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Sample records for affine toda field

  1. ODE/IM correspondence for modified B2(1) affine Toda field equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Katsushi; Shu, Hongfei

    2017-03-01

    We study the massive ODE/IM correspondence for modified B2(1) affine Toda field equation. Based on the ψ-system for the solutions of the associated linear problem, we obtain the Bethe ansatz equations. We also discuss the T-Q relations, the T-system and the Y-system, which are shown to be related to those of the A3 /Z2 integrable system. We consider the case that the solution of the linear problem has a monodromy around the origin, which imposes nontrivial boundary conditions for the T-/Y-system. The high-temperature limit of the T- and Y-system and their monodromy dependence are studied numerically.

  2. Conformal affine Toda model of two-dimensional black holes: The end-point state and the [ital S] matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Belgiorno, F.; Cattaneo, A.S. ); Fucito, F. ); Martellini, M. )

    1993-09-15

    In this paper we investigate a dilaton-gravity theory, which can be viewed as an SL(2) conformal affine Toda (CAT) theory. This new model is inspired by some previous work by Bilal, Callan, and de Alwis. The main results obtained in our approach are (i) a field redefinition of the CAT basis in terms of which it is possible to get the black hole solutions already known in the literature, and (ii) an investigation of the scattering matrix problem for the quantum black hole states. Given the validity of our assumptions, there is a range of values of the [ital N] free-falling shock matter fields forming the black hole solution, for which the end-point state of the black hole evaporation is a zero temperature regular remnant geometry. The quantum evolution to this final state seems to be nonunitary, in agreement with Hawking's scenario for black hole evaporation.

  3. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank-p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n-dimensions is bounded by (n + 1)!/p!(n − p)!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes. PMID:26858463

  4. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, Kenneth Sherman

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  5. Unified Field Theoretical Models from Generalized Affine Geometries II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio

    2011-06-01

    The space-time structure of the new Unified Field Theory presented in previous reference (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 49:1288-1301, 2010) is analyzed from its SL(2C) underlying structure in order to make precise the notion of minimal coupling. To this end, the framework is the language of tensors and particularly differential forms and the condition a priory of the existence of a potential for the torsion is relaxed. We shown trough exact cosmological solutions from this model, where the geometry is Euclidean R⊗ O 3˜ R⊗ SU(2), the relation between the space-time geometry and the structure of the gauge group. Precisely this relation is directly connected with the relation of the spin and torsion fields. The solution of this model is explicitly compared with our previous ones and we find that: (i) the torsion is not identified directly with the Yang Mills type strength field, (ii) there exists a compatibility condition connected with the identification of the gauge group with the geometric structure of the space-time: this fact lead the identification between derivatives of the scale factor a( τ) with the components of the torsion in order to allows the Hosoya-Ogura ansatz (namely, the alignment of the isospin with the frame geometry of the space-time), (iii) this compatibility condition precisely mark the fact that local gauge covariance, coordinate independence and arbitrary space time geometries are harmonious concepts and (iv) of two possible structures of the torsion the "tratorial" form (the only one studied here) forbids wormhole configurations, leading only, cosmological instanton space-time in eternal expansion.

  6. Field-Emission from Chemically Functionalized Diamond Surfaces: Does Electron Affinity Picture Work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Miyazaki, Takehide; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Okushi, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-03-01

    By means of the time-dependent density functional electron dynamics, we have revisited the field-emission efficiency of chemically functionalized diamond (100) surfaces. In order to achieve high efficiency and high (chemical) stability, proper chemical species are needed to terminate diamond surfaces. Hydrogen (H) termination is well known to achieve the negative electron affinity (NEA) of diamond surface which indeed enhances field emission performance than that of clean surface with positive electron affinity (PEA). Yet, the durability of H-terminated diamond surface was concerned for long-time operation of the field-emission. Meantime, oxidation, or hydroxyl (OH) termination was considered to achieve chemical stability of the surface but presence of oxygen (O) atom should reduce the emission efficiency. Recently, H- OH-co-terminated surface is reported as NEA and was expected to achieve both emission efficiency and chemical stability. However, our simulation showed that emission efficiency of the H- OH- co-terminated surface is much lower than clean surface with PEA, thus we note that the electron affinity cannot be a unique measure to determine the emission efficiency. In this talk, we introduce necessity of new concept to understand the emission efficiency which needs to know detailed potential profile from bulk to vacuum through surface, which is strongly dependent on the surface chemical functionalization. This work was supported by ALCA project conducted by Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  7. Electric Field Cancellation on Quartz by Rb Adsorbate-Induced Negative Electron Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, J A; Kim, E; Rittenhouse, S T; Weck, P F; Sadeghpour, H R; Shaffer, J P

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results will be important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems, as fundamental probes of atom-surface interactions, and for studies of 2D electron gases bound to surfaces.

  8. Metric-affine formalism of higher derivative scalar fields in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiulian E-mail: wangxiulian2000@yahoo.com.cn

    2012-07-01

    Higher derivative scalar field theories have received considerable attention for the potentially explanations of the initial state of the universe or the current cosmic acceleration which they might offer. They have also attracted many interests in the phenomenological studies of infrared modifications of gravity. These theories are mostly studied by the metric variational approach in which only the metric is the fundamental field to account for the gravitation. In this paper we study the higher derivative scalar fields with the metric-affine formalism where the affine connection is treated arbitrarily at the beginning. Because the higher derivative scalar fields couple to the connection directly in a covariant theory these two formalisms will lead to different results. These differences are suppressed by the powers of the Planck mass and are usually expected to have small effects. But in some cases they may cause non-negligible deviations. We show by a higher derivative dark energy model that the two formalisms lead to significantly different pictures of the future universe.

  9. Two-dimensional generalized Toda lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Olshanetsky, M. A.; Perelomov, A. M.

    1981-12-01

    The zero curvature representation is obtained for the two-dimensional generalized Toda lattices connected with semisimple Lie algebras. The reduction group and conservation laws are found and the mass spectrum is calculated.

  10. W 4 toda example as hidden Liouville CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, P.; Petkova, V. B.

    2017-03-01

    We construct correlators in the W 4 Toda 2d conformal field theory for a particular class of representations and demonstrate a relation to a W 2 (Virasoro) theory with different central charge. The relevance of the classical limits of the constructed 3-point functions and braiding matrices to problems in 4d conformal theories is discussed.

  11. Electric field cancellation on quartz by Rb adsorbate-induced negative electron affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, James

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces a negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results are important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems and the fundamental study of atom-surface interactions, as well as applications for electrons bound to a 2D surface. This work was supported by the DARPA Quasar program by a Grant through ARO (60181-PH-DRP) and the AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0282),.

  12. Generalised Eisenhart lift of the Toda chain

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Gibbons, Gary

    2014-02-15

    The Toda chain of nearest neighbour interacting particles on a line can be described both in terms of geodesic motion on a manifold with one extra dimension, the Eisenhart lift, or in terms of geodesic motion in a symmetric space with several extra dimensions. We examine the relationship between these two realisations and discover that the symmetric space is a generalised, multi-particle Eisenhart lift of the original problem that reduces to the standard Eisenhart lift. Such generalised Eisenhart lift acts as an inverse Kaluza-Klein reduction, promoting coupling constants to momenta in higher dimension. In particular, isometries of the generalised lift metric correspond to energy preserving transformations that mix coordinates and coupling constants. A by-product of the analysis is that the lift of the Toda Lax pair can be used to construct higher rank Killing tensors for both the standard and generalised lift metrics.

  13. On polynomial vector fields having a given affine variety as attractive and invariant set: application to robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possieri, Corrado; Tornambè, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    The main goal of this paper is to compute a class of polynomial vector fields, whose associated dynamical system has a given affine variety as attractive and invariant set, a given point in such an affine variety as invariant and attractive and another given affine variety as invariant set, solving the application of this technique in the robotic area. This objective is reached by using some tools taken from algebraic geometry. Practical examples of how these vector fields can be computed are reported. Moreover, by using these techniques, two feedback control laws, respectively, for a unicycle-like mobile robot and for a car-like mobile robot, which make them move, within the workspace, approaching to a selected algebraic curve, are given.

  14. Prediction of SAMPL3 Host-Guest Binding Affinities: Evaluating the Accuracy of Generalized Force-Fields

    PubMed Central

    Muddana, Hari S.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    We used the second-generation mining minima method (M2) to compute the binding affinities of the novel host-guest complexes in the SAMPL3 blind prediction challenge. The predictions were in poor agreement with experiment, and we conjectured that much of the error might derive from the force field, CHARMm with Vcharge charges. Repeating the calculations with other generalized force-fields led to no significant improvement, and we observed that the predicted affinities were highly sensitive to the choice of force-field. We therefore embarked on a systematic evaluation of a set of generalized force fields, based upon comparisons with PM6-DH2, a fast yet accurate semi-empirical quantum mechanics method. In particular, we compared gas-phase interaction energies and entropies for the host-guest complexes themselves, as well as for smaller chemical fragments derived from the same molecules. The mean deviations of the force field interaction energies from the quantum results were greater than 3 kcal/mol and 9 kcal/mol, for the fragments and host-guest systems respectively. We further evaluated the accuracy of force-fields for computing the vibrational entropies and found the mean errors to be greater than 4 kcal/mol. Given these errors in energy and entropy, it is not surprising in retrospect that the predicted binding affinities deviated from the experiment by several kcal/mol. These results emphasize the need for improvements in generalized force-fields and also highlight the importance of systematic evaluation of force-field parameters prior to evaluating different free-energy methods. PMID:22274835

  15. Non-affine fields in solid-solid transformations: the structure and stability of a product droplet.

    PubMed

    Paul, Arya; Sengupta, Surajit; Rao, Madan

    2014-01-08

    We describe the microstructure, morphology, and dynamics of growth of a droplet of martensite nucleating in a parent austenite during a solid-solid transformation, using a Landau theory written in terms of both conventional affine elastic deformations and non-affine deformations. Non-affineness, φ, serves as a source of strain incompatibility and screens long-ranged elastic interactions. It is produced wherever the local stress exceeds a threshold and anneals diffusively thereafter. Using a variational calculation, we find three types of stable solution (labeled I, II, and III) for the structure of the product droplet, depending on the stress threshold and the scaled mobilities of φ parallel and perpendicular to the parent-product interface. The profile of the non-affine field φ is different in these three solutions: I is characterized by a vanishingly small φ, II admits large values of φ localized in regions of high stress within the parent-product interface, and III is a structure in which φ completely wets the parent-product interface. The width l and size W of the twins follow the relation l is proportional to √W in solution I; this relation does not hold for II or III. We obtain a dynamical phase diagram featuring these solutions, and argue that they represent specific solid-state microstructures.

  16. Toric Networks, Geometric R-Matrices and Generalized Discrete Toda Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Rei; Lam, Thomas; Pylyavskyy, Pavlo

    2016-11-01

    We use the combinatorics of toric networks and the double affine geometric R-matrix to define a three-parameter family of generalizations of the discrete Toda lattice. We construct the integrals of motion and a spectral map for this system. The family of commuting time evolutions arising from the action of the R-matrix is explicitly linearized on the Jacobian of the spectral curve. The solution to the initial value problem is constructed using Riemann theta functions.

  17. Effect of buffer, electric field, and separation time on detection of aptamer-ligand complexes for affinity probe capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Danielle D; Jameson, Emily E; Perlette, Jon; Malik, Abdul; Kennedy, Robert T

    2003-05-01

    The separation and detection of complexes of aptamers and protein targets by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced fluorescence was examined. Aptamer-thrombin and aptamer-immunoglobulin E (IgE) were used as model systems. Phosphate, 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid with phosphate, and tris(hydroxyamino)methane-glycine-potassium (TGK) buffer at pH 8.4 were tested as electrophoresis media. Buffer had a large effect with TGK providing the most stable complexes for both protein-aptamer complexes. Conditions that suppressed electroosmotic flow, such as addition of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose to the media or modification of the capillary inner wall with polyacrylamide, were found to prevent detection of complexes. The effect of separation time and electric field were evaluated by monitoring complexes with electric field varied from 150-2850 V/cm and effective column lengths of 3.5 and 7.0 cm. As expected, shorter times on the column greatly increased peak heights for the complexes due to a combination of less dilution by diffusion and less dissociation on the column. High fields were found to have a detrimental effect on detection of complexes. It is concluded that the best conditions for detection of noncovalent complexes involve use of the minimal column length and electric field necessary to achieve separation. The results will be of interest in developing affinity probe CE assays wherein aptamers are used as affinity ligands.

  18. Wave Equations for Classical Two-Component Proca Fields in Curved Spacetimes with Torsionless Affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Júnior, S. I.; Cardoso, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    The world formulation of the full theory of classical Proca fields in generally relativistic spacetimes is reviewed. Subsequently, the entire set of field equations is transcribed in a straightforward way into the framework of one of the Infeld-van der Waerden formalisms. Some well-known calculational techniques are then utilized for deriving the wave equations that control the propagation of the fields allowed for. It appears that no interaction couplings between such fields and electromagnetic curvatures are ultimately carried by the wave equations at issue. What results is, in effect, that the only interactions which occur in the theoretical context under consideration involve strictly Proca fields and wave functions for gravitons.

  19. Biochemical affinity sensing systems based on luminescence generation in the evanescent field of optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duveneck, Gert L.; Oroszlan, Peter; Abel, A. P.; Klee, B.; Steiner, V.; Ehrat, Markus; Gygax, D.; Widmer, H. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a (bio)chemical analysis system based on luminescence generation and detection in the evanescent field associated with light guiding in an optical fiber. Our intention was directed towards optimization of not only the sensor, including the sensor handling and the immobilization of biochemical recognition elements, but also of the assay chemistry, with special emphasis on methods used for sensor regeneration, of the fluidic system, and of the experimental control software. Goals of this optimization process were not only to achieve high sensitivity, reproducibility and the related precision of the results, but also maximum regenerability of the sensors and system flexibility for a variety of different applications. Four examples of different bioaffinity assays, established on our sensor system, are presented: a competitive immunoassay for atrazine, a sandwich immunoassay for hirudin, a DNA hybridization assay, and first studies for the development of sensors based on membrane- bound receptors. In the atrazine assay, the sensor could be regenerated more than 300 times. In the hybridization assay, a detection limit of 7.5 multiplied by 10-14 M complementary fluorescein-labeled DNA was achieved. The performance of our system is compared with an established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on the example of the hirudin assay. In the concluding section of this paper, advantages and disadvantages of our fiberoptic, luminescence-based system, compared with commercialized systems, based on detection of changes of the effective refractive index, are discussed.

  20. Exact solution of the relativistic quantum Toda chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Cao, Junpeng; Yang, Wen-Li; Shi, Kangjie; Wang, Yupeng

    2017-03-01

    The relativistic quantum Toda chain model is studied with the generalized algebraic Bethe Ansatz method. By employing a set of local gauge transformations, proper local vacuum states can be obtained for this model. The exact spectrum and eigenstates of the model are thus constructed simultaneously.

  1. Kp and Toda Tau Functions in Bethe Ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasaki, Kanehisa

    2011-10-01

    Recent work of Foda and his group on a connection between classical integrable hierarchies (the KP and 2D Toda hierarchies) and some quantum integrable systems (the 6-vertex model with DWBC, the finite XXZ chain of spin 1/2, the phase model on a finite chain, etc.) is reviewed. Some additional information on this issue is also presented.

  2. Fine structure of matrix Darboux-Toda integrable mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leznov, A. N.; Yuzbashyan, E. A.

    1998-05-01

    The matrix Darboux-Toda mapping is represented as a product of a number of commutative mappings. The matrix Davey-Stewartson hierarchy is invariant with respect to each of these mappings. We thus introduce an entirely new type of discrete transformation for this hierarchy. The discrete transformation for the vector nonlinear Schrödinger system coincides with one of the mappings under necessary reduction conditions.

  3. Low uptake affinity cultivars with biochar to tackle Cd-tainted rice--A field study over four rice seasons in Hunan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, De; Guo, Hu; Li, Ruiyue; Li, Lianqing; Pan, Genxing; Chang, Andrew; Joseph, Stephen

    2016-01-15

    Biochar is becoming an environmentally friendly material for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils and improving food safety. A field trial over four rice seasons was conducted to investigate the use of biochar and low Cd accumulating cultivars on Cd uptake in a heavy metal contaminated soil. Wheat straw derived biochar was applied at 0, 20 and 40 t ha(-1). Two rice cultivars with differing Cd accumulation abilities were selected in each season. The results showed that both biochar and low Cd affinity cultivars significantly reduced rice grain Cd accumulation. Biochar had no significant effect the first season but thereafter consistently reduced rice grain Cd by a maximum of 61, 86 and 57% over the next three seasons. Zn accumulation in the rice grains was not decreased by biochar application, although available soil Zn was sharply reduced (35-91%). Indica conventional rice cultivars had much lower Cd, but higher Zn and lower Cd/Zn ratios in the grain than indica hybrid cultivars. Biochar was more effective for mitigating grain Cd accumulation in low Cd affinity cultivars than in high affinity cultivars. Soil pH was sustainably increased (up to nearly 1 unit) while available Cd significantly decreased by a maximum of 85% after biochar addition. The translocation of Cd from rice roots to shoots was reduced from 20 to 80% by biochar. Low uptake affinity cultivars combined with biochar reduced late rice grain Cd concentration and Cd/Zn ratios by 69-80% and 72-80%, respectively. It indicated that the management of combining biochar and low Cd affinity cultivars should be an efficient way to remediate Cd contaminated rice paddies and reduce health risk associated with consuming rice from these soils.

  4. Field and experimental evidence for low-O2 affinity of aerobic methane oxidizers in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Bange, Hermann; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2015-04-01

    ~200 µM), confirming results from the field study and attesting to an apparent Km of ≲ 0.5 µM. Enhancement of MOx at low O2 levels was more pronounced in incubations with bottom waters, but was also observed in surface waters, which are exposed year-round to high O2 levels in nature. This response to oxygen concentrations suggests a general low-O2 affinity of aerobic methane oxidizers in Eckernförde Bay. Lennartz, S. T., Lehmann, A., Herrford, J., Malien, F., Hansen, H.-P., Biester, H., and Bange, H. W.: Long-term trends at the Boknis Eck time series station (Baltic Sea), 1957-2013: does climate change counteract the decline in eutrophication?, Biogeosciences, 2014.

  5. Nonlinear dust-lattice waves: a modified Toda lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, N. F.

    2008-09-07

    Charged dust grains in a plasma interact with a Coulomb potential, but also with an exponential component to the potential, due to Debye shielding in the background plasma. Here we investigate large-amplitude oscillations and waves in dust-lattices, employing techniques used in Toda lattice analysis. The lattice consists of a linear chain of particles, or a periodic ring as occurs in experimentally observed dust particle clusters. The particle motion has a triangular waveform, and chaotic motion for large amplitude motion of a grain.

  6. Population structure and phylogeography of Toda buffalo in Nilgiris throw light on possible origin of aboriginal Toda tribe of South India.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, P; Kataria, R S; Mishra, B P; Dubey, P K; Sadana, D K; Joshi, B K

    2011-08-01

    We report the genetic structure and evolutionary relationship of the endangered Toda buffalo of Nilgiris in South India with Kanarese and two other riverine buffalo breeds. The upgma phylogeny drawn using Nei's distance grouped South Kanara and Toda buffaloes at a single node while Marathwada and Murrah together formed a separate node. Principal component analysis was performed with pairwise interindividual chord distances which revealed clustering of Murrah and Marathwada buffaloes distinctly, while individuals of Toda and South Kanara breeds completely intermingled with each other. Furthermore, there were highly significant group variances (p < 0.01) when the breeds were grouped based on phylogeny, thus revealing the existence of cryptic genetic structure within these buffalo breeds. To know the evolutionary relationship among these breeds, 537-bp D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA was analysed. The phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA haplotypes following NJ algorithm with Chinese swamp buffalo as outgroup revealed a major cluster that included haplotypes from all the four investigated breeds and two minor clusters formed by South Kanara and Toda haplotypes. Reduced median network analysis revealed haplotypes of South Kanara and Toda to be quite distinct from the commonly found haplotypes indicating that these might have been ancestral to all the present-day haplotypes. Few mutations in two of the haplotypes of South Kanara buffalo were found to have contributed to ancestral haplotypes of Toda buffalo suggesting the possible migration of buffaloes from Kanarese region towards Nilgiris along the Western Ghats. Considering the close social, economic and cultural association of Todas with their buffaloes, the present study supports the theory of migration of Toda tribe from Kanarese/Mysore region along with their buffaloes.

  7. On Differential form Method to Find Lie Symmetries of two Types of Toda Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qi; Tian, Shou-Fu

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate Lie symmetries of the (1 + 1)-dimensional celebrated Toda lattice and the (2 + 1)-dimensional modified semidiscrete Toda lattice by using the extended Harrison and Estabrook's geometric approach. Two closed ideals written in terms of a set of differential forms are constructed for Toda lattices. Moreover, commutation relations of a Kac-Moody-Virasoro type Lie algebra are obtained by direct computation.

  8. Upon Generating Discrete Expanding Integrable Models of the Toda Lattice Systems and Infinite Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Wang, Yan; Liu, Jiangen

    2017-01-01

    With the help of R-matrix approach, we present the Toda lattice systems that have extensive applications in statistical physics and quantum physics. By constructing a new discrete integrable formula by R-matrix, the discrete expanding integrable models of the Toda lattice systems and their Lax pairs are generated, respectively. By following the constructing formula again, we obtain the corresponding (2+1)-dimensional Toda lattice systems and their Lax pairs, as well as their (2+1)-dimensional discrete expanding integrable models. Finally, some conservation laws of a (1+1)-dimensional generalised Toda lattice system and a new (2+1)-dimensional lattice system are generated, respectively.

  9. One- and two-dimensional Toda lattices and the Painleve property

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, J.D.; Tabor, M.

    1985-08-01

    The Toda lattice and the two-dimensional Toda lattice (2-DTL) are shown to possess a type of ''Painleve property'' that is based on the use of separate ''singular manifolds'' for each dependent variable. The isospectral problem for the 2-DTL found by both Mikhailov and by Fordy and Gibbons can be simply and logically derived from this analysis. Some remarks are made about the connection between our work and independent work of Kametaka and Airhault on the relationship between the Toda lattice and the second Painleve transcendent.

  10. Equilibrium dynamical correlations in the Toda chain and other integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Aritra; Dhar, Abhishek

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the form of equilibrium spatiotemporal correlation functions of conserved quantities in the Toda lattice and in other integrable models. From numerical simulations we find that the correlations satisfy ballistic scaling with a remarkable collapse of data from different times. We examine special limiting choices of parameter values, for which the Toda lattice tends to either the harmonic chain or the equal mass hard-particle gas. In both these limiting cases, one can obtain the correlations exactly and we find excellent agreement with the direct Toda simulation results. We also discuss a transformation to "normal mode" variables, as commonly done in hydrodynamic theory of nonintegrable systems, and find that this is useful, to some extent, even for the integrable system. The striking differences between the Toda chain and a truncated version, expected to be nonintegrable, are pointed out.

  11. On Non-Topological Solutions for Planar Liouville Systems of Toda-Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakovsky, Arkady; Tarantello, Gabriella

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the study of non-abelian Chern Simons vortices of non-topological type in Gauge Field Theory, see e.g. Gudnason (Nucl Phys B 821:151-169, 2009), Gudnason (Nucl Phys B 840:160-185, 2010) and Dunne (Lecture Notes in Physics, New Series, vol 36. Springer, Heidelberg, 1995), we analyse the solvability of the following (normalised) Liouville-type system in the presence of singular sources: (1)_τ -Δ u_1 = e^{u_1} - τ e^{u_2} - 4N π δ_0,-Δ u_2 = e^{u_2} - τ e^{u_1}, β_1 = 1/2π int_{R2} e^{u_1} {and } β_2 = 1/2π int_{R2} e^{u_2}, with {τ > 0} and {N > 0}. We identify necessary and sufficient conditions on the parameter {τ} and the "flux" pair: {(β_1, β_2),} which ensure the radial solvability of {(1)_τ.} Since for {τ=1/2,} problem {(1)_τ} reduces to the (integrable) 2 {×} 2 Toda system, in particular we recover the existence result of Lin et al. (Invent Math 190(1):169-207, 2012) and Jost and Wang (Int Math Res Not 6:277-290, 2002), concerning this case. Our method relies on a blow-up analysis for solutions of {(1)_τ}, which (even in the radial setting) takes new turns compared to the single equation case. We mention that our approach also permits handling the non-symmetric case, where in each of the two equations in {(1)_τ}, the parameter {τ} is replaced by two different parameters {τ_1 > 0} and {τ_2 > 0} respectively, and also when the second equation in {(1)_τ} includes a Dirac measure supported at the origin.

  12. Toda-like (0,2) mirrors to products of projective spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Sharpe, Eric; Wu, Ruoxu

    2016-08-01

    One of the open problems in understanding (0,2) mirror symmetry concerns the construction of Toda-like Landau-Ginzburg mirrors to (0,2) theories on Fano spaces. In this paper, we begin to fill this gap by making an ansatz for (0,2) Toda-like theories mirror to (0,2) supersymmetric nonlinear sigma models on products of projective spaces, with deformations of the tangent bundle, generalizing a special case previously worked out for {{P}}^1× {{P}}^1 . We check this ansatz by matching correlation functions of the B/2-twisted Toda-like theories to correlation functions of corresponding A/2-twisted nonlinear sigma models, computed primarily using localization techniques. These (0,2) Landau-Ginzburg models admit redundancies, which can lend themselves to multiple distinct-looking representatives of the same physics, which we discuss.

  13. Kernel functions and Baecklund transformations for relativistic Calogero-Moser and Toda systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hallnaes, Martin; Ruijsenaars, Simon

    2012-12-15

    We obtain kernel functions associated with the quantum relativistic Toda systems, both for the periodic version and for the nonperiodic version with its dual. This involves taking limits of previously known results concerning kernel functions for the elliptic and hyperbolic relativistic Calogero-Moser systems. We show that the special kernel functions at issue admit a limit that yields generating functions of Baecklund transformations for the classical relativistic Calogero-Moser and Toda systems. We also obtain the nonrelativistic counterparts of our results, which tie in with previous results in the literature.

  14. Quasi-periodic solutions to the hierarchy of four-component Toda lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiao; Geng, Xianguo; Zeng, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Starting from a discrete 3×3 matrix spectral problem, the hierarchy of four-component Toda lattices is derived by using the stationary discrete zero-curvature equation. Resorting to the characteristic polynomial of the Lax matrix for the hierarchy, we introduce a trigonal curve Km-2 of genus m - 2 and present the related Baker-Akhiezer function and meromorphic function on it. Asymptotic expansions for the Baker-Akhiezer function and meromorphic function are given near three infinite points on the trigonal curve, from which explicit quasi-periodic solutions for the hierarchy of four-component Toda lattices are obtained in terms of the Riemann theta function.

  15. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  16. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  17. Bifurcation Diagrams and Quotient Topological Spaces Under the Action of the Affine Group of a Family of Planar Quadratic Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerba Diaconescu, Oxana; Schlomiuk, Dana; Vulpe, Nicolae

    In this article, we consider the class QSL4{u +vc+w^c, ∞ } of all real quadratic differential systems (dx)/(dt) = p(x, y), (dy)/(dt) = q(x, y) with gcd(p, q) = 1, having invariant lines of total multiplicity four and two complex and one real infinite singularities. We first construct compactified canonical forms for the class QSL4{u +vc+w^c, ∞ } so as to include limit points in the 12-dimensional parameter space of this class. We next construct the bifurcation diagrams for these compactified canonical forms. These diagrams contain many repetitions of phase portraits and we show that these are due to many symmetries under the group action. To retain the essence of the dynamics we finally construct the quotient spaces under the action of the group G = Aff(2, ℝ) × ℝ* of affine transformations and time homotheties and we place the phase portraits in these quotient spaces. The final diagrams retain only the necessary information to capture the dynamics under the motion in the parameter space as well as under this group action. We also present here necessary and sufficient conditions for an affine line to be invariant of multiplicity k for a quadratic system.

  18. Integrable boundary value problems for elliptic type Toda lattice in a disk

    SciTech Connect

    Guerses, Metin; Habibullin, Ismagil; Zheltukhin, Kostyantyn

    2007-10-15

    The concept of integrable boundary value problems for soliton equations on R and R{sub +} is extended to regions enclosed by smooth curves. Classes of integrable boundary conditions in a disk for the Toda lattice and its reductions are found.

  19. The generalized Toda lattices and the Whitham averaged system for the defocusing nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jian

    In Part I, we first study an iso-spectral deformation of general matrix which is a natural generalization of the nonperiodic Toda lattice equation. This deformation is equivalent to the Cholesky flow. We prove the integrability of the deformation, and give an explicit formula for the solution to the initial value problem. The formula is obtained by generalizing the orthogonalization procedure of Szego. Using the formula, the solution to the LU factorization can be constructed explicitly. Based on the root spaces for simple Lie algebras, we consider several reductions of the equation. This leads to generalized Toda equations related to other classical semi-simple Lie algebra which include the integrable systems studied by Bogoyavlensky and Kostant. We show these systems can be solved explicitly in a unified way. Based on the explicit solutions, we then consider the iso-spectral real manifolds of tridiagonal Hessenberg matrices with distinct real eigenvalues. The manifolds are described by the iso-spectral flows of indefinite Toda lattice equations introduced by Kodama and Ye. These Toda lattices consist of 2N-1 different systems with hamiltonians H = [[1]/over[2

  20. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  1. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  2. The Cutting Edge of Affinity Electrophoresis Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is an important technique that is widely used to separate and analyze biomolecules in the fields of biology and medicine. Both quantitative and qualitative information can be gained through affinity electrophoresis. Affinity electrophoresis can be applied through a variety of strategies, such as mobility shift electrophoresis, charge shift electrophoresis or capillary affinity electrophoresis. These strategies are based on changes in the electrophoretic patterns of biological macromolecules that result from interactions or complex-formation processes that induce changes in the size or total charge of the molecules. Nucleic acid fragments can be characterized through their affinity to other molecules, for example transcriptional factor proteins. Hydrophobic membrane proteins can be identified by means of a shift in the mobility induced by a charged detergent. The various strategies have also been used in the estimation of association/disassociation constants. Some of these strategies have similarities to affinity chromatography, in that they use a probe or ligand immobilized on a supported matrix for electrophoresis. Such methods have recently contributed to profiling of major posttranslational modifications of proteins, such as glycosylation or phosphorylation. Here, we describe advances in analytical techniques involving affinity electrophoresis that have appeared during the last five years. PMID:28248262

  3. Solutions of the sDiff(2)Toda equation with SU(2) symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, Daniel; McIver, John K.

    2010-07-01

    We present the general solution to the Plebański equation for an \\bm{\\mathfrak{h}} space that admits Killing vectors for an entire SU(2) of symmetries, which is therefore also the general solution of the sDiff(2)Toda equation that allows these symmetries. Desiring these solutions as a bridge toward the future for yet more general solutions of the sDiff(2)Toda equation, we generalize the earlier work of Olivier, on the Atiyah-Hitchin metric, and re-formulate work of Babich and Korotkin, and Tod, on the Bianchi IX approach to a metric with an SU(2) of symmetries. We also give careful delineations of the conformal transformations required to ensure that a metric of Bianchi IX type has a zero Ricci tensor, so that it is a self-dual, vacuum solution of the complex-valued version of Einstein's equations, as appropriate for the original Plebański equation.

  4. Variable-coefficient discrete tanh method and its application to ( 2+1)-dimensional Toda equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Hong-Qing

    2009-08-01

    In this Letter, a variable-coefficient discrete tanh method is proposed for solving nonlinear differential-difference equations. With the aid of symbolic computation, we choose a ( 2+1)-dimensional Toda equation to illustrate the validity and advantages of the method. As a result, hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions and rational solutions with arbitrary functions are obtained. It is shown that the proposed method provides a powerful mathematical tool for nonlinear differential-difference equations in mathematical physics.

  5. Toda lattices with indefinite metric II: Topology of the iso-spectral manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yuji; Ye, Jian

    1998-10-01

    We consider the iso-spectral real manifolds of tridiagonal Hessenberg matrices with distinct real eigenvalues. The manifolds are described by the iso-spectral flows of indefinite Toda lattice equations introduced by the authors [Physica D 91 (1996) 321-339]. These Toda lattices consist of 2 N-1 different systems with hamiltonians H = {1}/{2} Σ k=1N y k2 + Σ k=1N-1 s ks k+1exp(x k-x k+1) , where sk = ±1, which blow up in finite time except the case with all sksk+1 = 1. We compactify the manifolds by adding infinities according to the Toda flows. The resulting manifolds are shown to be nonorientable for N > 2, and the symmetry group is the semi-direct product of ( Z2) N-1 and the permutation group S n. These properties identify themselves with “small covers” introduced by Davis and Januszkiewicz [Duke Math. J. 62 (1991) 417-451]. As a corollary of our construction, we give a formula for the total number of zeros for a system of exponential polynomials generated as Hankel determinants.

  6. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  7. Asymptotics of a Class of Solutions to the Cylindrical Toda Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Craig A.; Widom, Harold

    The small t asymptotics of a class of solutions to the 2D cylindrical Toda equations is computed. The solutions, , have the representation where Kk$ are integral operators. This class includes the n-periodic cylindrical Toda equations. For n=2 our results reduce to the previously computed asymptotics of the 2D radial sinh-Gordon equation and for n=3 (and with an additional symmetry constraint) they reduce to earlier results for the radial Bullough-Dodd equation. Both of these special cases are examples of Painlevé III and have arisen in various applications. The asymptotics of are derived by computing the small t asymptotics where explicit formulas are given for the quantities ak and bk. The method consists of showing that the resolvent operator of Kk has an approximation in terms of resolvents of certain Wiener-Hopf operators, for which there are explicit integral formulas.

  8. Affinity capillary electrophoresis coupling with partial filling technique and field-amplified sample injection for enantioseparation and determination of DL-tetrahydropalmatine.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongzhi; Yu, Lishuang; Xu, Xueqin; Zheng, Chunsong; Lin, Wei; Liu, Xianxiang; Chen, Guonan

    2010-06-01

    A novel, simple and sensitive method for the enantioseparation and determination of DL-tetrahydropalmatine (DL-THP) was developed using ACE in combination with partial filling technique and field-amplified sample injection. A chiral selector, i.e. BSA, was used for the enantioseparation of DL-THP in ACE. Effects of BSA concentration, pH and separation voltage on the effectiveness of the enantiomer separation were evaluated. In an optimal condition, D- and L-THP were completely enantio-separated in less than 9 min by partially filling an electrophoretic capillary with 50 micromol/L BSA (50 mbar, 100 s) and carrying out an electrophoresis with 20 mmol/L phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 15 kV. The sensitivity was further improved by making use of field-amplified sample injection to lower the LOD (defined as S/N=3) down to 6 ng/mL. Real samples were also tested and promising results for the determination of DL-THP enantiomers were obtained.

  9. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  10. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  11. Bruhat Order in the Full Symmetric sl(n) Toda Lattice on Partial Flag Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyakov, Yury B.; Sharygin, Georgy I.; Sorin, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    In our previous paper [Comm. Math. Phys. 330 (2014), 367-399] we described the asymptotic behaviour of trajectories of the full symmetric sl_n Toda lattice in the case of distinct eigenvalues of the Lax matrix. It turned out that it is completely determined by the Bruhat order on the permutation group. In the present paper we extend this result to the case when some eigenvalues of the Lax matrix coincide. In that case the trajectories are described in terms of the projection to a partial flag space where the induced dynamical system verifies the same properties as before: we show that when tto±∞ the trajectories of the induced dynamical system converge to a finite set of points in the partial flag space indexed by the Schubert cells so that any two points of this set are connected by a trajectory if and only if the corresponding cells are adjacent. This relation can be explained in terms of the Bruhat order on multiset permutations.

  12. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  13. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  14. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  15. On the long time behavior of the doubly infinite toda lattice under initial data decaying at infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamvissis, Spyridon

    1993-05-01

    We provide rigorous analysis of the long time behavior of the (doubly infinite) Toda lattice under initial data that decay at infinity, in the absence of solitions. We solve (approximately and for large times) the Riemann-Hilbert matrix factorization problem equivalent to the related inverse scattering problem with the help of the Beals-Coifman formula, by reducing it to a simpler one through a series of contour deformations in the spirit of the Deift-Zhou method.

  16. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  17. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  18. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; Hargrove, Paul; Roman, Eric

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core maps and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.

  19. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    DOE PAGES

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; ...

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core mapsmore » and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.« less

  20. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF INORGANIC RADICALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    energy in the latter compound is 110 kcals/mole, distinctly higher than in ammonia. Cyanogen (CN)2 and hydrocyanic acid (HCN) yield values for the...ions very readily, and the electron affinity is 49 kcals/mole. A comparison with the results from thiocyanic acid (HNCS) indicates that the H-N bond

  1. On the τ-functions of the reduced Ostrovsky equation and the A(2)2 two-dimensional Toda system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Maruno, Ken-ichi; Ohta, Yasuhiro

    2012-09-01

    The reciprocal link between the reduced Ostrovsky equation and the A(2)2 two-dimensional Toda (2D-Toda) system is used to construct the N-soliton solution of the reduced Ostrovsky equation. The N-soliton solution of the reduced Ostrovsky equation is presented in the form of pfaffian through a hodograph (reciprocal) transformation. The bilinear equations and the τ-function of the reduced Ostrovsky equation are obtained from the period 3-reduction of the B∞ or C∞ 2D-Toda system, i.e. the A(2)2 2D-Toda system. One of the τ-functions of the A(2)2 2D-Toda system becomes the square of a pfaffian which also becomes a solution of the reduced Ostrovsky equation. There is another bilinear equation which is a member of the 3-reduced extended BKP hierarchy. Using this bilinear equation, we can also construct the same pfaffian solution.

  2. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  3. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field.

  4. The affine structure of gravitational theories: Symplectic groups and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.; de Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2014-09-01

    We give a geometrical description of gravitational theories from the viewpoint of symmetries and affine structure. We show how gravity, considered as a gauge theory, can be consistently achieved by the nonlinear realization of the conformal-affine group in an indirect manner: due to the partial isomorphism between CA(3, 1) and the centrally extended Sp( 8), we perform a nonlinear realization of the centrally extended (CE)Sp( 8) in its semi-simple version. In particular, starting from the bundle structure of gravity, we derive the conformal-affine Lie algebra and then, by the nonlinear realization, we define the coset field transformations, the Cartan forms and the inverse Higgs constraints. Finally, we discuss the geometrical Lagrangians where all the information on matter fields and their interactions can be contained.

  5. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  6. On the electron affinity of the oxygen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron affinity (EA) of oxygen is computed to be 1.287 eV, using 2p electron full configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions expanded in a 6s5p3d2f Slater-type orbital basis. The best complete active space self-consistent field - multireference CI (CASSCF-MRCI) result including only 2p correlation is 1.263 eV. However, inclusion of 2s intrashell and 2s2p intershell correlation increases the computed EA to 1.290 at the CASSCF-MRCI level. At the full CI basis set limit, the 2s contribution to the electron affinity is estimated to be as large as 0.1 eV. This study clearly establishes the synergistic effect between the higher excitations and basis set completeness on the electron affinity when the 2s electrons are correlated.

  7. Nonlocal integrable partners to generalized MKdV and two-dimensional Toda lattice equation in the formalism of a dressing method with quantized spectral parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degasperis, A.; Lebedev, D.; Olshanetsky, M.; Pakuliak, S.; Perelomov, A.; Santini, P.

    1991-10-01

    Two new hierarchies, MILW2 and a two-dimensional nonlocal Toda lattice are constructed. The characteristic property of the first one is the connection with the ILW2 hierarchy by means of gl(2) Miura transformation. On the other hand, MILW2 equations turn out to be symmetry equations for a two-dimensional nonlocal Toda lattice. A new version of the dressing technique with quantized spectral parameter is proposed.

  8. Affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.S.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1995-02-15

    A new technique, affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry, is described. In this method, a chemically modified membrane is used to selectively adsorb analytes bearing a particular functional group and concentrate them from solution. Release of the bound analyte results in its transfer across the membrane and allows it to be monitored mass spectrometrically, using, in the present case, a benchtop ion trap instrument. Alkylamine-modified cellulose membranes are used to bind substituted benzaldehydes through imine formation at high pH. Release of the bound aldehyde is achieved by acid hydrolysis of the surface-bound imine. Benzaldehyde is detected with excellent specificity at 10 ppm in a complex mixture using this method. Using the enrichment capability of the membrane, a full mass spectrum of benzaldehyde can be measured at a concentration of 10 ppb. The behavior of a variety of other aldehydes is also discussed to illustrate the capabilities of the method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  10. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  11. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  12. Characterizing traveling-wave collisions in granular chains starting from integrable limits: The case of the Korteweg-de Vries equation and the Toda lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Sen, S.; Hoffman, A.

    2014-08-01

    Our aim in the present work is to develop approximations for the collisional dynamics of traveling waves in the context of granular chains in the presence of precompression. To that effect, we aim to quantify approximations of the relevant Hertzian FPU-type lattice through both the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and the Toda lattice. Using the availability in such settings of both one-soliton and two-soliton solutions in explicit analytical form, we initialize such coherent structures in the granular chain and observe the proximity of the resulting evolution to the underlying integrable (KdV or Toda) model. While the KdV offers the possibility to accurately capture collisions of solitary waves propagating in the same direction, the Toda lattice enables capturing both copropagating and counterpropagating soliton collisions. The error in the approximation is quantified numerically and connections to bounds established in the mathematical literature are also given.

  13. Solutions for the Mikhailov-Shabat-Yamilov Difference-Differential Equations and Generalized Solutions for the Volterra and the Toda Lattice Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, K.

    1998-03-01

    We present two types of mixed 1-rational N-soliton solutions and two types of special solutions for four types of Volterra-related difference-differential equations arising in Mikhailov, Shabat and Yamilov's lists. We also find new expressions of mixed 1-rational N-soliton solutions for the Volterra and the Toda lattice equations based on the invariance of Gibbon and Tabor's equation (J. Math. Phys. 26 (1985), 1956) under the fractional linear transformation. By taking appropriate limits of wave numbers, we find some new rational solutions for the Volterra and the Toda lattice equations. We also present elliptic function solutions for the Volterra and the Toda lattice equations different from known ones based on the same formulation.

  14. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  15. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  16. Affine Covariant Features for Fisheye Distortion Local Modelling.

    PubMed

    Furnari, Antonino; Farinella, Giovanni; Bruna, Arcangelo; Battiato, Sebastiano

    2016-11-10

    Perspective cameras are the most popular imaging sensors used in Computer Vision. However, many application fields including automotive, surveillance and robotics, require the use of wide angle cameras (e.g., fisheye), which allow to acquire a larger portion of the scene using a single device at the cost of the introduction of noticeable radial distortion in the images. Affine covariant feature detectors have proven successful in a variety of Computer Vision applications including object recognition, image registration and visual search. Moreover, their robustness to a series of variabilities related to both the scene and the image acquisition process has been thoroughly studied in the literature. In this paper, we investigate their effectiveness on fisheye images providing both theoretical and experimental analyses. As theoretical outcome, we show that the inherently non-linear radial distortion can be locally approximated by linear functions with a reasonably small error. The experimental analysis builds on Mikolajczyk's benchmark to assess the robustness of three popular affine region detectors (i.e., Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER), Harris and Hessian affine region detectors), with respect to different variabilities as well as to radial distortion. To support the evaluations, we rely on the Oxford dataset and introduce a novel benchmark dataset comprising 50 images depicting different scene categories. Experiments are carried out on rectilinear images to which radial distortion is artificially added, and on real-world images acquired using fisheye lenses. Our analysis points out that affine region detectors can be effectively employed directly on fisheye images and that the radial distortion is locally modelled as an additional affine variability.

  17. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  18. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  19. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-04-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands.

  20. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  1. Affinity capillary electrophoresis: the theory of electromigration.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Pavel; Dvořák, Martin; Ansorge, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We focus on the state-of-the-art theory of electromigration under single and multiple complexation equilibrium. Only 1:1 complexation stoichiometry is discussed because of its unique status in the field of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). First, we summarize the formulas for the effective mobility in various ACE systems as they appeared since the pioneering days in 1992 up to the most recent theories till 2015. Disturbing phenomena that do not alter the mobility of the analyte directly but cause an unexpected peak broadening have been studied only recently and are also discussed in this paper. Second, we turn our attention to the viscosity effects in ACE. Change in the background electrolyte viscosity is unavoidable in ACE but numerous observations scattered throughout the literature have not been reviewed previously. This leads to an uncritical employment of correction factors that may or may not be appropriate in practice. Finally, we consider the ionic strength effects in ACE, too. Limitations of the current theories are also discussed and the tasks identified where open problems still prevail. Graphical Abstract A weak base (A) undergoes an acidic-basic equilibria (in blue) and migrates with an electrophoretic mobility of [Formula: see text]. Simultaneously, it interacts with a selector (sel) while the analyte-selector complex migrates with an electrophoretic mobility of [Formula: see text]. The strength of the interaction (in orange) is governed by the binding constant, K A , and the concentration of the selector, c sel . This all gives the analyte an effective mobility of [Formula: see text] and moves it out of the zero position (EOF; right top insert). The interaction of the positively charged analyte with the neutral selector slows down the analyte with increasing selector concentration (right bottom insert).

  2. The role of nonmetricity in metric-affine theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo

    2014-02-01

    The intriguing choice to treat alternative theories of gravity by means of the Palatini approach, namely elevating the affine connection to the role of independent variable, contains the seed of some interesting (usually under-explored) generalizations of General Relativity, the metric-affine theories of gravity. The peculiar aspect of these theories is to provide a natural way for matter fields to be coupled to the independent connection through the covariant derivative built from the connection itself. Adopting a procedure borrowed from the effective field theory prescriptions, we study the dynamics of metric-affine theories of increasing order, that in the complete version include invariants built from curvature, nonmetricity and torsion. We show that even including terms obtained from nonmetricity and torsion to the second order density Lagrangian, the connection lacks dynamics and acts as an auxiliary field that can be algebraically eliminated, resulting in some extra interactions between metric and matter fields. Dedicated to the memory of Francesco Caracciolo

  3. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  4. Affine sphere spacetimes which satisfy the relativity principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Lorentz-Finsler spacetime theories the relativity principle holds at a spacetime point if the indicatrix (observer space) is homogeneous. We point out that in four spacetime dimensions there are just three kinematical models which respect an exact form of the relativity principle and for which all observers agree on the spacetime volume. They have necessarily affine sphere indicatrices. For them every observer which looks at a flash of light emitted by a point would observe, respectively, an expanding (a) sphere, (b) tetrahedron, or (c) cone, with barycenter at the point. The first model corresponds to Lorentzian relativity, the second one has been studied by several authors though the relationship with affine spheres passed unnoticed, and the last one has not been previously recognized and it is studied here in some detail. The symmetry groups are O+(3 ,1 ),R3,O+(2 ,1 )×R , respectively. In the second part, devoted to the general relativistic theory, we show that the field equations can be obtained by gauging the Finsler Lagrangian symmetry while avoiding direct use of Finslerian curvatures. We construct some notable affine sphere spacetimes which in the appropriate velocity limit return the Schwarzschild, Kerr-Schild, Kerr-de Sitter, Kerr-Newman, Taub, and Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetimes, respectively.

  5. Stability of flavin semiquinones in the gas phase: the electron affinity, proton affinity, and hydrogen atom affinity of lumiflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlan; Papson, Kaitlin; Ochran, Richard; Ridge, Douglas P

    2013-11-07

    Examination of electron transfer and proton transfer reactions of lumiflavin and proton transfer reactions of the lumiflavin radical anion by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is described. From the equilibrium constant determined for electron transfer between 1,4-naphthoquinone and lumiflavin the electron affinity of lumiflavin is deduced to be 1.86 ± 0.1 eV. Measurements of the rate constants and efficiencies for proton transfer reactions indicate that the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion is between that of difluoroacetate (331.0 kcal/mol) and p-formyl-phenoxide (333.0 kcal/mol). Combining the electron affinity of lumiflavin with the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion gives a lumiflavin hydrogen atom affinity of 59.7 ± 2.2 kcal/mol. The ΔG298 deduced from these results for adding an H atom to gas phase lumiflavin, 52.1 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with ΔG298 for adding an H atom to aqueous lumiflavin from electrochemical measurements in the literature, 51.0 kcal/mol, and that from M06-L density functional calculations in the literature, 51.2 kcal/mol, suggesting little, if any, solvent effect on the H atom addition. The proton affinity of lumiflavin deduced from the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer reaction between lumiflavin and 2-picoline is 227.3 ± 2.0 kcal mol(-1). Density functional theory calculations on isomers of protonated lumiflavin provide a basis for assigning the most probable site of protonation as position 1 on the isoalloxazine ring and for estimating the ionization potentials of lumiflavin neutral radicals.

  6. Optimizing molecular electrostatic interactions: Binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik

    The design of molecules that bind tightly and specifically to designated target molecules is an important goal in many fields of molecular science. While the shape of the molecule to be designed is a relatively well defined problem with an intuitive answer, determination of the distribution of electrostatic charge that it should have in order to possess high affinity and/or specificity for a target is a subtle problem involving a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred due to the removal of solvent from the interacting surfaces of the reactants, and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. In this thesis, a theoretical formalism based on a continuum electrostatic approximation is developed in which charge distributions leading to optimal affinity and/or high specificity may be obtained. Methods for obtaining these charge distributions are developed in detail and analytical solutions are obtained in several special cases (where the molecules are shaped as infinite membranes, spheres, and spheroids). Their existence and non-uniqueness are also shown, and it is proven that the resulting optimized electrostatic binding free energies are favorable (negative) in many cases of physical interest. Affinity and specificity optimization is then applied to the chorismate mutase family of enzymes, including the catalytic antibody 1F7. It is shown that affinity optimization can be used to suggest better molecular inhibitors and that specificity optimization can be used to help elucidate molecular function and possibly aid in the creation of improved haptens. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  7. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  8. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  9. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  10. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same…

  11. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  12. Affine transformations from aerial photos to computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peet, F. G.; Mack, A. R.; Crosson, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    During the development of a project to estimate wheat production, it became necessary to pull data, corresponding to particular fields in a test site, off an ERTS computer compatible tape. Aerial photographs and topographic maps were on hand for the test site. A method was devised, using an affine transformation, to relate the aerial photographs or topographic maps to the tapes. One can thereby access data on the tape corresponding to regions covered by only a few pixels. The theory can be used for the registration of two tapes for the same area and for the geometric correction of images.

  13. Affine coherent states and Toeplitz operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutníková, Mária; Hutník, Ondrej

    2012-06-01

    We study a parameterized family of Toeplitz operators in the context of affine coherent states based on the Calderón reproducing formula (= resolution of unity on L_2( {R})) and the specific admissible wavelets (= affine coherent states in L_2( {R})) related to Laguerre functions. Symbols of such Calderón-Toeplitz operators as individual coordinates of the affine group (= upper half-plane with the hyperbolic geometry) are considered. In this case, a certain class of pseudo-differential operators, their properties and their operator algebras are investigated. As a result of this study, the Fredholm symbol algebras of the Calderón-Toeplitz operator algebras for these particular cases of symbols are described. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

  14. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  15. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  16. Use of Affinity Diagrams as Instructional Tools in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselden, Polly G.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes how the affinity diagram, a tool for gathering information and organizing it into natural groupings, can be used in inclusive classrooms. It discusses how students can be taught to use an affinity diagram, how affinity diagrams can be used to reflect many voices, and how affinity diagrams can be used to plan class projects.…

  17. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  18. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  19. On the electron affinity of B2

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vanda A.; Taylor, Peter

    2009-02-02

    We present the results of high-level ab initio calculations on the electron affinity of B2. Our new best estimate of 1.93±0.03 eV is in agreement with previous calculations as well as the sole existing experimental estimate of 1.8 eV, as derived from quantities with an uncertainty of 0.4 eV. The electron affinity of atomic boron, which is much smaller, is also calculated for comparison, and again found to be in good agreement with experiment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  20. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  1. Evidence of multi-affinity in the Japanese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2000-04-01

    Fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (Tokyo Stock Price Index: TOPIX) are analyzed using a multi-affine analysis method. In the research to date, only some simulated self-affine models have shown multi-affinity. In most experiments using observations of self-affine fractal profiles, multi-affinity has not been found. However, we find evidence of multi-affinity in fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (TOPIX). The qth-order Hurst exponent Hq varies with changes in q. This multi-affinity indicates that there are plural mechanisms that affect the same time scale as stock market price fluctuation dynamics.

  2. On modality and complexity of affine embeddings

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    2001-08-31

    Let G be a reductive algebraic group and let H be a reductive subgroup of G. The modality of a G-variety X is the largest number of the parameters in a continuous family of G-orbits in X. A precise formula for the maximum value of the modality over all affine embeddings of the homogeneous space G/H is obtained.

  3. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  4. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  5. Stabilization of the Motion of Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, E. A.; Martynyuk, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient conditions for the stability of a nonlinear affine system subject to interval initial conditions are established. These conditions are based on new estimates of the norms of the solutions of the systems of perturbed equations of motion. This stabilization method is used to analyze an electromechanical system with permanent magnet

  6. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  7. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  8. Cadmium accumulation characteristics of the winter farmland weeds Cardamine hirsuta Linn. and Gnaphalium affine D. Don.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lijin; Shi, Jun; Liu, Qihua; Liao, Ming'an; Mei, Luoyin

    2014-07-01

    In a preliminary study, we found that the cadmium (Cd) concentrations in shoots of the winter farmland weeds Cardamine hirsuta Linn. and Gnaphalium affine D. Don exceeded the critical value of a Cd-hyperaccumulator (100 mg kg(-1)), indicating that these two farmland weeds might be Cd-hyperaccumulators. In this study, we grew these species in soil containing various concentrations of Cd to further evaluate their Cd accumulation characteristics. The biomasses of C. hirsuta and G. affine decreased with increasing Cd concentrations in the soil, while the root/shoot ratio and the Cd concentrations in shoot tissues increased. The Cd concentrations in shoots of C. hirsuta and G. affine reached 121.96 and 143.91 mg kg(-1), respectively, at the soil Cd concentration of 50 mg kg(-1). Both of these concentrations exceeded the critical value of a Cd-hyperaccumulator (100 mg kg(-1)). The shoot bioconcentration factors of C. hirsuta and G. affine were greater than 1. The translocation factor of C. hirsuta was less than 1 and that of G. affine was greater than 1. These findings indicated that C. hirsuta is a Cd-accumulator and G. affine is Cd-hyperaccumulator. Both plants are distributed widely in the field, and they could be used to remediate Cd-contaminated farmland soil in winter.

  9. Isotope shift in the sulfur electron affinity: Observation and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Thomas; Scharf, Oliver; Godefroid, Michel; Froese Fischer, Charlotte

    2010-04-15

    The sulfur electron affinities {sup e}A(S) are measured by photodetachment microscopy for the two isotopes {sup 32}S and {sup 34}S (16 752.975 3(41) and 16 752.977 6(85) cm{sup -1}, respectively). The isotope shift in the electron affinity is found to be more probably positive, {sup e}A({sup 34}S)- {sup e}A({sup 32}S) =+0.0023(70) cm{sup -1}, but the uncertainty allows for the possibility that it may be either ''normal''[{sup e}A({sup 34}S) > {sup e}A({sup 32}S)] or ''anomalous''[{sup e}A({sup 34}S) < {sup e}A({sup 32}S)]. The isotope shift is estimated theoretically using elaborate correlation models, monitoring the electron affinity and the mass polarization term expectation value. The theoretical analysis predicts a very large specific mass shift (SMS) that counterbalances the normal mass shift (NMS) and produces an anomalous isotope shift {sup e}A({sup 34}S)- {sup e}A({sup 32}S) =-0.0053(24) cm{sup -1}, field shift corrections included. The total isotope shift can always be written as the sum of the NMS (here +0.0169 cm{sup -1}) and a residual isotope shift (RIS). Since the NMS has nearly no uncertainty, the comparison between experimental and theoretical RIS is more fair. With respective values of -0.0146(70) cm{sup -1} and -0.0222(24) cm{sup -1}, these residual isotope shifts are found to agree within the estimated uncertainties.

  10. Optimal Affine-Invariant Point Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mauro S.; Haralick, Robert M.; Phillips, Tsaiyun I.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    1989-03-01

    The affine-transformation matching scheme proposed by Hummel and Wolfson (1988) is very efficient in a model-based matching system, not only in terms of the computational complexity involved, but also in terms of the simplicity of the method. This paper addresses the implementation of the affine-invariant point matching, applied to the problem of recognizing and determining the pose of sheet metal parts. It points out errors that can occur with this method due to quantization, stability, symmetry, and noise problems. By beginning with an explicit noise model which the Hummel and Wolfson technique lacks, we can derive an optimal approach which overcomes these problems. We show that results obtained with the new algorithm are clearly better than the results from the original method.

  11. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  12. Negative affinity X-ray photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Duckett, S.

    1974-01-01

    A new X-ray image intensifier is described. The device should eventually have a quantum efficiency which is an order of magnitude greater than that of presently available high spatial resolution X-ray detectors, such as microchannel plates. The new intesifier is based upon a GaAs crystal photocathode which is activated to achieve negative electron affinity. Details concerning the detector concept are discussed together with the theoretical relations involved, X-ray data, and optical data.

  13. High-affinity interactions of ligands at recombinant Guinea pig 5HT7 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. E.; Ragan, J. E.; Pearlman, R. S.; Brusniak, M. Y.-. K.; Eglen, R. M.; Bonhaus, D. W.; Tenner, T. E., Jr.; Miller, J. D.

    2001-10-01

    The serotonin 5HT7 receptor has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes from circadian rhythms [1] to depression and schizophrenia. Clonal cell lines heterologously expressing recombinant receptors offer good models for understanding drug-receptor interactions and development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) is an important modern QSAR procedure that relates the steric and electrostatic fields of a set of aligned compounds to affinity. Here, we utilized CoMFA to predict affinity for a number of high-affinity ligands at the recombinant guinea pig 5HT7 receptor. Using R-lisuride as the template, a final CoMFA model was derived using procedures similar to those of our recent papers [2, 3, 4] The final cross-validated model accounted for >85% of the variance in the compound affinity data, while the final non-cross validated model accounted for >99% of the variance. Model evaluation was done using cross-validation methods with groups of 5 ligands. Twenty cross-validation runs yielded an average predictive r2(q2) of 0.779 ± 0.015 (range: 0.669-0.867). Furthermore, 3D-chemical database search queries derived from the model yielded hit lists of promising agents with high structural similarity to the template. Together, these results suggest a possible basis for high-affinity drug action at 5HT7 receptors.

  14. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture.

  15. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  16. Impact of crystalline quality on neuronal affinity of pristine graphene.

    PubMed

    Veliev, Farida; Briançon-Marjollet, Anne; Bouchiat, Vincent; Delacour, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Due to its outstanding mechanical and electrical properties as well as chemical inertness, graphene has attracted a growing interest in the field of bioelectric interfacing. Herein, we investigate the suitability of pristine, i.e. without a cell adhesive coating, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer graphene to act as a platform for neuronal growth. We study the development of primary hippocampal neurons grown on bare graphene (transferred on glass coverslip) for up to 5 days and show that pristine graphene significantly improves the neurons adhesion and outgrowth at the early stage of culture (1-2 days in vitro). At the later development stage, neurons grown on coating free graphene (untreated with poly-L-lysine) show remarkably well developed neuritic architecture similar to those cultured on conventional poly-L-lysine coated glass coverslips. This exceptional possibility to bypass the adhesive coating allows a direct electrical contact of graphene to the cells and reveals its great potential for chronic medical implants and tissue engineering. Moreover, regarding the controversial results obtained on the neuronal affinity of pristine graphene and its ability to support neuronal growth without the need of polymer or protein coating, we found that the crystallinity of CVD grown graphene plays an important role in neuronal attachment, outgrowth and axonal specification. In particular, we show that the decreasing crystalline quality of graphene tunes the neuronal affinity from highly adhesive to fully repellent.

  17. Integrin avidity regulation: are changes in affinity and conformation underemphasized?

    PubMed

    Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-10-01

    Integrins play critical roles in development, wound healing, immunity and cancer. Central to their function is their unique ability to modulate dynamically their adhesiveness through both affinity- and valency-based mechanisms. Recent advances have shed light on the structural basis for affinity regulation and on the signaling mechanisms responsible for both affinity and valency modes of regulation.

  18. Informe sobre el avance del proyecto de determinaciones de V sen i para todas las estrellas B más brillantes que 6.5 mag.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, H.; Levato, H.

    Se ha finalizado con la determinación de V sen i para todas las estrellas B más brillantes que 6.5 mag y al norte de -30 grados de declinación. Esta muestra involucra casi 1000 estrellas. Las observaciones fueron realizadas desde KPNO. Mientras tanto, se ha completado desde CASLEO la observación de 350 estrellas B más brillantes que 6.5 mag. al sur de -30 grados. Además de la determinación de la rotación axial se determinan, en los casos posibles, los anchos equivalentes de las líneas 4471 Ådel He I y 4481 Ådel Mg II.

  19. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  20. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  1. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  2. On the electron affinity of Be2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the electron affinity (EA) of Be2 using a large Slater-type orbital basis set and extensive correlation based upon a CASSCF reference are reported. The adiabatic EAs are estimated to be 0.44 eV for the 2Sigma sub g(+) state and 0.56 eV for the 2Pi sub u state. The extra electron attaches into an empty bonding orbital, causing a shortening of the bond length and an increase in omega(e). The D(e) of the 2Pi sub u state of Be2 is six times as large as the D(e) of Be2.

  3. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  4. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  5. Extraction of haemoglobin from human blood by affinity precipitation using a haptoglobin-based stimuli-responsive affinity macroligand.

    PubMed

    Stocker-Majd, Gisela; Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2008-06-13

    Affinity precipitation was compared to affinity chromatography and batch adsorption as the final purification step in a protocol for the isolation of haemoglobin from human blood. Haptoglobin was the affinity ligand. The first steps on the process were realized by traditional methods (lyses of red blood cells followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation). For affinity chromatography (and batch adsorption) the ligand was linked to Sepharose, for affinity precipitation to a thermoresponsive polymer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Five haptoglobin-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bioconjugates (affinity macroligands) were constructed with different polymer: haptoglobin-coupling ratios. Conjugation of haptoglobin to the soluble poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) apparently does not change the interaction thermodynamics with haemoglobin, as the haemoglobin binding constants calculated by a Scatchard analysis for the affinity macroligand were of the same order of magnitude as those described in the literature for the haemoglobin-haptoglobin complex in solution. Two elution protocols were used for haemoglobin release from the various affinity materials, one at pH 2, the other with 5 M urea at pH 11. Both affinity chromatography and affinity precipitation yielded a pure haemoglobin of high quality. Compared to the affinity chromatography, affinity precipitation showed a significantly higher ligand efficiency (ratio of the experimental capacity to the theoretical one). The method thus makes better use of the expensive affinity ligands. As affinity precipitation only requires small temperature changes to bring about precipitation/redissolution of the affinity complexes and a centrifugation step for recovery of the precipitate, the method in addition has advantages in term of scalability and simplicity.

  6. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  7. Affinity-based target deconvolution of safranal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Affinity-based target deconvolution is an emerging method for the identification of interactions between drugs/drug candidates and cellular proteins, and helps to predict potential activities and side effects of a given compound. In the present study, we hypothesized that a part of safranal pharmacological effects, one of the major constituent of Crocus sativus L., relies on its physical interaction with target proteins. Methods Affinity chromatography solid support was prepared by covalent attachment of safranal to agarose beads. After passing tissue lysate through the column, safranal-bound proteins were isolated and separated on SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot software. Results and major conclusion Data showed that safranal physically binds to beta actin, cytochrome b-c1 complex sub-unit 1, trifunctional enzyme sub-unit beta and ATP synthase sub-unit alpha and beta. These interactions may explain part of safranal’s pharmacological effects. However, phenotypic and/or biological relevance of these interactions remains to be elucidated by future pharmacological studies. PMID:23514587

  8. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  9. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  10. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  11. Development of thermo-responsive hydrogels with immobilized metal affinity groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young-Seo

    A Hydrogel is defined as a polymeric material which possesses the ability to swell in water and retain a significant fraction of water within its structure, but which will not dissolve in water. Hydrogels have been studied by many researchers because they have many useful applications in bio related fields such as drug delivery, bioseparation, and etc. In this thesis, a new hydrogel system that possesses the characteristics of thermo-responsive swelling property and immobilized metal affinity was developed. This affinity material consists of a hydrogel with stimuli responsive swelling characteristics to provide modulated diffusivity and size selectivity. Covalently bound ligands within hydrogels provide highly selective and tunable affinity-based separation. Swelling and affinity properties can be independently controlled by regulating the temperature or pH of the solution to provide a sequential separations scheme. The developed affinity hydrogels incorporate multiple modes of separations or recovery and concentrate specific solutes in chromatographic systems. Thermal sensitive affinity hydrogels were synthesized from a N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer, a crosslinker (1,4-bismethylene acrylamide) and a ligand attachable co-monomer acrylamide (AAm), using free radical chemistry. The ligand of choice is the metal affinity iminodiacetic acid (IDA) which is bound to hydrogel backbone via a spacer arm. The challenge lay in incorporating affinity ligands without affecting the temperature induced swelling of the hydrogel. Thus, PNIPAAm-Am hydrogels are functionalized with a spacer arm (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether), the chelating ligand IDA and a divalent metal ion (Cu2+). This ligand binds histidine groups at high pH and releases them upon protonation of histidine at low pH. This can be used to separate proteins based on the occurrence of surface histidine residues in them. The resulting affinity hydrogel was shown to adsorb the protein chicken egg white

  12. Prediction of SAMPL4 host-guest binding affinities using funnel metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Ya-Wen; Söderhjelm, Pär

    2014-04-01

    Accurately predicting binding affinities between ligands and macromolecules has been a much sought-after goal. A tremendous amount of resources can be saved in the pharmaceutical industry through accurate binding-affinity prediction and hence correct decision-making for the drug discovery processes. Owing to the structural complexity of macromolecules, one of the issues in binding affinity prediction using molecular dynamics is the adequate sampling of the conformational space. Recently, the funnel metadynamics method (Limongelli et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110:6358, 2013) was developed to enhance the sampling of the ligand at the binding site as well as in the solvated state, and offer the possibility to predict the absolute binding free energy. We apply funnel metadynamics to predict host-guest binding affinities for the cucurbit[7]uril host as part of the SAMPL4 blind challenge. Using total simulation times of 300-400 ns per ligand, we show that the errors due to inadequate sampling are below 1 kcal/mol. However, despite the large investment in terms of computational time, the results compared to experiment are not better than a random guess. As we obtain differences of up to 11 kcal/mol when switching between two commonly used force fields (with automatically generated parameters), we strongly believe that in the pursuit of accurate binding free energies a more careful force-field parametrization is needed to address this type of system.

  13. The affine cohomology spaces and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraj, Nizar Ben; Laraiedh, Ismail

    2016-12-01

    We compute the nth cohomology space of the affine Lie superalgebra 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) on the (1,1)-dimensional real superspace with coefficient in a large class of 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1)-modules M. We apply our results to the module of weight densities and the module of linear differential operators acting on a superspace of weighted densities. This work is the generalization of a result by Basdouri et al. [The linear 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-invariant differential operators on weighted densities on the superspace ℝ1|n and 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-relative cohomology, Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 10 (2013), Article ID: 1320004, 9 pp.

  14. Dynamic friction of self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Stéphane

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the velocity dependence of the friction between two rigid blocks limited by a self-affine surface such as the one generated by a crack. The upper solid is subjected either to gravity or to an external elastic stiffness, and is driven horizontally at constant velocity, V, while the lower solid is fixed. For low velocities, the apparent friction coefficient is constant. For high velocities, the apparent friction is shown to display a velocity weakening. The weakening can be related to the variation of the mean contact time due to the occurrence of jumps during the motions. The cross-over between these two regimes corresponds to a characteristic velocity which depends on the geometry of the surfaces and on the mean normal force. In the case of simple gravity loading, the velocity dependence of the apparent friction at high velocities is proportional to 1/V^2 where V is the imposed tangential velocity. In the case of external elastic stiffness, two velocity weakening regimes can be identified, the first is identical to the gravity case with a 1/V^2 dependence, the second appears at higher velocities and is characterized by a 1/V variation. The characteristic velocity of this second cross-over depends on the roughness and the elastic stiffness. The statistical distribution of ballistic flight distances is analysed, and is shown to reveal in all cases the self-affinity of the contacting surfaces. Nous analysons la dépendence en vitesse du frottement entre deux solides limités par une surface rugueuse auto-affine comme celle d'une surface de fracture. Le solide supérieur est soumis soit à la gravité, soit à une raideur élastique externe, et est entraîné à vitesse horizontale constante V sur le solide inférieur fixe. A faible vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent, est constant. A forte vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent devient inversement proportionnel à la vitesse. Cette dépendance peut être reliée à la variation du temps

  15. A new affine-invariant image matching method based on SIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-cheng; Chen, Qian; Chen, Hai-xin; Cheng, Hong-chang; Gong, Zhen-fei

    2013-09-01

    Local invariant feature extraction, as one of the main problems in the field of computer vision, has been widely applied to image matching, splicing and target recognition etc. Lowe's scale invariant feature transform (known as SIFT) algorithm has attracted much attention due to its invariance to scale, rotation and illumination. However, SIFT is not robust to affine deformations, because it is based on the DoG detector which extracts keypoints in a circle region. Besides, the feature descriptor is represented by a 128-dimensional vector, which means that the algorithm complexity is extremely large especially when there is a great quantity of keypoints in the image. In this paper, a new feature descriptor, which is robust to affine deformations, is proposed. Considering that circles turn to be ellipses after affine deformations, some improvements have been made. Firstly, the Gaussian image pyramids are constructed by convoluting the source image and the elliptical Gaussian kernel with two volatile parameters, orientation and eccentricity. In addition, the two parameters are discretely selected in order to imitate the possibilities of the affine deformation, which can make sure that anisotropic regions are transformed into isotropic ones. Next, all extreme points can be extracted as the candidates for the affine-invariant keypoints in the image pyramids. After accurate keypoints localization is performed, the secondary moment of the keypoints' neighborhood is calculated to identify the elliptical region which is affineinvariant, the same as SIFT, the main orientation of the keypoints can be determined and the feature descriptor is generated based on the histogram constructed in this region. At last, the PCA method for the 128-dimensional descriptor's reduction is used to improve the computer calculating efficiency. The experiments show that this new algorithm inherits all SIFT's original advantages, and has a good resistance to affine deformations; what's more, it

  16. Smooth affine shear tight frames: digitization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaosheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly discuss one of the recent developed directional multiscale representation systems: smooth affine shear tight frames. A directional wavelet tight frame is generated by isotropic dilations and translations of directional wavelet generators, while an affine shear tight frame is generated by anisotropic dilations, shears, and translations of shearlet generators. These two tight frames are actually connected in the sense that the affine shear tight frame can be obtained from a directional wavelet tight frame through subsampling. Consequently, an affine shear tight frame indeed has an underlying filter bank from the MRA structure of its associated directional wavelet tight frame. We call such filter banks affine shear filter banks, which can be designed completely in the frequency domain. We discuss the digitization of affine shear filter banks and their implementations: the forward and backward digital affine shear transforms. Redundancy rate and computational complexity of digital affine shear transforms are also investigated in this paper. Numerical experiments and comparisons in image/video processing show the advantages of digital affine shear transforms over many other state-of-art directional multiscale representation systems.

  17. Noncompetitive affinity assays of glucagon and amylin using mirror-image aptamers as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven; Roper, Michael G

    2016-03-21

    The ability to detect picomolar concentrations of glucagon and amylin using fluorescently labeled mirror-image aptamers, so-called Spiegelmers, is demonstrated. Spiegelmers rival the specificity of antibodies and overcome the problem of biostability of natural aptamers in a biological matrix. Using Spiegelmers as affinity probes, noncompetitive capillary electrophoresis affinity assays of glucagon and murine amylin were developed and optimized. The detection limit for glucagon was 6 pM and for amylin was 40 pM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and -2 did not interfere with the glucagon assay, while the amylin assay showed cross-reactivity to calcitonin gene related peptide. The developed assays were combined with a competitive immunoassay for insulin to measure glucagon, amylin, and insulin secretion from batches of islets after incubation with different glucose concentrations. The development of these assays is an important step towards incorporation into an online measurement system for monitoring dynamic secretion from single islets.

  18. Deconstructing Free Energies in the Law of Matching Water Affinities.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Beck, Thomas

    2017-02-23

    The law of matching water affinities (LMWA) is explored in classical molecular dynamics simulations of several alkali halide ion pairs, spanning the size range from small kosmotropes to large chaotropes. The ion-ion potentials of mean force (PMFs) are computed using three methods: the local molecular field theory (LMFT), the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM), and integration of the average force. All three methods produce the same total PMF for a given ion pair. In addition, LMFT-based partitioning into van der Waals and local and far-field electrostatic free energies and assessment of the enthalpic, entropic, and ion-water components yield insights into the origins of the observed free energy profiles in water. The results highlight the importance of local electrostatic interactions in determining the shape of the PMFs, while longer-ranged interactions enhance the overall ion-ion attraction, as expected in a dielectric continuum model. The association equilibrium constants are estimated from the smooth WHAM curves and compared to available experimental conductance data. By examining the variations in the average hydration numbers of ions with ion-ion distance, a correlation of the water structure in the hydration shells with the free energy features is found.

  19. Affine connection form of Regge calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Regge action is represented analogously to how the Palatini action for general relativity (GR) as some functional of the metric and a general connection as independent variables represents the Einstein-Hilbert action. The piecewise flat (or simplicial) spacetime of Regge calculus is equipped with some world coordinates and some piecewise affine metric which is completely defined by the set of edge lengths and the world coordinates of the vertices. The conjugate variables are the general nondegenerate matrices on the three-simplices which play the role of a general discrete connection. Our previous result on some representation of the Regge calculus action in terms of the local Euclidean (Minkowsky) frame vectors and orthogonal connection matrices as independent variables is somewhat modified for the considered case of the general linear group GL(4, R) of the connection matrices. As a result, we have some action invariant w.r.t. arbitrary change of coordinates of the vertices (and related GL(4, R) transformations in the four-simplices). Excluding GL(4, R) connection from this action via the equations of motion we have exactly the Regge action for the considered spacetime.

  20. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  1. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  2. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  3. Cambrian trilobites with Siberian affinities, southwestern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A.R.; Egbert, R.M.; Sullivan, R.; Knoth, J.S.

    1985-02-01

    Cambrian trilobites occur in two levels (about 7 m apart) in the core of a large, complex anticlinal structure in the area between the Taylor Mountains and the Hoholitna River in southwestern Alaska. The lower collection contains Erbia, Macannaia (a species close to Soviet forms described as Pagetia ferox Lermontova), two species of Kootenia (including one perhaps cospecific with forms from the central Brooks range), and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. It is clear that biogeographic affinities are with the transitional facies of the eastern Siberian platform and the south Siberian foldbelt. In Soviet terms, the age of the collection falls in a disputed interval called latest Early Cambrian (Tojonian) by some authors, and earliest Middle Cambrian (Amgan) by others. In North American terms, Macannaia is known only from early Middle Cambrian beds. The younger collection contains abundant agnostids, a variety of conocoryphids, Paradoxides, and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. This is an assemblage of undoubted late Middle Cambrian age, comparable to faunas described from the Maya State of the Siberian platform and the Paradoxides paradoxissimus Stage of the Baltic region. Both faunas are from ocean-facing or outer shelf environments. None of the key non-agnostid or non-pagetiid elements have been seen previously in deposits of Cambrian North America.

  4. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  5. Macroporous chitin affinity membranes for lysozyme separation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, E; Zeng, X

    1997-12-20

    Macroporous chitin membranes with high, controlled porosity and good mechanical properties have been prepared using a technique developed in this laboratory based on silica particles as porogen. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme. Chitin membranes (1 mm thickness) can be operated at high fluxes (>/=1.1 mL/min/cm(2)) corresponding to pressure drops >/=2 psi. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme ( approximately 50 mg/mL membrane) is by an order of magnitude higher than that of the chitin beads employed in column separation. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the membranes showed very high selectivity towards lysozyme. The effect of some important operation parameters, such as the flow rates during loading and elution were investigated. Lysozyme of very high purity (>98%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and from egg white. The results indicate that the macroporous chitin membranes can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme at large scale. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 610-617, 1997.

  6. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  7. Blind prediction of host-guest binding affinities: A new SAMPL3 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Muddana, Hari S.; Varnado, C. Daniel; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Urbach, Adam R.; Isaacs, Lyle; Geballe, Matthew T.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The computational prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities is of central interest in early-stage drug-discovery, and there is a widely recognized need for improved methods. Low molecular weight receptors and their ligands—i.e. host-guest systems – represent valuable test-beds for such affinity prediction methods, because their small size makes for fast calculations and relatively facile numerical convergence. The SAMPL3 community exercise included the first ever blind prediction challenge for host-guest binding affinities, through the incorporation of 11 new host-guest complexes. Ten participating research groups addressed this challenge with a variety of approaches. Statistical assessment indicates that, although most methods performed well at predicting some general trends in binding affinity, overall accuracy was not high, as all the methods suffered from either poor correlation or high RMS errors or both. There was no clear advantage in using explicit vs. implicit solvent models, any particular force field, or any particular approach to conformational sampling. In a few cases, predictions using very similar energy models but different sampling and/or free-energy methods resulted in significantly different results. The protonation states of one host and some guest molecules emerged as key uncertainties beyond the choice of computational approach. The present results have implications for methods development and future blind prediction exercises. PMID:22366955

  8. Fast and accurate registration techniques for affine and nonrigid alignment of MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Xiu; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Registration of magnetic resonance brain images is a geometric operation that determines point-wise correspondences between two brains. It remains a difficult task due to the highly convoluted structure of the brain. This paper presents novel methods, Brain Image Registration Tools (BIRT), that can rapidly and accurately register brain images by utilizing the brain structure information estimated from image derivatives. Source and target image spaces are related by affine transformation and non-rigid deformation. The deformation field is modeled by a set of Wendland's radial basis functions hierarchically deployed near the salient brain structures. In general, nonlinear optimization is heavily engaged in the parameter estimation for affine/non-rigid transformation and good initial estimates are thus essential to registration performance. In this work, the affine registration is initialized by a rigid transformation, which can robustly estimate the orientation and position differences of brain images. The parameters of the affine/non-rigid transformation are then hierarchically estimated in a coarse-to-fine manner by maximizing an image similarity measure, the correlation ratio, between the involved images. T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images were utilized for performance evaluation. Our experimental results using four 3-D image sets demonstrated that BIRT can efficiently align images with high accuracy compared to several other algorithms, and thus is adequate to the applications which apply registration process intensively. Moreover, a voxel-based morphometric study quantitatively indicated that accurate registration can improve both the sensitivity and specificity of the statistical inference results.

  9. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  10. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  11. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kyle G; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-07-28

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein's affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states.

  12. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  13. Tending to Change: Toward a Situated Model of Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommarito, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The concept of affinity spaces, a theoretical construct used to analyze literate activity from a spatial perspective, has gained popularity among scholars of literacy studies and, particularly, video-game studies. This article seeks to expand current notions of affinity spaces by identifying key assumptions that have limited researchers'…

  14. Affinity based information diffusion model in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Xie, Yun; Hu, Haibo; Chen, Zhigao

    2014-12-01

    There is a widespread intuitive sense that people prefer participating in spreading the information in which they are interested. The affinity of people with information disseminated can affect the information propagation in social networks. In this paper, we propose an information diffusion model incorporating the mechanism of affinity of people with information which considers the fitness of affinity values of people with affinity threshold of the information. We find that the final size of information diffusion is affected by affinity threshold of the information, average degree of the network and the probability of people's losing their interest in the information. We also explore the effects of other factors on information spreading by numerical simulations and find that the probabilities of people's questioning and confirming the information can affect the propagation speed, but not the final scope.

  15. Camelid VHH affinity ligands enable separation of closely related biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Timothy M.; Wendeler, Michaela; Wang, Xiangyang; Bezemer, Sandra; Hermans, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interest in new and diverse classes of molecules such as recombinant toxins, enzymes, and blood factors continues to grow for use a biotherapeutics. Compared to monoclonal antibodies, these novel drugs typically lack a commercially available affinity chromatography option, which leads to greater process complexity, longer development timelines, and poor platformability. To date, for both monoclonal antibodies and novel molecules, affinity chromatography has been mostly reserved for separation of process‐related impurities such as host cell proteins and DNA. Reports of affinity purification of closely related product variants and modified forms are much rarer. In this work we describe custom affinity chromatography development using camelid VHH antibody fragments as "tunable" immunoaffinity ligands for separation of product‐related impurities. One example demonstrates high selectivity for a recombinant immunotoxin where no binding was observed for an undesired deamidated species. Also discussed is affinity purification of a coagulation factor through specific recognition of the gamma‐carboxylglutamic acid domain. PMID:27677057

  16. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture.

  17. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  18. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  19. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  20. Chasing polys: Interdisciplinary affinity and its connection to physics identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tyler D.

    This research is based on two motivations that merge by means of the frameworks of interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. First, a goal of education is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in students' thinking and work. But an often ignored factor is students interests and beliefs about being interdisciplinary. Thus, this work develops and uses a framework called interdisciplinary affinity. It encompasses students interests in making connections across disciplines and their beliefs about their abilities to make those connections. The second motivation of this research is to better understand how to engage more students with physics. Physics identity describes how a student sees themselves in relation to physics. By understanding how physics identity is developed, researchers and educators can identify factors that increase interest and engagement in physics classrooms. Therefore, physics identity was used in conjunction with interdisciplinary affinity. Using a mixed methods approach, this research used quantitative data to identify the relationships interdisciplinary affinity has with physics identity and the physics classroom. These connections were explored in more detail using a case study of three students in a high school physics class. Results showed significant and positive relationships between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity, including the individual interest and recognition components of identity. It also identified characteristics of physics classrooms that had a significant, positive relationship with interdisciplinary affinity. The qualitative case study highlighted the importance of student interest to the relationship between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. It also identified interest and mastery orientation as key to understanding the link between interdisciplinary affinity and the physics classroom. These results are a positive sign that by understanding interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity

  1. Surface-modified magnetic colloids for affinity adsorption of immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Fernanda; Pinho, Samantha C.; Zollner, Terezinha C. A.; Zollner, Ricardo L.; de Cuyper, Marcel; Santana, Maria Helena A.

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and in vitro adsorption tests of surface-modified magnetoliposomes for affinity binding of (i) anticardiolipin (isotype G) antibodies and (ii) specific isotype E antibodies generated by hypersensitivity reactions in humans with respiratory allergy. In the first case, cardiolipin embedded in the bilayer of magnetoliposomes was used as specific ligand. In the second case, antigenic proteins present in an extract of Dermatophagoids pteronyssinus and Blomia tropicalis mites were covalently coupled on the surface of magnetoliposomes via a diglycolic spacer arm, and used as specific ligands for IgE. Antibody adsorption was performed in a high-gradient magnetophoresis system, using either sera of healthy individuals or a pool of sera from autoimmune or allergic patients. The selectivity and capacity of the system were quantified by a frontal analysis in a capillary column, and by constructing breakthrough curves. The results show that the highest yield and selectivity were obtained if the ligand was extended into the aqueous layer surrounding the magnetoliposome surface. A 100% selectivity was obtained for adsorption of specific IgE, and 8% for IgG. These results demonstrate the potentialities of both types of surface-modified magnetic biocolloids in the field of in vitro diagnosis tests for allergic or autoimmune conditions.

  2. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: A review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; White, Christopher J.; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  3. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  4. Binding Affinities Controlled by Shifting Conformational Equilibria: Opportunities and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Michielssens, Servaas; de Groot, Bert L.; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Conformational selection is an established mechanism in molecular recognition. Despite its power to explain binding events, it is hardly used in protein/ligand design to modulate molecular recognition. Here, we explore the opportunities and limitations of design by conformational selection. Using appropriate thermodynamic cycles, our approach predicts the effects of a conformational shift on binding affinity and also allows one to disentangle the effects induced by a conformational shift from other effects influencing the binding affinity. The method is assessed and applied to explain the contribution of a conformational shift on the binding affinity of six ubiquitin mutants showing different conformational shifts in six different complexes. PMID:25992736

  5. Real-time affine invariant gesture recognition for LED smart lighting control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xu; Liao, Miao; Feng, Xiao-Fan

    2015-03-01

    Gesture recognition has attracted extensive research interest in the field of human computer interaction. Realtime affine invariant gesture recognition is an important and challenging problem. This paper presents a robust affine view invariant gesture recognition system for realtime LED smart light control. As far as we know, this is the first time that gesture recognition has been applied for control LED smart light in realtime. Employing skin detection, hand blobs captured from a top view camera are first localized and aligned. Subsequently, SVM classifiers trained on HOG features and robust shape features are then utilized for gesture recognition. By accurately recognizing two types of gestures ("gesture 8" and a "5 finger gesture"), a user is enabled to toggle lighting on/off efficiently and control light intensity on a continuous scale. In each case, gesture recognition is rotation- and translation-invariant. Extensive evaluations in an office setting demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed gesture recognition algorithm.

  6. Proton affinities of candidates for positively charged ambient ions in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruusuvuori, K.; Kurtén, T.; Ortega, I. K.; Faust, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-10-01

    The optimized structures and proton affinities of a total of 81 nitrogen-containing bases, chosen based on field measurements of ambient positive ions, were studied using the CBS-QB3 quantum chemical method. The results were compared to values given in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Chemistry WebBook in cases where a value was listed. The computed values show good agreement with the values listed in NIST. Grouping the molecules based on their molecular formula, the largest calculated proton affinities for each group were also compared with experimentally observed ambient cation concentrations in a boreal forest. This comparison allows us to draw qualitative conclusions about the relative ambient concentrations of different nitrogen-containing organic base molecules.

  7. Proton affinities of candidates for positively charged ambient ions in the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruusuvuori, K.; Kurtén, T.; Ortega, I. K.; Faust, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-04-01

    The optimized structures and proton affinities of a total of 81 nitrogen-containing bases, chosen based on field measurements of ambient positive ions, were studied using the CBS-QB3 quantum chemical method. The results were compared to values given in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Chemistry WebBook in cases where a value was listed. The computed values show good agreement with the values listed in NIST. Grouping the molecules based on their molecular formula, the largest calculated proton affinities for each group were also compared with experimentally observed ambient cation concentrations in the boreal forest. This comparison allows us to draw qualitative conclusions about the relative ambient concentrations of different nitrogen-containing organic base molecules.

  8. Protein purification-free method of binding affinity determination by microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Yeh, Joanna; Timofeeva, Olga; Tarasov, Sergey G; Pritt, Samuel; Stefanisko, Karen; Tarasova, Nadya

    2013-08-15

    Quantitative characterization of protein interactions is essential in practically any field of life sciences, particularly drug discovery. Most of currently available methods of KD determination require access to purified protein of interest, generation of which can be time-consuming and expensive. We have developed a protocol that allows for determination of binding affinity by microscale thermophoresis (MST) without purification of the target protein from cell lysates. The method involves overexpression of the GFP-fused protein and cell lysis in non-denaturing conditions. Application of the method to STAT3-GFP transiently expressed in HEK293 cells allowed to determine for the first time the affinity of the well-studied transcription factor to oligonucleotides with different sequences. The protocol is straightforward and can have a variety of application for studying interactions of proteins with small molecules, peptides, DNA, RNA, and proteins.

  9. On the computation of stress in affine versus nonaffine fibril kinematics within planar collagen network models.

    PubMed

    Pence, Thomas J; Monroe, Ryan J; Wright, Neil T

    2008-08-01

    Some recent analyses modeled the response of collagenous tissues, such as epicardium, using a hypothetical network consisting of interconnected springlike fibers. The fibers in the network were organized such that internal nodes served as the connection point between three such collagen springs. The results for assumed affine and nonaffine deformations are contrasted after a homogeneous deformation at the boundary. Affine deformation provides a stiffer mechanical response than nonaffine deformation. In contrast to nonaffine deformation, affine deformation determines the displacement of internal nodes without imposing detailed force balance, thereby complicating the simplest intuitive notion of stress, one based on free body cuts, at the single node scale. The standard notion of stress may then be recovered via average field theory computations based on large micromesh realizations. An alternative and by all indications complementary viewpoint for the determination of stress in these collagen fiber networks is discussed here, one in which stress is defined using elastic energy storage, a notion which is intuitive at the single node scale. It replaces the average field theory computations by an averaging technique over randomly oriented isolated simple elements. The analytical operations do not require large micromesh realizations, but the tedious nature of the mathematical manipulation is clearly aided by symbolic algebra calculation. For the example case of linear elastic deformation, this results in material stiffnesses that relate the infinitesimal strain and stress. The result that the affine case is stiffer than the nonaffine case is recovered, as would be expected. The energy framework also lends itself to the natural inclusion of changes in mechanical response due to the chemical, electrical, or thermal environment.

  10. Bidirectional elastic image registration using B-spline affine transformation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C; Ma, Hongxia; Leader, Joseph; Kaminski, Naftali; Gur, David; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-06-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bidirectional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective/cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy.

  11. Bidirectional Elastic Image Registration Using B-Spline Affine Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Wang, Chen; Kaminski, Naftali; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-01-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-Spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bi-directional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective / cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy. PMID:24530210

  12. A thermodynamic approach to the affinity optimization of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ernesto

    2009-11-01

    High throughput screening and other techniques commonly used to identify lead candidates for drug development usually yield compounds with binding affinities to their intended targets in the mid-micromolar range. The affinity of these molecules needs to be improved by several orders of magnitude before they become viable drug candidates. Traditionally, this task has been accomplished by establishing structure activity relationships to guide chemical modifications and improve the binding affinity of the compounds. As the binding affinity is a function of two quantities, the binding enthalpy and the binding entropy, it is evident that a more efficient optimization would be accomplished if both quantities were considered and improved simultaneously. Here, an optimization algorithm based upon enthalpic and entropic information generated by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry is presented.

  13. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  14. Electrospun polyethersulfone affinity membrane: membrane preparation and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zuwei; Lan, Zhengwei; Matsuura, Takeshi; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-11-01

    Non-woven polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were prepared by electrospinning. After heat treatment and surface activation, the membranes were covalently functionalized with ligands to be used as affinity membranes. The membranes were characterized in terms of fiber diameter, porosity, specific area, pore size, ligand density and binding capacities. To evaluate the binding efficiency of the membrane, dynamic adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the Cibacron blue F3GA (CB) functionalized PES membrane was studied. Experimental breakthrough curves were fitted with the theoretical curves based on the plate model to estimate plate height (H(p)) of the affinity membrane. The high value of H(p) (1.6-8 cm) of the affinity membrane implied a poor dynamic binding efficiency, which can be explained by the intrinsic microstructures of the material. Although the electrospun membrane might not be an ideal candidate for the preparative affinity membrane chromatography for large-scale production, it still can be used for fast small-scale protein purification in which a highly efficient binding is not required. Spin columns packed with protein A/G immobilized PES membranes were demonstrated to be capable of binding IgG specifically. SDS-PAGE results demonstrated that the PES affinity membrane had high specific binding selectivity for IgG molecules and low non-specific protein adsorption. Compared with other reported affinity membranes, the PES affinity membrane had a comparable IgG binding capacity of 4.5 mg/ml, and had a lower flow through pressure drop due to its larger pore size. In conclusion, the novel PES affinity membrane is an ideal spin column packing material for fast protein purification.

  15. Considering affinity: an ethereal conversation (part two of three).

    PubMed

    Winsor, Mary P

    2015-06-01

    In 1840 Hugh Strickland published a diagram showing the relationships of genera of birds in the kingfisher family. Three years later he applied this mapping idea to genera of birds of prey and songbirds, creating a large wall chart that he displayed to colleagues but never published. Both of his diagrams featured a scale of degrees of affinity. The meaning of taxonomic affinity was something Darwin thought about deeply. Details in the chart undermine Strickland's claim that his method was purely inductive.

  16. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  17. Direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Premer, Scott A; Hoy, Julie A; Trent, James T; Hargrove, Mark S

    2003-06-01

    The biological functions of heme proteins are linked to their rate and affinity constants for ligand binding. Kinetic experiments are commonly used to measure equilibrium constants for traditional hemoglobins comprised of pentacoordinate ligand binding sites and simple bimolecular reaction schemes. However, kinetic methods do not always yield reliable equilibrium constants with more complex hemoglobins for which reaction mechanisms are not clearly understood. Furthermore, even where reaction mechanisms are clearly understood, it is very difficult to directly measure equilibrium constants for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to high-affinity (K(D) < 1 micro M) hemoglobins. This work presents a method for direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins that utilizes a competition for ligands between the "target" protein and an array of "scavenger" hemoglobins with known affinities. This method is described for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to two hexacoordinate hemoglobins: rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and Synechocystis hemoglobin. Our results demonstrate that although these proteins have different mechanisms for ligand binding, their affinities for oxygen and carbon monoxide are similar. Their large affinity constants for oxygen, 285 and approximately 100 micro M(-1) respectively, indicate that they are not capable of facilitating oxygen transport.

  18. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as affinity ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Li, C. M.; Zhou, Q.; Gan, Y.; Bao, Q. L.

    2007-03-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes is very challenging for their applications. The paper here describes a new method to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as specific affinity adsorbents. MWCNTs were acid purified and pretreated with (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (APTES) in order to introduce abundant amino groups on the surface of MWCNTs. After the conversion of amino groups to carboxyl groups by succinic acid anhydride, MWCNTs were attached to protein A or aminodextran using 1-ethyl-3,3' (dimethylamion)-propylcarbodiimide as a biofunctional crosslinker. The incorporation of aminodextran as a spacer arm noticeably increased the binding capacity of the APTES-modified MWCNTs for protein A. The application of affinity MWCNTs for purification of immunoglobulin G was then evaluated. The affinity of MWCNTs with AMD spacer exhibited a high adsorption capacity of ~361 µg IgG/mg MWCNT (wet basis). About 75% of bound IgG was eluted from affinity MWCNTs (ANT-I and ANT-II) and ELISA confirmed that the biological activity of IgG was well preserved during the course of affinity separation. The functionalized MWCNTs could be potentially used in affinity chromatography.

  19. Local BLyS production by T follicular cells mediates retention of high affinity B cells during affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Radhika; Matthews, Andrew H.; Zhang, Bochao; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Scholz, Jean L.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Leonard, Warren J.; Stohl, William; Hershberg, Uri

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed the role of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and its receptors in the germinal center (GC) reaction and affinity maturation. Despite ample BLyS retention on B cells in follicular (FO) regions, the GC microenvironment lacks substantial BLyS. This reflects IL-21–mediated down-regulation of the BLyS receptor TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor) on GC B cells, thus limiting their capacity for BLyS binding and retention. Within the GC, FO helper T cells (TFH cells) provide a local source of BLyS. Whereas T cell–derived BLyS is dispensable for normal GC cellularity and somatic hypermutation, it is required for the efficient selection of high affinity GC B cell clones. These findings suggest that during affinity maturation, high affinity clones rely on TFH-derived BLyS for their persistence. PMID:24367004

  20. There's no place like home? An exploration of the mechanisms behind plant litter-decomposer affinity in terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Austin, Amy T; Vivanco, Lucía; González-Arzac, Adelia; Pérez, Luis I

    2014-08-08

    Litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems is an important first step for carbon and nutrient cycling, as senescent plant material is degraded and consequently incorporated, along with microbial products, into soil organic matter. The identification of litter affinity effects, whereby decomposition is accelerated in its home environment (home-field advantage, HFA), highlights the importance of plant-soil interactions that have consequences for biogeochemical cycling. While not universal, these affinity effects have been identified in a range of ecosystems, particularly in forests without disturbance. The optimization of the local decomposer community to degrade a particular combination of litter traits is the most oft-cited explanation for HFA effects, but the ways in which this specialized community can develop are only beginning to be understood. We explore ways in which HFA, or more broadly litter affinity effects, could arise in terrestrial ecosystems. Plant-herbivore interactions, microbial symbiosis, legacies from phyllosphere communities and attractors of specific soil fauna could contribute to spatially defined affinity effects for litter decomposition. Pyrosequencing soil communities and functional linkages of soil fauna provide great promise in advancing our mechanistic understanding of these interactions, and could lead to a greater appreciation of the role of litter-decomposer affinity in the maintenance of soil functional diversity.

  1. Spinor representations of affine Lie algebras

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, I. B.

    1980-01-01

    Let [unk] be an infinite-dimensional Kac-Moody Lie algebra of one of the types Dl+1(2), Bl(1), or Dl(1). These algebras are characterized by the property that an elimination of any endpoint of their Dynkin diagrams gives diagrams of types Bl or Dl of classical orthogonal Lie algebras. We construct two representations of a Lie algebra [unk], which we call spinor representations, following the analogy with the classical case. We obtain that every spinor representation is either irreducible or has two irreducible components. This provides us with an explicit construction of fundamental representations of [unk], two for the type Dl+1(2), three for Bl(1), and four for Dl(1). We note the profound connection of our construction with quantum field theory—in particular, with fermion fields. Comparing the character formulas of our representations with another construction of the fundamental representations of Kac-Moody Lie algebras of types Al(1), Dl(1), El(1), we obtain classical Jacobi identities and addition formulas for elliptic θ-functions. PMID:16592912

  2. Nanoparticle multivalency counterbalances the ligand affinity loss upon PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Robert; Pollinger, Klaus; Veser, Anika; Breunig, Miriam; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-11-28

    The conjugation of receptor ligands to shielded nanoparticles is a widely used strategy to precisely control nanoparticle-cell interactions. However, it is often overlooked that a ligand's affinity can be severely impaired by its attachment to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains that are frequently used to protect colloids from serum protein adsorption. Using the model ligand EXP3174, a small-molecule antagonist for the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R), we investigated the ligand's affinity before and after its PEGylation and when attached to PEGylated nanoparticles. The PEGylated ligand displayed a 580-fold decreased receptor affinity compared to the native ligand. Due to their multivalency, the nanoparticles regained a low nanomolar receptor affinity, which is in the range of the affinity of the native ligand. Moreover, a four orders of magnitude higher concentration of free ligand was required to displace PEGylated nanoparticles carrying EXP3174 from the receptor. On average, one nanoparticle was decorated with 11.2 ligand molecules, which led to a multivalent enhancement factor of 22.5 compared to the monovalent PEGylated ligand. The targeted nanoparticles specifically bound the AT1R and showed no interaction to receptor negative cells. Our study shows that the attachment of a small-molecule ligand to a PEG chain can severely affect its receptor affinity. Concomitantly, when the ligand is tethered to nanoparticles, the immense avidity greatly increases the ligand-receptor interaction. Based on our results, we highly recommend the affinity testing of receptor ligands before and after PEGylation to identify potent molecules for active nanoparticle targeting.

  3. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P

    2016-12-09

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets.

  4. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets. PMID:28060343

  5. Affinity monolith chromatography: A review of principles and recent analytical applications

    PubMed Central

    Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Dupper, Courtney M.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Affinity monolith chromatography (AMC) is a type of liquid chromatography that uses a monolithic support and a biologically-related binding agent as a stationary phase. AMC is a powerful method for the selective separation, analysis or studies of specific target compounds in a sample. This review discusses the basic principles of AMC and recent developments or applications of this method, with particular emphasis being given to work that has appeared in the last five years. Various materials that have been used to prepare columns for AMC are examined, including organic monoliths, silica monoliths, agarose monoliths and cryogels. These supports have been used in AMC for formats that have ranged from traditional columns to disks, microcolumns and capillaries. Many binding agents have also been employed in AMC, such as antibodies, enzymes, proteins, lectins, immobilized metal-ions and dyes. Some applications that have been reported with these binding agents in AMC are bioaffinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography or immunoextraction, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, dye-ligand affinity chromatography, chiral separations and biointeraction studies. Examples are presented from fields that include analytical chemistry, pharmaceutical analysis, clinical testing and biotechnology. Current trends and possible future directions in AMC are also discussed. PMID:23187827

  6. Respiratory motion correction for PET oncology applications using affine transformation of list mode data.

    PubMed

    Lamare, F; Cresson, T; Savean, J; Cheze Le Rest, C; Reader, A J; Visvikis, D

    2007-01-07

    Respiratory motion is a source of artefacts and reduced image quality in PET. Proposed methodology for correction of respiratory effects involves the use of gated frames, which are however of low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore a method accounting for respiratory motion effects without affecting the statistical quality of the reconstructed images is necessary. We have implemented an affine transformation of list mode data for the correction of respiratory motion over the thorax. The study was performed using datasets of the NCAT phantom at different points throughout the respiratory cycle. List mode data based PET simulated frames were produced by combining the NCAT datasets with a Monte Carlo simulation. Transformation parameters accounting for respiratory motion were estimated according to an affine registration and were subsequently applied on the original list mode data. The corrected and uncorrected list mode datasets were subsequently reconstructed using the one-pass list mode EM (OPL-EM) algorithm. Comparison of corrected and uncorrected respiratory motion average frames suggests that an affine transformation in the list mode data prior to reconstruction can produce significant improvements in accounting for respiratory motion artefacts in the lungs and heart. However, the application of a common set of transformation parameters across the imaging field of view does not significantly correct the respiratory effects on organs such as the stomach, liver or spleen.

  7. Probing the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chenchen; Li, Hengye; Wang, Heye; Liu, Zhen

    2013-02-19

    The affinity of boronic acids to cis-diol-containing biomolecules has found wide applications in many fields, such as sensing, separation, drug delivery, and functional materials. A sound understanding of the binding interactions will greatly facilitate exquisite applications of this chemistry. Although a few analytical tools have been available for the characterization of the interactions, these techniques are associated with some apparent drawbacks, so they are only applicable to a limited range of boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. Therefore, a widely applicable method is still greatly needed. In this work, an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method was established and validated to probe the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. The method was proven to be applicable to almost all types of cis-diol-containing biomolecules and boronic acids. Based on this method, a quantitative, comparative study on the interactions between 14 boronic acids that have important potentials for application with 5 typical monosaccharides of biological importance was carried out. The findings provided new insights into boronate affinity interactions, particularly the relationship between the binding strength with the molecular structures of the binding species. Besides, effects of pH and temperature on the binding strength were also investigated. This method exhibited several significant advantages, including (1) possibility of simultaneous study of multiple interactions, (2) low requirement on the purity of the binding species, (3) wide applicability, and (4) high accuracy and precision.

  8. Size and shape dependent deprotonation potential and proton affinity of nanodiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Per, Manolo C.

    2014-11-01

    Many important reactions in biology and medicine involve proton abstraction and transfer, and it is integral to applications such as drug delivery. Unlike electrons, which are quantum mechanically delocalized, protons are instantaneously localized on specific residues in these reactions, which can be a distinct advantage. However, the introduction of nanoparticles, such as non-toxic nanodiamonds, to this field complicates matters, as the number of possible sites increases as the inverse radius of the particle. In this paper we present \\gt {{10}4} simulations that map the size- and shape-dependence of the deprotonation potential and proton affinity of nanodiamonds in the range 1.8-2.7 nm in average diameter. We find that while the average deprotonation potential and proton affinities decrease with size, the site-specific values are inhomogeneous over the surface of the particles, exhibiting strong shape-dependence. The proton affinity is strongly facet-dependent, whereas the deprotonation potential is edge/corner-dependent, which creates a type of spatial hysteresis in the transfer of protons to and from the nanodiamond, and provides new opportunities for selective functionalization.

  9. Parallel Exploration of Interaction Space by BioID and Affinity Purification Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Geoffrey G; Youn, Ji-Young; Samavarchi-Tehrani, Payman; Raught, Brian; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Complete understanding of cellular function requires knowledge of the composition and dynamics of protein interaction networks, the importance of which spans all molecular cell biology fields. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches are instrumental in this process, with affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) now widely used for defining interaction landscapes. Traditional AP-MS methods are well suited to providing information regarding the temporal aspects of soluble protein-protein interactions, but the requirement to maintain protein-protein interactions during cell lysis and AP means that both weak-affinity interactions and spatial information is lost. A more recently developed method called BioID employs the expression of bait proteins fused to a nonspecific biotin ligase, BirA*, that induces in vivo biotinylation of proximal proteins. Coupling this method to biotin affinity enrichment and mass spectrometry negates many of the solubility and interaction strength issues inherent in traditional AP-MS methods, and provides unparalleled spatial context for protein interactions. Here we describe the parallel implementation of both BioID and FLAG AP-MS allowing simultaneous exploration of both spatial and temporal aspects of protein interaction networks.

  10. Gradient-based habitat affinities predict species vulnerability to drought.

    PubMed

    Debinski, Diane M; Caruthers, Jennet C; Cook, Dianne; Crowley, Jason; Wickham, Hadley

    2013-05-01

    Ecological fingerprints of climate change are becoming increasingly evident at broad geographical scales as measured by species range shifts and changes in phenology. However, finer-scale species-level responses to environmental fluctuations may also provide an important bellwether of impending future community responses. Here we examined changes in abundance of butterfly species along a hydrological gradient of six montane meadow habitat types in response to drought. Our data collection began prior to the drought, and we were able to track changes for 11 years, of which eight were considered mild to extreme drought conditions. We separated the species into those that had an affinity for hydric vs. xeric habitats. We suspected that drought would favor species with xeric habitat affinities, but that there could be variations in species-level responses along the hydrological gradient. We also suspected that mesic meadows would be most sensitive to drought conditions. Temporal trajectories were modeled for both species groups (hydric vs. xeric affinity) and individual species. Abundances of species with affinity for xeric habitats increased in virtually all meadow types. Conversely, abundances of species with affinity for hydric habitats decreased, particularly in mesic and xeric meadows. Mesic meadows showed the most striking temporal abundance trajectory: Increasing abundances of species with xeric habitat affinity were offset by decreasing or stable abundances of species with hydric habitat affinity. The one counterintuitive finding was that, in some hydric meadows, species with affinity for hydric habitats increased. In these cases, we suspect that decreasing moisture conditions in hydric meadows actually increased habitat suitability because sites near the limit of moisture extremes for some species became more acceptable. Thus, species responses were relatively predictable based upon habitat affinity and habitat location along the hydrological gradient, and

  11. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%.

  12. The proton affinities of saturated and unsaturated heterocyclic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabli, Samira; van Beelen, Eric S. E.; Ingemann, Steen; Henriksen, Lars; Hammerum, Steen

    2006-03-01

    The proton affinities derived from G3-calculations of 23 five-membered ring heteroaromatic molecules agree well with the experimentally determined values available in the literature. The calculated local proton affinities show that the principal site of protonation of the heteroaromatic compounds examined is an atom of the ring, carbon when there is only one heteroatom in the ring, and nitrogen where there are two or more heteroatoms. The experimental proton affinities of non-aromatic cyclic ethers, amines and thioethers are also in excellent agreement with the calculated values, with two exceptions (oxetane, N-methylazetidine). The literature proton affinities of the four simple cyclic ethers, oxetane, tetrahydrofuran, tetrahydropyran and oxepane were confirmed by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, in order to examine the disagreement between the values predicted by extrapolation or additivity for tetrahydrofuran and tetrahydropyran and those determined by experiment and by calculation. The proton affinity differences between the pairs tetrahydropyran/1,4-dioxane, piperidine/morpholine and related compounds show that introduction of an additional oxygen atom in the ring considerably lowers the basicity.

  13. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  14. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  15. Affine kinematics in planar fibrous connective tissues: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Jayyosi, C; Affagard, J-S; Ducourthial, G; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Lynch, B; Bancelin, S; Ruggiero, F; Schanne-Klein, M-C; Allain, J-M; Bruyère-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2017-03-29

    The affine transformation hypothesis is usually adopted in order to link the tissue scale with the fibers scale in structural constitutive models of fibrous tissues. Thanks to the recent advances in imaging techniques, such as multiphoton microscopy, the microstructural behavior and kinematics of fibrous tissues can now be monitored at different stretching within the same sample. Therefore, the validity of the affine hypothesis can be investigated. In this paper, the fiber reorientation predicted by the affine assumption is compared to experimental data obtained during mechanical tests on skin and liver capsule coupled with microstructural imaging using multiphoton microscopy. The values of local strains and the collagen fibers orientation measured at increasing loading levels are used to compute a theoretical estimation of the affine reorientation of collagen fibers. The experimentally measured reorientation of collagen fibers during loading could not be successfully reproduced with this simple affine model. It suggests that other phenomena occur in the stretching process of planar fibrous connective tissues, which should be included in structural constitutive modeling approaches.

  16. Biphasic Affinity Chromatographic Approach for Deep Tyrosine Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Dong, Mingming; Wang, Yan; Dong, Jing; Li, Shawn S-C; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-02-21

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr) is important for normal physiology and implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. Identification of pTyr sites is critical to dissecting signaling pathways and understanding disease pathologies. However, compared with serine/threonine phosphorylation (pSer/pThr), the analysis of pTyr at the proteome level is more challenging due to its low abundance. Here, we developed a biphasic affinity chromatographic approach where Src SH2 superbinder was coupled with NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, for tyrosine phosphoproteome analysis. With the use of competitive elution agent biotin-pYEEI, this strategy can distinguish high-affinity phosphotyrosyl peptides from low-affinity ones, while the excess competitive agent is readily removed by using NeutrAvidin agarose resin in an integrated tip system. The excellent performance of this system was demonstrated by analyzing tyrosine phosphoproteome of Jurkat cells from which 3,480 unique pTyr sites were identified. The biphasic affinity chromatography method for deep Tyr phosphoproteome analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective. It is widely applicable to the global analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome associated with tyrosine kinase signal transduction.

  17. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva, M S; Graça, V C; Reis, L V; Santos, P F; Almeida, P; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2013-12-01

    The most selective purification method for proteins and other biomolecules is affinity chromatography. This method is based on the unique biological-based specificity of the biomolecule-ligand interaction and commonly uses biological ligands. However, these ligands may present some drawbacks, mainly because of their cost and lability. Dye-affinity chromatography overcomes the limitations of biological ligands and is widely used owing to the low cost of synthetic dyes and to their resistance to biological and chemical degradation. In this work, immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dyes are used in order to exploit affinity interactions with standard proteins such as lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin. These studies evaluate the affinity interactions occurring between the immobilized ligand and the different proteins, as a reflection of the sum of several molecular interactions, namely ionic, hydrophobic and van der Waals, spread throughout the structure, in a defined spatial manner. The results show the possibility of using an aminosquarylium cyanine dye bearing a N-hexyl pendant chain, with a ligand density of 1.8 × 10(-2) mmol of dye/g of chromatographic support, to isolate lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin from a mixture. The application of a decreasing ammonium sulfate gradient resulted in the recovery of lysozyme in the flowthrough. On the other hand, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin were retained, involving different interactions with the ligand. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential applicability of ligands such as aminosquarylium cyanine dyes for the separation and purification of proteins by affinity chromatography.

  18. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2012-02-01

    The generation of B-cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4(+) T cells which helps in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T-cell repertoire has abundant cells with the helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals, the generation of B-cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that the removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T-cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs the affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen-specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating the selection of B cells with high-affinity antibodies.

  19. A fast quantum algorithm for the affine Boolean function identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm (the one-query algorithm) can identify a completely specified linear Boolean function using a single query to the oracle with certainty. The first aim of the paper is to show that if the provided Boolean function is affine, then one more query to the oracle (the two-query algorithm) is required to identify the affinity of the function with certainty. The second aim of the paper is to show that if the provided Boolean function is incompletely defined, then the one-query and the two-query algorithms can be used as bounded-error quantum polynomial algorithms to identify certain classes of incompletely defined linear and affine Boolean functions respectively with probability of success at least 2/3.

  20. Enhancing Community Detection By Affinity-based Edge Weighting Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    Community detection refers to an important graph analytics problem of finding a set of densely-connected subgraphs in a graph and has gained a great deal of interest recently. The performance of current community detection algorithms is limited by an inherent constraint of unweighted graphs that offer very little information on their internal community structures. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to address this issue that weights the edges in a given graph based on recently proposed vertex affinity. The vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength, and therefore, it is ideal for graph analytics applications such as community detection. We also demonstrate that the affinity-based edge weighting scheme can improve the performance of community detection algorithms significantly.

  1. On the electron affinity of the oxygen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron affinity of oxygen is computed to be 1.287 eV, at the full CI level using a 6s5p3d 2f Slater-type orbital basis and correlating only the 2p electrons. The best CASSCF-MRCI result including only 2p correlation is 1.263 eV. However, inclusion of 2s intrashell and 2s2p intershell coorelation increases the computed EA to 1.290 eV at the CASSCF-MRCI level. At the full CI basis set limit, the 2s contribution to the electron affinity is estimated to be as large as 0.1 eV. The higher excitation contribution to the electron affinity is found to increase substantially with basis set completeness, especially when the 2s electrons are correlated. Relativistic effects are shown to make a small (less than 0.01 eV) change in the EA.

  2. AMPK beta subunits display isoform specific affinities for carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Koay, Ann; Woodcroft, Ben; Petrie, Emma J; Yue, Helen; Emanuelle, Shane; Bieri, Michael; Bailey, Michael F; Hargreaves, Mark; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Ralph, Stuart; Neumann, Dietbert; Stapleton, David; Gooley, Paul R

    2010-08-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimer of catalytic (alpha) and regulatory (beta and gamma) subunits with at least two isoforms for each subunit. AMPK beta1 is widely expressed whilst AMPK beta2 is highly expressed in muscle and both beta isoforms contain a mid-molecule carbohydrate-binding module (beta-CBM). Here we show that beta2-CBM has evolved to contain a Thr insertion and increased affinity for glycogen mimetics with a preference for oligosaccharides containing a single alpha-1,6 branched residue. Deletion of Thr-101 reduces affinity for single alpha-1,6 branched oligosaccharides by 3-fold, while insertion of this residue into the equivalent position in the beta1-CBM sequence increases affinity by 3-fold, confirming the functional importance of this residue.

  3. Solid support resins and affinity purification mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Havis, Spencer; Moree, Wilna J; Mali, Sujina; Bark, Steven J

    2017-02-28

    Co-affinity purification-mass spectrometry (CoAP-MS) is a primary technology for elucidating the protein-protein interactions that form the basis of all biological processes. A critical component of CoAP-MS is the affinity purification (AP) of the bait protein, usually by immobilization of an antibody to a solid-phase resin. This Minireview discusses common resins, reagents, tagging methods, and their consideration for successful AP of tagged proteins. We discuss our experiences with different solid supports, their impact in AP experiments, and propose areas where chemistry can advance this important technology.

  4. Affine generalization of the Komar complex of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2001-02-01

    On the basis of the ``on shell'' Noether identities of the metric-affine gauge approach of gravity, an affine superpotential is derived which comprises the energy- and angular-momentum content of exact solutions. In the special case of general relativity (GR) or its teleparallel equivalent, the Komar or Freud complex, respectively, are recovered. Applying this to the spontaneously broken anti-de Sitter gauge model of McDowell and Mansouri with an induced Euler term automatically yields the correct mass and spin of the Kerr-AdS solution of GR with a (induced) cosmological constant without the factor two discrepancy of the Komar formula.

  5. A quantum affine algebra for the deformed Hubbard chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisert, Niklas; Galleas, Wellington; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2012-09-01

    The integrable structure of the one-dimensional Hubbard model is based on Shastry's R-matrix and the Yangian of a centrally extended \\mathfrak {sl}(2|2) superalgebra. Alcaraz and Bariev have shown that the model admits an integrable deformation whose R-matrix has recently been found. This R-matrix is of trigonometric type and here we derive its underlying exceptional quantum affine algebra. We also show how the algebra reduces to the above-mentioned Yangian and to the conventional quantum affine \\mathfrak {sl}(2|2) algebra in two special limits.

  6. Gini covariance matrix and its affine equivariant version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherall, Lauren Anne

    Gini's mean difference (GMD) and its derivatives such as Gini index have been widely used as alternative measures of variability over one century in many research fields especially in finance, economics and social welfare. In this dissertation, we generalize the univariate GMD to the multivariate case and propose a new covariance matrix so called the Gini covariance matrix (GCM). The extension is natural, which is based on the covariance representation of GMD with the notion of multivariate spatial rank function. In order to gain the affine equivariance property for GCM, we utilize the transformation-retransformation (TR) technique and obtain TR version GCM that turns out to be a symmetrized M-functional. Indeed, both GCMs are symmetrized approaches based on the difference of two independent variables without reference of a location, hence avoiding some arbitrary definition of location for non-symmetric distributions. We study the properties of both GCMs. They possess the so-called independence property, which is highly important, for example, in independent component analysis. Influence functions of two GCMs are derived to assess their robustness. They are found to be more robust than the regular covariance matrix but less robust than Tyler and Dumbgen M-functional. Under elliptical distributions, the relationship between the scatter parameter and the two GCM are obtained. With this relationship, principal component analysis (PCA) based on GCM is possible. Estimation of two GCMs is presented. We study asymptotical behavior of the estimators. √n-consistency and asymptotical normality of estimators are established. Asymptotic relative efficiency (ARE) of TR-GCM estimator with respect to sample covariance matrix is compared to that of Tyler and Dumbgen M-estimators. With little loss on efficiency (< 2%) in the normal case, it gains high efficiency for heavy-tailed distributions. Finite sample behavior of Gini estimators is explored under various models using two

  7. Student Engagement and Neoliberalism: Mapping an Elective Affinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to argue that student engagement, an important area for research about learning and teaching in formal higher education, has an elective affinity with neoliberalism, a hegemonic ideology in many countries of the developed world. The paper first surveys an extensive research literature examining student engagement and…

  8. "The Hunger Games": Literature, Literacy, and Online Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This article examines adolescent literacy practices related to "The Hunger Games," a young adult novel and the first of a trilogy. By focusing on the interaction of social identities, discourses, and media paratexts within an online affinity space, this ethnographic study offers insight into how young adults engage with contemporary…

  9. Affinities and beyond! Developing Ways of Seeing in Online Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Julia

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an insider view of an online community of adults involved in sharing digital photography through a host website, Flickr. It describes how reciprocal teaching and learning partnerships in a dynamic multimodal environment are achieved through the creation of a "Third Space" or "Affinity Space", where "Funds of Knowledge" are…

  10. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago.

  11. Toward an Affinity Space Methodology: Considerations for Literacy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammers, Jayne C.; Curwood, Jen Scott; Magnifico, Alecia Marie

    2012-01-01

    As researchers seek to make sense of young people's online literacy practices and participation, questions of methodology are important to consider. In our work to understand the culture of physical, virtual and blended spheres that adolescents inhabit, we find it necessary to expand Gee's (2004) notion of affinity spaces. In this article, we draw…

  12. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    PubMed Central

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6. PMID:27291418

  13. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  14. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  15. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6.

  16. Limit measures for affine cellular automata on topological Markov subgroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Alejandro; Martínez, Servet; Sobottka, Marcelo

    2006-09-01

    Consider a topological Markov subgroup which is ps-torsion (with p prime) and an affine cellular automaton defined on it. We show that the Cesàro mean of the iterates, by the automaton of a probability measure with complete connections and summable memory decay that is compatible with the topological Markov subgroup, converges to the Haar measure.

  17. Affinity through Mathematical Activity: Cultivating Democratic Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta-Irving, Tesha

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author demonstrates how a broader view of what shapes affinity is ideologically and practically linked to creating democratic learning communities. Specifically, the author explores how a teacher employed complex instruction (an equity pedagogy) with her ethnically and racially diverse students in the "lowest track"…

  18. Semiempirical Theories of the Affinities of Negative Atomic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, John W.

    1961-01-01

    The determination of the electron affinities of negative atomic ions by means of direct experimental investigation is limited. To supplement the meager experimental results, several semiempirical theories have been advanced. One commonly used technique involves extrapolating the electron affinities along the isoelectronic sequences, The most recent of these extrapolations Is studied by extending the method to Include one more member of the isoelectronic sequence, When the results show that this extension does not increase the accuracy of the calculations, several possible explanations for this situation are explored. A different approach to the problem is suggested by the regularities appearing in the electron affinities. Noting that the regular linear pattern that exists for the ionization potentials of the p electrons as a function of Z, repeats itself for different degrees of ionization q, the slopes and intercepts of these curves are extrapolated to the case of the negative Ion. The method is placed on a theoretical basis by calculating the Slater parameters as functions of q and n, the number of equivalent p-electrons. These functions are no more than quadratic in q and n. The electron affinities are calculated by extending the linear relations that exist for the neutral atoms and positive ions to the negative ions. The extrapolated. slopes are apparently correct, but the intercepts must be slightly altered to agree with experiment. For this purpose one or two experimental affinities (depending on the extrapolation method) are used in each of the two short periods. The two extrapolation methods used are: (A) an isoelectronic sequence extrapolation of the linear pattern as such; (B) the same extrapolation of a linearization of this pattern (configuration centers) combined with an extrapolation of the other terms of the ground configurations. The latter method Is preferable, since it requires only experimental point for each period. The results agree within

  19. 3D QSAR studies on binding affinities of coumarin natural products for glycosomal GAPDH of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Lopes, Julio C. D.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Oliva, Glaucius; Pavão, Fernando; Castilho, Marcelo S.; Vieira, Paulo C.; Pupo, M.^onica T.

    2003-05-01

    Drug design strategies based on Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) have been used to predict the activity of new compounds. The major advantage of this approach is that it permits the analysis of a large number of quantitative descriptors and uses chemometric methods such as partial least squares (PLS) to correlate changes in bioactivity with changes in chemical structure. Because it is often difficult to rationalize all variables affecting the binding affinity of compounds using CoMFA solely, the program GRID was used to describe ligands in terms of their molecular interaction fields, MIFs. The program VolSurf that is able to compress the relevant information present in 3D maps into a few descriptors can treat these GRID fields. The binding affinities of a new set of compounds consisting of 13 coumarins, for one of which the three-dimensional ligand-enzyme bound structure is known, were studied. A final model based on the mentioned programs was independently validated by synthesizing and testing new coumarin derivatives. By relying on our knowledge of the real physical data (i.e., combining crystallographic and binding affinity results), it is also shown that ligand-based design agrees with structure-based design. The compound with the highest binding affinity was the coumarin chalepin, isolated from Rutaceae species, with an IC50 value of 55.5 μM towards the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) from glycosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. The proposed models from GRID MIFs have revealed the importance of lipophilic interactions in modulating the inhibition, but without excluding the dependence on stereo-electronic properties as found from CoMFA fields.

  20. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice selectively bred to produce high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    Devey, M E; Major, P J; Bleasdale-Barr, K M; Holland, G P; Dal Canto, M C; Paterson, P Y

    1990-01-01

    Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice genetically selected to produce either high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses has revealed significant differences in disease susceptibility between the two lines. HA mice were highly susceptible to EAE following subcutaneous sensitization to mouse central nervous system (CNS) tissue emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Furthermore, of HA mice surviving acute EAE, up to 93% subsequently developed chronic relapsing disease (CREAE) characterized by variable demyelinating inflammatory changes within the spinal cord. In contrast, LA mice, despite having a major histocompatability complex (MHC) haplotype associated with susceptibility to EAE, were highly resistant to the disease and showed no signs of CREAE when observed for up to 100 days post-sensitization. Antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP) were detected in both lines but rising titres of high functional affinity antibodies were only seen in HA mice. These HA and LA lines of mice provide a new approach to the study of EAE and, in particular, the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the chronic relapsing form of the disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:2335373

  1. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  2. PDZ affinity chromatography: a general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2014-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ∼90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins.

  3. Affinity learning with diffusion on tensor product graph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwei; Prasad, Lakshman; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, we are given a finite set of data points sampled from a data manifold and represented as a graph with edge weights determined by pairwise similarities of the samples. Often the pairwise similarities (which are also called affinities) are unreliable due to noise or due to intrinsic difficulties in estimating similarity values of the samples. As observed in several recent approaches, more reliable similarities can be obtained if the original similarities are diffused in the context of other data points, where the context of each point is a set of points most similar to it. Compared to the existing methods, our approach differs in two main aspects. First, instead of diffusing the similarity information on the original graph, we propose to utilize the tensor product graph (TPG) obtained by the tensor product of the original graph with itself. Since TPG takes into account higher order information, it is not a surprise that we obtain more reliable similarities. However, it comes at the price of higher order computational complexity and storage requirement. The key contribution of the proposed approach is that the information propagation on TPG can be computed with the same computational complexity and the same amount of storage as the propagation on the original graph. We prove that a graph diffusion process on TPG is equivalent to a novel iterative algorithm on the original graph, which is guaranteed to converge. After its convergence we obtain new edge weights that can be interpreted as new, learned affinities. We stress that the affinities are learned in an unsupervised setting. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach for data manifolds composed of shapes, images, and image patches on two very different tasks of image retrieval and image segmentation. With learned affinities, we achieve the bull's eye retrieval score of 99.99 percent on the MPEG-7 shape dataset, which is much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithms. When the data

  4. Model updating based on an affine scaling interior optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Jia, C. X.; Li, Jian; Spencer, B. F.

    2013-11-01

    Finite element model updating is usually considered as an optimization process. Affine scaling interior algorithms are powerful optimization algorithms that have been developed over the past few years. A new finite element model updating method based on an affine scaling interior algorithm and a minimization of modal residuals is proposed in this article, and a general finite element model updating program is developed based on the proposed method. The performance of the proposed method is studied through numerical simulation and experimental investigation using the developed program. The results of the numerical simulation verified the validity of the method. Subsequently, the natural frequencies obtained experimentally from a three-dimensional truss model were used to update a finite element model using the developed program. After updating, the natural frequencies of the truss and finite element model matched well.

  5. Learning factorizations in estimation of distribution algorithms using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; Larrañaga, Pedro; Lozano, José A

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs) that use marginal product model factorizations have been widely applied to a broad range of mainly binary optimization problems. In this paper, we introduce the affinity propagation EDA (AffEDA) which learns a marginal product model by clustering a matrix of mutual information learned from the data using a very efficient message-passing algorithm known as affinity propagation. The introduced algorithm is tested on a set of binary and nonbinary decomposable functions and using a hard combinatorial class of problem known as the HP protein model. The results show that the algorithm is a very efficient alternative to other EDAs that use marginal product model factorizations such as the extended compact genetic algorithm (ECGA) and improves the quality of the results achieved by ECGA when the cardinality of the variables is increased.

  6. Affinity-Driven Immobilization of Proteins to Hematite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zare-Eelanjegh, Elaheh; Bora, Debajeet K; Rupper, Patrick; Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Richter, Michael; Faccio, Greta

    2016-08-10

    Functional nanoparticles are valuable materials for energy production, bioelectronics, and diagnostic devices. The combination of biomolecules with nanosized material produces a new hybrid material with properties that can exceed the ones of the single components. Hematite is a widely available material that has found application in various sectors such as in sensing and solar energy production. We report a single-step immobilization process based on affinity and achieved by genetically engineering the protein of interest to carry a hematite-binding peptide. Fabricated hematite nanoparticles were then investigated for the immobilization of the two biomolecules C-phycocyanin (CPC) and laccase from Bacillus pumilus (LACC) under mild conditions. Genetic engineering of biomolecules with a hematite-affinity peptide led to a higher extent of protein immobilization and enhanced the catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  7. Reflection symmetry detection using locally affine invariant edge correspondence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaozhong; Tang, Zesheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Reflection symmetry detection receives increasing attentions in recent years. The state-of-the-art algorithms mainly use the matching of intensity-based features (such as the SIFT) within a single image to find symmetry axes. This paper proposes a novel approach by establishing the correspondence of locally affine invariant edge-based features, which are superior to the intensity based in the aspects that it is insensitive to illumination variations, and applicable to textureless objects. The locally affine invariance is achieved by simple linear algebra for efficient and robust computations, making the algorithm suitable for detections under object distortions like perspective projection. Commonly used edge detectors and a voting process are, respectively, used before and after the edge description and matching steps to form a complete reflection detection pipeline. Experiments are performed using synthetic and real-world images with both multiple and single reflection symmetry axis. The test results are compared with existing algorithms to validate the proposed method.

  8. Structural origins of high-affinity biotin binding to streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Weber, P C; Ohlendorf, D H; Wendoloski, J J; Salemme, F R

    1989-01-06

    The high affinity of the noncovalent interaction between biotin and streptavidin forms the basis for many diagnostic assays that require the formation of an irreversible and specific linkage between biological macromolecules. Comparison of the refined crystal structures of apo and a streptavidin:biotin complex shows that the high affinity results from several factors. These factors include the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions between biotin and the protein, together with the ordering of surface polypeptide loops that bury the biotin in the protein interior. Structural alterations at the biotin binding site produce quaternary changes in the streptavidin tetramer. These changes apparently propagate through cooperative deformations in the twisted beta sheets that link tetramer subunits.

  9. Robust Spectral Clustering Using Statistical Sub-Graph Affinity Model

    PubMed Central

    Eichel, Justin A.; Wong, Alexander; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods. PMID:24386111

  10. Tandem affinity purification vectors for use in gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Doherty, Geoff P; Lewis, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification has become a valuable tool for the isolation of protein complexes. Here we describe the construction and use of a series of plasmid vectors for Gram positive bacteria. The vectors utilize the SPA tag as well as variants containing a 3C rather than the TEV protease site as 3C protease has been shown to work efficiently at the low temperatures (4 degrees C) used to isolate protein complexes. In addition, a further vector incorporates a GST moiety in place of the 3xFLAG of the SPA tag which provides an additional tagging option for situations where SPA binding may be inefficient. The vectors are all compatible with previously constructed fluorescent protein fusion vectors enabling construction of a suite of affinity and fluorescently tagged genes using a single PCR product.

  11. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  12. Bioskin as an affinity matrix for the separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vicente, C; Sebastián, B; Fontaniella, B; Márquez, A; Xavier Filho, L; Legaz, M E

    2001-05-11

    Bioskin is a natural product produced by a mixed culture of Acetobacter xylinum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pombe cultured on media containing sucrose. It is of fibrillar nature able to retain some proteins, such as cytochrome c, by adsorption, and mainly composed of glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This makes it possible that, at an adequate pH value, proteins charged as polyanionic molecules, such as catalase, can be retained by ionic adsorption using the positively charged amino groups of the matrix. In addition, bioskin can also be used as an affinity matrix to retain glycoproteins able to perform specific affinity reactions with the amino sugars of the matrix, such as invertase, fetuin or ovalbumin. Its possible use as a chromatographic support is discussed.

  13. "Clickable" affinity ligands for effective separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Suksrichavalit, Thummaruk; Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Bülow, Leif; Ye, Lei

    2010-06-04

    In this paper, we present a new modular approach to immobilize boronic acid ligands that can offer effective separation of glycoproteins. A new "clickable" boronic acid ligand was synthesized by introducing a terminal acetylene group into commercially available 3-aminophenyl boronic acid. The clickable ligand, 3-(prop-2-ynyloxycarbonylamino)phenylboronic acid (2) could be easily coupled to azide-functionalized hydrophilic Sepharose using Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction under mild condition. Compared to other boronic acid affinity gels, the new affinity gel displayed superior effectiveness in separating model glycoproteins (ovalbumin and RNase B) from closely related bovine serum albumin and RNase A in the presence of crude Escherichia coli proteins. Because of the simplicity of the immobilization through "click chemistry", the new ligand 2 is expected to not only offer improved glycoprotein separation in other formats, but also act as a useful building block to develop new chemical sensors for analysis of other glycan compounds.

  14. Polysulfone affinity membranes for the treatment of amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rodemann, K; Staude, E

    1995-06-20

    Affinity membranes for the treatment of solutions containing amino acids were obtained via lithiating polysulfone that was subsequently converted with glycidylether. From this polymer asymmetric ultrafiltration membranes were cast. The membranes were reacted with iminodiacetic acid yielding membranes fitted out with bidentate chelates. The same reaction path was applied to commercially available symmetric microfiltration membranes. The chelate-bearing membranes were complexed with Cu, Ni, and Zn ions. For the experiments with amino acids only the Cu-complexed membranes were used. The complexation constants for histidine and tryptophan for six different membranes were determined. Because of the affinity of these two amino acids for the complexed Cu ions, they could easily be separated from solutions containing amino acids such as alanine, glycine, and valine. Also, concentrating very dilute amino acid solutions was carried out successfully.

  15. Mullerian inhibiting substance fractionation by dye affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Budzik, G P; Powell, S M; Kamagata, S; Donahoe, P K

    1983-08-01

    Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS), a large glycoprotein secreted by the fetal and neonatal testis, is responsible for regression of the Mullerian ducts in the male embryo. This fetal growth regulator has been purified more than 2000-fold from crude testicular incubation medium following fractionation on a triazinyl dye affinity support. A high yield of 60% recovered activity was achieved in the absence of exogenous carrier protein by stabilizing MIS with 2-mercaptoethanol, EDTA, and Nonidet-P40 and eliminating losses in the handling and concentration of MIS fractions. Although affinity elution with nucleotides has proved successful in other systems, MIS could not be eluted with ATP, GTP, or AMP, with or without divalent metal ions. Nucleotide elution, however, does remove contaminating proteins prior to MIS recovery with high ionic strength. The 2000-fold-purified MIS fraction, although not homogeneous, shows a reduction-sensitive band after SDS-gel electrophoresis that has been proposed to be the MIS dimer.

  16. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  17. Targeting Synaptic Pathology with a Novel Affinity Mass Spectrometry Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmalm, Ann; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Honer, William G.; Moreno, Julie A.; Jakobsson, Joel; Mallucci, Giovanna R.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Öhrfelt, Annika

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel strategy for studying synaptic pathology by concurrently measuring levels of four SNARE complex proteins from individual brain tissue samples. This method combines affinity purification and mass spectrometry and can be applied directly for studies of SNARE complex proteins in multiple species or modified to target other key elements in neuronal function. We use the technique to demonstrate altered levels of presynaptic proteins in Alzheimer disease patients and prion-infected mice. PMID:24973420

  18. Self-affinity and Crossover of A Clay Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.; Huru Bergene, H.; Hansen, A.; Manificat, G.

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM software, and wavelet methods. The deposited surfaces show an anti-persistent to persistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is thus concluded that the investigated electrolyte concentrations play a minor role

  19. Protein separation using affinity-based reversed micelles

    PubMed

    Sun; Gu; Tong; Bai; Ichikawa; Furusaki

    1999-05-01

    Reversed micellar two-phase extraction is a developing technique for protein separation. Introduction of an affinity ligand is considered to be an effective approach to increase the selectivity and capacity of reversed micelles. In this article, Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB) as an affinity ligand was immobilized to reversed micelles composed of soybean lecithin by a two-phase reaction. The affinity partitioning of lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the CB-lecithin micelles was studied. Formation of mixed micelles by additionally introducing a nonionic surfactant, Tween 85, to the CB-lecithin micelles was effective to increase the solubilization of lysozyme due to the increase of W0 (water/surfactant molar ratio)/micellar size. The partitioning isotherms of lysozyme to the CB-lecithin micelles with and without Tween 85 were expressed by the Langmuir equation. The dissociation constants in the Langmuir equation decreased on addition of Tween 85, indicating the increase of the effectiveness of lysozyme binding to the immobilized CB. On addition of 20 g/L Tween 85 to 50 g/L lecithin/hexane micellar phase containing 0.1 mmol/L CB, the extraction capacity for lysozyme could be increased by 42%. Moreover, the CB-lecithin micelles with or without Tween 85 showed significant size exclusion for BSA due to its high molecular weight. Thus, lysozyme and BSA were separated from artificial solutions containing the two proteins. In addition, the affinity-based reversed micellar phase containing Tween 85 was recycled three times for lysozyme purification from crude egg-white solutions. Lysozyme purity increased by 16-18-fold, reaching 60-70% in the recycled use.

  20. Recombinant spider silk genetically functionalized with affinity domains.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Ronnie; Thatikonda, Naresh; Lindberg, Diana; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Nygren, Per-Åke; Hedhammar, My

    2014-05-12

    Functionalization of biocompatible materials for presentation of active protein domains is an area of growing interest. Herein, we describe a strategy for functionalization of recombinant spider silk via gene fusion to affinity domains of broad biotechnological use. Four affinity domains of different origin and structure; the IgG-binding domains Z and C2, the albumin-binding domain ABD, and the biotin-binding domain M4, were all successfully produced as soluble silk fusion proteins under nondenaturing purification conditions. Silk films and fibers produced from the fusion proteins were demonstrated to be chemically and thermally stable. Still, the bioactive domains are concluded to be folded and accessible, since their respective targets could be selectively captured from complex samples, including rabbit serum and human plasma. Interestingly, materials produced from mixtures of two different silk fusion proteins displayed combined binding properties, suggesting that tailor-made materials with desired stoichiometry and surface distributions of several binding domains can be produced. Further, use of the IgG binding ability as a general mean for presentation of desired biomolecules could be demonstrated for a human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF) model system, via a first capture of anti-VEGF IgG to silk containing the Z-domain, followed by incubation with hVEGF. Taken together, this study demonstrates the potential of recombinant silk, genetically functionalized with affinity domains, for construction of biomaterials capable of presentation of almost any desired biomolecule.

  1. Measurement of the Electron Affinities of Indium and Thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J. S.; Carpenter, D. L.; Covington, A. M.; Williams, W. W.; Kvale, T. J.; Seely, D. G.

    1999-03-20

    The electron affinities of indium and thallium were measured in separate experiments using the laser-photodetachment electron spectroscopy technique. The measurements were performed at the University of Nevada, Reno. Negative ion beams of both indium and thallium were extracted from a cesium-sputter negative ion source, and mass analyzed using a 90{sup o} bending magnet. The negative ion beam of interest was then crossed at 90{sup o} with a photon beam from a cw 25-Watt Ar{sup +} laser. The resulting photoelectrons were energy analyzed with a 160{sup o} spherical-sector spectrometer. The electron affinity of In({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) was determined to be 0.404 {+-} 0.009 eV and the electron affinity of thallium was determined to be 0.377 {+-} 0.013 eV. The fine-structure splittings in the ground states of the negative ions were also determined. The experimental measurements will be compared to several recent theoretical predictions.

  2. Affinity-tuning leukocyte integrin for development of safe therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Spencer

    Much attention has been given to the molecular and cellular pathways linking inflammation with cancer and the local tumor environment to identify new target molecules that could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment. Among the many molecular players involved in the complex response, central to the induction of inflammation is intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is of particular interest for its highly sensitive and localized expression in response to inflammatory signals. ICAM-1, which has been implicated to play a critical role in tumor progression in various types of cancer, has also been linked to cancer metastases, where ICAM-1 facilitates the spread of metastatic cancer cells to secondary sites. This unique expression profile of ICAM-1 throughout solid tumor microenvironment makes ICAM-1 an intriguing molecular target, which holds great potential as an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Herein, we have engineered the ligand binding domain, or the inserted (I) domain of a leukocyte integrin, to exhibit a wide range of monovalent affinities to the natural ligand, ICAM-1. Using the resulting I domain variants, we have created drug and gene delivery nanoparticles, as well as targeted immunotherapeutics that have the ability to bind and migrate to inflammatory sites prevalent in tumors and the associated microenvironment. Through the delivery of diagnostic agents, chemotherapeutics, and immunotherapeutics, the following chapters demonstrate that the affinity enhancements achieved by directed evolution bring the affinity of I domains into the range optimal for numerous applications.

  3. Generation of recombinant antibodies and means for increasing their affinity.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, E P; Serebryanaya, D V; Katrukha, A G

    2010-12-01

    Highly specific interaction with foreign molecules is a unique feature of antibodies. Since 1975, when Keller and Milstein proposed the method of hybridoma technology and prepared mouse monoclonal antibodies, many antibodies specific to various antigens have been obtained. Recent development of methods for preparation of recombinant DNA libraries and in silico bioinformatics approaches for protein structure analysis makes possible antibody preparation using gene engineering approaches. The development of gene engineering methods allowed creating recombinant antibodies and improving characteristics of existing antibodies; this significantly extends the applicability of antibodies. By modifying biochemical and immunochemical properties of antibodies by changing their amino acid sequences it is possible to create antibodies with properties optimal for certain tasks. For example, application of recombinant technologies resulted in antibody preparation of high affinity significantly exceeding the initial affinity of natural antibodies. In this review we summarize information about the structure, modes of preparation, and application of recombinant antibodies and their fragments and also consider the main approaches used to increase antibody affinity.

  4. Structure of Greyhound hemoglobin: origin of high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Veer S; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Harris, David R; Couto, C Guillermo; Wang, Peng G; Palmer, Andre F

    2011-05-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of Greyhound hemoglobin (GrHb) determined to 1.9 Å resolution. GrHb was found to crystallize with an α₁β₁ dimer in the asymmetric unit and belongs to the R2 state. Oxygen-affinity measurements combined with the fact that GrHb crystallizes in the R2 state despite the high-salt conditions used for crystallization strongly indicate that GrHb can serve as a model high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin (Hb) for higher mammals, especially humans. Structural analysis of GrHb and its comparison with the R2-state of human Hb revealed several regions that can potentially contribute to the high oxygen affinity of GrHb and serve to rationalize the additional stability of the R2-state of GrHb. A previously well studied hydrophobic cluster of bar-headed goose Hb near α119 was also incorporated in the comparison between GrHb and human Hb. Finally, a structural comparison with generic dog Hb and maned wolf Hb was conducted, revealing that in contrast to GrHb these structures belong to the R state of Hb and raising the intriguing possibility of an additional allosteric factor co-purifying with GrHb that can modulate its quaternary structure.

  5. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in <4 h (corresponding to >3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  6. Composite affinity sorbents and their cleaning in place.

    PubMed

    Girot, P; Moroux, Y; Duteil, X P; Nguyen, C; Boschetti, E

    1990-06-27

    Making large-scale affinity sorbents that are reusable under acceptable hygienic conditions implies specific treatments for cleaning in place with known aqueous solutions of chemical agents. However, common agents such as sodium hydroxide are frequently considered too drastic for the stability of macromolecular biologically active immobilized ligands. According to a large series of trials, it was found that only a mixture of sodium hydroxide and ethanol was actually effective in sterilizing a sorbent in a single step. When hydroxide or an ethanol-acetic acid mixture were used alone, they were not totally efficient in the inactivation of sporulated Bacillus subtilis. Conversely, they were efficient when used sequentially. All these solutions were able to remove pyrogens from chromatographic sorbents. As the sterilizing solutions contained a certain amount of ethanol, the most suitable chromatographic affinity sorbents had to be based on an incompressible matrix. When washing an affinity silica sorbent that had proteins as ligands with solutions such as sodium hydroxide, ethanol-acetic acid or ethanol-sodium hydroxide, it was found that certain sorbents were able to tolerate the treatments without a noticeable decrease in their biochemical activity.

  7. Conformational equilibria and intrinsic affinities define integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Su, Yang; Xia, Wei; Qin, Yan; Humphries, Martin J; Vestweber, Dietmar; Cabañas, Carlos; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-03-01

    We show that the three conformational states of integrin α5β1 have discrete free energies and define activation by measuring intrinsic affinities for ligand of each state and the equilibria linking them. The 5,000-fold higher affinity of the extended-open state than the bent-closed and extended-closed states demonstrates profound regulation of affinity. Free energy requirements for activation are defined with protein fragments and intact α5β1 On the surface of K562 cells, α5β1 is 99.8% bent-closed. Stabilization of the bent conformation by integrin transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains must be overcome by cellular energy input to stabilize extension. Following extension, headpiece opening is energetically favored. N-glycans and leg domains in each subunit that connect the ligand-binding head to the membrane repel or crowd one another and regulate conformational equilibria in favor of headpiece opening. The results suggest new principles for regulating signaling in the large class of receptors built from extracellular domains in tandem with single-span transmembrane domains.

  8. Pepsin-modified chiral monolithic column for affinity capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tingting; Chi, Cuijie; Ji, Yibing

    2014-11-01

    Pepsin-modified affinity monolithic capillary electrochromatography, a novel microanalysis system, was developed by the covalent bonding of pepsin on silica monolith. The column was successfully applied in the chiral separation of (±)-nefopam. Furthermore, the electrochromatographic performance of the pepsin-functionalized monolith for enantiomeric analysis was evaluated in terms of protein content, pH of running buffer, sample volume, buffer concentration, applied voltage, and capillary temperature. The relative standard deviation (%RSD) values of retention time (intraday <0.53, n = 10; interday <0.53, n = 10; column-to-column <0.70, n = 20; and batch-to-batch <0.80, n = 20) indicated satisfactory stability of these columns. No appreciable change was observed in retention and resolution for chiral recognition of (±)-nefopam in 50 days with 100 injections. The proteolytic activity of this stationary phase was further characterized with bovine serum albumin as substrate for online protein digestion. As for monolithic immobilized enzyme reactor, successive protein injections confirmed both the operational stability and ability to reuse the bioreactor for at least 20 digestions. It implied that the affinity monolith used in this research opens a new path of exploring particularly versatile class of enzymes to develop enzyme-modified affinity capillary monolith for enantioseparation.

  9. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.

  10. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    DOE PAGES

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group andmore » a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.« less

  11. Affinity approaches in RNAi-based therapeutics purification.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Figueiras, Ana; Sousa, Fani

    2016-05-15

    The recent investigation on RNA interference (RNAi) related mechanisms and applications led to an increased awareness of the importance of RNA in biology. Nowadays, RNAi-based technology has emerged as a potentially powerful tool for silencing gene expression, being exploited to develop new therapeutics for treating a vast number of human disease conditions, as it is expected that this technology can be translated onto clinical applications in a near future. This approach makes use of a large number of small (namely short interfering RNAs, microRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are likely to have a crucial role as the next generation therapeutics. The commercial and biomedical interest in these RNAi-based therapy applications have fostered the need to develop innovative procedures to easily and efficiently purify RNA, aiming to obtain the final product with high purity degree, good quality and biological activity. Recently, affinity chromatography has been applied to ncRNAs purification, in view of the high specificity. Therefore, this article intends to review the biogenesis pathways of regulatory ncRNAs and also to discuss the most significant and recent developments as well as applications of affinity chromatography in the challenging task of purifying ncRNAs. In addition, the importance of affinity chromatography in ncRNAs purification is addressed and prospects for what is forthcoming are presented.

  12. Monitoring water supplies for weaponized bacteria and bacterial toxins using rapid fluorescence-based viability and affinity assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tassell, Roger L.; Evans, Mishell

    2004-03-01

    The rapid detection of weaponized bacteria and toxins is a major problem during a biological attack. Although sensitive detection formats exist for many biowarfare agents, they often require advanced training and complex procedures. Luna has developed simple, rapid means for determining the presence of pathogens and bacterial toxins in water supplies using fluorescence-based assays that can be adapted for field use. The batteries of rapid assays are designed for i) determining cell viability and bacterial loads by exploiting metabolic markers (e.g., acid-production, redox potentials, etc) and ii) detecting bacterial toxins using fluorescent, polymerized affinity liposomes (fluorosomes). The viability assays were characterized using E. coli, S. aureus and the anthrax simulant, B. globigii. The viability assays detected bacterial loads of ~ 104 CFU/ml and with simple filtration ~ 100CFU/ml could be detected. The affinity fluorosomes were characterized using cholera toxin (CT). Affinity liposomes displaying GM1 and anti-CT antibodies could detect CT at <μg/ml levels. Stability studies showed that affinity vesicles could be stored for weeks at 4°C or freeze-dried with no significant loss of binding capacity. Using an in-house fiber optic fluorescence system, Luna characterized the binding of affinity fluorosomes to respective targets and determined the responses of bacterial loads in the fluorescent viability assays. Using this two-tiered approach, Luna demonstrated that water susceptible to sabotage could be easily monitored and confirmed for specific agents using simple, general and specific fluorescence-based detection schemes based on metabolism and ligand-target interactions.

  13. Robust adaptive control for a class of uncertain non-affine nonlinear systems using affine-type neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shitie; Gao, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    A robust adaptive control is proposed for a class of single-input single-output non-affine nonlinear systems. In order to approximate the unknown nonlinear function, a novel affine-type neural network is used, and then to compensate the approximation error and external disturbance a robust control term is employed. By Lyapunov stability analysis for the closed-loop system, it is proved that tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero. Moreover, an observer is designed to estimate the system states because all the states may not be available for measurements. Furthermore, the adaptation laws of neural networks and the robust controller are given out based on the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  14. 77 FR 28411 - Adrenalina, Affinity Technology Group, Inc., Braintech, Inc., Builders Transport, Incorporated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Adrenalina, Affinity Technology Group, Inc., Braintech, Inc., Builders Transport, Incorporated... concerning the securities of Affinity Technology Group, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic...

  15. The Experimental Values of Atomic Electron Affinities: Their Selection and Periodic Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, E. C. M.; Wentworth, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes new experimental techniques, such as dye-laser photodetachment studies, which have recently provided accurate values for the electron affinity of numerous elements. Provides a periodic chart with available electron affinity data. (MLH)

  16. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  17. Discovery of Compounds that Positively Modulate the High Affinity Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Parul; Armstrong, Emma J.; Jorgensen, Csilla C.; Piotrowski, Mary; Barthmes, Maria; Torella, Rubben; Johnston, Sarah E.; Maruyama, Yuya; Janiszewski, John S.; Storer, R. Ian; Skerratt, Sarah E.; Benn, Caroline L.

    2017-01-01

    Cholinergic hypofunction is associated with decreased attention and cognitive deficits in the central nervous system in addition to compromised motor function. Consequently, stimulation of cholinergic neurotransmission is a rational therapeutic approach for the potential treatment of a variety of neurological conditions. High affinity choline uptake (HACU) into acetylcholine (ACh)-synthesizing neurons is critically mediated by the sodium- and pH-dependent high-affinity choline transporter (CHT, encoded by the SLC5A7 gene). This transporter is comparatively well-characterized but otherwise unexplored as a potential drug target. We therefore sought to identify small molecules that would enable testing of the hypothesis that positive modulation of CHT mediated transport would enhance activity-dependent cholinergic signaling. We utilized existing and novel screening techniques for their ability to reveal both positive and negative modulation of CHT using literature tools. A screening campaign was initiated with a bespoke compound library comprising both the Pfizer Chemogenomic Library (CGL) of 2,753 molecules designed specifically to help enable the elucidation of new mechanisms in phenotypic screens and 887 compounds from a virtual screening campaign to select molecules with field-based similarities to reported negative and positive allosteric modulators. We identified a number of previously unknown active and structurally distinct molecules that could be used as tools to further explore CHT biology or as a starting point for further medicinal chemistry. PMID:28289374

  18. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Mace G.

    2017-01-01

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D) protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors. PMID:28061508

  19. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  20. Minimization of the root of a quadratic functional under a system of affine equality constraints with application to portfolio management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Zinoviy

    2008-10-01

    We present an explicit closed form solution of the problem of minimizing the root of a quadratic functional subject to a system of affine constraints. The result generalizes Z. Landsman, Minimization of the root of a quadratic functional under an affine equality constraint, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 2007, to appear, see , articles in press, where the optimization problem was solved under only one linear constraint. This is of interest for solving significant problems pertaining to financial economics as well as some classes of feasibility and optimization problems which frequently occur in tomography and other fields. The results are illustrated in the problem of optimal portfolio selection and the particular case when the expected return of finance portfolio is certain is discussed.

  1. Characterization of the binding strengths between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chenchen; Liu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of boronic acids toward cis-diol-containing biomolecules has found wide applications in many fields, such as sensing, separation, drug delivery, and functional materials. A sound understanding of the binding interactions will greatly facilitate exquisite applications of this chemistry. Traditional techniques are associated with some apparent drawbacks, so they are only applicable to a limited range of boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. This chapter describes an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method for the characterization of the binding strengths between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. As compared with existing approaches, such as (11)B NMR, the ACE method exhibits several significant advantages: (1) possibility of simultaneous study of multiple interactions, (2) low requirement on the purity of the binding species, (3) widely applicable to almost all types of cis-diol-containing compounds and boronic acids, and (4) high accuracy and precision.

  2. PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: RECENT TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe A.; Bi, Cong; Li, Rong; Matsuda, Ryan; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Vargas, John; Zheng, Xiwei

    2012-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a separation technique that has become increasingly important in work with biological samples and pharmaceutical agents. This method is based on the use of a biologically-related agent as a stationary phase to selectively retain analytes or to study biological interactions. This review discusses the basic principles behind affinity chromatography and examines recent developments that have occurred in the use of this method for biomedical and pharmaceutical analysis. Techniques based on traditional affinity supports are discussed, but an emphasis is placed on methods in which affinity columns are used as part of HPLC systems or in combination with other analytical methods. General formats for affinity chromatography that are considered include step elution schemes, weak affinity chromatography, affinity extraction and affinity depletion. Specific separation techniques that are examined include lectin affinity chromatography, boronate affinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography, and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Approaches for the study of biological interactions by affinity chromatography are also presented, such as the measurement of equilibrium constants, rate constants, or competition and displacement effects. In addition, related developments in the use of immobilized enzyme reactors, molecularly imprinted polymers, dye ligands and aptamers are briefly considered. PMID:22305083

  3. Weyl-Eddington-Einstein affine gravity in the context of modern cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. T.

    2010-06-01

    We propose new models of the “affine” theory of gravity in multidimensional space-times with symmetric connections. We use and develop ideas of Weyl, Eddington, and Einstein, in particular, Einstein’s proposed method for obtaining the geometry using the Hamilton principle. More specifically, the connection coefficients are determined using a “geometric” Lagrangian that is an arbitrary function of the generalized (nonsymmetric) Ricci curvature tensor (and, possibly, other fundamental tensors) expressed in terms of the connection coefficients regarded as independent variables. Such a theory supplements the standard Einstein theory with dark energy (the cosmological constant, in the first approximation), a neutral massive (or tachyonic) meson, and massive (or tachyonic) scalar fields. These fields couple only to gravity and can generate dark matter and/or inflation. The new field masses (real or imaginary) have a geometric origin and must appear in any concrete model. The concrete choice of the Lagrangian determines further details of the theory, for example, the nature of the fields that can describe massive particles, tachyons, or even “phantoms.” In “natural” geometric theories, dark energy must also arise. The basic parameters of the theory (cosmological constant, mass, possible dimensionless constants) are theoretically indeterminate, but in the framework of modern “multiverse” ideas, this is more a virtue than a defect. We consider further extensions of the affine models and in more detail discuss approximate effective (“physical”) Lagrangians that can be applied to the cosmology of the early Universe.

  4. Study on CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingping; Deng, Riqiang; Wu, Wenyan

    2012-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor of human chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a key target in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection process due to its major involvement in binding to the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 and facilitating virus entry into the cells. The identification of naturally occurring CCR5 mutations (especially CCR5 delta-32) has allowed us to address the CCR5 molecule as a promising target to prevent or resist HIV infection in vivo. To obtain high-affinity peptides that can be used to block CCR5, CCR5 analogs with high conformational similarity are required. In this study, two recombinant proteins named CCR5 N-Linker-E2 and CCR5 mN-E1-E2 containing the fragments of the CCR5 N-terminal, the first extracellular loop or the second extracellular loop are cloned from a full-length human CCR5 cDNA. The recombinant human CCR5 analogs with self-cleavage activity of the intein Mxe or Ssp in the vector pTwinI were then produced with a high-yield expression and purification system in Escherichia coli. Experiments of extracellular epitope-activity identification (such as immunoprecipitation and indirective/competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) confirmed the close similarity between the epitope activity of the CCR5 analogs and that of the natural CCR5, suggesting the applicability of the recombinant CCR5 analogs as antagonists of the chemokine ligands. Subsequent screening of high-affinity peptides from the phage random-peptides library acquired nine polypeptides, which could be used as CCR5 peptide antagonists. The CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides elucidated in this paper provide us with a basis for further study of the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  5. The affinity of magnetic microspheres for Schistosoma eggs.

    PubMed

    Candido, Renata R F; Favero, Vivian; Duke, Mary; Karl, Stephan; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Woodward, Robert C; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Jones, Malcolm K; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease of humans, with two species primarily causing the intestinal infection: Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Traditionally, diagnosis of schistosomiasis is achieved through direct visualisation of eggs in faeces using techniques that lack the sensitivity required to detect all infections, especially in areas of low endemicity. A recently developed method termed Helmintex™ is a very sensitive technique for detection of Schistosoma eggs and exhibits 100% sensitivity at 1.3 eggs per gram of faeces, enough to detect even low-level infections. The Helminthex™ method is based on the interaction of magnetic microspheres and schistosome eggs. Further understanding the underlying egg-microsphere interactions would enable a targeted optimisation of egg-particle binding and may thus enable a significant improvement of the Helmintex™ method and diagnostic sensitivity in areas with low infection rates. We investigated the magnetic properties of S. mansoni and S. japonicum eggs and their interactions with microspheres with different magnetic properties and surface functionalization. Eggs of both species exhibited higher binding affinity to the magnetic microspheres than the non-magnetic microspheres. Binding efficiency was further enhanced if the particles were coated with streptavidin. Schistosoma japonicum eggs bound more microspheres compared with S. mansoni. However, distinct differences within eggs of each species were also observed when the distribution of the number of microspheres bound per egg was modelled with double Poisson distributions. Using this approach, both S. japonicum and S. mansoni eggs fell into two groups, one having greater affinity for magnetic microspheres than the other, indicating that not all eggs of a species exhibit the same binding affinity. Our observations suggest that interaction between the microspheres and eggs is more likely to be related to surface charge-based electrostatic

  6. Surface affinity role in graphoepitaxy of lamellar block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claveau, Guillaume; Quemere, Patrick; Argoud, Maxime; Hazart, Jerome; Barros, Patricia Pimenta; Sarrazin, Aurelien; Posseme, Nicolas; Tiron, Raluca; Chevalier, Xavier; Nicolet, Celia; Navarro, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Overcoming the optical limitations of 193-nm immersion lithography can be achieved using directed self-assembly (DSA) of block-copolymers (BCPs) as a low-cost and versatile complementary technique. The goal of this paper is to investigate the potential of DSA to address line and space (L/S) high-resolution patterning by performing the density multiplication of lines with the graphoepitaxy approach. As surface affinity is a key parameter in self-assembly, three variations, or "flavors," of DSA template affinity are investigated regarding several success criteria such as morphology control or defectivity. More precisely, both the methodology to register DSA defects and the impact of process parameters on defectivity are detailed. Using the 300-mm pilot line available in LETI and Arkema's advanced materials, we investigate process optimization of DSA line/space patterning of a 38-nm period lamellar PS-b-PMMA BCP (L38). Our integration scheme is based on BCP self-assembly inside organic hard mask guiding patterns obtained using 193i-nm lithography. Defect analysis coupled with the fine tuning of process parameters (annealing, brush material) provided the optimum conditions for the L38 self-assembly. Using such conditions, DSA using the three affinity flavors is investigated by means of SEM top-view and cross-section review. Lithographic performances of one selected flavor are then evaluated with the comparison of process windows function of either commensurability, morphology, or roughness. This work is meant as a guideline for the graphoepitaxy optimization of materials and process parameters on a 300-mm platform.

  7. Prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity by free energy simulations: assumptions, pitfalls and expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Julien; Essex, Jonathan W.

    2010-08-01

    Many limitations of current computer-aided drug design arise from the difficulty of reliably predicting the binding affinity of a small molecule to a biological target. There is thus a strong interest in novel computational methodologies that claim predictions of greater accuracy than current scoring functions, and at a throughput compatible with the rapid pace of drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. Notably, computational methodologies firmly rooted in statistical thermodynamics have received particular attention in recent years. Yet free energy calculations can be daunting to learn for a novice user because of numerous technical issues and various approaches advocated by experts in the field. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current capabilities of free energy calculations and to discuss the applicability of this technology to drug discovery.

  8. Affinity flow fractionation of cells via transient interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Suman; Singh, Rishi; Hanewich-Hollatz, Mikhail; Shen, Chong; Lee, Chia-Hua; Dorfman, David M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-07-01

    Flow fractionation of cells using physical fields to achieve lateral displacement finds wide applications, but its extension to surface molecule-specific separation requires labeling. Here we demonstrate affinity flow fractionation (AFF) where weak, short-range interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns laterally displace cells in a continuous, label-free process. We show that AFF can directly draw neutrophils out of a continuously flowing stream of blood with an unprecedented 400,000-fold depletion of red blood cells, with the sorted cells being highly viable, unactivated, and functionally intact. The lack of background erythrocytes enabled the use of AFF for direct enumeration of neutrophils by a downstream detector, which could distinguish the activation state of neutrophils in blood. The compatibility of AFF with capillary microfluidics and its ability to directly separate cells with high purity and minimal sample preparation will facilitate the design of simple and portable devices for point-of-care diagnostics and quick, cost-effective laboratory analysis.

  9. Recursive estimation of 3D motion and surface structure from local affine flow parameters.

    PubMed

    Calway, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    A recursive structure from motion algorithm based on optical flow measurements taken from an image sequence is described. It provides estimates of surface normals in addition to 3D motion and depth. The measurements are affine motion parameters which approximate the local flow fields associated with near-planar surface patches in the scene. These are integrated over time to give estimates of the 3D parameters using an extended Kalman filter. This also estimates the camera focal length and, so, the 3D estimates are metric. The use of parametric measurements means that the algorithm is computationally less demanding than previous optical flow approaches and the recursive filter builds in a degree of noise robustness. Results of experiments on synthetic and real image sequences demonstrate that the algorithm performs well.

  10. Utilization of nanoparticle labels for signal amplification in ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang; Bond, Alan M; Zhai, Jianping; Zhang, Jie

    2013-10-03

    Nanoparticles with desirable properties not exhibited by the bulk material can be readily synthesized because of rapid technological developments in the fields of materials science and nanotechnology. In particular their highly attractive electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity have facilitated achievement of the high level of signal amplification needed for the development of ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors for the detection of proteins and DNA. This review article explains the basic principles of nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensors, highlights the recent advances in the development of nanoparticle based signal amplification strategies, and provides a critical assessment of the likely drawbacks associated with each strategy. Finally, future perspectives for achieving advanced signal simplification in nanoparticles based biosensors are considered.

  11. Affinity-based biosensors as promising tools for gene doping detection.

    PubMed

    Minunni, Maria; Scarano, Simona; Mascini, Marco

    2008-05-01

    Innovative bioanalytical approaches can be foreseen as interesting means for solving relevant emerging problems in anti-doping control. Sport authorities fear that the newer form of doping, so-called gene doping, based on a misuse of gene therapy, will be undetectable and thus much less preventable. The World Anti-Doping Agency has already asked scientists to assist in finding ways to prevent and detect this newest kind of doping. In this Opinion article we discuss the main aspects of gene doping, from the putative target analytes to suitable sampling strategies. Moreover, we discuss the potential application of affinity sensing in this field, which so far has been successfully applied to a variety of analytical problems, from clinical diagnostics to food and environmental analysis.

  12. Nine switch-affine neurons suffice for Turing universality.

    PubMed

    Siegelmann, H T.; Margenstern, M

    1999-06-01

    In a previous work Pollack showed that a particular type of heterogeneous processor network is Turing universal. Siegelmann and Sontag (1991) showed the universality of homogeneous networks of first-order neurons having piecewise-linear activation functions. Their result was generalized by Kilian and Siegelmann (1996) to include various sigmoidal activation functions. Here we focus on a type of high-order neurons called switch-affine neurons, with piecewise-linear activation functions, and prove that nine such neurons suffice for simulating universal Turing machines.

  13. Friction and plasticity between self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark; Harrison, Judith

    2006-03-01

    Simulations are used to study the contact area and adhesion between two amorphous solids with self-affine fractal surfaces, and the results are compared to continuum calculations. The friction between non-adhesive surfaces is proportional to load, but the coefficient of friction increases with roughness. The friction is much higher than expected for elasticallly deforming surfaces,^* and substantial plastic deformation is observed. Indeed, friction forces for different surface roughness collapse when plotted against the number of plastic rearrangements per unit sliding distance. Including adhesion leads to an increase in both friction and plasticity. ^* M. H. Müser, L. Wenning, and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 1295 (2001).

  14. An affine projection algorithm using grouping selection of input vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, JaeWook; Kong, NamWoong; Park, PooGyeon

    2011-10-01

    This paper present an affine projection algorithm (APA) using grouping selection of input vectors. To improve the performance of conventional APA, the proposed algorithm adjusts the number of the input vectors using two procedures: grouping procedure and selection procedure. In grouping procedure, the some input vectors that have overlapping information for update is grouped using normalized inner product. Then, few input vectors that have enough information for for coefficient update is selected using steady-state mean square error (MSE) in selection procedure. Finally, the filter coefficients update using selected input vectors. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has small steady-state estimation errors comparing with the existing algorithms.

  15. The local electron affinity for non-minimal basis sets.

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    A technique known as intensity filtering is introduced to select valence-like virtual orbitals for calculating the local electron affinity, EA(L). Intensity filtering allows EA(L) to be calculated using semiempirical molecular orbital techniques that include polarisation functions. Without intensity filtering, such techniques yield spurious EA(L) values that are dominated by the polarisation functions. As intensity filtering should also be applicable for ab initio or density functional theory calculations with large basis sets, it also makes EA(L) available for these techniques.

  16. Statistical geometric affinity in human brain electric activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chornet-Lurbe, A.; Oteo, J. A.; Ros, J.

    2007-05-01

    The representation of the human electroencephalogram (EEG) records by neurophysiologists demands standardized time-amplitude scales for their correct conventional interpretation. In a suite of graphical experiments involving scaling affine transformations we have been able to convert electroencephalogram samples corresponding to any particular sleep phase and relaxed wakefulness into each other. We propound a statistical explanation for that finding in terms of data collapse. As a sequel, we determine characteristic time and amplitude scales and outline a possible physical interpretation. An analysis for characteristic times based on lacunarity is also carried out as well as a study of the synchrony between left and right EEG channels.

  17. Affine reflection groups for tiling applications: Knot theory and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, M.; Patera, J.; Peterson, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper some non-conventional applications of affine Weyl groups Waff of rank 2, the symmetry group of the tiling/lattice. We first develop and present the tools for applications requiring tilings of a real Euclidean plane {R}^2. We then elucidate the equivalence of these tilings with 2D projections of knots. The resulting mathematical structure provides a framework within which is encompassed recent work utilizing knot theory for modeling the structure and function of genetic molecules, specifically the action of particular enzymes in altering the topology of DNA in site-specific recombination.

  18. Linear algorithms of affine synthesis in the Lebesgue space L^1 \\lbrack 0,1 \\rbrack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, Pavel A.

    2010-10-01

    We prove that there are no linear algorithms of affine synthesis for affine systems in the Lebesgue space L^1 \\lbrack 0,1 \\rbrack with respect to the model space \\ell^1, although the corresponding affine synthesis problem has a positive solution under the most general assumptions. At the same time, by imposing additional conditions on the generating function of the affine system, we can give an explicit linear algorithm of affine synthesis in the Lebesgue space when the model space is that of the coefficients of the system. This linear algorithm generalizes the Fourier-Haar expansion into orthogonal series.

  19. [Progresses in screening active compounds from herbal medicine by affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying-shu; Tong, Shan-shan; Xu, Xi-ming; Yu, Jiang-nan

    2015-03-01

    Affinity chromatography is a chromatographic method for separating molecules using the binding characteristics of the stationary phase with potential drug molecules. This method can be performed as a high throughput screening method and a chromatographic separation method to screen a variety of active drugs. This paper summarizes the history of affinity chromatography, screening technology of affinity chromatography, and application of affinity chromatography in screening bio-active compounds in herbal medicines, and then discusses its application prospects, in order to broaden applications of the affinity chromatography in drug screening.

  20. Experimental and theoretical binding affinity between polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and selected phenolic compounds from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Durán-Lara, Esteban F; López-Cortés, Xaviera A; Castro, Ricardo I; Avila-Salas, Fabián; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Laurie, V Felipe; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-02-01

    Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) is a fining agent, widely used in winemaking and brewing, whose mode of action in removing phenolic compounds has not been fully characterised. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experimental and theoretical binding affinity of PVPP towards six phenolic compounds representing different types of phenolic species. The interaction between PVPP and phenolics was evaluated in model solutions, where hydroxyl groups, hydrophobic bonding and steric hindrance were characterised. The results of the study indicated that PVPP exhibits high affinity for quercetin and catechin, moderate affinity for epicatechin, gallic acid and lower affinity for 4-methylcatechol and caffeic acid. The affinity has a direct correlation with the hydroxylation degree of each compound. The results show that the affinity of PVPP towards phenols is related with frontier orbitals. This work demonstrates a direct correlation between the experimental affinity and the interaction energy calculations obtained through computational chemistry methods.

  1. Bicarbonate-form anion exchange: affinity, regeneration, and stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Rokicki, Christopher A; Boyer, Treavor H

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) is an effective process for removing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from natural waters, but its implementation has been limited due to production of waste sodium chloride solution (i.e., brine) from the regeneration process. Chloride is of concern because elevated concentrations can have adverse effects on engineered and natural systems. The goal of this research was to explore the efficacy of using anion exchange resin with bicarbonate as the mobile counter ion, which would produce a non-chloride regeneration solution. It was found that bicarbonate-form MIEX resin had a similar affinity as chloride-form MIEX resin for sulfate, nitrate, DOC, and ultraviolet-absorbing substances. Both bicarbonate-form and chloride-form MIEX resins showed the greatest removal efficiencies as fresh resin, and removal efficiency decreased with multiple regeneration cycles. Nevertheless, sodium bicarbonate solution was as effective as sodium chloride solution at regenerating MIEX resin. Regeneration of the bicarbonate-form MIEX resin was illustrated by sparging carbon dioxide gas in a water/resin slurry. This regeneration process would eliminate the need for the addition of salts such as sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate. The stoichiometry of the bicarbonate-form resin revealed that the bicarbonate was deprotonating within the resin matrix leading to a mixture of both carbonate and bicarbonate mobile counter ions. This work makes an important contribution to ion exchange applications for water treatment by evaluating the affinity, regeneration, and stoichiometry of bicarbonate-form anion exchange.

  2. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  3. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  4. The Mobile Phone Affinity Scale: Enhancement and Refinement

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rochelle K

    2016-01-01

    Background Existing instruments that assess individuals’ relationships with mobile phones tend to focus on negative constructs such as addiction or dependence, and appear to assume that high mobile phone use reflects pathology. Mobile phones can be beneficial for health behavior change, disease management, work productivity, and social connections, so there is a need for an instrument that provides a more balanced assessment of the various aspects of individuals’ relationships with mobile phones. Objective The purpose of this research was to develop, revise, and validate the Mobile Phone Affinity Scale, a multi-scale instrument designed to assess key factors associated with mobile phone use. Methods Participants (N=1058, mean age 33) were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk between March and April of 2016 to complete a survey that assessed participants’ mobile phone attitudes and use, anxious and depressive symptoms, and resilience. Results Confirmatory factor analysis supported a 6-factor model. The final measure consisted of 24 items, with 4 items on each of 6 factors: Connectedness, Productivity, Empowerment, Anxious Attachment, Addiction, and Continuous Use. The subscales demonstrated strong internal consistency (Cronbach alpha range=0.76-0.88, mean 0.83), and high item factor loadings (range=0.57-0.87, mean 0.75). Tests for validity further demonstrated support for the individual subscales. Conclusions Mobile phone affinity may have an important impact in the development and effectiveness of mobile health interventions, and continued research is needed to assess its predictive ability in health behavior change interventions delivered via mobile phones. PMID:27979792

  5. Compensating Enthalpic and Entropic Changes Hinder Binding Affinity Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafont,V.; Armstrong, A.; Ohtaka, H.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    A common strategy to improve the potency of drug candidates is to introduce chemical functionalities, like hydrogen bond donors or acceptors, at positions where they are able to establish strong interactions with the target. However, it is often observed that the added functionalities do not necessarily improve potency even if they form strong hydrogen bonds. Here, we explore the thermodynamic and structural basis for those observations. KNI-10033 is a potent experimental HIV-1 protease inhibitor with picomolar affinity against the wild-type enzyme (Kd = 13 pm). The potency of the inhibitor is the result of favorable enthalpic (?H = -8.2 kcal/mol) and entropic (-T?S = -6.7 kcal/mol) interactions. The replacement of the thioether group in KNI-10033 by a sulfonyl group (KNI-10075) results in a strong hydrogen bond with the amide of Asp 30B of the HIV-1 protease. This additional hydrogen bond improves the binding enthalpy by 3.9 kcal/mol; however, the enthalpy gain is completely compensated by an entropy loss, resulting in no affinity change. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis of the inhibitor/protease complexes indicates that the entropy losses are due to a combination of conformational and solvation effects. These results provide a set of practical guidelines aimed at overcoming enthalpy/entropy compensation and improve binding potency.

  6. Boronate affinity adsorption of RNA: possible role of conformational changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Willson, R. C.; Fox, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of the cation used, with barium being far more effective than the conventionally-used magnesium. This adsorption-promoting influence of barium is suggested to arise primarily from ionic influences on the structure and rigidity of the RNA molecule, as the adsorption of ribose-based small molecules is not similarly affected. The substitution of barium for the standard magnesium counterion does not greatly promote the adsorption of DNA, implying that the effect is specific to RNA and may be useful in boronate-based RNA separations. RNA adsorption isotherms exhibit sharp transitions as functions of temperature, and these transitions occur at different temperatures with Mg2+ and with Ba2+. Adsorption affinity and capacity were found to increase markedly at lower temperatures, suggestive of an enthalpically favored interaction process. The stoichiometric displacement parameter, Z, in Ba2+ buffer is three times the value in Mg2+ buffer, and is close to unity.

  7. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  8. Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.; Bierman, John C.

    2011-09-13

    A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

  9. Affinity purification of copper chelating peptides from chickpea protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, Maria M; Girón-Calle, Julio; Alaiz, Manuel; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2007-05-16

    Chickpea protein hydrolysates obtained with alcalase and flavourzyme were used for purification of copper chelating peptides by affinity chromatography using copper immobilized on solid supports. The chelating activity of purified peptides was indirectly measured by the inhibition of beta-carotene oxidation in the presence of copper. Two protein hydrolysates, obtained after 10 and 100 min of hydrolysis, were the most inhibitory of beta-carotene oxidation. Purified copper chelating peptides from these protein hydrolysates contained 19.7 and 35.1% histidine, respectively, in comparison to 2.7 and 2.6% in the protein hydrolysates. Chelating peptides from hydrolysate obtained after 10 min of hydrolysis were the most antioxidative being 8.3 times more antioxidative than the hydrolysate, while chelating peptides purified from protein hydrolysate obtained after 100 min were 3.1 times more antioxidative than its hydrolysate. However, the histidine content was higher in peptides derived from the 100 min hydrolysate (19.7 against 35.1% in 10 min hydrolysate), indicating that this amino acid is not the only factor involved in the antioxidative activity, and other factors such as peptide size or amino acid sequence are also determinant. This manuscript shows that affinity chromatography is a useful procedure for purification of copper chelating peptides. This method can be extended to other metals of interest in nutrition, such as calcium, iron, or zinc. Purified chelating peptides, in addition to their antioxidative properties, may also be useful in food mineral fortification for increasing the bioavailability of these metals.

  10. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses.

  11. Self-affinity in the dengue fever time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, S. M.; Saba, H.; Miranda, J. G. V.; Filho, A. S. Nascimento; Moret, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Dengue is a complex public health problem that is common in tropical and subtropical regions. This disease has risen substantially in the last three decades, and the physical symptoms depict the self-affine behavior of the occurrences of reported dengue cases in Bahia, Brazil. This study uses detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to verify the scale behavior in a time series of dengue cases and to evaluate the long-range correlations that are characterized by the power law α exponent for different cities in Bahia, Brazil. The scaling exponent (α) presents different long-range correlations, i.e. uncorrelated, anti-persistent, persistent and diffusive behaviors. The long-range correlations highlight the complex behavior of the time series of this disease. The findings show that there are two distinct types of scale behavior. In the first behavior, the time series presents a persistent α exponent for a one-month period. For large periods, the time series signal approaches subdiffusive behavior. The hypothesis of the long-range correlations in the time series of the occurrences of reported dengue cases was validated. The observed self-affinity is useful as a forecasting tool for future periods through extrapolation of the α exponent behavior. This complex system has a higher predictability in a relatively short time (approximately one month), and it suggests a new tool in epidemiological control strategies. However, predictions for large periods using DFA are hidden by the subdiffusive behavior.

  12. Purification of cytochrome c oxidase by lysine-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Felsch, J; Kotake, S; Copeland, R A

    1992-02-01

    A method for the purification of cytochrome c oxidase that is based on the affinity of this enzyme for polycations such as poly-L-lysine is described. When detergent extracts of bovine cardiac mitochondria were applied to either a poly-L-lysine-agarose or a lysine-Sepharose column at low ionic strength, cytochrome c oxidase was found to adhere tightly, whereas the bulk of the proteins were eluted by washing with the same buffer. The cytochrome c oxidase was eluted by application of a linear potassium chloride gradient to the columns. The resulting enzyme was identical to that obtained by more traditional purification methods in terms of its subunit composition, optical and resonance Raman spectra, and cytochrome c oxidizing activity. When detergent extracts of spheroplasts from Paracoccus denitrificans were applied to these columns, the cytochrome c oxidase from this organism was also found to adhere tightly. Thus this purification method appears applicable to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic forms of the enzyme. The advantages of this new purification method are that it is less labor intensive than the traditional procedure and less expensive than methods based on cytochrome c-affinity chromatography.

  13. Specific affinity between fibronectin and the epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, D T; O'Keefe, E J; McDonald, J A; Reese, M J; Briggaman, R A; Gammon, W R

    1987-01-01

    Autoantibodies in the skin and sera of patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita bind to a large matrix molecule within the lamina densa region of skin basement membrane. At the site of these immune complexes, the epidermis separates from the dermis, which creates a subepidermal blister just below the lamina densa. The target molecule for the autoantibodies is in close apposition to fibronectin, a major extracellular matrix molecule that is abundant in the upper dermis of skin. In this report, we show specific affinity between fibronectin and the 290,000-D chain of the epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen, and that this affinity is mediated by the gelatin/collagen-binding domain of fibronectin (Mr = 60,000). Since blistering in epidermolysis bullosa acquisita often occurs in the absence of clinical and histological inflammation, a direct interruption in the fibronectin-epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen bond may be involved in the pathogenesis of epidermal-dermal disadherence that occurs in this bullous disease. Images PMID:3584471

  14. High-affinity carbamate analogues of morphinan at opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuemei; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2007-03-15

    A series of carbamate analogues were synthesized from levorphanol (1a), cyclorphan (2a) or butorphan (3a) and evaluated in vitro for their binding affinity at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Functional activities of these compounds were measured in the [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assay. Phenyl carbamate derivatives 2d and 3d showed the highest binding affinity for kappa receptor (K(i)=0.046 and 0.051 nM) and for mu receptor (K(i)=0.11 and 0.12 nM). Compound 1c showed the highest mu selectivity. The preliminary assay for agonist and antagonist properties of these ligands in stimulating [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding mediated by the kappa opioid receptor illustrated that all of these ligands were kappa agonists. At the mu receptor, compounds 1b, 1c, 2b, and 3b were agonists, while compounds 2c-e and 3c-e were mu agonists/antagonists.

  15. Growth and mortality of larval Myctophum affine (Myctophidae, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Namiki, C; Katsuragawa, M; Zani-Teixeira, M L

    2015-04-01

    The growth and mortality rates of Myctophum affine larvae were analysed based on samples collected during the austral summer and winter of 2002 from south-eastern Brazilian waters. The larvae ranged in size from 2·75 to 14·00 mm standard length (L(S)). Daily increment counts from 82 sagittal otoliths showed that the age of M. affine ranged from 2 to 28 days. Three models were applied to estimate the growth rate: linear regression, exponential model and Laird-Gompertz model. The exponential model best fitted the data, and L(0) values from exponential and Laird-Gompertz models were close to the smallest larva reported in the literature (c. 2·5 mm L(S)). The average growth rate (0·33 mm day(-1)) was intermediate among lanternfishes. The mortality rate (12%) during the larval period was below average compared with other marine fish species but similar to some epipelagic fishes that occur in the area.

  16. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-07-18

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process.

  17. Iminobiotin affinity columns and their application to retrieval of streptavidin.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, K; Wood, S W; Brinton, C C; Montibeller, J A; Finn, F M

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for the retrieval of streptavidin from the culture broth of Streptomyces avidinii. The key step in this procedure is the adsorption of streptavidin from culture concentrates to an affinity column in which iminobiotin is attached to AH-Sepharose 4B. This column binds streptavbidin at pH 11 and releases the protein at pH 4. The recovery of streptavidin is practically quantitative. The pH dependence of the iminobiotin-avidin affinity, discovered by Green [Green, N. M. (1966) Biochem. J. 101, 774-779], has thus found practical application. The streptavidin bound 4.07 +/- 0.02 mol of [14C]biotin per mol and was essentially homogeneous as judged by disc and slab gel electrophoresis. Streptavidin was extensively succinoylated without loss of biotin-binding capacity. The observations that 125I-labeled streptavidin and 125I-labeled succinoylstreptavidin are retained by iminobiotin-AH-Sepharose 4B columns at pH 7.5 and are eluted at pH 4.0 provides a convenient purification method for these iodinated proteins. The technique employed for the retrieval of streptavidin is generally applicable to the isolation of iminobiotinylated molecules. PMID:6933515

  18. Membrane Affinity of Platensimycin and Its Dialkylamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Ian; Guo, Min; Yasmann, Anthony; Cember, Abigail; Sintim, Herman O.; Sukharev, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Membrane permeability is a desired property in drug design, but there have been difficulties in quantifying the direct drug partitioning into native membranes. Platensimycin (PL) is a new promising antibiotic whose biosynthetic production is costly. Six dialkylamine analogs of PL were synthesized with identical pharmacophores but different side chains; five of them were found inactive. To address the possibility that their activity is limited by the permeation step, we calculated polarity, measured surface activity and the ability to insert into the phospholipid monolayers. The partitioning of PL and the analogs into the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli was assessed by activation curve shifts of a re-engineered mechanosensitive channel, MscS, in patch-clamp experiments. Despite predicted differences in polarity, the affinities to lipid monolayers and native membranes were comparable for most of the analogs. For PL and the di-myrtenyl analog QD-11, both carrying bulky sidechains, the affinity for the native membrane was lower than for monolayers (half-membranes), signifying that intercalation must overcome the lateral pressure of the bilayer. We conclude that the biological activity among the studied PL analogs is unlikely to be limited by their membrane permeability. We also discuss the capacity of endogenous tension-activated channels to detect asymmetric partitioning of exogenous substances into the native bacterial membrane and the different contributions to the thermodynamic force which drives permeation. PMID:26247942

  19. Electron attachment and detachment: Electron affinities of isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, A. A.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Van Doren, Jane M.

    2004-11-01

    Rate constants for electron attachment to the three isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile [(CF3)(CN)C6H4, or TFMBN] were measured over the temperature range of 303-463 K in a 133-Pa He buffer gas, using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. At 303 K, the measured attachment rate constants are 9.0×10-8 (o-TFMBN), 5.5×10-8 (m-TFMBN), and 8.9×10-8 cm3 s-1 (p-TFMBN), estimated accurate to ±25%. The attachment process formed only the parent anion in all three cases. Thermal electron detachment was observed for all three anion isomers, and rate constants for this reverse process were also measured. From the attachment and detachment results, the electron affinities of the three isomers of TFMBN were determined to be 0.70(o-TFMBN), 0.67(m-TFMBN), and 0.83 eV (p-TFMBN), all ±0.05 eV. G3(MP2) [Gaussian-3 calculations with reduced Møller-Plesset orders (MP2)] calculations were carried out for the neutrals and anions. Electron affinities derived from these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  20. Electron attachment and detachment: electron affinities of isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Van Doren, Jane M

    2004-11-22

    Rate constants for electron attachment to the three isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile [(CF(3))(CN)C(6)H(4), or TFMBN] were measured over the temperature range of 303-463 K in a 133-Pa He buffer gas, using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. At 303 K, the measured attachment rate constants are 9.0 x 10(-8) (o-TFMBN), 5.5 x 10(-8) (m-TFMBN), and 8.9 x 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1) (p-TFMBN), estimated accurate to +/-25%. The attachment process formed only the parent anion in all three cases. Thermal electron detachment was observed for all three anion isomers, and rate constants for this reverse process were also measured. From the attachment and detachment results, the electron affinities of the three isomers of TFMBN were determined to be 0.70(o-TFMBN), 0.67(m-TFMBN), and 0.83 eV (p-TFMBN), all +/-0.05 eV. G3(MP2) [Gaussian-3 calculations with reduced Møller-Plesset orders (MP2)] calculations were carried out for the neutrals and anions. Electron affinities derived from these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  1. Influence of affinity on antibody determination in microtiter ELISA systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, J.H.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Butler, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Theoretically, all immunoassays are affinity (Ka) dependent when the product of the antibody (Ab) Ka and the free epitope concentration is less than 10. Thus, the degree of dependence on Ka depends on the concentration of available antigen in the system. The authors examined the binding of /sup 125/I-anti-fluorescein (a-FLU) monoclonal antibodies of different affinities to FLU-gelatin adsorbed on Immunlon 2 microtiter plates. Data obtained were in general agreement with our theoretical predictions; the percent of /sup 125/I-a-FLU which bound correlated with Ka, as did the shape of the titration curves. Measurement of 5 a-FLU monoclonals by the ELISA showed that the determination of Ab concentrations depends on the FLU-gelatin concentration, epitope density, and on the relationship between the Kas of test samples and the reference standard Ab preparation. Thus the ELISA is Ka dependent and should not be used routinely to estimate the absolute amount to Ab in unknown samples. However, the Ka dependency of the ELISA might provide a convenient assay for the estimation of the relative functional Ka (rfKa) of antibody preparations.

  2. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  3. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  4. Protein A affinity precipitation of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Janoschek, Lars; Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-08-15

    The potential of protein A affinity precipitation as an alternative method for traditional antibody purification techniques was investigated. Recombinant produced protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) was covalently linked to the pH-responsive copolymer Eudragit(®) S-100 and used for purification of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The Eudragit-SpA conjugate had a static binding capacity of 93.9 ± 2.8 mg hIgG per g conjugate and a dissociation constant of 787 ± 67 nM at 7 ± 1°C. The antibody was adsorbed rapidly onto Eudragit-SpA and reached equilibrium within 5 min. An excess of hIgG binding sites, provided by the conjugate, as well as adjusted elution conditions resulted in an appropriate hIgG purification performance. In summary, Eudragit-SpA was successfully applied to capture hIgG from a protein mixture with 65% antibody yield in the elution step. Nearly 96% purity and a purification factor of 12.4 were achieved. The Eudragit-SpA conjugate showed a stable ligand density over several cycles, which enabled reusability for repeated precipitation of hIgG. According to this, pH induced affinity precipitation can be seen as a potential alternative for protein A chromatography in antibody purification processes.

  5. Benzodiazepines: electron affinity, receptors and cell signaling - a multifaceted approach.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Ott, Nadia; Cooksy, Andrew L

    2013-12-01

    This report entails a multifaceted approach to benzodiazepine (BZ) action, involving electron affinity, receptors, cell signaling and other aspects. Computations of the electron affinities (EAs) of different BZs have been carried out to establish the effect of various substituents on their EA. These computations were undertaken to serve as a first step in determining what role electron transfer (ET) plays in BZ activity. The calculations were conducted on the premise that the nature of the substituent will either decrease or increase the electron density of the benzene ring, thus altering the ability of the molecule to accept an electron. Investigations were performed on the effect of drug protonation on EA. Similarities involving substituent effects in prior electrochemical studies are also discussed. As part of the multifaceted approach, EA is linked to ET, which appears to play a role in therapeutic activity and toxicity. There is extensive literature dealing with the role of receptors in BZ activity. Significant information on receptor involvement was reported more than 40 years ago. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is known to be importantly involved. GABA is a probable mediator of BZ effects. BZ and GABA receptors, although not identical, are physiologically linked. Cell signaling is known to play a part in the biochemistry of BZ action. Various factors participated, such as gene expression, allosteric influence, toxic effects and therapeutic action. Evidence points to involvement of EA and ET in the mode of action in cell signaling. Oxidative stress and antioxidant effects are also addressed.

  6. Telonemia, a new protist phylum with affinity to chromist lineages

    PubMed Central

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, K; Eikrem, W; Klaveness, D; Vaulot, D; Minge, M.A; Le Gall, F; Romari, K; Throndsen, J; Botnen, A; Massana, R; Thomsen, H.A; Jakobsen, K.S

    2006-01-01

    Recent molecular investigations of marine samples taken from different environments, including tropical, temperate and polar areas, as well as deep thermal vents, have revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of protists, some of them forming deep-branching clades within important lineages, such as the alveolates and heterokonts. Using the same approach on coastal samples, we have identified a novel group of protist small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences that do not correspond to any phylogenetic group previously identified. Comparison with other sequences obtained from cultures of heterotrophic protists showed that the environmental sequences grouped together with Telonema, a genus known since 1913 but of uncertain taxonomic affinity. Phylogenetic analyses using four genes (SSU, Hsp90, alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin), and accounting for gamma- and covarion-distributed substitution rates, revealed Telonema as a distinct group of species branching off close to chromist lineages. Consistent with these gene trees, Telonema possesses ultrastructures revealing both the distinctness of the group and the evolutionary affinity to chromist groups. Altogether, the data suggest that Telonema constitutes a new eukaryotic phylum, here defined as Telonemia, possibly representing a key clade for the understanding of the early evolution of bikont protist groups, such as the proposed chromalveolate supergroup. PMID:16790418

  7. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Papalia, Giuseppe A.; Flynn, Peter J.; Furneisen, Jamie; Quinn, John; Klein, Joshua S.; Katsamba, Phini S.; Waddell, M. Brent; Scott, Michael; Thompson, Joshua; Berlier, Judie; Corry, Schuyler; Baltzinger, Mireille; Zeder-Lutz, Gabrielle; Schoenemann, Andreas; Clabbers, Anca; Wieckowski, Sebastien; Murphy, Mary M.; Page, Phillip; Ryan, Thomas E.; Duffner, Jay; Ganguly, Tanmoy; Corbin, John; Gautam, Satyen; Anderluh, Gregor; Bavdek, Andrej; Reichmann, Dana; Yadav, Satya P.; Hommema, Eric; Pol, Ewa; Drake, Andrew; Klakamp, Scott; Chapman, Trevor; Kernaghan, Dawn; Miller, Ken; Schuman, Jason; Lindquist, Kevin; Herlihy, Kara; Murphy, Michael B.; Bohnsack, Richard; Andrien, Bruce; Brandani, Pietro; Terwey, Danny; Millican, Rohn; Darling, Ryan J.; Wang, Liann; Carter, Quincy; Dotzlaf, Joe; Lopez-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Campbell, Islay; Torreri, Paola; Hoos, Sylviane; England, Patrick; Liu, Yang; Abdiche, Yasmina; Malashock, Daniel; Pinkerton, Alanna; Wong, Melanie; Lafer, Eileen; Hinck, Cynthia; Thompson, Kevin; Primo, Carmelo Di; Joyce, Alison; Brooks, Jonathan; Torta, Federico; Bagge Hagel, Anne Birgitte; Krarup, Janus; Pass, Jesper; Ferreira, Monica; Shikov, Sergei; Mikolajczyk, Malgorzata; Abe, Yuki; Barbato, Gaetano; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; Beusink, Bianca; Satpaev, Daulet; Tsang, Tiffany; Fang, Eric; Partridge, James; Brohawn, Stephen; Horn, James; Pritsch, Otto; Obal, Gonzalo; Nilapwar, Sanjay; Busby, Ben; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Canepa, Sylvie; Witte, Krista; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Cho, Yun Hee; D’Agata, Roberta; Schlick, Kristian; Calvert, Rosy; Munoz, Eva M.; Hernaiz, Maria Jose; Bravman, Tsafir; Dines, Monica; Yang, Min-Hsiang; Puskas, Agnes; Boni, Erica; Li, Jiejin; Wear, Martin; Grinberg, Asya; Baardsnes, Jason; Dolezal, Olan; Gainey, Melicia; Anderson, Henrik; Peng, Jinlin; Lewis, Mark; Spies, Peter; Trinh, Quyhn; Bibikov, Sergei; Raymond, Jill; Yousef, Mohammed; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Feng, Yuguo; Emerick, Anne; Mundodo, Suparna; Guimaraes, Rejane; McGirr, Katy; Li, Yue-Ji; Hughes, Heather; Mantz, Hubert; Skrabana, Rostislav; Witmer, Mark; Ballard, Joshua; Martin, Loic; Skladal, Petr; Korza, George; Laird-Offringa, Ite; Lee, Charlene S.; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Podlaski, Frank; Neuner, Phillippe; Rothacker, Julie; Rafique, Ashique; Dankbar, Nico; Kainz, Peter; Gedig, Erk; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Boozer, Christina; Ly, Nguyen; Toews, Mark; Uren, Aykut; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Lewis, Kenneth; Chomey, Eugene; Pak, Brian J.; Myszka, David G.

    2013-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users of different expertise levels. The two proteins (a 50-kDa Fab and a 60-kDa glutathione S-transferase [GST] antigen) form a relatively high-affinity complex, so participants needed to optimize several experimental parameters, including ligand immobilization and regeneration conditions as well as analyte concentrations and injection/dissociation times. Although most participants collected binding responses that could be fit to yield kinetic parameters, the quality of a few data sets could have been improved by optimizing the assay design. Once these outliers were removed, the average reported affinity across the remaining panel of participants was 620 pM with a standard deviation of 980 pM. These results demonstrate that when this biosensor assay was designed and executed appropriately, the reported rate constants were consistent, and independent of which protein was immobilized and which biosensor was used. PMID:19133223

  8. Affinity Labeling of Membrane Receptors Using Tissue-Penetrating Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Franklin C.; Boja, John; Ho, Beng; Kuhar, Michael J.; Wong, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling, a useful in vivo biochemical tool, is limited when applied in vivo because of the poor tissue penetration by ultraviolet (UV) photons. This study investigates affinity labeling using tissue-penetrating radiation to overcome the tissue attenuation and irreversibly label membrane receptor proteins. Using X-ray (115 kVp) at low doses (<50 cGy or Rad), specific and irreversible binding was found on striatal dopamine transporters with 3 photoaffinity ligands for dopamine transporters, to different extents. Upon X-ray exposure (115 kVp), RTI-38 and RTI-78 ligands showed irreversible and specific binding to the dopamine transporter similar to those seen with UV exposure under other conditions. Similarly, gamma rays at higher energy (662 keV) also affect irreversible binding of photoreactive ligands to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (by PK14105) and to the dopamine (D2) membrane receptors (by azidoclebopride), respectively. This study reports that X-ray and gamma rays induced affinity labeling of membrane receptors in a manner similar to UV with photoreactive ligands of the dopamine transporter, D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBDZR). It may provide specific noninvasive irreversible block or stimulation of a receptor using tissue-penetrating radiation targeting selected anatomic sites. PMID:23936811

  9. Four-body atomic potential for modeling protein-ligand binding affinity: application to enzyme-inhibitor binding energy prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Models that are capable of reliably predicting binding affinities for protein-ligand complexes play an important role the field of structure-guided drug design. Methods Here, we begin by applying the computational geometry technique of Delaunay tessellation to each set of atomic coordinates for over 1400 diverse macromolecular structures, for the purpose of deriving a four-body statistical potential that serves as a topological scoring function. Next, we identify a second, independent set of three hundred protein-ligand complexes, having both high-resolution structures and known dissociation constants. Two-thirds of these complexes are randomly selected to train a predictive model of binding affinity as follows: two tessellations are generated in each case, one for the entire complex and another strictly for the isolated protein without its bound ligand, and a topological score is computed for each tessellation with the four-body potential. Predicted protein-ligand binding affinity is then based on an empirically derived linear function of the difference between both topological scores, one that appropriately scales the value of this difference. Results A comparison between experimental and calculated binding affinity values over the two hundred complexes reveals a Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with a standard error of SE = 1.98 kcal/mol. To validate the method, we similarly generated two tessellations for each of the remaining protein-ligand complexes, computed their topological scores and the difference between the two scores for each complex, and applied the previously derived linear transformation of this topological score difference to predict binding affinities. For these one hundred complexes, we again observe a correlation of r = 0.79 (SE = 1.93 kcal/mol) between known and calculated binding affinities. Applying our model to an independent test set of high-resolution structures for three hundred diverse enzyme-inhibitor complexes

  10. Computation of affinity and selectivity: Binding of 2,4-diaminopteridine and 2,4-diaminoquinazoline inhibitors to dihydrofolate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelius, John; Graffner-Nordberg, Malin; Hansson, Tomas; Hallberg, Anders; Åqvist, Johan

    1998-03-01

    Binding energy calculations for complexes of mutant and wild-type human dihydrofolate reductases with 2,4-diaminopteridine and 2,4-diaminoquinazoline inhibitors are reported. Quantitative insight into binding energetics of these molecules is obtained from calculations based on force field energy evaluation and thermal sampling by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated affinity of methotrexate for wild-type and mutant enzymes is reasonably well reproduced. Truncation of the methotrexate glutamate tail results in a loss of affinity by several orders of magnitude. No major difference in binding strength is predicted between the pteridines and the quinazolines, while the N-methyl group present in methotrexate appears to confer significantly stronger binding. The recent improvement, which is used here, of our linear interaction energy method for binding affinity prediction, as well as problems with treating charged and flexible ligands are discussed. This approach should be suitable in a drug discovery context for prediction of binding energies of new inhibitors prior to their synthesis, when some information about the binding mode is available.

  11. Relative binding affinity of carboxylate-, phosphonate-, and bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles targeted to damaged bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ryan D.; Cole, Lisa E.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2012-10-01

    Functionalized Au NPs have received considerable recent interest for targeting and labeling cells and tissues. Damaged bone tissue can be targeted by functionalizing Au NPs with molecules exhibiting affinity for calcium. Therefore, the relative binding affinity of Au NPs surface functionalized with either carboxylate ( l-glutamic acid), phosphonate (2-aminoethylphosphonic acid), or bisphosphonate (alendronate) was investigated for targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue in vitro. Targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue was qualitatively verified by visual observation and backscattered electron microscopy, and quantitatively measured by the surface density of Au NPs using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The surface density of functionalized Au NPs was significantly greater within damaged tissue compared to undamaged tissue for each functional group. Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs exhibited a greater surface density labeling damaged tissue compared to glutamic acid- and phosphonic acid-functionalized Au NPs, which was consistent with the results of previous work comparing the binding affinity of the same functionalized Au NPs to synthetic hydroxyapatite crystals. Targeted labeling was enabled not only by the functional groups but also by the colloidal stability in solution. Functionalized Au NPs were stabilized by the presence of the functional groups, and were shown to remain well dispersed in ionic (phosphate buffered saline) and serum (fetal bovine serum) solutions for up to 1 week. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs have potential for targeted delivery to damaged bone tissue in vitro and provide motivation for in vivo investigation.

  12. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  13. Fatigue damage prognosis of internal delamination in composite plates under cyclic compression loadings using affine arithmetic as uncertainty propagation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey J.-M.

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has become indispensable for reducing maintenance costs and increasing the in-service capacity of a structure. The increased use of lightweight composite materials in aircraft structures drastically increased the effects of fatigue induced damage on their critical structural components and thus the necessity to predict the remaining life of those components. Damage prognosis, one of the least investigated fields in SHM, uses the current damage state of the system to forecast its future performance by estimating the expected loading environments. A successful damage prediction model requires the integration of technologies in areas like measurements, materials science, mechanics of materials, and probability theories, but most importantly the quantification of uncertainty in all these areas. In this study, Affine Arithmetic is used as a method for incorporating the uncertainties due to the material properties into the fatigue life prognosis of composite plates subjected to cyclic compressive loadings. When loadings are compressive in nature, the composite plates undergo repeated buckling-unloading of the delaminated layer which induces mixed modes I and II states of stress at the tip of the delamination in the plates. The Kardomateas model-based prediction law is used to predict the growth of the delamination, while the integration of the effects of the uncertainties for modes I and II coefficients in the fatigue life prediction model is handled using Affine arithmetic. The Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue characterization of the composite plates are first experimentally studied to obtain the material coefficients and fracture toughness, respectively. Next, these obtained coefficients are used in the Kardomateas law to predict the delamination lengths in the composite plates while using Affine Arithmetic to handle their uncertainties. At last, the fatigue characterization of the composite plates during

  14. Low-affinity Na+ uptake in the halophyte Suaeda maritima.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suo-Min; Zhang, Jin-Lin; Flowers, Timothy J

    2007-10-01

    Na(+) uptake by plant roots has largely been explored using species that accumulate little Na(+) into their shoots. By way of contrast, the halophyte Suaeda maritima accumulates, without injury, concentrations of the order of 400 mM NaCl in its leaves. Here we report that cAMP and Ca(2+) (blockers of nonselective cation channels) and Li(+) (a competitive inhibitor of Na(+) uptake) did not have any significant effect on the uptake of Na(+) by the halophyte S. maritima when plants were in 25 or 150 mM NaCl (150 mM NaCl is near optimal for growth). However, the inhibitors of K(+) channels, TEA(+) (10 mM), Cs(+) (3 mM), and Ba(2+) (5 mM), significantly reduced the net uptake of Na(+) from 150 mM NaCl over 48 h, by 54%, 24%, and 29%, respectively. TEA(+) (10 mM), Cs(+) (3 mM), and Ba(2+) (1 mm) also significantly reduced (22)Na(+) influx (measured over 2 min in 150 mM external NaCl) by 47%, 30%, and 31%, respectively. In contrast to the situation in 150 mm NaCl, neither TEA(+) (1-10 mM) nor Cs(+) (0.5-10 mM) significantly reduced net Na(+) uptake or (22)Na(+) influx in 25 mM NaCl. Ba(2+) (at 5 mm) did significantly decrease net Na(+) uptake (by 47%) and (22)Na(+) influx (by 36% with 1 mM Ba(2+)) in 25 mM NaCl. K(+) (10 or 50 mM) had no effect on (22)Na(+) influx at concentrations below 75 mM NaCl, but the influx of (22)Na(+) was inhibited by 50 mM K(+) when the external concentration of NaCl was above 75 mM. The data suggest that neither nonselective cation channels nor a low-affinity cation transporter are major pathways for Na(+) entry into root cells. We propose that two distinct low-affinity Na(+) uptake pathways exist in S. maritima: Pathway 1 is insensitive to TEA(+) or Cs(+), but sensitive to Ba(2+) and mediates Na(+) uptake under low salinities (25 mM NaCl); pathway 2 is sensitive to TEA(+), Cs(+), and Ba(2+) and mediates Na(+) uptake under higher external salt concentrations (150 mM NaCl). Pathway 1 might be mediated by a high-affinity K transporter

  15. Picomolar affinity fibronectin domains engineered utilizing loop length diversity, recursive mutagenesis, and loop shuffling.

    PubMed

    Hackel, Benjamin J; Kapila, Atul; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-09-19

    The 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (Fn3) has been validated as an effective scaffold for molecular recognition. In the current work, it was desired to improve the robustness of selection of stable, high-affinity Fn3 domains. A yeast surface display library of Fn3 was created in which three solvent-exposed loops were diversified in terms of amino acid composition and loop length. The library was screened by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate binders to lysozyme. An affinity maturation scheme was developed to rapidly and broadly diversify populations of clones by random mutagenesis as well as homologous recombination-driven shuffling of mutagenized loops. The novel library and affinity maturation scheme combined to yield stable, monomeric Fn3 domains with 3 pM affinity for lysozyme. A secondary affinity maturation identified a stable 1.1 pM binder, the highest affinity yet reported for an Fn3 domain. In addition to extension of the affinity limit for this scaffold, the results demonstrate the ability to achieve high-affinity binding while preserving stability and the monomeric state. This library design and affinity maturation scheme is highly efficient, utilizing an initial diversity of 2x10(7) clones and screening only 1x10(8) mutants (totaled over all affinity maturation libraries). Analysis of intermediate populations revealed that loop length diversity, loop shuffling, and recursive mutagenesis of diverse populations are all critical components.

  16. Interaction of natural polyphenols with α-amylase in vitro: molecular property-affinity relationship aspect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Kai, Guoyin; Ni, Xiaoling; Yang, Fan; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between the structural properties of natural polyphenols and their affinities for α-amylase were investigated by fluorescence titration analysis. The binding process with α-amylase was strongly influenced by the structural differences of the compounds under study. For instance, the methylation of the hydroxyl group in flavonoids increased their binding affinities for α-amylase by 2.14 to 7.76 times. The hydroxylation on rings A, B, and C of flavonoids also significantly affected their affinities for α-amylase. The glycosylation of isoflavones and flavanones reduced their affinities for α-amylase and the glycosylation of flavones and flavonols enhanced their affinities for α-amylase. Hydrogenation of the C2=C3 double bond of flavonoids decreased the binding affinities. The galloylated catechins had higher binding affinities with α-amylase than non-galloylated catechins and the pyrogallol-type catechins had higher affinities than the catechol-type catechins. The presence of the galloyl moiety is the most decisive factor. The glycosylation of resveratrol decreased its affinity for α-amylase. The esterification of gallic acid significantly reduced the affinity for α-amylase. The binding interaction between polyphenols and α-amylase was mainly caused by hydrophobic forces.

  17. Boronate affinity materials for separation and molecular recognition: structure, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojin; Chen, Yang; Liu, Zhen

    2015-11-21

    Boronate affinity materials, as unique sorbents, have emerged as important media for the selective separation and molecular recognition of cis-diol-containing compounds. With the introduction of boronic acid functionality, boronate affinity materials exhibit several significant advantages, including broad-spectrum selectivity, reversible covalent binding, pH-controlled capture/release, fast association/desorption kinetics, and good compatibility with mass spectrometry. Because cis-diol-containing biomolecules, including nucleosides, saccharides, glycans, glycoproteins and so on, are the important targets in current research frontiers such as metabolomics, glycomics and proteomics, boronate affinity materials have gained rapid development and found increasing applications in the last decade. In this review, we critically survey recent advances in boronate affinity materials. We focus on fundamental considerations as well as important progress and new boronate affinity materials reported in the last decade. We particularly discuss on the effects of the structure of boronate ligands and supporting materials on the properties of boronate affinity materials, such as binding pH, affinity, selectivity, binding capacity, tolerance for interference and so on. A variety of promising applications, including affinity separation, proteomics, metabolomics, disease diagnostics and aptamer selection, are introduced with main emphasis on how boronate affinity materials can solve the issues in the applications and what merits boronate affinity materials can provide.

  18. Gunn effect in field-emission phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, V.; Evtukh, A.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Mutamba, K.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2005-02-01

    The peculiarities of electron field emission from nanostructured GaN surface have been investigated. The current-voltage characteristics of emission current in Fowler-Nordheim plot show two parts with different slopes. There are emission current oscillations in the changing slope region. As an explanation for the experimental results a model based on the electron-emission analysis from lower (Γ) valley, upper (U) valley, and electron transition between valleys due to heating in electric field has been proposed. The electron affinities for the emission from Γ and U valleys have been determined. The decreased affinities from there valleys have been estimated for quantization in nanostructured GaN.

  19. Ab initio dynamics of field emission from diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Miyazaki, Takehide; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Okushi, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new interpretation of the efficiency of field emission, which is understood based on the concept of electron affinity. We use time-dependent density functional theory to simulate field emission from clean and chemically modified diamond (001) surfaces under applied electric fields. We find that the emission efficiency is governed by the self-consistent electrostatic potential (VSCF) at the surface rather than by the sign of the electron affinity, which is determined by VSCF in the vacuum region far from the surface. We resolve the paradox that the emission efficiency of a clean (001) surface with positive electron affinity is even higher than that of a H/OH-co-terminated (001) surface with negative electron affinity.

  20. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunxiao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The planted (l, d) motif search (PMS) is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM) refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.

  1. Affinity sensor based on immobilized molecular imprinted synthetic recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Pieterjan; De Saeger, Sarah; Mattiasson, Bo; Hedström, Martin

    2015-07-15

    An affinity sensor based on capacitive transduction was developed to detect a model compound, metergoline, in a continuous flow system. This system simulates the monitoring of low-molecular weight organic compounds in natural flowing waters, i.e. rivers and streams. During operation in such scenarios, control of the experimental parameters is not possible, which poses a true analytical challenge. A two-step approach was used to produce a sensor for metergoline. Submicron spherical molecularly imprinted polymers, used as recognition elements, were obtained through emulsion polymerization and subsequently coupled to the sensor surface by electropolymerization. This way, a robust and reusable sensor was obtained that regenerated spontaneously under the natural conditions in a river. Small organic compounds could be analyzed in water without manipulating the binding or regeneration conditions, thereby offering a viable tool for on-site application.

  2. High-affinity ammonium transporters and nitrogen sensing in mycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Arnaud; André, Bruno; Marini, Anne Marie; Chalot, Michel

    2003-02-01

    Most terrestrial plants live in mutualistic symbiosis with root-infecting mycorrhizal fungi. This association requires a molecular dialogue between the two partners. However, the nature of the chemical signals that induce hyphal differentiation are not well characterized and the mechanisms for signal reception are still unknown. In addition to its role in ammonium scavenging, the Mep2 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed to act as an ammonium sensor that is essential for pseudohyphal differentiation in response to ammonium limitation. We propose that the high-affinity ammonium transporters from mycorrhizal fungi act in a similar manner to sense the environment and induce, via as-yet-unidentified signal transduction cascades, the switch in the mode of fungal growth observed during the formation of mycorrhiza.

  3. Predicting protein-ligand affinity with a random matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Brenner, Michael P; Colwell, Lucy J

    2016-11-29

    Rapid determination of whether a candidate compound will bind to a particular target receptor remains a stumbling block in drug discovery. We use an approach inspired by random matrix theory to decompose the known ligand set of a target in terms of orthogonal "signals" of salient chemical features, and distinguish these from the much larger set of ligand chemical features that are not relevant for binding to that particular target receptor. After removing the noise caused by finite sampling, we show that the similarity of an unknown ligand to the remaining, cleaned chemical features is a robust predictor of ligand-target affinity, performing as well or better than any algorithm in the published literature. We interpret our algorithm as deriving a model for the binding energy between a target receptor and the set of known ligands, where the underlying binding energy model is related to the classic Ising model in statistical physics.

  4. Chelators whose affinity for calcium is decreased by illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Roger Y. (Inventor); Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz (Inventor); Minta, Akwasi (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention discloses a group of calcium chelating compounds which have a descreased affinity for calcium following illumination. These new compounds contain a photolabile nitrobenzyl derivative coupled to a tetracarboxylate Ca.sup.2+ chelating parent compound having the octacoordinate chelating groups characteristic of EGTA or BAPTA. In a first form, the new compounds are comprised of a BAPTA-like chelator coupled to a single 2-nitrobenzyl derivative, which in turn is a photochemical precursor of a 2-nitrosobenzophenone. In a second form, the new compounds are comprised of a BAPTA-like chelator coupled to two 2-nitrobenzyl derivatives, themselves photochemical prcursors of the related 2-nitrosobenzophenones. The present invention also discloses a novel method for preparing 1-hydroxy- or 1-alkoxy-1-(2-nitroaryl)-1-aryl methanes. Methanes of this type are critical to the preparation of, or actually constitute, the photolabile Ca.sup.2+ chelating compounds disclosed and claimed herein.

  5. Bioavailable affinity label for collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, James D.; Higgin, Joshua J.; Kersteen, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. Its prevalent 4-hydroxyproline residues contribute greatly to its conformational stability. The hydroxyl groups arise from a post-translational modification catalyzed by the non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H). Here, we report that 4-oxo-5,6-epoxyhexanoate, a mimic of the α-ketoglutarate co-substrate, inactivates human P4H. The inactivation installs a ketone functionality in P4H, providing a handle for proteomic experiments. Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to the esterified epoxy ketone displays the phenotype of a worm lacking P4H. Thus, this affinity label can be used to mediate collagen stability in an animal, as is desirable in the treatment of a variety of fibrotic diseases. PMID:23702396

  6. HIGH AFFINITY, DSRNA BINDING BY DISCONNECTED INTERACTING PROTEIN 1†

    PubMed Central

    Catanese, Daniel J.; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2010-01-01

    Disconnected Interacting Protein 1 (DIP1) appears from sequence analysis and preliminary binding studies to be a member of the dsRNA-binding protein family. Of interest, DIP1 was shown previously to interact with and influence multiple proteins involved in transcription regulation in Drosophila melanogaster. We show here that the longest isoform of this protein, DIP1-c, exhibits a 500-fold preference for dsRNA over dsDNA of similar nucleotide sequence. Further, DIP1-c demonstrated very high affinity for a subset of dsRNA ligands, with binding in the picomolar range for VA1 RNA and miR-iab-4 precursor stem-loop, a potential physiological RNA target involved in regulating expression of its protein partner, Ultrabithorax. PMID:20643095

  7. Approximated affine projection algorithm for feedback cancellation in hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Kim, In-Young; Park, Young-Cheol

    2007-09-01

    We propose an approximated affine projection (AP) algorithm for feedback cancellation in hearing aids. It is based on the conventional approach using the Gauss-Seidel (GS) iteration, but provides more stable convergence behaviour even with small step sizes. In the proposed algorithm, a residue of the weighted error vector, instead of the current error sample, is used to provide stable convergence. A new learning rate control scheme is also applied to the proposed algorithm to prevent signal cancellation and system instability. The new scheme determines step size in proportion to the prediction factor of the input, so that adaptation is inhibited whenever tone-like signals are present in the input. Simulation results verified the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  8. Genetic affinities of Ukrainians from the maternal perspective.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnov, Andrey; Balanovsky, Oleg; Utevska, Olga; Metspalu, Ene; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Agdzhoyan, Anastasia; Churnosov, Mikhail; Atramentova, Lyubov; Balanovska, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The area of what is now the Ukraine has been the arena of large-scale demographic processes that may have left their traces in the contemporary gene pool of Ukrainians. In this study, we present new mitochondrial DNA data for 607 Ukrainians (hypervariable segment I sequences and coding region polymorphisms). To study the maternal affinities of Ukrainians at the level of separate mitochondrial haplotypes, we apply an original technique, the haplotype co-occurrence analysis. About 20% of the Ukrainian maternal gene pool is represented by lineages highly specific to Ukrainians, but is scarcely found in other populations. About 9% of Ukrainian mtDNA lineages are typical for peoples of the Volga region. We also identified minor gene pool strata (1.6-3.3%), each of which is common in Lithuanians, Estonians, Saami, Nenets, Cornish, and the populations of the North Caucasus.

  9. Deformation of supersymmetric and conformal quantum mechanics through affine transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiridonov, Vyacheslav

    1993-01-01

    Affine transformations (dilatations and translations) are used to define a deformation of one-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Resulting physical systems do not have conserved charges and degeneracies in the spectra. Instead, superpartner Hamiltonians are q-isospectral, i.e. the spectrum of one can be obtained from another (with possible exception of the lowest level) by q(sup 2)-factor scaling. This construction allows easily to rederive a special self-similar potential found by Shabat and to show that for the latter a q-deformed harmonic oscillator algebra of Biedenharn and Macfarlane serves as the spectrum generating algebra. A general class of potentials related to the quantum conformal algebra su(sub q)(1,1) is described. Further possibilities for q-deformation of known solvable potentials are outlined.

  10. Calculation of Electron Affinity and Partial Cross Sections of Hf^-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lin; Beck, Donald

    2008-05-01

    We have calculated for the first time the electron affinity (EA) of Hf^-, using the relativistic configuration interaction method. Our calculations show Hf^- has only one bound state 5d^26s^26p J=5/2, which is a 6p attachment to the ground state of Hf I. By combining our valence stage result with the separate estimate for the modest core-valence contribution, the EA of Hf^- is about 0.114 eV. So far there have been only two experimental results [1,2] for the EA of Hf^-, but both gave only the limits. Our result falls within both of the limits. We also calculate the partial cross sections for photodetachment to the lower lying neutral thresholds. [1] M-J. Nadeau et al, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123, 521 (1997) [2] Vernon T. Davis et al, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241, 118 (2005)

  11. Self-affine crossover length in a layered silicate deposit.

    PubMed

    Fossum, J O; Bergene, H H; Hansen, Alex; O'Rourke, B; Manificat, G

    2004-03-01

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic layered silicate 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM Fourier software and a wavelet method. The deposited surfaces show a persistence to antipersistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is concluded that the crossover length is associated with aggregate size, and further that the persistent roughness at small length scales signals near compact clusters of fractal dimension three, whereas the antipersistent roughness at large length scales signals a sedimentation process.

  12. Self-affine crossover length in a layered silicate deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.; Bergene, H. H.; Hansen, Alex; O'Rourke, B.; Manificat, G.

    2004-03-01

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic layered silicate 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM Fourier software and a wavelet method. The deposited surfaces show a persistence to antipersistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is concluded that the crossover length is associated with aggregate size, and further that the persistent roughness at small length scales signals near compact clusters of fractal dimension three, whereas the antipersistent roughness at large length scales signals a sedimentation process.

  13. Affinity constants for small molecules from SPR competition experiments.

    PubMed

    de Mol, Nico J

    2010-01-01

    Direct assay of small molecules by SPR in general is troublesome and at least tedious procedures have to be applied. Competition experiments offer an attractive alternative. A small ligand known to bind to the analyte is immobilized on an SPR sensor surface, and the binding of the larger analyte in the presence of compounds under investigation in a concentration range is assayed. The resulting inhibition curves of the equilibrium SPR signal as function of the compound concentration can be analyzed to yield thermodynamic binding constants for the interaction in solution between analyte and the compounds under investigation. An additional advantage of this method is that series of compounds can be analyzed using the same sensor surface, so there is no immobilization needed for each compound. An adaptation of the method to analyze interactions with bivalent analytes (e.g., antibodies) is also included. Some observed different affinities in solution compared to that on the SPR surface are discussed.

  14. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  15. The anatomy, affinity, and phylogenetic significance of Markuelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xi-Ping; Donoghue, Philip C J; Cunningham, John A; Liu, Jian-Bo; Cheng, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The fossil record provides a paucity of data on the development of extinct organisms, particularly for their embryology. The recovery of fossilized embryos heralds new insight into the evolution of development but advances are limited by an almost complete absence of phylogenetic constraint. Markuelia is an exception to this, known from cleavage and pre-hatchling stages as a vermiform and profusely annulated direct-developing bilaterian with terminal circumoral and posterior radial arrays of spines. Phylogenetic analyses have hitherto suggested assignment to stem-Scalidophora (phyla Kinorhyncha, Loricifera, Priapulida). We test this assumption with additional data and through the inclusion of additional taxa. The available evidence supports stem-Scalidophora affinity, leading to the conclusion that scalidophorans, cyclonerualians, and ecdysozoans are primitive direct developers, and the likelihood that scalidophorans are primitively metameric.

  16. DNA Shape Dominates Sequence Affinity in Nucleosome Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Gordon S.; Lequieu, Joshua P.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleosomes provide the basic unit of compaction in eukaryotic genomes, and the mechanisms that dictate their position at specific locations along a DNA sequence are of central importance to genetics. In this Letter, we employ molecular models of DNA and proteins to elucidate various aspects of nucleosome positioning. In particular, we show how DNA's histone affinity is encoded in its sequence-dependent shape, including subtle deviations from the ideal straight B-DNA form and local variations of minor groove width. By relying on high-precision simulations of the free energy of nucleosome complexes, we also demonstrate that, depending on DNA's intrinsic curvature, histone binding can be dominated by bending interactions or electrostatic interactions. More generally, the results presented here explain how sequence, manifested as the shape of the DNA molecule, dominates molecular recognition in the problem of nucleosome positioning.

  17. Virus inactivation by protein denaturants used in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Peter L; Lloyd, David

    2007-10-01

    Virus inactivation by a number of protein denaturants commonly used in gel affinity chromatography for protein elution and gel recycling has been investigated. The enveloped viruses Sindbis, herpes simplex-1 and vaccinia, and the non-enveloped virus polio-1 were effectively inactivated by 0.5 M sodium hydroxide, 6 M guanidinium thiocyanate, 8 M urea and 70% ethanol. However, pH 2.6, 3 M sodium thiocyanate, 6 M guanidinium chloride and 20% ethanol, while effectively inactivating the enveloped viruses, did not inactivate polio-1. These studies demonstrate that protein denaturants are generally effective for virus inactivation but with the limitation that only some may inactivate non-enveloped viruses. The use of protein denaturants, together with virus reduction steps in the manufacturing process should ensure that viral cross contamination between manufacturing batches of therapeutic biological products is prevented and the safety of the product ensured.

  18. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  19. Triazine dyes as inhibitors and affinity ligands of glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, J; Dziecioł, J; Kościelak, J

    1999-11-01

    The triazine dyes: Cibacron Blue 3GA, Reactive Red 120, Reactive Yellow 86, Reactive Green 19, Reactive Blue 4, Reactive Brown 10 inhibited the activity of a purified preparation of alpha1,6fucosyltransferase (GDP-L-fucose: N-acetyl beta-glucosaminide 6-alpha-L-fucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.68) from human blood platelets. Cibacron Blue 3GA and Reactive Red 120 were examined for the nature of the inhibition and both were found to be competitive inhibitors of the enzyme, with Ki = 11 microM and 2 microM, respectively. The two dyes inhibited also serum glycosyltransferases: alpha1,2fucosyltransferase (GDP-L-fucose: beta-D-galactosyl-R2-alpha-L-fucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.69), beta1,4galactosyltransferase (UDP-galactose: N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 4-beta-D-galactosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.90) and beta1,3N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (UDP-GlcNAc: 4-beta-D-galactosyl-D-glucose). Cibacron Blue 3GA was a more effective inhibitor of the glycosyltransferases that use UDP-linked sugar donors than Reactive Red 120 while the latter was a stronger inhibitor of the fucosyltransferases that use GDP-linked donor. All four glycosyltransferases could be affinity purified on Cibacron Blue 3GA-Agarose columns. The order of elution of glycosyltransferases from the columns with solutions of 0.25-1.0 M potassium iodide also depended upon the structure of nucleotide sugar donor, i.e. whether it contained UDP or GDP. Thus, triazine dyes should interact with the sugar donor binding sites of glycosyltransferases. The main advantages of the use of triazine dyes as affinity ligands for isolation of glycosyltransferases are their universal applicability regardless of enzyme specificity, low cost, and insensitivity to high concentration of other proteins present in the solution.

  20. Brain structure resolves the segmental affinity of anomalocaridid appendages.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peiyun; Ma, Xiaoya; Hou, Xianguang; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2014-09-25

    Despite being among the most celebrated taxa from Cambrian biotas, anomalocaridids (order Radiodonta) have provoked intense debate about their affinities within the moulting-animal clade that includes Arthropoda. Current alternatives identify anomalocaridids as either stem-group euarthropods, crown-group euarthropods near the ancestry of chelicerates, or a segmented ecdysozoan lineage with convergent similarity to arthropods in appendage construction. Determining unambiguous affinities has been impeded by uncertainties about the segmental affiliation of anomalocaridid frontal appendages. These structures are variably homologized with jointed appendages of the second (deutocerebral) head segment, including antennae and 'great appendages' of Cambrian arthropods, or with the paired antenniform frontal appendages of living Onychophora and some Cambrian lobopodians. Here we describe Lyrarapax unguispinus, a new anomalocaridid from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota, southwest China, nearly complete specimens of which preserve traces of muscles, digestive tract and brain. The traces of brain provide the first direct evidence for the segmental composition of the anomalocaridid head and its appendicular organization. Carbon-rich areas in the head resolve paired pre-protocerebral ganglia at the origin of paired frontal appendages. The ganglia connect to areas indicative of a bilateral pre-oral brain that receives projections from the eyestalk neuropils and compound retina. The dorsal, segmented brain of L. unguispinus reinforces an alliance between anomalocaridids and arthropods rather than cycloneuralians. Correspondences in brain organization between anomalocaridids and Onychophora resolve pre-protocerebral ganglia, associated with pre-ocular frontal appendages, as characters of the last common ancestor of euarthropods and onychophorans. A position of Radiodonta on the euarthropod stem-lineage implies the transformation of frontal appendages to another structure in crown

  1. Changing water affinity from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in hydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-27

    The behavior of water at hydrophobic interfaces can play a significant role in determining chemical reaction outcomes and physical properties. Carbon nanotubes and aluminophosphate materials have one-dimensional hydrophobic channels, which are entirely surrounded by hydrophobic interfaces. Unique water behavior was observed in such hydrophobic channels. In this article, changes in the water affinity in one-dimensional hydrophobic channels were assessed using water vapor adsorption isotherms at 303 K and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic behavior of water adsorbed in channels wider than 3 nm was observed for both adsorption and desorption processes, owing to the hydrophobic environment. However, water showed hydrophilic properties in both adsorption and desorption processes in channels narrower than 1 nm. In intermediate-sized channels, the hydrophobic properties of water during the adsorption process were seen to transition to hydrophilic behavior during the desorption process. Hydrophilic properties in the narrow channels for both adsorption and desorption processes are a result of the relatively strong water-channel interactions (10-15 kJ mol(-1)). In the 2-3 nm channels, the water-channel interaction energy of 4-5 kJ mol(-1) was comparable to the thermal translational energy. The cohesive water interaction was approximately 35 kJ mol(-1), which was larger than the others. Thus, the water affinity change in the 2-3 nm channels for the adsorption and desorption processes was attributed to weak water-channel interactions and strong cohesive interactions. These results are inherently important to control the properties of water in hydrophobic environments.

  2. Electron affinity of cubic boron nitride terminated with vanadium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yu; Sun, Tianyin; Shammas, Joseph; Hao, Mei; Nemanich, Robert J.; Kaur, Manpuneet

    2015-10-28

    A thermally stable negative electron affinity (NEA) for a cubic boron nitride (c-BN) surface with vanadium-oxide-termination is achieved, and its electronic structure was analyzed with in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The c-BN films were prepared by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition employing BF{sub 3} and N{sub 2} as precursors. Vanadium layers of ∼0.1 and 0.5 nm thickness were deposited on the c-BN surface in an electron beam deposition system. Oxidation of the metal layer was achieved by an oxygen plasma treatment. After 650 °C thermal annealing, the vanadium oxide on the c-BN surface was determined to be VO{sub 2}, and the surfaces were found to be thermally stable, exhibiting an NEA. In comparison, the oxygen-terminated c-BN surface, where B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detected, showed a positive electron affinity of ∼1.2 eV. The B{sub 2}O{sub 3} evidently acts as a negatively charged layer introducing a surface dipole directed into the c-BN. Through the interaction of VO{sub 2} with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer, a B-O-V layer structure would contribute a dipole between the O and V layers with the positive side facing vacuum. The lower enthalpy of formation for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} is favorable for the formation of the B-O-V layer structure, which provides a thermally stable surface dipole and an NEA surface.

  3. Rejuvenation of metallic glasses by non-affine thermal strain.

    PubMed

    Ketov, S V; Sun, Y H; Nachum, S; Lu, Z; Checchi, A; Beraldin, A R; Bai, H Y; Wang, W H; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Carpenter, M A; Greer, A L

    2015-08-13

    When a spatially uniform temperature change is imposed on a solid with more than one phase, or on a polycrystal of a single, non-cubic phase (showing anisotropic expansion-contraction), the resulting thermal strain is inhomogeneous (non-affine). Thermal cycling induces internal stresses, leading to structural and property changes that are usually deleterious. Glasses are the solids that form on cooling a liquid if crystallization is avoided--they might be considered the ultimate, uniform solids, without the microstructural features and defects associated with polycrystals. Here we explore the effects of cryogenic thermal cycling on glasses, specifically metallic glasses. We show that, contrary to the null effect expected from uniformity, thermal cycling induces rejuvenation, reaching less relaxed states of higher energy. We interpret these findings in the context that the dynamics in liquids become heterogeneous on cooling towards the glass transition, and that there may be consequent heterogeneities in the resulting glasses. For example, the vibrational dynamics of glassy silica at long wavelengths are those of an elastic continuum, but at wavelengths less than approximately three nanometres the vibrational dynamics are similar to those of a polycrystal with anisotropic grains. Thermal cycling of metallic glasses is easily applied, and gives improvements in compressive plasticity. The fact that such effects can be achieved is attributed to intrinsic non-uniformity of the glass structure, giving a non-uniform coefficient of thermal expansion. While metallic glasses may be particularly suitable for thermal cycling, the non-affine nature of strains in glasses in general deserves further study, whether they are induced by applied stresses or by temperature change.

  4. The high-affinity maltose switch MBP317-347 has low affinity for glucose: implications for targeting tumors with metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Gilmer; Schulte, Reinhard W; Ostermeier, Marc; Iwamoto, Keisuke S

    2014-03-01

    Development of agents with high affinity and specificity for tumor-specific markers is an important goal of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we propose a shift in paradigm using a strategy that relies on low affinity for fundamental metabolites found in different concentrations in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues: glucose and lactate. A molecular switch, MBP317-347, originally designed to be a high-affinity switch for maltose and maltose-like polysaccharides, was demonstrated to be a low-affinity switch for glucose, that is, able to be activated by high concentrations (tens of millimolar) of glucose. We propose that such a low-affinity glucose switch could be used as a proof of concept for a new prodrug therapy strategy denominated metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy (MDEPT) where glucose or, preferably, lactate serves as the activator. Accordingly, considering the typical differential concentrations of lactate found in tumors and in healthy tissues, a low-affinity lactate-binding switch analogous to the low-affinity glucose-binding switch MBP317-347 would be an order of magnitude more active in tumors than in normal tissues and therefore can work as a differential activator of anticancer drugs in tumors.

  5. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Neuropeptides Using Affinity-Enhanced Microdialysis with Antibody-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Schmerberg, Claire M.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) is a useful sampling tool for many applications due to its ability to permit sampling from an animal concurrent with normal activity. MD is of particular importance in the field of neuroscience, in which it is used to sample neurotransmitters (NTs) while the animal is behaving in order to correlate dynamic changes in NTs with behavior. One important class of signaling molecules, the neuropeptides (NPs), however, presented significant challenges when studied with MD, due to the low relative recovery (RR) of NPs by this technique. Affinity-enhanced microdialysis (AE-MD) has previously been used to improve recovery of NPs and similar molecules. For AE-MD, an affinity agent (AA), such as an antibody-coated particle or free antibody, is added to the liquid perfusing the MD probe. This AA provides an additional mass transport driving force for analyte to pass through the dialysis membrane, and thus increases the RR. In this work, a variety of AAs have been investigated for AE-MD of NPs in vitro and in vivo, including particles with C18 surface functionality and antibody-coated particles. Antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AbMnP) provided the best RR enhancement in vitro, with statistically significant (p<0.05) enhancements for 4 out of 6 NP standards tested, and RR increases up to 41-fold. These particles were then used for in vivo MD in the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, during a feeding study, with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. 31 NPs were detected in a 30 min collection sample, compared to 17 when no AA was used. The use of AbMnP also increased the temporal resolution from 4–18 hrs in previous studies to just 30 min in this study. The levels of NPs detected were also sufficient for reliable quantitation with the MS system in use, permitting quantitative analysis of the concentration changes for 7 identified NPs on a 30 min time course during feeding. PMID:23249250

  6. Cloning and functional characterization of the high-affinity K+ transporter HAK1 of pepper.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2004-10-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake in plants plays a crucial role in K+ nutrition and different systems have been postulated to contribute to the high-affinity K+ uptake. The results presented here with pepper (Capsicum annum) demonstrate that a HAK1-type transporter greatly contributes to the high-affinity K+ uptake observed in roots. Pepper plants starved of K+ for 3 d showed high-affinity K+ uptake (Km of 6 microM K+) that was very sensitive to NH and their roots expressed a high-affinity K+ transporter, CaHAK1, which clusters in group I of the KT/HAK/KUP family of transporters. When expressed in yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ), CaHAK1 mediated high-affinity K+ and Rb+ uptake with Km values of 3.3 and 1.9 microM, respectively. Rb+ uptake was competitively inhibited by micromolar concentrations of NH and Cs+, and by millimolar concentrations of Na+.

  7. Electromagnetic field parameters and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, A. R.; Jones, R. A.; Stell, M. E.; Adey, W. R.; Bawin, S.

    1986-07-01

    We studied the effects of the electric and magnetic components of a Loran-C type waveform on three biological systems. Neurochemical assays of brain neurotransmitter substances indicate field-related changes in the levels of norepinephrine in the hippocampus and in the number and affinities of the opiate receptors in the cortex. Behavioral data showed that rats trained in an operant conditioning task did not reliably detect any electric field strength used. Biochemical data demonstrated that the Loran-C field did not modify basal ornithine decarboxylase activity in primary bone cells.

  8. Describing high-dimensional dynamics with low-dimensional piecewise affine models: applications to renewable energy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a low-dimensional description for a high-dimensional system, which is a piecewise affine model whose state space is divided by permutations. We show that the proposed model tends to predict wind speeds and photovoltaic outputs for the time scales from seconds to 100 s better than by global affine models. In addition, computations using the piecewise affine model are much faster than those of usual nonlinear models such as radial basis function models.

  9. Intermediate affinity and potency of clozapine and low affinity of other neuroleptics and of antidepressants at H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Göthert, M

    1994-12-01

    It was the aim of the present study to determine the affinities of four neuroleptics and five antidepressants for histamine H3 receptors. In rat brain cortex membranes, the specifically bound [3H]-N alpha-methylhistamine was monophasically displaced by clozapine (pKi 6.15). The other drugs did not completely displace the radioligand even at 100 microM; the pKi values were: haloperidol (4.91); sulpiride (4.73); amitriptyline (4.56); desipramine (4.15); levomepromazine (4.14); fluovoxamine (4.13); maprotiline (4.09); moclobemide (< 4.0). The effect of clozapine was further examined in a functional H3 receptor model, i.e., in superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. The electrically evoked tritium overflow was not affected by clozapine 0.5-32 microM. However, clozapine shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine for its inhibitory effect on the evoked overflow to the right, but did not affect the maximum effect of histamine. The Schild plot yielded a pA2 value of 6.33. In conclusion, clozapine shows an intermediate affinity and potency (as a competitive antagonist) at H3 receptors. The Ki value of clozapine at H3 receptors resembles its Ki value at D2 receptors (the target of the classical neuroleptics), but is higher than its Ki values at D4, 5-HT2 or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which according to current hypotheses, might be involved in the atypical profile of clozapine.

  10. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenoids from Salvia splendens and evaluation of Opioid Receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gianfranco; Savona, Giuseppe; Rodríguez, Benjamín; Dersch, Christina M; Rothman, Richard B; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2008-12-20

    Salvinorin A (1), a neoclerodane diterpene from the hallucinogenic mint Salvia divinorum, is the only known non-nitrogenous and specific kappa-opioid agonist. Several structural congeners of 1 isolated from Salvia splendens (2 - 8) together with a series of semisynthetic derivatives (9 - 24), some of which possess a pyrazoline structural moiety (9, 19 - 22), have been tested for affinity at human mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. None of these compounds showed high affinity binding to these receptors. However, 10 showed modest affinity for kappa receptors suggesting other naturally neoclerodanes from different Salvia species may possess opioid affinity.

  11. Affinity proteomics to study endogenous protein complexes: Pointers, pitfalls, preferences and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Molloy, Kelly R.; Taylor, Martin S.; Domanski, Michal; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting and studying cellular systems requires the ability to specifically isolate distinct proteins along with the co-assembled constituents of their associated complexes. Affinity capture techniques leverage high affinity, high specificity reagents to target and capture proteins of interest along with specifically associated proteins from cell extracts. Affinity capture coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analyses has enabled the isolation and characterization of a wide range of endogenous protein complexes. Here, we outline effective procedures for the affinity capture of protein complexes, highlighting best practices and common pitfalls. PMID:25757543

  12. Affinity enhancement of an in vivo matured therapeutic antibody using structure-based computational design.

    PubMed

    Clark, Louis A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Eldredge, John; Fitch, Christopher; Friedman, Bethany; Hanf, Karl J M; Jarpe, Matthew; Liparoto, Stefano F; Li, You; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Miller, Stephan; Rushe, Mia; Sherman, Woody; Simon, Kenneth; Van Vlijmen, Herman

    2006-05-01

    Improving the affinity of a high-affinity protein-protein interaction is a challenging problem that has practical applications in the development of therapeutic biomolecules. We used a combination of structure-based computational methods to optimize the binding affinity of an antibody fragment to the I-domain of the integrin VLA1. Despite the already high affinity of the antibody (Kd approximately 7 nM) and the moderate resolution (2.8 A) of the starting crystal structure, the affinity was increased by an order of magnitude primarily through a decrease in the dissociation rate. We determined the crystal structure of a high-affinity quadruple mutant complex at 2.2 A. The structure shows that the design makes the predicted contacts. Structural evidence and mutagenesis experiments that probe a hydrogen bond network illustrate the importance of satisfying hydrogen bonding requirements while seeking higher-affinity mutations. The large and diverse set of interface mutations allowed refinement of the mutant binding affinity prediction protocol and improvement of the single-mutant success rate. Our results indicate that structure-based computational design can be successfully applied to further improve the binding of high-affinity antibodies.

  13. Affinity functions: recognizing essential parameters in fuzzy connectedness based image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2009-02-01

    Fuzzy connectedness (FC) constitutes an important class of image segmentation schemas. Although affinity functions represent the core aspect (main variability parameter) of FC algorithms, they have not been studied systematically in the literature. In this paper, we present a thorough study to fill this gap. Our analysis is based on the notion of equivalent affinities: if any two equivalent affinities are used in the same FC schema to produce two versions of the algorithm, then these algorithms are equivalent in the sense that they lead to identical segmentations. We give a complete characterization of the affinity equivalence and show that many natural definitions of affinity functions and their parameters used in the literature are redundant in the sense that different definitions and values of such parameters lead to equivalent affinities. We also show that two main affinity types - homogeneity based and object feature based - are equivalent, respectively, to the difference quotient of the intensity function and Rosenfeld's degree of connectivity. In addition, we demonstrate that any segmentation obtained via relative fuzzy connectedness (RFC) algorithm can be viewed as segmentation obtained via absolute fuzzy connectedness (AFC) algorithm with an automatic and adaptive threshold detection. We finish with an analysis of possible ways of combining different component affinities that result in non equivalent affinities.

  14. Complete affine connection in the causal boundary: static, spherically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Steven (Stacey) G.

    2017-02-01

    The boundary at I^+, future null infinity, for a standard static, spherically symmetric spactime is examined for possible linear connections. Two independent methods are employed, one for treating I^+ as the future causal boundary, and one for treating it as a conformal boundary (the latter is subsumed in the former, which is of greater generality). Both methods provide the same result: a constellation of various possible connections, depending on an arbitrary choice of a certain function, a sort of gauge freedom in obtaining a natural connection on I^+; choosing that function to be constant (for instance) results in a complete connection. Treating I^+ as part of the future causal boundary, the method is to impute affine connections on null hypersurfaces going out to I^+, in terms of a transverse vector field on each null hypersurface (there is much gauge freedom on choice of the transverse vector fields). Treating I^+ as part of a conformal boundary, the method is to make a choice of conformal factor that makes the boundary totally geodesic in the enveloping manifold (there is much gauge freedom in choice of that conformal factor). Similar examination is made of other boundaries, such as timelike infinity and timelike and spacelike singularities. These are much simpler, as they admit a unique connection from a similar limiting process (i.e., no gauge freedom); and that connection is complete.

  15. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. The phylogeny of varanoid lizards and the affinities of snakes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. S. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Evidence that platynotan squamates (living varanoid lizards, snakes and their fossil relatives) are monophyletic is presented. Evolutionary relationships within this group are then ascertained through a cladistic analysis of 144 osteological characters. Mosasauroids (aigialosaurs and mosasaurs), a group of large marine lizards, are identified as the nearest relatives of snakes, thus resolving the long-standing problem of snake affinities. The mosasauroid–snake clade (Pythonomorpha) is corroborated by 40 derived characters, including recumbent replacement teeth, thecodonty, four or fewer premaxillary teeth, supratemporal–prootic contact, free mandibular tips, crista circumfenestralis, straight vertical splenio-angular joint, loss of posterior ramus of the coronoid, reduced basipterygoid processes, reduced interpterygoid vacuity, zygosphene–zygantral articulations, and absence of epiphyses on the axial skeleton and skull. After mosasauroids, the next closest relatives of snakes are varanids (Varanus, Saniwa and Saniwides) and lanthanotids (Lanthanotus and Cherminotus). Derived features uniting varanids and lanthanotids include nine cervical vertebrae and three or fewer pairs of sternal ribs. The varanid–lanthanotid–pythonomorph clade, here termed Thecoglossa, is supported by features such as the anteriorly positioned basal tubera, and the loss of the second epibranchial. Successive outgroups to thecoglossans are Telmasaurus, an unresolved polytomy (Estesia, Gobidermatidae and Helodermatidae), Paravaranus and Proplatynota. The 'necrosaurs' are demonstrated to be an artificial (polyphyletic) assemblage of primitive platynotans that are not particularly closely related to each other. Snakes are presumed to have evolved from small, limbless, burrowing lizards and the inability of previous analyses to resolve the affinities of snakes has been attributed to extensive convergence among the numerous lineages of such lizards. The present study contradicts this claim

  17. Higher Nucleoporin-Importinβ Affinity at the Nuclear Basket Increases Nucleocytoplasmic Import

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2013-01-01

    Several in vitro studies have shown the presence of an affinity gradient in nuclear pore complex proteins for the import receptor Importinβ, at least partially contributing to nucleocytoplasmic transport, while others have historically argued against the presence of such a gradient. Nonetheless, the existence of an affinity gradient has remained an uncharacterized contributing factor. To shed light on the affinity gradient theory and better characterize how the existence of such an affinity gradient between the nuclear pore and the import receptor may influence the nucleocytoplasmic traffic, we have developed a general-purpose agent based modeling (ABM) framework that features a new method for relating rate constants to molecular binding and unbinding probabilities, and used our ABM approach to quantify the effects of a wide range of forward and reverse nucleoporin-Importinβ affinity gradients. Our results indicate that transport through the nuclear pore complex is maximized with an effective macroscopic affinity gradient of 2000 µM, 200 µM and 10 µM in the cytoplasmic, central channel and nuclear basket respectively. The transport rate at this gradient is approximately 10% higher than the transport rate for a comparable pore lacking any affinity gradient, which has a peak transport rate when all nucleoporins have an affinity of 200 µM for Importinβ. Furthermore, this optimal ratio of affinity gradients is representative of the ratio of affinities reported for the yeast nuclear pore complex – suggesting that the affinity gradient seen in vitro is highly optimized. PMID:24282617

  18. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  19. C-X...H contacts in biomolecular systems: how they contribute to protein-ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxiang; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zhijian; Yan, Xiuhua; Luo, Xiaoming; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Weiliang

    2009-09-17

    The hydrogen bond acceptor capability of halogens has long been underappreciated in the field of biology. In this work, we have surveyed structures of protein complexes with halogenated ligands to characterize geometrical preferences of C-X...H contacts and contributions of such interactions to protein-ligand binding affinity. Notably, F...H interactions in biomolecules exhibit a remarkably different behavior as compared to three other kinds of X...H (X = Cl, Br, I) interactions, which has been rationalized by means of ab initio calculations using simple model systems. The C-X...H contacts in biological systems are characterized as weak hydrogen bonding interactions. Furthermore, the electrophile "head on" and nucleophile "side on" interactions of halogens have been extensively investigated through the examination of interactions in protein structures and a two-layer ONIOM-based QM/MM method. In biomolecular systems, C-X...H contacts are recognized as secondary interaction contributions to C-X...O halogen bonds that play important roles in conferring specificity and affinity for halogenated ligands. The results presented here are within the context of their potential applications in drug design, including relevance to the development of accurate force fields for halogens.

  20. [Comparative study of uniform-doping and gradient-doping negative electron affinity GaN photocathodes].

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Chang, Ben-Kang; Xu, Yuan; Du, Xiao-Qing; Du, Yu-Jie; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Ju

    2011-08-01

    High temperature annealing and Cs/O activation are external incentives, while the property of GaN material is internal factor in the preparation of negative electron affinity GaN photocathode. The similarities and differences of the performance of the two structure photocathodes are analysed based on the difference of the structure between uniform-doping and gradient-doping negative electron affinity GaN photocathodes and the changes in photocurrents in activation and the quantum yield after successfully activated of GaN photocathodes. Experiments show that: the photocurrent growth rate is slower in activation, activation time is longer and quantum efficiency is higher after successfully activated of gradient-doping GaN photocathode than those of uniform-doping photocathode respectively. The field-assisted photocathode emission model can explain the differences between the two, built-in electric field of gradient-doping structure creates additional electronic drift to the photocathode surface, and the probability of electrons to reach the photocathode surface is improved correspondingly.

  1. Using three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships to examine estrogen receptor binding affinities of polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, C.L.; Minor, D.L.; McKinney, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    Certain phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system of animals, apparently in association with their estrogenic properties. Competition with natural estrogens for the estrogen receptor is a possible mechanism by which such effects could occur. We used comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) paradigm, to examine the underlying structural properties of ortho-chlorinated hydroxybiphenyl analogs known to bind to the estrogen receptor. The cross-validated and conventional statistical results indicate a high degree of internal predictability for the molecules included in the training data set. In addition to the phenolic (A) ring system, conformational restriction of the overall structure appears to play an important role in estrogen receptor binding affinity. Hydrophobic character as assessed using hydropathic interaction fields also contributes in a positive way to binding affinity. The CoMFA-derived QSARs may be useful in examining the estrogenic activity of a wider range of phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Fast left ventricle tracking using localized anatomical affine optical flow.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João L; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2017-02-16

    In daily clinical cardiology practice, left ventricle (LV) global and regional function assessment is crucial for disease diagnosis, therapy selection and patient follow-up. Currently, this is still a time-consuming task, spending valuable human resources. In this work, a novel fast methodology for automatic LV tracking is proposed based on localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow. This novel method can be combined to previously proposed segmentation frameworks or manually delineated surfaces at an initial frame to obtain fully delineated datasets and, thus, assess both global and regional myocardial function. Its feasibility and accuracy was investigated in three distinct public databases, namely in realistically simulated 3D ultrasound (US), clinical 3D echocardiography and clinical cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images. The method showed accurate tracking results in all databases, proving its applicability and accuracy for myocardial function assessment. Moreover, when combined to previous state-of-the-art segmentation frameworks, it outperformed previous tracking strategies in both 3D US and CMR data, automatically computing relevant cardiac indices with smaller biases and narrower limits of agreement compared to reference indices. Simultaneously, the proposed localized tracking method showed to be suitable for online processing, even for 3D motion assessment. Importantly, although here evaluated for LV tracking only, this novel methodology is applicable for tracking of other target structures with minimal adaptations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Reversible cyclic peptide libraries for the discovery of affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Stefano; Ward, Kevin Lawrence; Naik, Amith Dattatray; Kish, William Stanley; Blackburn, Robert Kevin; Carbonell, Ruben Guillermo

    2013-10-01

    A novel strategy is presented for the identification of cyclic peptide ligands from combinatorial libraries of reversible cyclic depsipeptides. A method for the solid-phase synthesis of individual cyclic depsipeptides and combinatorial libraries of these compounds is proposed, which employs lactic acid (Lact) and the dipeptide ester (Nα-Ac)-Ser(Ala)- as linkers for dilactonization. Upon alkaline treatment of the beads selected by screening a model library, the cyclic depsipeptides are linearized and released from the solid support to the liquid phase, to be sequenced via single-step tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The protocol presented for library synthesis provides for wide structural diversity. Two model sequences, VVWVVK and AAWAAR, were chosen to present different structural examples for depsipeptide libraries and demonstrate the process of sequence determination by mass spectrometry. Further, a case study using the IgG binding cyclic depsipeptide cyclo[(Nα-Ac)-S(A)-RWHYFK-Lact-E] is presented to demonstrate the process of library screening and sequence determination on the selected beads. Finally, a method is shown for synthesis of the irreversible cyclic peptide corresponding to the proposed depsipeptide structure, to make the ligand stable to the aqueous acid and alkaline conditions encountered in affinity chromatographic applications. The cyclic peptide ligand was synthesized on a poly(methacrylate) resin and used for chromatographic binding of the target IgG.

  4. Experimental Immunization Based on Plasmodium Antigens Isolated by Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Ali N.; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G.; Puyet, Antonio; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines blocking malaria parasites in the blood-stage diminish mortality and morbidity caused by the disease. Here, we isolated antigens from total parasite proteins by antibody affinity chromatography to test an immunization against lethal malaria infection in a murine model. We used the sera of malaria self-resistant ICR mice to lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii 17XL for purification of their IgGs which were subsequently employed to isolate blood-stage parasite antigens that were inoculated to immunize BALB/c mice. The presence of specific antibodies in vaccinated mice serum was studied by immunoblot analysis at different days after vaccination and showed an intensive immune response to a wide range of antigens with molecular weight ranging between 22 and 250 kDa. The humoral response allowed delay of the infection after the inoculation to high lethal doses of P. yoelii yoelii 17XL resulting in a partial protection against malaria disease, although final survival was managed in a low proportion of challenged mice. This approach shows the potential to prevent malaria disease with a set of antigens isolated from blood-stage parasites. PMID:26539558

  5. Affinity-based methods in drug-target discovery.

    PubMed

    Rylova, Gabriela; Ozdian, Tomas; Varanasi, Lakshman; Soural, Miroslav; Hlavac, Jan; Holub, Dusan; Dzubak, Petr; Hajduch, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Target discovery using the molecular approach, as opposed to the more traditional systems approach requires the study of the cellular or biological process underlying a condition or disease. The approaches that are employed by the "bench" scientist may be genetic, genomic or proteomic and each has its rightful place in the drug-target discovery process. Affinity-based proteomic techniques currently used in drug-discovery draw upon several disciplines, synthetic chemistry, cell-biology, biochemistry and mass spectrometry. An important component of such techniques is the probe that is specifically designed to pick out a protein or set of proteins from amongst the varied thousands in a cell lysate. A second component, that is just as important, is liquid-chromatography tandem massspectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS and the supporting theoretical framework has come of age and is the tool of choice for protein identification and quantification. These proteomic tools are critical to maintaining the drug-candidate supply, in the larger context of drug discovery.

  6. Preparation of phenylboronate affinity rigid monolith with macromolecular porogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Jie; Jia, Man; Zhao, Yong-Xin; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Akber Aisa, Haji

    2016-03-18

    Boronate-affinity monolithic column was first prepared via polystyrene (PS) as porogen in this work. The monolithic polymer was synthetized using 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (4-VPBA) as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as crosslinker monomer, and a mixture of PS solution in tetrahydrofuran, the linear macromolecular porogen, and toluene as porogen. Isoquercitrin (ISO) and hyperoside (HYP), isomer diol flavonoid glycosides, can be baseline separated on the poly(VPBA-co-EDMA) monolith. The effect of polymerization variables on the selectivity factor, e.g., the ratio of monomer to crosslinker (M/C), the amount of PS and the molecular weight of macromolecular porogen was investigated. The surface properties of the monolithic polymer were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption. The best polymerization condition was the M/C ratio of 7:3, and the PS concentration of 40 mg/ml. The poly(VPBA-co-EDMA) polymer was also applied to extract cis-diol flavonoid glycosides from the crude extraction of cotton flower. After treated by poly(VPBA-co-EDMA) for solid phase extraction, high purity ISO and HYP (>99.96%) can be obtained with recovery of 83.7% and 78.6%, respectively.

  7. Two measured completely different electron affinities for atomic Eu?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Felfli, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the electron affinity (EA) of atomic Eu was measured to be 0.116?eV. This value is in outstanding agreement with the theoretically calculated values using the Regge pole and MCDF-RCI methods. Previously, the EA of Eu was measured to be 1.053 eV. In an attempt to resolve the discrepancy between the two measured values, we have adopted the complex angular momentum (CAM) method and investigated in the electron energy range 0.11 eV

  8. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  9. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  10. Magnetic particles as affinity matrix for purification of antithrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercês, A. A. D.; Maciel, J. C.; Carvalho Júnior, L. B.

    2015-11-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto insoluble supports is an important tool for the fabrication of a diverse range of functional materials. It provides advantages: enhanced stability and easy separation. In this work two different magnetic composites were synthesized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) to human antithrombin purification. The magnetic particles (MAG) were obtained by co-precipitation method of iron salts II and III and subsequently coated with polyaniline (MAG-PANI particles). Dacron (polyethylene terephthalate) suffered a hydrazinolysis reaction to obtain a powder (Dacron hydrazide) which was subsequently magnetized (mDAC particles) also by co-precipitation method. Heparan sulfate (HS) was immobilized to MAG-PANI and mDAC retained respectively 35μg and 38.6μg per of support. The magnetic composite containing HS immobilized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) was incubated with human blood plasma (1mL) and then washed with NaCl gradients. Electrophoresis of proteins present in eluates showed bands of antithrombin (58kDa). A reduction in the antithrombin activity was detected in plasma that were incubated in the composites magnetic with HS immobilized, suggesting that the antithrombin was removed of the human blood plasma and then purified. Therefore, the above results suggest that both preparations: MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS are able to affinity purify antithrombin, an important component of blood coagulation.

  11. Sliding Window Generalized Kernel Affine Projection Algorithm Using Projection Mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavakis, Konstantinos; Theodoridis, Sergios

    2008-12-01

    Very recently, a solution to the kernel-based online classification problem has been given by the adaptive projected subgradient method (APSM). The developed algorithm can be considered as a generalization of a kernel affine projection algorithm (APA) and the kernel normalized least mean squares (NLMS). Furthermore, sparsification of the resulting kernel series expansion was achieved by imposing a closed ball (convex set) constraint on the norm of the classifiers. This paper presents another sparsification method for the APSM approach to the online classification task by generating a sequence of linear subspaces in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). To cope with the inherent memory limitations of online systems and to embed tracking capabilities to the design, an upper bound on the dimension of the linear subspaces is imposed. The underlying principle of the design is the notion of projection mappings. Classification is performed by metric projection mappings, sparsification is achieved by orthogonal projections, while the online system's memory requirements and tracking are attained by oblique projections. The resulting sparsification scheme shows strong similarities with the classical sliding window adaptive schemes. The proposed design is validated by the adaptive equalization problem of a nonlinear communication channel, and is compared with classical and recent stochastic gradient descent techniques, as well as with the APSM's solution where sparsification is performed by a closed ball constraint on the norm of the classifiers.

  12. Purification of baculovirus vectors using heparin affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Nasimuzzaman, Md; Lynn, Danielle; van der Loo, Johannes CM; Malik, Punam

    2016-01-01

    Baculoviruses are commonly used for recombinant protein and vaccine production. Baculoviruses are nonpathogenic to vertebrates, have a large packaging capacity, display broad host and cell type tropism, infect both dividing and nondividing cells, and do not elicit strong immune or allergic responses in vivo. Hence, their use as gene delivery vehicles has become increasingly popular in recent years. Moreover, baculovirus vectors carrying mammalian regulatory elements can efficiently transduce and express transgenes in mammalian cells. Based on the finding that heparan sulfate, which is structurally similar to heparin, is an attachment receptor for baculovirus, we developed a novel scalable baculovirus purification method using heparin-affinity chromatography. Baculovirus supernatants were loaded onto a POROS heparin column, washed to remove unbound materials, and eluted with 1.5 mol/l NaCl, which yielded a recovery of purified baculovirus of 85%. After ultracentrifugation, baculovirus titers increased from 200- to 700-fold with overall yields of 26–29%. We further show that baculovirus particles were infectious, normal in morphology and size, despite high-salt elution and shear forces used during purification and concentration. Our chromatography-based purification method is scalable and, together with ultracentrifugation and/or tangential flow filtration, will be suitable for large-scale manufacturing of baculovirus stocks for protein and vaccine production and in gene therapy applications. PMID:27933303

  13. A designed repeat protein as an affinity capture reagent.

    PubMed

    Speltz, Elizabeth B; Brown, Rebecca S H; Hajare, Holly S; Schlieker, Christian; Regan, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    Repeat proteins are an attractive target for protein engineering and design. We have focused our attention on the design and engineering of one particular class: tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins. In previous work, we have shown that the structure and stability of TPR proteins can be manipulated in a rational fashion [Cortajarena (2011) Prot. Sci. 20: , 1042-1047; Main (2003) Structure 11: , 497-508]. Building on those studies, we have designed and characterized a number of different peptide-binding TPR modules and we have also assembled these modules into supramolecular arrays [Cortajarena (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 5: , 545-552; Cortajarena (2008) ACS Chem. Biol. 3: , 161-166; Jackrel (2009) Prot. Sci. 18: , 762-774; Kajander (2007) Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crystallogr. 63: , 800-811]. Here we focus on the development of one such TPR-peptide interaction for a practical application, affinity purification. We illustrate the general utility of our designed protein interaction. Furthermore, this example highlights how basic research on protein-peptide interactions can lead to the development of novel reagents with important practical applications.

  14. Communication: Revised electron affinity of SF6 from kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Troe, Jürgen; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, Albert A

    2012-03-28

    Previously determined experimental data for thermal attachment of electrons to SF(6) and thermal detachment from SF(6)(-) over the range 590-670 K are reevaluated by a third-law analysis. Recent high precision calculations of SF(6)(-) harmonic frequences and anharmonicities (for several of the modes) lead to considerable changes in modeled vibrational partition functions which then have to be accommodated for by a smaller value of the derived adiabatic electron affinity EA of SF(6). The previously estimated value of EA = 1.20 (±0.05) eV in this way is reduced to a value of EA = 1.03 (±0.05) eV. In addition, the bond dissociation energy E(0,dis) for SF(6)(-) → SF(5)(-) + F is reduced to E(0,dis) = 1.44 (±0.05) eV. Finally, the consequences for modeled specific rate constants k(det)(E,J) of electron detachment from SF(6)(-) are discussed.

  15. Generation of metastatic melanoma specific antibodies by affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Birgit; Koppensteiner, Anita; Schörghofer, David; Kinslechner, Katharina; Timelthaler, Gerald; Eferl, Robert; Hengstschläger, Markus; Missbichler, Albert; Hundsberger, Harald; Mikula, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer and one of the most frequent tumours in young adults. Identification of primary tumours prone to develop metastasis is of paramount importance for further patient stratification. However, till today, no markers exist that are routinely used to predict melanoma progression. To ameliorate this problem, we generated antiserum directed against metastatic melanoma tissue lysate and applied a novel approach to purify the obtained serum via consecutive affinity chromatography steps. The established antibody, termed MHA-3, showed high reactivity against metastatic melanoma cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. We also tested MHA-3 on 227 melanoma patient samples and compared staining with the melanoma marker S100b. Importantly, MHA-3 was able to differentiate between metastatic and non-metastatic melanoma samples. By proteome analysis we identified 18 distinct antigens bound by MHA-3. Combined expression profiling of all identified proteins revealed a significant survival difference in melanoma patients. In conclusion, we developed a polyclonal antibody, which is able to detect metastatic melanoma on paraffin embedded sections. Hence, we propose that this antibody will represent a valuable additional tool for precise melanoma diagnosis. PMID:27853253

  16. Electron Affinity Difference in CdS/Si Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kuhaimi, Siham A.

    1998-09-01

    The electron affinity difference ΔEc=χ1-χ2, in CdS/Si solar cells fabricated by four different processes is measured from observations of the variations of open circuit voltage with temperature. For CdS/Si cells, the values of ΔEc lie between 0.43 and 0.48 eV and are found to be independent of the process of cell fabrication. The use of CdZnS in place of CdS decreases the value of ΔEc to 0.3 eV. The method used for the measurement of ΔEc is very simple. The values of the saturation current I0 for different types of cells are estimated from the slopes of qVoc versus kT characteristics and compared with those obtained from ln I versus V curves. The values of I0 found for each cell by the two methods are in good agreement.

  17. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  18. Human whole-blood oxygen affinity: effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Zwart, A; Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zijlstra, W G

    1984-08-01

    phe effect of temperature changes on human whole-blood O2 affinity was measured in the blood of six healthy donors over almost the entire O2 saturation (SO2) range (1-99%). The results showed that temperature has no influence on the shape of the O2 dissociation curve, implying that the temperature coefficient (delta log PO2/delta T) is independent of SO2. Simultaneous measurements of the total (proton) Haldane factor (delta[HbH]/[delta HbO2]) at the five temperatures under study (22, 27, 32, 37, and 42 degrees C) revealed that this factor depends on temperature. The liberation of protons from hemoglobin appeared to be linear with respect to changes in SO2. We therefore conclude that the (proton) Bohr factor (H+ factor) is dependent on temperature over the entire SO2 range in the same way as previously described for SO2 = 50%. The exothermic oxygenation reaction in whole blood was accompanied by a heat evolution (delta HO2) of 42.7 kJ/mol (monomeric) hemoglobin.

  19. Phosphatidylserine Reversibly Binds Cu2+ with Extremely High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Christopher F.; Cong, Xiao; Robison, Aaron; Pace, Hudson P.; Liu, Chunming; Poyton, Matthew F.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) embedded within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was found to bind Cu2+ from solution with extraordinarily high affinity. In fact, the equilibrium dissociation constant was in the femtomolar range. The resulting complex formed in a 1:2 Cu2+ to PS ratio and quenches a broad spectrum of lipid-bound fluorophores in a reversible and pH-dependent fashion. At acidic pH values, the fluorophores were almost completely unquenched, while at basic pH values significant quenching (85–90%) was observed. The pH at which the transition occurred was dependent on the PS concentration and ranged from approximately pH 5 to 8. The quenching kinetics was slow at low Cu2+ concentrations and basic values pH (up to several hours), while the unquenching reaction was orders of magnitude more rapid upon lowering the pH. This was consistent with diffusion limited complex formation at basic pH, but rapid dissociation under acidic conditions. The tight binding of Cu2+ to PS may have physiological consequences under certain circumstances. PMID:22548290

  20. Tuning Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open-Metal Sites and Its Origin for Enhancing CO2 Affinity by Metal Substitution.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Kim, Heejin; Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Yousung

    2012-04-05

    Reducing anthropogenic carbon emission is a problem that requires immediate attention. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as a promising new materials platform for carbon capture, of which Mg-MOF-74 offers chemospecific affinity toward CO2 because of the open Mg sites. Here we tune the binding affinity of CO2 for M-MOF-74 by metal substitution (M = Mg, Ca, and the first transition metal elements) and show that Ti- and V-MOF-74 can have an enhanced affinity compared to Mg-MOF-74 by 6-9 kJ/mol. Electronic structure calculations suggest that the origin of the major affinity trend is the local electric field effect of the open metal site that stabilizes CO2, but forward donation from the lone-pair electrons of CO2 to the empty d-levels of transition metals as in a weak coordination bond makes Ti and V have an even higher binding strength than Mg, Ca, and Sc.

  1. A HIGH-LEVEL CALCULATION OF THE PROTON AFFINITY OF DIBORANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The experimental proton affinity of diborane (B2H6) is based on an unstable species, B2H,+, 4 which has been observed only at low temperatures. The present work calculates the proton 5 affinity of diborane using the Gaussian-3 method and other high-level compound ab initio 6 met...

  2. Molecular determinants of affinity for aminoglycoside binding to the aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase(2'')-Ia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Serpersu, Engin H

    2006-08-29

    One of the most commonly occurring aminoglycoside resistance enzymes is aminoglycoside 2''-O-nucleotidyltransferase [ANT(2'')]. In the present study molecular determinants of affinity and specificity for aminoglycoside binding to this enzyme are investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Binding of aminoglycosides is enthalpically driven accompanied by negative entropy changes. The presence of metal-nucleotide increases the affinity for all but one of the aminoglycosides studied but has no effect on specificity. The substituents at positions 1, 2', and 6' are important determinants of substrate specificity. An amino group at these positions leads to greater affinity. No correlation is observed between the change in affinity and enthalpy. At the 2' position greater affinity results from a more negative enthalpy for an aminoglycoside containing an amino rather than a hydroxyl at that position. At the 6' position the greater affinity for an aminoglycoside containing an amino substituent results from a less disfavorable entropic contribution. The thermodynamic basis for the change in affinity at position 1 could not be determined because of the weak binding of one of the aminoglycoside substrates, amikacin. The effect of increasing osmotic stress on affinity was used to determine that a net release of approximately four water molecules occurs when tobramycin binds to ANT(2''). No measurable net change in the number of bound water molecules is observed when neomycin binds the enzyme. Data acquired in this work provide the rationale for the ability of ANT(2'') to confer resistance against kanamycins but not neomycins.

  3. B Cell Receptor Affinity for Insulin Dictates Autoantigen Acquisition and B Cell Functionality in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Thomas A.; Smith, Mia J.; Conrad, Francis J.; Johnson, Sara A.; Getahun, Andrew; Lindsay, Robin S.; Hinman, Rochelle M.; Friedman, Rachel S.; Thomas, James W.; Cambier, John C.

    2016-01-01

    B cells have been strongly implicated in the development of human type 1 diabetes and are required for disease in the NOD mouse model. These functions are dependent on B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity and expression of MHC, implicating linked autoantigen recognition and presentation to effector T cells. BCR-antigen affinity requirements for participation in disease are unclear. We hypothesized that BCR affinity for the autoantigen insulin differentially affects lymphocyte functionality, including tolerance modality and the ability to acquire and become activated in the diabetogenic environment. Using combined transgenic and retrogenic heavy and light chain to create multiple insulin-binding BCRs, we demonstrate that affinity for insulin is a critical determinant of the function of these autoreactive cells. We show that both BCR affinity for insulin and genetic background affect tolerance induction in immature B cells. We also find new evidence that may explain the enigmatic ability of B cells expressing 125 anti-insulin BCR to support development of TID in NOD mice despite a reported affinity beneath requirements for binding insulin at in vivo concentrations. We report that when expressed as an antigen receptor the affinity of 125 is much higher than determined by measurements of the soluble form. Finally, we show that in vivo acquisition of insulin requires both sufficient BCR affinity and permissive host/tissue environment. We propose that a confluence of BCR affinity, pancreas environment, and B cell tolerance-regulating genes in the NOD animal allows acquisition of insulin and autoimmunity. PMID:27834793

  4. Calcium-modulated conformational affinity chromatography. Application to the purification of calmodulin and S100 proteins.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, G; Neufeld, T; Star-Weinstock, M; Litvak, M; Solomon, B

    1992-04-24

    The purification of proteins by affinity chromatography is based on their highly specific interaction with an immobilized ligand followed by elution under conditions where their affinity towards the ligand is markedly reduced. Thus, a high-degree purification by a single chromatographic step is achieved. However, when several proteins in the crude mixture share affinity to a common immobilized ligand, they may not be resolved by affinity chromatography and subsequent "real" chromatographic purification steps may be required. It is shown that by using properly selected gradient elution conditions, the affinities of the various proteins towards the immobilized ligand may be gradually modulated and their separation may be achieved. This is exemplified by the isolation and separation of a group of Ca(2+)-activated proteins, Calmodulin, S100a and S100b, from bovine brain extract, using a melittin-Eupergit C affinity column which is developed with Ca(2+)-chelator gradients. As expected, separation of the three proteins into individual peaks, eluted in order of increasing affinity to the matrix, was obtained. Sigmoid selectivity curves calculated from the elution volumes under different elution conditions for each of the proteins were obtained, illustrating the chromatographic behaviour of the gradient affinity separation system.

  5. A feasible dual affine scaling steepest descent method for the linear semidefinite programming problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhadan, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear semidefinite programming problem is considered. The dual affine scaling method in which all current iterations belong to the feasible set is proposed for its solution. Moreover, the boundaries of the feasible set may be reached. This method is a generalization of a version of the affine scaling method that was earlier developed for linear programs to the case of semidefinite programming.

  6. Affinity for Quantitative Tools: Undergraduate Marketing Students Moving beyond Quantitative Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasi, Crina O.; Wilson, J. Holton; Puri, Cheenu; Divine, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing students are known as less likely to have an affinity for the quantitative aspects of the marketing discipline. In this article, we study the reasons why this might be true and develop a parsimonious 20-item scale for measuring quantitative affinity in undergraduate marketing students. The scale was administered to a sample of business…

  7. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  8. Electron affinity of p-quinones. Improved method of electrochemical estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Jan S.

    1986-06-01

    Electron affinities of four p-quinones are estimated from enthalpy changes obtained on the basis of measured formal potentials and reaction entropies in the electroreduction process. A linear correlation between electron affinities of p-quinones and parent hydrocarbons is found.

  9. The Assessment of the Relationships among Loneliness, Affinity-Seeking Competence, and Communication Apprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltjen, Lisa M.; Zakahi, Walter R.

    A study investigated the relationships among dyadic apprehension and levels of loneliness, dyadic apprehension and affinity-seeking competence, and affinity-seeking competence and levels of loneliness. Subjects, 198 undergraduate students, completed the Revised University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale, the Personal Report of…

  10. An affinity-effect relationship for microbial communities in plant-soil feedback loops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-soil feedback involving soil microorganisms can regulate plant populations. To participate in plant-soil feedback, microorganisms must display an affinity for plant species, and they must produce consistent effects on plant growth. We tested the validity and strength of microbial affinity-effe...

  11. The Impact of the Affinity Learning Authoring Tool on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, Leen-Kiat; Fowler, David; Zygielbaum, Art I.

    2008-01-01

    Affinity Learning is a system that allows the user to build a lesson on a subject matter by breaking it down into concepts, misconceptions, assessments, and remediation steps. Examples and questions can also used in these components. Affinity Learning has been found to be effective and can offer critical insights to student learning strategies.…

  12. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: MODEL II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The training set used to derive a common reactivity pattern (COREPA) model for estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinity in Model I (see Abstract I in this series) was extended to include 47 rat estrogen receptor (rER) relative binding affinity (RBA) measurements in addition to the...

  13. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  14. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  15. Affinity Spaces and Identity: Recommended Children's Literature for Use in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Lindsay L.; Holder, K. C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review of literature was to describe affinity spaces and identity formation for children of color in schools and recommend texts currently in use. The literature reviewed included studies utilizing qualitative and quantitative research and the Undoing Racism workshop. Topics reviewed include affinity spaces, understanding…

  16. An Investigation of State Educational Twitter Hashtags (SETHS) as Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Joshua M.; Greenhalgh, Spencer P.; Koehler, Matthew J.; Hamilton, Erica R.; Akcaoglu, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Affinity spaces are digital or physical spaces in which participants interact with one another around content of shared interest and through a common portal (or platform). Among teachers, some of the largest affinity spaces may be those organized around hashtags on Twitter: These spaces are public, largely unmoderated, and thriving, yet very…

  17. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: A COMPARISON OF THREE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative analysis of how three COREPA models for ER binding affinity performed when used to predict potential estrogen receptor (ER) ligands is presented. Models I and II were developed based on training sets of 232 and 279 rat ER binding affinity measurements, respectively....

  18. Fermion Interactions, Cosmological Constant and Space-Time Dimensionality in a Unified Approach Based on Affine Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio; Dorokhov, Alexander E.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main features of unified models, based on affine geometries, is that all possible interactions and fields naturally arise under the same standard. Here, we consider, from the effective Lagrangian of the theory, the torsion induced 4-fermion interaction. In particular, how this interaction affects the cosmological term, supposing that a condensation occurs for quark fields during the quark-gluon/hadron phase transition in the early universe. We explicitly show that there is no parity-violating pseudo-scalar density, dual to the curvature tensor (Holst term) and the spinor-bilinear scalar density has no mixed couplings of A-V form. On the other hand, the space-time dimensionality cannot be constrained from multidimensional phenomenological models admitting torsion.

  19. A linker peptide with high affinity towards silica-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Sunna, Anwar; Chi, Fei; Bergquist, Peter L

    2013-06-25

    A peptide sequence with affinity to silica-containing materials was fused to a truncated form of Streptococcus strain G148 Protein G. The resulting recombinant Linker-Protein G (LPG) was produced in Escherichia coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. It displayed high affinity towards two natural clinoptilolite zeolites. The LPG also displayed high binding affinity towards commercial-grade synthetic zeolite, silica and silica-containing materials. A commercial sample of the truncated Protein G and a basic protein, both without the linker, did not bind to natural or synthetic zeolites or silica. We conclude that the zeolite-binding affinity is mediated by the linker peptide sequence. As a consequence, these data may imply that the binding affinity is directed to the SiO2 component rather than to the atomic orientation on the zeolite crystal surface as previously assumed.

  20. Antigen affinity and antigen dose exert distinct influences on CD4 T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keck, Simone; Schmaler, Mathias; Ganter, Stefan; Wyss, Lena; Oberle, Susanne; Huseby, Eric S; Zehn, Dietmar; King, Carolyn G

    2014-10-14

    Cumulative T-cell receptor signal strength and ensuing T-cell responses are affected by both antigen affinity and antigen dose. Here we examined the distinct contributions of these parameters to CD4 T-cell differentiation during infection. We found that high antigen affinity positively correlates with T helper (Th)1 differentiation at both high and low doses of antigen. In contrast, follicular helper T cell (TFH) effectors are generated after priming with high, intermediate, and low affinity ligand. Unexpectedly, memory T cells generated after priming with very low affinity antigen remain impaired in their ability to generate secondary Th1 effectors, despite being recalled with high affinity antigen. These data challenge the view that only strongly stimulated CD4 T cells are capable of differentiating into the TFH and memory T-cell compartments and reveal that differential strength of stimulation during primary T-cell activation imprints unique and long lasting T-cell differentiation programs.

  1. Synthetic polymer nanoparticles with antibody-like affinity for a hydrophilic peptide.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiyang; Hoshino, Yu; Rodriguez, Andy; Yoo, Hoseong; Shea, Kenneth J

    2010-01-26

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles with antibody-like affinity for a hydrophilic peptide have been prepared by inverse microemulsion polymerization. Peptide affinity was achieved in part by incorporating the target (imprint) peptide in the polymerization reaction mixture. Incorporation of the imprint peptide assists in the creation of complementary binding sites in the resulting polymer nanoparticle (NP). To orient the imprint peptide at the interface of the water and oil domains during polymerization, the peptide target was coupled with fatty acid chains of varying length. The peptide--NP binding affinities (ca. 90-900 nM) were quantitatively evaluated by a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The optimal chain length was established that created high affinity peptide binding sites on the surface of the nanoparticles. This method can be used for the preparation of nanosized synthetic polymers with antibody-like affinity for hydrophilic peptides and proteins ("plastic antibodies").

  2. A novel gigaporous GSH affinity medium for high-speed affinity chromatography of GST-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongdong; Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Juan; Li, Qiang; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-03-01

    Novel GSH-AP (phenoxyl agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene, Agap-co-PSt) microspheres were successfully prepared by introducing GSH ligand into hydrophilic AP microspheres pre-activated with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of GSH-AP medium were evaluated and compared with commercial GSH Sepharose FF (GSH-FF) medium. The macropores (100-500nm) of gigaporous PSt microspheres were well maintained after coating with agarose and functionalized with GSH ligand. Hydrodynamic experiments showed that GSH-AP column had less backpressure and plate height than those of GSH-FF column at high flow velocity, which was beneficial for its use in high-speed chromatography. The presence of flow-through pores in GSH-AP microspheres also accelerated the mass transfer rate of biomolecules induced by convective flow, leading to high protein resolution and high dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of glutathione S-transferase (GST) at high flow velocity. High purity of GST and GST-tagged recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) were obtained from crude extract with an acceptable recovery yield within 1.5min at a velocity up to 1400cm/h. GSH-AP medium is promising for high-speed affinity chromatography for the purification of GST and GST-tagged proteins.

  3. Fluorescence measurements of the binding of cations to high-affinity and low-affinity sites on ATP-G-actin.

    PubMed

    Carlier, M F; Pantaloni, D; Korn, E D

    1986-08-15

    The binding of cations to ATP-G-actin has been assessed by measuring the kinetics of the increase in fluorescence of N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine-labeled actin. Ca2+ and Mg2+ compete for a single high-affinity site on ATP-G-actin with KD values of 1.5-15 nM for Ca2+ and 0.1-1 microM for Mg2+, i.e. with affinities 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported (Frieden, C., Lieberman, D., and Gilbert, H. R. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 8991-8993). As proposed by Frieden (Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886), the Mg-actin complex undergoes a slow isomerization (Kis = 0.03-0.1) to a higher affinity state (K'D = 4-40 nM). The replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at this high-affinity site causes a slow 10% increase in fluorescence that is 90% complete in about 200 s at saturating concentrations of Mg2+. Independently, Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ bind to low-affinity sites (KD values of 0.15 mM for Ca2+ and Mg2+ and 10 mM for K+) which causes a rapid 6-8% increase in fluorescence (complete in less than 5 s). We propose that the activation step that converts Ca-G-actin to a polymerizable species upon addition of Mg2+ is the binding of Mg2+ to the low-affinity sites and not the replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at the high-affinity site.

  4. Collagen-bound von Willebrand factor has reduced affinity for factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Bendetowicz, A V; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E

    1999-04-30

    von Willebrand factor (vWf) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein that serves as a carrier for factor VIII in plasma. Although each vWf subunit displays a high affinity binding site for factor VIII in vitro, in plasma, only 2% of the vWf sites for factor VIII are occupied. We investigated whether interaction of plasma proteins with vWf or adhesion of vWf to collagen may alter the affinity or availability of factor VIII-binding sites on vWf. When vWf was immobilized on agarose-linked monoclonal antibody, factor VIII bound to vWf with high affinity, and neither the affinity nor binding site availability was influenced by the presence of 50% plasma. Therefore, plasma proteins do not alter the affinity or availability of factor VIII-binding sites. In contrast, when vWf was immobilized on agarose-linked collagen, its affinity for factor VIII was reduced 4-fold, with KD increasing from 0.9 to 3.8 nM. However, one factor VIII-binding site remained available on each vWf subunit. A comparable reduction in affinity for factor VIII was observed when vWf was a constituent of the subendothelial cell matrix and when it was bound to purified type VI collagen. In parallel with the decreased affinity for factor VIII, collagen-bound vWf displayed a 6-fold lower affinity for monoclonal antibody W5-6A, with an epitope composed of residues 78-96 within the factor VIII-binding motif of vWf. We conclude that collagen induces a conformational change within the factor VIII-binding motif of vWf that lowers the affinity for factor VIII.

  5. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  6. Template affinity role in CH shrink by DSA planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiron, R.; Gharbi, A.; Pimenta Barros, P.; Bouanani, S.; Lapeyre, C.; Bos, S.; Fouquet, A.; Hazart, J.; Chevalier, X.; Argoud, M.; Chamiot-Maitral, G.; Barnola, S.; Monget, C.; Farys, V.; Berard-Bergery, S.; Perraud, L.; Navarro, C.; Nicolet, C.; Hadziioannou, G.; Fleury, G.

    2015-03-01

    Density multiplication and contact shrinkage of patterned templates by directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) stands out as a promising alternative to overcome the limitations of conventional lithography. The main goal of this paper is to investigate the potential of DSA to address contact and via levels patterning with high resolution by performing either CD shrink or contact multiplication. Different DSA processes are benchmarked based on several success criteria such as: CD control, defectivity (missing holes) as well as placement control. More specifically, the methodology employed to measure DSA contact overlay and the impact of process parameters on placement error control is detailed. Using the 300mm pilot line available in LETI and Arkema's materials, our approach is based on the graphoepitaxy of PS-b-PMMA block copolymers. Our integration scheme, depicted in figure 1, is based on BCP self-assembly inside organic hard mask guiding patterns obtained using 193i nm lithography. The process is monitored at different steps: the generation of guiding patterns, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers and PMMA removal, and finally the transfer of PS patterns into the metallic under layer by plasma etching. Furthermore, several process flows are investigated, either by tuning different material related parameters such as the block copolymer intrinsic period or the interaction with the guiding pattern surface (sidewall and bottom-side affinity). The final lithographic performances are finely optimized as a function of the self-assembly process parameters such as the film thickness and bake (temperature and time). Finally, DSA performances as a function of guiding patterns density are investigated. Thus, for the best integration approach, defect-free isolated and dense patterns for both contact shrink and multiplication (doubling and more) have been achieved on the same processed wafer. These results show that contact hole shrink and

  7. A global/local affinity graph for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Xiaofang Wang; Yuxing Tang; Masnou, Simon; Liming Chen

    2015-04-01

    Construction of a reliable graph capturing perceptual grouping cues of an image is fundamental for graph-cut based image segmentation methods. In this paper, we propose a novel sparse global/local affinity graph over superpixels of an input image to capture both short- and long-range grouping cues, and thereby enabling perceptual grouping laws, including proximity, similarity, continuity, and to enter in action through a suitable graph-cut algorithm. Moreover, we also evaluate three major visual features, namely, color, texture, and shape, for their effectiveness in perceptual segmentation and propose a simple graph fusion scheme to implement some recent findings from psychophysics, which suggest combining these visual features with different emphases for perceptual grouping. In particular, an input image is first oversegmented into superpixels at different scales. We postulate a gravitation law based on empirical observations and divide superpixels adaptively into small-, medium-, and large-sized sets. Global grouping is achieved using medium-sized superpixels through a sparse representation of superpixels' features by solving a ℓ0-minimization problem, and thereby enabling continuity or propagation of local smoothness over long-range connections. Small- and large-sized superpixels are then used to achieve local smoothness through an adjacent graph in a given feature space, and thus implementing perceptual laws, for example, similarity and proximity. Finally, a bipartite graph is also introduced to enable propagation of grouping cues between superpixels of different scales. Extensive experiments are carried out on the Berkeley segmentation database in comparison with several state-of-the-art graph constructions. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach, which outperforms state-of-the-art graphs using four different objective criteria, namely, the probabilistic rand index, the variation of information, the global consistency error, and the

  8. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity.

  9. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  10. Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4: structure, function, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Naz, Farha; Anjum, Farah; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2013-11-01

    MAP/Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) belongs to the family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate the microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) causing their detachment from the microtubules thereby increasing microtubule dynamics and facilitating cell division, cell cycle control, cell polarity determination, cell shape alterations, etc. The MARK4 gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms, L and S that differ in their C-terminal region. These isoforms are differentially regulated in human tissues including central nervous system. MARK4L is a 752-residue-long polypeptide that is divided into three distinct domains: (1) protein kinase domain (59-314), (2) ubiquitin-associated domain (322-369), and (3) kinase-associated domain (703-752) plus 54 residues (649-703) involved in the proper folding and function of the enzyme. In addition, residues 65-73 are considered to be the ATP-binding domain and Lys88 is considered as ATP-binding site. Asp181 has been proposed to be the active site of MARK4 that is activated by phosphorylation of Thr214 side chain. The isoform MARK4S is highly expressed in the normal brain and is presumably involved in neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, the isoform MARK4L is upregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells and gliomas suggesting its involvement in cell cycle. Several biological functions are also associated with MARK4 including microtubule bundle formation, nervous system development, and positive regulation of programmed cell death. Therefore, MARK4 is considered as the most suitable target for structure-based rational drug design. Our sequence, structure- and function-based analysis should be helpful for better understanding of mechanisms of regulation of microtubule dynamics and MARK4 associated diseases.

  11. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Eng, W S; Robles, S; Vogt, R G; Wiśniewski, J R; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural 3H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated [125I]12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added 125I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of [125I]12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  12. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    Immunoglobulins (Ig), also referred to as antibodies, act as protective agents against pathogens trying to invade an organism. Human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), as the most prominent immunoglobulin presented in serum and other human fluids, has broad applications in fields like immunotherapy and clinical diagnostics. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A and Streptococcus Protein G are the most common affinity ligands for IgG purifaction and detection. However, drawbacks associated with these two protein ligands have motivated searches for alternative affinity ligands. The hexamer peptide ligand HWRGWV identified from a one-bead-one-peptide combinatorial library synthesized on chromatography resins has demonstrated high affinity and specificity to the Fc fragment of hIgG. A chromatography resin with HWRGWV can purify human IgG (hIgG) from complete minimum essential medium (cMEM) with purities and yields as high as 95%, which are comparable to using Protein A as affinity ligand (4). As a short peptide ligand, HWRGWV can be produced at relatively low costs under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions, it is highly robust, less immunogenic and allows for milder elution conditions for the bound antibody (3, 5). Although this short peptide ligand has exhibited promising properties for IgG capture and purification, limited information is available on the intrinsic mechanisms of affinity interaction between the peptide ligand and target protein. In this study, the affinity interaction between hIgG and peptide ligand immobilized on solid surfaces was studied by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Compared with previous methods employed for the peptide characterization, QCM and SPR can provide direct measurements of equilibrium adsorption isotherms and rates of adsorption, allowing a complete kinetic and thermodynamics analyses of the ligand-target interactions. New methods were developed to modify gold and silica surfaces of QCM and SPR

  13. Enhanced bacterial affinity of PVDF membrane: its application as improved sea water sampling tool for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sweta Binod; Sharnagat, Preeti; Manna, Paramita; Bhattacharya, Amit; Haldar, Soumya

    2017-02-01

    Isolation of diversified bacteria from seawater is a major challenge in the field of environmental microbiology. In the present study, an attempt has been made to select specific membrane with improved property of attaching diversified bacteria. Initially, different concentrations (15, 18, and 20% W/W) of polysulfone (PSF) were used to check their affinity for the attachment of selected gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Among these, 20% W/W PSF showed maximum attachment. Therefore, membrane prepared with other materials such as polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polyether sulfone (PES) were used with the same concentration (20% W/W) to check their improved bacterial attachment property. Comparative study of bacterial attachment on three different membranes revealed that PVDF possessed the highest affinity towards both the groups of bacteria. This property was confirmed by different analytical methods viz. contact angle, atomic force microscopy, zeta potential, and flux study and further validated with seawater samples collected from seven sites of western coast and Lakshadweep island of India, using Biolog EcoPlate™. All the samples showed that bacterial richness and diversity was high in PVDF membrane in comparison to surrounding seawater samples. Interestingly, affinity for more diversified bacteria was reported to be higher in water sample with less turbidity and low bacteria load. This finding can facilitate the development of PVDF (20% W/W) membrane as a simple, cheap, and less labor intensive environmental sampling tool for the isolation of diversified bacteria from seawater sample wih different physiochemical properties. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  14. A monolithic silicon optoelectronic transducer as a real-time affinity biosensor.

    PubMed

    Misiakos, Konstantinos; Kakabakos, Sotirios E; Petrou, Panagiota S; Ruf, Hans H

    2004-03-01

    An optical real-time affinity biosensor, which is based on a monolithic silicon optoelectronic transducer and a microfluidic module, is described. The transducer monolithically integrates silicon avalanche diodes as light sources, silicon nitride optical fibers, and p/n junction detectors and efficiently intercouples these elements through a self-alignment technique. The transducer surface is hydrophilized by oxygen plasma treatment, silanized with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and bioactivated through adsorption of the biomolecular probes. The use of a microfluidic module allows real-time monitoring of the binding reaction of the gold nanoparticle-labeled analytes with the immobilized probes. Their binding within the evanescent field at the surface of the optical fiber causes attenuated total reflection of the waveguided modes and reduction of the detector photocurrent. The biotin-streptavidin model assay was used for the evaluation of the analytical potentials of the device developed. Detection limits of 3.8 and 13 pM in terms of gold nanoparticle-labeled streptavidin were achieved for continuous- and stopped-flow assay modes, respectively. The detection sensitivity was improved by silver plating of the immobilized gold nanoparticles, and a detection limit of 20 fM was obtained after 20-min of silver plating. In addition, two different analytes, streptavidin and anti-mouse IgG, were simultaneously assayed on the same chip demonstrating the multianalyte potential of the sensor developed.

  15. [Ecological affinity and current distribution of primates (Cebidae) in Campeche, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Navarro Fernández, Eloísa; Pozo de la Tijera, Carmen; Escobedo Cabrera, Enrique

    2003-06-01

    We carried out surveys realized field work from March to September 2000 to get the current distribution of Cebids in the state of Campeche, Mexico. Based on interviews and direct observations. We defined the distribution of Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis and Alouatta pigra and we documented the first time localities where Allouata palliata is found in the state. We made distributional maps of each species using vegetation overlays from Inventario Nacional Forestal (Inv For) and each point documented during fieldwork. We presented the distribution of species according to confiability of the verified or expected data. Using the attributes table of Inv For, we calculated the areas of distribution which were 22,735 km2 for Alouatta sp. and 18,501 km2 for A. g. yucatanensis. We also presented the area occupied by each species according to vegetation types and the relative proportion of these vegetation types in the state. We confirmed the ability of Alouatta sp. to survive in disturbed environments produced by habitat fragmentation, and the affinity of A. g. yucatanesis to well preserved habitats.

  16. Accurate Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Acceptor Molecules: A Benchmark of GW Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Noa; Knight, Joseph; Wang, Xiaopeng; Gallandi, Lukas; Dolgounitcheva, Olga; Ren, Xinguo; Ortiz, Vincent; Rinke, Patrick; Korzdorfer, Thomas

    The performance of different GW methods is assessed for a set of 24 organic acceptors. Errors are evaluated with respect to coupled cluster singles, doubles, perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] reference data for the vertical ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs), extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Additional comparisons are made to experimental data, where available. We consider fully self-consistent GW (scGW), partial self-consistency in the Green's function (scGW0) , non-self-consistent G0W0 based on several mean-field starting points, and a ``beyond GW'' second order screened exchange (SOSEX) correction to G0W0. The best performers overall are G0W0 + SOSEX and G0W0 based on an IP-tuned long range corrected hybrid functional with the former being more accurate for EAs and the latter for IPs. Both provide a balanced treatment of localized vs. delocalized states and valence spectra in good agreement with photoemission spectroscopy (PES) experiments.

  17. Selectivity and affinity determinants for ligand binding to the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Knut; McKinney, Jeffrey Alan; Haavik, Jan; Martínez, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxylation of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan is carried out by a family of non-heme iron and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) dependent enzymes, i.e. the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAHs). The reactions catalyzed by these enzymes are important for biomedicine and their mutant forms in humans are associated with phenylketonuria (phenylalanine hydroxylase), Parkinson's disease and DOPA-responsive dystonia (tyrosine hydroxylase), and possibly neuropsychiatric and gastrointestinal disorders (tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and 2). We attempt to rationalize current knowledge about substrate and inhibitor specificity based on the three-dimensional structures of the enzymes and their complexes with substrates, cofactors and inhibitors. In addition, further insights on the selectivity and affinity determinants for ligand binding in the AAHs were obtained from molecular interaction field (MIF) analysis. We applied this computational structural approach to a rational analysis of structural differences at the active sites of the enzymes, a strategy that can help in the design of novel selective ligands for each AAH.

  18. Traces of Intertwiners for Quantum Affine sl_2 and Felder-Varchenko Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi

    2016-10-01

    We show that the traces of {U_q({widehat{sl}_2)}-intertwiners of [ESV02] valued in the three-dimensional evaluation representation converge in a certain region of parameters and give a representation-theoretic construction of Felder-Varchenko's hypergeometric solutions to the q-KZB heat equation given in [FV02]. This gives the first proof that such a trace function converges and resolves the first case of the Etingof-Varchenko conjecture of [EV00]. As applications, we prove a symmetry property for traces of intertwiners and prove Felder-Varchenko's conjecture in [FV04] that their elliptic Macdonald polynomials are related to the affine Macdonald polynomials defined as traces over irreducible integrable {U_q({widehat{sl}_2)}-modules in [EK95]. In the trigonometric and classical limits, we recover results of [EK94,EV00]. Our method relies on an interplay between the method of coherent states applied to the free field realization of the q-Wakimoto module of [Mat94], convergence properties given by the theta hypergeometric integrals of [FV02], and rationality properties originating from the representation-theoretic definition of the trace function.

  19. Near-orthogonal and adaptive affine lifting scheme on vector-valued signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwa, Tadeusz; Voisin, Yvon; Diou, Alain

    2004-02-01

    Lifting Scheme is actually a widely used second generation multi-resolution technique in image and video processing field. It permits to easily create fast, reversible, separable or no, not necessarily linear, multi-resolution analysis for sound, image, video or even 3D graphics. An interesting feature of lifting scheme is the ability to build adaptive transforms, more easily than with other decompositions. Many works have already be done in this subject, especially in lossless or near-lossless compression framework where there is no orthogonal constraint. However, some applications as lossy compression or de-noising requires well conditioned transforms. Indeed, this is due to the use of shrinking or quantization which has not controlled propagation through inverse transform. Authors have recently presented a technique permitting to determine some lifting scheme filters in order to obtain a high level of adaptivity combined with near-orthogonal properties, useful for most of these applications. Naturly coming into the adaptive near orthogonal framework, the point of interest of this article is affine algebraic filters. Color images and video have especially been studied through point of view of compression. In this way, the treatment of the vector aspect of signal, not only by processing channels independently, becomes the focus point of the article.

  20. 2d Affine XY-Spin Model/4d Gauge Theory Duality and Deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /San Francisco State U.

    2012-08-16

    We introduce a duality between two-dimensional XY-spin models with symmetry-breaking perturbations and certain four-dimensional SU(2) and SU(2) = Z{sub 2} gauge theories, compactified on a small spatial circle R{sup 1,2} x S{sup 1}, and considered at temperatures near the deconfinement transition. In a Euclidean set up, the theory is defined on R{sup 2} x T{sup 2}. Similarly, thermal gauge theories of higher rank are dual to new families of 'affine' XY-spin models with perturbations. For rank two, these are related to models used to describe the melting of a 2d crystal with a triangular lattice. The connection is made through a multi-component electric-magnetic Coulomb gas representation for both systems. Perturbations in the spin system map to topological defects in the gauge theory, such as monopole-instantons or magnetic bions, and the vortices in the spin system map to the electrically charged W-bosons in field theory (or vice versa, depending on the duality frame). The duality permits one to use the two-dimensional technology of spin systems to study the thermal deconfinement and discrete chiral transitions in four-dimensional SU(N{sub c}) gauge theories with n{sub f} {ge} 1 adjoint Weyl fermions.

  1. Physics-based enzyme design: predicting binding affinity and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Pearlman, David A; Sherman, Woody

    2014-12-01

    Computational enzyme design is an emerging field that has yielded promising success stories, but where numerous challenges remain. Accurate methods to rapidly evaluate possible enzyme design variants could provide significant value when combined with experimental efforts by reducing the number of variants needed to be synthesized and speeding the time to reach the desired endpoint of the design. To that end, extending our computational methods to model the fundamental physical-chemical principles that regulate activity in a protocol that is automated and accessible to a broad population of enzyme design researchers is essential. Here, we apply a physics-based implicit solvent MM-GBSA scoring approach to enzyme design and benchmark the computational predictions against experimentally determined activities. Specifically, we evaluate the ability of MM-GBSA to predict changes in affinity for a steroid binder protein, catalytic turnover for a Kemp eliminase, and catalytic activity for α-Gliadin peptidase variants. Using the enzyme design framework developed here, we accurately rank the most experimentally active enzyme variants, suggesting that this approach could provide enrichment of active variants in real-world enzyme design applications.

  2. Diagnostics Strategies with Electrochemical Affinity Biosensors Using Carbon Nanomaterials as Electrode Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Pingarrón, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis is often the key to successful patient treatment and survival. The identification of various disease signaling biomarkers which reliably reflect normal and disease states in humans in biological fluids explain the burgeoning research field in developing new methodologies able to determine the target biomarkers in complex biological samples with the required sensitivity and selectivity and in a simple and rapid way. The unique advantages offered by electrochemical sensors together with the availability of high affinity and specific bioreceptors and their great capabilities in terms of sensitivity and stability imparted by nanostructuring the electrode surface with different carbon nanomaterials have led to the development of new electrochemical biosensing strategies that have flourished as interesting alternatives to conventional methodologies for clinical diagnostics. This paper briefly reviews the advantages of using carbon nanostructures and their hybrid nanocomposites as electrode modifiers to construct efficient electrochemical sensing platforms for diagnosis. The review provides an updated overview of some selected examples involving attractive amplification and biosensing approaches which have been applied to the determination of relevant genetic and protein diagnostics biomarkers. PMID:28035946

  3. Magnetoencephalography source localization using the source affine image reconstruction (SAFFIRE) algorithm.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Mihai; Blunt, Shannon D; Chan, Tszping

    2010-07-01

    Nonparametric iterative algorithms have been previously proposed to achieve high-resolution, sparse solutions to the bioelectromagnetic inverse problem applicable to multichannel magnetoencephalography and EEG recordings. Using a mmse estimation framework, we propose a new algorithm of this type denoted as source affine image reconstruction (SAFFIRE) aiming to reduce the vulnerability to initialization bias, augment robustness to noise, and decrease sensitivity to the choice of regularization. The proposed approach operates in a normalized lead-field space and employs an initial estimate based on matched filtering to combat the potential biasing effect of previously proposed initialization methods. SAFFIRE minimizes difficulties associated with the selection of the most appropriate regularization parameter by using two separate loading terms: a fixed noise-dependent term that can be directly estimated from the data and arises naturally from the mmse formulation, and an adaptive term (adjusted according to the update of the source estimate) that accounts for uncertainties of the forward model in real-experimental applications. We also show that a noncoherent integration scheme can be used within the SAFFIRE algorithm structure to further enhance the reconstruction accuracy and improve robustness to noise.

  4. Functional traits and ecological affinities of riparian plants along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmquist, Emily C.; Ralston, Barbara; Sarr. Daniel,; Merritt, David; Shafroth, Patrick B; Scott, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Trait-based approaches to vegetation analyses are becoming more prevalent in studies of riparian vegetation dynamics, including responses to flow regulation, groundwater pumping, and climate change. These analyses require species trait data compiled from the literature and floras or original field measurements. Gathering such data makes trait-based research time intensive at best and impracticable in some cases. To support trait-based analysis of vegetation along the Colorado River through Grand Canyon, a data set of 20 biological traits and ecological affinities for 179 species occurring in that study area was compiled. This diverse flora shares species with many riparian areas in the western USA and includes species that occur across a wide moisture gradient. Data were compiled from published scientific papers, unpublished reports, plant fact sheets, existing trait databases, regional floras, and plant guides. Data for ordinal environmental tolerances were more readily available than were quantitative traits. More publicly available data are needed for traits of both common and rare southwestern U.S. plant species to facilitate comprehensive, trait-based research. The trait data set is free to use and can be downloaded from ScienceBase: https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/58af41dee4b01ccd54f9f2ff and https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7QV3JN1

  5. The Dynamics Behind the Affinity: Controlling Heme-Gas Affinity via Geminate Recombination and Heme Propionate Conformation in the NO Carrier Cytochrome c'.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Colin R; Petrova, Olga N; Lamarre, Isabelle; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Rappaport, Fabrice; Negrerie, Michel

    2016-11-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) sensors are heme proteins which may also bind CO and O2. Control of heme-gas affinity and their discrimination are achieved by the structural properties and reactivity of the heme and its distal and proximal environments, leading to several energy barriers. In the bacterial NO sensor cytochrome c' from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (AXCP), the single Leu16Ala distal mutation boosts the affinity for gas ligands by a remarkable 10(6)-10(8)-fold, transforming AXCP from one of the lowest affinity gas binding proteins to one of the highest. Here, we report the dynamics of diatomics after photodissociation from wild type and L16A-AXCP over 12 orders of magnitude in time. For the L16A variant, the picosecond geminate rebinding of both CO and NO appears with an unprecedented 100% yield, and no exit of these ligands from protein to solvent could be observed. Molecular dynamic simulations saliently demonstrate that dissociated CO stays within 4 Å from Fe(2+), in contrast to wild-type AXCP. The L16A mutation confers a heme propionate conformation and docking site which traps the diatomics, maximizing the probability of recombination and directly explaining the ultrahigh affinities for CO, NO, and O2. Overall, our results point to a novel mechanism for modulating heme-gas affinities in proteins.

  6. Affinity purification using recombinant PXR as a tool to characterize environmental ligands.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Sonia; Bellet, Virginie; Grimaldi, Marina; Riu, Anne; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Cavaillès, Vincent; Fenet, Hélène; Balaguer, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Many environmental endocrine disrupting compounds act as ligands for nuclear receptors. The human pregnane X receptor (hPXR), for instance, is activated by a variety of environmental ligands such as steroids, pharmaceutical drugs, pesticides, alkylphenols, polychlorinated biphenyls and polybromo diethylethers. Some of us have previously reported the occurrence of hPXR ligands in environmental samples but failed to identify them. The aim of this study was to test whether a PXR-affinity column, in which recombinant hPXR was immobilized on solid support, could help the purification of these chemicals. Using PXR ligands of different affinity (10 nM < EC50 < 10 μM), we demonstrated that the PXR-affinity preferentially column captured ligands with medium to high affinities (EC50 < 1 μM). Furthermore, by using the PXR-affinity column to analyze an environmental sample containing ERα, AhR, AR, and PXR activities, we show that (i) half of the PXR activity of the sample was due to compounds with medium to high affinity for PXR and (ii) PXR shared ligands with ERα, AR, and AhR. These findings demonstrate that the newly developed PXR-affinity column coupled to reporter cell lines represents a valuable tool for the characterization of the nature of PXR active compounds and should therefore guide and facilitate their further analysis.

  7. Low-affinity CD4+ T cells are major responders in the primary immune response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Martinez, Hunter A.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust primary immune response has been correlated with the precursor number of antigen-specific T cells, as identified using peptide MHCII tetramers. However, these tetramers identify only the highest-affinity T cells. Here we show the entire CD4+ T-cell repertoire, inclusive of low-affinity T cells missed by tetramers, using a T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling reporter and micropipette assay to quantify naive precursors and expanded populations. In vivo limiting dilution assays reveal hundreds more precursor T cells than previously thought, with higher-affinity tetramer-positive T cells, comprising only 5–30% of the total antigen-specific naive repertoire. Lower-affinity T cells maintain their predominance as the primary immune response progresses, with no enhancement of survival of T cells with high-affinity TCRs. These findings demonstrate that affinity for antigen does not control CD4+ T-cell entry into the primary immune response, as a diverse range in affinity is maintained from precursor through peak of T-cell expansion. PMID:27976744

  8. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  9. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  10. Low-affinity CD4+ T cells are major responders in the primary immune response.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ryan J; Andargachew, Rakieb; Martinez, Hunter A; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-12-15

    A robust primary immune response has been correlated with the precursor number of antigen-specific T cells, as identified using peptide MHCII tetramers. However, these tetramers identify only the highest-affinity T cells. Here we show the entire CD4+ T-cell repertoire, inclusive of low-affinity T cells missed by tetramers, using a T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling reporter and micropipette assay to quantify naive precursors and expanded populations. In vivo limiting dilution assays reveal hundreds more precursor T cells than previously thought, with higher-affinity tetramer-positive T cells, comprising only 5-30% of the total antigen-specific naive repertoire. Lower-affinity T cells maintain their predominance as the primary immune response progresses, with no enhancement of survival of T cells with high-affinity TCRs. These findings demonstrate that affinity for antigen does not control CD4+ T-cell entry into the primary immune response, as a diverse range in affinity is maintained from precursor through peak of T-cell expansion.

  11. Limits for antibody affinity maturation and repertoire diversification in hypervaccinated humans.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tine Rugh; Jensen, Allan; Haurum, John S; Andersen, Peter S

    2011-10-15

    The immune system is known to generate a diverse panel of high-affinity Abs by adaptively improving the recognition of pathogens during ongoing immune responses. In this study, we report the biological limits for Ag-driven affinity maturation and repertoire diversification by analyzing Ab repertoires in two adult volunteers after each of three consecutive booster vaccinations with tetanus toxoid. Maturation of on-rates and off-rates occurred independently, indicating a kinetically controlled affinity maturation process. The third vaccination induced no significant changes in the distribution of somatic mutations and binding rate constants implying that the limits for affinity maturation and repertoire diversification had been reached. These fully matured Ab repertoires remained similar in size, genetically diverse, and dynamic. Somatic mutations and kinetic rate constants showed normal and log-normal distribution profiles, respectively. Mean values can therefore be considered as biological constants defining the observed boundaries. At physiological temperature, affinity maturation peaked at k(on) = 1.6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and k(off) = 1.7 × 10(-4) s(-1) leading to a maximum mean affinity of K(D) = 1.0 × 10(-9) M. At ambient temperature, the average affinity increased to K(D) = 3.4 × 10(-10) M mainly due to slower off-rates. This experimentally determined set of constants can be used as a benchmark for analysis of the maturation level of human Abs and Ab responses.

  12. A Tulczyjew triple for classical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Katarzyna

    2012-04-01

    The geometrical structure known as the Tulczyjew triple has proved to be very useful in describing mechanical systems, even those with singular Lagrangians or subject to constraints. Starting from basic concepts of the variational calculus, we construct the Tulczyjew triple for first-order field theory. The important feature of our approach is that we do not postulate ad hoc the ingredients of the theory, but obtain them as unavoidable consequences of the variational calculus. This picture of field theory is covariant and complete, containing not only the Lagrangian formalism and Euler-Lagrange equations but also the phase space, the phase dynamics and the Hamiltonian formalism. Since the configuration space turns out to be an affine bundle, we have to use affine geometry, in particular the notion of the affine duality. In our formulation, the two maps α and β which constitute the Tulczyjew triple are morphisms of double structures of affine-vector bundles. We also discuss the Legendre transformation, i.e. the transition between the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian formulation of the first-order field theory.

  13. Delimiting affinity zones as a basis for air pollution mapping in Europe.

    PubMed

    Vienneau, Danielle; Briggs, David J

    2013-01-01

    Affinity zones are defined as areas within which air quality displays consistent behaviour over space and time. Constructed using multivariate statistical techniques and physiographic and landscape variables reflecting underlying sources and spatial patterns of air pollution, affinity zones provide a spatial structure suited to exploring the representativity of monitoring networks and as a basis for air pollution mapping and exposure assessment. The affinity zone method is demonstrated using European air pollution monitoring sites, and environmental data compiled within a 1 km GIS. Organised into three main stages, this method involves: (i) indicator selection, using principal components analysis, (ii) zonation by cluster analysis to classify areas into distinct types, and (iii) site allocation, to confirm similarity within affinity zones in terms of monitored air pollution concentrations. Ten interpretable and coherent air pollution affinity zones were constructed for Europe, including two rural zones and eight related to different types of densely populated and built up environments. Concentrations between affinity zones differed significantly for NO(2) background and traffic sites and for PM(10) traffic sites only. Not all zones, however, were found to be sufficiently represented by monitoring sites, illustrating the importance of affinity zones in identifying deficiencies in monitoring networks. Spatial modelling within affinity zones is also demonstrated, showing that simple kriging of background NO(2) concentrations within zones (compared to kriging ignoring zones) produced a ca. 22% reduction in errors and increased R(2) by 0.25 at reserved validation monitoring sites. The affinity zone method developed here is a robust, statistical approach that can be used for evaluating the representativity of routine monitoring networks often used in continental level environmental and health risk assessments.

  14. Cadmium inhibits the induction of high-affinity nitrate uptake in maize (Zea mays L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Rizzardo, Cecilia; Tomasi, Nicola; Monte, Rossella; Varanini, Zeno; Nocito, Fabio F; Cesco, Stefano; Pinton, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) detoxification involves glutathione and phytochelatins biosynthesis: the higher need of nitrogen should require increased nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake and metabolism. We investigated inducible high-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake across the plasma membrane (PM) in maize seedlings roots upon short exposure (10 min to 24 h) to low Cd concentrations (0, 1 or 10 μM): the activity and gene transcript abundance of high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters, NO(3)(-) reductases and PM H(+)-ATPases were analyzed. Exposure to 1 mM NO(3)(-) led to a peak in high-affinity (0.2 mM) NO(3)(-) uptake rate (induction), which was markedly lowered in Cd-treated roots. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity was also strongly limited, while internal NO(3)(-) accumulation and NO(3)(-) reductase activity in extracts of Cd treated roots were only slightly lowered. Kinetics of high- and low-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake showed that Cd rapidly (10 min) blocked the inducible high-affinity transport system; the constitutive high-affinity transport system appeared not vulnerable to Cd and the low-affinity transport system appeared to be less affected and only after a prolonged exposure (12 h). Cd-treatment also modified transcript levels of genes encoding high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters (ZmNTR2.1, ZmNRT2.2), PM H(+)-ATPases (ZmMHA3, ZmMHA4) and NO(3)(-) reductases (ZmNR1, ZmNADH:NR). Despite an expectable increase in NO(3)(-) demand, a negative effect of Cd on NO(3)(-) nutrition is reported. Cd effect results in alterations at the physiological and transcriptional levels of NO(3)(-) uptake from the external solution and it is particularly severe on the inducible high-affinity anion transport system. Furthermore, Cd would limit the capacity of the plant to respond to changes in NO(3) (-) availability.

  15. Methyl cation affinities of neutral and anionic maingroup-element hydrides: trends across the periodic table and correlation with proton affinities.

    PubMed

    Mulder, R Joshua; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2010-07-22

    We have computed the methyl cation affinities in the gas phase of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using ZORA-relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide the methyl cation affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of all anionic (XH(n-1)(-)) and neutral bases (XH(n)) constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-17 and the noble gases (i.e., group 18) along the periods 2-6. The cation affinity of the bases decreases from H(+) to CH(3)(+). To understand this trend, we have carried out quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). Quantitative correlations are established between the MCA and PA values.

  16. Indium phosphide negative electron affinity photocathodes: Surface cleaning and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun

    InP(100) is a very important semi-conductor for many applications. When activated by Cs and oxygen, the InP surface achieves the state of Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) making the Cs+O/InP system a very efficient electron source. Despite many years of study, the chemical cleaning and activation of InP are still not well understood. In our work, we have established an understanding of the basic physics and chemistry for the chemical cleaning and activation of the InP(100) surface. Synchrotron Radiation Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the main technique used in this study because of its high surface sensitivity and ability to identify chemical species present on the surface at each stage of our process. A clean, stoichiometric InP(100) surface is crucial for obtaining high performance of NEA photocathodes. Therefore, the first part of our study focused on the chemical cleaning of InP(100). We found that hydrogen peroxide based solutions alone, originally developed to clean GaAs(100) surfaces and widely used for InP(100), do not result in clean InP(I00) surfaces because oxide is left on the surface. A second cleaning step, which uses acid solutions like HCl or H2SO4, can remove all the oxide and leave a 0.4 ML protective layer of elemental phosphorous on the surface. The elemental phosphorous can be removed by annealing at 330°C and a clean InP(100) surface can be obtained. Cs deposition on InP(100) surface shows clear charge transfer from the Cs ad-atoms to the substrate. When the Cs/InP(100) surface is dosed with oxygen, the charge transfer from the Cs to substrate is reduced and substrate is oxidized. The activation of InP as a NEA photocathode is carried out by an alternating series of steps consisting of Cs deposition and Cs+O co-deposition. Two types of oxygen are found after activation. The first is dissociated oxygen and the other is a di-oxygen species (peroxide or superoxide). The decay of quantum-yield with time and with annealing is studied and changes in

  17. A novel protein complex identification algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE).

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; He, Tingting; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Yan

    2014-06-01

    A novel algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE) for mining overlapping functional modules in protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. In this approach, the value of protein connected affinity which is inferred from protein complexes is interpreted as the reliability and possibility of interaction. The protein interaction network is constructed as a weighted graph, and the weight is dependent on the connected affinity coefficient. The experimental results of our CACE in two test data sets show that the CACE can detect the functional modules much more effectively and accurately when compared with other state-of-art algorithms CPM and IPC-MCE.

  18. Combining Structural Modeling with Ensemble Machine Learning to Accurately Predict Protein Fold Stability and Binding Affinity Effects upon Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Lopez, Sebastian; Kim, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing have led to a rapid accumulation of mutations, some of which are associated with diseases. However, to draw mechanistic conclusions, a biochemical understanding of these mutations is necessary. For coding mutations, accurate prediction of significant changes in either the stability of proteins or their affinity to their binding partners is required. Traditional methods have used semi-empirical force fields, while newer methods employ machine learning of sequence and structural features. Here, we show how combining both of these approaches leads to a marked boost in accuracy. We introduce ELASPIC, a novel ensemble machine learning approach that is able to predict stability effects upon mutation in both, domain cores and domain-domain interfaces. We combine semi-empirical energy terms, sequence conservation, and a wide variety of molecular details with a Stochastic Gradient Boosting of Decision Trees (SGB-DT) algorithm. The accuracy of our predictions surpasses existing methods by a considerable margin, achieving correlation coefficients of 0.77 for stability, and 0.75 for affinity predictions. Notably, we integrated homology modeling to enable proteome-wide prediction and show that accurate prediction on modeled structures is possible. Lastly, ELASPIC showed significant differences between various types of disease-associated mutations, as well as between disease and common neutral mutations. Unlike pure sequence-based prediction methods that try to predict phenotypic effects of mutations, our predictions unravel the molecular details governing the protein instability, and help us better understand the molecular causes of diseases. PMID:25243403

  19. Interaction between DNA and Drugs Having Protonable Basic Groups: Characterization through Affinity Constants, Drug Release Kinetics, and Conformational Changes.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Liliana P; Baena, Yolima; Manzo, Rubén H

    2017-01-04

    This paper reports the in vitro characterization of the interaction between the phosphate groups of DNA and the protonated species of drugs with basic groups through the determination of the affinity constants, the reversibility of the interaction, and the effect on the secondary structure of the macromolecule. Affinity constants of the counterionic condensation DNA-drug were in the order of 10⁶. The negative electrokinetic potential of DNA decreased with the increase of the proportion of loading drugs. The drugs were slowly released from the DNA-drug complexes and had release kinetics consistent with the high degree of counterionic condensation. The circular dichroism profile of DNA was not modified by complexation with atenolol, lidocaine, or timolol, but was significantly altered by the more lipophilic drugs benzydamine and propranolol, revealing modifications in the secondary structure of the DNA. The in vitro characterization of such interactions provides a physicochemical basis that would contribute to identify the effects of this kind of drugs in cellular cultures, as well as side effects observed under their clinical use. Moreover, this methodology could also be projected to the fields of intracellular DNA transfection and the use of DNA as a carrier of active drugs.

  20. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  1. The fourth dimension in immunological space: how the struggle for nutrients selects high-affinity lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wensveen, Felix M; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Eldering, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lymphocyte activation via the antigen receptor is associated with radical shifts in metabolism and changes in requirements for nutrients and cytokines. Concomitantly, drastic changes occur in the expression of pro-and anti-apoptotic proteins that alter the sensitivity of lymphocytes to limiting concentrations of key survival factors. Antigen affinity is a primary determinant for the capacity of activated lymphocytes to access these vital resources. The shift in metabolic needs and the variable access to key survival factors is used by the immune system to eliminate activated low-affinity cells and to generate an optimal high-affinity response. In this review, we focus on the control of apoptosis regulators in activated lymphocytes by nutrients, cytokines, and costimulation. We propose that the struggle among individual clones that leads to the formation of high-affinity effector cell populations is in effect an 'invisible' fourth signal required for effective immune responses.

  2. Salmonella Infection Drives Promiscuous B Cell Activation Followed by Extrafollicular Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Di Niro, Roberto; Lee, Seung-Joo; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Elsner, Rebecca A; Trivedi, Nikita; Bannock, Jason M; Gupta, Namita T; Kleinstein, Steven H; Vigneault, Francois; Gilbert, Tamara J; Meffre, Eric; McSorley, Stephen J; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2015-07-21

    The B cell response to Salmonella typhimurium (STm) occurs massively at extrafollicular sites, without notable germinal centers (GCs). Little is known in terms of its specificity. To expand the knowledge of antigen targets, we screened plasmablast (PB)-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Salmonella specificity, using ELISA, flow cytometry, and antigen microarray. Only a small fraction (0.5%-2%) of the response appeared to be Salmonella-specific. Yet, infection of mice with limited B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires impaired the response, suggesting that BCR specificity was important. We showed, using laser microdissection, that somatic hypermutation (SHM) occurred efficiently at extrafollicular sites leading to affinity maturation that in turn led to detectable STm Ag-binding. These results suggest a revised vision of how clonal selection and affinity maturation operate in response to Salmonella. Clonal selection initially is promiscuous, activating cells with virtually undetectable affinity, yet SHM and selection occur during the extrafollicular response yielding higher affinity, detectable antibodies.

  3. Affinity chromatography approaches to overcome the challenges of purifying plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fani; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Queiroz, João A

    2008-09-01

    The diversity of biomolecules present in plasmid DNA (pDNA)-containing extracts and the structural and chemical similarities between pDNA and impurities are some of the main challenges of improving or establishing novel purification procedures. In view of the unequalled specificity of affinity purification, this technique has recently begun to be applied in downstream processing of plasmids. This paper discusses the progress and importance of affinity chromatography (AC) for the purification of pDNA-based therapeutic products. Several affinity approaches have already been successfully developed for a variety of applications, and we will focus here on highlighting their possible contributions to the pDNA purification challenge. Diverse affinity applications and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as the most significant results and improvements in the challenging task of purifying plasmids.

  4. Quantum image encryption based on generalized affine transform and logistic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hao-Ran; Tao, Xiang-Yang; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2016-07-01

    Quantum circuits of the generalized affine transform are devised based on the novel enhanced quantum representation of digital images. A novel quantum image encryption algorithm combining the generalized affine transform with logistic map is suggested. The gray-level information of the quantum image is encrypted by the XOR operation with a key generator controlled by the logistic map, while the position information of the quantum image is encoded by the generalized affine transform. The encryption keys include the independent control parameters used in the generalized affine transform and the logistic map. Thus, the key space is large enough to frustrate the possible brute-force attack. Numerical simulations and analyses indicate that the proposed algorithm is realizable, robust and has a better performance than its classical counterpart in terms of computational complexity.

  5. Mathematical modeling of the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin

    2012-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in E. coli. The model is a system of three ordinary differential equations and takes the dynamics of mRNAs for the araE and araFGH proteins and the internal arabinose into account. Special attention was paid to estimate the model parameters from the literature. Our analysis and simulations suggest that the high affinity transport system helps the low affinity transport system to respond to high concentration of extracellular arabinose faster, whereas the high affinity transport system responds to a small amount of extracellular arabinose. Steady state analysis of the model also predicts that there is a regime for the extracellular concentration of arabinose where the arabinose system can show bistable behavior.

  6. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay.

    PubMed

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this end, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to 1,000 domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from human papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human 'PDZome'. We obtained sharply sequence-dependent binding profiles that quantitatively describe the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes.

  7. Generation of an affinity column for antibody purification by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2003-11-01

    Coupling an antigenic peptide to a solid support is a crucial step in the affinity purification of a peptide-specific antibody. Conventional methods for generating reactive agarose, cellulose or other matrices for peptide conjugation are laborious and can result in a significant amount of chemical waste. In this report, we present a novel method for the facile production of a peptide affinity column by employing intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) in conjunction with chitin affinity chromatography. A reactive thioester was generated at the C-terminal of the chitin binding domain (CBD) from the chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-2 by thiol-induced cleavage of the peptide bond between the CBD and a modified intein. Peptide epitopes possessing an N-terminal cysteine were ligated to the chitin bound CBD tag. We demonstrate that the resulting peptide columns permit the highly specific and efficient affinity purification of antibodies from animal sera.

  8. The Binding of Biotin to Sepharose-Avidin Column: Demonstration of the Affinity Chromatography Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, A. D.; Landman, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a biochemistry experiment that illustrates the methodology of affinity chromatography by attaching avidin, a glycoprotein in egg white, to a Sepharose matrix in order to bind biotin-containing proteins. (MLH)

  9. Dual-tagging system for the affinity purification of mammalian protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Huang, Ying; Wu, Jun; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Although affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provides a powerful tool to study protein-protein interactions, this strategy has encountered numerous difficulties when adapted to mammalian cells. Here we describe a Gateway{reg_sign}-compatible dual-tag affinity purification system that integrates regulatable expression, tetracysteine motifs, and various combinations of affinity tags to facilitate the cloning, detection, and purification of bait proteins and their interacting partners. Utilizing the human telomere binding protein TRF2 as a benchmark, we demonstrate bait protein recoveries upwards of approximately 16% from as little as 1-7 x 10{sup 7} cells and successfully identify known TRF2 interacting proteins, suggesting that our dual-tag affinity purification approach is a capable new tool for expanding the capacity to explore mammalian proteomic networks.

  10. [Reliability and validity of the Japanese revised version of the television affinity scale].

    PubMed

    Erikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Kazunari

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the Japanese version of the Television Affinity Scale (TAS), and to examine the relationship between affinity for television and viewing behavior. Data was based on a random sample of 552 people in Hachioji City (Tokyo, Japan); the response rate was 55.2%. The results revealed the following: (a) the TAS 6-item version had sufficient reliability and validity, (b) the TAS provided information which could not be explained directly by demographic factors, and (c) affinity for television was positively correlated with unplanned and non-concentrated television viewing. These results are consistent with the findings of Erikawa, Yamada, Kawabata, and Numazaki (2007). In addition, the TAS scores correlated positively with entertainment program viewing. This is consistent with the findings of Rubin (1984) that television affinity correlated with ritualized television viewing. The implications of these results for contemporary television viewing are discussed.

  11. Affinity Chromatography of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Alexander J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a laboratory technique of enzyme purification by affinity chromatography as part of an undergraduate biochemical methodology course. Provides preparation details of the rat muscle homogenate and reagents. Proposes column requirements and assaying information. (MVL)

  12. Bioengineering of bacteria to assemble custom-made polyester affinity resins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Iain D; Du, Jinping; Burr, Natalie; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2015-01-01

    Proof of concept for the in vivo bacterial production of a polyester resin displaying various customizable affinity protein binding domains is provided. This was achieved by engineering various protein binding domains into a bacterial polyester-synthesizing enzyme. Affinity binding domains based on various structural folds and derived from molecular libraries were used to demonstrate the potential of this technique. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), engineered OB-fold domains (OBodies), and VHH domains from camelid antibodies (nanobodies) were employed. The respective resins were produced in a single bacterial fermentation step, and a simple purification protocol was developed. Purified resins were suitable for most lab-scale affinity chromatography purposes. All of the affinity domains tested produced polyester beads with specific affinity for the target protein. The binding capacity of these affinity resins ranged from 90 to 600 nmol of protein per wet gram of polyester affinity resin, enabling purification of a recombinant protein target from a complex bacterial cell lysate up to a purity level of 96% in one step. The polyester resin was efficiently produced by conventional lab-scale shake flask fermentation, resulting in bacteria accumulating up to 55% of their cellular dry weight as polyester. A further proof of concept demonstrating the practicality of this technique was obtained through the intracellular coproduction of a specific affinity resin and its target. This enables in vivo binding and purification of the coproduced "target protein." Overall, this study provides evidence for the use of molecular engineering of polyester synthases toward the microbial production of specific bioseparation resins implementing previously selected binding domains.

  13. Bioengineering of Bacteria To Assemble Custom-Made Polyester Affinity Resins

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Iain D.; Du, Jinping; Burr, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Proof of concept for the in vivo bacterial production of a polyester resin displaying various customizable affinity protein binding domains is provided. This was achieved by engineering various protein binding domains into a bacterial polyester-synthesizing enzyme. Affinity binding domains based on various structural folds and derived from molecular libraries were used to demonstrate the potential of this technique. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), engineered OB-fold domains (OBodies), and VHH domains from camelid antibodies (nanobodies) were employed. The respective resins were produced in a single bacterial fermentation step, and a simple purification protocol was developed. Purified resins were suitable for most lab-scale affinity chromatography purposes. All of the affinity domains tested produced polyester beads with specific affinity for the target protein. The binding capacity of these affinity resins ranged from 90 to 600 nmol of protein per wet gram of polyester affinity resin, enabling purification of a recombinant protein target from a complex bacterial cell lysate up to a purity level of 96% in one step. The polyester resin was efficiently produced by conventional lab-scale shake flask fermentation, resulting in bacteria accumulating up to 55% of their cellular dry weight as polyester. A further proof of concept demonstrating the practicality of this technique was obtained through the intracellular coproduction of a specific affinity resin and its target. This enables in vivo binding and purification of the coproduced “target protein.” Overall, this study provides evidence for the use of molecular engineering of polyester synthases toward the microbial production of specific bioseparation resins implementing previously selected binding domains. PMID:25344238

  14. Purification of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase by copper chelate affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Weslake, R.J.; Chesney, S.L.; Petkau, A.; Friesen, A.D.

    1986-05-15

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase was isolated from human red blood cell hemolysate by DEAE-Sepharose and copper chelate affinity chromatography. Enzyme preparations had specific activities ranging from 3400 to 3800 U/mg and recoveries were approximately 60% of the enzyme activity in the lysate. Copper chelate affinity chromatography resulted in a purification factor of about 60-fold. The homogeneity of the superoxide dismutase preparation was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis, analytical gel filtration chromatography, and isoelectric focusing.

  15. Estimation of affine motion from projection data using a mass conservation model.

    PubMed

    Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Amini, Amir A

    2011-01-01

    An approximate model for the effect of respiration is that the cross section of the thoracic area under interrogation experience time-varying magnification and displacement along two perpendicular axes - we propose to model this motion as parametric affine motion. A theoretical framework for determination of parameters of affine motion modeling the global respiratory motion based on the sinogram data in the projection domain is described. It is assumed that the spatial image considered is a density image where conservation of mass holds.

  16. Purification of L-( sup 3 H) Nicotine eliminates low affinity binding

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, E.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. ); Lippiello, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some studies of L-({sup 3}H) nicotine binding to rodent and human brain tissue have detected two binding sites as evidenced by nonlinear Scatchard plots. Evidence presented here indicated that the low affinity binding site is not stereospecific, is not inhibited by low concentrations of cholinergic agonists and is probably due to breakdown products of nicotine since purification of the L-({sup 3}H)nicotine eliminates the low affinity site.

  17. Negative Electron Affinity Effect on the Surface of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Polycrystalline Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.; Mearini, G. T.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Strong negative electron affinity effects have been observed on the surface of as-grown chemical vapor deposited diamond using Secondary Electron Emission. The test samples were randomly oriented and the surface was terminated with hydrogen. The effect appears as an intensive peak in the low energy part of the spectrum of the electron energy distribution and may be described in the model of effective negative electron affinity.

  18. A review on structure-affinity relationship of dietary flavonoids with serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of plant secondary metabolites and among thousands of flavonoids few are considered as dietary flavonoids. Serum albumin (SA), the most abundant protein in plasma, functions as the most important carrier of vital drugs, including dietary flavonoids. The binding affinity of dietary flavonoids to SA is demonstrated to be governed by structure-affinity relationship (SAR) and its bioavailability. The present review summarizes the interactions of flavonoids categorized as flavanol, flavonol, flavone, isoflavone, flavanones, and anthocyanidins with SAs (bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin) in light of SAR. The key findings are: (1) the position and degree of hydroxylation highly influence the affinity of flavonoids to SAs, (2) glycosylation decreases and substitution of methoxy group increases the affinity of flavonoids for SAs, (3) catechin gallates have higher binding affinity to SAs than catechins and gallocatechins, (4) inorganic metal ions modulate the binding affinity of flavonoids to SAs, and (5) hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in the interactions of all flavonoids with SAs.

  19. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-08

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals.

  20. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  1. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  2. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo. In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein–DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein–DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein–DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein–DNA binding. PMID:26635393

  3. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization.

  4. Food and value motivation: Linking consumer affinities to different types of food products.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Joop; Schösler, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    This study uses the consumer affinity concept to examine the multiple motives that may shape consumers' relationships with food. The concept was applied in a study on four broad product types in the Netherlands, which cover a wide range of the market and may each appeal to consumers with different affinities towards foods. These product types may be denoted as 'conventional', 'efficient', 'gourmet' and 'pure'. A comparative analysis, based on Higgins' Regulatory Focus Theory, was performed to examine whether food-related value motivations could explain different consumer affinities for these product types. The affinities of consumers were measured by means of a non-verbal, visual presentation of four samples of food products in a nationwide survey (n = 742) among consumers who were all involved in food purchasing and/or cooking. The affinities found could be predicted fairly well from a number of self-descriptions relating to food and eating, which expressed different combinations of type of value motivation and involvement with food. The analysis demonstrated the contrasting role of high and low involvement as well as the potential complementarity of promotion- and prevention-focused value motivation. It is suggested that knowledge of the relationships between product types, consumer affinities and value motivation can help improve the effectiveness of interventions that seek to promote healthy and sustainable diets in developed countries.

  5. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-07

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  6. Lower Affinity T Cells are Critical Components and Active Participants of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and biophysical parameters of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide:MHC (pMHC) interaction define intrinsic factors required for T cell activation and differentiation. Although receptor ligand kinetics are somewhat cumbersome to assess experimentally, TCR:pMHC affinity has been shown to predict peripheral T cell functionality and potential for forming memory. Multimeric forms of pMHC monomers have often been used to provide an indirect readout of higher affinity T cells due to their availability and ease of use while allowing simultaneous definition of other functional and phenotypic characteristics. However, multimeric pMHC reagents have introduced a bias that underestimates the lower affinity components contained in the highly diverse TCR repertoires of all polyclonal T cell responses. Advances in the identification of lower affinity cells have led to the examination of these cells and their contribution to the immune response. In this review, we discuss the identification of high- vs. low-affinity T cells as well as their attributed signaling and functional differences. Lastly, mechanisms are discussed that maintain a diverse range of low- and high-affinity T cells. PMID:26441973

  7. Receptor crosstalk protein, calcyon, regulates affinity state of dopamine D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lidow, M S; Roberts, A; Zhang, L; Koh, P O; Lezcano, N; Bergson, C

    2001-09-21

    The recently cloned protein, calcyon, potentiates crosstalk between G(s)-coupled dopamine D1 receptors and heterologous G(q/11)-coupled receptors allowing dopamine D1 receptors to stimulate intracellular Ca(2+) release, in addition to cAMP production. This crosstalk also requires the participating G(q/11)-coupled receptors to be primed by their agonists. We examined the ability of calcyon and priming to regulate the affinity of dopamine D1 receptors for its ligands. Receptor binding assays were performed on HEK293 cell membrane preparations expressing dopamine D1 receptors either alone or in combination with calcyon. Co-expression of dopamine D1 receptor and calcyon affected neither the affinity of this receptor for antagonists nor the affinity of agonist binding to this receptor high and low-affinity states. However, the presence of calcyon dramatically decreased the proportion of the high-affinity dopamine D1 receptor agonist binding sites. This decrease was reversed by carbachol, which primes the receptor crosstalk by stimulating endogenous G(q/11)-coupled muscarinic receptors. Our findings suggest that calcyon regulates the ability of dopamine D1 receptors to achieve the high-affinity state for agonists, in a manner that depends on priming of receptor crosstalk.

  8. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  9. Cyclization strategies of meditopes: affinity and diffraction studies of meditope–Fab complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bzymek, Krzysztof P.; Ma, Yuelong; Avery, Kendra A.; Horne, David A.; Williams, John C.

    2016-05-23

    An overview of cyclization strategies of a Fab-binding peptide to maximize affinity. Recently, a unique binding site for a cyclic 12-residue peptide was discovered within a cavity formed by the light and heavy chains of the cetuximab Fab domain. In order to better understand the interactions that drive this unique complex, a number of variants including the residues within the meditope peptide and the antibody, as well as the cyclization region of the meditope peptide, were created. Here, multiple crystal structures of meditope peptides incorporating different cyclization strategies bound to the central cavity of the cetuximab Fab domain are presented. The affinity of each cyclic derivative for the Fab was determined by surface plasmon resonance and correlated to structural differences. Overall, it was observed that the disulfide bond used to cyclize the peptide favorably packs against a hydrophobic ‘pocket’ and that amidation and acetylation of the original disulfide meditope increased the overall affinity ∼2.3-fold. Conversely, replacing the terminal cysteines with serines and thus creating a linear peptide reduced the affinity over 50-fold, with much of this difference being reflected in a decrease in the on-rate. Other cyclization methods, including the formation of a lactam, reduced the affinity but not to the extent of the linear peptide. Collectively, the structural and kinetic data presented here indicate that small perturbations introduced by different cyclization strategies can significantly affect the affinity of the meditope–Fab complex.

  10. Immobilizing affinity proteins to nitrocellulose: a toolbox for paper-based assay developers.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Carly A; Chevalier, Aaron; Bennett, Steven; Anderson, Caitlin E; Keniston, Karen; Olsen, Cathryn; Li, Bing; Bales, Brian; Moore, David R; Fu, Elain; Baker, David; Yager, Paul

    2016-02-01

    To enable enhanced paper-based diagnostics with improved detection capabilities, new methods are needed to immobilize affinity reagents to porous substrates, especially for capture molecules other than IgG. To this end, we have developed and characterized three novel methods for immobilizing protein-based affinity reagents to nitrocellulose membranes. We have demonstrated these methods using recombinant affinity proteins for the influenza surface protein hemagglutinin, leveraging the customizability of these recombinant "flu binders" for the design of features for immobilization. The three approaches shown are: (1) covalent attachment of thiolated affinity protein to an epoxide-functionalized nitrocellulose membrane, (2) attachment of biotinylated affinity protein through a nitrocellulose-binding streptavidin anchor protein, and (3) fusion of affinity protein to a novel nitrocellulose-binding anchor protein for direct coupling and immobilization. We also characterized the use of direct adsorption for the flu binders, as a point of comparison and motivation for these novel methods. Finally, we demonstrated that these novel methods can provide improved performance to an influenza hemagglutinin assay, compared to a traditional antibody-based capture system. Taken together, this work advances the toolkit available for the development of next-generation paper-based diagnostics.

  11. Relating TCR-peptide-MHC affinity to immunogenicity for the design of tumor vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Rachel H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Jordan, Kimberly R.; Dow, Steven W.; Wilson, Darcy B.; Slansky, Jill E.

    2006-01-01

    One approach to enhancing the T cell response to tumors is vaccination with mimotopes, mimics of tumor epitopes. While mimotopes can stimulate proliferation of T cells that recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), this expansion does not always correlate with control of tumor growth. We hypothesized that vaccination with mimotopes of optimal affinity in this interaction will improve antitumor immunity. Using a combinatorial peptide library and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone that recognizes a TAA, we identified a panel of mimotopes that, when complexed with MHC, bound the TAA-specific TCR with a range of affinities. As expected, in vitro assays showed that the affinity of the TCR-peptide-MHC (TCR-pMHC) interaction correlated with activity of the T cell clone. However, only vaccination with mimotopes in the intermediate-affinity range elicited functional T cells and provided protection against tumor growth in vivo. Vaccination with mimotopes with the highest-affinity TCR-pMHC interactions elicited TAA-specific T cells to the tumor, but did not control tumor growth at any of the peptide concentrations tested. Further analysis of these T cells showed functional defects in response to the TAA. Thus, stimulation of an antitumor response by mimotopes may be optimal with peptides that increase but do not maximize the affinity of the TCR-pMHC interaction. PMID:16932807

  12. Extension of the selection of protein chromatography and the rate model to affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, G; Shene, C; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2010-01-01

    The rational selection of optimal protein purification sequences, as well as mathematical models that simulate and allow optimization of chromatographic protein purification processes have been developed for purification procedures such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. This paper investigates the extension of such analysis to affinity chromatography both in the selection of chromatographic processes and in the use of the rate model for mathematical modelling and simulation. Two affinity systems were used: Blue Sepharose and Protein A. The extension of the theory developed previously for ion-exchange and HIC chromatography to affinity separations is analyzed in this paper. For the selection of operations two algorithms are used. In the first, the value of η, which corresponds to the efficiency (resolution) of the actual chromatography and, Σ, which determines the amount of a particular contaminant eliminated after each separation step, which determines the purity, have to be determined. It was found that the value of both these parameters is not generic for affinity separations but will depend on the type of affinity system used and will have to be determined on a case by case basis. With Blue Sepharose a salt gradient was used and with Protein A, a pH gradient. Parameters were determined with individual proteins and simulations of the protein mixtures were done. This approach allows investigation of chromatographic protein purification in a holistic manner that includes ion-exchange, HIC, gel filtration and affinity separations for the first time.

  13. Visual field

    MedlinePlus

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  14. Immunoproteomics using polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled affinity-purified recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Edfors, Fredrik; Boström, Tove; Forsström, Björn; Zeiler, Marlis; Johansson, Henrik; Lundberg, Emma; Hober, Sophia; Lehtiö, Janne; Mann, Matthias; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    The combination of immuno-based methods and mass spectrometry detection has great potential in the field of quantitative proteomics. Here, we describe a new method (immuno-SILAC) for the absolute quantification of proteins in complex samples based on polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragments to allow affinity enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis and accurate quantification. We took advantage of the antibody resources publicly available from the Human Protein Atlas project covering more than 80% of all human protein-coding genes. Epitope mapping revealed that a majority of the polyclonal antibodies recognized multiple linear epitopes, and based on these results, a semi-automated method was developed for peptide enrichment using polyclonal antibodies immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. A protocol based on the simultaneous multiplex capture of more than 40 protein targets showed that approximately half of the antibodies enriched at least one functional peptide detected in the subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. The approach was further developed to also generate quantitative data via the addition of heavy isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragment standards prior to trypsin digestion. Here, we show that we were able to use small amounts of antibodies (50 ng per target) in this manner for efficient multiplex analysis of quantitative levels of proteins in a human HeLa cell lysate. The results suggest that polyclonal antibodies generated via immunization of recombinant protein fragments could be used for the enrichment of target peptides to allow for rapid mass spectrometry analysis taking advantage of a substantial reduction in sample complexity. The possibility of building up a proteome-wide resource for immuno-SILAC assays based on publicly available antibody resources is discussed.

  15. Interactions of helquats with chiral acidic aromatic analytes investigated by partial-filling affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Martin; Koval, Dušan; Vávra, Jan; Reyes-Gutiérrez, Paul E; Teplý, Filip; Kašička, Václav

    2016-10-07

    Noncovalent molecular interactions between helquats, a new class of dicationic helical extended diquats, and several chiral acidic aromatic drugs and catalysts have been investigated using partial-filling affinity capillary electrophoresis (PF-ACE). Helquats dissolved at 1mM concentration in the aqueous background electrolyte (40mM Tris, 20mM acetic acid, pH 8.1) were introduced as ligand zones of variable length (0-130mm) into the hydroxypropylcellulose coated fused silica capillary whereas 0.1mM solutions of negatively charged chiral drugs or catalysts (warfarin, ibuprofen, mandelic acid, etodolac, binaphthyl phosphate and 11 other acidic aromatic compounds) were applied as a short analyte zone at the injection capillary end. After application of electric field, analyte and ligand migrated against each other and in case of their interactions, migration time of the analyte was increasing with increasing length of the ligand zone. From the tested compounds, only isomers of those exhibiting helical chirality and/or possessing conjugated aromatic systems were enantioselectively separated through their differential interactions with helquats. Some compounds with conjugated aromatic groups interacted with helquats moderately strongly but non-enantiospecifically. Small compounds with single benzene ring exhibited no or very weak non-enantiospecific interactions. PF-ACE method allowed to determine binding constants of the analyte-helquat complexes from the changes of migration times of the analytes. Binding constants of the weakest complexes of the analytes with helquats were less than 50L/mol, whereas binding constants of the strongest complexes were in the range 1 000-1 400L/mol.

  16. Floral affinity and benefits of dietary mixing with flowers for a polyphagous scarab, Popillia japonica Newman.

    PubMed

    Held, David W; Potter, Daniel A

    2004-07-01

    Many generalist herbivores, especially adult beetles, are facultative florivores, feeding on leaves but readily accepting floral tissues when available. We speculated that day-flying beetles with high energetic requirements would benefit from dietary mixing with nutrient-rich flower tissues and favor them during foraging. We tested that "Floral Affinity Hypothesis" with Popillia japonica, a day-active ruteline scarab that feeds intermittently throughout its adult life on multiple plant species. In field tests with six species of flowering hosts, far more landings occurred on flowers than on foliage for all plants except Hibiscus syriacus which bears flowers along the main stem rather than terminally. Trials with elevated plants showed that height of the floral display contributes to beetles' landing on flowers. Flower petals generally were preferred over leaves in laboratory choice tests. Nitrogen and water content were comparable or higher in foliage than in petals, but plant sugars were much higher in petals. Longevity and fecundity of beetles provided single-plant diets of Hibiscus, Rosa x hybrida, or Trifolium flowers for 3 weeks were as high, or higher, than for beetles fed foliage of Tilia cordata, a highly suitable resource. As expected, rotating flowers or Tilia foliage with marginally suitable Quercus palustris foliage enhanced those parameters relative to a diet of Quercus alone, but beetles provided high-quality Tilia foliage also benefitted from dietary mixing with flowers. Nearly all past dietary mixing studies concerned immature insects, for which growth rate is paramount. Opportunistic florivory by adult beetles represents a type of dietary mixing wherein the premium may be calorie-rich food for fueling flight muscles, with ensuing reproductive benefits.

  17. The Nonlinear Field Space Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielczarek, Jakub; Trześniewski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    In recent years the idea that not only the configuration space of particles, i.e. spacetime, but also the corresponding momentum space may have nontrivial geometry has attracted significant attention, especially in the context of quantum gravity. The aim of this letter is to extend this concept to the domain of field theories, by introducing field spaces (i.e. phase spaces of field values) that are not affine spaces. After discussing the motivation and general aspects of our approach we present a detailed analysis of the prototype (quantum) Nonlinear Field Space Theory of a scalar field on the Minkowski background. We show that the nonlinear structure of a field space leads to numerous interesting predictions, including: non-locality, generalization of the uncertainty relations, algebra deformations, constraining of the maximal occupation number, shifting of the vacuum energy and renormalization of the charge and speed of propagation of field excitations. Furthermore, a compact field space is a natural way to implement the "Principle of finiteness" of physical theories, which once motivated the Born-Infeld theory. Thus the presented framework has a variety of potential applications in the theories of fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity), as well as in condensed matter physics (e.g. continuous spin chains), and can shed new light on the issue of divergences in quantum field theories.

  18. Two distinct functional high affinity receptors for mouse interleukin-3 (IL-3).

    PubMed Central

    Hara, T; Miyajima, A

    1992-01-01

    The human interleukin-3 receptor (IL-3R) is composed of an IL-3 specific alpha subunit (IL-3R alpha) and a common beta subunit (beta c) that is shared by IL-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 receptors. In contrast to the human, the mouse has two distinct but related genes, AIC2A and AIC2B, both of which are homologous to the human beta c gene. AIC2B has proved to encode a common beta subunit between mouse GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors. AIC2A is unique to the mouse and encodes a low affinity IL-3 binding protein. Based on the observation that the AIC2A protein is a component of a high affinity IL-3R, we searched for a cDNA encoding a protein which conferred high affinity IL-3 binding when coexpressed with the AIC2A protein in COS7 cells. We obtained such a cDNA (SUT-1) encoding a mature protein of 70 kDa that has weak homology to the human IL-3R alpha. The SUT-1 protein bound IL-3 with low affinity and formed high affinity receptors not only with the AIC2A protein but also with the AIC2B protein. Both high affinity IL-3Rs expressed on a mouse T cell line, CTLL-2, showed similar IL-3 binding properties and transmitted a growth signal in response to IL-3. Thus, the mouse has two distinct functional high affinity IL-3Rs, providing a molecular explanation for the differences observed between mouse and human IL-3Rs. Images PMID:1582416

  19. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  20. Increasing the molecular contacts between maurotoxin and Kv1.2 channel augments ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    M'Barek, Sarrah; Chagot, Benjamin; Andreotti, Nicolas; Visan, Violeta; Mansuelle, Pascal; Grissmer, Stephan; Marrakchi, Mohamed; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Sampieri, François; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad; De Waard, Michel; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2005-08-15

    Scorpion toxins interact with their target ion channels through multiple molecular contacts. Because a "gain of function" approach has never been described to evaluate the importance of the molecular contacts in defining toxin affinity, we experimentally examined whether increasing the molecular contacts between a toxin and an ion channel directly impacts toxin affinity. For this purpose, we focused on two scorpion peptides, the well-characterized maurotoxin with its variant Pi1-like disulfide bridging (MTX(Pi1)), used as a molecular template, and butantoxin (BuTX), used as an N-terminal domain provider. BuTX is found to be 60-fold less potent than MTX(Pi1) in blocking Kv1.2 (IC(50) values of 165 nM for BuTX versus 2.8 nM for MTX(Pi1)). Removal of its N-terminal domain (nine residues) further decreases BuTX affinity for Kv1.2 by 5.6-fold, which is in agreement with docking simulation data showing the importance of this domain in BuTX-Kv1.2 interaction. Transfer of the BuTX N-terminal domain to MTX(Pi1) results in a chimera with five disulfide bridges (BuTX-MTX(Pi1)) that exhibits 22-fold greater affinity for Kv1.2 than MTX(Pi1) itself, in spite of the lower affinity of BuTX as compared to MTX(Pi1). Docking experiments performed with the 3-D structure of BuTX-MTX(Pi1) in solution, as solved by (1)H-NMR, reveal that the N-terminal domain of BuTX participates in the increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicate that acting on molecular contacts between a toxin and a channel is an efficient strategy to modulate toxin affinity.

  1. High affinity choline uptake: an early index of cholinergic innervation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, M; Kataoka, K

    1975-08-29

    The uptake of [3H]choline was investigated in nuclei-free homogenates or crude synaptosomal fractions (P2) from rat brain under various stages of development. A comparable sensitivity of uptake to treatment by hyposmotic shock suggested the involvement of synaptosomal populations in choline uptake in immature as well as in adult brains. However, significant changes in the "apparent" Km for the high affinity transport system and quantitative differences in the Na ion requirement for maximal uptake at 0.43 muM choline concentration were found during development; facts which suggested a greater contribution of the low affinity system in the more immature brains. Assuming that the uptake with high and low sensitivity to Na+ reduction reflected that via the high and low affinity system reslectively, we have attempted to obtain real Km values for the high affinity system. These Km values changed less than those measured directly, suggesting that the affinity constant for the high affinity system does not change during development. On these assumptions, the developmental changes of cholinergic synaptogenesis were examined in 5 distinct regions of the brain. It was found that the synaptogenesis begins several days earlier than the increase of choline acetyltransferase (ChAc) level in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus, the superior colliculus and the cerebellum. These regions may be included among the terminal-rich regions according to available evidence related to cholinergic systems. On the other hand, synaptogenesis accompanied the concomitant ChAc increase in the striatum, where the cholinergic interneurons are present. It is concluded that the increase of ChAc in the terminal-rich regions is delayed by the axoplasmic flow; therefore, the earlier index of cholinergic synaptogenesis in these regions is the high affinity uptake activity rather than the enzyme activity.

  2. (/sup 125/I)diiodoinsulins. Binding affinities, biologic potencies, and properties of their decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Maceda, B.; Linde, S.; Sonne, O.; Gliemann, J.

    1982-07-01

    Insulin was iodinated with 0.3-0.4 mol /sup 125/I/mol insulin using the lactoperoxidase method. About one-third of the radioactivity incorporated into insulin was in diiodoinsulins and about 40% of these molecules contained diiodotyrosine in residue 14 of the A chain. Most of the remaining molecules contained one A14-monoiodotyrosine and one monoiodotyrosine in either position A19, B16, or B26. The binding affinity and biologic potency of this heterogeneous diiodoinsulin preparation was not significantly different from that of A14-(/sup 125/I)monoiodoinsulin in rat adipocytes, whereas it was slightly reduced in hepatocytes and IM-9 lymphocytes. From the iodine distribution and previous data on the binding affinity of each of the four monoiodoinsulin isomers it was calculated that A14-diiodotyrosine-insulin possesses full binding affinity and biologic potency in adipocytes. Diiodoinsulins isolated from another iodoinsulin preparation (iodate method) contained 58% A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin, and most remaining molecules contained one A19-monoiodotyrosine. The binding affinity of this mixed diiodoinsulin preparation was approximately one-fourth of that of A14-monoiodoinsulin in adipocytes, IM-9 lymphocytes, and hepatocytes. It was calculated that A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin is nearly devoid of binding affinity. The diiodoinsulins (lactoperoxidase method) decayed to iodide (probably from diiodotyrosine-insulin) or to polymers with little specific but a markedly increased nonspecific binding. In addition, the polymers had a marked tendency to adsorb to cellulose acetate filters. Conclusions: 1. The binding affinities of diiodoinsulins range from very low values to values at least as high as that of insulin depending on the positions of the iodine moieties. 2. The relative binding affinities vary among tissues. 3. Polymeric decay products give high nonspecific binding.

  3. High frequency lateral flow affinity assay using superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago-Cachón, D.; Rivas, M.; Martínez-García, J. C.; Oliveira-Rodríguez, M.; Blanco-López, M. C.; García, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Lateral flow assay is one of the simplest and most extended techniques in medical diagnosis for point-of-care testing. Although it has been traditionally a positive/negative test, some work has been lately done to add quantitative abilities to lateral flow assay. One of the most successful strategies involves magnetic beads and magnetic sensors. Recently, a new technique of superparamagnetic nanoparticle detection has been reported, based on the increase of the impedance induced by the nanoparticles on a RF-current carrying copper conductor. This method requires no external magnetic field, which reduces the system complexity. In this work, nitrocellulose membranes have been installed on the sensor, and impedance measurements have been carried out during the sample diffusion by capillarity along the membrane. The impedance of the sensor changes because of the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. The results prove the potentiality of the method for point-of-care testing of biochemical substances and nanoparticle capillarity flow studies.

  4. Tuning the Protein Corona of Hydrogel Nanoparticles: The Synthesis of Abiotic Protein and Peptide Affinity Reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-06-21

    Nanomaterials, when introduced into a complex, protein-rich environment, rapidly acquire a protein corona. The type and amount of proteins that constitute the corona depend significantly on the synthetic identity of the nanomaterial. For example, hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) have little affinity for plasma proteins; in contrast, carboxylated poly(styrene) NPs acquire a dense protein corona. This range of protein adsorption suggests that the protein corona might be "tuned" by controlling the chemical composition of the NP. In this Account, we demonstrate that small libraries of synthetic polymer NPs incorporating a diverse pool of functional monomers can be screened for candidates with high affinity and selectivity to targeted biomacromolecules. Through directed synthetic evolution of NP compositions, one can tailor the protein corona to create synthetic organic hydrogel polymer NPs with high affinity and specificity to peptide toxins, enzymes, and other functional proteins, as well as to specific domains of large proteins. In addition, many NIPAm NPs undergo a change in morphology as a function of temperature. This transformation often correlates with a significant change in NP-biomacromolecule affinity, resulting in a temperature-dependent protein corona. This temperature dependence has been used to develop NP hydrogels with autonomous affinity switching for the protection of proteins from thermal stress and as a method of biomacromolecule purification through a selective thermally induced catch and release. In addition to temperature, changes in pH or buffer can also alter a NP protein corona composition, a property that has been exploited for protein purification. Finally, synthetic polymer nanoparticles with low nanomolar affinity for a peptide toxin were shown to capture and neutralize the toxin in the bloodstream of living mice. While the development of synthetic polymer alternatives to protein affinity reagents is

  5. Elastomeric Capture Microparticles (ECmuPs) and Their use with Acoustophoresis to Perform Affinity Capture Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Kevin Wallace

    This dissertation describes the development of elastomeric capture microparticles (ECmicroPs) and their use with acoustophoresis to perform affinity capture assays. ECμPs that function as negative acoustic contrast particles were developed by crosslinking emulsion-based droplets composed of commercially available silicone precursors followed by functionalization with avidin/biotin reagents. The size distribution of the ECμPs was very broad or narrow depending on the emulsion system that was used during the synthesis process. Elastomeric particles exhibited a very broad size distribution when a bulk-emulsion process was used; however, when microfluidic systems were utilized, their size distribution became comparatively narrow. The functionalization of elastomeric particles was accomplished by the non-specific adsorption of avidin protein followed by bovine serum albumin (BSA) blocking and bio-specific adsorption of a biotinylated-capture antibody. Polydisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind prostate specific antigen (PSA) or IgG-phycoerythrin (PE) in aqueous media (buffer, plasma, blood); whereas monodisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind a high density lipoprotein in the aqueous media. Polydisperse ECμPs functionalized to bind PSA in a physiological buffer (PBS pH 7.4) demonstrated nanomolar detection using flow cytometry analysis; whereas ECμPs functionalized to bind IgG-PE demonstrated picomolar detection in 10% porcine plasma. ECμPs have a specific density of ~1.03 and are more compressible than their surrounding aqueous media; which allowed the ECμPs to exhibit negative acoustic contrast properties under an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave field. The negative acoustic contrast property of ECμPs was advantageously utilized in an IgG-PE assay conducted in 0.1% whole porcine blood. The ligand-bound ECμPs suspended in the diluted blood sample were flowed through an acoustofluidic device where the application of an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave

  6. Effect of temperature on alpha-adrenoceptor affinity and contractility of rabbit ear blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M F; Chilgren, J D; Zygmunt, A C

    1989-01-01

    We have studied contractile responses to norepinephrine (NE) and K+ of isolated rabbit ear arteries and veins in an effort to determine how alpha-adrenoceptor affinity and smooth muscle contractility affect responsiveness at different temperatures. Arteries have predominantly alpha 1-adrenoceptors and veins have predominantly receptors of the alpha 2-type. We obtained dose-response curves to NE at 9, 16, 23, 30, 37 and 42 degrees C in the absence and presence of the irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor blocker phenoxybenzamine (POB). In both vessels, affinity of the alpha-adrenoceptors was determined by comparing equieffective doses of NE before and after blockade of the receptors. In other experiments, we obtained contractions to 80 mM KCl at the same temperatures. Affinity of the ear arterial alpha 1-receptors was maximal at 23 degrees C, while affinity of ear venous alpha 2-receptors increased linearly with cooling to 9 degrees C. Responses to K+ in both vessels decreased with cooling. Taken together, the changes in receptor affinity and response to K+ may explain the shape of curves relating contractile strength to temperature.

  7. Affinity chromatography of Band 3, the anion transport protein of erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Pimplikar, S W; Reithmeier, R A

    1986-07-25

    Affinity chromatography of Band 3 was performed using a series of affinity matrices synthesized with various inhibitor ligands and spacer arms. Hydrophilic spacer arms greater than four atoms in length were essential for Band 3 binding. An affinity resin prepared by reacting 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (Ki = 10 microM) with Affi-Gel 102 was found to be the most effective resin of the series tested. Solubilized proteins from human erythrocyte membranes were incubated with the affinity resin, and pure Band 3 was recovered by eluting with 4-benzamido-4'-aminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (BADS; Ki = 2 microM). Band 3 bound to the resin specifically in its stilbene disulfonate binding site, and optimal binding was achieved at pH 8 and at high ionic strength. At 4 degrees C, up to 80% of the bound Band 3 could be eluted by 1 mM BADS, whereas the remainder could be eluted under denaturing conditions using 1% lithium dodecyl sulfate. At 22 or 37 degrees C, the amount of BADS-elutable Band 3 was reduced with a concomitant increase of Band 3 in the lithium dodecyl sulfate elute. Thus, for successful affinity chromatography, the experiment must be carried out rapidly at 4 degrees C. This procedure was also used to purify the Band 3 protein from mouse, horse, pig, and chicken erythrocytes.

  8. Non-affine deformations in flexible and semi-flexible polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anindita; Wen, Qi; Mao, Xiaoming; Lubensky, Tom; Janmey, Paul; Yodh, Arjun

    2011-03-01

    We test the validity of affine deformation assumption in flexible and semi-flexible polymer networks by embedding different-sized fluorescent tracer beads within model polymer networks and quantifying their displacements under shear. A conventional rheometer is used with a confocal microscope for this purpose. Non-affinity is quantified as a function of applied strain, polymer chain density, cross-link concentration, network morphology, reaction kinetics and size of probe particles used. ~Non-affinity measurements in flexible polymer gels are in qualitative agreement with current theories in rubber elasticity. ~For semi-flexible bio-polymer gels, measurements indicate that non-affine deformations are small for networks of thinner, relatively flexible filaments and get smaller as strain increases into non-linear elastic regime. These small measures are consistent with the entropic model for non-linear elasticity of semi-flexible gels. However, as filament stiffness and mesh size increase, the deformations become more non-affine, as predicted by the enthalpic bending and stretching models of non-linear elasticity. MRSEC DMR-0520020, DMR-0505048, and DMR- 0079909. Done...processed 7726 records...17:54:11 Beginning APS data extraction...17:54:12

  9. Definition of the affinity of binding between human von Willebrand factor and coagulation factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Ganz, P R; Atkins, J S; Palmer, D S; Dudani, A K; Hashemi, S; Luison, F

    1991-10-15

    Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor are two plasma proteins essential for effective hemostasis. In vivo, they form a non-covalent complex whose association appears to be metal ion dependent. However, a precise definition of the nature of the molecular forces governing their association remains to be defined, as does their binding affinity. In this paper we have determined the dissociation constant and stoichiometry for Factor VIII binding to immobilized von Willebrand factor. The data demonstrate that these proteins interact saturably and with relatively high affinity. Computer assisted analyses of the Scatchard data favour a two site binding model. The higher affinity site was found to have a Kd of 62 (+/- 13) x 10(-12) M while that of the lower affinity site was 380 (+/- 92) x 10(-12) M. The density of Factor VIII binding sites (Bmax) present on von Willebrand factor was 31 (+/- 3) pM for the high affinity binding site and 46 (+/- 6) pM for the lower site, corresponding to a calculated Factor VIII: von Willebrand factor binding ratio of 1:33 and 1:23, respectively.

  10. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-09-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression.

  11. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression. PMID:27628341

  12. On the binding affinity of macromolecular interactions: daring to ask why proteins interact

    PubMed Central

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins are orchestrated in a precise and time-dependent manner, underlying cellular function. The binding affinity, defined as the strength of these interactions, is translated into physico-chemical terms in the dissociation constant (Kd), the latter being an experimental measure that determines whether an interaction will be formed in solution or not. Predicting binding affinity from structural models has been a matter of active research for more than 40 years because of its fundamental role in drug development. However, all available approaches are incapable of predicting the binding affinity of protein–protein complexes from coordinates alone. Here, we examine both theoretical and experimental limitations that complicate the derivation of structure–affinity relationships. Most work so far has concentrated on binary interactions. Systems of increased complexity are far from being understood. The main physico-chemical measure that relates to binding affinity is the buried surface area, but it does not hold for flexible complexes. For the latter, there must be a significant entropic contribution that will have to be approximated in the future. We foresee that any theoretical modelling of these interactions will have to follow an integrative approach considering the biology, chemistry and physics that underlie protein–protein recognition. PMID:23235262

  13. Kosmotropes enhance the yield of antibody purified by affinity chromatography using immobilized bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngo, That T; Narinesingh, Dyer

    2008-01-01

    The yield of antibody purified using affinity chromatography on immobilized Protein A or Protein G was increased up to 5-fold (500%) by including kosmotropic salts in the binding buffer. The binding buffer is used to equilibrate the affinity column before applying a sample to the column and also to dilute the sample prior to loading onto the affinity column to optimize conditions for a maximal binding of antibodies to affinity gels. In this study, the kosmotropic salts that were effective in greatly increasing antibody binding to Protein A included both inorganic and organic salts of ammonium; sodium; or potassium sulfate, phosphate, polycarboxylates; for example, succinate, citrate, isocitrate, N-(2-hydroxyethylene diamine triacetate (HEDTA), ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and ethylene glycol-O,O'-bis(2-aminoethyl)-N,N,N'N'-tetra acetate(EGTA). On an equal-molar basis, the greater the number of carboxylic groups within the polycarboxylate molecule, the greater the increase in the yield of the purified antibody that was observed. The data show that kosmotropes can be used as effective additives to enhance the binding of immunoglobulins to Protein A or Protein G gels with a resultant increase in the yield of the purified antibodies. Thus, it appears that strongly hydrated anions (citrate, sulfate, and phosphate) and weakly hydrated cations (ammonium, potassium) increase the yield of antibody purified on either Protein A or Protein G affinity gels.

  14. Preparation of a boronate-functionalized affinity hybrid monolith for specific capture of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Mao, J; He, X W; Chen, L X; Zhang, Y K

    2013-06-01

    A novel strategy for preparation of a boronate affinity hybrid monolith was developed using a Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction of an alkyne-boronate ligand with an azide-functionalized monolithic intermediate. An azide-functionalized hybrid monolith was first synthesized via a single-step procedure to provide reactive sites for click chemistry; then the alkyne-boronate ligands were covalently immobilized on the azide-functionalized hybrid monolith via an in-column CuAAC reaction to form a boronate affinity hybrid monolith under mild conditions. The boronate affinity monolith was characterized and evaluated by means of elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The boronate affinity hybrid monolith exhibited excellent specificity toward nucleosides and glycoproteins, which were chosen as test cis-diol-containing compounds under neutral conditions. The binding capacity of the monolith for the glycoprotein ovalbumin was 2.36 mg · g(-1) at pH 7.0. The practicability of the boronate affinity hybrid monolithic material was demonstrated by specific capture of the glycoproteins ovalbumin and ovotransferrin from an egg sample.

  15. Development of immune-affinity 96 spots monolith array for multiple mycotoxins detection in food samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xia, Li-Ru; Zhao, Yong-Fu; Wang, He-Ye

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel highly sensitive chemiluminescence immune-affinity 96 spots monolith array was developed to detect deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN), T-2 toxin (T-2), and fumonisin B1 (FB1) in corn samples. Firstly, the monolith array was prepared through on suit UV-initiated copolymerization using polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as functional monomer and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200) as the porogen. Subsequently, the four mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array was prepared by immobilization of DON, ZEN, T-2, and FB1 antibody. The mole ratio of PEGDA/GMA, UV exposure time, and the volume ratio of PEG 200/PEGDA were optimized to improve the performances of the immune-affinity monolith array. For the mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array based on chemiluminescence detection, the limit of detection was 0.0036ng/mL (DON), 0.0048ng/mL (ZEN), 0.0039ng/mL (T-2), and 0.0017ng/mL (FB1), respectively. The linear response in the range of 0.01-0.1ng/mL (R(2)=0.98). The results showed that the proposed four mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array was a stable, accurate, and highly sensitive method to determine levels of DON, ZEN, T-2, and FB1 in real samples.

  16. Identification of Integrin β Subunit Mutations That Alter Affinity for Extracellular Matrix Ligand*

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Timmy; Mukai, Leona; Jannuzi, Alison L.; Bunch, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined over 50 mutations in the Drosophila βPS integrin subunit that alter integrin function in situ for their ability to bind a soluble monovalent ligand, TWOW-1. Surprisingly, very few of the mutations, which were selected for conditional lethality in the fly, reduce the ligand binding ability of the integrin. The most prevalent class of mutations activates the integrin heterodimer. These findings emphasize the importance of integrin affinity regulation and point out how molecular interactions throughout the integrin molecule are important in keeping the integrin in a low affinity state. Mutations strongly support the controversial deadbolt hypothesis, where the CD loop in the β tail domain acts to restrain the I domain in the inactive, bent conformation. Site-directed mutations in the cytoplasmic domains of βPS and αPS2C reveal different effects on ligand binding from those observed for αIIbβ3 integrins and identify for the first time a cytoplasmic cysteine residue, conserved in three human integrins, as being important in affinity regulation. In the fly, we find that genetic interactions of the βPS mutations with reduction in talin function are consistent with the integrin affinity differences measured in cells. Additionally, these genetic interactions report on increased and decreased integrin functions that do not result in affinity changes in the PS2C integrin measured in cultured cells. PMID:21757698

  17. CSM-lig: a web server for assessing and comparing protein–small molecule affinities

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Douglas E.V.; Ascher, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the affinity of a ligand for a given protein is a crucial component of drug development and understanding their biological effects. Predicting binding affinities is a challenging and difficult task, and despite being regarded as poorly predictive, scoring functions play an important role in the analysis of molecular docking results. Here, we present CSM-Lig (http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/csm_lig), a web server tailored to predict the binding affinity of a protein-small molecule complex, encompassing both protein and small-molecule complementarity in terms of shape and chemistry via graph-based structural signatures. CSM-Lig was trained and evaluated on different releases of the PDBbind databases, achieving a correlation of up to 0.86 on 10-fold cross validation and 0.80 in blind tests, performing as well as or better than other widely used methods. The web server allows users to rapidly and automatically predict binding affinities of collections of structures and assess the interactions made. We believe CSM-lig would be an invaluable tool for helping assess docking poses, the effects of multiple mutations, including insertions, deletions and alternative splicing events, in protein-small molecule affinity, unraveling important aspects that drive protein–compound recognition. PMID:27151202

  18. Rac recruits high-affinity integrin alphavbeta3 to lamellipodia in endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kiosses, W B; Shattil, S J; Pampori, N; Schwartz, M A

    2001-03-01

    Integrin alphavbeta3 has an important role in the proliferation, survival, invasion and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Like other integrins, alphavbeta3 can exist in different functional states with respect to ligand binding. These changes involve both affinity modulation, by which conformational changes in the integrin heterodimer govern affinity for individual extracellular matrix proteins, and avidity modulation, by which changes in lateral mobility and integrin clustering affect the binding of cells to multivalent matrices. Here we have used an engineered monoclonal antibody Fab (antigen-binding fragment) named WOW-1, which binds to activated integrins alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 from several species, to investigate the role of alphavbeta3 activation in endothelial cell behaviour. Because WOW-1 is monovalent, it is insensitive to changes in integrin clustering and therefore reports only changes in affinity. WOW-1 contains an RGD tract in its variable region and binds only to unoccupied, high-affinity integrins. By using WOW-1, we have identified the selective recruitment of high-affinity integrins as a mechanism by which lamellipodia promote formation of new adhesions at the leading edge in cell migration.

  19. Novel affinity membranes with macrocyclic spacer arms synthesized via click chemistry for lysozyme binding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ligang; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Kaiyu; Zhong, Yonghui; Cheng, Qi; Bian, Xihui; Xin, Qingping; Cheng, Bowen; Feng, Xianshe; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2017-04-05

    Affinity membrane has great potential for applications in bioseparation and purification. Disclosed herein is the design of a novel affinity membrane with macrocyclic spacer arms for lysozyme binding. The clickable azide-cyclodextrin (CD) arms and clickable alkyne ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVAL) chains are designed and prepared. By the azide-alkyne click reaction, the EVAL-CD-ligands affinity membranes with CD spacer arms in three-dimensional micro channels have been successfully fabricated. The FT-IR, XPS, NMR, SEM and SEM-EDS results give detailed information of structure evolution. The abundant pores in membrane matrix provide efficient working channels, and the introduced CD arms with ligands (affinity sites) provide supramolecular atmosphere. Compared with that of raw EVAL membrane, the adsorption capacity of EVAL-CD-ligands membrane (26.24mg/g) show a triple increase. The study indicates that three effects (inducing effect, arm effect, site effect) from CD arms render the enhanced performance. The click reaction happened in membrane matrix in bulk. The effective lysozyme binding and higher adsorption performance of affinity membranes described herein compared with other reported membranes are markedly related with the proposed strategy involving macrocyclic spacer arms and supramolecular working channels.

  20. IA-2 autoantibody affinity in children at risk for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Stephanie; Chmiel, Ruth; Bonifacio, Ezio; Scholz, Marlon; Powell, Michael; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Rees Smith, Bernard; Ziegler, Anette-G; Achenbach, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Autoantibodies to insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA-2A) are associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes. Here we examined IA-2A affinity and epitope specificity to assess heterogeneity in response intensity in relation to pathogenesis and diabetes risk in 50 children who were prospectively followed from birth. At first IA-2A appearance, affinity ranged from 10(7) to 10(11)L/mol and was high (>1.0×10(9)L/mol) in 41 (82%) children. IA-2A affinity was not associated with epitope specificity or HLA class II haplotype. On follow-up, affinity increased or remained high, and IA-2A were commonly against epitopes within the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like IA-2 domain and the homologue protein IA-2β. IA-2A were preceded or accompanied by other islet autoantibodies in 49 (98%) children, of which 34 progressed to diabetes. IA-2A affinity did not stratify diabetes risk. In conclusion, the IA-2A response in children is intense with rapid maturation against immunogenic epitopes and a strong association with diabetes development.