive and 71.0% (52/73) coagulasenegative. Among the coagulase-negative strains, 90.4% were resistant to penicillin, 65.4% to oxacillin, 28.8% to clarithromycin, 61.5% to clindamycin, and none to vancomycin. Among the coagulase-positive strains, 76.2% were resistant to penicillin, 23.8% to oxacillin, 23.8% to clarithromycin, 47.6% to clindamycin, and none to vancomycin. The genus Streptococcus was not detected in any of the evaluated toys. Conclusions: Toys can be contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria with antimicrobial resistance, representing a possible source of nosocomial infection for patients who are already debilitated. PMID:25479842

  2. Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance in the Surgery Wards of a Large Teaching Hospital in Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Silvano; Gioia, Renato; De Simone, Giuseppe; Noviello, Silvana; Lombardi, Domenico; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo Giuseppe; Filippelli, Amelia; Rega, Maria Rosaria; Massari, Angelo; Elberti, Maria Giovanna; Grisi, Lucilla; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Leone, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Surgical infections represent an increasingly important problem for the National Health System. In this study we retrospectively evaluated the bacterial epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of the microorganisms concerned as well as the utilization of antibiotics in the General and Emergency Surgery wards of a large teaching hospital in southern Italy in the period 2011–2013. Methods Data concerning non-duplicate bacterial isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility were retrieved from the Vitek 2 database. The pharmacy provided data about the consumption of antibiotics in the above reported wards. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test were used. Results In all, 94 Gram-negative were isolated in 2011, 77 in 2012, and 125 in 2013, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa always being the most frequently isolated microorganisms. A. baumannii showed high rates of resistance to carbapenems (with values of 100% in 2011 and 2012) and low rates of resistance to tigecycline, colistin and amikacin. In the same years, there were respectively 105, 93, and 165 Gram-positive isolated. The rate of MRSA isolates ranged from 66% to 75% during the study period. Conclusions Our results show no significant increase in antimicrobial resistance over the period in question, and a higher rate of both MRSA isolates and resistance to carbapenems in A. baumannii compared with other European data. PMID:26075047

  3. Transfusion-Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood Donors at Wolaita Sodo University Teaching Referral Hospital, South Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bisetegen, Fithamlak Solomon; Bekele, Fanuel Belayneh; Ageru, Temesgen Anjulo; Wada, Fiseha Wadilo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion-transmissible infections, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and syphilis are among the greatest threats to blood safety and pose a serious public health problem. Objective. To determine the magnitude of blood borne infections among blood donors at Wolaita Sodo University Teaching Referral Hospital. Methods and Materials. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 10/11/2015 up to 10/12/2015. 390 donors were consecutively included and data on donor's age, sex, blood type, and serum screening results were obtained by structured questionnaire and laboratory investigation. The collected data were entered into Epi Data version 1.4 and then exported to SPSS version 20.0 for analysis. Result. The seroprevalence of blood borne pathogens is 29.5% of which HCV, HBV, HIV, and syphilis account for 8.5%, 9.5%, 6.4%, and 7.5%, respectively. Multiple infections were observed among 2.8% of the infected individuals. In addition, age ≥ 30 has a significant association with HCV. Conclusion. Significantly higher prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections was identified from blood donors and they remain to be the greatest threat to blood safety, so comprehensive screening of donors' blood for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis using standard methods is highly recommended to ensure the safety of blood recipient. PMID:27597875

  4. Assessment of quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkhute, Sonali A.; Bajait, Chaitali S.; Dakhale, Ganesh N.; Sontakke, Smita D.; Jaiswal, Kavita M.; Kinge, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Health-related quality of life (QOL) is an important outcome in epilepsy treatment. Very few studies have been carried out on the quality of life in epilepsy (QOLIE-31) in India. The present study aimed to determine the level of health-related QOLIE-31 in patients of epilepsy. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Respondents were adults aged at least 18-year-old with a diagnosis of epilepsy. QOLIE-31 was used for collecting data on health-related QOL. The unpaired t-test or one-way analysis of variance was used to compare means of QOL scores between groups. Results: Totally, 60 patients of epilepsy were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation) total score of QOLIE-31 was 64.61. A score of cognitive and medication effect were significantly better in carbamazepine group as compared to valproate group. Conclusions: Patients on monotherapy had a better QOL as compared to patients receiving polytherapy. PMID:26600647

  5. A comparative study of burnout syndrome among health professionals in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Olley, B O

    2003-09-01

    Burnout as a measure of stress has generated research interest in the past two decades. However, there is a dearth of research on this interesting and important phenomenon in Nigeria. This study compared burnout and its associated factors in various health professionals working at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Two hundred and sixty health care providers were sampled from 5 main units: Theatre/Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Accident and Emergency (A & E), Oncology, Dentistry and General Outpatients Department (GOP), among others. Included were 104 nurses (40%), 83 doctors (31.9%), 21 pharmacists/pharmacy technicians (8.0%), 10 medical social workers (3.8%) and 42 nursing assistants (16.1%). Outcome measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the 30-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Core findings indicated that nurses consistently reported higher scores on all measures of burnout: exhaustion (F = 3.60, df = 258, P < .05); accomplishment (F = 3.94, df = 258, P < .05) and depersonalization (F = 4.58, df 258, P < .01) when compared with other health care providers. Significant differences were also noted between nurses and all other care providers in total scores on the General Health Questionnaire (F = 6.54, df 258, P < .01) and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (F = 1.91, df 258, P < .05), respectively. These results are discussed in relation to the existing literature on burnout in Nigeria. Further empirical study is highly suggested in view of dearth of studies on the occupational health of health care providers in Nigeria.

  6. Maternal mortality -- aetiological factors: analytic study from a teaching hospital of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Sarin, A R; Singla, P; Kaur, H

    1992-01-01

    A review of maternal deaths at Rajendra Hospital, Punjab, from January 1978 to December 1991 yielded important data for the planning of maternal health services in this area of India, During the 14 year study period, there were 33,160 births and 339 deaths, for a maternal mortality rate of 1002/100,000 live births. Women who had received no prenatal care accounted for 47.4% of deliveries but 92.8% of maternal deaths. In addition, a disproportionate number of deaths involved rural women (74.6%) and poor women (76.4%). 57.8% of maternal deaths involved women 21-30 years of age; 37.1% occurred among primigravidas. Direct obstetrical causes were considered the etiologic factor in 83.1% of these deaths. Primary among these causes were sepsis (37.1%), obstetric hemorrhage (26.2%), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (21.4%), and obstructed labor (15.3%). 30.6% of deaths occurred during pregnancy, 50.3% during labor, and 19.1% in the postpartum period. Indirect obstetrical causes, notably severe anemia and anesthesia complications, were implicated in 15.3% of the maternal deaths. Critical analysis of the maternal deaths in this series suggested that 89.6% were totally preventable, 9.6% were probably preventable, and only 0.8% were not avoidable. Factors that would reduce the high rate of maternal mortality in this region include more widespread use of prenatal care, training of traditional birth attendants in asepsis, referral of high-risk pregnancies, and improved transportation in rural areas. PMID:12288813

  7. An evaluation of postoperative pain management in pediatric patients at a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Cox, T H

    1995-11-01

    In recent years, pediatric pain management has begun to receive some much deserved attention. Many misconceptions regarding pediatric pain management have resulted in infants and children receiving inadequate pain control after surgical or invasive procedures. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate appropriateness of pain management practices, emphasizing drug therapy, in children with acute pain after a surgical procedure. Analgesic use and pain assessment methods were evaluated for 30 pediatric patients undergoing an invasive medical procedure or surgery. Data were collected concurrently on the use of pain medications, potential for drug interactions/duplication of therapeutic classes, pain assessment, patient response to medication, and any adverse effects experienced by a child. Twenty patients (67%) had concurrent orders written for multiple analgesics on admission to the nursing unit. Only 6 of these 20 order sets (30%) designated specific indications for use. Ten of the 14 remaining order sets (those without specific directions for use) contained at least one medication that was inappropriate to treat the expected level of postoperative pain. Fifty-four percent of total physician orders fell outside study criteria for appropriate dosing and scheduling frequency. Patient records revealed that nursing administered the lowest ordered dose 47% of the time, and a failure to consistently conduct pain assessments or document patient response to medication. Eight patients (27%) experienced allergic-type reactions, whereas 7 patients (23%) experienced adverse drug reactions. Information gathered from this review will be used to determine if a need exists to develop hospital guidelines or adopt the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines for acute pain management in children.

  8. Frequency of medication errors in an emergency department of a large teaching hospital in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Zamani, Zahra; Hatam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the frequency of medication errors (MEs) occurring in tertiary care emergency department (ED) of a large academic hospital in Iran. The incidence of MEs was determined through the disguised direct observation method conducted by a trained observer. A total of 1,031 medication doses administered to 202 patients admitted to the tertiary care ED were observed over a course of 54 6-hour shifts. Following collection of the data and analysis of the errors with the assistance of a clinical pharmacist, frequency of errors in the different stages was reported and analyzed in SPSS-21 software. For the 202 patients and the 1,031 medication doses evaluated in the present study, 707 (68.5%) MEs were recorded in total. In other words, 3.5 errors per patient and almost 0.69 errors per medication are reported to have occurred, with the highest frequency of errors pertaining to cardiovascular (27.2%) and antimicrobial (23.6%) medications. The highest rate of errors occurred during the administration phase of the medication use process with a share of 37.6%, followed by errors of prescription and transcription with a share of 21.1% and 10% of errors, respectively. Omission (7.6%) and wrong time error (4.4%) were the most frequent administration errors. The less-experienced nurses (P=0.04), higher patient-to-nurse ratio (P=0.017), and the morning shifts (P=0.035) were positively related to administration errors. Administration errors marked the highest share of MEs occurring in the different medication use processes. Increasing the number of nurses and employing the more experienced of them in EDs can help reduce nursing errors. Addressing the shortcomings with further research should result in reduction of MEs in EDs. PMID:25525391

  9. Frequency of medication errors in an emergency department of a large teaching hospital in southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Zamani, Zahra; Hatam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the frequency of medication errors (MEs) occurring in tertiary care emergency department (ED) of a large academic hospital in Iran. The incidence of MEs was determined through the disguised direct observation method conducted by a trained observer. A total of 1,031 medication doses administered to 202 patients admitted to the tertiary care ED were observed over a course of 54 6-hour shifts. Following collection of the data and analysis of the errors with the assistance of a clinical pharmacist, frequency of errors in the different stages was reported and analyzed in SPSS-21 software. For the 202 patients and the 1,031 medication doses evaluated in the present study, 707 (68.5%) MEs were recorded in total. In other words, 3.5 errors per patient and almost 0.69 errors per medication are reported to have occurred, with the highest frequency of errors pertaining to cardiovascular (27.2%) and antimicrobial (23.6%) medications. The highest rate of errors occurred during the administration phase of the medication use process with a share of 37.6%, followed by errors of prescription and transcription with a share of 21.1% and 10% of errors, respectively. Omission (7.6%) and wrong time error (4.4%) were the most frequent administration errors. The less-experienced nurses (P=0.04), higher patient-to-nurse ratio (P=0.017), and the morning shifts (P=0.035) were positively related to administration errors. Administration errors marked the highest share of MEs occurring in the different medication use processes. Increasing the number of nurses and employing the more experienced of them in EDs can help reduce nursing errors. Addressing the shortcomings with further research should result in reduction of MEs in EDs. PMID:25525391

  10. Physician's practices and perspectives regarding tobacco cessation in a teaching hospital in Mysore City, Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Saud, Mohammed; Madhu, B; Srinath, K M; Ashok, N C; Renuka, M

    2014-01-01

    Context: Tobacco is a leading cause of disease and premature death. Most of the smokers visit a doctor for various health related ailments and thus such clinic visits provide many opportunities for interventions and professional tobacco cessation advice. Aims: The primary aim of the following study is to assess the physician practices, perspectives, resources, barriers and education relating to tobacco cessation and their perceived need for training for the same. The secondary aim is to compare the physician's cessation practices from patient's perspective. Settings and Design: A descriptive study was conducted in a hospital attached to Medical College in Mysore city, Karnataka. Materials and Methods: Information about doctor's practices, perspectives and their perceived need for training in tobacco cessation were collected using pre-structured self-administered Questionnaire, which were distributed in person. Patient's practices and perspectives were assessed using a pre-structured Oral Questionnaire. Results: Almost 95% of physicians said that they ask patients about their smoking status and 94% advise them to quit smoking, but only 50% assist the patient to quit smoking and only 28% arrange follow-up visits. Thus, they do not regularly provide assistance to help patients quit, even though 98% of the physicians believed that helping patients to quit was a part of their role. Only 18% and 35% of the physicians said that Undergraduate Medical Education and Post Graduate Medical Education respectively prepared them very well to participate in smoking cessation activities. Conclusions: Tobacco cessation requires repeated and regular assistance. Such assistance is not being provided to patients by attending doctors. Our medical education system is failing to impart the necessary skills to doctors, needed to help patients quit smoking. Reforms in education are needed so as to prepare the physician to effectively address this problem. PMID:24574555

  11. Examination of hospital characteristics and patient quality outcomes using four inpatient quality indicators and 30-day all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Carretta, Henry J; Chukmaitov, Askar; Tang, Anqi; Shin, Jihyung

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to examine hospital mortality outcomes and structure using 2008 patient-level discharges from general community hospitals. Discharges from Florida administrative files were merged to the state mortality registry. A cross-sectional analysis of inpatient mortality was conducted using Inpatient Quality Indicators (IQIs) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke, pneumonia, and all-payer 30-day postdischarge mortality. Structural characteristics included bed size, volume, ownership, teaching status, and system affiliation. Outcomes were risk adjusted using 3M APR-DRG. Volume was inversely correlated with AMI, CHF, stroke, and 30-day mortality. Similarities and differences in the direction and magnitude of the relationship of structural characteristics to 30-day postdischarge and IQI mortality measures were observed. Hospital volume was inversely correlated with inpatient mortality outcomes. Other hospital characteristics were associated with some mortality outcomes. Further study is needed to understand the relationship between 30-day postdischarge mortality and hospital quality.

  12. Interethnic Romantic Relationships: Enacting Affiliative Ethnic Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yodanis, Carrie; Lauer, Sean; Ota, Risako

    2012-01-01

    Through in-depth interviews with respondents who were in interethnic relationships (N = 28), the authors extended and refined a new approach to mate selection based on affiliative ethnic identities (T. Jimenez, 2010). Rather than assimilation and a breakdown of ethnic group boundaries, they found that people pursued interethnic relationships…

  13. 7 CFR 12.8 - Affiliated persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... through another business enterprise; or (3) Any trust in which the individual, business enterprise, or any... held indirectly through another business enterprise. (c) Affiliated persons of an entity. If the person... venture, except for persons who have an indirect interest through another business enterprise in...

  14. Antisocial Behavior and Affiliation With Deviant Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Paul A.; Urberg, Kathryn A.; Heinze, Hillary J.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the associations among gender, antisocial behavior, and peer-group affiliation in a high-risk sample of 401 homeless and matched housed adolescents (139 boys and 262 girls). The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (Version 2.3, 1991; Costello, Edelbrock, Kalas, Kessler, & Klaric, 1982) yielded 2 measures of adolescent antisocial…

  15. Affiliation of Opposite-Sexed Strangers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, Bryant Bernhardt; Mehrabian, Albert

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of physical attractiveness on live verbal interactions between males and females. It was assumed that if opposite-sexed individuals primarily base their liking of the other on physical attractiveness, then subjects should be more positive and affiliative with attractive than unattractive others. (Author/RK)

  16. 24 CFR 242.66 - Affiliate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Affiliate transactions. 242.66 Section 242.66 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  17. Cult Affiliation and Disaffiliation: Implications for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Beth; Frye, Ellen M.; Bradley, Loretta J.

    1997-01-01

    Data on cult membership and the characteristics of cults are provided. The process of cult affiliation and its relationship to family dynamics are reviewed. Defection, the processes of disaffiliation (voluntary and involuntary), and clinical symptoms after cult disaffiliation are discussed. Implications and recommendations for counselors are…

  18. 7 CFR 983.3 - Affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affiliation. 983.3 Section 983.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  19. 7 CFR 983.3 - Affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Affiliation. 983.3 Section 983.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  20. 7 CFR 983.3 - Affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affiliation. 983.3 Section 983.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  1. 7 CFR 983.3 - Affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affiliation. 983.3 Section 983.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  2. 15 CFR 1180.9 - Affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affiliates. 1180.9 Section 1180.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND...

  3. 15 CFR 1180.9 - Affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affiliates. 1180.9 Section 1180.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND...

  4. 15 CFR 1180.9 - Affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affiliates. 1180.9 Section 1180.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND...

  5. Clinical features and molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A baumannii complex in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Feng; Yang, Chih-Man; Lin, Chung-Hui; Huang, Mei-Luan; Tu, Chi-Chao; Liou, Ming-Li

    2009-11-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan to investigate the clinical features and molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A baumannii (MDR Acb) complex. Case patients had higher mortality than controls did. MDR Acb complex acquisition risk factors include longer hospital stays, higher ratio of nasogastric tube and Foley catheter use, and more carbapenem use. All available isolates were divided into 36 subtypes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The proportion of the same subtypes with their appearance within 1 and 2 months was 62.5% and 87.5%, respectively. We concluded that many different MDR Acb complex clones could be found in a hospital and that the same clones often spread on a small scale within a short period of time if no outbreaks noted.

  6. A national study of transitional hospital services in mental health.

    PubMed Central

    Dorwart, R A; Hoover, C W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Shifts in care for the seriously mentally ill from inpatient to community-based treatment have highlighted the importance of transitional care. Our objectives were to document the kinds and quantity of transitional services provided by psychiatric hospitals nationally and to assess the impact of hospital type (psychiatric vs general), ownership (public vs private), case mix, and revenue source on provision of these services. METHODS. A national sample of nonfederal inpatient mental health facilities (n = 915) was surveyed in 1988, and data were analyzed by using multiple regression. RESULTS. Half (46%) of the facilities surveyed provided patient follow-up of 1 week or less, and almost all (93%) conducted team review of discharge plans, but 74% provided no case management services. Hospital type was the most consistent predictor of transitional care, with psychiatric hospitals providing more of these services than general hospitals. Severity of illness, level of nonfederal funding, urbanicity, and teaching hospital affiliation were positively associated with provision of case management. CONCLUSIONS. Transitional care services for mentally ill patients leaving the hospital were found to be uneven and often inadequate. Reasons for broad variation in services are discussed. PMID:8059877

  7. Identification and characterization of CTX-M-15 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clone ST101 in a Hungarian university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Melegh, Szilvia; Schneider, György; Horváth, Marianna; Jakab, Ferenc; Emődy, Levente; Tigyi, Zoltán

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the molecular epidemiology of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates derived from the teaching hospitals of University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary in the time period 2004-2008. Molecular typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of common β-lactamase genes (bla(CTX-M), bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)) and virulence associated traits (hypermucoviscosity, magA, k2a, rmpA, siderophores, type 1 and 3 fimbria, biofilm formation, serum resistance) were performed for 102 isolates. The results showed the presence of three major ciprofloxacin resistant CTX-M-15 producing clones (ST15 n = 69, ST101 n = 10, and ST147 n = 9), of which ST15 was predominant and universally widespread. Considering distribution in time and place, ST101 and ST147 were detected at fewer inpatient units and within a narrower time frame, as compared to ST15. Beside major clones, eleven minor clones were identified, and were shown to harbour the following β-lactamase genes: six clones carried bla(CTX-M), four clones harboured bla(SHV-5) and one clone possessed both bla(CTX-M) and ESBL type bla(SHV). Among the SHV-5 producing K. pneumoniae clones a novel sequence type was found, namely ST1193, which harboured a unique infB allele. Different virulence factor content and peculiar antimicrobial susceptibility profile were characteristic for each clone. In contrast to major clone isolates, which showed high level resistance to ciprofloxacin, minor clone isolates displayed significantly lower MIC values for ciprofloxacin suggesting a role for fluoroquinolones in the dissemination of the major K. pneumoniae clones. This is the first description of the CTX-M-15 producing K. pneumoniae clone ST101 in Hungary. PMID:26551567

  8. Inappropriateness of medication prescriptions about chronic kidney disease patients without dialysis therapy in a Chinese tertiary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Na; Wang, Rong-Rong; Li, Lu; Jiang, Sai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increasing incidence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD), inappropriate use of medicine in CKD patients is an important issue, as it may cause adverse effects in patients and progression to chronic renal failure. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of inappropriate medicine use among CKD patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 1 to December 1, 2014 in a Chinese teaching tertiary hospital. All medication prescriptions for CKD patients with serum creatinine level above normal value were enrolled. The prescriptions, including unreasonable dosage, contraindicated, and cautiously used medicines in CKD patients, were evaluated and the related medications were also analyzed and classified. Results Two hundred and two patients were included, and a total of 1,733 lines of medication prescriptions were evaluated. The prevalence of inappropriate medication prescriptions in CKD patients was 15.18%, of which, unreasonable dosage (n=56), contraindicated (n=46), and cautiously used medicines (n=161) accounted for 3.23%, 2.65%, and 9.29%, respectively. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient implied that there was a significant correlation between the severity of renal insufficiency and frequency of inappropriate medication prescriptions (P=0.02, r=0.056). Among the inappropriate medication prescriptions, nutraceutical and electrolytes (n=65, 24.71%), cardiovascular drugs (n=61, 23.19%), and antimicrobial drugs (n=55, 20.91%) represented the top three medicine categories in CKD patients. Conclusion The study confirmed that inappropriate medication prescriptions were prevalent in CKD patients. Improving the quality of medication prescriptions in CKD patients is necessary. PMID:27785039

  9. Perceptions of burden of caregiving by informal caregivers of cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akpan-Idiok, Paulina Ackley; Anarado, Agnes Nonye

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cancer care is devastating to families. This research studied the informal caregivers’ perceptions of burden of caregiving to cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. Methods The research adopted a cross-sectioned descriptive design and 210 caregivers providing care to advanced cancer patients were purposively selected. Data were collected using a researcher developed questionnaire and standardized Zarit Burden Interview scale (ZBIS). Data collected were analysed using descriptive and chi-square statistics with the help of SPSS 18.0 and PAS 19.0 softwares. Results The results indicated that the caregivers were in their youthful and active economic age, dominated by females, Christians, spouses, partners and parents. The burden levels experienced by the caregivers were as follows: severe (46.2%), moderate (36.2%) and trivial of no burden (17.6%). The forms of burden experienced were physical (43.4%), psychological (43.3%), financial (41.1%) and social (46.7%), quite frequently and nearly always. Psychological and social forms of burden had the highest weighted score of 228 in terms of magnitude of burden. The result further showed that there was a significant (P = 0.001) and inverse association between caregivers’ burden and the care receivers’ functional ability. The level of burden also increased significantly (P = 0.000) with the duration of care, while there was also a significant (P = 0.01) relationship between caregivers’ experience of burden and their desire to continue caregiving. Conclusion Caregiving role can be enhanced by provision of interventions such as formal education programme on cancer caregiving, oncology, home services along side with transmural care. PMID:25419297

  10. Identification and characterization of CTX-M-15 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clone ST101 in a Hungarian university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Melegh, Szilvia; Schneider, György; Horváth, Marianna; Jakab, Ferenc; Emődy, Levente; Tigyi, Zoltán

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the molecular epidemiology of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates derived from the teaching hospitals of University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary in the time period 2004-2008. Molecular typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of common β-lactamase genes (bla(CTX-M), bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)) and virulence associated traits (hypermucoviscosity, magA, k2a, rmpA, siderophores, type 1 and 3 fimbria, biofilm formation, serum resistance) were performed for 102 isolates. The results showed the presence of three major ciprofloxacin resistant CTX-M-15 producing clones (ST15 n = 69, ST101 n = 10, and ST147 n = 9), of which ST15 was predominant and universally widespread. Considering distribution in time and place, ST101 and ST147 were detected at fewer inpatient units and within a narrower time frame, as compared to ST15. Beside major clones, eleven minor clones were identified, and were shown to harbour the following β-lactamase genes: six clones carried bla(CTX-M), four clones harboured bla(SHV-5) and one clone possessed both bla(CTX-M) and ESBL type bla(SHV). Among the SHV-5 producing K. pneumoniae clones a novel sequence type was found, namely ST1193, which harboured a unique infB allele. Different virulence factor content and peculiar antimicrobial susceptibility profile were characteristic for each clone. In contrast to major clone isolates, which showed high level resistance to ciprofloxacin, minor clone isolates displayed significantly lower MIC values for ciprofloxacin suggesting a role for fluoroquinolones in the dissemination of the major K. pneumoniae clones. This is the first description of the CTX-M-15 producing K. pneumoniae clone ST101 in Hungary.

  11. Nasal carriage rate of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among at National Medical College Teaching Hospital, Birgunj, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shakya, B; Shrestha, S; Mitra, T

    2010-03-01

    Present study was conducted to assess the nasal carriage rate of methicilin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among patients, visitors/patient attendants and healthcare personnel at National Medical College Teaching Hospital, Birgunj, Nepal. A total of 112 nasal swabs (patients: 31, visitors/patient attendants: 61, and healthcare personnel: 20) were subjected to bacteriological investigation following standard protocol. S. aureus isolates were identified by mannitol fermentation and coagulase positivity. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method on Muller-Hinton agar medium. S. aureus was isolated in 14 (12.5%) of participants (M: 11.3%, F: 13.6%). Highest nasal colonization rate was found among healthcare personnel (25.0%) followed by the visitors/patient attendants (13.1%) and the patients (3.2%) (P>0.05). Highest positive rate was observed in the age group d"14 years (33.3%), followed by 15 to 50 years (13.2%) and >50 years (5.6%) (P>0.05). Out of 14 S. aureus isolates, 57.1% were methicillin resistant, prevalence rate of MRSA among total subjects being 7.1%. MRSA prevalence rate were 5.6% and 8.5% in total male and female participants, respectively (P>0.05). Highest MRSA prevalence rate was among health-care personnel (10.0%), followed by visitors/patient attendants (8.2%) and the patients (3.2%) (P>0.05). All MRSA isolates were resistant to Ampicillin, followed by Cephalexin (37.5%), Ciprofloxacin (37.5%), Tetracycline (37.5%), Gentamycin (25.0%), Erythromycin (0.0%) and Vancomycin (0.0%). High rate of nasal MRSA carriage rate found in this study indicates the need for standard infection control to prevent MRSA transmission.

  12. Infective endocarditis in a Finnish teaching hospital: a study on 326 episodes treated during 1980–2004

    PubMed Central

    Heiro, M; Helenius, H; Mäkilä, S; Hohenthal, U; Savunen, T; Engblom, E; Nikoskelainen, J; Kotilainen, P

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate potential changes of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital during the past 25 years. Patients 326 episodes of IE in 303 patients treated during 1980–2004 were evaluated for clinical characteristics and their changes over time. Results The mean age of the patients increased with time (from 47.2 to 54.5 years, p  =  0.003). Twenty‐five (7.7%) episodes were associated with intravenous drug use (IVDU), with a significant increase of these episodes after 1996 (from 0 to 19 (20%), p < 0.001). Viridans streptococci were the most common causative agents of IE during 1980–1994, but after that Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (p  =  0.015). The proportion of IE of the aortic valve decreased during the study (from 30 (49%) to 26 (27%), whereas the proportions of mitral (11 (18%) to 33 (35%) and tricuspid valve IE (0 to 13 (14%) increased correspondingly (p  =  0.001). This was mainly due to more patients with IVDU. Chronic dialysis for renal failure as an underlying condition increased over time (from 0 to 7 (7.4%), p  =  0.015) but no other predisposing conditions changed. Complications such as neurological manifestations and heart failure did not change in frequency, but the incidence of lung emboli increased (from 0% to 10.5%, p < 0.001); 83% of these emboli occurred in patients with IVDU. The proportion of patients requiring surgical treatment and mortality due to IE did not change. Conclusions During these 25 years, the causative agents, affected valves and complications of IE changed to some degree. These changes were mainly attributed to the increase of IVDU‐associated IE. Except for the increase in age, the clinical presentation and outcome in non‐addicts remained substantially unchanged. PMID:16644858

  13. Prevalence of Needlestick Injuries Among Healthcare Workers in the Accident and Emergency Department of a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isara, AR; Oguzie, KE; Okpogoro, OE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are continually exposed to hazards from contact with blood and body fluids of patients in the healthcare setting. Aim: To determine the prevalence of needlestick injuries (NSIs) and associated factors among HCWs in the Accident and Emergency Department of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data were collected using a structured, self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using IBM SPSS version 20. Univariate, bivariate, and binary logistic regression analyses were done. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The prevalence of NSIs 12 months preceding the study was 51.0% (50/98). Doctors 8/10 (80.0%) and nurses 28/40 (70.0%) had the highest occurrence. Recapping of needles 19/50 (38.0%) and patient aggression 13/50 (26.0%) were responsible for most injuries. The majority 31/50 (62.0%) of the injuries were not reported. The uptake of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) was low 11/50 (22.0%). The factors that were significantly associated with NSI include age 30 years and above (odds ratio [OR] =0.28, confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.70), work duration of three years and above (OR = 0.29, CI = 0.11–0.75), and being a nurse (OR = 3.38, CI = 1.49–9.93) or a paramedic (OR = 0.18, CI = 0.06–0.52). Conclusion: The high prevalence of NSIs among the HCWs, especially in doctors and nurses is an indication that HCWs in UBTH are at great risk of contracting blood-borne infections. Efforts should be made to ensure that injuries are reported and appropriate PEP undertaken following NSIs. PMID:27057376

  14. Building a transcontinental affiliation: a new model for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Sostman, H Dirk; Forese, Laura L; Boom, Marc L; Schroth, Lynn; Klein, Arthur A; Mushlin, Alvin I; Hagale, John E; Pardes, Herbert; Girotto, Ronald G; Gotto, Antonio M

    2005-11-01

    The recent affiliation of The Methodist Hospital (TMH) with Weill Medical College (WMC) of Cornell University and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is the first transcontinental primary affiliation between major, not-for-profit academic health centers (AHCs) in the United States. The authors describe the process followed, the issues involved, the initial accomplishments, and the opportunities envisioned. The key enablers of this affiliation were a rapid process, mutual trust based on existing professional relationships, and commitment to the project by Board leadership. Because of their geographic separation, the parties were not competitors in providing clinical care to their regional populations. The affiliation is nonexclusive, but is reciprocally primary in New York and Texas. Members of the TMH medical staff are eligible for faculty appointments at WMC. The principal areas of collaboration will be education, research, quality improvement, information technology, and international program development. The principal challenge has been the physical distance between the parties. Although extensive use of videoconferencing has been successful, personal contact is essential in establishing relationships. External processes impose a slower sequence and tempo of events than some might wish. This new model for AHCs creates exciting possibilities for the tripartite mission of research, education, and patient care. Realizing the potential of these opportunities will require unconstrained ideas and substantial investment of time and other critical resources. Since many consider that AHCs are in economic and cultural crisis, successful development of such possibilities could have importance beyond the collective interests of these three institutions.

  15. Information technology governance domains in hospitals: a case study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Mehraban; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Ahmadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    IT governance is a set of organizational structures ensuring decision-making rights and responsibilities with regard to the organization's IT assets. This qualitative study was carried out to identify the IT governance domains in teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. There were 10 heads of IT departments and 10 hospital directors. Semi structured interviews used for data collection. To analyze the data content analysis was applied. All the interviewees (100%) believed that decisions upon hospital software needs could be made in a decentralized fashion by the IT department of the university. Most of the interviewees (90%) believed that there were policies for logistics and maintenance of networks, purchase and maintenance, standards and general policies in the direction of the policies of the ministry of health and medical education. About 80% of the interviewees believed that the current emphasis of the hospital's IT unit and the hospital management for outsourcing of services were in the format of specialized contracts and under supervision of the university Statistic and IT department. A hospital strategic committee is an official organizational group consisting of hospital executives, heads of IT and multiple functional areas and business units in a hospital. In this committee, "the head of hospital" acts as the director of IT activities and ensures that IT strategies are alignment with the hospital business strategies. PMID:25948446

  16. Strengthening an affiliation without a merger.

    PubMed

    Hegwer, Laura Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Froedtert Health and the Medical College of Wisconsin have created a shared governance structure with joint committees focused on value, IT, marketing, strategic planning, and other areas. A new funds-flow model shifts a percentage of the health system's bottom line to the medical college to support physician recruitment,joint initiatives, academic programs, and a strategic reserve. The strengthened affiliation has enhanced the ability of the organizations to engage in accountable care and population health initiatives, among other benefits.

  17. Strengthening an affiliation without a merger.

    PubMed

    Hegwer, Laura Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Froedtert Health and the Medical College of Wisconsin have created a shared governance structure with joint committees focused on value, IT, marketing, strategic planning, and other areas. A new funds-flow model shifts a percentage of the health system's bottom line to the medical college to support physician recruitment,joint initiatives, academic programs, and a strategic reserve. The strengthened affiliation has enhanced the ability of the organizations to engage in accountable care and population health initiatives, among other benefits. PMID:26665524

  18. Knowledge of Social Affiliations Biases Economic Decisions.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Joel E; Mack, Michael L; Gelman, Bernard D; Preston, Alison R

    2016-01-01

    An individual's reputation and group membership can produce automatic judgments and behaviors toward that individual. Whether an individual's social reputation impacts interactions with affiliates has yet to be demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that during initial encounters with others, existing knowledge of their social network guides behavior toward them. Participants learned reputations (cooperate, defect, or equal mix) for virtual players through an iterated economic game (EG). Then, participants learned one novel friend for each player. The critical question was how participants treated the friends in a single-shot EG after the friend-learning phase. Participants tended to cooperate with friends of cooperators and defect on friends of defectors, indicative of a decision making bias based on memory for social affiliations. Interestingly, participants' explicit predictions of the friends' future behavior showed no such bias. Moreover, the bias to defect on friends of defectors was enhanced when affiliations were learned in a social context; participants who learned to associate novel faces with player faces during reinforcement learning did not show reputation-based bias for associates of defectors during single-shot EG. These data indicate that when faced with risky social decisions, memories of social connections influence behavior implicitly. PMID:27441563

  19. Knowledge of Social Affiliations Biases Economic Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Joel E.; Mack, Michael L.; Gelman, Bernard D.; Preston, Alison R.

    2016-01-01

    An individual’s reputation and group membership can produce automatic judgments and behaviors toward that individual. Whether an individual’s social reputation impacts interactions with affiliates has yet to be demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that during initial encounters with others, existing knowledge of their social network guides behavior toward them. Participants learned reputations (cooperate, defect, or equal mix) for virtual players through an iterated economic game (EG). Then, participants learned one novel friend for each player. The critical question was how participants treated the friends in a single-shot EG after the friend-learning phase. Participants tended to cooperate with friends of cooperators and defect on friends of defectors, indicative of a decision making bias based on memory for social affiliations. Interestingly, participants’ explicit predictions of the friends’ future behavior showed no such bias. Moreover, the bias to defect on friends of defectors was enhanced when affiliations were learned in a social context; participants who learned to associate novel faces with player faces during reinforcement learning did not show reputation-based bias for associates of defectors during single-shot EG. These data indicate that when faced with risky social decisions, memories of social connections influence behavior implicitly. PMID:27441563

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus spa Type t002 Outbreak in Horses and Staff at a Veterinary Teaching Hospital after Its Presumed Introduction by a Veterinarian.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Amir; Masarwa, Samira; Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Gleser, Dan; Kelmer, Gal; Adler, Amos; Carmeli, Yehuda; Schwaber, Mitchell J

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and colonization, involving MRSA strains which differ from common human health care-associated clones, have become serious emerging conditions in equine veterinary hospitals. In 2010, MRSA spa type t535 caused an outbreak involving both horses and personnel in a veterinary teaching hospital in Israel. Since then, surveillance continued, and occasional MRSA isolation occurred. Two years later, MRSA of another spa type, t002, was isolated from a veterinarian and, 3 weeks later, from a horse. The appearance of spa type t002, a common clone in human medicine in Israel, among both personnel and horses, prompted a point-prevalence survey of hospital personnel and hospitalized horses. Fifty-nine staff members (n = 16 equine; n = 43, other) and 14 horses were screened. Ten of 59 staff members (16.9%) and 7 of 14 horses (50%) were MRSA carriers. Among the staff, 44% of large animal department (LAD) personnel, compared with only 7% of non-LAD personnel, were carriers. Isolates from all horses and from 9 of 10 personnel were found to be of MRSA spa type t002. This clone was later isolated from an infected postoperative wound in a hospitalized horse. Measures were taken to contain transmission between horses and personnel, as was done in the previous outbreak, resulting in reduction of transmission and, finally, cessation of cross-transmission between horses and personnel.

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus spa Type t002 Outbreak in Horses and Staff at a Veterinary Teaching Hospital after Its Presumed Introduction by a Veterinarian

    PubMed Central

    Masarwa, Samira; Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Gleser, Dan; Kelmer, Gal; Adler, Amos; Carmeli, Yehuda; Schwaber, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and colonization, involving MRSA strains which differ from common human health care-associated clones, have become serious emerging conditions in equine veterinary hospitals. In 2010, MRSA spa type t535 caused an outbreak involving both horses and personnel in a veterinary teaching hospital in Israel. Since then, surveillance continued, and occasional MRSA isolation occurred. Two years later, MRSA of another spa type, t002, was isolated from a veterinarian and, 3 weeks later, from a horse. The appearance of spa type t002, a common clone in human medicine in Israel, among both personnel and horses, prompted a point-prevalence survey of hospital personnel and hospitalized horses. Fifty-nine staff members (n = 16 equine; n = 43, other) and 14 horses were screened. Ten of 59 staff members (16.9%) and 7 of 14 horses (50%) were MRSA carriers. Among the staff, 44% of large animal department (LAD) personnel, compared with only 7% of non-LAD personnel, were carriers. Isolates from all horses and from 9 of 10 personnel were found to be of MRSA spa type t002. This clone was later isolated from an infected postoperative wound in a hospitalized horse. Measures were taken to contain transmission between horses and personnel, as was done in the previous outbreak, resulting in reduction of transmission and, finally, cessation of cross-transmission between horses and personnel. PMID:26085620

  2. Evaluation of a primary-care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital by a student business group: implementing business training within the curriculum.

    PubMed

    Louisa Poon, W Y; Covington, Jennifer P; Dempsey, Lauren S; Goetgeluck, Scott L; Marscher, William F; Morelli, Sierra C; Powell, Jana E; Rivers, Elizabeth M; Roth, Ira G

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the use of students' business skills in optimizing teaching opportunities, student learning, and client satisfaction in a primary health care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital. Seven veterinary-student members of the local chapter of the Veterinary Business Management Association (VBMA) evaluated the primary-care service at the University of Georgia (UGA) veterinary teaching hospital and assessed six areas of focus: (1) branding and marketing, (2) client experience, (3) staff and staffing, (4) student experience, (5) time management, and (6) standard operating procedures and protocols. For each area of focus, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats were identified. Of the six areas, two were identified as areas in need of immediate improvement, the first being the updating of standard operating protocols and the second being time management and the flow of appointments. Recommendations made for these two areas were implemented. Overall, the staff and students provided positive feedback on the recommended changes. Through such a student-centered approach to improving the quality of their education, students are empowered and are held accountable for their learning environment. The fact that the VBMA functions without a parent organization and that the primary-care service at UGA functions primarily as a separate entity from the specialty services at the College of Veterinary Medicine allowed students to have a direct impact on their learning environment. We hope that this model for advancing business education will be studied and promoted to benefit both veterinary education and business practice within academia. PMID:24531532

  3. Evaluation of a primary-care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital by a student business group: implementing business training within the curriculum.

    PubMed

    Louisa Poon, W Y; Covington, Jennifer P; Dempsey, Lauren S; Goetgeluck, Scott L; Marscher, William F; Morelli, Sierra C; Powell, Jana E; Rivers, Elizabeth M; Roth, Ira G

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the use of students' business skills in optimizing teaching opportunities, student learning, and client satisfaction in a primary health care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital. Seven veterinary-student members of the local chapter of the Veterinary Business Management Association (VBMA) evaluated the primary-care service at the University of Georgia (UGA) veterinary teaching hospital and assessed six areas of focus: (1) branding and marketing, (2) client experience, (3) staff and staffing, (4) student experience, (5) time management, and (6) standard operating procedures and protocols. For each area of focus, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats were identified. Of the six areas, two were identified as areas in need of immediate improvement, the first being the updating of standard operating protocols and the second being time management and the flow of appointments. Recommendations made for these two areas were implemented. Overall, the staff and students provided positive feedback on the recommended changes. Through such a student-centered approach to improving the quality of their education, students are empowered and are held accountable for their learning environment. The fact that the VBMA functions without a parent organization and that the primary-care service at UGA functions primarily as a separate entity from the specialty services at the College of Veterinary Medicine allowed students to have a direct impact on their learning environment. We hope that this model for advancing business education will be studied and promoted to benefit both veterinary education and business practice within academia.

  4. Health-care waste incineration and related dangers to public health: case study of the two teaching and referral hospitals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Njagi, Nkonge A; Oloo, Mayabi A; Kithinji, J; Kithinji, Magambo J

    2012-12-01

    There are practically no low cost, environmentally friendly options in practice whether incineration, autoclaving, chemical treatment or microwaving (World Health Organisation in Health-care waste management training at national level, [2006] for treatment of health-care waste. In Kenya, incineration is the most popular treatment option for hazardous health-care waste from health-care facilities. It is the choice practiced at both Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret. A study was done on the possible public health risks posed by incineration of the segregated hazardous health-care waste in one of the incinerators in each of the two hospitals. Gaseous emissions were sampled and analyzed for specific gases the equipment was designed and the incinerators Combustion efficiency (CE) established. Combustion temperatures were also recorded. A flue gas analyzer (Model-Testos-350 XL) was used to sample flue gases in an incinerator under study at Kenyatta National Hospital--Nairobi and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital--Eldoret to assess their incineration efficiency. Flue emissions were sampled when the incinerators were fully operational. However the flue gases sampled in the study, by use of the integrated pump were, oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, sulphur dioxide and No(x). The incinerator at KNH operated at a mean stack temperature of 746 °C and achieved a CE of 48.1 %. The incinerator at MTRH operated at a mean stack temperature of 811 °C and attained a CE of 60.8 %. The two health-care waste incinerators achieved CE below the specified minimum National limit of 99 %. At the detected stack temperatures, there was a possibility that other than the emissions identified, it was possible that the two incinerators tested released dioxins, furans and antineoplastic (cytotoxic drugs) fumes should the drugs be subjected to incineration in the two units.

  5. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  6. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  7. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  8. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  9. 76 FR 4569 - Market-Based Rate Affiliate Restrictions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ..., fuel procurement or resource planning may not be shared under the market- based rate affiliate..., 75 FR 20796 (Apr. 21, 2010), Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 32,567 (2010). I... affiliates, i.e., affiliates whose power sales are regulated in whole or in part on a market-based rate...

  10. 47 CFR 32.27 - Transactions with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or transferred between a carrier and its affiliate pursuant to a tariff, including a tariff filed.... Non-tariffed assets sold or transferred between a carrier and its affiliate that qualify for... net book cost. (c) Services provided between a carrier and its affiliate pursuant to a...

  11. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. In addition, we are making technical corrections to the regulations governing provider administrative appeals and judicial review; updating the reasonable compensation equivalent (RCE) limits, and revising the methodology for determining such limits, for services furnished by physicians to certain teaching hospitals and hospitals excluded from the IPPS; making regulatory revisions to broaden the specified uses of Medicare Advantage (MA) risk adjustment data and to specify the conditions for release of such risk adjustment data to entities outside of CMS; and making changes to the enforcement procedures for organ transplant centers. We are aligning the reporting and submission timelines for clinical quality measures for the Medicare HER Incentive Program for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) with the reporting and submission timelines for the Hospital IQR Program. In addition, we provide guidance and clarification of certain policies for eligible hospitals and CAHs such as our policy for reporting zero denominators on clinical quality measures and our policy for case threshold exemptions. In this document, we are finalizing two interim final rules with comment period relating to criteria for disproportionate share hospital uncompensated care payments and extensions of temporary changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals and of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital (MDH) Program.

  12. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. In addition, we are making technical corrections to the regulations governing provider administrative appeals and judicial review; updating the reasonable compensation equivalent (RCE) limits, and revising the methodology for determining such limits, for services furnished by physicians to certain teaching hospitals and hospitals excluded from the IPPS; making regulatory revisions to broaden the specified uses of Medicare Advantage (MA) risk adjustment data and to specify the conditions for release of such risk adjustment data to entities outside of CMS; and making changes to the enforcement procedures for organ transplant centers. We are aligning the reporting and submission timelines for clinical quality measures for the Medicare HER Incentive Program for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) with the reporting and submission timelines for the Hospital IQR Program. In addition, we provide guidance and clarification of certain policies for eligible hospitals and CAHs such as our policy for reporting zero denominators on clinical quality measures and our policy for case threshold exemptions. In this document, we are finalizing two interim final rules with comment period relating to criteria for disproportionate share hospital uncompensated care payments and extensions of temporary changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals and of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital (MDH) Program. PMID:25167590

  13. A Survey of the quantity and type of biological aerosols in selected wards of a teaching hospital in Ghazvin

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Akbar; Karimi, Fatemeh; Karimi, Zainab; Rajabi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bioaerosols are agents that can cause infection, allergy or induce other toxic effects in the human body. If the person exposed to such particles is not capable of their destruction or elimination from the body, the established chemical and physiological disorders can result in disease or death. The aim of this study was to assess the concentrations of bioaerosols in several wards of a teaching hospital. Methods Given that gas air-conditioners (split and window types) were used for ventilation in the eye operating room, internal intensive care unit, and the respiratory isolation room, these wards were selected for passive sampling. Sterile plates containing culture medium were exposed for two hours to the wards’ indoor ambient air. After this time, they were transferred to a lab to undergo incubation, colony count, and identification of the microorganisms. The data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 18, and the significance level of less than 0.05 was used. Results Based on our findings, the highest colony-forming bacterial unit was observed 22 cfu/plate/h in the eye operating room and, the highest colony-forming fungal unit was observed 4 cfu/plate/h in the internal intensive care unit. Based on the results of the differential tests, the most prevalent bacteria identified were Staphylococcus epidermidis (75%) in the air of eye operating room and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (52%) in the internal intensive care unit and isolation room. The most prevalent identified fungi in the air of selected wards were related to Alternaria alternata (43%), Aspergillus flavus (24%), Penicillium (36%) and Curvularia (21%) types. Based on Spearman’s correlation test, no significant relationship was observed between the factor of temperature and the number of fungal and bacterial colonies (r = 0.201, p = 0.42; r = −0.197, p = 0.41). Moreover, a meaningful relationship was observed only between the number of individuals and the bacterial colonies present in

  14. Seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus among voluntary counseling and testing clients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Sinku, Yohannes; Gezahegn, Takele; Gashaw, Yalewayiker; Workineh, Meseret; Deressa, Tekalign

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Ethiopia varies with regions, study population, and time. Thus, timely information on HIV epidemiology is critical for the combat of the epidemic. In this study, we aim to update HIV prevalence and risk factors among voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) clients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A total of 2,120 VCT clients’ records from September 2007 to August 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Bivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify significant predictors. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Statistical significance was set at P-value <0.05. Results Of 2,120 VCT clients, 363 (17.1%) were seropositive for HIV. A higher rate of HIV positivity was observed among female clients (20.4%) than that in male clients (14.0%) (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.26–1.98, P=0.00). Widowed (95% CI 10.42–34.92, P=0.00), married (95% CI 3.42–5.94, P=0.00), divorced (95% CI 2.79–5.32, P=0.00), and illiterate (95% CI 2.33–5.47, P=0.00) clients were associated with HIV infection with the odds ratios of 19.07, 4.51, 3.85, and 3.57, respectively. Clients within the age category of 35–49 years (OR 5.03, 95% CI 3.56–7.12, P=0.00) and above the age of 50 years (OR 4.99, 95% CI 2.67–9.34, P=0.00) were more likely to be infected with HIV. Conclusion HIV is still the major concern of public health in the Gondar area as evidenced by our data. Being female, widowed, married, illiterate, and older age were the identified risk factors for HIV infection. Thus, consideration of these factors in future intervention and clinical practice is recommended. PMID:27574468

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among children attending the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, IZ; Mainasara, AS; Erhabor, Osaro; Omojuyigbe, ST; Dallatu, MK; Bilbis, LS; Adias, TC

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human enzyme deficiencies in the world. It is particularly common in populations living in malaria-endemic areas, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. This present study was conducted with the aim of determining the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children visiting the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital for pediatric-related care. The study included 118 children, made up of 77 (65.3%) males and 41 (34.7%) females aged ≤5 years with mean age of 3.26 ± 1.90 years. Randox G6PD quantitative in vitro test screening was used for the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency. Of the 118 children tested, 17 (14.4%) were G6PD-deficient. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency was concentrated predominantly among male children (22.1%). Male sex was significantly correlated with G6PD deficiency among the children studied (r = 7.85, P = 0.01). The highest prevalence occurred among children in the 2- to 5-year age-group. Of the 17 G6PD-deficient children, twelve (70.2%) were moderately deficient, while five (29.4%) were severely deficient. Blood film from G6PD-deficient children indicated the following morphological changes; Heinz bodies, schistocytes, target cells, nucleated red cells, spherocytes, and polychromasia. This present study has shown a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children residing in Sokoto in the northwestern geopolitical zone of Nigeria. The study indicated a male sex bias in the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the children studied. There is a need for the routine screening of children for G6PD deficiency in our environment, to allow for evidence-based management of these children and to ensure the avoidance of food, drugs, and infective agents that can potentially predispose these children to oxidative stress as well as diseases that deplete micronutrients that protect against oxidative stress. There is need to build capacity in our

  16. [Affiliative achievement motivation and non-affiliative achievement motivation of female students].

    PubMed

    Doi, K

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the two dimensional theory of achievement motivation (Doi, 1982) in female students. Doi's motivation scale were administered to 81 female university students, 58 female students of school of nursing and 77 female students of school of English Language, and the Yatabe-Guilford personality inventory was also administered to the first and the second groups. Affiliative achievement motivation and non-affiliative achievement motivation were extracted by principal component analyses and canonical correlation analyses. Non-affiliative achievement motivation was found to be related to personality type: emotional instability and introversion. These findings differ from achievement motivation concepts (Murray, 1938; McClelland, Atkinson, Clark, & Lowell, 1953), that include emotional stability and extraversion.

  17. Oxytocin and social affiliation in humans.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ruth

    2012-03-01

    A conceptual model detailing the process of bio-behavioral synchrony between the online physiological and behavioral responses of attachment partners during social contact is presented as a theoretical and empirical framework for the study of affiliative bonds. Guided by an ethological behavior-based approach, we suggest that micro-level social behaviors in the gaze, vocal, affective, and touch modalities are dynamically integrated with online physiological processes and hormonal response to create dyad-specific affiliations. Studies across multiple attachments throughout life are presented and demonstrate that the extended oxytocin (OT) system provides the neurohormonal substrate for parental, romantic, and filial attachment in humans; that the three prototypes of affiliation are expressed in similar constellations of social behavior; and that OT is stable over time within individuals, is mutually-influencing among partners, and that mechanisms of cross-generation and inter-couple transmission relate to coordinated social behavior. Research showing links between peripheral and genetic markers of OT with concurrent parenting and memories of parental care; between administration of OT to parent and infant's physiological readiness for social engagement; and between neuropeptides and the online synchrony of maternal and paternal brain response in social-cognitive and empathy networks support the hypothesis that human attachment develops within the matrix of biological attunement and close behavioral synchrony. The findings have conceptual implications for the study of inter-subjectivity as well as translational implications for the treatment of social disorders originating in early childhood, such as autism spectrum disorders, or those associated with disruptions to early bonding, such as postpartum depression or child abuse and neglect. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. PMID:22285934

  18. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan-do-check-act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. PMID:24669192

  19. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People’s Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan–do–check–act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. PMID:24669192

  20. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan-do-check-act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety.

  1. Frequency of bacterial agents isolated from patients with nosocomial infection in teaching hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Ali Reza; Najafi, Narges; Hoseini Shirazi, Mohsen; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The antibiotic resistance of nosocomial organisms is rapidly increasing. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of bacterial agents isolated from patients with nosocomial infection. Methods: This study was performed in the different wards of teaching hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (northern Iran). The study population consists of the patients with the symptoms of nosocomial infection admitted in these hospitals in 2012. The patient data (including age, sex, type of infection, type of isolated organisms and their antibiotic susceptibility) were collected and analyzed. Results: The total number of hospitalizations was 57122 and the number of nosocomial infection was 592. The overall prevalence of nosocomial infection was 1.03% that was mostly in Burn unit and intensive care unit. The most common nosocomial infection was wound infection (44.6%) and the most common organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter. Conclusion: Given the increasing numbers of nosocomial infection in this region, especially infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, it is necessary to make a precise reporting and improve the procedures of infection control in hospitals. PMID:25489435

  2. Pain in hospitalized children: A prospective cross-sectional survey of pain prevalence, intensity, assessment and management in a Canadian pediatric teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Elsa M; Boyer, Kristina; Campbell, Fiona A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain is under-recognised and undertreated. Although standards now exist for pain management, it is not known if this has improved care of hospitalized children. OBJECTIVES: To benchmark pain prevalence, pain intensity, pain assessment documentation and pharmacological treatment of pain. The aim was to highlight areas of good practice, identify areas for improvement and inform development of hospital standards, education, future audits and the research agenda. METHODS: The present prospective cross-sectional survey of all medical and surgical inpatient units took place on a single day at the Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, Ontario), a Canadian tertiary and quaternary pediatric hospital. A structured, verbally administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on patient demographics, pain before admission, pain intensity during admission and pain treatment. Charts were reviewed to establish frequency of documented pain assessment, the pain assessment tool used and analgesics given. Subgroup analysis was included for age, sex, visible minority or fluency in English, medical versus surgical services and acute pain service input. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Two hundred forty-one (83%) of the 290 inpatients or their carergivers were interviewed. It was found that 27% of patients usually had pain before admission, and 77% experienced pain during admission. Of these, 23% had moderate or severe pain at interview and 64% had moderate or severe pain sometime in the previous 24 h. Analgesics were largely intermittent and single-agent, although 90% of patients found these helpful. Fifty-eight per cent of those with pain received analgesics in the preceding 24 h but only 25% received regular analgesia. Only 27% of children had any pain score documented in the preceding 24 h. It was concluded that pain was infrequently assessed, yet occurred commonly across all age groups and services and was often moderate or severe. Although effective, analgesic therapy

  3. Antisocial behavior and affiliation with deviant peers.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Hillary J; Toro, Paul A; Urberg, Kathryn A

    2004-06-01

    We examined the associations among gender, antisocial behavior, and peer-group affiliation in a high-risk sample of 401 homeless and matched housed adolescents (139 boys and 262 girls). The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (Version 2.3, 1991; Costello, Edelbrock, Kalas, Kessler, & Klaric, 1982) yielded 2 measures of adolescent antisocial behavior: symptoms of conduct disorder and substance abuse or dependence. Various deviant behaviors of friends were assessed based on adolescent self-report. Results indicated that, for both boys and girls, having many deviant peers was associated with more antisocial behavior, regardless of the number of boys in the peer network. Furthermore, findings suggest that the relation between number of deviant peers and antisocial behavior may be stronger for boys and homeless adolescents than for girls and housed adolescents, respectively. The results of prior studies indicating that antisocial behavior is a function of affiliation with male peers may be due to the higher frequencies of maladaptive behaviors evidenced in boys in normative samples.

  4. Strategic planning and designing of a hospital disaster manual in a tertiary care, teaching, research and referral institute in India

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Shweta; Bhatia, Prateek; Kumar, Ashok; Gupta, A. K.; Ojha, Col. D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As per the “Disaster Management Act, 2005” of India, it is mandatory for government hospitals in India to prepare a disaster plan. This study aimed to prepare a disaster manual of a 1 900 bed tertiary care hospital, in consultation and involvement of all concerned stakeholders. METHODS: A committee of members from hospital administration, clinical, diagnostic and supportive departments worked on an initial document prepared according to the Act and gave their inputs to frame a final disaster manual. RESULTS: The prepared departmental standard operating procedures involved 116 people (doctors and paramedical staff), and were then synchronized, in 12 committee meetings, to produce the final hospital disaster manual. CONCLUSIONS: The present disaster manual is one of the few comprehensive plans prepared by the stakeholders of a government hospital in India, who themselves form a part of the disaster response team. It also helped in co-ordinated conduction of mock drills. PMID:25215145

  5. Hospital structure and consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, G V

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between hospital structural characteristics and patient satisfaction with hospital care. Teaching hospitals and private hospitals were expected to receive higher ratings of patient satisfaction than were nonteaching and government-controlled hospitals, because they generally are reputed to be technologically superior. Results show that, in general, most patients are satisfied with their hospital stays, but they are clearly more dissatisfied with their stays in teaching hospitals. Although a number of other correlates of patient satisfaction with the hospital stay are identified, no measure succeeds in reducing to insignificance the strong relationship between teaching status and dissatisfaction. Some suggestions are made as to why teaching hospital receive relatively poor evaluations from their patients. PMID:7228714

  6. Prevalence and characterization of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from companion animals and environment in the veterinary teaching hospital in Zambia, Africa.

    PubMed

    Youn, Jung-Ho; Park, Yong Ho; Hang'ombe, Bernard; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2014-03-01

    The Republic of Zambia consists of only one veterinary teaching school at the University of Zambia (UNZA) where students and veterinarians are exposed to many bacterial pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP). The aim of this study was the characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of eleven SA and 48 SP isolates from the veterinary hospitals' in- and outpatients and the environment. No isolate was resistant to cefoxitin by disk diffusion test and the corresponding resistance gene mecA was not found. In contrast, the resistance rates of SA to penicillin (63.6%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (36.4%) and SP to penicillin (52.1%) and tetracycline (25.0%) were the highest. A variety of sequence types (STs) without a predominant type including numerous novel types were determined, especially for SP (39.6%). The spa typing provided a clonal assignment for all SAs (100%) and 24 SPs (50%) with three and two novel types, respectively. This study has provided an overview of SA and SP in the veterinary teaching hospital at UNZA. However, for a better understanding of these species regarding pathogenesis and transmission, further studies on the prevalence and characterization of SA and SP from veterinary staff, pet owners, and farm animals in Zambia is needed.

  7. Information Technology Governance Domains in Hospitals: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehraban; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Ahmadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    IT governance is a set of organizational structures ensuring decision-making rights and responsibilities with regard to the organization’s IT assets. This qualitative study was carried out to identify the IT governance domains in teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. There were 10 heads of IT departments and 10 hospital directors. Semi structured interviews used for data collection. To analyze the data content analysis was applied. All the interviewees (100%) believed that decisions upon hospital software needs could be made in a decentralized fashion by the IT department of the university. Most of the interviewees (90%) believed that there were policies for logistics and maintenance of networks, purchase and maintenance, standards and general policies in the direction of the policies of the ministry of health and medical education. About 80% of the interviewees believed that the current emphasis of the hospital’s IT unit and the hospital management for outsourcing of services were in the format of specialized contracts and under supervision of the university Statistic and IT department. A hospital strategic committee is an official organizational group consisting of hospital executives, heads of IT and multiple functional areas and business units in a hospital. In this committee, “the head of hospital” acts as the director of IT activities and ensures that IT strategies are alignment with the hospital business strategies. PMID:25948446

  8. Short-term and one-year outcome of infective endocarditis in adult patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital during 1980–2004

    PubMed Central

    Heiro, Maija; Helenius, Hans; Hurme, Saija; Savunen, Timo; Engblom, Erik; Nikoskelainen, Jukka; Kotilainen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    Background Previous studies on factors predicting the prognosis of infective endocarditis have given somewhat conflicting results. Our aim was to define the factors predicting the outcome of patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital. Methods A total of 326 episodes of infective endocarditis in 303 patients treated during 1980–2004 were evaluated for short-term and 1-year outcome and complications. Results Infection of 2 native valves and the occurrence of neurological complications, peripheral emboli, or heart failure significantly predicted both in-hospital and 1-year mortality, while age ≥65 years or the presence of a major criterion or vegetation on echocardiography predicted death within 1 year. A significant trend was observed between the level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) on admission and both the short-term and 1-year outcome. In the patients who had CRP values ≥100 mg/l on admission, the hazard ratio for in-hospital death was 2.9-fold and the hazard ratio for 1-year death was 3.9-fold as compared to those with lower CRP values. Male sex and age < 64 years significantly predicted a need for both in-hospital and 1-year surgery, as did the development of heart failure or the presence of a major criterion or vegetation on echocardiography. Peripheral emboli were associated with a need for in-hospital surgery, while Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative agent or infection of 2 native valves predicted a need for surgery within 1 year from admission. Conclusion Some of the factors (e.g. heart failure, neurological complications, peripheral emboli) predicting a poor prognosis and/or need for surgery were the same observed in previous studies. A new finding was that high CRP values (≥100 mg/l) on admission significantly predicted both short-term and 1-year mortality. PMID:17640339

  9. Evaluation of antioxidant status of female diabetic patients in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Anambra State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okuonghae, E O P; Onyenekwe, C C; Ahaneku, J E; Ukibe, N R; Nwani, P O; Asomugha, A L; Osakue, N O; Aidomeh, F; Awalu, C C

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become an onerous disease to developing countries such as Nigeria. Rapid acceptance of urbanisation and sedentary life styles pose an encumbrance to its prevention and management. Increased oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus has been implicated as a culprit in perpetuating antioxidant depletion and diabetic complications in diabetes mellitus individuals. This study aims to evaluate the level of antioxidant status in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) female participants visiting the out-patient diabetic clinic of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria. A total of 86 participants aged 51±10 years were recruited for this study. The test group consists of 43 already confirmed type 2 diabetes mellitus females, while the control group consists of 43 apparently healthy females. The test subjects were further subgrouped into good and poor glycaemic control groups, using a cut-off of <7% for HbA1c. Whole blood was collected from participants and aliquoted into specified sample containers for analysis of the following parameters: random blood glucose (RBG; mg/dL), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c; %), glutathione reductase (GR; U/L) and total antioxidant status (TAS; mmol/L). Results from this study showed that the mean differences in RBG (197.74±49.29 mg/dL) and HbA1c (9.86±1.44%) were significantly higher in the test group compared to the control group RBG (104.79±11.33 mg/dL) and HbA1c (5.21±1.23%) (P<0.05). The mean differences of GR (45.81±20.45 U/L) and TAS (1.81±1.04 mmol/L) were significantly lower in the test group compared to the control group GR (61.21±14.34 U/L) and TAS (2.73±2.08 mmol/L) (P<0.05). The poor glycaemic test group was observed to have the highest RBG (200.34±50.4 mg/dL) and HbA1c (10.23±1.33%) compared both to good glycaemic test group RBG (186.38±45.39 mg/dL), HbA1c (6.54±0.45%) and non-diabetic group RBG (104.79±11.33 mg/dL) and HbA1c (5.21±1.23%) (P<0.05). Glutathione

  10. Impact of implementing an Internal Bed Regulation Committee on administrative and care indicators at a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Luciane Cristine Ribeiro; Juliani, Carmen Maria Casquel Monti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare hospital indicators before and after implementing an Internal Bed Regulation Committee at a reference hospital. Methods It is an quantitative, evaluation, exploratory, descriptive and cross-sectional research. The data was gathered from the hospital administrative reports for the period 2008-2013, provided by the Information Technology Center of the Complexo FAMEMA. Results The indicators improved after implementation of the Internal Bed Regulation Committee. Conclusion The individuals involved in the process acknowledged the improvement. It is necessary to carry on the regulatory actions, especially in a comprehensive and complex healthcare system, such as the brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde. PMID:25993075

  11. A financial career in a hospital management company.

    PubMed

    Herr, H T

    1980-01-01

    Concurrent with the recent development of the hospital financial manager's position has been the emergence of investor-owned multifacility hospital management companies. Many of these companies had their beginnings in the late 1960s. One such company is Hospital Affiliates International, formed in 1967 and now providing management to approximately 150 hospitals. About 50 of these facilities are owned by Hospital Affiliates, and 100 are managed for other, primarily community, nonprofit and governmental organizations. Development of investor-owned management companies has progressed to the extent that as of September 30, 1979 they provided management to approximately 330 hospitals in the United States and in foreign countries.

  12. Epidemiology of Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms in a Teaching Hospital in Oman: A One-Year Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Balkhair, Abdullah; Al-Farsi, Yahya M.; Al-Muharrmi, Zakariya; Al-Rashdi, Raiya; Al-Jabri, Mansoor; Neilson, Fatma; Al-Adawi, Sara S.; El-Beeli, Marah

    2014-01-01

    Background. Antimicrobial resistance is increasingly recognized as a global challenge. A few studies have emerged on epidemiology of multidrug resistant organisms in tertiary care settings in the Arabian Gulf. Aim. To describe the epidemiology of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, a tertiary hospital in Oman. Methods. A retrospective review of MDRO records has been conducted throughout the period from January 2012 till December 2012. Organisms were identified and tested by an automated identification and susceptibility system, and the antibiotic susceptibility testing was confirmed by the disk diffusion method. Results. Out of the total of 29,245 admissions, there have been 315 patients registered as MDRO patients giving an overall prevalence rate of 10.8 (95% CI 9.3, 12.4) MDRO cases per 1000 admissions. In addition, the prevalence rate of MDRO isolates was 11.2 (95% CI 9.7, 12.9) per 1000 admissions. Overall, increasing trends in prevalence rates of MDRO patients and MDRO isolates were observed throughout the study period. Conclusion. Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging challenge in Oman. Continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility and strict adherence to infection prevention guidelines are essential to prevent proliferation of MDRO. Along such quest, stringent antibiotic prescription guidelines are needed in the country. PMID:24526881

  13. Factors associated with success of vaginal birth after one caesarean section (VBAC) at three teaching hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vaginal delivery after previous one cesarean section for a non recurring indication has been described by several authors as safe and having a success rate of 60–80%. Hence many centers are offering VBAC for candidates leaving the century old dictum of once cesarean always cesarean. But predicting success of VBAC after trial of labor (TOL) is still a difficult task due to the lack of a validated prediction tool. Studies on predictors of success are few and most of them conducted in developed countries and difficult to generalize. Therefore assessing factors associated with successful VBAC is very important to for counseling mothers while offering VBAC. The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with successful VBAC in three teaching Hospitals in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Methods A case control study was conducted to compare the factors associated with successful VBAC in teaching hospitals in Addis Ababa in one year period. The cases were those successfully delivered vaginally and the controls were those with failed VBAC and delivered by caesarean section. The sample size of the cases was 101vaginal deliveries and the controls were 103 failed VBAC patients which made the case to control ratio of 1:1. Result In this study independent factors determining successful VBAC were, history of successful VBAC in the past, rupture of membrane at admission, and cervical dilatation of more than 3cm at admission. Presence of meconium, malposition and history of stillbirth were associated with failed VBAC. Factors like maternal age, past caesarean indications, inter delivery interval, and birth weight were not found to be significant determinants of success. The most common reason for repeat cesarean section for after trial of labor was labour dysfunction because of absence of a policy for augmentation on a scarred uterus in these hospitals. Conclusion It is possible to prepare a decision tool on the success of VBAC by taking important past and present

  14. A three-state dynamical model for religious affiliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David H.

    2015-02-01

    In the last century the western world has seen a rapid increase in the number of people describing themselves as affiliated with no religious group. We construct a set of models using coupled differential equations in which members of a society can be in one of three groups; religiously committed, religiously affiliated or religiously not affiliated. These models are then used to analyse post World War II census data for Northern Ireland.

  15. A questionnaire-based survey to ascertain the views of clinicians regarding rational use of antibiotics in teaching hospitals of Kolkata

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Dattatreyo; Sen, Sukanta; Begum, Sabnam Ara; Adhikari, Anjan; Hazra, Avijit; Das, Anup Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to assess the views of clinicians in teaching hospitals of Kolkata regarding the use of antibiotics in their own hospitals, focusing on perceived misuse, reasons behind such misuse and feasible remedial measures. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 clinicians from core clinical disciplines was approached in six teaching hospitals of Kolkata through purposive sampling. A structured, validated questionnaire adopted from published studies and modified to suit the responding population was completed by consenting respondents through face-to-face interaction with a single interviewer. Respondents were free to leave out questions they did not wish to answer. Results: Among 130 participating clinicians (65% of approached), all felt that antibiotic misuse occurs in various hospital settings; 72 (55.4% of the respondents) felt it was a frequent occurrence and needed major rectification. Cough and cold (78.5%), fever (65.4%), and diarrhea (62.3%) were perceived to be the commonest conditions of antibiotic misuse. About half (50.76%) felt that oral preparations were more misused compared to injectable or topical ones. Among oral antibiotics, co-amoxiclav (66.9%) and cefpodoxime (63.07%) whereas among parenteral ones, ceftriaxone and other third generation cephalosporins (74.6%) followed by piperacillin-tazobactam (61.5%) were selected as the most misused ones. Deficient training in rational use of medicines (70.7%) and absence of institutional antibiotic policy (67.7%) were listed as the two most important predisposing factors. Training of medical students and interns in rational antibiotic use (78.5%), implementation of antibiotic policy (76.9%), improvement in microbiology support (70.7%), and regular surveillance on this issue (64.6%) were cited as the principal remedial measures. Conclusions: Clinicians acknowledge that the misuse of antibiotics is an important problem in their hospitals. A system of clinical audit of antibiotic usage

  16. [Follow-up of cancer treatment activities at the University Teaching Hospital in Dijon: the value of data from standardized discharge summaries].

    PubMed

    Titton, Monique; Binquet, Christine; Vourc'h, Michèle; Martin, Laurent; Girodon, François; Quantin, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This work aimed to assess the feasibility of coalescing data sources to follow up on the management and delivery of cancer patient care using both anatomical-pathological data and a medical record information system based on the "Medicalisation of Information Systems Programme" which is administered by an independent source. The study group was comprised of all hospitalised cancer patients in the Dijon university teaching hospital during the first quarter of 2001. Data were obtained from a cross-analysis of medical records with pathological information and standard discharge files. A manual validation was then carried out to ensure a valid synthesis. Overall, 1377 abstracts were created and selected for cancer patients hospitalized for the first time. Among these, 60% were validated by the compatibility and concordance of data between the medical record discharge issued and the pathological record, less than 5% were identified only through looking at the anatomical-pathological data in the medical record, and 24% identified by exploring the patient discharge forms. These results demonstrate the difficulty and challenge as well as the benefits of crossing multiple sources of patient information and combine them to more thoroughly and appropriately assess the hospital's activity for caring for cancer patients.

  17. [Blood exposure accidents: Knowledge, attitudes and practices of nursing and midwifery students at the Bobo-Dioulasso teaching hospital (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Zoungrana, J; Yaméogo, T M; Kyelem, C G; Aba, Y T; Sawadogo, A; Millogo, A

    2014-01-01

    Blood exposure accidents are the source of major risks of contamination of healthcare personnel. The objective of this study was to describe the knowledge of standard precautions, and the attitudes and practices of nursing and midwifery students in relation to this accidental exposure. This cross-sectional survey, conducted in November 2011, was based on voluntary anonymous questionnaires completed by students working in the medical ward of the Bobo-Dioulasso teaching hospital. Of the 275 students asked to participate, 219 (92.8%) completed the questionnaire: 138 (63,0%) were student nurses and 81 (37.0%) student midwives. Their mean age was 27.9 ± 5 years. Among them, 64 (29.1%) acknowledged accidental exposure to blood during treatment performed as part of their hospital work. Only 30 of these 64 cases were reported at the time. The standard precautions for the prevention of these accidents were known to 131 students (59.8%); 58.4% always wore gloves for invasive procedures; 74.9% reported that the syringe container was "always" or "often" used. The needles used were "always" or "often" recapped before disposal in only 39.1% of cases. Only 11.0% were fully vaccinated against hepatitis B. Blood exposure accidents were not uncommon among these students and their knowledge of the standard precautions and actions to take in case of an accident is insufficient. These data show the need for further training and awareness campaigns to improve these hospital practices. PMID:24922618

  18. Characteristics and determinants of adult patients with acute poisoning attending the accident and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Khudair, I F; Jassim, Z; Hanssens, Y; Alsaad, W A

    2013-09-01

    Data about etiologic and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar are lacking. This prospective observational study was undertaken to analyze characteristics and possible determinants of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar. During 2010, 18,073 patients attended the emergency department of Hamad General Hospital, a teaching hospital in Qatar. Out of them, 599 (3.3%) patients were diagnosed as "poisoning case" with either chemical or pharmaceutical substances. The prevalence rate of poisoning incidence was 35.3/100,000 population. Seven patients died, corresponding with a case-fatality rate of 0.39/1000. The majority were male (65%) and the mean age was 34 years. The poisons involved were mainly chemicals (61.6%) and pharmaceuticals (38.4%). Female, mainly single, suffered more intentional poisoning compared to male. Of the patients aged 60 years and above (7.2%), the majority (95.3%) suffered unintentional poisoning with pharmaceuticals; 56% with warfarin, 12% with digoxin and 7% with insulin. Multivariate analysis shows that female gender, single status, younger than 35 years of age, being poisoned by pharmaceutical products, and the need for hospitalization are significant determinants for acute intentional poisoning after adjusting all other possible covariates. The findings of this study can be used to establish awareness and prophylactic campaigns in Qatar.

  19. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Poznik, G David; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Allentoft, Morten E; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D; Stafford, Thomas W; Meltzer, David J; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-07-23

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on an initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans. In order to resolve Kennewick Man's ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ∼1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including for the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome-wide data are available for comparison, several seem to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genome-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia.

  20. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Poznik, G David; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Allentoft, Morten E; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D; Stafford, Thomas W; Meltzer, David J; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-07-23

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on an initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans. In order to resolve Kennewick Man's ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ∼1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including for the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome-wide data are available for comparison, several seem to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genome-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia. PMID:26087396

  1. The Ancestry and Affiliations of Kennewick Man

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Poznik, G. David; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; de León, Marcia Ponce; Allentoft, Morten E.; Moltke, Ida; Jónsson, Hákon; Valdiosera, Cristina; Malhi, Ripan S.; Orlando, Ludovic; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Meltzer, David J.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2016-01-01

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon-dated to 8340–9200 calibrated years BP1. His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and legal controversy. Based on initial study of cranial morphology it was asserted that Kennewick Man was neither Native American nor closely related to the Claimant Plateau tribes of the Pacific Northwest, who claimed ancestral relationship and requested repatriation under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The morphological analysis was important to judicial decisions that Kennewick Man was not Native American and that therefore NAGPRA did not apply. Instead of repatriation, additional studies of the remains were permitted2. Subsequent craniometric analysis affirmed Kennewick Man to be more closely related to circumpacific groups such as the Ainu and Polynesians than he is to modern Native Americans2. In order to resolve Kennewick Man’s ancestry and affiliations, we have sequenced his genome to ~1× coverage and compared it to worldwide genomic data including the Ainu and Polynesians. We find that Kennewick Man is closer to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Among the Native American groups for whom genome wide data is available for comparison, several appear to be descended from a population closely related to that of Kennewick Man, including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), one of the five tribes claiming Kennewick Man. We revisit the cranial analyses and find that, as opposed to genomic-wide comparisons, it is not possible on that basis to affiliate Kennewick Man to specific contemporary groups. We therefore conclude based on genetic comparisons that Kennewick Man shows continuity with Native North Americans over at least the last eight millennia. PMID:26087396

  2. Updates on the Epidemiology and Pattern of Traumatic Maxillofacial Injuries in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital: A 12-Month Prospective Cohort In-Hospital Outcome Study

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Adeola Adenike; Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Aladelusi, Timothy Olukunle; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have been undertaken in Nigeria on maxillofacial trauma. However, only a few have considered both the skeletal and soft tissue injuries (in general) involving all the aspects of the maxillofacial region or considered other etiological sources of trauma apart from road traffic crashes. Fewer still have reviewed the outcome of management of facial injuries in our low-resource environment. This study sets out to examine the recent trends in both the clinical and epidemiological patterns of all facial injuries from all causes seen in a low-resource practice of a developing country. It also assessed the in-hospital treatment outcomes, and the levels of the patients' satisfaction with treatment received in this setting. Over a 12-month period, the clinical records of consecutive patients who were evaluated and treated for maxillofacial injuries in our unit were prospectively acquired, entered into predesigned forms and subsequently analyzed. There were 259 patients (79.5% males) during the study period. The mean age was 32.21( ± 16.588) years. Overall, motor bike crashes, 42.1%, were the commonest source of these traumas; and armed robbery was the commonest form (69.0%) of assault. Mandibular fractures were the commonest maxillofacial fractures (37.8%) whereas head injury had the highest frequency among the associated injuries (71.4%). Closed reduction and immobilization was deployed in 88.0% of those who had treatment and majority was satisfied with the esthetic outcome of the treatment received. Mean length of hospital stay was 12.6 ( ± 4.423) days. Maxillofacial trauma poses a significant socioeconomic burden on affected individuals in this study population. This is made worse by the presence of associated injuries in the other body systems. More local studies on the outcome of management of maxillofacial trauma will improve the available literature in this region. PMID:25709753

  3. Prevalence of CTX-M-Type and PER Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Among Klebsiella spp. Isolated From Clinical Specimens in the Teaching Hospital of Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Atena; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Moniri, Rezvan; Zibaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) is one of the most important mechanisms of resistance to β-lactams especially among Enterobacteriaceae family including Klebsiella spp. Different types of extended-spectrum β-lactamases including CTX-M-type and PER enzymes are identified among gram negative bacteria. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M-type and PER extended-spectrum β-lactamases among Klebsiella spp. isolated from clinical specimens in the teaching hospital of Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods: One hundred Klebsiella spp. were isolated from clinical specimens of hospitalized patients at Shahid-Beheshti hospital from December 2012 to November 2013. Disk diffusion method was used to determine the susceptibility of these isolates to 14 different antimicrobial agents; disks were purchased from MAST company (United Kingdom). The phenotypic double disk synergy confirmatory test was used to screen the isolates to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase. DNAs of isolates were extracted using boiling method and PCR assay was used to characterize the blaCTX-M type and blaPER genes. The purified PCR products were sent to Macrogen research company (Korea) for sequencing. Results: Of the total 100 Klebsiella isolates, %93 was susceptible to imipenem. Resistance to ampicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, aztreonam and cefotaxime was (92%), (67%), (65%), (64%) and (59%), respectively. The phenotypic confirmatory test (PCT) confirmed that 35% (n = 35) of the isolates were ESBL-producing Klebsiella strains. The prevalence of blaCTX-M type and blaRER genes among Klebsiella isolates were 28% (n = 28) and 9% (n = 9), respectively. Conclusions: The prevalence of ESBL-producing Klebsiella strains in Shahid-Beheshti hospital in Kashan has increased. The study concluded that there was a high prevalence of the blaCTX-M type gene among ESBL positive isolates. PMID:27247786

  4. The barriers to accessing primary care resulting in hospital presentation for exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a large teaching hospital in London.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Marium; Khachi, Hasanin

    2016-08-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) account direct costs of £1 billion each per year in the United Kingdom (UK). A national review of asthma deaths found that a significant proportion of patients die without seeking medical assistance or before emergency medical care could be provided. This study aims to establish the pathway that patients undertake to access care in the lead up to an accident and emergency (A&E) attendance and/or inpatient admission. Patients attending A&E and/or following an inpatient admission due to an exacerbation of asthma or COPD were reviewed by a specialist respiratory pharmacist during weekday working hours. Over a one-year period, 920 (224 asthma and 696 COPD) presentations for exacerbation of asthma and COPD were reviewed. Although the majority of the patients were registered with a general practitioner (GP), less than 50% received medical attention from their GP and/or had an active intervention prior to presenting to hospital. These findings correlate with those found in the national review of asthma deaths. At a time of increasing demands on healthcare resources, these results pose the question of how we can better triage patients to appropriate care settings to minimise unscheduled care and improve patient outcomes. PMID:27492527

  5. Manpower and Training Survey of Hospitals in Region 3, New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital and Health Planning Council of Metropolitan New Jersey, Inc., Newark.

    A survey was made in 1969 through interviews and questionnaires administered to hospital personnel directors to give health planners an indication of the health manpower needs and the existing hospital based or affiliated training programs. Areas of concern were accreditation, medical school affiliation, training programs, nursing home…

  6. Control and Affiliation: A Two Dimensional Approach to Relational Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolhuizen, James H.

    Interpersonal behavior has been observed in a number of studies, and yet the two relational issues of control and affiliation are commonly reflected in all of them. Relational control includes such behaviors as dominance, assertiveness, retiring, and following, while relational affiliation includes involvement, acceptance, friendliness, and…

  7. Senior Service Centers: A Comparison of Affiliated and Nonaffiliated Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Alan B.; Alessi, Hunter Downing

    2000-01-01

    The authors divided 275 elderly volunteers into 2 groups (affiliated and non-affiliated participants) and examined demographic, emotional, and practical issues that affect elderly people. There were significant differences between the groups on issues of loneliness, nutrition, and overall quality of life. (Contains 20 references and 3 tables.)…

  8. Factors Affecting Affiliate Station Loyalty towards Broadcast Television Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Carolyn A.

    1996-01-01

    Examines factors that may influence future ties between television networks and their affiliate stations. Surveys by mail affiliate general managers for the three commercial networks, asking programming questions and questions about level of loyalty to the networks. Finds that organization factors appear to be more essential in network-affiliate…

  9. Cognitive Effects of Greek Affiliation in College: Additional Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascarella, Ernest T.; Flowers, Lamont; Whitt, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research published in this journal found broad-based negative effects of Greek affiliation on standardized measures of cognitive development after 1 year of college. Following the same sample, and employing essentially the same research design and analytic model, the present study found that the negative effects of Greek affiliation were…

  10. Developmental Psychology and the Biophilia Hypothesis: Children's Affiliation with Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews literature on biophilia hypothesis that children have fundamental, genetically based propensity to affiliate with other living organisms. Identifies three concerns: (1) genetic basis of biophilia; (2) existence of seemingly negative affiliations with nature; and (3) quality of supporting evidence. Presents structural-developmental approach…

  11. 17 CFR 50.52 - Exemption for swaps between affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affiliate counterparties is located in the European Union, Japan, or Singapore, the following may satisfy... between the eligible affiliate counterparty located in the European Union, Japan, or Singapore and an... Singapore, the requirements of paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section shall not apply to the eligible...

  12. 13 CFR 121.103 - How does SBA determine affiliation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... regulations found at 29 CFR 2510.3-101(d); (ii) Employee benefit or pension plans established and maintained... in fact separate. (g) Affiliation based on the newly organized concern rule. Affiliation may arise... receives one contract, SBA will determine compliance with the three awards in two years rule for...

  13. 14 CFR 223.25 - List of affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false List of affiliates. 223.25 Section 223.25 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS FREE AND REDUCED-RATE TRANSPORTATION International Travel § 223.25 List of affiliates. (a)...

  14. 12 CFR 563.41 - Transactions with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... means “unimpaired capital and unimpaired surplus,” as defined in 12 CFR 560.93(b)(11). (6) 12 CFR 223.3...-OPERATIONS Operation and Structure § 563.41 Transactions with affiliates. (a) Scope. (1) This section... affiliates. (2) For the purposes of this section, “savings association” is defined at section 3 of...

  15. Behavioral Intent of Power and Affiliation: Implications for Functional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag, John W.; Kemp, Suzanne E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes that power/control and affiliation may be valid functions of some behaviors and should be considered in a functional behavior analysis of maladaptive behavior in students. Suggestions are offered for school-based manipulations to determine whether power/control and affiliation are relevant functions in given situations.…

  16. 17 CFR 250.43 - Sales to affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sales to affiliates. 250.43... Financial Transactions 2 § 250.43 Sales to affiliates. (a) General provisions. No registered holding company... to any sale of securities or utility assets or any other interest in any business in an...

  17. 75 FR 72871 - Survey of Information Sharing Practices With Affiliates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Survey of Information Sharing Practices With Affiliates AGENCY: Office of... collection. Title of Proposal: Survey of Information Sharing Practices with Affiliates. OMB Number: 1550-0121... Agencies will gather information by means of a Survey to be completed by financial institutions and...

  18. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations (continued) § 1.199-7 Expanded... the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated group (EAG) are treated as...

  19. 47 CFR 43.21 - Transactions with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... calendar year; and (2) A report of the actual use of network plant investment for the prior calendar year...) REPORTS OF COMMUNICATION COMMON CARRIERS AND CERTAIN AFFILIATES § 43.21 Transactions with affiliates. (a... the responsible accounting officer. A copy of each annual report shall be as retained in the...

  20. 47 CFR 43.21 - Transactions with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... calendar year; and (2) A report of the actual use of network plant investment for the prior calendar year...) REPORTS OF COMMUNICATION COMMON CARRIERS AND CERTAIN AFFILIATES § 43.21 Transactions with affiliates. (a... the responsible accounting officer. A copy of each annual report shall be as retained in the...

  1. Religious Minorities and Persistence at a Systemic Religiously Affiliated University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Todd A.; Rice, N. Dewaine

    2009-01-01

    There is paucity in the professional literature regarding the religious minority in religiously affiliated colleges and universities. This exploratory study analyzed one conservative private religiously affiliated university and the persistence rates of both the religious majority and religious minority. Crosstabs and chi-square analysis indicated…

  2. 14 CFR 223.25 - List of affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false List of affiliates. 223.25 Section 223.25 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS FREE AND REDUCED-RATE TRANSPORTATION International Travel § 223.25 List of affiliates. (a)...

  3. 14 CFR 223.25 - List of affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false List of affiliates. 223.25 Section 223.25 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS FREE AND REDUCED-RATE TRANSPORTATION International Travel § 223.25 List of affiliates. (a)...

  4. 14 CFR 223.25 - List of affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false List of affiliates. 223.25 Section 223.25 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS FREE AND REDUCED-RATE TRANSPORTATION International Travel § 223.25 List of affiliates. (a)...

  5. 14 CFR 223.25 - List of affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false List of affiliates. 223.25 Section 223.25 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS FREE AND REDUCED-RATE TRANSPORTATION International Travel § 223.25 List of affiliates. (a)...

  6. 78 FR 65765 - National Academic Affiliations Council Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... AFFAIRS National Academic Affiliations Council Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Academic Affiliations Council (NAAC) will be held on November 14-15, 2013, in the Office of Academic... Council is to advise the Secretary on matters affecting partnerships between VA and its...

  7. Implementing an Online Reporting System in the Anatomical Pathology Department of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in India: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishna, Kedar; Correa, Marjorie; Thounaojam, Deepak; Raj, Tony D. S.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a case study in designing, developing, and implementing a web-enabled reporting application for the anatomical pathology (histopathology) department of a tertiary care teaching hospital in India. The article describes workflows, requirements assessment, and implementation methods that the investigators adopted for deploying the solution. The primary focus of the study was to demonstrate the requirements assessment performed, the strategies adopted, and the challenges encountered during the development and implementation. The study demonstrates a successful deployment as well as successful adoption of healthcare information technology by the end users. Factors that played a crucial role in adoption included the combination of people, processes, and technology. The lessons learned from this study would help application developers design efficient systems that suit the requirements of the end users while keeping in mind the ever-changing need for workflows and scalability in a developing country. PMID:23861673

  8. An audit on the knowledge, beliefs and attitudes about the uses and side-effects of antibiotics among outpatients attending 2 teaching hospitals in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, K; Al-Azzam, S; Alhusban, A; Mukattash, T; Al-Zubaidy, S; Alomari, N; Khader, Y

    2013-05-01

    This study aimedto assess general knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of people towards the use of antibiotics. Individuals referring to the outpatient pharmacies of 2 major teaching hospitals in the north of Jordan completed a self-administered, validated questionnaire. A total of 1091 individuals (56.8% males) participated in the study. Of these, 20.1% of the participants stated that antibiotics were used for bacterial infections, while 18.3% thought they were used for viral infections and 43.6% for mixed bacterial/viral infections. The average knowledge score of the participants about antibiotic uses and side-effects was low. Middle-aged participants and those with an education beyond high school had significantly higher knowledge scores about antibiotics use. Almost 75% of the participants disagreed that antibiotics could be given without a prescription.

  9. In Vitro Activities of Ceftazidime-Avibactam and Aztreonam-Avibactam against 372 Gram-Negative Bacilli Collected in 2011 and 2012 from 11 Teaching Hospitals in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Feifei; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wang, Zhanwei; Nichols, Wright W.; Testa, Raymond; Li, Henan; Chen, Hongbin; He, Wenqiang; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam, aztreonam-avibactam, and comparators were tested by reference broth microdilution against 372 nonrepetitive Gram-negative bacilli (346 unselected plus 26 selected meropenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae isolates) collected from 11 teaching hospitals in China in 2011 and 2012. Meropenem-nonsusceptible isolates produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs; e.g., CTX-M-14/3), AmpCs (e.g., CMY-2), and/or carbapenemases (e.g., KPC-2 and NDM-1). Avibactam potentiated the activity of ceftazidime against organisms with combinations of ESBLs, AmpCs, and KPC-2. Aztreonam-avibactam was active against all β-lactamase producers (including producers of NDM-1 and IMP-4/8) except blaOXA-containing Acinetobacter baumannii and some Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. PMID:24342639

  10. Differences in medical error risk among nurses working two- and three-shift systems at teaching hospitals: a six-month prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Masaya; Hiro, Hisanori; Kakinuma, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Mika; Kamata, Naoki; Miyaoka, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Shift work, including night work, has been regarded as a risk factor for medical safety. However, few studies have investigated the difference in medical error risk between two- and three-shift systems. A total of 1,506 registered nurses working shifts at teaching hospitals participated in this study to evaluate the difference in medical error risk between two- and three-shift systems. After adjustment for potential confounding factors using a log Poisson generalized estimating equation model, the results showed significantly higher frequencies of perceived adverse events over 6 months in the three-shift than in the two-shift system, with estimated mean numbers of adverse events of 1.05 and 0.74, respectively. Shorter intervals after night shifts and greater frequency of night shifts in three-shift systems, which reduce the recovery time from night shift work, may be linked to increased medical errors by nurses.

  11. Organizational affiliation and effectiveness: the case of rape crisis centers.

    PubMed

    Byington, D B; Martin, P Y; DiNitto, D M; Maxwell, M S

    1991-01-01

    Many rape crisis centers (RCCs) that were founded as autonomous organizations have affiliated with other organizations. The relationship of affiliation type and effectiveness is examined in a sample of 25 RCCs in Florida. Effectiveness is defined in terms of range of services for rape victims and involvement in rape prevention (social change) activities. The data show that 23 RCCs are affiliated with six types of organizations and two are free-standing. Each affiliation type has advantages and disadvantages but, overall, free-standing RCCs appear to be most effective and RCCs affiliated with community mental health centers, least effective. Of the seven types, free-standing agencies are most involved in rape prevention activities aimed at social change. PMID:10114294

  12. [Clinical and developmental aspects of care-related tetanus in the reference service of the teaching hospital of Abidjan].

    PubMed

    Aba, T; Kra, O; Ehui, E; Tanon, K A; Kacou, A R; Ouatara, B; Bissagnéné, E; Kadio, A

    2011-02-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from medical data of inpatients with tetanus in the Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases of the University Hospital of Treichville in Abidjan from January 2003 to December 2007. In five years, 221 cases of tetanus have been hospitalized. The tetanus gateway was found in 188 patients (85%). Tetanus gateway linked to care was found in 22 patients (11.7%). Acts of care in question were intramuscular injections (10 cases) and operative procedures (12 cases). Concerning medical care by intramuscular injection, quinine (four cases), sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (one case), and long-acting penicillin (one case) were the identified drugs. The operative procedures mainly involved were skin sutures (nine cases), cures of hernia (two cases), and flattening of Fournier's gangrene (one case). The average incubation period was 9.5 days. The invasion lasted for an average of 1.8 days. On admission, tetanus was immediately generalized for all patients with the presence of paroxysms in 20 patients (90.9%). The lethality of tetanus related care was 54.5%. The death rate in the first 48 hours of hospitalization was estimated at 83.3%. The average length of hospital stay was 14.6 days. Health workers should be involved in the prevention of tetanus in improving the quality of care and especially in reducing intramuscular injections. Also, any patient not immunized against tetanus should receive anti-tetanus serum and an update of its tetanus vaccine before any invasive procedures.

  13. Clonal transmission of a rare methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genotype between horses and staff at a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Schwaber, Mitchell J; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Masarwa, Samira; Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Adler, Amos; Chmelnitsky, Inna; Carmeli, Yehuda; Klement, Eyal; Steinman, Amir

    2013-03-23

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization has become a serious emerging condition in equine hospitals. Following the detection of MRSA in asymptomatic hospitalized horses and in two horses with post-operative wound infections, an investigation was conducted. Twelve of 84 horses (14.3%) and 16 of 139 personnel (11.5%) were MRSA carriers. The profile of the dominant MRSA strain common to horses and staff was multi-drug-resistant, spa-type t535, SCCmec type V, pvl-negative. MLST of a representative isolate yielded sequence type (ST) 5. The risk of MRSA carriage among veterinary personnel was greater in equine veterinarians and full-time technicians in comparison to part-time technicians and to other personnel not working with horses. Strict infection control measures were implemented, horses infected or colonized with MRSA were isolated and decolonization of personnel was attempted. Six months after the intervention, the large animal department personnel and hospitalized horses were all MRSA-negative and the decolonization was considered successful. This outbreak, caused by a rare MRSA strain and involving both hospitalized horses and personnel, further demonstrates the ability of MRSA to spread between animals and humans and emphasizes the importance of infection control measures to decrease the risk for MRSA colonization and infection of both horses and personnel. PMID:23265243

  14. Teaching Hospital and Other Issues Related to Graduate Medical Education. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Ways and Means. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second Session (June 11, 1196).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Ways and Means.

    This document reports testimony presented on Medicare financing of graduate medical education, as proposed by the Balanced Budget Act of 1995. Witnesses included: (1) Timothy M. Golddfarb, Director, Healthcare Systems (Oregon), who noted the importance of graduate medical education funding to teaching hospitals; (2) Leo P. Brideau of Strong…

  15. Profile of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children under fourteen years of age at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH).

    PubMed

    Rijal, P; Sharma, A; Shrestha, S; Upadhyay, S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the current pattern and prevalence of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital in Katmandu, Nepal. A retrospective study was done in 73 children, admitted to the Pediatric ward over a period of one year from January 2010-December 2010. This study showed, 52.0% children below two years of age had acute lower respiratory tract infections, where 68.4% had pneumonia and 31.6% had acute bronchiolitis. The prevalence of infections was 58.9% in male children. The occurrence of infections was common in January and April month. Pneumonia was detected in 37.7% children with malnutrition. The most common presenting symptoms was fever observed in 90.4%, cough in 71.2% and fast breathing in 34.2% children. The WBC count was high in 47.9% children, out of which 43.8% had pneumonia and 4.1% had bronchiolitis. Increased neutrophil count in 36.9% and increased ESR in 50.7% seen in patients only with pneumonia. Chest x-ray showed, lobar pneumonia in 45.2% children where right middle zone was most commonly involved in 42.4% patients. Six (8.2%) children were diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. The average duration of hospital stay was 6 days. PMID:21991705

  16. Does labour epidural slow the progress of labour and lead to complications? Obstetricians’ perception working in private and public sector teaching hospitals in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Sohaib, Muhammad; Ismail, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Obstetricians play a major role in the decision making for provision of analgesia for the woman in labour. As epidural analgesia (EA) is the most preferred technique, it is important to know obstetricians' perception regarding its effect on progress of labour and associated complications. Methods: The 6 months cross-sectional study included 114 obstetricians from teaching hospitals. After informed consent, obstetricians were asked to fill a predesigned questionnaire containing 13 close ended questions regarding their perception on the effect of EA on progress of labour, EA complications and whether they would recommend EA to their patients or not. Other variables included age, gender, training in EA, practice type and hospital settings (private or public sector). Results: Majority of the obstetricians had the perception of EA prolonging the first stage (89.5%) and second stage (98.2%) of labour, increasing the rate of caesarean section (87.7%), instrumental delivery (58.8%) and increasing the incidence of backache (85.5%). None of the obstetricians received any formal training in EA. Majority (84.2%) were not sure if they would recommend EA to their patients. When these responses were compared between public and private sector, a statistically higher percentage (P < 0.001) of public sector obstetricians had negative perception of EA. Conclusion: Perception of obstetrician regarding EA is contrary to the current evidence. There is a need to introduce formal curriculum on EA in obstetric training program and conduct regular refresher courses. PMID:26903670

  17. Left in the dark: Seven years after Katrina, Sandy is teaching hospitals more lessons on how to survive nature's fury.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie; Carlson, Joe; Barr, Paul; Kutscher, Beth; Zigmond, Jessica

    2012-11-01

    In the wake of the devastation Sandy wreaked along the Atlantic Coast, some hospitals were forced to close. But others took on new roles, whether as makeshift phone-charging stations or dealing with healthcare needs patients usually turned to outpatient centers for. "The biggest challenge is making up for the other services that are not available in the community," says Steven Littleson, of Jersey Shore University Medical Center. PMID:23198308

  18. Left in the dark: Seven years after Katrina, Sandy is teaching hospitals more lessons on how to survive nature's fury.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie; Carlson, Joe; Barr, Paul; Kutscher, Beth; Zigmond, Jessica

    2012-11-01

    In the wake of the devastation Sandy wreaked along the Atlantic Coast, some hospitals were forced to close. But others took on new roles, whether as makeshift phone-charging stations or dealing with healthcare needs patients usually turned to outpatient centers for. "The biggest challenge is making up for the other services that are not available in the community," says Steven Littleson, of Jersey Shore University Medical Center.

  19. A review of 187 gunshot wound admissions to a teaching hospital over a 54-month period: training and service implications.

    PubMed Central

    Cowey, A.; Mitchell, P.; Gregory, J.; Maclennan, I.; Pearson, R.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Violence involving the use of firearms has increased in the UK over the past decade. This study assesses the implications of such injuries for service provision and training by reviewing the experience at one hospital. METHODS: Accident and emergency triage data were searched for patients presenting with gunshot wounds over a 54-month period. Case notes were reviewed and patterns of care established. The resources required for clinical management were ascertained, and the financial consequences determined at contemporary full cost. RESULTS: There were 187 attendances with 247 wounds. Mean age was 21 years (range, 8-63 years). Of the attendances, 69% were out of normal working hours. Of the 187 cases, 97 patients were admitted to one hospital (83 of whom required surgery) and 10 patients were transferred to other hospitals (6 for plastic surgery not available at the Manchester Royal Infirmary and 4 due to lack of beds). Of the 80 patients who were not admitted, 4 died in accident and emergency, the rest were either air gun wounds or relatively simple higher calibre injuries. A wide range of surgical specialties was involved (limb injury, 53; thoraco-abdominal and vascular, 28; head and neck, 5; and orbit, 2), and combinations of injuries transgressed specialty and sub-specialty boundaries. The total cost of patient care was pound 267,000. CONCLUSIONS: Gunshot wounds present a heavy demand on the clinical and financial resources of the receiving hospital, and surgeons responsible for unselected acute admissions in "general surgery" should be capable of dealing with these indiscriminate injuries. Current training and service trends towards increasing sub-specialisation may mitigate against them achieving or retaining this capability. PMID:15005928

  20. Trends and correlation of antibacterial usage and bacterial resistance: time series analysis for antibacterial stewardship in a Chinese teaching hospital (2009-2013).

    PubMed

    Zou, Y M; Ma, Y; Liu, J H; Shi, J; Fan, T; Shan, Y Y; Yao, H P; Dong, Y L

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the effect of antibacterial stewardship and evaluate the trends and correlation of antibacterial resistance and usage from 2009 to 2013 in a tertiary-care teaching hospital in northwest China. Antibacterial usage was expressed as defined daily doses per 100 patients per day (DDDs/100 PDs). Hospital-wide population-level data and time series analysis were used to evaluate the trends and determine associations between antibacterial exposure and acquisition of resistance. Yearly consumption of overall antibacterials significantly decreased from 66.54 to 28.08 DDDs/100 PDs (β = -10.504, p < 0.01). The resistant rates of the five most frequently isolated species (including Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) significantly decreased or remained stable, and none of them showed a statistically significant upward trend. The medical quality indicators got better or remained stable. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models demonstrated that the monthly resistance rate of P. aeruginosa to imipenem was strongly correlated with antipseudomonal carbapenems usage (β = 34.94, p < 0.001), as did the correlation of P. aeruginosa to meropenem with antipseudomonal third-generation cephalosporins usage (β = 32.76, p < 0.01) and K. pneumoniae to amikacin with aminoglycosides usage (β = 22.01, p < 0.001). The decreased antibacterial use paralleled the improved bacterial resistance without deteriorating medical quality indicators during antimicrobial stewardship. It also suggests that optimum antibiotic use is necessary to alleviate the threat posed by resistant microorganisms at the hospital level.