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Sample records for affinity binding component

  1. Further characterization of the low and high affinity binding components of the thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McQuade, R.; Thomas, C.G. Jr.; Nayfeh, S.N.

    1986-05-29

    Following cross-linking with disuccinimdiyl suberate and analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, both the high- and low-affinity TSH binding components exhibited two similar /sup 125/I-TSH-labeled bands, with Mr values of 80,000 and 68,000. IgG fractions from patients with Graves' disease inhibited /sup 125/I-TSH binding to both components, while normal IgG had no effect. Although not entirely conclusive, these results suggest that the high- and low-affinity components share similar subunit composition and antigenic determinants.

  2. The AVR4 elicitor protein of Cladosporium fulvum binds to fungal components with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Westerink, Nienke; Roth, Ronelle; Van den Burg, Harrold A; De Wit, Pierre J G M; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2002-12-01

    The interaction between tomato and the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum complies with the gene-for-gene system. Strains of C. fulvum that produce race-specific elicitor AVR4 induce a hypersensitive response, leading to resistance, in tomato plants that carry the Cf-4 resistance gene. The mechanism of AVR4 perception was examined by performing binding studies with 125I-AVR4 on microsomal membranes of tomato plants. We identified an AVR4 high-affinity binding site (KD = 0.05 nM) which exhibited all the characteristics expected for ligand-receptor interactions, such as saturability, reversibility, and specificity. Surprisingly, the AVR4 high-affinity binding site appeared to originate from fungi present on infected tomato plants rather than from the tomato plants themselves. Detailed analysis showed that this fungus-derived, AVR4-specific binding site is heat- and proteinase K-resistant. Affinity crosslinking demonstrated that AVR4 specifically binds to a component of approximately 75 kDa that is of fungal origin. Our data suggest that binding of AVR4 to a fungal component or components is related to the intrinsic virulence function of AVR4 for C. fulvum.

  3. Prolactin-binding components in rabbit mammary gland: characterization by partial purification and affinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, M.; Djiane, J.; Kelly, P.A.

    1985-06-01

    The molecular characteristics of the PRL receptor isolated from rabbit mammary gland microsomes were investigated. Two approaches were employed: 1) affinity purification of PRL receptors and direct electrophoretic analysis, and 2) affinity cross-linking of microsomal receptors with (/sup 125/I)ovine PRL ((/sup 125/I)oPRL). PRL receptors were solubilized from mammary microsomes with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)1-propane sulfonate and purified using an oPRL agarose affinity column. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining of the gel revealed at least nine bands, including a 32,000 mol wt band which was most intensively labeled with /sup 125/I using the chloramine-T method. Covalent labeling of PRL receptors with (/sup 125/I)oPRL was performed using N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azido benzoate, disuccinimidyl suberate, or ethylene glycol bis (succinimidyl succinate). A single band of 59,000 mol wt was produced by all three cross-linkers when sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed under reducing conditions. Assuming 1:1 binding of hormone and binding subunit and by subtracting the mol wt of (/sup 125/I)oPRL, which was estimated from the migration distance on the gel, the mol wt of the binding subunit was calculated as 32,000. In the absence of dithiothreitol during electrophoresis, only one major hormone-receptor complex band was observed. The same mol wt binding components were also detected in microsomal fractions of rabbit kidney, ovary, and adrenal. A slightly higher mol wt binding subunit was observed in rat liver microsomes. Rabbit liver microsomes revealed five (/sup 125/I)oPRL-binding components, three of which were considered to be those of a GH receptor. Moreover, affinity labeling of detergent-solubilized and affinity purified mammary PRL receptors showed a similar major binding subunit.

  4. Lactobacillus acidophilus binds to MUC3 component of cultured intestinal epithelial cells with highest affinity.

    PubMed

    Das, Jugal Kishore; Mahapatra, Rajani Kanta; Patro, Shubhransu; Goswami, Chandan; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2016-04-01

    Lactobacillus strains have been shown to adhere to the mucosal components of intestinal epithelial cells. However, established in vitro adhesion assays have several drawbacks in assessing the adhesion of new Lactobacillus strains. The present study aimed to compare the adhesion of four different Lactobacillus strains and select the most adherent microbe, based on in silico approach supported by in vitro results. The mucus-binding proteins in Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. brevis and L. fermentum were identified and their capacities to interact with intestinal mucin were compared by molecular docking analysis. Lactobacillus acidophilus had the maximal affinity of binding to mucin with predicted free energy of -6.066 kcal mol(-1) Further, in vitro experimental assay of adhesion was performed to validate the in silico results. The adhesion of L. acidophilus to mucous secreting colon epithelial HT-29 MTX cells was highest at 12%, and it formed biofilm with maximum depth (Z = 84 μm). Lactobacillus acidophilus was determined to be the most adherent strain in the study. All the Lactobacillus strains tested in this study, displayed maximum affinity of binding to MUC3 component of mucus as compared to other gastrointestinal mucins. These findings may have importance in the design of probiotics and health care management.

  5. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  6. Identification of pheromone components and their binding affinity to the odorant binding protein CcapOBP83a-2 of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, P; He, X L; Woodcock, C; Pickett, J A; Field, L M; Birkett, M A; Kalinova, B; Gomulski, L M; Scolari, F; Gasperi, G; Malacrida, A R; Zhou, J J

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly (or medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae), is a serious pest of agriculture worldwide, displaying a very wide larval host range with more than 250 different species of fruit and vegetables. Olfaction plays a key role in the invasive potential of this species. Unfortunately, the pheromone communication system of the medfly is complex and still not well established. In this study, we report the isolation of chemicals emitted by sexually mature individuals during the "calling" period and the electrophysiological responses that these compounds elicit on the antennae of male and female flies. Fifteen compounds with electrophysiological activity were isolated and identified in male emissions by gas chromatography coupled to electroantennography (GC-EAG). Within the group of 15 identified compounds, 11 elicited a response in antennae of both sexes, whilst 4 elicited a response only in female antennae. The binding affinity of these compounds, plus 4 additional compounds known to be behaviourally active from other studies, was measured using C. capitata OBP, CcapOBP83a-2. This OBP has a high homology to Drosophila melanogaster OBPs OS-E and OS-F, which are associated with trichoid sensilla and co-expressed with the well-studied Drosophila pheromone binding protein LUSH. The results provide evidence of involvement of CcapOBP83a-2 in the medfly's odorant perception and its wider specificity for (E,E)-α-farnesene, one of the five major compounds in medfly male pheromone emission. This represents the first step in the clarification of the C. capitata and pheromone reception pathway, and a starting point for further studies aimed towards the creation of new powerful attractants or repellents applicable in the actual control strategies.

  7. Identification of pheromone components and their binding affinity to the odorant binding protein CcapOBP83a-2 of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, P.; He, X.L.; Woodcock, C.; Pickett, J.A.; Field, L.M.; Birkett, M.A.; Kalinova, B.; Gomulski, L.M.; Scolari, F.; Gasperi, G.; Malacrida, A.R.; Zhou, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly (or medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae), is a serious pest of agriculture worldwide, displaying a very wide larval host range with more than 250 different species of fruit and vegetables. Olfaction plays a key role in the invasive potential of this species. Unfortunately, the pheromone communication system of the medfly is complex and still not well established. In this study, we report the isolation of chemicals emitted by sexually mature individuals during the “calling” period and the electrophysiological responses that these compounds elicit on the antennae of male and female flies. Fifteen compounds with electrophysiological activity were isolated and identified in male emissions by gas chromatography coupled to electroantennography (GC–EAG). Within the group of 15 identified compounds, 11 elicited a response in antennae of both sexes, whilst 4 elicited a response only in female antennae. The binding affinity of these compounds, plus 4 additional compounds known to be behaviourally active from other studies, was measured using C. capitata OBP, CcapOBP83a-2. This OBP has a high homology to Drosophila melanogaster OBPs OS-E and OS-F, which are associated with trichoid sensilla and co-expressed with the well-studied Drosophila pheromone binding protein LUSH. The results provide evidence of involvement of CcapOBP83a-2 in the medfly's odorant perception and its wider specificity for (E,E)-α-farnesene, one of the five major compounds in medfly male pheromone emission. This represents the first step in the clarification of the C. capitata and pheromone reception pathway, and a starting point for further studies aimed towards the creation of new powerful attractants or repellents applicable in the actual control strategies. PMID:24607850

  8. Neuronal acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila: the ARD protein is a component of a high-affinity alpha-bungarotoxin binding complex.

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, P; Hermans-Borgmeyer, I; Betz, H; Gundelfinger, E D

    1988-01-01

    The ard gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a structural homologue of vertebrate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) and is expressed exclusively in nervous tissue. To study the nature of the ARD protein, antibodies were raised against fusion constructs containing two regions of this polypeptide. One segment is putatively extracellular (amino acids 65-212), the other domain is exposed to the cytoplasm (amino acids 305-444). The ARD antisera obtained served to investigate the physical relationship between the ARD protein and alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Btx) binding sites occurring in Drosophila. Two different high-affinity binding sites for [125I]alpha-Btx, a highly potent antagonist of vertebrate muscle AChR, were detected in fly head membranes. Equilibrium binding and kinetic studies revealed Kd values of approximately 0.1 nM (site 1) and approximately 4 nM (site 2). The estimated maximal binding (Bmax) was approximately 240 and 1080 fmol/mg protein respectively. Both sites exhibited a nicotinic-cholinergic pharmacology. Immunoprecipitation experiments with the ARD antisera indicated that the ARD protein is associated with the [125I]alpha-Btx binding site 1 only. These data support the previously postulated hypothesis that the ARD protein is part of an alpha-Btx binding neuronal AChR of Drosophila. Furthermore, they indicate heterogeneity in nicotinic-cholinergic binding sites in the insect nervous system. PMID:3141150

  9. Flexibility and binding affinity in protein–ligand, protein–protein and multi-component protein interactions: limitations of current computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Tuffery, Pierre; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The recognition process between a protein and a partner represents a significant theoretical challenge. In silico structure-based drug design carried out with nothing more than the three-dimensional structure of the protein has led to the introduction of many compounds into clinical trials and numerous drug approvals. Central to guiding the discovery process is to recognize active among non-active compounds. While large-scale computer simulations of compounds taken from a library (virtual screening) or designed de novo are highly desirable in the post-genomic area, many technical problems remain to be adequately addressed. This article presents an overview and discusses the limits of current computational methods for predicting the correct binding pose and accurate binding affinity. It also presents the performances of the most popular algorithms for exploring binary and multi-body protein interactions. PMID:21993006

  10. Neurotensin high affinity binding sites and endopeptidase 24. 11 are present respectively in the meningothelial and in the fibroblastic components of human meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Mailleux, P.; Przedborski, S.; Beaumont, A.; Verslijpe, M.; Depierreux, M.; Levivier, M.; Kitabgi, P.; Roques, B.P.; Vanderhaeghen, J.J. )

    1990-11-01

    The presence of neurotensin receptors and endopeptidase 24.11 (E-24.11) in 16 human meningioma specimens, obtained at surgery, was assessed by measuring the binding of {sup 125}I-(tyrosyl3)neurotensin(1-13) ({sup 125}I-NT) and the inhibitor {sup 3}H-N(2RS)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-(oxopropyl)glycine ({sup 3}H-HACBO-Gly), for the receptor and enzyme, respectively. E-24.11 activity was also measured. Autoradiography, on the 16 meningiomas, showed that specific {sup 125}I-NT labeling (nonspecific labeling was assessed in the presence of excess NT) was exclusively located in the meningothelial regions. In contrast, specific {sup 3}H-HACBO-Gly labeling (nonspecific labeling was assessed in the presence of an excess of the E-24.11 inhibitor thiorphan) was exclusively found in fibroblastic regions. No specific labeling of either ligand was found on collagen or blood vessels. In vitro binding assays were performed on membranes of 10 of the 16 meningiomas. In the 4 meningiomas rich in meningothelial cells, {sup 125}I-NT specifically bound to one population of sites with Bmax ranging from 57 to 405 fmol/mg protein and Kd around 0.3 nM. These sites share common properties with the brain NT receptor, since the carboxy terminal acetyl NT(8-13) fragment bound to the same sites but with a higher affinity. The carboxy terminal analogue of NT, neuromedin N, also bound to the same sites with a 10-fold lower affinity and the sites were bradykinin and levocabastine insensitive. In the 4 meningiomas rich in fibroblastic cells, {sup 3}H-HACBO-Gly specifically bound to one population of sites with Bmax ranging from 251 to 739 fmol/mg protein and Kd around 2.8 nM.

  11. Binding Affinities Controlled by Shifting Conformational Equilibria: Opportunities and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Michielssens, Servaas; de Groot, Bert L.; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Conformational selection is an established mechanism in molecular recognition. Despite its power to explain binding events, it is hardly used in protein/ligand design to modulate molecular recognition. Here, we explore the opportunities and limitations of design by conformational selection. Using appropriate thermodynamic cycles, our approach predicts the effects of a conformational shift on binding affinity and also allows one to disentangle the effects induced by a conformational shift from other effects influencing the binding affinity. The method is assessed and applied to explain the contribution of a conformational shift on the binding affinity of six ubiquitin mutants showing different conformational shifts in six different complexes. PMID:25992736

  12. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  13. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  14. Psd1 binding affinity toward fungal membrane components as assessed by SPR: The role of glucosylceramide in fungal recognition and entry.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Luciano Neves; Domitrovic, Tatiana; de Andrade, Paula Cavalcante; Faria, Jane; Bergter, Eliana Barreto; Weissmüller, Gilberto; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2014-11-01

    Psd1 is a plant defensin that has antifungal activity against several pathogenic and nonpathogenic fungi. Previous analysis of Psd1 chemical shift perturbations by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that this defensin interacts with phospholipids and the sphingolipid glucosylceramide isolated from Fusarium solani (GlcCer(Fusarium solani)). In this study, these interactions were evaluated by real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. The data obtained demonstrated that Psd1 could bind more strongly to small unilamellar vesicles (SUV)-containing GlcCer(Fusarium solani) than to SUV that was composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) alone or was enriched with GlcCer that had been isolated from soybeans. An increase in the SPR response after cholesterol or ergosterol incorporation in PC-SUV was detected; however, SUV composed of PC:Erg (7:3; molar:molar) became unstable in the presence of Psd1, suggesting membrane destabilization. We also observed a lack of Psd1 internalization in Candida albicans strains that were deficient in the glucosyl ceramide synthase gene. Together, these data indicate that GlcCer is essential for Psd1 anchoring in the fungal plasma membrane as well as internalization.

  15. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  16. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  17. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction.

  18. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  19. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  20. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  1. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.

  2. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    DOE PAGES

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group andmore » a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.« less

  3. Binding mode and affinity studies of DNA-binding agents using topoisomerase I DNA unwinding assay.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Ruel E; Gleason, Aaron B; Keyes, James A; Sahabi, Sadia

    2007-02-15

    A topoisomerase I DNA unwinding assay has been used to determine the relative DNA-binding affinities of a model pair of homologous naphthalene diimides. Binding affinity data were corroborated using calorimetric (ITC) and spectrophotometric (titration and T(m)) studies, with substituent size playing a significant role in binding. The assay was also used to investigate the mode of binding adopted by several known DNA-binding agents, including SYBR Green and PicoGreen. Some of the compounds exhibited unexpected binding modes.

  4. Targeted protein engineering provides insights into binding mechanism and affinities of bacterial collagen adhesins.

    PubMed

    Ross, Caná L; Liang, Xiaowen; Liu, Qing; Murray, Barbara E; Höök, Magnus; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K

    2012-10-05

    The collagen-binding bacterial proteins, Ace and Cna, are well characterized on the biochemical and structural level. Despite overall structural similarity, recombinant forms of the Ace and Cna ligand-binding domains exhibit significantly different affinities and binding kinetics for collagen type I (CI) in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand, in submolecular detail, the bases for these differences. Using a structure-based approach, we engineered Cna and Ace variants by altering specific structural elements within the ligand-binding domains. Surface plasmon resonance-based binding analysis demonstrated that mutations that are predicted to alter the orientation of the Ace and Cna N(1) and N(2) subdomains significantly affect the interaction between the MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule) and CI in vitro, including affinity, association/dissociation rates and binding ratio. Moreover, we utilized this information to engineer an Ace variant with an 11,000-fold higher CI affinity than the parent protein. Finally, we noted that several engineered proteins that exhibited a weak interaction with CI recognized more sites on CI, suggesting an inverse correlation between affinity and specificity.

  5. Nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites exert interdependent effects on the binding affinities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    We can determine the effects of many possible sequence variations in transcription factor binding sites using microarray binding experiments. Analysis of wild-type and mutant Zif268 (Egr1) zinc fingers bound to microarrays containing all possible central 3 bp triplet binding sites indicates that the nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites cannot be treated independently. This indicates that the current practice of characterizing transcription factor binding sites by mutating individual positions of binding sites one base pair at a time does not provide a true picture of the sequence specificity. Similarly, current bioinformatic practices using either just a consensus sequence, or even mononucleotide frequency weight matrices to provide more complete descriptions of transcription factor binding sites, are not accurate in depicting the true binding site specificities, since these methods rely upon the assumption that the nucleotides of binding sites exert independent effects on binding affinity. Our results stress the importance of complete reference tables of all possible binding sites for comparing protein binding preferences for various DNA sequences. We also show results suggesting that microarray binding data using particular subsets of all possible binding sites can be used to extrapolate the relative binding affinities of all possible full-length binding sites, given a known binding site for use as a starting sequence for site preference refinement. PMID:11861919

  6. Biochemical characterization of high-affinity 3H-opioid binding. Further evidence for Mu1 sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.L.; Recht, L.D.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In saturation studies with (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine, unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (1 nM) inhibited the high-affinity binding component far more potently than the lower-affinity one. Similarly, morphine (1 nM) inhibited the higher-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin to a greater extent than its lower-affinity binding component, consistent with a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and enkephalins. Treatment of tissue with either trypsin (1 microgram/ml) or N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) effectively eliminated the high-affinity binding component of a series of /sup 3/H-opiates and opioid peptides. Competition studies following both treatments were consistent with a common high-affinity binding site. Both treatments also eliminated the ability of low morphine concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin binding and of low D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding. Protection experiments examining N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding showed significant protection (p less than 0.002) by both unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin and morphine (both at 1 nM). When studied together, both naloxonazine and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding to a similar extent. Equally important, tissue previously treated with naloxonazine was far less sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide than was untreated control tissue, consistent with the possibility that both treatments affected the same site. Together, these results support the concept of a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and opioid peptides.

  7. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  8. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  9. HIGH AFFINITY, DSRNA BINDING BY DISCONNECTED INTERACTING PROTEIN 1†

    PubMed Central

    Catanese, Daniel J.; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2010-01-01

    Disconnected Interacting Protein 1 (DIP1) appears from sequence analysis and preliminary binding studies to be a member of the dsRNA-binding protein family. Of interest, DIP1 was shown previously to interact with and influence multiple proteins involved in transcription regulation in Drosophila melanogaster. We show here that the longest isoform of this protein, DIP1-c, exhibits a 500-fold preference for dsRNA over dsDNA of similar nucleotide sequence. Further, DIP1-c demonstrated very high affinity for a subset of dsRNA ligands, with binding in the picomolar range for VA1 RNA and miR-iab-4 precursor stem-loop, a potential physiological RNA target involved in regulating expression of its protein partner, Ultrabithorax. PMID:20643095

  10. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites.

  11. Structural origins of high-affinity biotin binding to streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Weber, P C; Ohlendorf, D H; Wendoloski, J J; Salemme, F R

    1989-01-06

    The high affinity of the noncovalent interaction between biotin and streptavidin forms the basis for many diagnostic assays that require the formation of an irreversible and specific linkage between biological macromolecules. Comparison of the refined crystal structures of apo and a streptavidin:biotin complex shows that the high affinity results from several factors. These factors include the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions between biotin and the protein, together with the ordering of surface polypeptide loops that bury the biotin in the protein interior. Structural alterations at the biotin binding site produce quaternary changes in the streptavidin tetramer. These changes apparently propagate through cooperative deformations in the twisted beta sheets that link tetramer subunits.

  12. Optimizing molecular electrostatic interactions: Binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik

    The design of molecules that bind tightly and specifically to designated target molecules is an important goal in many fields of molecular science. While the shape of the molecule to be designed is a relatively well defined problem with an intuitive answer, determination of the distribution of electrostatic charge that it should have in order to possess high affinity and/or specificity for a target is a subtle problem involving a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred due to the removal of solvent from the interacting surfaces of the reactants, and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. In this thesis, a theoretical formalism based on a continuum electrostatic approximation is developed in which charge distributions leading to optimal affinity and/or high specificity may be obtained. Methods for obtaining these charge distributions are developed in detail and analytical solutions are obtained in several special cases (where the molecules are shaped as infinite membranes, spheres, and spheroids). Their existence and non-uniqueness are also shown, and it is proven that the resulting optimized electrostatic binding free energies are favorable (negative) in many cases of physical interest. Affinity and specificity optimization is then applied to the chorismate mutase family of enzymes, including the catalytic antibody 1F7. It is shown that affinity optimization can be used to suggest better molecular inhibitors and that specificity optimization can be used to help elucidate molecular function and possibly aid in the creation of improved haptens. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  13. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity.

  14. Compensating Enthalpic and Entropic Changes Hinder Binding Affinity Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafont,V.; Armstrong, A.; Ohtaka, H.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    A common strategy to improve the potency of drug candidates is to introduce chemical functionalities, like hydrogen bond donors or acceptors, at positions where they are able to establish strong interactions with the target. However, it is often observed that the added functionalities do not necessarily improve potency even if they form strong hydrogen bonds. Here, we explore the thermodynamic and structural basis for those observations. KNI-10033 is a potent experimental HIV-1 protease inhibitor with picomolar affinity against the wild-type enzyme (Kd = 13 pm). The potency of the inhibitor is the result of favorable enthalpic (?H = -8.2 kcal/mol) and entropic (-T?S = -6.7 kcal/mol) interactions. The replacement of the thioether group in KNI-10033 by a sulfonyl group (KNI-10075) results in a strong hydrogen bond with the amide of Asp 30B of the HIV-1 protease. This additional hydrogen bond improves the binding enthalpy by 3.9 kcal/mol; however, the enthalpy gain is completely compensated by an entropy loss, resulting in no affinity change. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis of the inhibitor/protease complexes indicates that the entropy losses are due to a combination of conformational and solvation effects. These results provide a set of practical guidelines aimed at overcoming enthalpy/entropy compensation and improve binding potency.

  15. Relations between high-affinity binding sites of markers for binding regions on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1985-01-01

    Binding of warfarin, digitoxin, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red, individually or in different pair combinations, to defatted human serum albumin at ligand/protein molar ratios less than 1:1 was studied at pH 7.0. The binding was determined by ultrafiltration. Some of the experiments were repeated with the use of equilibrium dialysis in order to strengthen the results. Irrespective of the method used, all ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with an association constant in the range 10(4)-10(6) M-1. High-affinity binding of the following pair of ligands took place independently: warfarin-Phenol Red, warfarin-diazepam, warfarin-digitoxin and digitoxin-diazepam. Simultaneous binding of warfarin and salicylate led to a mutual decrease in binding of one another, as did simultaneous binding of digitoxin and Phenol Red. Both effects could be accounted for by a coupling constant. The coupling constant is the factor by which the primary association constants are affected; in these examples of anti-co-operativity the factor has a value between 0 and 1. In the first example it was calculated to be 0.8 and in the latter 0.5. Finally, digitoxin and salicylate were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site. The present findings support the proposal of four separate primary binding sites for warfarin, digitoxin (and salicylate), diazepam and Phenol Red. An attempt to correlate this partial binding model for serum albumin with other models in the literature is made. PMID:3977850

  16. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  17. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  19. Carbohydrate-binding protein identification by coupling structural similarity searching with binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; von Itzstein, Mark; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-11-15

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) are potential biomarkers and drug targets. However, the interactions between carbohydrates and proteins are challenging to study experimentally and computationally because of their low binding affinity, high flexibility, and the lack of a linear sequence in carbohydrates as exists in RNA, DNA, and proteins. Here, we describe a structure-based function-prediction technique called SPOT-Struc that identifies carbohydrate-recognizing proteins and their binding amino acid residues by structural alignment program SPalign and binding affinity scoring according to a knowledge-based statistical potential based on the distance-scaled finite-ideal gas reference state (DFIRE). The leave-one-out cross-validation of the method on 113 carbohydrate-binding domains and 3442 noncarbohydrate binding proteins yields a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.56 for SPalign alone and 0.63 for SPOT-Struc (SPalign + binding affinity scoring) for CBP prediction. SPOT-Struc is a technique with high positive predictive value (79% correct predictions in all positive CBP predictions) with a reasonable sensitivity (52% positive predictions in all CBPs). The sensitivity of the method was changed slightly when applied to 31 APO (unbound) structures found in the protein databank (14/31 for APO versus 15/31 for HOLO). The result of SPOT-Struc will not change significantly if highly homologous templates were used. SPOT-Struc predicted 19 out of 2076 structural genome targets as CBPs. In particular, one uncharacterized protein in Bacillus subtilis (1oq1A) was matched to galectin-9 from Mus musculus. Thus, SPOT-Struc is useful for uncovering novel carbohydrate-binding proteins. SPOT-Struc is available at http://sparks-lab.org.

  20. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  1. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Eng, W S; Robles, S; Vogt, R G; Wiśniewski, J R; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural 3H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated [125I]12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added 125I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of [125I]12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  2. Insulin and epidermal growth factor-urogastrone: Affinity crosslinking to specific binding sites in rat liver membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Hock, R. A.; Hollenberg, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    Both insulin and human epidermal growth factor-urogastrone (EGF/URO) can be covalently linked to specific rat liver membrane binding sites by glutaraldehyde coupling followed by sodium borohydride reduction to yield affinity-labeled membrane constituents sufficiently stable for solubilization and further analysis by various techniques. Solubilization of membranes covalently labeled with 125I-labeled insulin yields a component with chromatographic properties identical to those of a soluble insulin receptor characterized in previous studies. A second soluble insulin-binding component that is not revealed by the affinity-labeling method and that has not yet been reported can also be detected. Membranes similarly labeled with 125I-labeled EGF/URO yield one major and two minor ligand-specific soluble (Triton X-100) affinity-labeled components, as detected by chromatography on Sepharose 6B. Further analysis of the EGF/URO-labeled components by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose, by disc gel electrophoresis, and by enzymatic digestion suggests that the major specific binding component for EGF/URO in liver membranes is a glycoprotein subunit of approximately 100,000 daltons that possesses a 20,000-dalton portion inaccessible to proteolytic cleavage when the subunit is anchored in the membrane. The affinity labeling approach described should prove of use for the study of other polypeptide receptors that, like the EGF/URO receptor, lose their ligand recognition property subsequent to membrane solubilization. PMID:205865

  3. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  4. Phosphatidylserine Reversibly Binds Cu2+ with Extremely High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Christopher F.; Cong, Xiao; Robison, Aaron; Pace, Hudson P.; Liu, Chunming; Poyton, Matthew F.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) embedded within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was found to bind Cu2+ from solution with extraordinarily high affinity. In fact, the equilibrium dissociation constant was in the femtomolar range. The resulting complex formed in a 1:2 Cu2+ to PS ratio and quenches a broad spectrum of lipid-bound fluorophores in a reversible and pH-dependent fashion. At acidic pH values, the fluorophores were almost completely unquenched, while at basic pH values significant quenching (85–90%) was observed. The pH at which the transition occurred was dependent on the PS concentration and ranged from approximately pH 5 to 8. The quenching kinetics was slow at low Cu2+ concentrations and basic values pH (up to several hours), while the unquenching reaction was orders of magnitude more rapid upon lowering the pH. This was consistent with diffusion limited complex formation at basic pH, but rapid dissociation under acidic conditions. The tight binding of Cu2+ to PS may have physiological consequences under certain circumstances. PMID:22548290

  5. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  6. Scatter factor binds to thrombospondin and other extracellular matrix components.

    PubMed Central

    Lamszus, K.; Joseph, A.; Jin, L.; Yao, Y.; Chowdhury, S.; Fuchs, A.; Polverini, P. J.; Goldberg, I. D.; Rosen, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    Scatter factor (SF) is an angiogenic growth factor that stimulates motility and invasion of carcinoma cells. SF is present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of breast cancers, where it might act to promote tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis. To investigate how SF is incorporated into the ECM, we studied the binding of SF to various ECM components using a solid-phase binding assay based on the SF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that SF binds to a variety of ECM molecules, with different binding capacities. The highest SF binding capacities were observed for thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), fibronectin (Fn), and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, although SF did not bind to albumin. Mature two-chain SF and precursor single-chain SF bound approximately equally well to TSP-1 and Fn. Moreover, two SF alpha-chain peptides (NK1 and NK2) both bound to TSP-1 and Fn, suggesting that the whole SF molecule is not required for binding. Based on binding competition assays, TSP-1 exhibited higher affinity for SF than did nine other ECM molecules, including Fn and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Although heparin in solution potently inhibited the binding of SF to TSP-1-coated surfaces, even very high concentrations of heparin could not elute SF already bound to TSP-1. SF binding was modulated by binding interactions among ECM molecules (TSP-1-Fn, TSP-1-collagen I, and Fn-collagen I), suggesting that the matrix capacity to bind SF depends upon its exact composition. SF bound in a dose-dependent fashion to ECMs secreted by three human breast carcinoma cell lines. Binding of SF to matrices from all three cell lines was significantly inhibited by preincubation of the matrices with antibodies against TSP-1, whereas antibodies against several other ECM components were less effective or ineffective in inhibiting SF binding. In addition, TSP-1 markedly inhibited chemotaxis of microvascular endothelial cells toward SF and SF-induced angiogenesis in the rat cornea neovascularization assay

  7. The binding specificity and affinity determinants of family 1 and family 3 cellulose binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Lehtiö, Janne; Sugiyama, Junji; Gustavsson, Malin; Fransson, Linda; Linder, Markus; Teeri, Tuula T.

    2003-01-01

    Cellulose binding modules (CBMs) potentiate the action of cellulolytic enzymes on insoluble substrates. Numerous studies have established that three aromatic residues on a CBM surface are needed for binding onto cellulose crystals and that tryptophans contribute to higher binding affinity than tyrosines. However, studies addressing the nature of CBM–cellulose interactions have so far failed to establish the binding site on cellulose crystals targeted by CBMs. In this study, the binding sites of CBMs on Valonia cellulose crystals have been visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Fusion of the CBMs with a modified staphylococcal protein A (ZZ-domain) allowed direct immuno-gold labeling at close proximity of the actual CBM binding site. The transmission electron microscopy images provide unequivocal evidence that the fungal family 1 CBMs as well as the family 3 CBM from Clostridium thermocellum CipA have defined binding sites on two opposite corners of Valonia cellulose crystals. In most samples these corners are worn to display significant area of the hydrophobic (110) plane, which thus constitutes the binding site for these CBMs. PMID:12522267

  8. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  9. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: MODEL II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The training set used to derive a common reactivity pattern (COREPA) model for estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinity in Model I (see Abstract I in this series) was extended to include 47 rat estrogen receptor (rER) relative binding affinity (RBA) measurements in addition to the...

  10. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  11. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: A COMPARISON OF THREE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative analysis of how three COREPA models for ER binding affinity performed when used to predict potential estrogen receptor (ER) ligands is presented. Models I and II were developed based on training sets of 232 and 279 rat ER binding affinity measurements, respectively....

  12. Affinity and Specificity of Protein U1A-RNA Complex Formation Based on an Additive Component Free Energy Model

    PubMed Central

    Kormos, Bethany L.; Benitex, Yulia; Baranger, Anne M.; Beveridge, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A MM-GBSA computational protocol was used successfully to account for wild type U1A-RNA and F56 U1A mutant experimental binding free energies. The trend in mutant binding free energies compared to wild type is well-reproduced. Following application of a linear-response-like equation to scale the various energy components, the binding free energies agree quantitatively with observed experimental values. Conformational adaptation contributes to the binding free energy for both the protein and the RNA in these systems. Small differences in ΔGs are the result of different and sometimes quite large relative contributions from various energetic components. Residual free energy decomposition indicates differences not only at the site of mutation, but throughout the entire protein. MM-GBSA and ab initio calculations performed on model systems suggest that stacking interactions may nearly, but not completely, account for observed differences in mutant binding affinities. This study indicates that there may be different underlying causes of ostensibly similar experimentally observed binding affinities of different mutants, and thus recommends caution in the interpretation of binding affinities and specificities purely by inspection. PMID:17603075

  13. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  14. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  15. Purification of L-( sup 3 H) Nicotine eliminates low affinity binding

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, E.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. ); Lippiello, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some studies of L-({sup 3}H) nicotine binding to rodent and human brain tissue have detected two binding sites as evidenced by nonlinear Scatchard plots. Evidence presented here indicated that the low affinity binding site is not stereospecific, is not inhibited by low concentrations of cholinergic agonists and is probably due to breakdown products of nicotine since purification of the L-({sup 3}H)nicotine eliminates the low affinity site.

  16. Separation of TFIIIC into two functional components by sequence specific DNA affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, N; Berk, A J

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that mammalian transcription factor IIIC (TFIIIC) activity can be separated by anion exchange FPLC chromatography into two functional components (1), both of which are required for transcription of tRNA and the adenovirus VA RNA genes. Here we show that these two functional components, designated TFIIIC1 and TFIIIC2, can also be separated by sequence specific DNA affinity chromatography. These results confirm the observation that TFIIIC can be fractionated into two components, which are both required for transcription of VA I and tRNA genes in vitro. Thus in the mammalian reconstituted system, a minimum of three proteins, in addition to RNA polymerase III, are required for the transcription of the VA and tRNA genes in vitro. The DNA binding component, TFIIIC2, binds specifically to the 3' segment of the internal promoter (the B block), demonstrated by its ability to protect this region from digestion by DNase I. TFIIIC2 is the limiting, titratable component in the phosphocellulose C fraction required for the formation of a stable pre-initiation complex on the VAI RNA gene in vitro, as demonstrated with a template competition and rescue assay. Images PMID:3697084

  17. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  18. Molecular determinants of affinity for aminoglycoside binding to the aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase(2'')-Ia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Serpersu, Engin H

    2006-08-29

    One of the most commonly occurring aminoglycoside resistance enzymes is aminoglycoside 2''-O-nucleotidyltransferase [ANT(2'')]. In the present study molecular determinants of affinity and specificity for aminoglycoside binding to this enzyme are investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Binding of aminoglycosides is enthalpically driven accompanied by negative entropy changes. The presence of metal-nucleotide increases the affinity for all but one of the aminoglycosides studied but has no effect on specificity. The substituents at positions 1, 2', and 6' are important determinants of substrate specificity. An amino group at these positions leads to greater affinity. No correlation is observed between the change in affinity and enthalpy. At the 2' position greater affinity results from a more negative enthalpy for an aminoglycoside containing an amino rather than a hydroxyl at that position. At the 6' position the greater affinity for an aminoglycoside containing an amino substituent results from a less disfavorable entropic contribution. The thermodynamic basis for the change in affinity at position 1 could not be determined because of the weak binding of one of the aminoglycoside substrates, amikacin. The effect of increasing osmotic stress on affinity was used to determine that a net release of approximately four water molecules occurs when tobramycin binds to ANT(2''). No measurable net change in the number of bound water molecules is observed when neomycin binds the enzyme. Data acquired in this work provide the rationale for the ability of ANT(2'') to confer resistance against kanamycins but not neomycins.

  19. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  20. Metal binding components in human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, P.G.; Zlotkin, S.H.; Sarkar, B. )

    1990-02-26

    Amniotic fluid is a potential source of both nutritionally essential and toxic metals for the fetus. As the binding pattern of these metals in amniotic fluid may be one of the determining factors in their availability to the fetus, the objective of this study was to investigate metal binding in vitro. The binding of six trace metals, Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Fe(III), to components of human amniotic fluid was studied by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration at physiological pH, using radioisotopes as tracers and 50 mM TRIS/HCl as the elution buffer. The amniotic fluid was collected at 16-16.5 weeks gestation by amniocentesis and pooled for analysis. Extensive amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd and small amounts of Mn and Ni were bound to high molecular weight proteins with elution patterns similar to those seen for the binding of these metals in serum. In addition, large amounts of Fe, Mn, Ni and Cd and small amounts of Zn and Cu were associated with low molecular weight component(s). The identity of these latter components is unknown, but they play an important biological role in amniotic fluid.

  1. Experimental and theoretical binding affinity between polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and selected phenolic compounds from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Durán-Lara, Esteban F; López-Cortés, Xaviera A; Castro, Ricardo I; Avila-Salas, Fabián; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Laurie, V Felipe; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-02-01

    Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) is a fining agent, widely used in winemaking and brewing, whose mode of action in removing phenolic compounds has not been fully characterised. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experimental and theoretical binding affinity of PVPP towards six phenolic compounds representing different types of phenolic species. The interaction between PVPP and phenolics was evaluated in model solutions, where hydroxyl groups, hydrophobic bonding and steric hindrance were characterised. The results of the study indicated that PVPP exhibits high affinity for quercetin and catechin, moderate affinity for epicatechin, gallic acid and lower affinity for 4-methylcatechol and caffeic acid. The affinity has a direct correlation with the hydroxylation degree of each compound. The results show that the affinity of PVPP towards phenols is related with frontier orbitals. This work demonstrates a direct correlation between the experimental affinity and the interaction energy calculations obtained through computational chemistry methods.

  2. The Binding of Biotin to Sepharose-Avidin Column: Demonstration of the Affinity Chromatography Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, A. D.; Landman, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a biochemistry experiment that illustrates the methodology of affinity chromatography by attaching avidin, a glycoprotein in egg white, to a Sepharose matrix in order to bind biotin-containing proteins. (MLH)

  3. (/sup 125/I)diiodoinsulins. Binding affinities, biologic potencies, and properties of their decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Maceda, B.; Linde, S.; Sonne, O.; Gliemann, J.

    1982-07-01

    Insulin was iodinated with 0.3-0.4 mol /sup 125/I/mol insulin using the lactoperoxidase method. About one-third of the radioactivity incorporated into insulin was in diiodoinsulins and about 40% of these molecules contained diiodotyrosine in residue 14 of the A chain. Most of the remaining molecules contained one A14-monoiodotyrosine and one monoiodotyrosine in either position A19, B16, or B26. The binding affinity and biologic potency of this heterogeneous diiodoinsulin preparation was not significantly different from that of A14-(/sup 125/I)monoiodoinsulin in rat adipocytes, whereas it was slightly reduced in hepatocytes and IM-9 lymphocytes. From the iodine distribution and previous data on the binding affinity of each of the four monoiodoinsulin isomers it was calculated that A14-diiodotyrosine-insulin possesses full binding affinity and biologic potency in adipocytes. Diiodoinsulins isolated from another iodoinsulin preparation (iodate method) contained 58% A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin, and most remaining molecules contained one A19-monoiodotyrosine. The binding affinity of this mixed diiodoinsulin preparation was approximately one-fourth of that of A14-monoiodoinsulin in adipocytes, IM-9 lymphocytes, and hepatocytes. It was calculated that A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin is nearly devoid of binding affinity. The diiodoinsulins (lactoperoxidase method) decayed to iodide (probably from diiodotyrosine-insulin) or to polymers with little specific but a markedly increased nonspecific binding. In addition, the polymers had a marked tendency to adsorb to cellulose acetate filters. Conclusions: 1. The binding affinities of diiodoinsulins range from very low values to values at least as high as that of insulin depending on the positions of the iodine moieties. 2. The relative binding affinities vary among tissues. 3. Polymeric decay products give high nonspecific binding.

  4. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  5. Density-dependent cooperative non-specific binding in solid-phase SELEX affinity selection.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Abdullah; White, Brian S; Lis, John T; Shalloway, David

    2013-08-01

    The non-specific binding of undesired ligands to a target is the primary factor limiting the enrichment of tight-binding ligands in affinity selection. Solution-phase non-specific affinity is determined by the free-energy of ligand binding to a single target. However, the solid-phase affinity might be higher if a ligand bound concurrently to multiple adjacent immobilized targets in a cooperative manner. Cooperativity could emerge in this case as a simple consequence of the relationship between the free energy of binding, localization entropy and the spatial distribution of the immobilized targets. We tested this hypothesis using a SELEX experimental design and found that non-specific RNA aptamer ligands can concurrently bind up to four bead-immobilized peptide targets, and that this can increase their effective binding affinity by two orders-of-magnitude. Binding curves were quantitatively explained by a new statistical mechanical model of density-dependent cooperative binding, which relates cooperative binding to both the target concentration and the target surface density on the immobilizing substrate. Target immobilization plays a key role in SELEX and other ligand enrichment methods, particularly in new multiplexed microfluidic purification devices, and these results have strong implications for optimizing their performance.

  6. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo. In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein–DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein–DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein–DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein–DNA binding. PMID:26635393

  7. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-07

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  8. Androgen-induced sexual dimorphism in high affinity dopamine binding in the brain transcends the hypothalamic-limbic region.

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian-Tehrani, M. H.; Karakiulakis, G.; Le Blond, C. B.; Powell, R.; Thomas, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 High affinity binding of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]-5-HT) was measured in membrane fractions prepared from cerebral cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, thalamus and brain stem of rats of either sex and of rats which had been either neonatally castrated or androgenized. 2 Binding was measured in rats of 8, 20 and 30 days old as well as in adults. 3 [3H]-dopamine bound with approximately 30 nM affinity ahd [3H]-5-HT with approximately 10 nM affinity to all areas of the brain tested. The relative inhibitory effects of haloperidol, apomorphine, cis-flupenthixol, unlabelled dopamine, noradrenaline, spiroperone, (+)-butaclamol, fluphenazine, pimozide and 5-HT on [3H]-dopamine binding in the cerebral cortex was consistent with receptor status for the binding components there as were the relative inhibitory effects of methysergide, dopamine, fluoxetine and ouabain on [3H]-5-HT binding in the fore brain. 4 Neither [3H]-dopamine nor [3H]-5-HT binding varied with the state of the sexual cycle in females. 5 There were no sexual differences in [3H]-5-HT binding in any of the brain areas tested nor was it affected by neonatal androgenization or neonatal castration. 6 [3H]-dopamine binding was greater in the cerebral cortex and amygdala of male than of female rats. These differences could be mimicked artificially by neonatal castration of males (female type development) or neonatal androgenization of females (male type development). Sexual dimorphism did not become overt until 20 days of age and did not extend to hypothalamus, thalamus or brain stem. 7 It is concluded that neonatal sex differences in exposure to steroid hormones has permanent effects on the number of dopamine binding sites in the cerebral cortex and is suggested that this sexual dimorphism extends to the amygdala. PMID:7074286

  9. Photoaffinity labelling of high affinity dopamine binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G.M.; McCarry, B.E.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-03-01

    A photoactive analogue of the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) has been synthesized and used to photoaffinity label dopamine binding proteins prepared from bovine caudate nucleus. N-(3-)N'-4-azidobenzamidol)-aminopropyl)-aminopropyl)-ADTN (AzB-AP-ADTN) was incubated with caudate membranes and irradiated with UV light. Membranes were then repeatedly washed by centrifugation to remove excess photolabel. A binding assay, using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 (a D/sub 1/ specific antagonist), was then performed to evaluate the loss of receptor density in the photolyzed preparation. AzB-AP-ADTN irreversibly blocked (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding in a dose-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease in the B/sub max/, with no significant change in the K/sub d/, of (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding. Compounds which compete for D/sub 1/ receptor binding (such as dopamine, SKF 38393 or apomorphine), proteted the SCH 23390 binding site from inactivation. This data would suggest that the novel photoaffinity ligand, AzB-AP-ADTN, can covalently label the D/sub 1/ (adenylate cyclase linked) dopamine receptor.

  10. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  11. A simple, high-resolution method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Boger, D L; Fink, B E; Brunette, S R; Tse, W C; Hedrick, M P

    2001-06-27

    Full details of the development of a simple, nondestructive, and high-throughput method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are described. The method is based on the loss of fluorescence derived from the displacement of ethidium bromide or thiazole orange from the DNA of interest or, in selected instances, the change in intrinsic fluorescence of a DNA binding agent itself and is applicable for assessing relative or absolute DNA binding affinities. Enlisting a library of hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides containing all five base pair (512 hairpins) or four base pair (136 hairpins) sequences displayed in a 96-well format, a compound's rank order binding to all possible sequences is generated, resulting in a high-resolution definition of its sequence selectivity using this fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay. As such, the technique complements the use of footprinting or affinity cleavage for the establishment of DNA binding selectivity and provides the information at a higher resolution. The merged bar graphs generated by this rank order binding provide a qualitative way to compare, or profile, DNA binding affinity and selectivity. The 96-well format assay (512 hairpins) can be conducted at a minimal cost (presently ca. $100 for hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides/assay with ethiduim bromide or less with thiazole orange), with a rapid readout using a fluorescent plate reader (15 min), and is adaptable to automation (Tecan Genesis Workstation 100 robotic system). Its use in generating a profile of DNA binding selectivity for several agents including distamycin A, netropsin, DAPI, Hoechst 33258, and berenil is described. Techniques for establishing binding constants from quantitative titrations are compared, and recommendations are made for use of a Scatchard or curve fitting analysis of the titration binding curves as a reliable means to quantitate the binding affinity.

  12. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins.

  13. Circular permutation of the starch-binding domain: inversion of ligand selectivity with increased affinity.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Preyesh; Tseng, Kai-Li; Liu, Yu-Nan; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2012-03-07

    Proteins containing starch-binding domains (SBDs) are used in a variety of scientific and technological applications. A circularly permutated SBD (CP90) with improved affinity and selectivity toward longer-chain carbohydrates was synthesized, suggesting that a new starch-binding protein may be developed for specific scientific and industrial applications.

  14. Definition of the affinity of binding between human von Willebrand factor and coagulation factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Ganz, P R; Atkins, J S; Palmer, D S; Dudani, A K; Hashemi, S; Luison, F

    1991-10-15

    Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor are two plasma proteins essential for effective hemostasis. In vivo, they form a non-covalent complex whose association appears to be metal ion dependent. However, a precise definition of the nature of the molecular forces governing their association remains to be defined, as does their binding affinity. In this paper we have determined the dissociation constant and stoichiometry for Factor VIII binding to immobilized von Willebrand factor. The data demonstrate that these proteins interact saturably and with relatively high affinity. Computer assisted analyses of the Scatchard data favour a two site binding model. The higher affinity site was found to have a Kd of 62 (+/- 13) x 10(-12) M while that of the lower affinity site was 380 (+/- 92) x 10(-12) M. The density of Factor VIII binding sites (Bmax) present on von Willebrand factor was 31 (+/- 3) pM for the high affinity binding site and 46 (+/- 6) pM for the lower site, corresponding to a calculated Factor VIII: von Willebrand factor binding ratio of 1:33 and 1:23, respectively.

  15. Increasing the affinity of selective bZIP-binding peptides through surface residue redesign

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jenifer B; Reinke, Aaron W; Keating, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    The coiled-coil dimer is a prevalent protein interaction motif that is important for many cellular processes. The basic leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are one family of proteins for which coiled-coil mediated dimerization is essential for function, and misregulation of bZIPs can lead to disease states including cancer. This makes coiled coils attractive protein–protein interaction targets to disrupt using engineered molecules. Previous work designing peptides to compete with native coiled-coil interactions focused primarily on designing the core residues of the interface to achieve affinity and specificity. However, folding studies on the model bZIP GCN4 show that coiled-coil surface residues also contribute to binding affinity. Here we extend a prior study in which peptides were designed to bind tightly and specifically to representative members of each of 20 human bZIP families. These “anti-bZIP” peptides were designed with an emphasis on target-binding specificity, with contributions to design-target specificity and affinity engineered considering only the coiled-coil core residues. High-throughput testing using peptide arrays indicated many successes. We have now measured the binding affinities and specificities of anti-bZIPs that bind to FOS, XBP1, ATF6, and CREBZF in solution and tested whether redesigning the surface residues can increase design–target affinity. Incorporating residues that favor helix formation into the designs increased binding affinities in all cases, providing low-nanomolar binders of each target. However, changes in surface electrostatic interactions sometimes changed the binding specificity of the designed peptides. Impact Statement Designing molecules to bind native proteins is a fundamental objective in protein engineering. Ideally, designs should bind their targets both tightly and selectively. This paper reports binding affinities and specificities for computationally designed peptides that interact with human b

  16. De Novo Identification and Biophysical Characterization of Transcription Factor Binding Sites with Microfluidic Affinity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, Polly M.; Gerber, Doron; Tran, Danh; Zheng, Jiashun; Li, Hao; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated in part by protein transcription factors (TFs) that bind target regulatory DNA sequences. Predicting DNA binding sites and affinities from transcription factor sequence or structure is difficult; therefore, experimental data are required to link TFs to target sequences. We present a microfluidics-based approach for de novo discovery and quantitative biophysical characterization of DNA target sequences. We validated our technique by measuring sequence preferences for 28 S. cerevisiae TFs with a variety of DNA binding domains, including several that have proven difficult to study via other techniques. For each TF, we measured relative binding affinities to oligonucleotides covering all possible 8-bp DNA sequences to create a comprehensive map of sequence preferences; for 4 TFs, we also determined absolute affinities. We anticipate that these data and future use of this technique will provide information essential for understanding TF specificity, improving identification of regulatory sites, and reconstructing regulatory interactions. PMID:20802496

  17. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  18. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  19. Prediction of SAMPL4 host-guest binding affinities using funnel metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Ya-Wen; Söderhjelm, Pär

    2014-04-01

    Accurately predicting binding affinities between ligands and macromolecules has been a much sought-after goal. A tremendous amount of resources can be saved in the pharmaceutical industry through accurate binding-affinity prediction and hence correct decision-making for the drug discovery processes. Owing to the structural complexity of macromolecules, one of the issues in binding affinity prediction using molecular dynamics is the adequate sampling of the conformational space. Recently, the funnel metadynamics method (Limongelli et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110:6358, 2013) was developed to enhance the sampling of the ligand at the binding site as well as in the solvated state, and offer the possibility to predict the absolute binding free energy. We apply funnel metadynamics to predict host-guest binding affinities for the cucurbit[7]uril host as part of the SAMPL4 blind challenge. Using total simulation times of 300-400 ns per ligand, we show that the errors due to inadequate sampling are below 1 kcal/mol. However, despite the large investment in terms of computational time, the results compared to experiment are not better than a random guess. As we obtain differences of up to 11 kcal/mol when switching between two commonly used force fields (with automatically generated parameters), we strongly believe that in the pursuit of accurate binding free energies a more careful force-field parametrization is needed to address this type of system.

  20. Binding affinity of five PBPs to Ostrinia sex pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) of Lepidoptera function in chemical communication, mate attraction and recognition, and may be involved in reinforcement of sexual isolation between recently diverged species. Directional selection was previously predicted between PBP3 orthologs of the corn borer si...

  1. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  2. Kosmotropes enhance the yield of antibody purified by affinity chromatography using immobilized bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngo, That T; Narinesingh, Dyer

    2008-01-01

    The yield of antibody purified using affinity chromatography on immobilized Protein A or Protein G was increased up to 5-fold (500%) by including kosmotropic salts in the binding buffer. The binding buffer is used to equilibrate the affinity column before applying a sample to the column and also to dilute the sample prior to loading onto the affinity column to optimize conditions for a maximal binding of antibodies to affinity gels. In this study, the kosmotropic salts that were effective in greatly increasing antibody binding to Protein A included both inorganic and organic salts of ammonium; sodium; or potassium sulfate, phosphate, polycarboxylates; for example, succinate, citrate, isocitrate, N-(2-hydroxyethylene diamine triacetate (HEDTA), ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and ethylene glycol-O,O'-bis(2-aminoethyl)-N,N,N'N'-tetra acetate(EGTA). On an equal-molar basis, the greater the number of carboxylic groups within the polycarboxylate molecule, the greater the increase in the yield of the purified antibody that was observed. The data show that kosmotropes can be used as effective additives to enhance the binding of immunoglobulins to Protein A or Protein G gels with a resultant increase in the yield of the purified antibodies. Thus, it appears that strongly hydrated anions (citrate, sulfate, and phosphate) and weakly hydrated cations (ammonium, potassium) increase the yield of antibody purified on either Protein A or Protein G affinity gels.

  3. Probing the binding affinity of plasma proteins adsorbed on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Shaoning

    2017-04-06

    Nanoparticle (NP) surfaces are modified immediately by the adsorption of proteins when exposed to human blood, leading to the formation of a protein corona. The adsorption of serum proteins is the key process for exploring the bioapplication and biosafety of NPs. In this study, NP-protein binding affinity (Ka) was investigated. Some serum proteins, such as human serum albumin (HSA), trypsin (TRP), hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (MB), immunoglobulin G (IgG), carbonic anhydrase (CA), fibrinogen (FIB), chymotrypsin and r-globulin, were used with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to address binding affinity according to isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) combined with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence quenching. The NP protein binding affinities determined by the two methods were in agreement, and depended on the protein properties and size of the NPs. The two methods are convenient, and the results are highly comparable. These methods can be extended to determine the binding affinity of NP protein interactions. The adsorption of proteins upon the AuNP surface is a complex process and depends on several factors, but the binding affinities are higher for proteins with more cysteine residues located on the surface.

  4. Wheat germ poly(A) binding protein enhances the binding affinity of eukaryotic initiation factor 4F and (iso)4F for cap analogues.

    PubMed

    Wei, C C; Balasta, M L; Ren, J; Goss, D J

    1998-02-17

    Most eukaryotic mRNAs contain a 5' cap (m7GppX) and a 3' poly(A) tail to increase synergistically the translational efficiency. Recently, the poly(A) binding protein (PABP) and cap-binding protein, eIF-4F, were found to interact [Le et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 16247-16255; Tarun and Sachs (1996) EMBO J. 15, 7168-7177]. These data suggest that PABP may exert its effect on translational efficiency either by increasing the formation of initiation factor-mRNA complex or by enhancing ribosome recycling. To investigate the functional consequences of these interactions, the fluorescent cap analogue, ant-m7GTP, which is an environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe [Ren and Goss (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3629-3634] was used to investigate the cap-binding affinity. Our data show that the binding of eIF-(iso)4F or eIF-4F to cap analogue enhanced their binding affinity toward PABP approximately 40-fold. Similarly, the eIF-4F/PABP or eIF-(iso)4F/PABP complexes show a 40-fold enhancement of cap analogue binding as compared to eIF-4F or eIF-(iso)4F alone. At least part of the enhancement of the translational initiation by PABP can be accounted for by direct changes in cap-binding affinity. The interactions of these components also suggest a mechanism whereby the poly(A) tail is brought into close proximity with m7G cap. This effect was examined by fluorescence energy transfer, and it was determined that the PABP/eIF-4F complex could bind both poly(A) and 5' cap simultaneously.

  5. A Low Affinity Ground State Conformation for the Dynein Microtubule Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Lynn; Tikhonenko, Irina; Banavali, Nilesh K.; LeMaster, David M.; Koonce, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Dynein interacts with microtubules through a dedicated binding domain that is dynamically controlled to achieve high or low affinity, depending on the state of nucleotide bound in a distant catalytic pocket. The active sites for microtubule binding and ATP hydrolysis communicate via conformational changes transduced through a ∼10-nm length antiparallel coiled-coil stalk, which connects the binding domain to the roughly 300-kDa motor core. Recently, an x-ray structure of the murine cytoplasmic dynein microtubule binding domain (MTBD) in a weak affinity conformation was published, containing a covalently constrained β+ registry for the coiled-coil stalk segment (Carter, A. P., Garbarino, J. E., Wilson-Kubalek, E. M., Shipley, W. E., Cho, C., Milligan, R. A., Vale, R. D., and Gibbons, I. R. (2008) Science 322, 1691–1695). We here present an NMR analysis of the isolated MTBD from Dictyostelium discoideum that demonstrates the coiled-coil β+ registry corresponds to the low energy conformation for this functional region of dynein. Addition of sequence encoding roughly half of the coiled-coil stalk proximal to the binding tip results in a decreased affinity of the MTBD for microtubules. In contrast, addition of the complete coiled-coil sequence drives the MTBD to the conformationally unstable, high affinity binding state. These results suggest a thermodynamic coupling between conformational free energy differences in the α and β+ registries of the coiled-coil stalk that acts as a switch between high and low affinity conformations of the MTBD. A balancing of opposing conformations in the stalk and MTBD enables potentially modest long-range interactions arising from ATP binding in the motor core to induce a relaxation of the MTBD into the stable low affinity state. PMID:20351100

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter isolates from sediments and the association with phenanthrene binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    In this study, selected spectroscopic characteristics of sediment organic matter (SOM) were compared and discussed with respect to their different isolation methods, the source discrimination capabilities, and the association with the extent of phenanthrene binding. A total of 16 sediments were collected from three categorized locations including a costal lake, industrial areas, and upper streams, each of which is likely influenced by the organic sources of algal production, industrial effluent, and terrestrial input, respectively. The spectroscopic properties related to aromatic structures and terrestrial humic acids were more pronounced for alkaline extractable organic matter (AEOM) isolates than for the SOM isolates based on water soluble extracts and pore water. The three categorized sampling locations were the most differentiated in the AEOM isolates, suggesting AEOM may be the most representative SOM isolates in terms of describing the chemical properties and the organic sources of SOM. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) based on fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) showed that a combination of three fluorescent groups could represent all the fluorescence features of SOM. The three categorized sampling locations were well discriminated by the percent distributions of humic-like fluorescent groups of the AEOM isolates. The relative distribution of terrestrial humic-like fluorophores was well correlated with the extent of phenanthrene binding (r=0.571; p<0.05), suggesting that the presence of humic acids in SOM may contribute to the enhancement of binding with hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA) further demonstrated that the extent of SOM's binding affinity might be affected by the degree of biogeochemical transformation in SOM.

  7. Ganglioside embedded in reconstituted lipoprotein binds cholera toxin with elevated affinity.

    PubMed

    Bricarello, Daniel A; Mills, Emily J; Petrlova, Jitka; Voss, John C; Parikh, Atul N

    2010-09-01

    The ability to exogenously present cell-surface receptors in high-affinity conformations in a synthetic system offers an opportunity to provide host cells with protection from pathogenic toxins. This strategy requires improvement of the synthetic receptor binding affinity against its native counterpart, particularly with polyvalent toxins where clustering of membrane receptors can hinder binding. Here we demonstrate that reconstituted lipoprotein, nanometer-sized discoidal lipid bilayers bounded by apolipoprotein and functionalized by incorporation of pathogen receptors, provides a means to enhance toxin-receptor binding through molecular-level control over the receptor microenvironment (specifically, its rigidity, composition, and heterogeneity). Using a Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based assay, we found that reconstituted lipoprotein incorporating low concentrations of ganglioside monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) binds polymeric cholera toxin with significantly higher affinity than liposomes or supported lipid bilayers, most likely a result of the enhanced control over receptor clustering provided by the lipoprotein platform. Using wide-area epifluorescence, we found that this enhanced binding capacity can be effectively utilized to divert cholera toxin away from populations of healthy mammalian cells. In summary, we found that reconstitutions of high-density lipoprotein can be engineered to include specific pathogen receptors; that their pathogen binding affinity is altered, presumably due to attenuation of receptor aggregation; and that these assemblies are effective at protecting cells from biological toxins.

  8. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  9. Influence of the galloyl moiety in tea catechins on binding affinity for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Kanako; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Katsumata, Tomoharu; Onobori, Ken-ichi; Mori, Taiki; Suzuki, Yukiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    The major catechins of green tea extract are (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). Recent research has indicated that catechins form complexes with human serum albumin (HSA) in blood, and differences in their binding affinity toward HSA are believed to modulate their bioavailability. In this study, we kinetically investigated the interaction between the catechins and HSA immobilized on a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The association constants obtained from the frequency changes of QCM revealed interactions of ECg and EGCg with HSA that are 100 times stronger than those of EC and EGC. Furthermore, comparisons of these catechins by native-gel electrophoresis/blotting with redox-cycling staining revealed that, in a phosphate buffer, ECg and EGCg have a higher binding affinity toward HSA than EC and EGC. These observations indicate that catechins with a galloyl moiety have higher binding affinities toward HSA than catechins lacking a galloyl moiety.

  10. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water.

  11. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  12. Multisite phosphorylation of the NDC80 complex gradually tunes its microtubule-binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Mick, Jeanne E.; Maslennikov, Evgeny; Nikashin, Boris; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) attachment to kinetochores is vitally important for cell division, but how these interactions are controlled by phosphorylation is not well known. We used quantitative approaches in vitro combined with molecular dynamics simulations to examine phosphoregulation of the NDC80 complex, a core kinetochore component. We show that the outputs from multiple phosphorylation events on the unstructured tail of its Hec1 subunit are additively integrated to elicit gradual tuning of NDC80-MT binding both in vitro and in silico. Conformational plasticity of the Hec1 tail enables it to serve as a phosphorylation-controlled rheostat, providing a new paradigm for regulating the affinity of MT binders. We also show that cooperativity of NDC80 interactions is weak and is unaffected by NDC80 phosphorylation. This in vitro finding strongly supports our model that independent molecular binding events to MTs by individual NDC80 complexes, rather than their structured oligomers, regulate the dynamics and stability of kinetochore-MT attachments in dividing cells. PMID:25808492

  13. High affinity binding of [3H]-tyramine in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, A.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum assay conditions for the association of [3H]-para-tyramine [( 3H]-pTA) with rat brain membranes were characterized, and a saturable, reversible, drug-specific, and high affinity binding mechanism for this trace amine was revealed. The binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-pTA in the corpus striatum was approximately 30 times higher than that in the cerebellum, with similar dissociation constants (KD). The binding process of [3H]-pTA involved the dopamine system, inasmuch as (a) highest binding capacity was associated with dopamine-rich regions; (b) dopamine and pTA equally displaced specifically bound [3H]-pTA; (c) there was a severe loss in striatal binding capacity for [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, for [3H]-dopamine, following unilateral nigrostriatal lesion; (d) acute in vivo reserpine treatment markedly decreased the density of [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, of [3H]-dopamine binding sites. In competition experiments [3H]-pTA binding sites, though displaying nanomolar affinity for dopamine, revealed micromolar affinities for the dopamine agonists apomorphine and pergolide, and for several dopamine antagonists, while having very high affinity for reserpine, a marker for the catecholamine transporter in synaptic vesicles. The binding process of [3H]-pTA was both energy-dependent (ouabain-sensitive), and ATP-Mg2+-insensitive; furthermore, the potencies of various drugs in competing for [3H]-pTA binding to rat striatal membranes correlated well (r = 0.96) with their reported potencies in inhibiting [3H]-dopamine uptake into striatal synaptosomes. It is concluded that [3H]-pTA binds at a site located on/within synaptic vesicles where it is involved in the transport mechanism of dopamine. PMID:3801770

  14. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-09-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression.

  15. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression. PMID:27628341

  16. On the binding affinity of macromolecular interactions: daring to ask why proteins interact

    PubMed Central

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins are orchestrated in a precise and time-dependent manner, underlying cellular function. The binding affinity, defined as the strength of these interactions, is translated into physico-chemical terms in the dissociation constant (Kd), the latter being an experimental measure that determines whether an interaction will be formed in solution or not. Predicting binding affinity from structural models has been a matter of active research for more than 40 years because of its fundamental role in drug development. However, all available approaches are incapable of predicting the binding affinity of protein–protein complexes from coordinates alone. Here, we examine both theoretical and experimental limitations that complicate the derivation of structure–affinity relationships. Most work so far has concentrated on binary interactions. Systems of increased complexity are far from being understood. The main physico-chemical measure that relates to binding affinity is the buried surface area, but it does not hold for flexible complexes. For the latter, there must be a significant entropic contribution that will have to be approximated in the future. We foresee that any theoretical modelling of these interactions will have to follow an integrative approach considering the biology, chemistry and physics that underlie protein–protein recognition. PMID:23235262

  17. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  18. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  19. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered.

  20. Drug design for protein kinases and phosphatases: flexible-receptor docking, binding affinity and specificity, and drug-binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chung F; Bairy, Sneha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews some of our experiences on applying computational techniques to aid the design of drugs targeting protein kinases and phosphatases. It is not a comprehensive review. Rather, it focuses on several less explored approaches or ideas that we have experiences on. It reviews some recent improvements on the Poisson-Boltzmann/Surface Area model for calculating binding affinity and discusses ways to perform calculations that are more tolerant to statistical and systematic errors. Several new ways to incorporate protein flexibility in molecular docking and estimating binding affinity are also discussed. Its discussions also go beyond binding affinity to considering drug-binding kinetics, not only on investigating protein-ligand interactions in isolation, but also on accounting for upstream and downstream influences that can occur in cells, through kinetic modeling of cell signaling. This review also describes a quick molecular simulation method for understanding drug-binding kinetics at the molecular level, with the hope of generating guiding principles for designing drugs with the desired kinetic properties. Sources of drug-binding selectivity that appear obvious but often overlooked are also discussed.

  1. A luminescent affinity tag for proteins based on the terbium(III)-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Shinji; Tanaka, Shogo; Inoue, Sayomi; Komatsu, Hideyuki

    2012-03-01

    Genetically encoded tags attached to proteins of interest are widely exploited for proteome analysis. Here, we present Tb(3+)-binding peptides (TBPs) which can be used for both luminescent measurements and affinity purification of proteins. TBPs consist of acidic amino acid residues and tryptophan residues which serve as Tb(3+)-binding sites and sensitizers for Tb(3+) luminescence, respectively. The Tb(3+) complexes of TBPs fused to a target protein exhibited luminescence characteristic of Tb(3+) by excitation of the tryptophan residue, and fusion proteins fused to one of the TPBs were successfully isolated from Escherichia coli cell lysate by affinity chromatography with a Tb(3+)-immobilized solid support.

  2. Comparison of Relative Binding Affinities for Trout and Human Estrogen Receptor Based upon Different Competitive Binding Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a predictive model based upon a single aquatic species inevitably raises the question of whether this information is valid for other species. To partially address this question, relative binding affinities (RBA) for six alkylphenols (para-substituted, n- and b...

  3. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  4. Determinants of the Differential Antizyme-Binding Affinity of Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Chin; Hsu, Den-Hua; Huang, Chi-Liang; Liu, Yi-Liang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is conserved in all species from bacteria to humans. Mammalian ODC is degraded by the proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner by direct binding to the antizyme (AZ). In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei ODC has a low binding affinity toward AZ. In this study, we identified key amino acid residues that govern the differential AZ binding affinity of human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC. Multiple sequence alignments of the ODC putative AZ-binding site highlights several key amino acid residues that are different between the human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequences, including residue 119, 124,125, 129, 136, 137 and 140 (the numbers is for human ODC). We generated a septuple human ODC mutant protein where these seven bases were mutated to match the Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequence. The septuple mutant protein was much less sensitive to AZ inhibition compared to the WT protein, suggesting that these amino acid residues play a role in human ODC-AZ binding. Additional experiments with sextuple mutants suggest that residue 137 plays a direct role in AZ binding, and residues 119 and 140 play secondary roles in AZ binding. The dissociation constants were also calculated to quantify the affinity of the ODC-AZ binding interaction. The Kd value for the wild type ODC protein-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_WT]-AZ) is approximately 0.22 μM, while the Kd value for the septuple mutant-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_7M]-AZ) is approximately 12.4 μM. The greater than 50-fold increase in [ODC_7M]-AZ binding affinity shows that the ODC-7M enzyme has a much lower binding affinity toward AZ. For the mutant proteins ODC_7M(-Q119H) and ODC_7M(-V137D), the Kd was 1.4 and 1.2 μM, respectively. These affinities are 6-fold higher than the WT_ODC Kd, which suggests that residues 119 and 137 play a role in AZ binding. PMID:22073206

  5. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  6. Observation of interactions of human serum components with transferrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Taga, Atsushi; Maruyama, Rie; Yamamoto, Yuka; Honda, Susumu

    2008-01-22

    Interaction of human transferrin (TF) with human serum components was investigated by affinity capillary electrophoresis. It was found that any peaks of human serum protein fractions did not give migration time change on addition of intact TF to running buffer (50mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.5), whereas two peaks belonging to alpha-globulin fraction showed marked acceleration upon addition of desialylated TF. These results provide strong evidence that the sialic acid residue in TF masks its binding ability to serum proteins. The association constants of desialylated TF to these interactive components, estimated based on the double reciprocal plot of migration time change vs. glycoprotein concentration, were at a high level of 10(7)M(-1). TF is well known as a ferric ion transfer protein, and hence formation of this protein might be changed by ferric ion. The presence of iron(II) played no essential role in this interaction, though its influence was not negligible.

  7. Four-body atomic potential for modeling protein-ligand binding affinity: application to enzyme-inhibitor binding energy prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Models that are capable of reliably predicting binding affinities for protein-ligand complexes play an important role the field of structure-guided drug design. Methods Here, we begin by applying the computational geometry technique of Delaunay tessellation to each set of atomic coordinates for over 1400 diverse macromolecular structures, for the purpose of deriving a four-body statistical potential that serves as a topological scoring function. Next, we identify a second, independent set of three hundred protein-ligand complexes, having both high-resolution structures and known dissociation constants. Two-thirds of these complexes are randomly selected to train a predictive model of binding affinity as follows: two tessellations are generated in each case, one for the entire complex and another strictly for the isolated protein without its bound ligand, and a topological score is computed for each tessellation with the four-body potential. Predicted protein-ligand binding affinity is then based on an empirically derived linear function of the difference between both topological scores, one that appropriately scales the value of this difference. Results A comparison between experimental and calculated binding affinity values over the two hundred complexes reveals a Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with a standard error of SE = 1.98 kcal/mol. To validate the method, we similarly generated two tessellations for each of the remaining protein-ligand complexes, computed their topological scores and the difference between the two scores for each complex, and applied the previously derived linear transformation of this topological score difference to predict binding affinities. For these one hundred complexes, we again observe a correlation of r = 0.79 (SE = 1.93 kcal/mol) between known and calculated binding affinities. Applying our model to an independent test set of high-resolution structures for three hundred diverse enzyme-inhibitor complexes

  8. Rapid and Reliable Binding Affinity Prediction of Bromodomain Inhibitors: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Binding free energies of bromodomain inhibitors are calculated with recently formulated approaches, namely ESMACS (enhanced sampling of molecular dynamics with approximation of continuum solvent) and TIES (thermodynamic integration with enhanced sampling). A set of compounds is provided by GlaxoSmithKline, which represents a range of chemical functionality and binding affinities. The predicted binding free energies exhibit a good Spearman correlation of 0.78 with the experimental data from the 3-trajectory ESMACS, and an excellent correlation of 0.92 from the TIES approach where applicable. Given access to suitable high end computing resources and a high degree of automation, we can compute individual binding affinities in a few hours with precisions no greater than 0.2 kcal/mol for TIES, and no larger than 0.34 and 1.71 kcal/mol for the 1- and 3-trajectory ESMACS approaches. PMID:28005370

  9. Pinealectomy increases ouabain high-affinity binding sites and dissociation constant in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Acuña Castroviejo, D; del Aguila, C M; Fernández, B; Gomar, M D; Castillo, J L

    1991-06-24

    The effect of the pineal gland on the ouabain high-affinity binding sites (Kd = 3.1 +/- 0.4 nM, Bmax = 246.4 +/- 18.4 fmol/mg protein) in rat cerebral cortex was studied. Pinealectomy increased Bmax (940.7 +/- 42.8 fmol/mg protein) and Kd (7.6 +/- 1.5 nM) while melatonin injection (100 micrograms/kg b.wt.) counteracted these effects, restoring kinetic parameters (Kd = 1.9 +/- 0.05 nM; Bmax = 262.2 +/- 29.6 fmol/mg prot) to control values. Melatonin activity on ouabain binding in vitro did not depend upon a direct effect on the binding sites themselves. However, in competition experiments, melatonin increased binding affinity of ouabain as shown by the decreased IC50 values.

  10. Development of predictive models for predicting binding affinity of endocrine disrupting chemicals to fish sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihui; Yang, Xianhai; Yin, Cen; Wei, Mengbi; He, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Disturbing the transport process is a crucial pathway for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) exerting disrupting endocrine function. However, this mechanism has not received enough attention compared with that of hormones receptors and synthetase. Recently, we have explored the interaction between EDCs and sex hormone-binding globulin of human (hSHBG). In this study, interactions between EDCs and sex hormone-binding globulin of eight fish species (fSHBG) were investigated by employing classification methods and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). In the modeling, the relative binding affinity (RBA) of a chemical with 17β-estradiol binding to fSHBG was selected as the endpoint. Classification models were developed for two fish species, while QSAR models were established for the other six fish species. Statistical results indicated that the models had satisfactory goodness of fit, robustness and predictive ability, and that application domain covered a large number of endogenous and exogenous steroidal and non-steroidal chemicals. Additionally, by comparing the log RBA values, it was found that the same chemical may have different affinities for fSHBG from different fish species, thus species diversity should be taken into account. However, the affinity of fSHBG showed a high correlation for fishes within the same Order (i.e., Salmoniformes, Cypriniformes, Perciformes and Siluriformes), thus the fSHBG binding data for one fish species could be used to extrapolate other fish species in the same Order.

  11. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  12. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  13. Calculating protein-ligand binding affinities with MMPBSA: Method and error analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhao; Nguyen, Peter H; Pham, Kevin; Huynh, Danielle; Le, Thanh-Binh Nancy; Wang, Hongli; Ren, Pengyu; Luo, Ray

    2016-10-15

    Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MMPBSA) methods have become widely adopted in estimating protein-ligand binding affinities due to their efficiency and high correlation with experiment. Here different computational alternatives were investigated to assess their impact to the agreement of MMPBSA calculations with experiment. Seven receptor families with both high-quality crystal structures and binding affinities were selected. First the performance of nonpolar solvation models was studied and it was found that the modern approach that separately models hydrophobic and dispersion interactions dramatically reduces RMSD's of computed relative binding affinities. The numerical setup of the Poisson-Boltzmann methods was analyzed next. The data shows that the impact of grid spacing to the quality of MMPBSA calculations is small: the numerical error at the grid spacing of 0.5 Å is already small enough to be negligible. The impact of different atomic radius sets and different molecular surface definitions was further analyzed and weak influences were found on the agreement with experiment. The influence of solute dielectric constant was also analyzed: a higher dielectric constant generally improves the overall agreement with experiment, especially for highly charged binding pockets. The data also showed that the converged simulations caused slight reduction in the agreement with experiment. Finally the direction of estimating absolute binding free energies was briefly explored. Upon correction of the binding-induced rearrangement free energy and the binding entropy lost, the errors in absolute binding affinities were also reduced dramatically when the modern nonpolar solvent model was used, although further developments were apparently necessary to further improve the MMPBSA methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The statistical-thermodynamic basis for computation of binding affinities: a critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, M K; Given, J A; Bush, B L; McCammon, J A

    1997-01-01

    Although the statistical thermodynamics of noncovalent binding has been considered in a number of theoretical papers, few methods of computing binding affinities are derived explicitly from this underlying theory. This has contributed to uncertainty and controversy in certain areas. This article therefore reviews and extends the connections of some important computational methods with the underlying statistical thermodynamics. A derivation of the standard free energy of binding forms the basis of this review. This derivation should be useful in formulating novel computational methods for predicting binding affinities. It also permits several important points to be established. For example, it is found that the double-annihilation method of computing binding energy does not yield the standard free energy of binding, but can be modified to yield this quantity. The derivation also makes it possible to define clearly the changes in translational, rotational, configurational, and solvent entropy upon binding. It is argued that molecular mass has a negligible effect upon the standard free energy of binding for biomolecular systems, and that the cratic entropy defined by Gurney is not a useful concept. In addition, the use of continuum models of the solvent in binding calculations is reviewed, and a formalism is presented for incorporating a limited number of solvent molecules explicitly. PMID:9138555

  15. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  16. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected.

  17. Soybean. beta. -glucan binding sites display maximal affinity for a heptaglucoside phytoalexin-elicitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cosio, E.G.; Waldmueller, T.; Frey, T.; Ebel, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The affinity of soybean {beta}-glucan-binding sites for a synthetic heptaglucan elicitor was tested in a ligand-competition assay against a {sup 125}I-labeled 1,3-1,6-{beta}-glucan preparation (avg. DP=20). Half-maximal displacement of label (IC{sub 50}) was obtained at 9nM heptaglucan, the highest affinity of all fractions tested to date. Displacement followed a uniform sigmoidal pattern and was complete at 1{mu}M indicating access of heptaglucan to all sites available to the labeled elicitor. A mathematical model was used to predict IC{sub 50} values according to the DP of glucan fragments obtained from fungal cell walls. The lowest IC{sub 50} predicted by this model is 3nM. Binding affinity of the glucans was compared with their elicitor activity in a bioassay.

  18. Identifying Affinity Classes of Inorganic Materials Binding Sequences via a Graph-Based Model.

    PubMed

    Du, Nan; Knecht, Marc R; Swihart, Mark T; Tang, Zhenghua; Walsh, Tiffany R; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in bionanotechnology have recently generated growing interest in identifying peptides that bind to inorganic materials and classifying them based on their inorganic material affinities. However, there are some distinct characteristics of inorganic materials binding sequence data that limit the performance of many widely-used classification methods when applied to this problem. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to predict the affinity classes of peptide sequences with respect to an associated inorganic material. We first generate a large set of simulated peptide sequences based on an amino acid transition matrix tailored for the specific inorganic material. Then the probability of test sequences belonging to a specific affinity class is calculated by minimizing an objective function. In addition, the objective function is minimized through iterative propagation of probability estimates among sequences and sequence clusters. Results of computational experiments on two real inorganic material binding sequence data sets show that the proposed framework is highly effective for identifying the affinity classes of inorganic material binding sequences. Moreover, the experiments on the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) data set shows that the proposed framework is general and can be applied to traditional protein sequences.

  19. Calculation of Absolute Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity Using Path and Endpoint Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    solvent method (35) using an explicit solvent layer width of 10 Å. The hybrid solvent model (35) involves encapsulating a biological solute by a layer of...Gilson. 2004. Calculation of cyclodextrin binding affinities: energy, entropy, and implications for drug design. Biophys. J. 87:3035–3049. 42. Janezic, D

  20. Calculation of Absolute Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity Using Path and Endpoint Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    an explicit solvent layer width of 10 Å. The hybrid solvent model (35) involves encapsulating a biological solute by a layer of water molecules...of cyclodextrin binding affinities: energy, entropy, and implications for drug design. Biophys. J. 87:3035–3049. 42. Janezic, D., R. M. Venable, and

  1. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Mace G.

    2017-01-01

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D) protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors. PMID:28061508

  2. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95/sup 0/C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na/sup +/ ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC/sub 50/ = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC/sub 50/ values below ..mu..M concentrations.

  3. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively.

  4. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K.; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G.; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H.

    2017-01-01

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. PMID:27899623

  5. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J.; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L.; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R2 = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R2 = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures.

  6. Application of Binding Free Energy Calculations to Prediction of Binding Modes and Affinities of MDM2 and MDMX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    Molecular docking is widely used to obtain binding modes and binding affinities of a molecule to a given target protein. Despite considerable efforts, however, prediction of both properties by docking remains challenging mainly due to protein’s structural flexibility and inaccuracy of scoring functions. Here, an integrated approach has been developed to improve the accuracy of binding mode and affinity prediction, and tested for small molecule MDM2 and MDMX antagonists. In this approach, initial candidate models selected from docking are subjected to equilibration MD simulations to further filter the models. Free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations are then applied to the filtered ligand models to enhance the ability in predicting the near-native ligand conformation. The calculated binding free energies for MDM2 complexes are overestimated compared to experimental measurements mainly due to the difficulties in sampling highly flexible apo-MDM2. Nonetheless, the FEP/MD binding free energy calculations are more promising for discriminating binders from nonbinders than docking scores. In particular, the comparison between the MDM2 and MDMX results suggests that apo-MDMX has lower flexibility than apo-MDM2. In addition, the FEP/MD calculations provide detailed information on the different energetic contributions to ligand binding, leading to a better understanding of the sensitivity and specificity of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:22731511

  7. Partitioning of fish and insect antifreeze proteins into ice suggests they bind with comparable affinity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher B; Tomczak, Melanie M; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Kuiper, Michael J; Lankin, Christopher; Walker, Virginia K; Davies, Peter L

    2004-01-13

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of ice by binding to the surface of ice crystals, preventing the addition of water molecules to cause a local depression of the freezing point. AFPs from insects are much more effective at depressing the freezing point than fish AFPs. Here, we have investigated the possibility that insect AFPs bind more avidly to ice than fish AFPs. Because it is not possible to directly measure the affinity of an AFP for ice, we have assessed binding indirectly by examining the partitioning of proteins into a slowly growing ice hemisphere. AFP molecules adsorbed to the surface and became incorporated into the ice as they were overgrown. Solutes, including non-AFPs, were very efficiently excluded from ice, whereas AFPs became incorporated into ice at a concentration roughly equal to that of the original solution, and this was independent of the AFP concentration in the range (submillimolar) tested. Despite their >10-fold difference in antifreeze activity, fish and insect AFPs partitioned into ice to a similar degree, suggesting that insect AFPs do not bind to ice with appreciably higher affinity. Additionally, we have demonstrated that steric mutations on the ice binding surface that decrease the antifreeze activity of an AFP also reduce its inclusion into ice, supporting the validity of using partitioning measurements to assess a protein's affinity for ice.

  8. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-16

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  9. False positive RNA binding activities after Ni-affinity purification from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Milojevic, Tetyana; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Romeo, Alessandra; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Bläsi, Udo

    2013-06-01

    A His-tag is often added by means of recombinant DNA technology to a heterologous protein of interest, which is then over-produced in Escherchia coli and purified by one-step immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Owing to the presence of 24 histidines at the C-termini of the hexameric E. coli RNA chaperone Hfq, the protein co-purifies with His-tagged proteins of interest. As Hfq can bind to distinct RNA substrates with high affinity, its presence can obscure studies performed with (putative) RNA binding activities purified by IMAC. Here, we present results for a seemingly positive RNA-binding activity, exemplifying that false-positive results can be avoided if the protein of interest is either subjected to further purification step(s) or produced in an E. coli hfq- strain.

  10. Studies on the binding affinity of anticancer drug mitoxantrone to chromatin, DNA and histone proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hajihassan, Zahra; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra

    2009-01-01

    Mitoxantrone is a potent antitumor drug, widely used in the treatment of various cancers. In the present study, we have investigated and compared the affinity of anticancer drug, mitoxantrone, to EDTA-soluble chromatin (SE-chromatin), DNA and histones employing UV/Vis, fluorescence, CD spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and equilibrium dialysis techniques. The results showed that the interaction of mitoxantrone with SE-chromatin proceeds into compaction/aggregation as revealed by reduction in the absorbencies at 608 and 260 nm (hypochromicity) and disappearance of both histones and DNA on the gels. Mitoxantrone interacts strongly with histone proteins in solution making structural changes in the molecule as shown by CD and fluorescence analysis. The binding isotherms demonstrate a positive cooperative binding pattern for the chromatin- mitoxantrone interaction. It is suggested higher binding affinity of mitoxantrone to chromatin compared to DNA implying that the histone proteins may play an important role in the chromatin- mitoxantrone interaction process. PMID:19284573

  11. Engineering Streptavidin and a Streptavidin-Binding Peptide with Infinite Binding Affinity and Reversible Binding Capability: Purification of a Tagged Recombinant Protein to High Purity via Affinity-Driven Thiol Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Fogen, Dawson; Wu, Sau-Ching; Ng, Kenneth Kai-Sing; Wong, Sui-Lam

    2015-01-01

    To extend and improve the utility of the streptavidin-binding peptide tag (SBP-tag) in applications ranging from affinity purification to the reversible immobilization of recombinant proteins, a cysteine residue was introduced to the streptavidin mutein SAVSBPM18 and the SBP-tag to generate SAVSBPM32 and SBP(A18C), respectively. This pair of derivatives is capable of forming a disulfide bond through the newly introduced cysteine residues. SAVSBPM32 binds SBP-tag and biotin with binding affinities (Kd ~ 10-8M) that are similar to SAVSBPM18. Although SBP(A18C) binds to SAVSBPM32 more weakly than SBP-tag, the binding affinity is sufficient to bring the two binding partners together efficiently before they are locked together via disulfide bond formation–a phenomenon we have named affinity-driven thiol coupling. Under the condition with SBP(A18C) tags in excess, two SBP(A18C) tags can be captured by a tetrameric SAVSBPM32. The stoichiometry of the disulfide-bonded SAVSBPM32-SBP(A18C) complex was determined using a novel two-dimensional electrophoresis method which has general applications for analyzing the composition of disulfide-bonded protein complexes. To illustrate the application of this reversible immobilization technology, optimized conditions were established to use the SAVSBPM32-affinity matrix for the purification of a SBP(A18C)-tagged reporter protein to high purity. Furthermore, we show that the SAVSBPM32-affinity matrix can also be applied to purify a biotinylated protein and a reporter protein tagged with the unmodified SBP-tag. The dual (covalent and non-covalent) binding modes possible in this system offer great flexibility to many different applications which need reversible immobilization capability. PMID:26406477

  12. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  13. Novel affinity membranes with macrocyclic spacer arms synthesized via click chemistry for lysozyme binding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ligang; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Kaiyu; Zhong, Yonghui; Cheng, Qi; Bian, Xihui; Xin, Qingping; Cheng, Bowen; Feng, Xianshe; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2017-04-05

    Affinity membrane has great potential for applications in bioseparation and purification. Disclosed herein is the design of a novel affinity membrane with macrocyclic spacer arms for lysozyme binding. The clickable azide-cyclodextrin (CD) arms and clickable alkyne ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVAL) chains are designed and prepared. By the azide-alkyne click reaction, the EVAL-CD-ligands affinity membranes with CD spacer arms in three-dimensional micro channels have been successfully fabricated. The FT-IR, XPS, NMR, SEM and SEM-EDS results give detailed information of structure evolution. The abundant pores in membrane matrix provide efficient working channels, and the introduced CD arms with ligands (affinity sites) provide supramolecular atmosphere. Compared with that of raw EVAL membrane, the adsorption capacity of EVAL-CD-ligands membrane (26.24mg/g) show a triple increase. The study indicates that three effects (inducing effect, arm effect, site effect) from CD arms render the enhanced performance. The click reaction happened in membrane matrix in bulk. The effective lysozyme binding and higher adsorption performance of affinity membranes described herein compared with other reported membranes are markedly related with the proposed strategy involving macrocyclic spacer arms and supramolecular working channels.

  14. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase.

  15. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  16. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  17. Blind prediction of host-guest binding affinities: A new SAMPL3 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Muddana, Hari S.; Varnado, C. Daniel; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Urbach, Adam R.; Isaacs, Lyle; Geballe, Matthew T.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The computational prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities is of central interest in early-stage drug-discovery, and there is a widely recognized need for improved methods. Low molecular weight receptors and their ligands—i.e. host-guest systems – represent valuable test-beds for such affinity prediction methods, because their small size makes for fast calculations and relatively facile numerical convergence. The SAMPL3 community exercise included the first ever blind prediction challenge for host-guest binding affinities, through the incorporation of 11 new host-guest complexes. Ten participating research groups addressed this challenge with a variety of approaches. Statistical assessment indicates that, although most methods performed well at predicting some general trends in binding affinity, overall accuracy was not high, as all the methods suffered from either poor correlation or high RMS errors or both. There was no clear advantage in using explicit vs. implicit solvent models, any particular force field, or any particular approach to conformational sampling. In a few cases, predictions using very similar energy models but different sampling and/or free-energy methods resulted in significantly different results. The protonation states of one host and some guest molecules emerged as key uncertainties beyond the choice of computational approach. The present results have implications for methods development and future blind prediction exercises. PMID:22366955

  18. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  19. Affinity binding of inclusion bodies on supermacroporous monolithic cryogels using labeling with specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Josefin; Kumar, Ashok; Sundström, Heléne; Ledung, Erika; Hörnsten, E Gunnar; Enfors, Sven-Olof; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-03-23

    A new chromatographic method based on affinity supermacroporous monolithic cryogels is developed for binding and analyzing inclusion bodies during fermentation. The work demonstrated that it is possible to bind specific IgG and IgY antibodies to the 15 and 17 amino acids at the terminus ends of a 33 kDa target protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth can be specifically retained in protein A and pseudo-biospecific ligand sulfamethazine modified supermacroporous cryogels. The degree of binding of IgG and IgY treated inclusion bodies to the Protein A and sulfamethazine gels are investigated, as well as the influence of pH on the sulfamethazine ligand. Optimum binding of 78 and 72% was observed on both protein A and sulfamethazine modified cryogel columns, respectively, using IgG labeling of the inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies pass through unretained in the sulfamethazine supermacroporous gel at pH that does not favour the binding between the ligand on the gel and the antibodies on the surface of inclusion bodies. Also the unlabeled inclusion bodies went through the gel unretained, showing no non-specific binding or trapping within the gel. These findings may very well be the foundation for the building of a powerful analytical tool during fermentation of inclusion bodies as well as a convenient way to purify them from fermentation broth. These results also support our earlier findings [Kumar, A., Plieva, F.M., Galaev, I.Yu., Mattiasson, B., 2003. Affinity fractionation of lymphocytes using a monolithic cyogel. J. Immunol. Methods 283, 185-194] with mammalian cells that were surface labeled with specific antibodies and recognized on protein A supermacroporous gels. A general binding and separation system can be established on antibody binding cryogel affinity matrices.

  20. Heterogeneity of the chondroitin sulfate portion of phosphacan/6B4 proteoglycan regulates its binding affinity for pleiotrophin/heparin binding growth-associated molecule.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Nobuaki; He, Jue; Yajima, Yuki; Mikami, Tadahisa; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Yabe, Tomio

    2003-09-12

    PTP zeta is a receptor-type protein-tyrosine phosphatase that is synthesized as a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and uses pleiotrophin as a ligand. The chondroitin sulfate portion of this receptor is essential for high affinity binding to pleiotrophin. Here, we purified phosphacan, which corresponds to the extracellular domain of PTP zeta, from postnatal day 7 (P7) and P12 rat cerebral cortex (PG-P7 and PG-P12, respectively) and from P20 rat whole brain (PG-P20). The chondroitin sulfate of these preparations displayed immunologically and compositionally different structures. In particular, only PG-P20 reacted with the monoclonal antibody MO-225, which recognizes chondroitin sulfate containing the GlcA(2S)beta 1-3GalNAc(6S) disaccharide unit (D unit). Analysis of the chondroitinase digestion products revealed that GlcA beta 1-3GalNAc(4S) disaccharide unit (A unit) was the major component in these preparations and that PG-P20 contained 1.3% D unit, which was not detected in PG-P7 and PG-P12. Interaction analysis using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that PG-P20 had approximately 5-fold stronger affinity for pleiotrophin (dissociation constant (KD) = 0.14 nM) than PG-P7 and PG-P12, although all these preparations showed similar low affinity binding to pleiotrophin after chondroitinase ABC digestion (KD = 1.4 approximately 1.6 nM). We also found that shark cartilage chondroitin sulfate D containing approximately 20% D unit bound to pleiotrophin with moderate affinity (KD = 2.7 nM), whereas whale cartilage chondroitin sulfate A showed no binding to this growth factor. These results suggest that variation of chondroitin sulfate plays important roles in the regulation of signal transduction in the brain.

  1. Integrating computational methods and experimental data for understanding the recognition mechanism and binding affinity of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Yugandhar, K

    2017-01-07

    Protein-protein interactions perform several functions inside the cell. Understanding the recognition mechanism and binding affinity of protein-protein complexes is a challenging problem in experimental and computational biology. In this review, we focus on two aspects (i) understanding the recognition mechanism and (ii) predicting the binding affinity. The first part deals with computational techniques for identifying the binding site residues and the contribution of important interactions for understanding the recognition mechanism of protein-protein complexes in comparison with experimental observations. The second part is devoted to the methods developed for discriminating high and low affinity complexes, and predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes using three-dimensional structural information and just from the amino acid sequence. The overall view enhances our understanding of the integration of experimental data and computational methods, recognition mechanism of protein-protein complexes and the binding affinity.

  2. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  3. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs.

  4. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  6. Measurement of free glucocorticoids: quantifying corticosteroid-binding globulin binding affinity and its variation within and among mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Delehanty, Brendan; Hossain, Sabrina; Jen, Chao Ching; Crawshaw, Graham J.; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used as measures of stress in wildlife. A great deal of evidence indicates that only free GC (GC not bound by the specific binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin, CBG) leaves the circulation and exerts biological effects on GC-sensitive tissues. Free hormone concentrations are difficult to measure directly, so researchers estimate free GC using two measures: the binding affinity and the binding capacity in plasma. We provide an inexpensive saturation binding method for calculating the binding affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd) of CBG that can be run without specialized laboratory equipment. Given that other plasma proteins, such as albumin, also bind GCs, the method compensates for this non-specific binding. Separation of bound GC from free GC was achieved with dextran-coated charcoal. The method provides repeatable estimates (12% coefficient of variation in the red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and there is little evidence of inter-individual variation in Kd (range 2.0–7.3 nM for 16 Richardson's ground squirrels, Urocitellus richardsonii). The Kd values of 28 mammalian species we assessed were mostly clustered around a median of 4 nM, but five species had values between 13 and 61 nM. This pattern may be distinct from birds, for which published values are more tightly distributed (1.5–5.1 nM). The charcoal separation method provides a reliable and robust method for measuring the Kd in a wide range of species. It uses basic laboratory equipment to provide rapid results at very low cost. Given the importance of CBG in regulating the biological activity of GCs, this method is a useful tool for physiological ecologists. PMID:27293705

  7. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  8. Protein-binding affinity of leucaena condensed tannins of differing molecular weights.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao Dan; Liang, Juan Boo; Tan, Hui Yin; Yahya, Rosiyah; Long, Ruijun; Ho, Yin Wan

    2011-10-12

    Depending on their source, concentration, chemical structure, and molecular weight, condensed tannins (CTs) form insoluble complexes with protein, which could lead to ruminal bypass protein, benefiting animal production. In this study, CTs from Leuceana leucocephala hybrid were fractionated into five fractions by a size exclusion chromatography procedure. The molecular weights of the CT fractions were determined using Q-TOF LC-MS, and the protein-binding affinities of the respective CT fractions were determined using a protein precipitation assay with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the standard protein. The calculated number-average molecular weights (M(n)) were 1348.6, 857.1, 730.1, 726.0, and 497.1, and b values (the b value represents the CT quantity that is needed to bind half of the maximum precipitable BSA) of the different molecular weight fractions were 0.381, 0.510, 0.580, 0.636, and 0.780 for fractions 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The results indicated that, in general, CTs of higher molecular weight fractions have stronger protein-binding affinity than those of lower molecular weights. However, the number of hydroxyl units within the structure of CT polymers also affects the protein-binding affinity.

  9. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  10. Cholera toxin binding affinity and specificity for gangliosides determined by surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kuziemko, G.M.; Stroh, M.; Stevens, R.C. |

    1996-05-21

    The present study determines the affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside series GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1A, GD1B, GT1B, asialo GM1, globotriosyl ceramide, and lactosyl ceramide using real time biospecific interaction analysis (surface plasmon resonance, SPR). SPR shows that cholera toxin preferably binds to gangliosides in the following sequence: GM1 > GM2 > GD1A > GM3 > GT1B > GD1B > asialo-GM1. The measured binding affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside sequence ranges from 4.61 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} M for GM1 to 1.88 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M for asialo GM1. The picomolar values obtained by surface plasmon resonance are similar to K{sub d} values determined with whole-cell binding assays. Both whole-cell assays ans SPR measurements on synthetic membranes are higher than free solution measurements by several orders of magnitude. This difference may be caused by the effects of avidity and charged lipid head-groups, which may play a major role in the binding between cholera toxin, the receptor, and the membrane surface. The primary difference between free solution binding studies and surface plasmon resonance studies is that the latter technique is performed on surfaces resembling the cell membrane. Surface plasmon resonance has the further advantage of measuring apparent kinetic association and dissociation rates in real time, providing direct information about binding events at the membrane surface. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  12. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  13. Lower Affinity T Cells are Critical Components and Active Participants of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and biophysical parameters of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide:MHC (pMHC) interaction define intrinsic factors required for T cell activation and differentiation. Although receptor ligand kinetics are somewhat cumbersome to assess experimentally, TCR:pMHC affinity has been shown to predict peripheral T cell functionality and potential for forming memory. Multimeric forms of pMHC monomers have often been used to provide an indirect readout of higher affinity T cells due to their availability and ease of use while allowing simultaneous definition of other functional and phenotypic characteristics. However, multimeric pMHC reagents have introduced a bias that underestimates the lower affinity components contained in the highly diverse TCR repertoires of all polyclonal T cell responses. Advances in the identification of lower affinity cells have led to the examination of these cells and their contribution to the immune response. In this review, we discuss the identification of high- vs. low-affinity T cells as well as their attributed signaling and functional differences. Lastly, mechanisms are discussed that maintain a diverse range of low- and high-affinity T cells. PMID:26441973

  14. Phosphorylation of a chloroplast RNA-binding protein changes its affinity to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lisitsky, I; Schuster, G

    1995-01-01

    An RNA-binding protein of 28 kDa (28RNP) was previously isolated from spinach chloroplasts and found to be required for 3' end-processing of chloroplast mRNAs. The amino acid sequence of 28RNP revealed two approximately 80 amino-acid RNA-binding domains, as well as an acidic- and glycine-rich amino terminal domain. Upon analysis of the RNA-binding properties of the 'native' 28RNP in comparison to the recombinant bacterial expressed protein, differences were detected in the affinity to some chloroplastic 3' end RNAs. It was suggested that post-translational modification can modulate the affinity of the 28RNP in the chloroplast to different RNAs. In order to determine if phosphorylation accounts for this post-translational modification, we examined if the 28RNP is a phosphoprotein and if it can serve as a substrate for protein kinases. It was found that the 28RNP was phosphorylated when intact chloroplasts were metabolically labeled with [32P] orthophosphate, and that recombinant 28RNP served as an excellent substrate in vitro for protein kinase isolated from spinach chloroplasts or recombinant alpha subunit of maize casein kinase II. The 28RNP was apparently phosphorylated at one site located in the acidic domain at the N-terminus of the protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of the serines in that region revealed that the phosphorylation of the protein was eliminated when serine number 22 from the N-terminus was changed to tryptophan. RNA-binding analysis of the phosphorylated 28RNP revealed that the affinity of the phosphorylated protein was reduced approximately 3-4-fold in comparison to the non-phosphorylated protein. Therefore, phosphorylation of the 28RNP modulates its affinity to RNA and may play a significant role in its biological function in the chloroplast. Images PMID:7630729

  15. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  16. Insights into the conformational equilibria of maltose-binding protein by analysis of high affinity mutants.

    PubMed

    Telmer, Patrick G; Shilton, Brian H

    2003-09-05

    The affinity of maltose-binding protein (MBP) for maltose and related carbohydrates was greatly increased by removal of groups in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft. The wild-type protein has a KD of 1200 nM for maltose; mutation of residues Met-321 and Gln-325, both to alanine, resulted in a KD for maltose of 70 nM; deletion of 4 residues, Glu-172, Asn-173, Lys-175, and Tyr-176, which are part of a poorly ordered loop, results in a KD for maltose of 110 nM. Combining the mutations yields an increased affinity for maltodextrins and a KD of 6 nM for maltotriose. Comparison of ligand binding by the mutants, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, indicates that decreases in the off-rate are responsible for the increased affinity. Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to demonstrate that the mutations do not significantly affect the solution conformation of MBP in either the presence or absence of maltose. The crystal structures of selected mutants showed that the mutations do not cause significant structural changes in either the closed or open conformation of MBP. These studies show that interactions in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft, which we term the "balancing interface," are responsible for modulating the affinity of MBP for its ligand. Our results are consistent with a model in which the ligand-bound protein alternates between the closed and open conformations, and removal of interactions in the balancing interface decreases the stability of the open conformation, without affecting the closed conformation.

  17. RNA containing pyrrolocytidine base analogs: increased binding affinity and fluorescence that responds to hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Alexander S; Damha, Masad J; Hudson, Robert H E

    2008-01-01

    6-Phenylpyrrolocytidine and 6-methoxymethylene-pyrrolocytidine are base-modified nucleosides with remarkable fluorescence properties. These analogs produce increased binding affinity to both RNA and DNA targets when incorporated into oligoribonucleotides. The fluorescence observed for the single-stranded oligomers is quenched upon duplex formation with either RNA or DNA targets. The fluorescence response depends on the nature of the 6-substituent and the sequence position of the modified nucleoside.

  18. Receptor affinity purification of a lipid-binding adhesin from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, C A; Wasfy, G; Han, H; Huesca, M

    1993-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that Helicobacter pylori specifically recognizes gangliotetraosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, and phosphatidylethanolamine in vitro. This binding specificity is shared by exoenzyme S from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and monoclonal antibodies against this adhesin prevent the attachment of H. pylori to its lipid receptors. We now report the use of a novel, versatile affinity matrix to purify a 63-kDa exoenzyme S-like adhesin from H. pylori which is responsible for the lipid-binding specificity of this organism. Images PMID:8500882

  19. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  20. Entropy and Mg2+ control ligand affinity and specificity in the malachite green binding RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Bernard Da Costa, Jason; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The binding of small molecule targets by RNA aptamers provides an excellent model to study the versatility of RNA function. The malachite green aptamer binds and recognizes its ligand via stacking and electrostatic interactions. The binding of the aptamer to its original selection target and three related molecules was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis, and fluorescence titration. The results reveal that the entropy of complex formation plays a large role in determining binding affinity and ligand specificity. These data combined with previous structural studies show that metal ions are required to stabilize the complexes with non-native ligands whereas the complex with the original selection target is stable at low salt and in the absence of divalent metal ions.

  1. Correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding affinity in non-preorganized receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Romen; Morales, Ezequiel Q; Martín, Víctor S; Martín, Tomás

    2013-08-16

    Positive cooperativity between host conformational equilibria and guest binding has been widely reported in protein receptors. However, reported examples of this kind of cooperativity in synthetic hosts are scarce and largely serendipitous, among other things because it is hard to envision systems which display this kind of cooperativity. In order to shed some light on the correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding, selected structural modifications have been performed over a family of nonpreorganized hosts in order to induce conformational changes and to analyze their effect on the binding affinity. The conformational effect was evaluated by a theoretical conformational search and correlated with the ability of the receptors. All data suggest that those receptors that display the best association constants are able to sample folded conformations analogous to the conformational requirements for the binding of the guests. On the contrary, for those receptors where folded conformers are scarce, then the association constant and enantioselectivity clearly drop.

  2. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding.

    PubMed

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2014-10-21

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.

  3. Variation in Vector Competence for Dengue Viruses Does Not Depend on Mosquito Midgut Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan; Brown, Heidi E.; Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus genotypes of Southeast Asian origin have been associated with higher virulence and transmission compared to other genotypes of serotype 2 (DEN-2). We tested the hypothesis that genetic differences in dengue viruses may result in differential binding to the midgut of the primary vector, Aedes aegypti, resulting in increased transmission or vectorial capacity. Methodology/Principal Finding Two strains of each of the four DEN-2 genotypes (Southeast Asian, American, Indian, and West African) were tested to determine their binding affinity for mosquito midguts from two distinct populations (Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico and McAllen, Texas, USA). Our previous studies demonstrated that Southeast Asian viruses disseminated up to 65-fold more rapidly in Ae. aegypti from Texas and were therefore more likely to be transmitted to humans. Results shown here demonstrate that viruses from all four genotypes bind to midguts at the same rate, in a titer-dependent manner. In addition, we show population differences when comparing binding affinity for DEN-2 between the Tapachula and McAllen mosquito colonies. Conclusions If midgut binding potential is the same for all DEN-2 viruses, then viral replication differences in these tissues and throughout the mosquito can thus probably explain the significant differences in dissemination and vector competence. These conclusions differ from the established paradigms to explain mosquito barriers to infection, dissemination, and transmission. PMID:21610852

  4. Evolution of binding affinity in a WW domain probed by phage display.

    PubMed Central

    Dalby, P. A.; Hoess, R. H.; DeGrado, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    The WW domain is an approximately 38 residue peptide-binding motif that binds a variety of sequences, including the consensus sequence xPPxY. We have displayed hYAP65 WW on the surface of M13 phage and randomized one-third of its three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. Improved binding to the hydrophobic peptide, GTPPPPYTVG (WW1), was selected in the presence of three different concentrations of proteinase K to simultaneously drive selection for improved stability as well as high-affinity binding. While some of the selected binders show cooperative unfolding transitions, others show noncooperative thermal unfolding curves. Two novel WW consensus sequences have been identified, which bind to the xPPxY motif with higher affinity than the wild-type hYAP65 WW domain. These WW domain sequences are not precedented in any natural WW domain sequence. Thus, there appear to be a large number of motifs capable of recognizing the target peptide sequence, only a subset of which appear to be used in natural proteins. PMID:11206058

  5. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  6. Synthesis and receptor binding of N-substituted tropane derivatives. High-affinity ligands for the cocaine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.A.; Saha, J.K.; Madras, B.K.; Neumeyer, J.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of N-substituted 3-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane derivatives is reported. The compounds displayed binding characteristics that paralleled those of cocaine, and several had substantially higher affinity at cocaine recognition sites. Conjugate addition of 4-fluorophenyl magnesium bromide to anhydroecgonine methyl ester gave 2 beta-(carbomethoxy)-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (4a, designated CFT, also known as WIN 35,428) after flash chromatography. N demethylation of 4a was effected by Zn/HOAc reduction of the corresponding 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate to give 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)nortropane (5), which was alkylated with allyl bromide to afford the N-allyl analogue, 6. The N-propyl analogue, 7, was prepared by catalytic reduction (Pd/C) of 6. The most potent analogue, 4a, was tritiated at a specific activity of 81.3 Ci/mmol. ({sup 3}H)4a bound rapidly and reversibly to caudate putamen membranes; the two-component binding curve typical of cocaine analogues was observed. Equilibrium was achieved within 2 h and was stable for at least 4 h. High- and low-affinity Kd values observed for ({sup 3}H)4a (4.7 and 60 nM, respectively) were more than 4 times lower than those for ({sup 3}H)cocaine, and the density of binding sites (Bmax = 50 pmol/g, high, and 290 pmol/g, low) for the two drugs were comparable. Nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)4a was 5-10% of total binding.

  7. Radiotracers for Cardiac Sympathetic Innervation: Transport Kinetics and Binding Affinities for the Human Norepinephrine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, David M.; Chen, Wei; Jung, Yong-Woon; Jang, Keun Sam; Gu, Guie; Cozzi, Nicholas V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Most radiotracers for imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation are substrates of the norepinephrine transporter (NET). The goal of this study was to characterize the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of several sympathetic nerve radiotracers, including [11C]-(−)-meta-hydroxyephedrine, [11C]-(−)-epinephrine, and a series of [11C]-labeled phenethylguanidines under development in our laboratory. For comparison, the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of some [3H]-labeled biogenic amines were also determined. Methods Transport kinetics studies were performed using rat C6 glioma cells stably transfected with the human norepinephrine transporter (C6-hNET cells). For each radiolabeled NET substrate, saturation transport assays with C6-hNET cells measured the Michaelis-Menten transport constants Km and Vmax for NET transport. Competitive inhibition binding assays with homogenized C6-hNET cells and [3H]mazindol provided estimates of binding affinities (KI) for NET. Results Km, Vmax and KI values were determined for each NET substrate with a high degree of reproducibility. Interestingly, C6-hNET transport rates for ‘tracer concentrations’ of substrate, given by the ratio Vmax/Km, were found to be highly correlated with neuronal transport rates measured previously in isolated rat hearts (r2 = 0.96). This suggests that the transport constants Km and Vmax measured using the C6-hNET cells accurately reflect in vivo transport kinetics. Conclusion The results of these studies show how structural changes in NET substrates influence NET binding and transport constants, providing valuable insights that can be used in the design of new tracers with more optimal kinetics for quantifying regional sympathetic nerve density. PMID:23306137

  8. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  9. Subcutaneous bioavailability of therapeutic antibodies as a function of FcRn binding affinity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Y Gloria; Hoyte, Kwame; Lutman, Jeff; Lu, Yanmei; Iyer, Suhasini; DeForge, Laura E; Theil, Frank-Peter; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta

    2012-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in immunoglobulin G (IgG) catabolism; however, its role in the disposition of IgG after subcutaneous (SC) administration, including bioavailability, is relatively unknown. To examine the potential effect of FcRn on IgG SC bioavailability, we engineered three anti-amyloid β monoclonal antibody (mAb) reverse chimeric mouse IgG2a (mIgG2a) Fc variants (I253A.H435A, N434H and N434Y) with different binding affinities to mouse FcRn (mFcRn) and compared their SC bioavailability to that of the wild-type (WT) mAb in mice. Our results indicated that the SC bioavailability of mIgG2a was affected by mFcRn-binding affinity. Variant I253A.H435A, which did not bind to mFcRn at either pH 6.0 or pH 7.4, had the lowest bioavailability (41.8%). Variant N434Y, which had the greatest increase in binding affinity at both pH 6.0 and pH 7.4, had comparable bioavailability to the WT antibody (86.1% vs. 76.3%), whereas Variant N434H, which had modestly increased binding affinity at pH 6.0 to mFcRn and affinity comparable to the WT antibody at pH 7.4, had the highest bioavailability (94.7%). A semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic model, which described well the observed data with the WT antibody and variant I253A.H435A, is consistent with the hypothesis that the decreased bioavailability of variant I253A.H435A was due to loss of the FcRn-mediated protection from catabolism at the absorption site. Together, these data demonstrate that FcRn plays an important role in SC bioavailability of therapeutic IgG antibodies. PMID:22327433

  10. Binding site number variation and high-affinity binding consensus of Myb-SANT-like transcription factor Adf-1 in Drosophilidae

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael; Juan, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the evolution of transcription factor binding sites and corresponding functional change of transcriptional regulation. In this context, we have examined the structural changes of the ADF-1 binding sites at the Adh promoters of Drosophila funebris and D. virilis. We detected an expanded footprinted region in D. funebris that contains various adjacent binding sites with different binding affinities. ADF-1 was described to direct sequence-specific DNA binding to sites consisting of the multiple trinucleotide repeat . The ADF-1 recognition sites with high binding affinity differ from this trinucleotide repeat consensus sequence and a new consensus sequence is proposed for the high-affinity ADF-1 binding sites. In vitro transcription experiments with the D. funebris and D. virilis ADF-1 binding regions revealed that stronger ADF-1 binding to the expanded D. funebris ADF-1 binding region only moderately lead to increased transcriptional activity of the Adh gene. The potential of this regional expansion is discussed in the context of different ADF-1 cellular concentrations and maintenance of the ADF-1 stimulus. Altogether, evolutionary change of ADF-1 binding regions involves both, rearrangements of complex binding site cluster and also nucleotide substitutions within sites that lead to different binding affinities. PMID:20542916

  11. Application of volcanic ash particles for protein affinity purification with a minimized silica-binding tag.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed A A; Ikeda, Takeshi; Motomura, Kei; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-11-01

    We recently reported that the spore coat protein, CotB1 (171 amino acids), from Bacillus cereus mediates silica biomineralization and that the polycationic C-terminal sequence of CotB1 (14 amino acids), designated CotB1p, serves as a silica-binding tag when fused to other proteins. Here, we reduced the length of this silica-binding tag to only seven amino acids (SB7 tag: RQSSRGR) while retaining its affinity for silica. Alanine scanning mutagenesis indicated that the three arginine residues in the SB7 tag play important roles in binding to a silica surface. Monomeric l-arginine, at concentrations of 0.3-0.5 M, was found to serve as a competitive eluent to release bound SB7-tagged proteins from silica surfaces. To develop a low-cost, silica-based affinity purification procedure, we used natural volcanic ash particles with a silica content of ∼70%, rather than pure synthetic silica particles, as an adsorbent for SB7-tagged proteins. Using green fluorescent protein, mCherry, and mKate2 as model proteins, our purification method achieved 75-90% recovery with ∼90% purity. These values are comparable to or even higher than that of the commonly used His-tag affinity purification. In addition to low cost, another advantage of our method is the use of l-arginine as the eluent because its protein-stabilizing effect would help minimize alteration of the intrinsic properties of the purified proteins. Our approach paves the way for the use of naturally occurring materials as adsorbents for simple, low-cost affinity purification.

  12. Neurotensin decreases high affinity [3H]-ouabain binding to cerebral cortex membranes.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Carina; Ordieres, María Graciela López; Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez de Lores

    2011-12-10

    Previous work from this laboratory showed the ability of neurotensin to inhibit synaptosomal membrane Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, the effect being blocked by SR 48692, a non-peptidic antagonist for high affinity neurotensin receptor (NTS1) [López Ordieres and Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz 2000; 2001]. To further study neurotensin interaction with Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, peptide effect on high affinity [(3)H]-ouabain binding was studied in cerebral cortex membranes. It was observed that neurotensin modified binding in a dose-dependent manner, leading to 80% decrease with 1 × 10(-4)M concentration. On the other hand, the single addition of 1 × 10(-6)M, 1 × 10(-5)M and 1 × 10(-4)M SR 48692 (Sanofi-Aventis, U.S., Inc.) decreased [(3)H]-ouabain binding (in %) to 87 ± 16; 74 ± 16 and 34 ± 17, respectively. Simultaneous addition of neurotensin and SR 48692 led to additive or synergic effects. Partial NTS2 agonist levocabastine inhibited [(3)H]-ouabain binding likewise. Saturation assays followed by Scatchard analyses showed that neurotensin increased K(d) value whereas failed to modify B(max) value, indicating a competitive type interaction of the peptide at Na(+), K(+)-ATPase ouabain site. At variance, SR 48692 decreased B(max) value whereas it did not modify K(d) value. [(3)H]-ouabain binding was also studied in cerebral cortex membranes obtained from rats injected i. p. 30 min earlier with 100 μg and 250 μg/kg SR 48692. It was observed that the 250 μg/kg SR 48692 dose led to 19% decrease in basal [(3)H]-ouabain binding. After SR 48692 treatments, addition of 1 × 10(-6)M led to additive or synergic effect. Results suggested that [(3)H]-ouabain binding inhibition by neurotensin hardly involves NTS1 receptor.

  13. Measurement of Cationic and Intracellular Modulation of Integrin Binding Affinity by AFM-Based Nanorobot

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Kevin C.; Yang, Ruiguo; Zeng, Bixi; Song, Bo; Wang, Shouye; Xi, Ning; Basson, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrins are dynamic transmembrane cation-dependent heterodimers that both anchor cells in position and transduce signals into and out of cells. We used an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanorobotic system to measure integrin-binding forces in intact human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The AFM-based nanorobot enables human-directed, high-accuracy probe positioning and site-specific investigations. Functionalizing the AFM probe with an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-containing sequence (consensus binding sequence for integrins) allowed us to detect a series of peptide-cell membrane interactions with a median binding force of 115.1 ± 4.9 pN that were not detected in control interactions. Chelating divalent cations from the culture medium abolished these interactions, as did inhibiting intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK) using Y15. Adding 1 mM Mg2+ to the medium caused a rightward shift in the force-binding curve. Adding 1 mM Ca2+ virtually abolished the RGD-membrane specific interactions and blocked the Mg2+ effects. Cell adhesion assays demonstrated parallel effects of divalent cations and the FAK inhibitor on cell adhesion. These results demonstrate direct modulation of integrin-binding affinity by both divalent cations and intracellular signal inhibition. Additionally, three binding states (nonspecific, specific inactivated, and specific activated) were delineated from affinity measurements. Although other research has assumed that this process of integrin conformational change causes altered ligand binding, in this work we directly measured these three states in individual integrins in a physiologically based study. PMID:23823222

  14. Measurement of cationic and intracellular modulation of integrin binding affinity by AFM-based nanorobot.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Kevin C; Yang, Ruiguo; Zeng, Bixi; Song, Bo; Wang, Shouye; Xi, Ning; Basson, Marc D

    2013-07-02

    Integrins are dynamic transmembrane cation-dependent heterodimers that both anchor cells in position and transduce signals into and out of cells. We used an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanorobotic system to measure integrin-binding forces in intact human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The AFM-based nanorobot enables human-directed, high-accuracy probe positioning and site-specific investigations. Functionalizing the AFM probe with an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-containing sequence (consensus binding sequence for integrins) allowed us to detect a series of peptide-cell membrane interactions with a median binding force of 115.1 ± 4.9 pN that were not detected in control interactions. Chelating divalent cations from the culture medium abolished these interactions, as did inhibiting intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK) using Y15. Adding 1 mM Mg(2+) to the medium caused a rightward shift in the force-binding curve. Adding 1 mM Ca(2+) virtually abolished the RGD-membrane specific interactions and blocked the Mg(2+) effects. Cell adhesion assays demonstrated parallel effects of divalent cations and the FAK inhibitor on cell adhesion. These results demonstrate direct modulation of integrin-binding affinity by both divalent cations and intracellular signal inhibition. Additionally, three binding states (nonspecific, specific inactivated, and specific activated) were delineated from affinity measurements. Although other research has assumed that this process of integrin conformational change causes altered ligand binding, in this work we directly measured these three states in individual integrins in a physiologically based study.

  15. The C-terminal region of laminin beta chains modulates the integrin binding affinities of laminins.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yukimasa; Ido, Hiroyuki; Sanzen, Noriko; Hayashi, Maria; Sato-Nishiuchi, Ryoko; Futaki, Sugiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2009-03-20

    Laminins are major cell-adhesive proteins in basement membranes that are capable of binding to integrins. Laminins consist of three chains (alpha, beta, and gamma), in which three laminin globular modules in the alpha chain and the Glu residue in the C-terminal tail of the gamma chain have been shown to be prerequisites for binding to integrins. However, it remains unknown whether any part of the beta chain is involved in laminin-integrin interactions. We compared the binding affinities of pairs of laminin isoforms containing the beta1 or beta2 chain toward a panel of laminin-binding integrins, and we found that beta2 chain-containing laminins (beta2-laminins) bound more avidly to alpha3beta1 and alpha7X2beta1 integrins than beta1 chain-containing laminins (beta1-laminins), whereas alpha6beta1, alpha6beta4, and alpha7X1beta1 integrins did not show any preference toward beta2-laminins. Because alpha3beta1 contains the "X2-type" variable region in the alpha3 subunit and alpha6beta1 and alpha6beta4 contain the "X1-type" region in the alpha6 subunit, we hypothesized that only integrins containing the X2-type region were capable of discriminating between beta1-laminins and beta2-laminins. In support of this possibility, a putative X2-type variant of alpha6beta1 was produced and found to bind preferentially to beta2-laminins. Production of a series of swap mutants between the beta1 and beta2 chains revealed that the C-terminal 20 amino acids in the coiled-coil domain were responsible for the enhanced integrin binding by beta2-laminins. Taken together, the results provide evidence that the C-terminal region of beta chains is involved in laminin recognition by integrins and modulates the binding affinities of laminins toward X2-type integrins.

  16. High-energy water sites determine peptide binding affinity and specificity of PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Beuming, Thijs; Farid, Ramy; Sherman, Woody

    2009-08-01

    PDZ domains have well known binding preferences for distinct C-terminal peptide motifs. For most PDZ domains, these motifs are of the form [S/T]-W-[I/L/V]. Although the preference for S/T has been explained by a specific hydrogen bond interaction with a histidine in the PDZ domain and the (I/L/V) is buried in a hydrophobic pocket, the mechanism for Trp specificity at the second to last position has thus far remained unknown. Here, we apply a method to compute the free energies of explicit water molecules and predict that potency gained by Trp binding is due to a favorable release of high-energy water molecules into bulk. The affinities of a series of peptides for both wild-type and mutant forms of the PDZ domain of Erbin correlate very well with the computed free energy of binding of displaced waters, suggesting a direct relationship between water displacement and peptide affinity. Finally, we show a correlation between the magnitude of the displaced water free energy and the degree of Trp-sensitivity among subtypes of the HTRA PDZ family, indicating a water-mediated mechanism for specificity of peptide binding.

  17. Induced binding of proteins by ammonium sulfate in affinity and ion-exchange column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke; Kita, Yoshiko; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Tokunaga, Masao

    2007-04-10

    In general, proteins bind to affinity or ion-exchange columns at low salt concentrations, and the bound proteins are eluted by raising the salt concentration, changing the solvent pH, or adding competing ligands. Blue-Sepharose is often used to remove bovine serum albumin (BSA) from samples, but when we applied BSA to Blue-Sepharose in 20 mM phosphate, pH 7.0, 50%-60% of the protein flowed through the column; however, complete binding of BSA was achieved by the addition of 2 M ammonium sulfate (AS) to the column equilibration buffer and the sample. The bound protein was eluted by decreasing the AS concentration or by adding 1 M NaCl or arginine. AS at high concentrations resulted in binding of BSA even to an ion-exchange column, Q-Sepharose, at pH 7.0. Thus, although moderate salt concentrations elute proteins from Blue-Sepharose or ion-exchange columns, proteins can be bound to these columns under extreme salting-out conditions. Similar enhanced binding of proteins by AS was observed with an ATP-affinity column.

  18. Relative penicillin G resistance in Neisseria meningitidis and reduced affinity of penicillin-binding protein 3.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelman, P M; Campos, J; Chaffin, D O; Serfass, D A; Smith, A L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1988-01-01

    We examined clinical isolates of Neisseria meningitidis relatively resistant to penicillin G (mean MIC, 0.3 micrograms/ml; range, 0.1 to 0.7 micrograms/ml), which were isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid for resistance mechanisms, by using susceptible isolates (mean MIC, less than or equal to 0.06 micrograms/ml) for comparison. The resistant strains did not produce detectable beta-lactamase activity, otherwise modify penicillin G, or bind less total penicillin. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 of the six resistant isolates tested uniformly bound less penicillin G in comparison to the same PBP of four susceptible isolates. Reflecting the reduced binding affinity of PBP 3 of the two resistant strains tested, the amount of 3H-labeled penicillin G required for half-maximal binding was increased in comparison with that of PBP 3 of the two susceptible isolates. We conclude that the mechanism of resistance in these meningococci relatively resistant to penicillin G was decreased affinity of PBP 3. Images PMID:3134848

  19. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  20. Path integral method for predicting relative binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mulakala, Chandrika; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel approach for computing biomolecular interaction binding affinities based on a simple path integral solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. Computing the free energy of protein-ligand interactions can expedite structure-based drug design. Traditionally, the problem is seen through the lens of statistical thermodynamics. The computations can become, however, prohibitively long for the change in the free energy upon binding to be determined accurately. In this work we present a different approach based on a stochastic kinetic formalism. Inspired by Feynman's path integral formulation, we extend the theory to classical interacting systems. The ligand is modeled as a Brownian particle subjected to the effective non-bonding interaction potential of the receptor. This allows the calculation of the relative binding affinities of interacting biomolecules in water to be computed as a function of the ligand's diffusivity and the curvature of the potential surface in the vicinity of the binding minimum. The calculation is thus exceedingly rapid. In test cases, the correlation coefficient between actual and computed free energies is >0.93 for accurate data-sets. PMID:19275144

  1. Determining the Ice-binding Planes of Antifreeze Proteins by Fluorescence-based Ice Plane Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms. PMID:24457629

  2. Activated G-protein releases cGMP from high affinity binding sites on PDE from toad rod outer segments (ROS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, P.S.T.; Walseth, T.F.; Panter, S.S.; Sundby, S.R.; Graeff, R.M.; Goldberg, N.D.

    1987-05-01

    cGMP binding proteins in toad ROS were identified by direct photoaffinity labeling (PAL) with /sup 32/P-cGMP and quantified by retention of complexes on nitrocellulose filters. By PAL, high affinity sites were present on the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) which have MW/sub app/ of 94 and 90 kDa. A doublet was deduced from its photolabeling properties to represent PDE/sub ..gamma../ photocrosslinked with PDE/sub ..cap alpha../ or PDE/sub ..beta../, respectively. cGMP prebound to these high affinity sites was released by light-activated G-protein or its ..cap alpha.. subunit complexed with GTP..gamma..S; this inhibition of cGMP binding to PDE did not result from decreased cGMP availability due to enhanced hydrolysis. A low affinity cGMP binding component identified by PAL is tightly associated with ROS membranes. Apparent ATP/light-dependent stimulation of cGMP binding was shown to result from light activated cGMP hydrolysis in conjunction with ATP-promoted conversion of GMP to GDP/GTP and increased GDP/GTP binding. These findings coincide with a model for light-related regulation of cGMP binding and metabolism predicted from intact and cellfree kinetic measurements: in the dark state the cGMP hydrolic rate is constrained by the availability of cGMP because of its binding to high affinity sites on PDE. Light activated G-protein releases cGMP from these sites and allows for its redistribution to lower affinity sites represented by PDE catalytic site(s) and possible cGMP-dependent membrane cation channels.

  3. High-affinity RNA binding by a hyperthermophilic single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Morten, Michael J; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Cubeddu, Liza; Kariawasam, Ruvini; Peregrina, Jose; Penedo, J Carlos; White, Malcolm F

    2017-03-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), including replication protein A (RPA) in eukaryotes, play a central role in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. SSBs utilise an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain to bind DNA, and typically oligomerise in solution to bring multiple OB fold domains together in the functional SSB. SSBs from hyperthermophilic crenarchaea, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, have an unusual structure with a single OB fold coupled to a flexible C-terminal tail. The OB fold resembles those in RPA, whilst the tail is reminiscent of bacterial SSBs and mediates interaction with other proteins. One paradigm in the field is that SSBs bind specifically to ssDNA and much less strongly to RNA, ensuring that their functions are restricted to DNA metabolism. Here, we use a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches to demonstrate that the binding properties of S. solfataricus SSB are essentially identical for ssDNA and ssRNA. These features may represent an adaptation to a hyperthermophilic lifestyle, where DNA and RNA damage is a more frequent event.

  4. High-affinity VEGF antagonists by oligomerization of a minimal sequence VEGF-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Stefano, James E; Bird, Julie; Kyazike, Josephine; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Dwyer, Markryan; Hou, Lihui; Qiu, Huawei; Matthews, Gloria; O'Callaghan, Michael; Pan, Clark Q

    2012-12-19

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) neutralizing antagonists including antibodies or receptor extracellular domain Fc fusions have been applied clinically to control angiogenesis in cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, and edema. We report here the generation of high-affinity VEGF-binding domains by chemical linkage of the second domain of the VEGF receptor Flt-1 (D2) in several configurations. Recombinant D2 was expressed with a 13 a.a. C-terminal tag, including a C-terminal cysteine to enable its dimerization by disulfide bond formation or by attachment to divalent PEGs and oligomerization by coupling to multivalent PEGs. Disulfide-linked dimers produced by Cu(2+) oxidation of the free-thiol form of the protein demonstrated picomolar affinity for VEGF in solution, comparable to that of a D2-Fc fusion (sFLT01) and ~50-fold higher than monomeric D2, suggesting the 26 a.a. tag length between the two D2 domains permits simultaneous interaction of both faces of the VEGF homodimer. Extending the separation between the D2 domains by short PEG spacers from 0.35 kD to 5 kD produced a modest ~2-fold increase in affinity over the disulfide, thus defining the optimal distance between the two D2 domains for maximum affinity. By surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a larger (~5-fold) increase in affinity was observed by conjugation of the D2 monomer to the termini of 4-arm PEG, and yielding a product with a larger hydrodynamic radius than sFLT01. The higher affinity displayed by these D2 PEG tetramers than either D2 dimer or sFLT01 was largely a consequence of a slower rate of dissociation, suggesting the simultaneous binding by these tetramers to neighboring surface-bound VEGF. Finally, disulfide-linked D2 dimers showed a greater resistance to autocatalytic fragmentation than sFLT01 under elevated temperature stress, indicating such minimum-sequence constructs may be better suited for sustained-release formulations. Therefore, these constructs represent novel Fc

  5. Quinine binding by the cocaine-binding aptamer. Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic analysis of high-affinity binding of an off-target ligand.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Oren; Yoo, Mina; Han, Chris; Palmo, Tsering; Beckham, Simone A; Wilce, Matthew C J; Johnson, Philip E

    2013-12-03

    The cocaine-binding aptamer is unusual in that it tightly binds molecules other than the ligand it was selected for. Here, we study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer with one of these off-target ligands, quinine. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to quantify the quinine-binding affinity and thermodynamics of a set of sequence variants of the cocaine-binding aptamer. We find that the affinity of the cocaine-binding aptamer for quinine is 30-40 times stronger than it is for cocaine. Competitive-binding studies demonstrate that both quinine and cocaine bind at the same site on the aptamer. The ligand-induced structural-switching binding mechanism of an aptamer variant that contains three base pairs in stem 1 is retained with quinine as a ligand. The short stem 1 aptamer is unfolded or loosely folded in the free form and becomes folded when bound to quinine. This folding is confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and by the short stem 1 construct having a more negative change in heat capacity of quinine binding than is seen when stem 1 has six base pairs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of the free aptamer and both the quinine- and the cocaine-bound forms show that, for the long stem 1 aptamers, the three forms display similar hydrodynamic properties, and the ab initio shape reconstruction structures are very similar. For the short stem 1 aptamer there is a greater variation among the SAXS-derived ab initio shape reconstruction structures, consistent with the changes expected with its structural-switching binding mechanism.

  6. Penem derivatives: beta-lactamase stability and affinity for penicillin-binding proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ohya, S; Utsui, Y; Sugawara, S; Yamazaki, M

    1982-03-01

    Penem derivatives, a new group of beta-lactam antibiotics with potent activities against a wide range of bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were tested for their stability against hydrolysis by beta-lactamases purified from clinical isolates of Morganella morganii. Proteus vulgaris, and Escherichia coli and by a penicillinase from Bacillus cereus. Penems having 6 alpha substituents, such as hydroxyethyl, hydroxymethyl, and ethyl groups, were very stable against hydrolysis by each of the enzymes. Penems having no 6 alpha substituents were easily hydrolyzed by P. vulgaris and E. coli enzymes, whereas they were rather stable against hydrolysis by M. morganii and B. cereus enzymes, a typical cephalosporinase and penicillinase, respectively. Affinity of the penems for E. coli penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was also tested. beta-Lactamase-stable penems having a 6 alpha-hydroxyethyl group showed high affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 as well as for PBP-1A, -1Bs, and -2. However, the penems having no 6 alpha substituents showed a far lower affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 than that shown by the corresponding 6 alpha-hydroxyethyl penems. Among the penems tested, affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 was closely related to their beta-lactamase stability, as was the case among cephamycins and cephalosporins. Effects of the penems on the morphology of a strain of E. coli are also described.

  7. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Halogen bond: its role beyond drug-target binding affinity for drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Yingtao; Lu, Yunxiang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-27

    Halogen bond has attracted a great deal of attention in the past years for hit-to-lead-to-candidate optimization aiming at improving drug-target binding affinity. In general, heavy organohalogens (i.e., organochlorines, organobromines, and organoiodines) are capable of forming halogen bonds while organofluorines are not. In order to explore the possible roles that halogen bonds could play beyond improving binding affinity, we performed a detailed database survey and quantum chemistry calculation with close attention paid to (1) the change of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines along the drug discovery and development process and (2) the halogen bonds between organohalogens and nonbiopolymers or nontarget biopolymers. Our database survey revealed that (1) an obviously increasing trend of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines was observed along the drug discovery and development process, illustrating that more organofluorines are worn and eliminated than heavy organohalogens during the process, suggesting that heavy halogens with the capability of forming halogen bonds should have priority for lead optimization; and (2) more than 16% of the halogen bonds in PDB are formed between organohalogens and water, and nearly 20% of the halogen bonds are formed with the proteins that are involved in the ADME/T process. Our QM/MM calculations validated the contribution of the halogen bond to the binding between organohalogens and plasma transport proteins. Thus, halogen bonds could play roles not only in improving drug-target binding affinity but also in tuning ADME/T property. Therefore, we suggest that albeit halogenation is a valuable approach for improving ligand bioactivity, more attention should be paid in the future to the application of the halogen bond for ligand ADME/T property optimization.

  9. Sugar-binding proteins from fish: selection of high affinity "lambodies" that recognize biomedically relevant glycans.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xia; Ma, Mark Z; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Barchi, Joseph J; Mariuzza, Roy A; Murphy, Michael B; Mao, Li; Pancer, Zeev

    2013-01-18

    Glycan-binding proteins are important for a wide variety of basic research and clinical applications, but proteins with high affinity and selectivity for carbohydrates are difficult to obtain. Here we describe a facile and cost-effective strategy to generate monoclonal lamprey antibodies, called lambodies, that target glycan determinants. We screened a library of yeast surface-displayed (YSD) lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for clones that can selectively bind various biomedically important glycotopes. These glycoconjugates included tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (Tn and TFα), Lewis antigens (LeA and LeX), N-glycolylneuraminic acid, targets of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (poly-Man9 and the HIV gp120), and the glycoproteins asialo-ovine submaxillary mucin (aOSM) and asialo-human glycophorin A (aGPA). We isolated clones that bind each of these targets in a glycan-dependent manner and with very strong binding constants, for example, 6.2 nM for Man9 and 44.7 nM for gp120, determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). One particular lambody, VLRB.aGPA.23, was shown by glycan array analysis to be selective for the blood group H type 3 trisaccharide (BG-H3, Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAcα), aGPA, and TFα (Galβ1-3GalNAcα), with affinity constants of 0.2, 1, and 8 nM, respectively. In human tissue microarrays this lambody selectively detected cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens in 14 different types of cancers. It stained 27% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples in a pattern that correlated with poor patient survival. Lambodies with exquisite affinity and selectivity for glycans may find myriad uses in glycobiology and biomedical research.

  10. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  11. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  12. Affinity purification of proteins binding to kinase inhibitors immobilized on self-assembling monolayers.

    PubMed

    Bantscheff, Marcus; Hobson, Scott; Kuster, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors represent a relatively new class of drugs that offer novel therapies targeting specific -malfunctioning kinase-mediated signaling pathways in oncology and potentially inflammation. As the ATP binding sites of the ∼500 human kinases are structurally conserved and because most current drugs target the ATP binding site, there is a need to profile all the kinases that a drug may bind and/or inhibit. We have developed a chemical proteomics method that affinity purifies kinases from cell or tissue lysates using kinase inhibitors immobilized on self-assembling monolayers. The method can be applied to assess the selectivity of a given kinase inhibitor and thus to guide its preclinical or clinical development.

  13. Temperature-sensitive high affinity (/sup 3/H)serotonin binding: characterization and effects of antidepressant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Helmeste, D.M.; Tang, S.W.

    1984-08-13

    Characterization of temperature-sensitive (/sup 3/H)serotonin (5-HT) binding sites (1 and 4 nM Kd sites) revealed complex inhibition by neuroleptics and serotonin antagonists. There was no simple correlation with affinities for S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ receptors. In vivo pretreatment (48 h before) with mianserin did not alter B/sub max/ or Kd for the 1 nM Kd (/sup 3/H)5-HT site, although (/sup 3/H)ketanserin (S/sub 2/) densities were decreased by 50%. This suggested that possible S/sub 2/ components of (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding must be negligible, even though ketanserin competed with high affinity (IC/sub 50/ = 3 nM) for a portion of the 1 nM Kd (/sup 3/H)5-HT site. Low concentrations of mianserin inhibited the 1 nM Kd (/sup 3/H)5-HT site in a non-competitive manner, as shown by a decrease in B/sub max/ with no change in Kd after in vitro incubation. The complex inhibition data may therefore represent indirect interactions through another site.

  14. Copper binding affinity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) gills: Implications for assessing bioavailable metal

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, R.K.; Smith, D.E.; Swoboda-Colberg, N.; Meyer, J.S.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative for determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.

  15. Quality control of coated antibodies: new, rapid determination of binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Ricoux, R; Chazaud, B; Tresca, J P; Pontet, M

    2000-03-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of the affinity constant between a fluid-phase biotinylated antigen and a solid-phase monoclonal antibody. This procedure allows evaluation of the efficiency of an antibody as a coated tool for an immunoassay. For this purpose, the biotinylation of the antigen and its further quantitative measurement by streptavidin-peroxidase led to a single reversible interaction, the binding affinity of which greatly determines the quality of the assay. The free and bound fractions of the biotinylated antigen were obtained in wells coated with a low level of immobilized antibodies. At the equilibrium state, the free antigen present in the supernatant of these wells was further transferred to high level antibody coated wells which captured all the free antigen molecules. These molecules were quantified using a standard curve established with known concentrations of biotinylated antigen, also incubated in wells coated with the high level of antibody.

  16. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  17. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-07

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity.

  18. Accurate electron affinity of Pb and isotope shifts of binding energies of Pb-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-08-01

    Lead (Pb) was the last element of the group IVA whose electron affinity had a low accuracy around 10 meV before the present work. This was due to the generic threshold photodetachment measurement that cannot extent well below 0.5 eV due to the light source limitation. In the present work, the electron affinity of Pb was determined to be 2877.33(13) cm-1 or 0.356 743(16) eV for the isotope m = 208. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 500 with respect to the previous laser photodetachment electron spectroscopy. Moreover, remarkable isotope shifts of the binding energy of Pb- 6p3 4S3/2 - Pb 6p2 3P2 were observed for m = 206, 207, and 208.

  19. Accurate electron affinity of Pb and isotope shifts of binding energies of Pb(.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-08-28

    Lead (Pb) was the last element of the group IVA whose electron affinity had a low accuracy around 10 meV before the present work. This was due to the generic threshold photodetachment measurement that cannot extent well below 0.5 eV due to the light source limitation. In the present work, the electron affinity of Pb was determined to be 2877.33(13) cm(-1) or 0.356 743(16) eV for the isotope m = 208. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 500 with respect to the previous laser photodetachment electron spectroscopy. Moreover, remarkable isotope shifts of the binding energy of Pb(-) 6p(3) (4)S3/2 - Pb 6p(2) (3)P2 were observed for m = 206, 207, and 208.

  20. Protein purification-free method of binding affinity determination by microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Yeh, Joanna; Timofeeva, Olga; Tarasov, Sergey G; Pritt, Samuel; Stefanisko, Karen; Tarasova, Nadya

    2013-08-15

    Quantitative characterization of protein interactions is essential in practically any field of life sciences, particularly drug discovery. Most of currently available methods of KD determination require access to purified protein of interest, generation of which can be time-consuming and expensive. We have developed a protocol that allows for determination of binding affinity by microscale thermophoresis (MST) without purification of the target protein from cell lysates. The method involves overexpression of the GFP-fused protein and cell lysis in non-denaturing conditions. Application of the method to STAT3-GFP transiently expressed in HEK293 cells allowed to determine for the first time the affinity of the well-studied transcription factor to oligonucleotides with different sequences. The protocol is straightforward and can have a variety of application for studying interactions of proteins with small molecules, peptides, DNA, RNA, and proteins.

  1. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    PubMed

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  2. Fluorescence measurements of the binding of cations to high-affinity and low-affinity sites on ATP-G-actin.

    PubMed

    Carlier, M F; Pantaloni, D; Korn, E D

    1986-08-15

    The binding of cations to ATP-G-actin has been assessed by measuring the kinetics of the increase in fluorescence of N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine-labeled actin. Ca2+ and Mg2+ compete for a single high-affinity site on ATP-G-actin with KD values of 1.5-15 nM for Ca2+ and 0.1-1 microM for Mg2+, i.e. with affinities 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported (Frieden, C., Lieberman, D., and Gilbert, H. R. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 8991-8993). As proposed by Frieden (Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886), the Mg-actin complex undergoes a slow isomerization (Kis = 0.03-0.1) to a higher affinity state (K'D = 4-40 nM). The replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at this high-affinity site causes a slow 10% increase in fluorescence that is 90% complete in about 200 s at saturating concentrations of Mg2+. Independently, Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ bind to low-affinity sites (KD values of 0.15 mM for Ca2+ and Mg2+ and 10 mM for K+) which causes a rapid 6-8% increase in fluorescence (complete in less than 5 s). We propose that the activation step that converts Ca-G-actin to a polymerizable species upon addition of Mg2+ is the binding of Mg2+ to the low-affinity sites and not the replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at the high-affinity site.

  3. HLA class I alleles are associated with peptide-binding repertoires of different size, affinity, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sinu; Weiskopf, Daniela; Angelo, Michael A; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-12-15

    Prediction of HLA binding affinity is widely used to identify candidate T cell epitopes, and an affinity of 500 nM is routinely used as a threshold for peptide selection. However, the fraction (percentage) of peptides predicted to bind with affinities of 500 nM varies by allele. For example, of a large collection of ~30,000 dengue virus-derived peptides only 0.3% were predicted to bind HLA A*0101, whereas nearly 5% were predicted for A*0201. This striking difference could not be ascribed to variation in accuracy of the algorithms used, as predicted values closely correlated with affinity measured in vitro with purified HLA molecules. These data raised the question whether different alleles would also vary in terms of epitope repertoire size, defined as the number of associated epitopes or, alternatively, whether alleles vary drastically in terms of the affinity threshold associated with immunogenicity. To address this issue, strains of HLA transgenic mice with wide (A*0201), intermediate (B*0702), or narrow (A*0101) repertoires were immunized with peptides of varying binding affinity and relative percentile ranking. The results show that absolute binding capacity is a better predictor of immunogenicity, and analysis of epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database revealed that predictive efficacy is increased using allele-specific affinity thresholds. Finally, we investigated the genetic and structural basis of the phenomenon. Although no stringent correlate was defined, on average HLA B alleles are associated with significantly narrower repertoires than are HLA A alleles.

  4. pH-dependent binding engineering reveals an FcRn affinity threshold that governs IgG recycling.

    PubMed

    Borrok, M Jack; Wu, Yanli; Beyaz, Nurten; Yu, Xiang-Qing; Oganesyan, Vaheh; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-02-13

    The Fc domain of IgG has been the target of multiple mutational studies aimed at altering the pH-dependent IgG/FcRn interaction to modulate IgG pharmacokinetics. These studies have yielded antibody variants with disparate pharmacokinetic characteristics, ranging from extended in vivo half-life to those exhibiting extremely rapid clearance. To better understand pH-dependent binding parameters that govern these outcomes and limit FcRn-mediated half-life extension, we generated a panel of novel Fc variants with high affinity binding at acidic pH that vary in pH 7.4 affinities and assessed pharmacokinetic outcomes. Pharmacokinetic studies in human FcRn transgenic mice and cynomolgus monkeys showed that multiple variants with increased FcRn affinities at acidic pH exhibited extended serum half-lives relative to the parental IgG. Importantly, the results reveal an underappreciated affinity threshold of neutral pH binding that determines IgG recycling efficiency. Variants with pH 7.4 FcRn affinities below this threshold recycle efficiently and can exhibit increased serum persistence. Increasing neutral pH FcRn affinity beyond this threshold reduced serum persistence by offsetting the benefits of increased pH 6.0 binding. Ultra-high affinity binding to FcRn at both acidic and neutral pH leads to rapid serum clearance.

  5. NADP+ binding to the regulatory subunit of methionine adenosyltransferase II increases intersubunit binding affinity in the hetero-trimer.

    PubMed

    González, Beatriz; Garrido, Francisco; Ortega, Rebeca; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Pajares, María A

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian methionine adenosyltransferase II (MAT II) is the only hetero-oligomer in this family of enzymes that synthesize S-adenosylmethionine using methionine and ATP as substrates. Binding of regulatory β subunits and catalytic α2 dimers is known to increase the affinity for methionine, although scarce additional information about this interaction is available. This work reports the use of recombinant α2 and β subunits to produce oligomers showing kinetic parameters comparable to MAT II purified from several tissues. According to isothermal titration calorimetry data and densitometric scanning of the stained hetero-oligomer bands on denatured gels, the composition of these oligomers is that of a hetero-trimer with α2 dimers associated to single β subunits. Additionally, the regulatory subunit is able to bind NADP(+) with a 1:1 stoichiometry, the cofactor enhancing β to α2-dimer binding affinity. Mutants lacking residues involved in NADP(+) binding and N-terminal truncations of the β subunit were able to oligomerize with α2-dimers, although the kinetic properties appeared altered. These data together suggest a role for both parts of the sequence in the regulatory role exerted by the β subunit on catalysis. Moreover, preparation of a structural model for the hetero-oligomer, using the available crystal data, allowed prediction of the regions involved in β to α2-dimer interaction. Finally, the implications that the presence of different N-terminals in the β subunit could have on MAT II behavior are discussed in light of the recent identification of several splicing forms of this subunit in hepatoma cells.

  6. NADP+ Binding to the Regulatory Subunit of Methionine Adenosyltransferase II Increases Intersubunit Binding Affinity in the Hetero-Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Rebeca; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Pajares, María A.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian methionine adenosyltransferase II (MAT II) is the only hetero-oligomer in this family of enzymes that synthesize S-adenosylmethionine using methionine and ATP as substrates. Binding of regulatory β subunits and catalytic α2 dimers is known to increase the affinity for methionine, although scarce additional information about this interaction is available. This work reports the use of recombinant α2 and β subunits to produce oligomers showing kinetic parameters comparable to MAT II purified from several tissues. According to isothermal titration calorimetry data and densitometric scanning of the stained hetero-oligomer bands on denatured gels, the composition of these oligomers is that of a hetero-trimer with α2 dimers associated to single β subunits. Additionally, the regulatory subunit is able to bind NADP+ with a 1∶1 stoichiometry, the cofactor enhancing β to α2-dimer binding affinity. Mutants lacking residues involved in NADP+ binding and N-terminal truncations of the β subunit were able to oligomerize with α2-dimers, although the kinetic properties appeared altered. These data together suggest a role for both parts of the sequence in the regulatory role exerted by the β subunit on catalysis. Moreover, preparation of a structural model for the hetero-oligomer, using the available crystal data, allowed prediction of the regions involved in β to α2-dimer interaction. Finally, the implications that the presence of different N-terminals in the β subunit could have on MAT II behavior are discussed in light of the recent identification of several splicing forms of this subunit in hepatoma cells. PMID:23189196

  7. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Ming; Lee, Yuarn-Jang; Wang, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chien-Ting; Tsai, Jing-Shin; Wu, Chien-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang; and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  8. A machine learning approach to predicting protein-ligand binding affinity with applications to molecular docking

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Pedro J.; Mitchell, John B.O.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation Accurately predicting the binding affinities of large sets of diverse protein-ligand complexes is an extremely challenging task. The scoring functions that attempt such computational prediction are essential for analysing the outputs of Molecular Docking, which is in turn an important technique for drug discovery, chemical biology and structural biology. Each scoring function assumes a predetermined theory-inspired functional form for the relationship between the variables that characterise the complex, which also include parameters fitted to experimental or simulation data, and its predicted binding affinity. The inherent problem of this rigid approach is that it leads to poor predictivity for those complexes that do not conform to the modelling assumptions. Moreover, resampling strategies, such as cross-validation or bootstrapping, are still not systematically used to guard against the overfitting of calibration data in parameter estimation for scoring functions. Results We propose a novel scoring function (RF-Score) that circumvents the need for problematic modelling assumptions via non-parametric machine learning. In particular, Random Forest was used to implicitly capture binding effects that are hard to model explicitly. RF-Score is compared with the state of the art on the demanding PDBbind benchmark. Results show that RF-Score is a very competitive scoring function. Importantly, RF-Score’s performance was shown to improve dramatically with training set size and hence the future availability of more high quality structural and interaction data is expected to lead to improved versions of RF-Score. PMID:20236947

  9. Water-Hydrogel Binding Affinity Modulates Freeze-Drying-Induced Micropore Architecture and Skeletal Myotube Formation.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Marshall, Nicholas; Clay, Nicholas; Chen, Jinrong; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-08-10

    Freeze-dried hydrogels are increasingly used to create 3D interconnected micropores that facilitate biomolecular and cellular transports. However, freeze-drying is often plagued by variance in micropore architecture based on polymer choice. We hypothesized that water-polymer binding affinity plays a significant role in sizes and numbers of micropores formed through freeze-drying, influencing cell-derived tissue quality. Poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels with alginate methacrylate (AM) were used due to AM's higher binding affinity for water than PEGDA. PEGDA-AM hydrogels with larger AM concentrations resulted in larger sizes and numbers of micropores than pure PEGDA hydrogels, attributed to the increased mass of water binding to the PEGDA-AM gel. Skeletal myoblasts loaded in microporous PEGDA-AM hydrogels were active to produce 3D muscle-like tissue, while those loaded in pure PEGDA gels were localized on the gel surface. We propose that this study will be broadly useful in designing and improving the performance of various microporous gels.

  10. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  11. Affinity electrophoresis as a method for determining substrate-binding specificity of carbohydrate-active enzymes for soluble polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Moraïs, Sarah; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is a simple and rapid tool for the analysis of protein-binding affinities to soluble polysaccharides. This approach is particularly suitable for the characterization of the carbohydrate-active enzymes that contain a carbohydrate-binding module and for their mutants and chimeras. Knowledge of the binding characteristics of these enzymes can be the first step to elucidate the enzymatic activity of a putative enzyme; moreover in some cases, enzymes are able to bind polysaccharides targets other than their specified substrate, and this knowledge can be essential to understand the basics of the intrinsic mechanism of these enzymes in their natural environment.

  12. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R.; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface

  13. Relations between high-affinity binding sites for L-tryptophan, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1983-01-01

    Binding of L-tryptophan, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red to defatted human serum albumin was studied by ultrafiltration at pH 7.0. All ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with association constants of the order of 10(4)-10(5)M-1. The number of secondary binding sites was found to vary from zero to five, with association constants about 10(3)M-1. Competitive binding studies with different pairs of the ligands were performed. Binding of both ligands was determined simultaneously. L-Tryptophan and diazepam were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site on albumin. The following combinations of ligands do not bind competitively to albumin: L-tryptophan-Phenol Red, L-tryptophan-salicylate and Phenol Red-salicylate. On the other hand, high-affinity bindings of the three ligands do not take place independently but in such a way that binding of one of the ligands results in a decrease in binding of the other ligands. The decreases in binding are reciprocal and can be accounted for by introducing a coupling constant. The magnitude of the constant is dependent on the ligands being bound. In the present study, the mutual decrease in binding was more pronounced with L-tryptophan-salicylate and Phenol Red-salicylate than with L-tryptophan-Phenol Red. PMID:6847607

  14. Binding affinities of amino acid analogues at the charged aqueous titania interface: implications for titania-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Anas M; Hughes, Zak E; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2014-11-11

    Despite the extensive utilization of biomolecule-titania interfaces, biomolecular recognition and interactions at the aqueous titania interface remain far from being fully understood. Here, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, in partnership with metadynamics, are used to calculate the free energy of adsorption of different amino acid side chain analogues at the negatively-charged aqueous rutile TiO2 (110) interface, under conditions corresponding with neutral pH. Our calculations predict that charged amino acid analogues have a relatively high affinity to the titania surface, with the arginine analogue predicted to be the strongest binder. Interactions between uncharged amino acid analogues and titania are found to be repulsive or weak at best. All of the residues that bound to the negatively-charged interface show a relatively stronger adsorption compared with the charge-neutral interface, including the negatively-charged analogue. Of the analogues that are found to bind to the titania surface, the rank ordering of the binding affinities is predicted to be "arginine" > "lysine" ≈ aspartic acid > "serine". This is the same ordering as was found previously for the charge-neutral aqueous titania interface. Our results show very good agreement with available experimental data and can provide a baseline for the interpretation of peptide-TiO2 adsorption data.

  15. Relative binding affinity does not predict biological response to xenoestrogens in rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Strunck, E; Stemmann, N; Hopert, A; Wünsche, W; Frank, K; Vollmer, G

    2000-10-01

    The possible adverse effects of the so-called environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern. Developmental, endocrine and reproductive disorders in wildlife animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with estrogen-like activity (xenoestrogens); yet, the potential impact of environmental estrogens on human health is currently under debate also due to lack of data. A battery of in vitro assays exist for identifying compounds with estrogenic activity, but only a few models are available to assess estrogenic potency in a multiparametric analysis. We have recently established the endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line RUCA-I; it enables us to compare estrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo as these cells are estrogen responsive in vitro and grow estrogen sensitive tumors if inoculated in syngeneic animals in vivo. Here we report in vitro data concerning (a) the relative binding affinity of the selected synthetic chemicals Bisphenol A, nonylphenol, p-tert-octylphenol, and o,p-DDT to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells and (b) the relative potency of these compounds in inducing increased production of complement C3, an endogenous estrogen-responsive gene. Competitive Scatchard analysis revealed that xenoestrogens bound with an at least 1000-fold lower affinity to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells than estradiol itself, thereby exhibiting the following affinity ranking, estradiol>nonylphenol>bisphenol A approximately p-tert-octylphenol>o,p-DDT. Despite these low binding affinities, bisphenol A, nonylphenol and p-tert-octylphenol increased production of complement C3 in a dose dependent manner. Compared with estradiol, only 100-fold higher concentrations were needed for all the compounds to achieve similar levels of induction, except o,p-DDT which was by far less potent. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that the increased production of complement C3 was mediated by an increased transcription. In summary, cultured

  16. On the molecular basis of the high affinity binding of basic amino acids to LAOBP, a periplasmic binding protein from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Nancy O; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Tellez, Luis A; Pérez-Hernández, Gerardo; García-Hernández, Enrique; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Fernández-Velasco, D Alejandro

    2015-02-01

    The rational designing of binding abilities in proteins requires an understanding of the relationship between structure and thermodynamics. However, our knowledge of the molecular origin of high-affinity binding of ligands to proteins is still limited; such is the case for l-lysine-l-arginine-l-ornithine periplasmic binding protein (LAOBP), a periplasmic binding protein from Salmonella typhimurium that binds to l-arginine, l-lysine, and l-ornithine with nanomolar affinity and to l-histidine with micromolar affinity. Structural studies indicate that ligand binding induces a large conformational change in LAOBP. In this work, we studied the thermodynamics of l-histidine and l-arginine binding to LAOBP by isothermal titration calorimetry. For both ligands, the affinity is enthalpically driven, with a binding ΔCp of ~-300 cal mol(-1)  K(-1) , most of which arises from the burial of protein nonpolar surfaces that accompanies the conformational change. Osmotic stress measurements revealed that several water molecules become sequestered upon complex formation. In addition, LAOBP prefers positively charged ligands in their side chain. An energetic analysis shows that the protein acquires a thermodynamically equivalent state with both ligands. The 1000-fold higher affinity of LAOBP for l-arginine as compared with l-histidine is mainly of enthalpic origin and can be ascribed to the formation of an extra pair of hydrogen bonds. Periplasmic binding proteins have evolved diverse energetic strategies for ligand recognition. STM4351, another arginine binding protein from Salmonella, shows an entropy-driven micromolar affinity toward l-arginine. In contrast, our data show that LAOBP achieves nanomolar affinity for the same ligand through enthalpy optimization.

  17. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  18. High affinity binding of 125I-angiotensin II to rat glomerular basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Sraer, J; Baud, L; Cosyns, J P; Verroust, P; Nivez, M P; Ardaillou, R

    1977-01-01

    125I-angiotensin II (AII) specifically bound to rat glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The kinetics of binding were similar to those obtained with the total glomeruli. The apparent dissociation constant was close to 50 pM with both preparations. The number of sites related to the amount of protein was two times greater with GBM than with total glomeruli. Since the amount of GBM protein extracted from a given amount of glomerular protein was about 10%, it was possible to estimate the share of the GBM binding sites for AII as representing 20% of the total number present in the entire glomerulus. Binding studies at equilibrium as a function of 125I-AII concentration and competitive binding experiments suggested either multiplicity of the binding sites or cooperativity in the binding reaction. Degradation of 125I-AII in the presence of GBM was slight and did not increase with time. The difference in the degrees of degradation of 125I-AII was too small to account for the observed difference in binding when the results obtained with GBM and isolated glomeruli preparations were compared. 125I-AII binding to GBM was increased after treatment of these membranes with collagenase, slightly diminished with neuraminidase, and almost completely abolished with trypsin suggesting the proteic nature of the receptor. 125I-AII binding to GBM was diminished after incubation of GBM with anti-GBM antibodies as a result of a decrease in the number of binding sites. 125I-AII binding was even more diminished in preparations of glomeruli isolated from rats passively immunized with anti-GBM antibodies when compared with glomeruli from control animals. This resulted from both smaller affinity for AII and decrease in the number of the binding sites. The present data provides evidence for specific binding sites for AII localized on GBM. This is noteworthy since receptors for polypeptide hormones are currently observed on the surface of cell membranes. These findings also suggest a new

  19. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  20. Asparagine deamidation reduces DNA-binding affinity of the Drosophila melanogaster Scr homeodomain.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Nichole E; Lelli, Katherine; Mann, Richard S; Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-10-24

    Spontaneous deamidation of asparagine is a non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins. Residue Asn 321 is the main site of deamidation of the Drosophila melanogaster Hox transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr). Formation of iso-aspartate, the major deamidation product, is detected by HNCACB triple-resonance NMR spectroscopy. The rate of deamidation is quantified by fitting the decay of Asn NH2 side-chain signals in a time-series of (15)N-(1)H HSQC NMR spectra. The deamidated form of Scr binds to specific DNA target sequences with reduced affinity as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay.

  1. Copper(II) ions and the Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide: Affinity and stoichiometry of binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõugu, Vello; Friedemann, Merlin; Tiiman, Ann; Palumaa, Peep

    2014-10-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid plaques is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis this deposition is an early event and primary cause of the disease, however, the mechanisms that cause this deposition remain elusive. An increasing amount of evidence shows that the interactions of biometals can contribute to the fibrillization and amyloid formation by amyloidogenic peptides. From different anions the copper ions deserve the most attention since it can contribute not only toamyloid formation but also to its toxicity due to the generation of ROS. In this thesis we focus on the affinity and stoichiometry of copper(II) binding to the Aβ molecule.

  2. RNA containing pyrrolocytidine base analogs: good binding affinity and fluorescence that responds to hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Alexander S; Damha, Masad J; Hudson, Robert H E

    2008-01-01

    6-Phenylpyrrolocytidine and 6-methoxymethylene-pyrrolocytidine are base-modified nucleosides with remarkable fluorescence properties. When incorporated into RNA, these analogs enhance binding affinity towards RNA and DNA targets with a concomitant change in their fluorescence upon duplex formation. The fluorescence response depends on the nature of the 6-substituent and the sequence position of the modified nucleoside. The fluorescence response of these structurally conservative, well-tolerated fluorescent nucleosides may be exploited as probes in the study of nucleic acid processing enzymes.

  3. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.

  4. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Ozçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 10(9) (13.7 nM); however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  5. Positron-attachment to small molecules: Vibrational enhancement of positron affinities with configuration interaction level of multi-component molecular orbital approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Masanori

    2015-12-31

    To theoretically demonstrate the binding of a positron to small polarized molecules, we have calculated the vibrational averaged positron affinity (PA) values along the local vibrational contribution with the configuration interaction level of multi-component molecular orbital method. This method can take the electron-positron correlation contribution into account through single electronic - single positronic excitation configurations. The PA values are enhanced by including the local vibrational contribution from vertical PA values due to the anharmonicity of the potential.

  6. Membrane Modulates Affinity for Calcium Ion to Create an Apparent Cooperative Binding Response by Annexin a5

    PubMed Central

    Gauer, Jacob W.; Knutson, Kristofer J.; Jaworski, Samantha R.; Rice, Anne M.; Rannikko, Anika M.; Lentz, Barry R.; Hinderliter, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to characterize the binding of calcium ion (Ca2+) and phospholipid to the peripheral membrane-binding protein annexin a5. The phospholipid was a binary mixture of a neutral and an acidic phospholipid, specifically phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine in the form of large unilamellar vesicles. To stringently define the mode of binding, a global fit of data collected in the presence and absence of membrane concentrations exceeding protein saturation was performed. A partition function defined the contribution of all heat-evolving or heat-absorbing binding states. We find that annexin a5 binds Ca2+ in solution according to a simple independent-site model (solution-state affinity). In the presence of phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes, binding of Ca2+ differentiates into two classes of sites, both of which have higher affinity compared with the solution-state affinity. As in the solution-state scenario, the sites within each class were described with an independent-site model. Transitioning from a solution state with lower Ca2+ affinity to a membrane-associated, higher Ca2+ affinity state, results in cooperative binding. We discuss how weak membrane association of annexin a5 prior to Ca2+ influx is the basis for the cooperative response of annexin a5 toward Ca2+, and the role of membrane organization in this response. PMID:23746516

  7. Single-Step Affinity Purification of ERK Signaling Complexes Using the Streptavidin-Binding Peptide (SBP) Tag.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Veraksa, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of biological functions of signaling proteins is facilitated by studying their protein-protein interaction networks. Affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become a favorite method to study protein complexes. Here we describe a procedure for single-step purification of ERK (Rolled) and associated proteins from Drosophila cultured cells. The use of the streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP) tag allows for a highly efficient isolation of native ERK signaling complexes, which are suitable for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry. Our analysis of the ERK interactome has identified both known and novel signaling components. This method can be easily adapted for SBP-based purification of protein complexes in any expression system.

  8. Purification of Capping Protein Using the Capping Protein Binding Site of CARMIL as an Affinity Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Capping Protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function and regulation. PMID:19427903

  9. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    PubMed

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  10. Neutrophil recruitment limited by high-affinity bent β2 integrin binding ligand in cis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; McArdle, Sara; Marki, Alex; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Gutierrez, Edgar; Engelhardt, Britta; Deutsch, Urban; Ginsberg, Mark; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for innate immunity and inflammation and many neutrophil functions are β2 integrin-dependent. Integrins can extend (E+) and acquire a high-affinity conformation with an ‘open' headpiece (H+). The canonical switchblade model of integrin activation proposes that the E+ conformation precedes H+, and the two are believed to be structurally linked. Here we show, using high-resolution quantitative dynamic footprinting (qDF) microscopy combined with a homogenous conformation-reporter binding assay in a microfluidic device, that a substantial fraction of β2 integrins on human neutrophils acquire an unexpected E−H+ conformation. E−H+ β2 integrins bind intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) in cis, which inhibits leukocyte adhesion in vitro and in vivo. This endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanism inhibits neutrophil aggregation, accumulation and inflammation. PMID:27578049

  11. A cleavable silica-binding affinity tag for rapid and inexpensive protein purification.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François

    2014-10-01

    We describe a new affinity purification tag called Car9 that confers proteins to which it is fused micromolar affinity for unmodified silica. When appended to the C-terminus of GFPmut2 through a flexible linker, Car9 promotes efficient adsorption to silica gel and the fusion protein can be released from the particles by incubation with L-lysine. Using a silica gel column and the lysine elution approach in fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) mode, Car9-tagged versions of GFPmut2, mCherry and maltose binding protein (MBP) can be recovered from clarified lysates with a purity of 80-90%. Capitalizing on silica's ability to handle large pressure drops, we further show that it is possible to go from cell lysates to purified protein in less than 15 min using a fully disposable device. Finally, we demonstrate that the linker-Car9 region is susceptible to proteolysis by E. coli OmpT and take advantage of this observation to excise the C-terminal extension of GFPmut2-Car9 by incubating purified fusion protein with cells that overproduce the outer membrane protease OmpT. The set of strategies described herein, should reduce the cost of affinity purification by at least 10-fold, cut down purification times to minutes, and allow for the production of proteins with native (or nearly native) termini from their C-terminally-tagged versions.

  12. Structure-based identification of new high-affinity nucleosome binding sequences.

    PubMed

    Battistini, Federica; Hunter, Christopher A; Moore, Irene K; Widom, Jonathan

    2012-06-29

    The substrate for the proteins that express genetic information in the cell is not naked DNA but an assembly of nucleosomes, where the DNA is wrapped around histone proteins. The organization of these nucleosomes on genomic DNA is influenced by the DNA sequence. Here, we present a structure-based computational approach that translates sequence information into the energy required to bend DNA into a nucleosome-bound conformation. The calculations establish the relationship between DNA sequence and histone octamer binding affinity. In silico selection using this model identified several new DNA sequences, which were experimentally found to have histone octamer affinities comparable to the highest-affinity sequences known. The results provide insights into the molecular mechanism through which DNA sequence information encodes its organization. A quantitative appreciation of the thermodynamics of nucleosome positioning and rearrangement will be one of the key factors in understanding the regulation of transcription and in the design of new promoter architectures for the purposes of tuning gene expression dynamics.

  13. Characterization of high affinity (/sup 3/H)triazolam binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O/sup 0/C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37/sup 0/C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0/sup 0/C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37/sup 0/C). Inhibition studies showed that (/sup 3/H)TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0/sup 0/C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37/sup 0/C. In Ro 15-1788/(/sup 3/H)TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion (/sup 3/H)TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists.

  14. Identification of an Orthogonal Peptide Binding Motif for Biarsenical Multiuse Affinity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Haishi; Yan, Ping; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-07-01

    Biarsenical multiuse affinity probes (MAPs) complexed with ethanedithiol (EDT) permit the selective cellular labeling of proteins engineered with tetracysteine motifs, but are limited by the availability of a single binding motif (i.e., CCPGCC or PG tag) that prevents the differential labeling of co-expressed proteins. To overcome this problem, we have used a high-throughput peptide screen to identify an alternate binding motif (i.e., CCKACC or KA tag), which has a similar brightness to the classical sequence upon MAP binding, but displays altered rates and affinities of association that permit the differential labeling of these peptide sequences by the red probe 4,5-bis(1,3,2-dithiarsolan-2-yl)-resorufin (ReAsH-EDT2) or its green cognate 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein-(1,2-ethanedithiol)2 (FLAsH-EDT2). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated following the expression of PG- and KA-tagged subunits of RNA polymerase expressed in E. coli. Specific labeling of two subunits of RNA polymerase in cellular lysates was achieved, whereby ReAsH-EDT2 is shown to selectively label the PG-tag on RNA polymerase alpha subunit prior to the labeling of the KA-tag sequence of the beta subunit of RNA polymerase with FlAsH-EDT2. These results demonstrate the ability to selectively label multiple individual proteins with orthogonal sequence tags in complex cellular lystates with spectroscopically distinct MAPs, and indicate the absolute specificity of ReAsH to target expressed proteins with essentially no nonspecific binding interactions.

  15. Affinity polymers tailored for the protein A binding site of immunoglobulin G proteins.

    PubMed

    Latza, Patricia; Gilles, Patrick; Schaller, Torsten; Schrader, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rational design in combination with a screening process was used to develop affinity polymers for a specific binding site on the surface of immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins. The concept starts with the identification of critical amino acid residues on the protein interface and their topological arrangement. Appropriate binding monomers were subsequently synthesized. Together with a sugar monomer (2-5 equiv) for water solubility and a dansyl monomer (0.5 equiv) as a fluorescent label, they were subjected in aqueous solution to linear radical copolymerization in various compositions (e.g., azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN), homogeneous water/DMF mixtures). After ultrafiltration and lyophilization, colorless dry water-soluble powders were obtained. NMR spectroscopic and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) characterization indicated molecular weights between 30 and 500 kD and confirmed retention of monomer composition as well as the absence of monomers. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screen of the polymer libraries (20-50 members), few copolymers qualified as strong and selective binders for the protein A binding site on the Fc fragment of the antibody. Their monomer composition precisely reflected the critical amino acids found at the interface. The simple combination of a charged and a nonpolar binding monomer sufficed for selective submicromolar IgG recognition by the synthetic polymer. Affinities were confirmed by fluorescence titrations; they increased with decreasing salt load but remained largely unaltered at lowered pH. Other proteins, including those of similar size and isoelectric point (pI), were bound 10-1000 times less tightly. This example indicates that interaction domains in other proteins may also be targeted by synthetic polymers if their comonomer composition reflects the nature and arrangement of amino acid residues on the protein surface.

  16. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  17. Fructose Uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti Is Mediated by a High-Affinity ATP-Binding Cassette Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Annie; Østerås, Magne; Mandon, Karine; Poggi, Marie-Christine; Le Rudulier, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter (FrcB, a periplasmic substrate binding protein, FrcC, an integral membrane permease, and FrcA, an ATP-binding cytoplasmic protein), which is the unique high-affinity (Km of 6 μM) fructose uptake system in S. meliloti. The FrcK protein shows homology with some kinases, while FrcR is probably a transcriptional regulator of the repressor-ORF-kinase family. The expression of S. meliloti frcBCAK in Escherichia coli, which transports fructose only via the phosphotransferase system, resulted in the detection of a periplasmic fructose binding activity, demonstrating that FrcB is the binding protein of the Frc transporter. The analysis of substrate specificities revealed that the Frc system is also a high-affinity transporter for ribose and mannose, which are both fructose competitors for the binding to the periplasmic FrcB protein. However, the Frc mutant was still able to grow on these sugars as sole carbon source, demonstrating the presence of at least one other uptake system for mannose and ribose in S. meliloti. The expression of the frcBC genes as determined by measurements of alkaline phosphatase activity was shown to be induced by mannitol and fructose, but not by mannose, ribose, glucose, or succinate, suggesting that the Frc system is primarily targeted towards fructose. Neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impared in the TnphoA mutant, demonstrating that fructose uptake is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, although FrcB protein is

  18. Fructose uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti is mediated by a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette transport system.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A; Østerås, M; Mandon, K; Poggi, M C; Le Rudulier, D

    2001-08-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter (FrcB, a periplasmic substrate binding protein, FrcC, an integral membrane permease, and FrcA, an ATP-binding cytoplasmic protein), which is the unique high-affinity (K(m) of 6 microM) fructose uptake system in S. meliloti. The FrcK protein shows homology with some kinases, while FrcR is probably a transcriptional regulator of the repressor-ORF-kinase family. The expression of S. meliloti frcBCAK in Escherichia coli, which transports fructose only via the phosphotransferase system, resulted in the detection of a periplasmic fructose binding activity, demonstrating that FrcB is the binding protein of the Frc transporter. The analysis of substrate specificities revealed that the Frc system is also a high-affinity transporter for ribose and mannose, which are both fructose competitors for the binding to the periplasmic FrcB protein. However, the Frc mutant was still able to grow on these sugars as sole carbon source, demonstrating the presence of at least one other uptake system for mannose and ribose in S. meliloti. The expression of the frcBC genes as determined by measurements of alkaline phosphatase activity was shown to be induced by mannitol and fructose, but not by mannose, ribose, glucose, or succinate, suggesting that the Frc system is primarily targeted towards fructose. Neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impared in the TnphoA mutant, demonstrating that fructose uptake is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, although FrcB protein is

  19. Affinity chromatography reveals RuBisCO as an ecdysteroid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Kamlar, Marek; Kohout, Ladislav; Jezek, Rudolf; Harmatha, Juraj; Macek, Tomas

    2008-12-22

    The aim of this work was to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins using affinity chromatography. Ecdysteroids as insect hormones have been investigated thoroughly but their function and the mechanism of action in plants and other organisms is still unknown although ecdysteroids occur in some plants in a relatively large amount. Therefore, 20-hydroxyecdysone was immobilized on a polymeric carrier as a ligand for affinity chromatography in order to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins from the cytosolic extract of New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia tetragonoides). Non-specifically bound proteins were eluted with a rising gradient of concentration of sodium chloride, and 3% (v/v) acetic acid was used for the elution of the specifically bound proteins. Using this method, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) was isolated. The influence of ecdysteroids on RuBisCO was further studied. Our results show that ecdysteroids are able to increase the yield of RuBisCO-mediated reaction in which CO(2) is fixed into organic matter by more than 10%.

  20. Isomer-Specific Binding Affinity of Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) to Serum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Beesoon, Sanjay; Martin, Jonathan W

    2015-05-05

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are among the most prominent contaminants in human serum, and these were historically manufactured as technical mixtures of linear and branched isomers. The isomers display unique pharmacokinetics in humans and in animal models, but molecular mechanisms underlying isomer-specific PFOS and PFOA disposition have not previously been studied. Here, ultrafiltration devices were used to examine (i) the dissociation constants (Kd) of individual PFOS and PFOA isomers with human serum albumin (HSA) and (ii) relative binding affinity of isomers in technical mixtures spiked to whole calf serum and human serum. Measurement of HSA Kd's demonstrated that linear PFOS (Kd=8(±4)×10(-8) M) was much more tightly bound than branched PFOS isomers (Kd range from 8(±1)×10(-5) M to 4(±2)×10(-4) M). Similarly, linear PFOA (Kd=1(±0.9)×10(-4) M) was more strongly bound to HSA compared to branched PFOA isomers (Kd range from 4(±2)×10(-4) M to 3(±2)×10(-4) M). The higher binding affinities of linear PFOS and PFOA to total serum protein were confirmed when both calf serum and human serum were spiked with technical mixtures. Overall, these data provide a mechanistic explanation for the longer biological half-life of PFOS in humans, compared to PFOA, and for the higher transplacental transfer efficiencies and renal clearance of branched PFOS and PFOA isomers, compared to the respective linear isomer.

  1. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    PubMed

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  2. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  3. Improving the binding affinity of an antibody using molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Casipit, C. L.; Tal, R.; Wittman, V.; Chavaillaz, P. A.; Arbuthnott, K.; Weidanz, J. A.; Jiao, J. A.; Wong, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    Activated Factor X releases F1.2, a 271-amino acid peptide, from the amino terminus of prothrombin during blood coagulation. A nine-amino acid peptide, C9 (DSDRAIEGR), corresponding to the carboxyl terminus of F1.2 was synthesized and used to produce a monoclonal antibody, TA1 (K(D)) 1.22 x 10(-6) M). To model the TA1 antibody, we entered the sequence information of the cloned TA1 Fv into the antibody modeling program, ABM, which combines homology methods, conformational search procedures, and energy screening and has proved to be a reliable and reproducible antibody modeling method. Using a novel protein fusion procedure, we expressed the C9 peptide fused to the carboxyl terminus of the PENI repressor protein from Bacillus licheniformis in Escherichia coli. We constructed fusion proteins containing alanine substitutions for each amino acid in the C9 epitope. Binding studies, using the C9 alanine mutants and TA1, and spatial constraints predicted by the modeled TA1 binding cleft enabled us to establish a plausible conformation for C9 complexed with TA1. Furthermore, based on binding results of conservative amino acid substitutions in C9 and mutations in the antibody, we were able to refine the complex model and identify antibody mutations that would improve binding affinity. PMID:10082364

  4. Binding site on human immunoglobulin G for the affinity ligand HWRGWV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiou; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Williams, D. Keith; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Cavanagh, John; Muddiman, David C.; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity ligand HWRGWV has demonstrated the ability to isolate human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from mammalian cell culture media. The ligand specifically binds hIgG through its Fc portion. This work shows that deglycosylation of hIgG has no influence on its binding to the HWRGWV ligand and the ligand does not compete with Protein A or Protein G in binding hIgG. It is suggested by the mass spectrometry (MS) data and docking simulation that HWRGWV binds to the pFc portion of hIgG and interacts with the amino acids in the loop Ser383–Asn389 (SNGQPEN) located in the CH3 domain. Subsequent modeling has suggested a possible three-dimensional minimized solution structure for the interaction of hIgG and the HWRGWV ligand. The results support the fact that a peptide as small as a hexamer can have specific interactions with large proteins such as hIgG. PMID:20049844

  5. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  6. SNP2TFBS - a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-04

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/.

  7. Response Element Composition Governs Correlations between Binding Site Affinity and Transcription in Glucocorticoid Receptor Feed-forward Loops.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Zuo, Zheng; Kadiyala, Vineela; Zhang, Liyang; Pufall, Miles A; Jain, Mukesh K; Phang, Tzu L; Stormo, Gary D; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-08-07

    Combinatorial gene regulation through feed-forward loops (FFLs) can bestow specificity and temporal control to client gene expression; however, characteristics of binding sites that mediate these effects are not established. We previously showed that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and KLF15 form coherent FFLs that cooperatively induce targets such as the amino acid-metabolizing enzymes AASS and PRODH and incoherent FFLs exemplified by repression of MT2A by KLF15. Here, we demonstrate that GR and KLF15 physically interact and identify low affinity GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for PRODH and AASS that contribute to combinatorial regulation with KLF15. We used deep sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to derive in vitro GR binding affinities across sequence space. We applied these data to show that AASS GRE activity correlated (r(2) = 0.73) with predicted GR binding affinities across a 50-fold affinity range in transfection assays; however, the slope of the linear relationship more than doubled when KLF15 was expressed. Whereas activity of the MT2A GRE was even more strongly (r(2) = 0.89) correlated with GR binding site affinity, the slope of the linear relationship was sharply reduced by KLF15, consistent with incoherent FFL logic. Thus, GRE architecture and co-regulator expression together determine the functional parameters that relate GR binding site affinity to hormone-induced transcriptional responses. Utilization of specific affinity response functions and GR binding sites by FFLs may contribute to the diversity of gene expression patterns within GR-regulated transcriptomes.

  8. Exploring the interplay between experimental methods and the performance of predictors of binding affinity change upon mutations in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Cunliang; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2016-08-01

    Reliable prediction of binding affinity changes (ΔΔG) upon mutations in protein complexes relies not only on the performance of computational methods but also on the availability and quality of experimental data. Binding affinity changes can be measured by various experimental methods with different accuracies and limitations. To understand the impact of these on the prediction of binding affinity change, we present the Database of binding Affinity Change Upon Mutation (DACUM), a database of 1872 binding affinity changes upon single-point mutations, a subset of the SKEMPI database (Moal,I.H. and Fernández-Recio,J. Bioinformatics, 2012;28:2600-2607) extended with information on the experimental methods used for ΔΔG measurements. The ΔΔG data were classified into different data sets based on the experimental method used and the position of the mutation (interface and non-interface). We tested the prediction performance of the original HADDOCK score, a newly trained version of it and mutation Cutoff Scanning Matrix (Pires,D.E.V., Ascher,D.B. and Blundell,T.L. Bioinformatics 2014;30:335-342), one of the best reported ΔΔG predictors so far, on these various data sets. Our results demonstrate a strong impact of the experimental methods on the performance of binding affinity change predictors for protein complexes. This underscores the importance of properly considering and carefully choosing experimental methods in the development of novel binding affinity change predictors. The DACUM database is available online at https://github.com/haddocking/DACUM.

  9. Identification of BZR1-interacting Proteins as Potential Components of the Brassinosteroid Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis Through Tandem Affinity Purification*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunming; Shang, Jian-Xiu; Chen, Qi-Xiu; Oses-Prieto, Juan A.; Bai, Ming-Yi; Yang, Yihong; Yuan, Min; Zhang, Yu-Lan; Mu, Cong-Cong; Deng, Zhiping; Wei, Chuang-Qi; Burlingame, Alma L.; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential phytohormones for plant growth and development. BRs are perceived by the cell surface receptor kinase BRI1, and downstream signal transduction through multiple components leads to activation of the transcription factors BZR1 and BZR2/BES1. BZR1 activity is highly controlled by BR through reversible phosphorylation, protein degradation, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. To further understand the molecular function of BZR1, we performed tandem affinity purification of the BZR1 complex and identified BZR1-associated proteins using mass spectrometry. These BZR1-associated proteins included several known BR signaling components, such as BIN2, BSK1, 14–3-3λ, and PP2A, as well as a large number of proteins with previously unknown functions in BR signal transduction, including the kinases MKK5 and MAPK4, histone deacetylase 19, cysteine proteinase inhibitor 6, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, cysteine endopeptidases RD21A and RD21B, calmodulin-binding transcription activator 5, ubiquitin protease 12, cyclophilin 59, and phospholipid-binding protein synaptotagmin A. Their interactions with BZR1 were confirmed by in vivo and in vitro assays. Furthermore, MKK5 was found to phosphorylate BZR1 in vitro. This study demonstrates an effective method for purifying proteins associated with low-abundance transcription factors, and identifies new BZR1-interacting proteins with potentially important roles in BR response. PMID:24019147

  10. Exploring binding affinity of oxaliplatin and carboplatin, to nucleoprotein structure of chromatin: spectroscopic study and histone proteins as a target.

    PubMed

    Soori, Hosna; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Davoodi, Jamshid

    2015-01-07

    Platinum drugs are potent chemotherapeutic agents widely used in cancer therapy. They exert their biological activity by binding to DNA, producing DNA adducts; however, in the cell nucleus, DNA is complexed with histone proteins into a nucleoprotein structure known as chromatin. The aim of this study was to explore the binding affinity of oxaliplatin and carboplatin to chromatin using spectroscopic as well as thermal denaturation and equilibrium dialysis techniques. The results showed that the drugs quenched with chromophores of chromatin and the quenching effect for oxaliplatin (Ksv = 3.156) was higher than carboplatin (Ksv = 0.28). The binding of the drugs exhibited hypochromicity both in thermal denaturation profiles and UV absorbance at 210 nm. The binding was positive cooperation with spontaneous reaction and oxaliplatin (Ka = 5.3 × 10(3) M(-1), n = 1.7) exhibited higher binding constant and number of binding sites than carboplatin (Ka = 0.33 × 10(3) M(-1), n = 1.0) upon binding to chromatin. Also secondary structure of chromatin proteins was altered upon drugs binding. It is concluded that oxaliplatin represents higher binding affinity to chromatin compared to carboplatin. In chromatin where DNA is compacted into nucleosomes structure with histones, the affinity of the platinated drugs is reduced and histone proteins may play a fundamental role in this binding process.

  11. Machine-learning scoring functions to improve structure-based binding affinity prediction and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Ain, Qurrat Ul; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; Roessler, Florian D; Ballester, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    Docking tools to predict whether and how a small molecule binds to a target can be applied if a structural model of such target is available. The reliability of docking depends, however, on the accuracy of the adopted scoring function (SF). Despite intense research over the years, improving the accuracy of SFs for structure-based binding affinity prediction or virtual screening has proven to be a challenging task for any class of method. New SFs based on modern machine-learning regression models, which do not impose a predetermined functional form and thus are able to exploit effectively much larger amounts of experimental data, have recently been introduced. These machine-learning SFs have been shown to outperform a wide range of classical SFs at both binding affinity prediction and virtual screening. The emerging picture from these studies is that the classical approach of using linear regression with a small number of expert-selected structural features can be strongly improved by a machine-learning approach based on nonlinear regression allied with comprehensive data-driven feature selection. Furthermore, the performance of classical SFs does not grow with larger training datasets and hence this performance gap is expected to widen as more training data becomes available in the future. Other topics covered in this review include predicting the reliability of a SF on a particular target class, generating synthetic data to improve predictive performance and modeling guidelines for SF development. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:405-424. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1225 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  12. Proteome-wide Discovery and Characterizations of Nucleotide-binding Proteins with Affinity-labeled Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xinning; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins play pivotal roles in many cellular processes including cell signaling. However, targeted study of sub-proteome of nucleotide-binding proteins, especially protein kinases and GTP-binding proteins, remained challenging. Here, we reported a general strategy in using affinity-labeled chemical probes to enrich, identify, and quantify ATP- and GTP-binding proteins in the entire human proteome. Our results revealed that the ATP/GTP affinity probes facilitated the identification of 100 GTP-binding proteins and 206 kinases with the use of low mg quantities of lysate of HL-60 cells. In combination with the use of SILAC-based quantitative proteomics method, we assessed the ATP/GTP binding selectivities of nucleotide-binding proteins at the global proteome scale. Our results confirmed known and, more importantly, unveiled new ATP/GTP-binding preferences of hundreds of nucleotide-binding proteins. Additionally, our strategy led to the identification of three and one unique nucleotide-binding motifs for kinases and GTP-binding proteins, respectively, and the characterizations of the nucleotide binding selectivities of individual motifs. Our strategy for capturing and characterizing ATP/GTP-binding proteins should be generally applicable for those proteins that can interact with other nucleotides. PMID:23413923

  13. Actin affinity chromatography in the purification of human, avian and other mammalian plasma proteins binding vitamin D and its metabolites (Gc globulins).

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, J G; Kowalski, M A; Sanger, J W

    1984-01-01

    The human plasma protein binding vitamin D and its metabolites (Gc globulin; group-specific component) has been isolated from human plasma by column affinity chromatography on gels to which monomeric actin was covalently attached. Rabbit skeletal-muscle G-actin was covalently coupled to amino-agarose gels before the application of human plasma. At actin/protein molar ratios of 4-8:1, excellent recovery (approximately 58%) of purified binding protein was achieved. After 0.75 M-NaCl washes, the binding protein was eluted from the columns in 3 M-guanidinium chloride, dialysed and analysed. These eluates contained the binding protein as 34-100% of the total protein, reflecting a 130-fold average purification in this single step. In the presence of Ca2+, gelsolin (another plasma protein that binds actin) was apparently retained by the affinity column, but this was prevented by chelation of plasma Ca2+. The actin affinity step also was effective in the isolation of the binding protein from rat, rabbit and chicken plasma, as indicated by autoradiographs of purified fractions analysed by gel electrophoresis after incubation with 25-hydroxy[26,27-3H]cholecalciferol. Further isolation by hydroxyapatite chromatography yielded a purified binding protein which displayed characteristic binding activity toward vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, and retained its physicochemical features. This brief purification sequence is relatively simple and efficient, and should prove to be useful to investigators studying this interesting plasma protein. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6547042

  14. A carbohydrate-binding affinity ligand for the specific enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; El Khoury, Graziella; Zhang, Peiqing; Rudd, Pauline M; Lowe, Christopher R

    2016-04-29

    One challenge facing the production of glycoprotein therapeutics is the lack of stable and selective affinity ligands for their enrichment. Synthetic affinity ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction represent a desirable option, particularly those incorporating benzoboroxole and its derivatives, which have been shown to enrich glycoproteins under physiological conditions. Thus, an Ugi ligand, A21C11I8, comprising 5-amino-2-hydroxymethylphenylboronic acid was synthesised on aldehyde-functionalised Sepharose™. Immobilised A21C11I8 displayed affinity for the glycosylated protein, glucose oxidase (GOx), which bound primarily through its glycan moiety. The ligand had a preference for sugar alcohols and the furanose form of the monosaccharides tested. Compared with immobilised 3-aminophenylboronic acid and Concanavalin A, the Ugi ligand was able to purify GOx from spiked Escherichia coli supernatants with retention of its maximum enzymatic activity and protein recovery. Glycan profiles of human immunoglobulin G tested on A21C11I8 columns suggested that the adsorbent possesses the potential to resolve sialylated and neutral glycoforms. The benzoboroxole-functionalised Ugi ligand may find application in selective glycoform separation.

  15. Phosphorylation of CREB affects its binding to high and low affinity sites: implications for cAMP induced gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, M; Weih, F; Schmid, W; DeVack, C; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Luckow, B; Boshart, M; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP treatment of hepatoma cells leads to increased protein binding at the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in vivo, as revealed by genomic footprinting, whereas no increase is observed at the CRE of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Several criteria establish that the 43 kDa CREB protein is interacting with both of these sites. Two classes of CRE with different affinity for CREB are described. One class, including the TATCRE, is characterized by asymmetric and weak binding sites (CGTCA), whereas the second class containing symmetrical TGACGTCA sites shows a much higher binding affinity for CREB. Both classes show an increase in binding after phosphorylation of CREB by protein kinase A (PKA). An in vivo phosphorylation-dependent change in binding of CREB increases the occupancy of weak binding sites used for transactivation, such as the TATCRE, while high affinity sites may have constitutive binding of transcriptionally active and inactive CREB dimers, as demonstrated by in vivo footprinting at the PEPCK CRE. Thus, lower basal level and higher relative stimulation of transcription by cyclic AMP through low affinity CREs should result, allowing finely tuned control of gene activation. Images PMID:1354612

  16. Tuning the affinity of anion binding sites in porin channels with negatively charged residues: molecular details for OprP.

    PubMed

    Modi, Niraj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Bains, Manjeet; Benz, Roland; Hancock, Robert E W; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-02-20

    The cell envelope of the Gram negative opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly permeable to many classes of hydrophilic molecules including antibiotics due to the presence of the narrow and selective porins. Here we focused on one of the narrow-channel porins, that is, OprP, which is responsible for the high-affinity uptake of phosphate ions. Its two central binding sites for phosphate contain a number of positively charged amino acids together with a single negatively charged residue (D94). The presence of this negatively charged residue in a binding site for negatively charged phosphate ions is highly surprising due to the potentially reduced binding affinity. The goal of this study was to better understand the role of D94 in phosphate binding, selectivity, and transport using a combination of mutagenesis, electrophysiology, and free-energy calculations. The presence of a negatively charged residue in the binding site is critical for this specific porin OprP as emphasized by the evolutionary conservation of such negatively charged residue in the binding site of several anion-selective porins. Mutations of D94 in OprP to any positively charged or neutral residue increased the binding affinity of phosphate for OprP. Detailed analysis indicated that this anionic residue in the phosphate binding site of OprP, despite its negative charge, maintained energetically favorable phosphate binding sites in the central region of the channel and at the same time decreased residence time thus preventing excessively strong binding of phosphate that would oppose phosphate flux through the channel. Intriguingly mutations of D94 to positively charged residues, lysine and arginine, resulted in very different binding affinities and free energy profiles, indicating the importance of side chain conformations of these positively charged residues in phosphate binding to OprP.

  17. Imaging progesterone receptor in breast tumors: Synthesis and receptor binding affinity of fluoroalkyl-substituted analogs of Tanaproget

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bing; Lee, Jae Hak; Mayne, Christopher G.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) is estrogen regulated, and PR levels in breast tumors can be used to predict the success of endocrine therapies targeting the estrogen receptor (ER). Tanaproget is a non-steroidal progestin agonist with very high PR binding affinity and excellent in vivo potency. When appropriately radiolabeled, it might be used to image PR-positive breast tumors non-invasively, by positron emission tomography (PET). We describe the synthesis and PR binding affinities of a series of fluoroalkyl-substituted 6-aryl-1,4-dihydrobenzo[d][1,3]oxazine-2-thiones, analogs of Tanaproget. Some of these compounds have subnanomolar binding affinities, higher than that of either Tanaproget itself or the high affinity PR ligand R5020. Structure-binding affinity relationships can be rationalized by molecular modeling of ligand complexes with PR, and the enantioselectivity of binding has been predicted. These compounds are being further evaluated as potential diagnostic PET imaging agents for breast cancer, and enantiomerically pure materials of defined stereochemistry are being prepared. PMID:20355713

  18. Dextran as a generally applicable multivalent scaffold for improving immunoglobulin-binding affinities of peptide and peptidomimetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kenrick, Sophia; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-08-20

    Molecules able to bind the antigen-binding sites of antibodies are of interest in medicine and immunology. Since most antibodies are bivalent, higher affinity recognition can be achieved through avidity effects in which a construct containing two or more copies of the ligand engages both arms of the immunoglobulin simultaneously. This can be achieved routinely by immobilizing antibody ligands at high density on solid surfaces, such as ELISA plates, but there is surprisingly little literature on scaffolds that routinely support bivalent binding of antibody ligands in solution, particularly for the important case of human IgG antibodies. Here we show that the simple strategy of linking two antigens with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer long enough to span the two arms of an antibody results in higher affinity binding in some, but not all, cases. However, we found that the creation of multimeric constructs in which several antibody ligands are displayed on a dextran polymer reliably provides much higher affinity binding than is observed with the monomer in all cases tested. Since these dextran conjugates are simple to construct, they provide a general and convenient strategy to transform modest affinity antibody ligands into high affinity probes. An additional advantage is that the antibody ligands occupy only a small number of the reactive sites on the dextran, so that molecular cargo can be attached easily, creating molecules capable of delivering this cargo to cells displaying antigen-specific receptors.

  19. Overcoming drug resistance by cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of a doxorubicin dimer with high DNA-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Freidel, Christoph; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Tabujew, Ilja; Schramm, Alexander; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Müllen, Klaus; Peneva, Kalina

    2017-04-21

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of a novel bioconjugate, consisting of an octaarginine cell-penetrating peptide and a highly DNA-affine doxorubicin dimer. The linkage between the two components is composed of a cleavable disulfide bond, which enables the efficient intracellular delivery of the cytotoxic payload within the reductive environment of the cytosol, mediated through glutathione. To determine the DNA-binding affinity of the dimeric drug molecule, microscale thermophoresis was applied. This is the first utilization of this method to assess the binding interactions of an anthracycline drug with nucleic acids. The cytotoxic effect of the peptide-drug conjugate, studied with drug-sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant cancer cells, demonstrates that the bioconjugate can successfully overcome drug resistance in neuroblastoma cells.

  20. Conformational features and binding affinities to Cripto, ALK7 and ALK4 of Nodal synthetic fragments.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Caporale, Andrea; Focà, Annalia; Focà, Giuseppina; D'Auria, Gabriella; Falcigno, Lucia; Ruvo, Menotti

    2015-04-01

    Nodal, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is a potent embryonic morphogen also implicated in tumor progression. As for other TGF-βs, it triggers the signaling functions through the interaction with the extracellular domains of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and with the co-receptor Cripto. Recently, we reported the molecular models of Nodal in complex with its type I receptors (ALK4 and ALK7) as well as with Cripto, as obtained by homology modeling and docking simulations. From such models, potential binding epitopes have been identified. To validate such hypotheses, a series of mutated Nodal fragments have been synthesized. These peptide analogs encompass residues 44-67 of the Nodal protein, corresponding to the pre-helix loop and the H3 helix, and reproduce the wild-type sequence or bear some modifications to evaluate the hot-spot role of modified residues in the receptor binding. Here, we show the structural characterization in solution by CD and NMR of the Nodal peptides and the measurement of binding affinity toward Cripto by surface plasmon resonance. Data collected by both conformational analyses and binding measurements suggest a role for Y58 of Nodal in the recognition with Cripto and confirm that previously reported for E49 and E50. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays with recombinant proteins show that Nodal interacts in vitro also with ALK7 and ALK4 and preliminary data, generated using the Nodal synthetic fragments, suggest that Y58 of Nodal may also be involved in the recognition with these protein partners.

  1. Binding interaction between a queen pheromone component HOB and pheromone binding protein ASP1 of Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chen; Fu, Yuxia; Jiang, Hongtao; Zhuang, Shulin; Li, Hongliang

    2015-01-01

    The honeybee's social behavior is closely related to the critical response to pheromone, while pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) play an important role in binding and transferring those pheromones. Here we report one known PBP, antennal special protein 1(ASP1), which has high affinity with a queen mandibular pheromone component, methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB). In this study, multiple fluorescent spectra, UV absorption spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and molecular docking analysis were combined to clarify the binding process. Basically, fluorescence intensity of ASP1 could be considerably quenched by HOB with an appropriate interaction distance (3.1 nm), indicating that a complex, which is more stable in lower temperature, was formed. The fact ΔH < 0, ΔS < 0, by thermodynamic analysis, indicated the van der Waals and hydrogen bond as main driving force. Moreover, synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD spectra analysis showed the change of partial hydrophilicity of ASP1 and the increase of α-helix after HOB addition. In conclusion, ASP1 can strongly and spontaneously interact with HOB. But the binding ability decreases with the rise of temperature, which may be necessary for sufficient social stability of hives. This study provides elucidation of the detailed binding mechanism and potential physicochemical basis of thermal stability to the social behavior of honeybee.

  2. The Dac-tag, an affinity tag based on penicillin-binding protein 5.

    PubMed

    Lee, David Wei; Peggie, Mark; Deak, Maria; Toth, Rachel; Gage, Zoe Olivia; Wood, Nicola; Schilde, Christina; Kurz, Thimo; Knebel, Axel

    2012-09-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5), a product of the Escherichia coli gene dacA, possesses some β-lactamase activity. On binding to penicillin or related antibiotics via an ester bond, it deacylates and destroys them functionally by opening the β-lactam ring. This process takes several minutes. We exploited this process and showed that a fragment of PBP5 can be used as a reversible and monomeric affinity tag. At ambient temperature (e.g., 22°C), a PBP5 fragment binds rapidly and specifically to ampicillin Sepharose. Release can be facilitated either by eluting with 10mM ampicillin or in a ligand-free manner by incubation in the cold (1-10°C) in the presence of 5% glycerol. The "Dac-tag", named with reference to the gene dacA, allows the isolation of remarkably pure fusion protein from a wide variety of expression systems, including (in particular) eukaryotic expression systems.

  3. Screening major binding sites on human serum albumin by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Seung; Austin, John; Hage, David S

    2004-01-01

    A screening method is described for determining whether a drug or small solute has significant interactions at the two major binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA). This method uses affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) to perform a mobility shift assay, where the solute of interest is injected in both the presence of pH 7.4, 0.067 M phosphate buffer, and the same buffer containing a known concentration of HSA. Dextran is also used in the running buffer to adjust the mobility of HSA. Two types of modified HSA are used in this assay. The first is modified with 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide (HNB), which selectively blocks HSA's warfarin-azapropazone site. The second type of HSA is modified with tetranitromethane (TNM), which decreases binding at the indole-benzodiazepine site. By comparing the mobility of a solute in the presence of these two modified forms of HSA vs normal HSA, it is possible to detect solute interactions at these binding sites. This approach is illustrated using warfarin and ibuprofen as examples of test solutes.

  4. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  5. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  6. Computational analysis of binding affinity and neural response at the l-alanine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzi, Thomas J.; Bryant, Bruce P.; Venanzi, Carol A.

    1995-10-01

    A model of analogue-receptor binding is developed for the l-alanine receptor in the channel catfish using the AM1-SM2 and ab initio SCRF computational methods. Besides interactions involving the zwitterionic moiety of the amino acid analogue and complementary subsites on the receptor, the model suggests the presence of a hydrophobic pocket with dispersion interactions between the receptor and the residue on the amino acid analogue. Conformational analysis suggests not only a small compact active site on the receptor, but also that the analogues with the highest affinity occupy nearly identical regions of space. Although the binding interaction is dominated by the ionic terms, AM1-SM2 calculations indicate that free energy terms associated with cavity formation, solvent reorganization, and dispersion interactions can be correlated to activation and neural response. From a consideration of this model, molecular features of the analogues that are important for binding and neural response were deduced and other analogues or ligands were developed and tested.

  7. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  8. Structure-affinity relationship of flavones on binding to serum albumins: effect of hydroxyl groups on ring A.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Cao, Hui; Wang, Yuanfeng; Yamamoto, Koichiro; Wei, Xinlin

    2010-07-01

    Four flavones (flavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, and baicalein) sharing the same B- and C-ring structure but a different numbers of hydroxyl groups on the A-ring were studied for their affinities for BSA and HSA. The hydroxylation on ring A of flavones increased the binding constants (K(a)) and the number of binding sites (n) between flavones and serum albumins. The affinities of 7-hydroxyflavone for BSA and HSA were about 800 times and 40 times higher than that of flavone, respectively. It appears that the optimal number of hydroxyl groups introduced to the ring A of flavones is one. As more hydroxyl groups were introduced to positions at C-5, C-6, and/or C-7 of flavones, the affinities for serum albumins decrease. The critical energy transfer distances (R(0)) between the hydroxylated flavones (1-3 OH on the ring A) and serum albumins decreased with the increasing affinities for serum albumins.

  9. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  10. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis.

  11. Protein-Polyelectrolyte Coacervation: Morphology Diagram, Binding Affinity, and Protein Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David; Du, Xiaosong; Dubin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    For aqueous mixtures of negatively charged polysaccharide, hyaluronic acid (HA), and globular protein, either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a pH-ionic strength (I) morphology diagram, with regions of homogeneous solution, soluble complex, coacervation, precipitation, and redissolution, was developed by pH titrations performed at fixed I. The systems are models for coacervation, or liquid-liquid phase separation, between flexible and compact solutes of opposite charge. Protein charge here is tuned by pH, and titration keeps the mixtures close to equilibrium. At high I, only homogeneous solution is observed, as true at high and low pH. Diagrams for the proteins differ because HA affinity for BSA is higher than for BLG, traced to BSA's greater charge patchiness and higher net charge; isothermal solution titration calorimetry finds a factor of two difference in binding energy. Dependences of transition pH on protein charge Z and solution I offer additional insights into interactions underlying morphology transitions. At optimal conditions, the affinity disparity is sufficient to achieve highly selective BSA coacervation in a 1:1 protein mixture, suggesting coacervation to separate similar proteins under mild, non-denaturing conditions. Funding: NSF CBET-1133289, NSF (UMass MRSEC).

  12. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  13. Prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity by free energy simulations: assumptions, pitfalls and expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Julien; Essex, Jonathan W.

    2010-08-01

    Many limitations of current computer-aided drug design arise from the difficulty of reliably predicting the binding affinity of a small molecule to a biological target. There is thus a strong interest in novel computational methodologies that claim predictions of greater accuracy than current scoring functions, and at a throughput compatible with the rapid pace of drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. Notably, computational methodologies firmly rooted in statistical thermodynamics have received particular attention in recent years. Yet free energy calculations can be daunting to learn for a novice user because of numerous technical issues and various approaches advocated by experts in the field. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current capabilities of free energy calculations and to discuss the applicability of this technology to drug discovery.

  14. Functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles with high-binding capacity for affinity separation of therapeutic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masthoff, Ingke-Christine; David, Florian; Wittmann, Christoph; Garnweitner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with immobilized metal ligands were prepared for the separation of antibody fragments. First, iron oxide nanoparticles were produced in a solvothermal synthesis using triethylene glycol as solvent and iron(III) acetylacetonate as organic precursor. Via functionalization of the particles with priorly reacted 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and N α, N α-bis(carboxymethyl)- l-lysine (NTA), and charging with Ni2+, magnetic affinity adsorbents were obtained. The particles were applied to separate a His-tagged antibody fragment from a heterogeneous protein mixture of a microbial cultivation supernatant. Binding properties and specificity for purification of the target product ABF D1.3 scFv were optimized regarding the GNTA concentration and were found superior as compared to commercially available systems. A molar ratio of 1:2 Fe2O3:GNTA was most beneficial for the specific purification of the antibody fragment.

  15. Relative binding affinities of chlorophylls in peridinin-chlorophyll-protein reconstituted with heterochlorophyllous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Brotosudarmo, T H P; Mackowski, S; Hofmann, E; Hiller, R G; Bräuchle, C; Scheer, H

    2008-01-01

    Peridinin-chlorophyll-protein (PCP), containing differently absorbing chlorophyll derivatives, are good models with which to study energy transfer among monomeric chlorophylls (Chls) by both bulk and single-molecule spectroscopy. They can be obtained by reconstituting the N-terminal domain of the protein (N-PCP) with peridinin and chlorophyll mixtures. Upon dimerization of these "half-mers", homo- and heterochlorophyllous complexes are generated, that correspond structurally to monomeric protomers of native PCP from Amphidinium carterae. Heterochlorophyllous complexes contain two different Chls in the two halves of the complete structure. Here, we report reconstitution of N-PCP with binary mixtures of Chl a, Chl b, and [3-acetyl]-Chl a. The ratios of the pigments were varied in the reconstitution mixture, and relative binding constants were determined from quantification of these pigments in the reconstituted PCPs. We find higher affinities for both Chl b and [3-acetyl]-Chl a than for the native pigment, Chl a.

  16. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody-antigen interface.

    PubMed

    Marino, S F; Olal, D; Daumke, O

    2016-03-01

    This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment), J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA). The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: "Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) in a mouse model of multiple myeloma", Mol. Oncol. 9 (7) (2015) pp. 1348-58.

  17. Identification of the high affinity binding site in the Streptococcus intermedius toxin intermedilysin for its membrane receptor, the human complement regulator CD59.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy R; Ross, Kirsty S; Cowan, Graeme J M; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Harris, Claire L; Mitchell, Timothy J; Morgan, B Paul

    2009-04-01

    The unique species specificity of the bacterial cytolysin intermedilysin is explained by its requirement for the human complement regulator CD59 as the primary receptor. Binding studies using individual domains of intermedilysin mapped the CD59-binding site to domain 4 and swap mutants between human and rabbit (non-intermedilysin-binding) CD59 implicated a short sequence (residues 42-59) in human CD59 in binding intermedilysin. We set out to map more closely the CD59 binding site in intermedilysin. We first looked for regions of homology between domain 4 in intermedilysin and the terminal complement components that bind CD59, C8 and C9. A nine amino acid sequence immediately adjacent the undecapeptide segment in intermedilysin domain 4 matched (5 of 9 identical, 3 of 9 conserved) a sequence in C9. A peptide containing this sequence caused dose-dependent inhibition of intermedilysin-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and rendered erythrocytes more susceptible to complement lysis. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of intermedilysin binding to immobilized CD59 revealed saturable fast-on, fast-off binding and a calculated affinity of 4.9 nM. Substitution of three residues from the putative binding site caused a 5-fold reduction in lytic potency of intermedilysin and reduced affinity for immobilized CD59 by 2.5-fold. The demonstration that a peptide modeled on the CD59-binding site inhibits intermedilysin-mediated haemolysis leads us to suggest that such peptides might be useful in treating infections caused by intermedilysin-producing bacteria.

  18. Increased Peptide Contacts Govern High Affinity Binding of a Modified TCR Whilst Maintaining a Native pMHC Docking Mode.

    PubMed

    Cole, David K; Sami, Malkit; Scott, Daniel R; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Todorov, Penio T; Moysey, Ruth K; Jakobsen, Bent K; Boulter, Jonathan M; Baker, Brian M; Yi Li

    2013-01-01

    Natural T cell receptors (TCRs) generally bind to their cognate pMHC molecules with weak affinity and fast kinetics, limiting their use as therapeutic agents. Using phage display, we have engineered a high affinity version of the A6 wild-type TCR (A6wt), specific for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A(∗)0201) complexed with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 111-19 peptide (A2-Tax). Mutations in just 4 residues in the CDR3β loop region of the A6wt TCR were selected that improved binding to A2-Tax by nearly 1000-fold. Biophysical measurements of this mutant TCR (A6c134) demonstrated that the enhanced binding was derived through favorable enthalpy and a slower off-rate. The structure of the free A6c134 TCR and the A6c134/A2-Tax complex revealed a native binding mode, similar to the A6wt/A2-Tax complex. However, concordant with the more favorable binding enthalpy, the A6c134 TCR made increased contacts with the Tax peptide compared with the A6wt/A2-Tax complex, demonstrating a peptide-focused mechanism for the enhanced affinity that directly involved the mutated residues in the A6c134 TCR CDR3β loop. This peptide-focused enhanced TCR binding may represent an important approach for developing antigen specific high affinity TCR reagents for use in T cell based therapies.

  19. Determination of the minimal essential nucleotide sequence for diphtheria tox repressor binding by in vitro affinity selection.

    PubMed

    Tao, X; Murphy, J R

    1994-09-27

    The expression of diphtheria toxin in lysogenic toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae is controlled by the heavy metal ion-activated regulatory protein DtxR. In the presence of divalent heavy metal ions, DtxR specifically binds to the diphtheria tox operator and protects a 27-bp interrupted palindromic sequence from DNase I digestion. To determine the consensus DNA sequence for DtxR binding, we have used gel electrophoresis mobility-shift assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification for in vitro affinity selection of DNA binding sequences from a universe of 6.9 x 10(10) variants. After 10 rounds of in vitro affinity selection, each round coupled with 30 cycles of PCR amplification, we isolated and characterized a family of DNA sequences that function as DtxR-responsive genetic elements both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, these DNA sequences were found to bind activated DtxR with an affinity similar to that of the wild-type tox operator. The DNA sequence analysis of 21 unique in vitro affinity-selected binding sites has revealed the minimal essential nucleotide sequence for DtxR binding to be a 9-bp palindrome separated by a single base pair.

  20. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  1. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  2. Novel Structural Parameters of Ig–Ag Complexes Yield a Quantitative Description of Interaction Specificity and Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Marillet, Simon; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Boudinot, Pierre; Cazals, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Antibody–antigen complexes challenge our understanding, as analyses to date failed to unveil the key determinants of binding affinity and interaction specificity. We partially fill this gap based on novel quantitative analyses using two standardized databases, the IMGT/3Dstructure-DB and the structure affinity benchmark. First, we introduce a statistical analysis of interfaces which enables the classification of ligand types (protein, peptide, and chemical; cross-validated classification error of 9.6%) and yield binding affinity predictions of unprecedented accuracy (median absolute error of 0.878 kcal/mol). Second, we exploit the contributions made by CDRs in terms of position at the interface and atomic packing properties to show that in general, VH CDR3 and VL CDR3 make dominant contributions to the binding affinity, a fact also shown to be consistent with the enthalpy–entropy compensation associated with preconfiguration of CDR3. Our work suggests that the affinity prediction problem could be partially solved from databases of high resolution crystal structures of complexes with known affinity. PMID:28232828

  3. Dynamic Multi-Component Covalent Assembly for the Reversible Binding of Secondary Alcohols and Chirality Sensing

    PubMed Central

    You, Lei; Berman, Jeffrey S.; Anslyn, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    Reversible covalent bonding is often employed for the creation of novel supramolecular structures, multi-component assemblies, and sensing ensembles. In spite of remarkable success of dynamic covalent systems, the reversible binding of a mono-alcohol with high strength is challenging. Here we show that a strategy of carbonyl activation and hemiaminal ether stabilization can be embodied in a four-component reversible assembly that creates a tetradentate ligand and incorporates secondary alcohols with exceptionally high affinity. Evidence is presented that the intermediate leading to binding and exchange of alcohols is an iminium ion. Further, to demonstrate the use of this assembly process we explored chirality sensing and enantiomeric excess determinations. An induced twist in the ligand by a chiral mono-ol results in large Cotton effects in the circular dichroism spectra indicative of the alcohol’s handedness. The strategy revealed in this study should prove broadly applicable for the incorporation of alcohols into supramolecular architecture construction. PMID:22109274

  4. Arene Binding Affinities in [CpRu(nu6-arene)]+ Complexes: Models for the Adsorption of Arenes on Hydroesulferization Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M. G.; Ho, T. C.; Angelici, R.

    2008-02-29

    Product/reactant ratios (Y) were determined for the reactions CpRu({eta}{sup 6}-DBT){sup +} + L CpRu({eta}{sup 6}-L){sup +} + DBT (where DBT is dibenzothiophene and L is a homo- or heterocyclic arene), which were conducted under UV photolysis conditions. In the photostationary state, the Y values for the different arenes decrease in the following order: mesitylene (17) > toluene (13) > indole (9.1) > carbazole (6.7) > benzene (5.9) > fluorene (5.1) > biphenyl (3.9) > DBT (1.0) > phenanthrene (0.65) > naphthalene (0.35). In general, alkyl-substituted arenes have a higher binding affinity than the parent arene, except for tert-butyl groups, which decrease the Y values. These trends in {eta}{sup 6}-arene binding to CpRu{sup +} provide a basis for understanding competitive adsorption of arenes on metal sites of hydrotreating catalysts. Such arene components in petroleum feedstocks reduce the rates of hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophenes.

  5. Amide-mediated hydrogen bonding at organic crystal/water interfaces enables selective endotoxin binding with picomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Thirumoorthi, Navanita; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-05-22

    Since the discovery of endotoxins as the primary toxic component of Gram-negative bacteria, researchers have pursued the quest for molecules that detect, neutralize, and remove endotoxins. Selective removal of endotoxins is particularly challenging for protein solutions and, to this day, no general method is available. Here, we report that crystals of the purine-derived compound allantoin selectively adsorb endotoxins with picomolar affinity through amide-mediated hydrogen bonding in aqueous solutions. Atom force microscopy and chemical inhibition experiments indicate that endotoxin adsorption is largely independent from hydrophobic and ionic interactions with allantoin crystals and is mediated by hydrogen bonding with amide groups at flat crystal surfaces. The small size (500 nm) and large specific surface area of allantoin crystals results in a very high endotoxin-binding capacity (3 × 10(7) EU/g) which compares favorably with known endotoxin-binding materials. These results provide a proof-of-concept for hydrogen bond-based molecular recognition processes in aqueous solutions and establish a practical method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions.

  6. Development and characterization of small bispecific albumin-binding domains with high affinity for ErbB3.

    PubMed

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Astrand, Mikael; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2013-10-01

    Affinity proteins based on small scaffolds are currently emerging as alternatives to antibodies for therapy. Similarly to antibodies, they can be engineered to have high affinity for specific proteins. A potential problem with small proteins and peptides is their short in vivo circulation time, which might limit the therapeutic efficacy. To circumvent this issue, we have engineered bispecificity into an albumin-binding domain (ABD) derived from streptococcal Protein G. The inherent albumin binding was preserved while the opposite side of the molecule was randomized for selection of high-affinity binders. Here we present novel ABD variants with the ability to bind to the epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (ErbB3). Isolated candidates were shown to have an extraordinary thermal stability and affinity for ErbB3 in the nanomolar range. Importantly, they were also shown to retain their affinity to albumin, hence demonstrating that the intended strategy to engineer bispecific single-domain proteins against a tumor-associated receptor was successful. Moreover, competition assays revealed that the new binders could block the natural ligand Neuregulin-1 from binding to ErbB3, indicating a potential anti-proliferative effect. These new binders thus represent promising candidates for further development into ErbB3-signaling inhibitors, where the albumin interaction could result in prolonged in vivo half-life.

  7. Molecular cloning, expression profile, odorant affinity, and stability of two odorant-binding proteins in Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2017-02-01

    The polyembryonic endoparasitoid wasp Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is deployed successfully as a biocontrol agent for corn pest insects from the Lepidopteran genus Ostrinia in Europe and throughout Asia, including Japan, Korea, and China. The odorants are recognized, bound, and solubilized by odorant-binding protein (OBP) in the initial biochemical recognition steps in olfaction that transport them across the sensillum lymph to initiate behavioral response. In the present study, we examine the odorant-binding effects on thermal stability of McinOBP2, McinOBP3, and their mutant form that lacks the third disulfide bonds. Real-time PCR experiments indicate that these two are expressed mainly in adult antennae, with expression levels differing by sex. Odorant-binding affinities of aldehydes, terpenoids, and aliphatic alcohols were measured with circular dichroism spectroscopy based on changes in the thermal stability of the proteins upon their affinities to odorants. The obtained results reveal higher affinity of trans-caryophelle, farnesene, and cis-3-Hexen-1-ol exhibits to both wild and mutant McinOBP2 and McinOBP3. Although conformational flexibility of the mutants and shape of binding cavity make differences in odorant affinity between the wild-type and mutant, it suggested that lacking the third disulfide bond in mutant proteins may have chance to incorrect folded structures that reduced the affinity to these odorants. In addition, CD spectra clearly indicate proteins enriched with α-helical content.

  8. Profiling of drug binding proteins by monolithic affinity chromatography in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuepei; Wang, Tongdan; Zhang, Hanzhi; Han, Bing; Wang, Lishun; Kang, Jingwu

    2014-09-12

    A new approach for proteome-wide profiling drug binding proteins by using monolithic capillary affinity chromatography in combination with HPLC-MS/MS is reported. Two immunosuppresive drugs, namely FK506 and cyclosporin A, were utilized as the experimental models for proof-of-concept. The monolithic capillary affinity columns were prepared through a single-step copolymerization of the drug derivatives with glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate. The capillary chromatography with the affinity monolithic column facilitates the purification of the drug binding proteins from the cell lysate. By combining the capillary affinity column purification and the shot-gun proteomic analysis, totally 33 FK506- and 32 CsA-binding proteins including all the literature reported target proteins of these two drugs were identified. Among them, two proteins, namely voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 and serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5 were verified by using the recombinant proteins. The result supports that the monolithic capillary affinity chromatography is likely to become a valuable tool for profiling of binding proteins of small molecular drugs as well as bioactive compounds.

  9. Affinity of ceftobiprole for penicillin-binding protein 2b in Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with various susceptibilities to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Davies, Todd A; He, Wenping; Bush, Karen; Flamm, Robert K

    2010-10-01

    Wild-type penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2b from penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae had high affinity for ceftobiprole and penicillin (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC(50)s] of ≤0.15 μg/ml) but not ceftriaxone (IC(50) of >8 μg/ml). In clinical isolates, ceftobiprole and PBP 2b affinities were reduced 15- to 30-fold with a Thr-446-Ala substitution and further still with an additional Ala-619-Gly PBP 2b substitution. Ceftobiprole remained active (MICs of ≤1 μg/ml) against all strains tested and behaved more like penicillin than ceftriaxone with respect to PBP 2b binding.

  10. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  11. Conformational Destabilization of Immunoglobulin G Increases the Low pH Binding Affinity with the Neonatal Fc Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Benjamin T.; Jensen, Pernille F.; Larraillet, Vincent; Lin, Kevin; Patapoff, Thomas; Schlothauer, Tilman; Rand, Kasper D.; Zhang, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic evidence suggests that the pH-dependent affinity of IgG molecules for the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) receptor primarily arises from salt bridges involving IgG histidine residues, resulting in moderate affinity at mildly acidic conditions. However, this view does not explain the diversity in affinity found in IgG variants, such as the YTE mutant (M252Y,S254T,T256E), which increases affinity to FcRn by up to 10×. Here we compare hydrogen exchange measurements at pH 7.0 and pH 5.5 with and without FcRn bound with surface plasmon resonance estimates of dissociation constants and FcRn affinity chromatography. The combination of experimental results demonstrates that differences between an IgG and its cognate YTE mutant vary with their pH-sensitive dynamics prior to binding FcRn. The conformational dynamics of these two molecules are nearly indistinguishable upon binding FcRn. We present evidence that pH-induced destabilization in the CH2/3 domain interface of IgG increases binding affinity by breaking intramolecular H-bonds and increases side-chain adaptability in sites that form intermolecular contacts with FcRn. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of pH-dependent affinity in IgG-FcRn interactions and exemplify the important and often ignored role of intrinsic conformational dynamics in a protein ligand, to dictate affinity for biologically important receptors. PMID:26627822

  12. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  13. A Rigid Hinge Region Is Necessary for High-Affinity Binding of Dimannose to Cyanovirin and Associated Constructs.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Bolia, Ashini; Maxwell, Jason D; Bobkov, Andrey A; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Ozkan, S Banu; Margulis, Claudio J

    2015-11-24

    Mutations in the hinge region of cyanovirin-N (CVN) dictate its preferential oligomerization state. Constructs with the Pro51Gly mutation preferentially exist as monomers, whereas wild-type cyanovirin can form domain-swapped dimers under certain conditions. Because the hinge region is an integral part of the high-affinity binding site of CVN, we investigated whether this mutation affects the shape, flexibility, and binding affinity of domain B for dimannose. Our studies indicate that the capability of monomeric wild-type CVN to resist mechanical perturbations is enhanced when compared to that of constructs in which the hinge region is more flexible. Our computational results also show that enhanced flexibility leads to blocking of the binding site by allowing different rotational isomeric states of Asn53. Moreover, at higher temperatures, this observed flexibility leads to an interaction between Asn53 and Asn42, further hindering access to the binding site. On the basis of these results, we predicted that binding affinity for dimannose would be more favorable for cyanovirin constructs containing a wild-type hinge region, whereas affinity would be impaired in the case of mutants containing Pro51Gly. Experimental characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry of a set of cyanovirin mutants confirms this hypothesis. Those possessing the Pro51Gly mutation are consistently inferior binders.

  14. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium.

  15. Nanofluidic Fluorescence Microscopy (NFM) for real-time monitoring of protein binding kinetics and affinity studies.

    PubMed

    Teerapanich, Pattamon; Pugnière, Martine; Henriquet, Corinne; Lin, Yii-Lih; Chou, Chia-Fu; Leïchlé, Thierry

    2017-02-15

    Kinetic monitoring of protein interactions offers insights to their corresponding functions in cellular processes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is the current standard tool used for label-free kinetic assays; however, costly and sophisticated setups are required, decreasing its accessibility to research laboratories. We present a cost-effective nanofluidic-based immunosensor for low-noise real-time kinetic measurement of fluorescent-labeled protein binding. With the combination of fluorescence microscopy and reversed buffer flow operation, association and dissociation kinetics can be accessed in one single experiment without extra buffer loading step, which results in a simplified operation and reduced time of analysis compared to typical microfluidic immunoassays. Kinetic constants of two representative protein-ligand binding pairs (streptavidin/biotin; IgG/anti-IgG) were quantified. The good agreement of extracted rate constants with literature values and analogous SPR measurements indicates that this approach is applicable to study protein interactions of medium- and high-affinities with a limit of detection down to 1 pM, regardless of the analyte size.

  16. Evolved Streptavidin Mutants Reveal Key Role of Loop Residue in High-affinity Binding

    SciTech Connect

    M Magalhaes; C Melo Czekster; R Guan; V Malashkevich; S Almo; M Levy

    2011-12-31

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing contact which keeps this loop open and accessible in the absence of ligand. When this mutation was introduced into the wild-type protein, destabilization of the opened loop conferred a {approx}10-fold decrease in both the on-rate and off-rate for the ligand biotin-4-fluoroscein. A similar effect was observed when this mutation was added to a monomeric form of this protein. Our results provide key insight into the role of the streptavidin flexible loop in ligand binding and maintaining high affinity interactions.

  17. Computation of affinity and selectivity: Binding of 2,4-diaminopteridine and 2,4-diaminoquinazoline inhibitors to dihydrofolate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelius, John; Graffner-Nordberg, Malin; Hansson, Tomas; Hallberg, Anders; Åqvist, Johan

    1998-03-01

    Binding energy calculations for complexes of mutant and wild-type human dihydrofolate reductases with 2,4-diaminopteridine and 2,4-diaminoquinazoline inhibitors are reported. Quantitative insight into binding energetics of these molecules is obtained from calculations based on force field energy evaluation and thermal sampling by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated affinity of methotrexate for wild-type and mutant enzymes is reasonably well reproduced. Truncation of the methotrexate glutamate tail results in a loss of affinity by several orders of magnitude. No major difference in binding strength is predicted between the pteridines and the quinazolines, while the N-methyl group present in methotrexate appears to confer significantly stronger binding. The recent improvement, which is used here, of our linear interaction energy method for binding affinity prediction, as well as problems with treating charged and flexible ligands are discussed. This approach should be suitable in a drug discovery context for prediction of binding energies of new inhibitors prior to their synthesis, when some information about the binding mode is available.

  18. Binding patterns and structure-affinity relationships of food azo dyes with lysozyme: a multitechnique approach.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Li

    2013-12-18

    Food dyes serve to beguile consumers: they are often used to imitate the presence of healthful, colorful food produce such as fruits and vegetables. But considering the hurtful impact of these chemicals on the human body, it is time to thoroughly uncover the toxicity of these food dyes at the molecular level. In the present contribution, we have examined the molecular reactions of protein lysozyme with model food azo compound Color Index (C.I.) Acid Red 2 and its analogues C.I. Acid Orange 52, Solvent Yellow 2, and the core structure of azobenzene using a combination of biophysical methods at physiological conditions. Fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), time-resolved fluorescence, UV-vis absorption as well as computer-aided molecular modeling were used to analyze food dye affinity, binding mode, energy transfer, and the effects of food dye complexation on lysozyme stability and conformation. Fluorescence emission spectra indicate complex formation at 10(-5) M dye concentration, and this corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results showing the diminution in the tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence mainly via a static type (KSV = 1.505 × 10(4) M(-1)) and Förster energy transfer. Structural analysis displayed the participation of several amino acid residues in food dye protein adducts, with hydrogen bonds, π-π and cation-π interactions, but the conformation of lysozyme was unchanged in the process, as derived from fluorescence emission, far-UV CD, and synchronous fluorescence spectra. The overall affinity of food dye is 10(4) M(-1) and there exists only one kind of binding domain in protein for food dye. These data are consistent with hydrophobic probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) displacement, and molecular modeling manifesting the food dye binding patch was near to Trp-62 and Trp-63 residues of lysozyme. On the basis of the computational analyses, we determine that the type of substituent on the azobenzene structure has a powerful influence on the

  19. Absence of Rapid Exchange Component in a Low-Affinity Carrier Transport

    PubMed Central

    LeFevre, Paul G.

    1963-01-01

    A previous study showed that human red blood cells equilibrate much less rapidly with D-glucose at moderately high concentrations than with C14-glucose added after the net movement is completed. This had been predicted from a simple reversible mobile-carrier mediated-transport model system suggested by the net monosaccharide transport kinetics in these cells, but is also consistent with the more complex models proposed for certain active transport systems to account for elevation of tracer fluxes of even low-affinity "substrates" when their trans-concentration is raised. The simple model predicts, however, that with any sugar showing a much lower apparent affinity for the reactive sites, such as D-ribose, this phenomenon would not be observed, and tracer equilibration should proceed at approximately the same rate as net uptake. The latter expectation was confirmed experimentally by analyses of the ribose, or radioactivity, content of washed red cells sampled serially during incubation with ribose or C14-ribose in the appropriate mixtures. The tracer ribose movement showed no evidence of a relatively rapid exchange component. The relative rapidity of glucose tracer uptake into cells preloaded with ordinary glucose may therefore more readily be attributed simply to depression of tracer efflux by competition for the saturated reactive sites, than to any action of the trans-concentration on the influx by way of a coupled exchange process. PMID:13929247

  20. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems.

  1. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K.; Ali, Abdullah M.; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S.; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein–protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting. PMID:26261309

  2. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K; Ali, Abdullah M; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L

    2015-08-25

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein-protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting.

  3. Sperm in poor quality semen from bulls during heat stress have a lower affinity for binding hydrogen-3 heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Ax, R.L.; Gilbert, G.R.; Shook, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Binding assays with (/sup 3/H) heparin were performed using spermatozoa collected prior to, during, and following summer heat stress to dairy bulls. Ejaculates collected in August 1983 after a period of ambient temperatures exceeding 29.4/sup 0/C exhibited a high frequency of abnormal sperm, and motility was reduced in some samples. Sperm in samples collected during heat stress possessed dissociation constants for binding (/sup 3/H) heparin ranging from 134.5 to 163.2 nmol. In contrast, sperm in semen collected prior to and after heat stress had significantly lower dissociation constants (higher affinity) for (/sup 3/H)heparin, 12.9 to 56.4 nmol. The number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H) heparin on sperm did not change among collection periods. It was concluded that the binding affinity for (/sup 3/H) heparin may reflect membrane integrity of bull sperm.

  4. Omega-conotoxin GVIA binding to a high-affinity receptor in brain: characterization, calcium sensitivity, and solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.A.; Snowman, A.M.; Biswas, A.; Olivera, B.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    We describe unique, high-affinity binding sites for omega(/sup 125/I)conotoxin GVIA in membranes from rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglia which appear to be primarily associated with N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The dissociation constant (KD) for the toxin in rat brain membranes is 60 pM. Physiologic extracellular concentrations of calcium inhibit toxin binding noncompetitively (IC50 = 0.2 mM). The regional distribution of the binding sites in rat brain differs markedly from that of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist receptors associated with L-type calcium channels. In detergent-solubilized brain membranes, toxin binding retains the same affinity, specificity, and ionic sensitivity as in particulate preparations.

  5. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  6. Disease-associated mutant alpha-actinin-4 reveals a mechanism for regulating its F-actin-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Weins, Astrid; Schlondorff, Johannes S; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Denker, Bradley M; Hartwig, John H; Stossel, Thomas P; Pollak, Martin R

    2007-10-09

    Alpha-actinin-4 is a widely expressed protein that employs an actin-binding site with two calponin homology domains to crosslink actin filaments (F-actin) in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner in vitro. An inherited, late-onset form of kidney failure is caused by point mutations in the alpha-actinin-4 actin-binding domain. Here we show that alpha-actinin-4/F-actin aggregates, observed in vivo in podocytes of humans and mice with disease, likely form as a direct result of the increased actin-binding affinity of the protein. We document that exposure of a buried actin-binding site 1 in mutant alpha-actinin-4 causes an increase in its actin-binding affinity, abolishes its Ca(2+) regulation in vitro, and diverts its normal localization from actin stress fibers and focal adhesions in vivo. Inactivation of this buried actin-binding site returns the affinity of the mutant to that of the WT protein and abolishes aggregate formation in cells. In vitro, actin filaments crosslinked by the mutant alpha-actinin-4 exhibit profound changes of structural and biomechanical properties compared with WT alpha-actinin-4. On a molecular level, our findings elucidate the physiological importance of a dynamic interaction of alpha-actinin with F-actin in podocytes in vivo. We propose that a conformational change with full exposure of actin-binding site 1 could function as a switch mechanism to regulate the actin-binding affinity of alpha-actinin and possibly other calponin homology domain proteins under physiological conditions.

  7. Rat α-Fetoprotein binding affinities of a large set of structurally diverse chemicals elucidated the relationships between structures and binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Dial, Stacey L; Moland, Carrie L; Fang, Hong; Shen, Jie; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2012-11-19

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system in animals, including humans, to exert adverse effects. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through the binding of receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of any chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors. α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind with estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability for entrance into the target cell. Sequestration of an estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical's potential for disrupting estrogen receptor-mediated responses. To better understand endocrine disruption, we developed a competitive binding assay using rat amniotic fluid, which contains very high levels of AFP, and measured the binding to the rat AFP for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which are known to bind ER. Fifty-three chemicals were able to bind the rat AFP in the assay, while 72 chemicals were determined to be nonbinders. Observations from closely examining the relationship between the binding data and structures of the tested chemicals are rationally explained in a manner consistent with proposed binding regions of rat AFP in the literature. The data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for rat AFP binding. The data assist in elucidating binding interactions and mechanisms between chemicals and rat AFP and, in turn, assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals.

  8. Receptor binding profiles and quantitative structure-affinity relationships of some 5-substituted-N,N-diallyltryptamines.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Daley, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    N,N-Diallyltryptamine (DALT) and 5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT) are two tryptamines synthesized and tested by Alexander Shulgin. In self-experiments, 5-MeO-DALT was reported to be psychoactive in the 12-20mg range, while the unsubstituted compound DALT had few discernible effects in the 42-80 mg range. Recently, 5-MeO-DALT has been used in nonmedical settings for its psychoactive effects, but these effects have been poorly characterized and little is known of its pharmacological properties. We extended the work of Shulgin by synthesizing additional 5-substituted-DALTs. We then compared them to DALT and 5-MeO-DALT for their binding affinities at 45 cloned receptors and transporter proteins. Based on in vitro binding affinity, we identified 27 potential receptor targets for the 5-substituted-DALT compounds. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 10-80 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2B receptors, while the affinity of DALT itself at 5-HT1A receptors was slightly lower at 100 nM. Among the 5-HT2 subtypes, the weakest affinity was at 5-HT2A receptors, spanning 250-730 nM. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 50-400 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1D, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors; again, it was the unsubstituted DALT that had the weakest affinity at all three subtypes. The test drugs had even weaker affinity for 5-HT1B, 5-HT1E, and 5-HT5A subtypes and little or no affinity for the 5-HT3 subtype. These compounds also had generally nanomolar affinities for adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C receptors, sigma receptors σ1 and σ2, histamine H1 receptors, and norepinephrine and serotonin uptake transporters. They also bound to other targets in the nanomolar-to-low micromolar range. Based on these binding results, it is likely that multiple serotonin receptors, as well as several nonserotonergic sites are important for the psychoactive effects of DALT drugs. To learn whether any quantitative structure-affinity relationships existed, we evaluated

  9. Affinity of ceftaroline and other beta-lactams for penicillin-binding proteins from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kosowska-Shick, K; McGhee, P L; Appelbaum, P C

    2010-05-01

    We compared the affinities of ceftaroline for all penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) with those of ceftriaxone and cefotaxime in 6 Staphylococcus aureus and 7 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with various resistance phenotypes. Ceftaroline MICs were affinities for penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae strains were in the order PBP2X and -3 > PBP1A, -1B, and -2A > PBP2B, and ceftaroline had >or=4-fold higher 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) (0.1 to 4 microg/ml) for PBP2X, -2A, -2B, and -3 than those for the other cephalosporins tested. Among 3 penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae strains, ceftaroline had a high affinity for PBP2X (IC(50), 0.1 to 1 microg/ml), a primary target for cephalosporin PBP binding activity, and high affinities for PBP2B (IC(50), 0.5 to 4 microg/ml) and PBP1A (IC(50), 0.125 to 0.25 microg/ml) as well, both of which are also known as major targets for PBP binding activity of cephalosporins. Ceftaroline PBP affinities in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains were greater than or equal to those of the 3 other beta-lactams tested. Ceftaroline bound to PBP2a in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (IC(50), 0.01 to 1 microg/ml) with up to 256-fold-higher affinity than those of other agents. Ceftaroline demonstrated very good PBP affinity against all S. aureus and S. pneumoniae strains tested, including resistant isolates.

  10. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) unmasks specific high affinity FSH-binding sites in cell-free membrane preparations of porcine granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, K.A.; LaBarbera, A.R.

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine whether changes in FSH receptors correlated with FSH-induced attenuation of FSH-responsive adenylyl cyclase in immature porcine granulosa cells. Cells were incubated with FSH (1-1000 ng/ml) for up to 24 h, treated with acidified medium (pH 3.5) to remove FSH bound to cells, and incubated with (125I)iodo-porcine FSH to quantify FSH-binding sites. FSH increased binding of FSH in a time-, temperature-, and FSH concentration-dependent manner. FSH (200 ng/ml) increased binding approximately 4-fold within 16 h. Analysis of equilibrium saturation binding data indicated that the increase in binding sites reflected a 2.3-fold increase in receptor number and a 5.4-fold increase in apparent affinity. The increase in binding did not appear to be due to 1) a decrease in receptor turnover, since the basal rate of turnover appeared to be very slow; 2) an increase in receptor synthesis, since agents that inhibit protein synthesis and glycosylation did not block the increase in binding; or 3) an increase in intracellular receptors, since agents that inhibit cytoskeletal components had no effect. Agents that increase intracellular cAMP did not affect FSH binding. The increase in binding appeared to result from unmasking of cryptic FSH-binding sites, since FSH increased binding in cell-free membrane preparations to the same extent as in cells. Unmasking of cryptic sites was hormone specific, and the sites bound FSH specifically. Unmasking of sites was reversible in a time- and temperature-dependent manner after removal of bound FSH. The similarity between the FSH dose-response relationships for unmasking of FSH-binding sites and attenuation of FSH-responsive cAMP production suggests that the two processes are functionally linked.

  11. Fast and accurate determination of the relative binding affinities of small compounds to HIV-1 protease using non-equilibrium work.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Hung, Huynh Minh; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-12-05

    The fast pulling ligand (FPL) out of binding cavity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate and low CPU demand method for the determination of the relative binding affinities of a large number of HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors. In this approach, the ligand is pulled out of the binding cavity of the protein using external harmonic forces, and the work of pulling force corresponds to the relative binding affinity of HIV-1 PR inhibitor. The correlation coefficient between the pulling work and the experimental binding free energy of R=-0.95 shows that FPL results are in good agreement with experiment. It is thus easier to rank the binding affinities of HIV-1 PR inhibitors, that have similar binding affinities because the mean error bar of pulling work amounts to δW=7%. The nature of binding is discovered using the FPL approach. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  13. Characterization of the sources of protein-ligand affinity: 1-sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene binding to intestinal fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, W R; Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G

    1996-01-01

    1-Sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene (1,8-ANS) was employed as a fluorescent probe of the fatty acid binding site of recombinant rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein (1-FABP). The enhancement of fluorescence upon binding allowed direct determination of binding affinity by fluorescence titration experiments, and measurement of the effects on that affinity of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Solvent isotope effects were also determined. These data were compared to results from isothermal titration calorimetry. We obtained values for the enthalpy and entropy of this interaction at a variety of temperatures, and hence determined the change in heat capacity of the system consequent upon binding. The ANS-1-FABP is enthalpically driven; above approximately 14 degrees C it is entropically opposed, but below this temperature the entropy makes a positive contribution to the binding. The changes we observe in both enthalpy and entropy of binding with temperature can be derived from the change in heat capacity upon binding by integration, which demonstrates the internal consistency of our results. Bound ANS is displaced by fatty acids and can itself displace fatty acids bound to I-FABP. The binding site for ANS appears to be inside the solvent-containing cavity observed in the x-ray crystal structure, the same cavity occupied by fatty acid. From the fluorescence spectrum and from an inversion of the Debye-Hueckel formula for the activity coefficients as a function of added salt, we inferred that this cavity is fairly polar in character, which is in keeping with inferences drawn from the x-ray structure. The binding affinity of ANS is considered to be a consequence of both electrostatic and conditional hydrophobic effects. We speculate that the observed change in heat capacity is produced mainly by the displacement of strongly hydrogen-bonded waters from the protein cavity. PMID:8770188

  14. Autoradiographic imaging and quantification of the high-affinity GHB binding sites in rodent brain using (3)H-HOCPCA.

    PubMed

    Klein, A B; Bay, T; Villumsen, I S; Falk-Petersen, C B; Marek, A; Frølund, B; Clausen, R P; Hansen, H D; Knudsen, G M; Wellendorph, P

    2016-11-01

    GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) is a compound endogenous to mammalian brain with high structural resemblance to GABA. GHB possesses nanomolar-micromolar affinity for a unique population of binding sites, but the exact nature of these remains elusive. In this study we utilized the highly selective GHB analogue, 3-hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA) as a tritiated version ((3)H-HOCPCA) to radioactively label the specific GHB high-affinity binding site and gain further insight into the density, distribution and developmental profile of this protein. We show that, in low nanomolar concentrations, (3)H-HOCPCA displays excellent signal-to-noise ratios using rodent brain autoradiography, which makes it a valuable ligand for anatomical quantification of native GHB binding site levels. Our data confirmed that (3)H-HOCPCA labels only the high-affinity specific GHB binding site, found in high density in cortical and hippocampal regions. The experiments revealed markedly stronger binding at pH 6.0 (Kd 73.8 nM) compared to pH 7.4 (Kd 2312 nM), as previously reported for other GHB radioligands but similar Bmax values. Using (3)H-HOCPCA we analyzed the GHB binding protein profile during mouse brain development. Due to the high sensitivity of this radioligand, we were able to detect low levels of specific binding already at E15 in mouse brain, which increased progressively until adulthood. Collectively, we show that (3)H-HOCPCA is a highly sensitive radioligand, offering advantages over the commonly used radioligand (3)H-NCS-382, and thus a very suitable in vitro tool for qualitative and quantitative autoradiography of the GHB high-affinity site.

  15. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  16. HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) binds genomic and spliced RNAs with different affinity and stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Abd El-Wahab, Ekram W; Dubois, Noé; Hijnen, Marcel; Smyth, Redmond P; Mak, Johnson; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-02

    The HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) precursor specifically selects genomic RNA (gRNA) from a large variety of cellular and spliced viral RNAs (svRNAs), however the molecular mechanisms of this selective recognition remains poorly understood. To gain better understanding of this process, we analyzed the interactions between Pr55(Gag) and a large panel of viral RNA (vRNA) fragments encompassing the main packaging signal (Psi) and its flanking regions by fluorescence spectroscopy. We showed that the gRNA harbors a high affinity binding site which is absent from svRNA species, suggesting that this site might be crucial for selecting the HIV-1 genome. Our stoichiometry analysis of protein/RNA complexes revealed that few copies of Pr55(Gag) specifically associate with the 5' region of the gRNA. Besides, we found that gRNA dimerization significantly impacts Pr55(Gag) binding, and we confirmed that the internal loop of stem-loop 1 (SL1) in Psi is crucial for specific interaction with Pr55(Gag). Our analysis of gRNA fragments of different length supports the existence of a long-range tertiary interaction involving sequences upstream and downstream of the Psi region. This long-range interaction might promote optimal exposure of SL1 for efficient Pr55(Gag) recognition. Altogether, our results shed light on the molecular mechanisms allowing the specific selection of gRNA by Pr55(Gag) among a variety of svRNAs, all harboring SL1 in their first common exon.

  17. Evidence that cell surface heparan sulfate is involved in the high affinity thrombin binding to cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, K; Ozawa, T

    1985-01-01

    It has been postulated that thrombin binds to endothelial cells through, at least in part, cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate, which could serve as antithrombin cofactor on the endothelium. In the present study, we have directly evaluated the binding of 125I-labeled bovine thrombin to cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells. The thrombin binding to the cell surface was rapid, reversible, and displaced by enzymatically inactive diisopropylphosphoryl-thrombin. The concentration of thrombin at half-maximal binding was approximately 20 nM. Both specific and nonspecific binding of 125I-thrombin to the endothelial cell surface was partially inhibited in the presence of protamine sulfate, after the removal of cell surface heparan sulfate by the treatment of cells with crude Flavobacterium heparinum enzyme or purified heparitinase. The binding as a function of the concentration of thrombin revealed that the maximal amount of specific binding was reduced by approximately 50% with little alteration in binding affinity by these enzymatic treatments. The reversibility and active-site independence as well as the rate of the binding did not change after heparitinase treatment. Whereas removal of chondroitin sulfates by chondroitin ABC lyase treatment of cells did not affect the binding, identical enzymatic treatments of [35S]sulfate-labeled cells showed that either heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate was selectively and completely removed from the cell surface by heparitinase or chondroitin ABC lyase treatment, respectively. Furthermore, proteolysis of cell surface proteins by the purified glycosaminoglycan lyases was excluded by the identical enzymatic treatments of [3H]leucine-labeled or cell surface radioiodinated cells. Our results provide the first direct evidence that heparan sulfate on the cell surface is involved in the high-affinity, active site-independent thrombin binding by endothelial cells, and also suggest the presence of thrombin-binding

  18. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  19. Role of constraint in catalysis and high-affinity binding by proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vanselow, Donald G

    2002-01-01

    Using a model for catalysis of a dynamic equilibrium, the role of constraint in catalysis is quantified. The intrinsic rigidity of proteins is shown to be insufficient to constrain the activated complexes of enzymes, irrespective of the mechanism. However, when minimization of the surface excess free energy of water surrounding a protein is considered, model proteins can be designed with regions of sufficient rigidity. Structures can be designed to focus surface tension or hydrophobic attraction as compressive stress. A monomeric structure has a limited ability to concentrate compressive stress and constrain activated complexes. Oligomeric or multidomain proteins, with domains surrounding a rigid core, have unlimited ability to concentrate stress, provided there are at least four domains. Under some circumstances, four is the optimum number, which could explain the frequency of tetrameric enzymes in nature. The minimum compressive stress in oligomers increases with the square of the radius. For tetramers of similar size to natural enzymes, this stress agrees reasonably well with that needed to constrain the activated complex. A similar principle applies to high affinity binding proteins. The models explain the trigonal pyramidal shape of fibroblast growth factor and provide a basis for interpretation of protein crystal structures. PMID:11964220

  20. Selectivity and affinity determinants for ligand binding to the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Knut; McKinney, Jeffrey Alan; Haavik, Jan; Martínez, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxylation of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan is carried out by a family of non-heme iron and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) dependent enzymes, i.e. the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAHs). The reactions catalyzed by these enzymes are important for biomedicine and their mutant forms in humans are associated with phenylketonuria (phenylalanine hydroxylase), Parkinson's disease and DOPA-responsive dystonia (tyrosine hydroxylase), and possibly neuropsychiatric and gastrointestinal disorders (tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and 2). We attempt to rationalize current knowledge about substrate and inhibitor specificity based on the three-dimensional structures of the enzymes and their complexes with substrates, cofactors and inhibitors. In addition, further insights on the selectivity and affinity determinants for ligand binding in the AAHs were obtained from molecular interaction field (MIF) analysis. We applied this computational structural approach to a rational analysis of structural differences at the active sites of the enzymes, a strategy that can help in the design of novel selective ligands for each AAH.

  1. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier.

  2. Effects of lead on the kidney: Roles of high-affinity lead-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, B.A. ); DuVal, G. )

    1991-02-01

    Lead-induced nephropathy produces both tubular and interstitial manifestations of cell injury, but the pathophysiology of these lesions is not completely understood. Delineation of the molecular factors underlying renal handling of lead is one of central importance in understanding the mechanisms of renal cell injury from this agent. Recent studies from this laboratory have identified several distinct high-affinity lead-binding proteins (PbBP) from rat kidney and brain that appear to play critical roles in the intracellular bioavailability of lead to several essential cellular processes in these target tissues at low dose levels. These studies have also shown that the real PbBP is selectively localized in only certain nephrons and only specific segments of the renal proximal tubule. The striking nephron and cell-type specificity of the localization reaction could result from physoiological differences in nephron functional activity or selective molecular uptake mechanisms/metabolism differences that act to define target cell populations in the kidney. In addition, other preliminary studies have shown that short-term, high-dose lead exposure produces increased excretion of this protein into the urine with concomitant decreases in renal concentrations.

  3. Spectroscopic detection of etoposide binding to chromatin components: The role of histone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamani, Elham; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Zahraei, Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    Chromatin has been introduced as a main target for most anticancer drugs. Etoposide is known as a topoisomerase II inhibitor, but its effect on chromatin components is unknown. This report, for the first time, describes the effect of etoposide on DNA, histones and DNA-histones complex in the structure of nucleosomes employing thermal denaturation, fluorescence, UV absorbance and circular dichroism spectroscopy techniques. The results showed that the binding of etoposide decreased UV absorbance and fluorescence emission intensity, altered secondary structure of chromatin and hypochromicity was occurred in thermal denaturation profiles. The drug exhibited higher affinity to chromatin compared to DNA. Quenching of drug chromophores with tyrosine residues of histones indicated that globular domain of histones is the site of etoposide binding. Moreover, the binding of etoposide to histones altered their secondary structure accompanied with hypochromicity revealing compaction of histones in the presence of the drug. From the results it is concludes that apart from topoisomerase II, chromatin components especially its protein moiety can be introduced as a new site of etoposide binding and histone proteins especially H1 play a fundamental role in this process and anticancer activity of etoposide.

  4. Characterization of the binding strengths between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chenchen; Liu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of boronic acids toward cis-diol-containing biomolecules has found wide applications in many fields, such as sensing, separation, drug delivery, and functional materials. A sound understanding of the binding interactions will greatly facilitate exquisite applications of this chemistry. Traditional techniques are associated with some apparent drawbacks, so they are only applicable to a limited range of boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. This chapter describes an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method for the characterization of the binding strengths between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. As compared with existing approaches, such as (11)B NMR, the ACE method exhibits several significant advantages: (1) possibility of simultaneous study of multiple interactions, (2) low requirement on the purity of the binding species, (3) widely applicable to almost all types of cis-diol-containing compounds and boronic acids, and (4) high accuracy and precision.

  5. Expression of the affinity tags, glutathione-S-transferase and maltose-binding protein, in tobacco chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Niaz; Michoux, Franck; McCarthy, James; Nixon, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Chloroplast transformation offers an exciting platform for the safe, inexpensive and large-scale production of recombinant proteins in plants. An important advantage for the isolation of proteins produced in the chloroplast would be the use of affinity tags for rapid purification by affinity chromatography. To date, only His-tags have been used. In this study, we have tested the feasibility of expressing two additional affinity tags: glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and a His-tagged derivative of the maltose-binding protein (His₆-MBP). By using the chloroplast 16S rRNA promoter and 5' untranslated region of phage T7 gene 10, GST and His₆-MBP were expressed in homoplastomic tobacco plants at approximately 7% and 37% of total soluble protein, respectively. GST could be purified by one-step-affinity purification using a glutathione column. Much better recoveries were obtained for His₆-MBP by using a twin-affinity purification procedure involving first immobilised nickel followed by binding to amylose. Interestingly, expression of GST led to cytoplasmic male sterility. Overall, our work expands the tools available for purifying recombinant proteins from the chloroplast.

  6. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Adam W.; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D.; Hays, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  7. Preferential affinity of the components of liquid mixtures at a rigid non-polar surface: enthalpic and entropic driving forces.

    PubMed

    Choutko, Alexandra; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2011-12-09

    The modulation of the properties of lipid membranes by polyhydroxylated cosolutes such as sugars is a phenomenon of considerable biological, technological and medicinal relevance. A few years ago, we proposed the sugar-like mechanism--binding driven by the release of water molecules--as an attempt to rationalize the preferential affinity of carbohydrate molecules compared to water molecules for the surface of lipid bilayers, which is presumably related to the bioprotective action of these compounds. The goal herein is to gain a better understanding of the driving force underlying this mechanism, in terms of specific interactions or effects, as well as in terms of the energy-entropy partitioning. This is done in the simplest possible context of an apolar rigid-wall model representing the membrane, and mixtures of closely related and possibly artificial species in solution, namely monomers or dimers of Lennard-Jones particles, water with physical or reduced charges, and hydroxymethyl groups. The results indicate that although the sugar-like mechanism seems phenomenologically reasonable, the main driving force underlying this mechanism is not the entropy gain upon releasing water molecules into the bulk, as originally suggested, but rather the hydrophobic effect. Note that the latter effect is a generic concept and may in principle involve both a solvent release and an interaction component, depending on the solute considered.

  8. Alkali metal ion binding to amino acids versus their methyl esters: affinity trends and structural changes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Talley, Jody M; Cerda, Blas A; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2002-03-15

    The relative alkali metal ion (M(+)) affinities (binding energies) between seventeen different amino acids (AA) and the corresponding methyl esters (AAOMe) were determined in the gas phase by the kinetic method based on the dissociation of AA-M(+)-AAOMe heterodimers (M=Li, Na, K, Cs). With the exception of proline, the Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) affinities of the other aliphatic amino acids increase in the order AAaffinities generally decrease in this direction. For aliphatic beta-amino acids, which are particularly basic molecules, the order AA>AAOMe is already observed for K(+). Proline binds more strongly than its methyl ester to all M(+) except Li(+). Ab initio calculations on the M(+) complexes of alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, proline, glycine methyl ester, alanine methyl ester, and proline methyl ester show that their energetically most favorable complexes result from charge solvation, except for proline which forms salt bridges. The most stable mode of charge solvation depends on the ligand (AA or AAOMe) and, for AA, it gradually changes with metal ion size. Esters chelate all M(+) ions through the amine and carbonyl groups. Amino acids coordinate Li(+) and Na(+) ions through the amine and carbonyl groups as well, but K(+) and Cs(+) ions are coordinated by the O atoms of the carboxyl group. Upon consideration of these differences in favored binding geometries, the theoretically derived relative M(+) affinities between aliphatic AA and AAOMe are in good overall agreement with the above given experimental trends. The majority of side chain functionalized amino acids studied show experimentally the affinity order AAaffinity order AA>AAOMe. The latter ranking is attributed to salt bridge formation.

  9. Feature selection and classification of protein-protein complexes based on their binding affinities using machine learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Yugandhar, K; Gromiha, M Michael

    2014-09-01

    Protein-protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes is one of the challenging problems in computational and molecular biology. In this work, we related sequence features of protein-protein complexes with their binding affinities using machine learning approaches. We set up a database of 185 protein-protein complexes for which the interacting pairs are heterodimers and their experimental binding affinities are available. On the other hand, we have developed a set of 610 features from the sequences of protein complexes and utilized Ranker search method, which is the combination of Attribute evaluator and Ranker method for selecting specific features. We have analyzed several machine learning algorithms to discriminate protein-protein complexes into high and low affinity groups based on their Kd values. Our results showed a 10-fold cross-validation accuracy of 76.1% with the combination of nine features using support vector machines. Further, we observed accuracy of 83.3% on an independent test set of 30 complexes. We suggest that our method would serve as an effective tool for identifying the interacting partners in protein-protein interaction networks and human-pathogen interactions based on the strength of interactions.

  10. ATLAS: A database linking binding affinities with structures for wild-type and mutant TCR-pMHC complexes.

    PubMed

    Borrman, Tyler; Cimons, Jennifer; Cosiano, Michael; Purcaro, Michael; Pierce, Brian G; Baker, Brian M; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-02-03

    The ATLAS (Altered TCR Ligand Affinities and Structures) database (https://zlab.umassmed.edu/atlas/web/) is a manually curated repository containing the binding affinities for wild-type and mutant T cell receptors (TCRs) and their antigens, peptides presented by the major histocompatibility complex (pMHC). The database links experimentally measured binding affinities with the corresponding three dimensional (3D) structures for TCR-pMHC complexes. The user can browse and search affinities, structures, and experimental details for TCRs, peptides, and MHCs of interest. We expect this database to facilitate the development of next-generation protein design algorithms targeting TCR-pMHC interactions. ATLAS can be easily parsed using modeling software that builds protein structures for training and testing. As an example, we provide structural models for all mutant TCRs in ATLAS, built using the Rosetta program. Utilizing these structures, we report a correlation of 0.63 between experimentally measured changes in binding energies and our predicted changes. Proteins 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Design of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL Inhibitors with Subnanomolar Binding Affinities Based upon a New Scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Haibin; Chen, Jianfang; Meagher, Jennifer L.; Yang, Chao-Yie; Aguilar, Angelo; Liu, Liu; Bai, Longchuan; Cong, Xin; Cai, Qian; Fang, Xueliang; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wang, Shaomeng

    2014-10-02

    Employing a structure-based strategy, we have designed a new class of potent small-molecule inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. An initial lead compound with a new scaffold was designed based upon the crystal structure of Bcl-xL and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and was found to have an affinity of 100 {micro}M for both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Linking this weak lead to another weak-affinity fragment derived from Abbott's ABT-737 led to an improvement of the binding affinity by a factor of >10,000. Further optimization ultimately yielded compounds with subnanomolar binding affinities for both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and potent cellular activity. The best compound (21) binds to Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 with K{sub i} < 1 nM, inhibits cell growth in the H146 and H1417 small-cell lung cancer cell lines with IC{sub 50} values of 60-90 nM, and induces robust cell death in the H146 cancer cell line at 30-100 nM.

  12. Epitope structure and binding affinity of single chain llama anti-β-amyloid antibodies revealed by proteolytic excision affinity-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paraschiv, Gabriela; Vincke, Cécile; Czaplewska, Paulina; Manea, Marilena; Muyldermans, Serge; Przybylski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ß-Amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has become a promising strategy for reducing the level of Aß in brain. New immunological approaches have been recently proposed for rapid, early diagnosis, and molecular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases related to Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The combination of proteolytic epitope excision and extraction and mass spectrometry using digestion with various proteases has been shown to be an efficient tool for the identification and molecular characterization of antigenic determinants. Here, we report the identification of the Aβ epitope recognized by the variable domain of single chain llama anti-Aβ-antibodies, termed Aβ-nanobodies, that have been discovered in the blood of camelids and found to be promising candidates for immunotherapy of AD. The epitope recognized by two Aβ-specific nanobodies was identified by proteolytic epitope extraction- and excision-mass spectrometry using a series of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, GluC-protease, and LysC-protease). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--mass spectrometric analysis of the affinity--elution fraction provided the epitope, Aβ(17-28), in the mid- to carboxy-terminal domain of Aβ, which has been shown to exert an Aß-fibril inhibiting effect. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope confirmed that the Aβ(17-28) peptide is the minimal fragment that binds to the nanobodies. The interactions between the nanobodies and full length Aβ(1-40) or Aβ-peptides containing or lacking the epitope sequence were further characterized by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and bioaffinity analysis. Determinations of binding affinities between the Aβ-nanobodies and Aβ(1-40) and the Aβ(17-28) epitope provided K(D) values of approximately 150 and 700 nmol, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of the epitope may be highly useful for future studies of Aβ-aggregation (oligomerization and fibril formation) and for designing new aggregation inhibitors.

  13. Transmembrane-truncated alphavbeta3 integrin retains high affinity for ligand binding: evidence for an 'inside-out' suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, R J; Diefenbach, B; Brown, A; Cullen, E; Jonczyk, A; Güssow, D; Luckenbach, G A; Goodman, S L

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of alphavbeta3 integrin affinity regulation have important biological implications in tumour development, wound repair and angiogenesis. We expressed, purified and characterized recombinant forms of human alphavbeta3 (r-alphavbeta3) and compared the activation state of these with alphavbeta3 in its cellular environment. The ligand specificity and selectivity of recombinant full-length and double transmembrane truncations of r-alphavbeta3 cloned in BacPAK6 vectors and expressed in Sf9 and High Five insect cells were compared with those of native placental alphavbeta3 and the receptor in situ on the cell surface. r-alphavbeta3 integrins were purified by affinity chromatography from detergent extracts of cells (full-length), and from the culture medium of cells expressing double-truncated r-alphavbeta3. r-alphavbeta3 had the same epitopes, ligand-binding specificities, bivalent cation requirements and susceptibility to RGD-containing peptides as native alphavbeta3. On M21-L4 melanoma cells, alphavbeta3 mediated binding to vitronectin, but not to fibrinogen unless activated with Mn2+. Non-activated alphaIIbbeta3 integrin as control in M21-L-IIb cells had the opposite profile, mediating binding to fibrinogen, but not to vitronectin unless activated with Mn2+. Thus these receptors had moderate to low ligand affinity. In marked contrast, purified alphavbeta3 receptors, with or without transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, were constitutively of high affinity and able to bind strongly to vitronectin, fibronectin and fibrinogen under physiological conditions. Our data suggest that, in contrast with the positive regulation of alphaIIbbeta3 in situ, intracellular controls lower the affinity of alphavbeta3, and the cytoplasmic domains may act as a target for negative regulators of alphavbeta3 activity. PMID:9480902

  14. Linear Interaction Energy Based Prediction of Cytochrome P450 1A2 Binding Affinities with Reliability Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Capoferri, Luigi; Verkade-Vreeker, Marlies C. A.; Buitenhuis, Danny; Commandeur, Jan N. M.; Pastor, Manuel; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Geerke, Daan P.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) binding affinities of small ligands, i.e., substrates and inhibitors, represents an important task for predicting drug-drug interactions. A quantitative assessment of the ligand binding affinity towards different CYPs can provide an estimate of inhibitory activity or an indication of isoforms prone to interact with the substrate of inhibitors. However, the accuracy of global quantitative models for CYP substrate binding or inhibition based on traditional molecular descriptors can be limited, because of the lack of information on the structure and flexibility of the catalytic site of CYPs. Here we describe the application of a method that combines protein-ligand docking, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) theory, to allow for quantitative CYP affinity prediction. Using this combined approach, a LIE model for human CYP 1A2 was developed and evaluated, based on a structurally diverse dataset for which the estimated experimental uncertainty was 3.3 kJ mol-1. For the computed CYP 1A2 binding affinities, the model showed a root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.1 kJ mol-1 and a standard error in prediction (SDEP) in cross-validation of 4.3 kJ mol-1. A novel approach that includes information on both structural ligand description and protein-ligand interaction was developed for estimating the reliability of predictions, and was able to identify compounds from an external test set with a SDEP for the predicted affinities of 4.6 kJ mol-1 (corresponding to 0.8 pKi units). PMID:26551865

  15. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling.

  16. High-affinity consensus binding of target RNAs by the STAR/GSG proteins GLD-1, STAR-2 and Quaking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background STAR/GSG proteins regulate gene expression in metazoans by binding consensus sites in the 5' or 3' UTRs of target mRNA transcripts. Owing to the high degree of homology across the STAR domain, most STAR proteins recognize similar RNA consensus sequences. Previously, the consensus for a number of well-characterized STAR proteins was defined as a hexameric sequence, referred to as the SBE, for STAR protein binding element. C. elegans GLD-1 and mouse Quaking (Qk-1) are two representative STAR proteins that bind similar consensus hexamers, which differ only in the preferred nucleotide identities at certain positions. Earlier reports also identified partial consensus elements located upstream or downstream of a canonical consensus hexamer in target RNAs, although the relative contribution of these sequences to the overall binding energy remains less well understood. Additionally, a recently identified STAR protein called STAR-2 from C. elegans is thought to bind target RNA consensus sites similar to that of GLD-1 and Qk-1. Results Here, a combination of fluorescence-polarization and gel mobility shift assays was used to demonstrate that STAR-2 binds to a similar RNA consensus as GLD-1 and Qk-1. These assays were also used to further delineate the contributions of each hexamer consensus nucleotide to high-affinity binding by GLD-1, Qk-1 and STAR-2 in a variety of RNA contexts. In addition, the effects of inserting additional full or partial consensus elements upstream or downstream of a canonical hexamer in target RNAs were also measured to better define the sequence elements and RNA architecture recognized by different STAR proteins. Conclusions The results presented here indicate that a single hexameric consensus is sufficient for high-affinity RNA binding by STAR proteins, and that upstream or downstream partial consensus elements may alter binding affinities depending on the sequence and spacing. The general requirements determined for high-affinity RNA

  17. Molecular Weight, Protein Binding Affinity and Methane Mitigation of Condensed Tannins from Mangosteen-peel (Garcinia mangostana L)

    PubMed Central

    Paengkoum, P.; Phonmun, T.; Liang, J. B.; Huang, X. D.; Tan, H. Y.; Jahromi, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the molecular weight of condensed tannins (CT) extracted from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) peel, its protein binding affinity and effects on fermentation parameters including total gas, methane (CH4) and volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. The average molecular weight (Mw) of the purified CT was 2,081 Da with a protein binding affinity of 0.69 (the amount needed to bind half the maximum bovine serum albumin). In vitro gas production declined by 0.409, 0.121, and 0.311, respectively, while CH4 production decreased by 0.211, 0.353, and 0.549, respectively, with addition of 10, 20, and 30 mg CT/500 mg dry matter (DM) compared to the control (p<0.05). The effects of CT from mangosteen-peel on in vitro DM degradability (IVDMD) and in vitro N degradability was negative and linear (p<0.01). Total VFA, concentrations of acetic, propionic, butyric and isovaleric acids decreased linearly with increasing amount of CT. The aforementioned results show that protein binding affinity of CT from mangosteen-peel is lower than those reported for Leucaena forages, however, the former has stronger negative effect on IVDMD. Therefore, the use of mangosteen-peel as protein source and CH4 mitigating agent in ruminant feed requires further investigations. PMID:26323400

  18. Free energy calculations offer insights into the influence of receptor flexibility on ligand-receptor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Jožica; Riniker, Sereina; Gaspari, Roberto; Daura, Xavier; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-08-01

    Docking algorithms for computer-aided drug discovery and design often ignore or restrain the flexibility of the receptor, which may lead to a loss of accuracy of the relative free enthalpies of binding. In order to evaluate the contribution of receptor flexibility to relative binding free enthalpies, two host-guest systems have been examined: inclusion complexes of α-cyclodextrin (αCD) with 1-chlorobenzene (ClBn), 1-bromobenzene (BrBn) and toluene (MeBn), and complexes of DNA with the minor-groove binding ligands netropsin (Net) and distamycin (Dist). Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations reveal that restraining of the flexibility of the receptor can have a significant influence on the estimated relative ligand-receptor binding affinities as well as on the predicted structures of the biomolecular complexes. The influence is particularly pronounced in the case of flexible receptors such as DNA, where a 50% contribution of DNA flexibility towards the relative ligand-DNA binding affinities is observed. The differences in the free enthalpy of binding do not arise only from the changes in ligand-DNA interactions but also from changes in ligand-solvent interactions as well as from the loss of DNA configurational entropy upon restraining.

  19. Preparation of a boronate affinity silica stationary phase with enhanced binding properties towards cis-diol compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Hengye; Zhang, Xuemeng; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xiaojin; Kong, Fenying; Fan, Dahe; Li, Lei; Wang, Wei

    2016-11-18

    In this study, a boronate affinity silica stationary phase with enhanced binding properties towards cis-diol compounds was prepared through the combination of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) with a Wulff-type boronate as affinity ligand. The stationary phase showed good hydrophilicity and improved binding strength toward adenosine, with binding constant to be as low as 2.38×10(-4)M. The column exhibited excellent binding specificity, low binding pH (≥5.5) and high binding capacities (80.1μmol adenosine g(-1) at pH 7.0 and 45.2μmol adenosine g(-1) at pH 5.5, respectively). The stationary phase was applied as adsorbent for the selective extraction of nucleosides in human urine with excellent specificity and high enrichment efficiency. These results demonstrated that this stationary phase could be favorably applied for selective capture and enrichment of cis-diol compounds in complex samples.

  20. Identification of a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran in the nerve cord of the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Satoshi; Komaki, Iori; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2006-04-01

    The binding of the neonicotinoid insecticide dinotefuran to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was examined by a centrifugation method using the nerve cord membranes of American cockroaches and [3H]dinotefuran (78 Ci mmol-1). The Kd and Bmax values of [3H]dinotefuran binding were estimated to be 13.7 nM and 14.8 fmol 40 microg-1 protein respectively by Scatchard analysis. Epibatidine, an nAChR agonist, showed a rather lower affinity to the dinotefuran binding site (IC50=991 nM) than dinotefuran (IC50=5.02 nM). Imidacloprid and nereistoxin displayed lower potencies than dinotefuran but higher potencies than epibatidine. The potencies of five dinotefuran analogues in inhibiting the specific binding of [3H]dinotefuran to nerve cord membranes were determined. A good correlation (r2=0.970) was observed between the -log IC50 values of the tested compounds and their piperonyl butoxide-synergised insecticidal activities (-log LD50 values) against German cockroaches. The results indicate that a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran is present in the nerve cord of the American cockroach and that the binding of ligands to the site leads to the manifestation of insecticidal activity.

  1. Are high-affinity progesterone binding site(s) from porcine liver microsomes members of the sigma receptor family?

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Schmieding, K; Falkenstein, E; Wehling, M

    1998-04-24

    Membrane progesterone binding sites have been purified recently from pig liver. Since progesterone is considered as an endogenous sigma (sigma) receptor ligand, these sites were characterized pharmacologically by ligands selective for sigma receptor and dopamine receptor binding sites, and by other drugs from distinct pharmacological classes. Binding studies using the radioligand [3H]progesterone were done in crude membrane preparations and solubilized fractions to determine half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values, from which inhibitory constants (Ki values) were calculated. Radioligand binding was inhibited by the sigma receptor ligands haloperidol, carbetapentane citrate, 1,3-Di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2 aminopropane HCl (R(-)-PPAAP HCl), or sigma receptor antagonists like (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine HCl (R(+)-PPP HCl) and cis-9-[3-(3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-9H-carbazole dihydrochloride (rimcazole 2HCl). The hierarchy of inhibitory action was not fully compatible with either sigma receptor class I (moderate affinity of pentazocine, diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) insensitivity) or II sites (high affinity of carbetapentane). The data thus suggest that progesterone binding sites in porcine liver membranes are related to the sigma receptor binding site superfamily, but may represent a particular species with progesterone specificity.

  2. Effects of water models on binding affinity: evidence from all-atom simulation of binding of tamiflu to A/H5N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔG(bind) of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔG(bind) is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔG(bind) decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM.

  3. Chemical Affinity between Tannin Size and Salivary Protein Binding Abilities: Implications for Wine Astringency

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wen; Waffo-Teguo, Pierre; Jourdes, Michael; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Astringency perception, as an essential parameter for high-quality red wine, is principally elicited by condensed tannins in diversified chemical structures. Condensed tannins, which are also known as proanthocyanidins (PAs), belong to the flavonoid class of polyphenols and are incorporated by multiple flavan-3-ols units according to their degree of polymerization (DP). However, the influence of DP size of PAs on astringency perception remains unclear for decades. This controversy was mainly attributed to the lack of efficient strategies to isolate the PAs in non-galloylated forms and with individual degree size from grape/wine. In the present study, the astringency intensity of purified and identified grape oligomeric tannins (DP ranged from 1 to 5) was firstly explored. A novel non-solid phase strategy was used to rapidly exclude the galloylated PAs from the non-galloylated PAs and fractionate the latter according to their DP size. Then, a series of PAs with individual DP size and galloylation were purified by an approach of preparative hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Furthermore, purified compounds were identified by both normal phase HPLC-FLD and reverse phase UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF. Finally, the contribution of the astringency perception of the individual purified tannins was examined with a salivary protein binding ability test. The results were observed by HPLC-FLD and quantified by changes in PA concentration remaining in the filtrate. In summary, a new approach without a solid stationary phase was developed to isolate PAs according to their DP size. And a positive relationship between the DP of PAs and salivary protein affinity was revealed. PMID:27518822

  4. ITC-derived binding affinity may be biased due to titrant (nano)-aggregation. Binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the catalytic domain of human protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Winiewska, Maria; Bugajska, Ewa; Poznański, Jarosław

    2017-01-01

    The binding of four bromobenzotriazoles to the catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 was assessed by two complementary methods: Microscale Thermophoresis (MST) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). New algorithm proposed for the global analysis of MST pseudo-titration data enabled reliable determination of binding affinities for two distinct sites, a relatively strong one with the Kd of the order of 100 nM and a substantially weaker one (Kd > 1 μM). The affinities for the strong binding site determined for the same protein-ligand systems using ITC were in most cases approximately 10-fold underestimated. The discrepancy was assigned directly to the kinetics of ligand nano-aggregates decay occurring upon injection of the concentrated ligand solution to the protein sample. The binding affinities determined in the reverse ITC experiment, in which ligands were titrated with a concentrated protein solution, agreed with the MST-derived data. Our analysis suggests that some ITC-derived Kd values, routinely reported together with PDB structures of protein-ligand complexes, may be biased due to the uncontrolled ligand (nano)-aggregation, which may occur even substantially below the solubility limit.

  5. ITC-derived binding affinity may be biased due to titrant (nano)-aggregation. Binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the catalytic domain of human protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    Winiewska, Maria; Bugajska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The binding of four bromobenzotriazoles to the catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 was assessed by two complementary methods: Microscale Thermophoresis (MST) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). New algorithm proposed for the global analysis of MST pseudo-titration data enabled reliable determination of binding affinities for two distinct sites, a relatively strong one with the Kd of the order of 100 nM and a substantially weaker one (Kd > 1 μM). The affinities for the strong binding site determined for the same protein-ligand systems using ITC were in most cases approximately 10-fold underestimated. The discrepancy was assigned directly to the kinetics of ligand nano-aggregates decay occurring upon injection of the concentrated ligand solution to the protein sample. The binding affinities determined in the reverse ITC experiment, in which ligands were titrated with a concentrated protein solution, agreed with the MST-derived data. Our analysis suggests that some ITC-derived Kd values, routinely reported together with PDB structures of protein-ligand complexes, may be biased due to the uncontrolled ligand (nano)-aggregation, which may occur even substantially below the solubility limit. PMID:28273138

  6. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Kandra, Lili; Hachem, Maher Abou; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Kramhøft, Birte; Svensson, Birte

    2006-09-18

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites as binding barriers. Barley alpha-amylase 1 mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile, converting barriers to binding areas. These findings highlight the dynamic binding energy distribution and the versatility of long maltooligosaccharide derivatives in mapping extended binding clefts in alpha-amylases.

  7. Site-Specific Polymer Attachment to HR2 Peptide Fusion Inhibitors against HIV-1 Decreases Binding Association Rates and Dissociation Rates Rather Than Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Stauffer, Angela N; Wurm, Frederik R; Root, Michael J; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2017-03-15

    A popular strategy for overcoming the limited plasma half-life of peptide heptad repeat 2 (HR2) fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 is conjugation with biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). However, despite improved resistance to proteolysis and reduced renal elimination, covalent attachment of polymers often causes a loss in therapeutic potency. In this study, we investigated the molecular origins of the loss in potency upon conjugation of linear, midfunctional, and hyperbranched PEG-like polymers to peptides that inhibit HIV-1-host cell membrane fusion. Fluorescence binding assays revealed that polymer conjugation imparted mass transport limitations that manifested as coexistent slower association and dissociation rates from the gp41 target on HIV-1. Furthermore, reduced association kinetics rather than affinity disruption was responsible for the loss in antiviral potency. Finally, the binding assays indicated that the unmodified HR2-derived peptide demonstrated diffusion-limited binding. The observed high potency of the unmodified peptide in HIV-1 inhibition assays was therefore attributed to rapid peptide conformational changes upon binding to the gp41 prehairpin structure. This study emphasizes that the view in which polymer ligation to therapeutic peptides inadvertently leads to loss in potency due to a loss in binding affinity requires scientific verification on a case-by-case basis and that high peptide potency may be due to rapid target-binding events.

  8. A biomimetic Protein G affinity adsorbent: an Ugi ligand for immunoglobulins and Fab fragments based on the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Graziella; Lowe, Christopher R

    2013-04-01

    This work reports the development of a synthetic affinity adsorbent for immunoglobulins based on the Fab-binding domain of Streptococcal Protein G (SpG-domain III). The ligand (A2C7I1) was synthesized by the four-component Ugi reaction to generate a substituted peptoidal scaffold mimicking key amino acid residues of SpG. Computer-aided analysis suggests a putative binding site on the CH 1 domain of the Fab molecule. In silico studies, supported by affinity chromatography in comparison with immobilized SpG, as well as analytical characterization by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance of the ligand synthesized in solution, indicated the authenticity and suitability of the designed ligand for the purification of immunoglobulins. The immobilized ligand displayed an apparent static binding capacity of ~17 mg IgG ml(-1) and a dissociation constant of 5.34 × 10(-5)  M. Preparative chromatography demonstrated the ability of the immobilized ligand to purify IgG and Fab fragments from crude mammalian and yeast cell cultures, under near physiological ionic strength and pH, to yield proteins of 99% and 93% purity, respectively.

  9. Mixed kappa agonists and mu agonists/antagonists as potential pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine abuse: synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinity of N-substituted derivatives of morphinan.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, J L; Gu, X H; van Vliet, L A; DeNunzio, N J; Rusovici, D E; Cohen, D J; Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Bidlack, J M

    2001-10-22

    A series of new N-substituted derivatives of morphinan was synthesized and their binding affinity for the three opioid receptors (mu, delta, and kappa) was determined. A paradoxical effect of N-propargyl (MCL-117) and N-(3-iodoprop-(2E)-enyl) (MCL-118) substituents on the binding affinities for the mu and kappa opioid receptors was observed. All of these novel derivatives showed a preference for the mu and kappa versus delta binding.

  10. Affinity of the heparin binding motif of Noggin1 to heparan sulfate and its visualization in the embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Nesterenko, Alexey M; Orlov, Eugeny E; Ermakova, Galina V; Ivanov, Igor A; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Martynova, Natalia Y; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    Heparin binding motifs were found in many secreted proteins and it was suggested that they are responsible for retardation of the protein diffusion within the intercellular space due to the binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycanes (HSPG). Here we used synthetic FITC labeled heparin binding motif (HBM peptide) of the Xenopus laevis secreted BMP inhibitor Noggin1 to study its diffusion along the surface of the heparin beads by FRAP method. As a result, we have found out that diffusivity of HBM-labeled FITC was indeed much lesser than those predicted by theoretical calculations even for whole protein of the Noggin size. We also compared by isothermal titration calorimetry the binding affinity of HBM and the control oligolysine peptide to several natural polyanions including heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, the bacterial dextran sulfate and salmon sperm DNA, and demonstrated that HBM significantly exceeds oligolysine peptide in the affinity to HS, heparin and DNA. By contrast, oligolysine peptide bound with higher affinity to dextran sulfate. We speculate that such a difference may ensure specificity of the morphogen binding to HSPG and could be explained by steric constrains imposed by different distribution of the negative charges along a given polymeric molecule. Finally, by using EGFP-HBM recombinant protein we have visualized the natural pattern of the Noggin1 binding sites within the X. laevis gastrula and demonstrated that these sites forms a dorsal-ventral concentration gradient, with a maximum in the dorsal blastopore lip. In sum, our data provide a quantitative basis for modeling the process of Noggin1 diffusion in embryonic tissues, considering its interaction with HSPG.

  11. Irreversible blockade of the high and low affinity ( sup 3 H) naloxone binding sites by C-6 derivatives of morphinane-6-ones

    SciTech Connect

    Krizsan, D. ); Varga, E.; Benyhe, S.; Szucs, M.; Borsodi, A. ); Hosztafi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    C-6 derivatives-hydrazones, phenylhydrazones, dinitrophenylhydrazones, oximes and semicarbazones - of morphinane-6-ones were synthesized and their binding characteristics were studied on rat brain membranes. The dihydromorphinone and oxymorphone derivatives compete for the ({sup 3}H)naloxone binding sites with high affinity, while the dihydrocodeinone and oxycodone derivatives are less potent. The affinity of the new compounds is decreased for the delta sites as compared to the parent ligands. The ligands bearing bulky substituents also bind with low affinity to the kappa sites. The modification decreased the Na{sup +}-index of compounds indicating their mixed agonist-antagonist character. The dihydromorphinone derivatives are all capable to block irreversibly the high affinity binding site of ({sup 3}H)naloxone, whereas the dihydrocodeinone derivatives block irreversibly the low affinity site. A possible mechanism for the inhibition is suggested.

  12. [Prospects of application of the chitin-binding domains to isolation and purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography: a review].

    PubMed

    Kurek, D V; Lopatin, S A; Varlamov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Properties of substrate-binding domains, some parameters of affinity sorbents, and a number of other special features that were necessary to take into account during creation of chromatographic system for isolation and purification of proteins with incorporated chitin-binding domain were discussed in this review. This method was shown to be successfully used along with metal-chelate affinity chromatography. The metal-chelate affinity chromatography with the use of polyhistidine peptides as affinity labels is successfully applied to isolation, purification, and investigation of recombinant proteins. However, this system had some disadvantages. At present, scientists attracted more and more attention to substrate-binding domains, including those chitin-binding, because they had a number of advantages being used as affinity label.

  13. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  14. Does a more precise chemical description of protein-ligand complexes lead to more accurate prediction of binding affinity?

    PubMed

    Ballester, Pedro J; Schreyer, Adrian; Blundell, Tom L

    2014-03-24

    Predicting the binding affinities of large sets of diverse molecules against a range of macromolecular targets is an extremely challenging task. The scoring functions that attempt such computational prediction are essential for exploiting and analyzing the outputs of docking, which is in turn an important tool in problems such as structure-based drug design. Classical scoring functions assume a predetermined theory-inspired functional form for the relationship between the variables that describe an experimentally determined or modeled structure of a protein-ligand complex and its binding affinity. The inherent problem of this approach is in the difficulty of explicitly modeling the various contributions of intermolecular interactions to binding affinity. New scoring functions based on machine-learning regression models, which are able to exploit effectively much larger amounts of experimental data and circumvent the need for a predetermined functional form, have already been shown to outperform a broad range of state-of-the-art scoring functions in a widely used benchmark. Here, we investigate the impact of the chemical description of the complex on the predictive power of the resulting scoring function using a systematic battery of numerical experiments. The latter resulted in the most accurate scoring function to date on the benchmark. Strikingly, we also found that a more precise chemical description of the protein-ligand complex does not generally lead to a more accurate prediction of binding affinity. We discuss four factors that may contribute to this result: modeling assumptions, codependence of representation and regression, data restricted to the bound state, and conformational heterogeneity in data.

  15. 3D QSAR studies on binding affinities of coumarin natural products for glycosomal GAPDH of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Lopes, Julio C. D.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Oliva, Glaucius; Pavão, Fernando; Castilho, Marcelo S.; Vieira, Paulo C.; Pupo, M.^onica T.

    2003-05-01

    Drug design strategies based on Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) have been used to predict the activity of new compounds. The major advantage of this approach is that it permits the analysis of a large number of quantitative descriptors and uses chemometric methods such as partial least squares (PLS) to correlate changes in bioactivity with changes in chemical structure. Because it is often difficult to rationalize all variables affecting the binding affinity of compounds using CoMFA solely, the program GRID was used to describe ligands in terms of their molecular interaction fields, MIFs. The program VolSurf that is able to compress the relevant information present in 3D maps into a few descriptors can treat these GRID fields. The binding affinities of a new set of compounds consisting of 13 coumarins, for one of which the three-dimensional ligand-enzyme bound structure is known, were studied. A final model based on the mentioned programs was independently validated by synthesizing and testing new coumarin derivatives. By relying on our knowledge of the real physical data (i.e., combining crystallographic and binding affinity results), it is also shown that ligand-based design agrees with structure-based design. The compound with the highest binding affinity was the coumarin chalepin, isolated from Rutaceae species, with an IC50 value of 55.5 μM towards the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) from glycosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. The proposed models from GRID MIFs have revealed the importance of lipophilic interactions in modulating the inhibition, but without excluding the dependence on stereo-electronic properties as found from CoMFA fields.

  16. Binding modes of noncompetitive GABA-channel blockers revisited using engineered affinity-labeling reactions combined with new docking studies.

    PubMed

    Charon, Sébastien; Taly, Antoine; Rodrigo, Jordi; Perret, Philippe; Goeldner, Maurice

    2011-04-13

    The binding modes of noncompetitive GABA(A)-channel blockers were re-examined taking into account the recent description of the 3D structure of prokaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which provided access to new mammalian or insect GABA receptor models, emphasizing their transmembrane portion. Two putative binding modes were deciphered for this class of compounds, including the insecticide fipronil, located nearby either the intra- or the extracellular part of the membrane, respectively. These results are in full agreement with previously described affinity-labeling reactions performed with GABA(A) noncompetitive blockers (Perret et al. J. Biol. Chem.1999, 274, 25350-25354).

  17. Using affinity capillary electrophoresis and computational models for binding studies of heparinoids with p-selectin and other proteins.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Mona; Balasupramaniam, Shantheya; Preu, Lutz; El Deeb, Sami; Reiter, Christian G; Wätzig, Hermann

    2017-03-03

    A fast and precise affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method has been developed and applied for the investigation of the binding interactions between P-selectin and heparinoids as potential P-selectin inhibitors in the presence and absence of calcium ions. Furthermore, model proteins and vitronectin were used to appraise the binding behavior of P-selectin. The normalized mobility ratios (∆R/Rf ), which provided information about the binding strength and the overall charge of the protein-ligand complex, were used to evaluate the binding affinities. It was found that P-selectin interacts more strongly with heparinoids in the presence of calcium ions. P-selectin was affected by heparinoids at the concentration of 3 mg/L. In addition, the results of the ACE experiments showed that among other investigated proteins, albumins and vitronectin exhibited strong interactions with heparinoids. Especially with P-selectin and vitronectin, the interaction may additionally induce conformational changes. Subsequently, computational models were applied to interpret the ACE experiments. Docking experiments explained that the binding of heparinoids on P-selectin is promoted by calcium ions. These docking models proved to be particularly well suited to investigate the interaction of charged compounds, and are therefore complementary to ACE experiments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Binding affinity and adhesion force of organophosphate hydrolase enzyme with soil particles related to the isoelectric point of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Yeasmin, Shabina; Islam, Md Saiful; Islam, Md Shariful

    2017-03-16

    The binding affinity of organophosphate hydrolase enzyme (OphB) with soil particles in relation to the isoelectric point (pI) was studied. Immobilization of OphB with soil particles was observed by confocal microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Atomic force microscopy (AFM). The calculated pI of OphB enzyme was increased from 8.69 to 8.89, 9.04 and 9.16 by the single, double and triple mutant of OphB enzyme, respectively through the replacement of negatively charged aspartate with positively charged histidine. Practically, the binding affinity was increased to 5.30%, 11.50%, and 16.80% for single, double and triple mutants, respectively. In contrast, enzyme activity of OphB did not change by the mutation of the enzyme. On the other hand, adhesion forces were gradually increased for wild type OphB enzyme (90 pN) to 96, 100 and 104 pN for single, double and triple mutants of OphB enzyme, respectively. There was an increasing trend of binding affinity and adhesion force by the increase of isoelectric point (pI) of OphB enzyme.

  19. Synthesis and binding affinity of novel mono- and bivalent morphinan ligands for κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Tangzhi; Sromek, Anna W; Scrimale, Thomas; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2011-05-01

    A novel series of homo- and heterodimeric ligands containing κ/μ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist pharmacophores joined by a 10-carbon ester linker chain were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity at κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors, and their functional activities were determined at κ and μ receptors in [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays. Most of these compounds had high binding affinity at μ and κ receptors (K(i) values less than 1nM). Compound 15b, which contains butorphan (1) at one end of linking chain and butorphanol (5) at the other end, was the most potent ligand in this series with binding affinity K(i) values of 0.089nM at the μ receptor and 0.073nM at the κ receptor. All of the morphinan-derived ligands were found to be partial κ and μ agonists; ATPM-derived ligands 12 and 11 were found to be full κ agonists and partial μ agonists.

  20. Direct detection of thrombin binding to 8-bromodeoxyguanosine-modified aptamer: effects of modification on affinity and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Goji, Shou; Matsui, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The affinity of an 8-bromodeoxyguanosine- (8-BrdG-) substituted thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA-Br), which has the 1st and 10th guanosine residues replaced with 8-BrdG, was estimated using reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). When comparing TBA-Br with unmodified TBA (TBA-H), it was demonstrated that the modification effectively improved the affinity of TBA; dissociation constants (K(D)) of TBA-H and TBA-Br were 45.4 nM and 1.99 nM, respectively. These values, which were obtained by direct observation of thrombin binding using RIfS, have the same order of magnitude as those obtained in our previous study utilizing conformational changes in TBA to detect thrombin binding, thus confirming the validity of the obtained K(D) values. RIfS measurements also revealed that the 8-BrdG modification resulted in a lower dissociation rate constant (k(d)), which suggests that the enhancement of affinity can be attributed to the stabilization of the G-quadruplex structure on introduction of 8-BrdG.

  1. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  2. Voltage-sensor conformation shapes the intra-membrane drug binding site that determines gambierol affinity in Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Kopljar, Ivan; Grottesi, Alessandro; de Block, Tessa; Rainier, Jon D; Tytgat, Jan; Labro, Alain J; Snyders, Dirk J

    2016-08-01

    Marine ladder-shaped polyether toxins are implicated in neurological symptoms of fish-borne food poisonings. The toxin gambierol, produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, belongs to the group of ladder-shaped polyether toxins and inhibits Kv3.1 channels with nanomolar affinity through a mechanism of gating modification. Binding determinants for gambierol localize at the lipid-exposed interface of the pore forming S5 and S6 segments, suggesting that gambierol binds outside of the permeation pathway. To explore a possible involvement of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), we made different chimeric channels between Kv3.1 and Kv2.1, exchanging distinct parts of the gating machinery. Our results showed that neither the electro-mechanical coupling nor the S1-S3a region of the VSD affect gambierol sensitivity. In contrast, the S3b-S4 part of the VSD (paddle motif) decreased gambierol sensitivity in Kv3.1 more than 100-fold. Structure determination by homology modeling indicated that the position of the S3b-S4 paddle and its primary structure defines the shape and∖or the accessibility of the binding site for gambierol, explaining the observed differences in gambierol affinity between the channel chimeras. Furthermore, these findings explain the observed difference in gambierol affinity for the closed and open channel configurations of Kv3.1, opening new possibilities for exploring the VSDs as selectivity determinants in drug design.

  3. SILAC-iPAC: a quantitative method for distinguishing genuine from non-specific components of protein complexes by parallel affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Rees, Johanna S; Lilley, Kathryn S; Jackson, Antony P

    2015-02-06

    Pull-down assays can identify members of protein complexes but suffer from co-isolation of contaminants. The problem is particularly acute when the specifically interacting partners are of low-abundance and/or bind transiently with low affinity. To differentiate true interacting partners from contaminants, we have combined SILAC labelling with a proteomic method called "Interactomes by Parallel Affinity Capture" (iPAC). In our method, a cell-line stably expressing a doubly tagged target endogenous protein and its tag-less control cell-line are differentially SILAC labelled. Lysates from the two cell-lines are mixed and the tagged protein is independently purified for MS analysis using multiple affinity resins in parallel. This allows the quantitative identification of tagged proteins and their binding partners. SILAC-iPAC provides a rigorous and sensitive approach that can discriminate between genuine binding partners and contaminants, even when the contaminants in the pull-down are in large excess. We employed our method to examine the interacting partners of phosphatidyl inositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase 2β subunit (PI5P4K2β) and the Fanconi anaemia core complex in the chicken pre-B cell-line DT40. We confirmed known components of these two complexes, and we have identified new potential binding partners. Combining the iPAC approach with SILAC labelling provides a sensitive and fully quantitative method for the discrimination of specific interactions under conditions where low signal to noise ratios are unavoidable. In addition, our work provides the first characterisation of the most abundant proteins within the DT40 proteome and the non-specific DT40 'beadomes' (non-specific proteins binding to beads) for common epitope tags. Given the importance and widespread use of the DT40 cell-line, these will be important resources for the cell biology and immunology communities. Biological significance SILAC-iPAC provides an improved method for the analysis of low-affinity

  4. SILAC-iPAC: A quantitative method for distinguishing genuine from non-specific components of protein complexes by parallel affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Johanna S.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    Pull-down assays can identify members of protein complexes but suffer from co-isolation of contaminants. The problem is particularly acute when the specifically interacting partners are of low-abundance and/or bind transiently with low affinity. To differentiate true interacting partners from contaminants, we have combined SILAC labelling with a proteomic method called “Interactomes by Parallel Affinity Capture” (iPAC). In our method, a cell-line stably expressing a doubly tagged target endogenous protein and its tag-less control cell-line are differentially SILAC labelled. Lysates from the two cell-lines are mixed and the tagged protein is independently purified for MS analysis using multiple affinity resins in parallel. This allows the quantitative identification of tagged proteins and their binding partners. SILAC–iPAC provides a rigorous and sensitive approach that can discriminate between genuine binding partners and contaminants, even when the contaminants in the pull-down are in large excess. We employed our method to examine the interacting partners of phosphatidyl inositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase 2β subunit (PI5P4K2β) and the Fanconi anaemia core complex in the chicken pre-B cell-line DT40. We confirmed known components of these two complexes, and we have identified new potential binding partners. Combining the iPAC approach with SILAC labelling provides a sensitive and fully quantitative method for the discrimination of specific interactions under conditions where low signal to noise ratios are unavoidable. In addition, our work provides the first characterisation of the most abundant proteins within the DT40 proteome and the non-specific DT40 ‘beadomes’ (non-specific proteins binding to beads) for common epitope tags. Given the importance and widespread use of the DT40 cell-line, these will be important resources for the cell biology and immunology communities. Biological significance SILAC–iPAC provides an improved method for the analysis of

  5. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  6. Tuning the Binding Affinities and Reversion Kinetics of a Light Inducible Dimer Allows Control of Transmembrane Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Seth P; Hallett, Ryan A; Bourke, Ashley M; Bear, James E; Kennedy, Matthew J; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-09-20

    Inducible dimers are powerful tools for controlling biological processes through colocalizing signaling molecules. To be effective, an inducible system should have a dissociation constant in the "off" state that is greater (i.e., weaker affinity) than the concentrations of the molecules that are being controlled, and in the "on" state a dissociation constant that is less (i.e., stronger affinity) than the relevant protein concentrations. Here, we reengineer the interaction between the light inducible dimer, iLID, and its binding partner SspB, to better control proteins present at high effective concentrations (5-100 μM). iLID contains a light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domain that undergoes a conformational change upon activation with blue light and exposes a peptide motif, ssrA, that binds to SspB. The new variant of the dimer system contains a single SspB point mutation (A58V), and displays a 42-fold change in binding affinity when activated with blue light (from 3 ± 2 μM to 125 ± 40 μM) and allows for light-activated colocalization of transmembrane proteins in neurons, where a higher affinity switch (0.8-47 μM) was less effective because more colocalization was seen in the dark. Additionally, with a point mutation in the LOV domain (N414L), we lengthened the reversion half-life of iLID. This expanded suite of light induced dimers increases the variety of cellular pathways that can be targeted with light.

  7. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  8. Structural mechanisms underlying sequence-dependent variations in GAG affinities of decorin binding protein A, a Borrelia burgdorferi adhesin.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli M; Wang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Decorin-binding protein A (DBPA) is an important surface adhesin of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates the bacteria's colonization of human tissue by adhering to glycosaminoglycan (GAG), a sulfated polysaccharide. Interestingly, DBPA sequence variation among different strains of Borrelia spirochetes is high, resulting in significant differences in their GAG affinities. However, the structural mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. We determined the solution structures of DBPAs from strain N40 of B. burgdorferi and strain PBr of Borrelia garinii, two DBPA variants whose GAG affinities deviate significantly from strain B31, the best characterized version of DBPA. Our structures revealed that significant differences exist between PBr DBPA and B31/N40 DBPAs. In particular, the C-terminus of PBr DBPA, unlike C-termini from B31 and N40 DBPAs, is positioned away from the GAG-binding pocket and the linker between helices one and two of PBr DBPA is highly structured and retracted from the GAG-binding pocket. The repositioning of the C-terminus allowed the formation of an extra GAG-binding epitope in PBr DBPA and the retracted linker gave GAG ligands more access to the GAG-binding epitopes than other DBPAs. Characterization of GAG ligands' interactions with wild-type (WT) PBr and mutants confirmed the importance of the second major GAG-binding epitope and established the fact that the two epitopes are independent of one another and the new epitope is as important to GAG binding as the traditional epitope.

  9. Comparison of Relative Binding Affinities for Trout and Human Estrogen Receptor Based upon Different Competitive Binding Assays, oral

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has been mandated to screen industrial chemicals and pesticides for potential endocrine activity. To evaluate the potential for chemicals to cause endocrine disruption in fish we have previously measured the affinity of a number of chemicals for the rainbow trout estr...

  10. A photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag for the facile release of a photo-crosslinked carbohydrate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsung-Che; Adak, Avijit K; Lin, Ting-Wei; Li, Pei-Jhen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lai, Chain-Hui; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    The use of photo-crosslinking glycoprobes represents a powerful strategy for the covalent capture of labile protein complexes and allows detailed characterization of carbohydrate-mediated interactions. The selective release of target proteins from solid support is a key step in functional proteomics. We envisaged that light activation can be exploited for releasing labeled protein in a dual photo-affinity probe-based strategy. To investigate this possibility, we designed a trifunctional, galactose-based, multivalent glycoprobe for affinity labeling of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The resulting covalent protein-probe adduct is attached to a photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag; the biotin moiety enables specific presentation of the conjugate on streptavidin-coated beads, and the photolabile linker allows the release of the labeled proteins. This dual probe promotes both the labeling and the facile cleavage of the target protein complexes from the solid surfaces and the remainder of the cell lysate in a completely unaltered form, thus eliminating many of the common pitfalls associated with traditional affinity-based purification methods.

  11. Laccase-mediated transformations of endocrine disrupting chemicals abolish binding affinities to estrogen receptors and their estrogenic activity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Viana, María Teresa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are known to mainly affect aquatic organisms, producing negative effects in aquaculture. Transformation of the estrogenic compounds 17β-estradiol (E2), bisphenol-A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), and triclosan (TCS) by laccase of Coriolopsis gallica was studied. Laccase is able to efficiently transform them into polymers. The estrogenic activity of the EDCs and their laccase transformation products was evaluated in vitro as their affinity for the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERα) and for the ligand binding domain of zebrafish (Danio rerio) estrogen receptor alpha (zfERαLBD). E2, BPA, NP, and TCS showed higher affinity for the zfERαLBD than for hERα. After laccase treatment, no affinity was found, except a marginal affinity of E2 products for the zfERαLBD. Endocrine disruption studies in vivo on zebrafish were performed using the induction of vitellogenin 1 as a biomarker (VTG1 mRNA levels). The use of enzymatic bioreactors, containing immobilized laccase, efficiently eliminates the endocrine activity of BPA and TCS, and significantly reduces the effects of E2. The potential use of enzymatic reactors to eliminate the endocrine activity of EDCs in supply water for aquaculture is discussed.

  12. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  13. Low density and high affinity of platelet [3H]paroxetine binding in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Agneta; Sundblad-Elverfors, Charlotta; Landén, Mikael; Eriksson, Tomas; Eriksson, Elias

    2006-06-15

    Impaired serotonin transmission has been suggested to be implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa. As an indirect measure of brain serotonergic activity, the binding of tritiated ligands to platelet serotonin transporters has been studied in bulimia nervosa as well as in other putatively serotonin-related psychiatric disorders. In this study, the density and affinity of platelet serotonin transporters were assessed in 20 women meeting the DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa and in 14 controls without previous or ongoing eating disorder using [(3)H]paroxetine as a ligand. In comparison to controls, women with bulimia nervosa had a significantly reduced number of platelet binding sites (B(max) = 721 +/- 313 vs. 1145 +/- 293 fmol/mg protein) and an increase in the affinity for the ligand demonstrated by a lower dissociaton constant (K(d) = 33 +/- 10 vs. 44 +/- 10 pM). A significant correlation between B(max) and K(d) values was found in patients but not in controls. Our results support the notion that bulimia nervosa is associated with a reduction in platelet serotonin transporter density. In addition, our study is the first to report that this reduced transporter density in women with bulimia nervosa is accompanied by an increase in the affinity of the transporter for the ligand.

  14. Differences in receptor binding affinity of several phytocannabinoids do not explain their effects on neural cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rosenthaler, Sarah; Pöhn, Birgit; Kolmanz, Caroline; Huu, Chi Nguyen; Krewenka, Christopher; Huber, Alexandra; Kranner, Barbara; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Moldzio, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids are potential candidates for neurodegenerative disease treatment. Nonetheless, the exact mode of action of major phytocannabinoids has to be elucidated, but both, receptor and non-receptor mediated effects are discussed. Focusing on the often presumed structure-affinity-relationship, Ki values of phytocannabinoids cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarin (CBDV), cannabichromene (CBC), cannabigerol (CBG), cannabinol (CBN), THC acid (THCA) and THC to human CB1 and CB2 receptors were detected by using competitive inhibition between radioligand [(3)H]CP-55,940 and the phytocannabinoids. The resulting Ki values to CB1 range from 23.5 nM (THCA) to 14711 nM (CBDV), whereas Ki values to CB2 range from 8.5 nM (THC) to 574.2 nM (CBDV). To study the relationship between binding affinity and effects on neurons, we investigated possible CB1 related cytotoxic properties in murine mesencephalic primary cell cultures and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cell line. Most of the phytocannabinoids did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in primary cultures, whereas propidium iodide and resazurin formation assays revealed cytotoxic properties of CBN, CBDV and CBG. However, THC showed positive effects on N18TG2 cell viability at a concentration of 10 μM, whereas CBC and THCA also displayed slightly positive activities. These findings are not linked to the receptor binding affinity therewith pointing to another mechanism than a receptor mediated one. [Corrected

  15. Relative binding affinity of carboxylate-, phosphonate-, and bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles targeted to damaged bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ryan D.; Cole, Lisa E.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2012-10-01

    Functionalized Au NPs have received considerable recent interest for targeting and labeling cells and tissues. Damaged bone tissue can be targeted by functionalizing Au NPs with molecules exhibiting affinity for calcium. Therefore, the relative binding affinity of Au NPs surface functionalized with either carboxylate ( l-glutamic acid), phosphonate (2-aminoethylphosphonic acid), or bisphosphonate (alendronate) was investigated for targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue in vitro. Targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue was qualitatively verified by visual observation and backscattered electron microscopy, and quantitatively measured by the surface density of Au NPs using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The surface density of functionalized Au NPs was significantly greater within damaged tissue compared to undamaged tissue for each functional group. Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs exhibited a greater surface density labeling damaged tissue compared to glutamic acid- and phosphonic acid-functionalized Au NPs, which was consistent with the results of previous work comparing the binding affinity of the same functionalized Au NPs to synthetic hydroxyapatite crystals. Targeted labeling was enabled not only by the functional groups but also by the colloidal stability in solution. Functionalized Au NPs were stabilized by the presence of the functional groups, and were shown to remain well dispersed in ionic (phosphate buffered saline) and serum (fetal bovine serum) solutions for up to 1 week. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs have potential for targeted delivery to damaged bone tissue in vitro and provide motivation for in vivo investigation.

  16. Structural basis for specific, high-affinity tetracycline binding by an in vitro evolved aptamer and artificial riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; Edwards, Thomas E; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2008-10-20

    The tetracycline aptamer is an in vitro selected RNA that binds to the antibiotic with the highest known affinity of an artificial RNA for a small molecule (Kd approximately 0.8 nM). It is one of few aptamers known to be capable of modulating gene expression in vivo. The 2.2 A resolution cocrystal structure of the aptamer reveals a pseudoknot-like fold formed by tertiary interactions between an 11 nucleotide loop and the minor groove of an irregular helix. Tetracycline binds within this interface as a magnesium ion chelate. The structure, together with previous biochemical and biophysical data, indicates that the aptamer undergoes localized folding concomitant with tetracycline binding. The three-helix junction, h-shaped architecture of this artificial RNA is more complex than those of most aptamers and is reminiscent of the structures of some natural riboswitches.

  17. Binding of the bioactive component Aloe dihydroisocoumarin with human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu-Feng; Xie, Ling; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Tang, Ya-Lin

    2008-11-01

    Aloe dihydroisocoumarin, one of new components isolated from Aloe vera, can scavenge reactive oxygen species. In order to explore the mechanism of drug action at a molecular level, the binding of Aloe dihydroisocoumarin with human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by using fluorescence, ultraviolet (UV), circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence dynamics, and molecular dynamic docking for the first time. We observed a quenching of fluorescence of HSA in the presence of Aloe dihydroisocoumarin and also analyzed the quenching results using the Stern-Volmer equation and obtained high affinity binding to HSA. An isoemissive point at 414 nm is seen, indicating that the quenching of HSA fluorescence depends on the formation of Aloe dihydroisocoumarin-HSA complex, which is further confirmed by fluorescence dynamic result. From the CD and FT-IR results, it is apparent that the interaction of Aloe dihydroisocoumarin with HSA causes a conformational change of the protein, with the gain of α-helix, β-sheet and random coil stability and the loss of β-turn content. Data obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence dynamics, CD, and FTIR experiments along with the docking studies suggest that Aloe dihydroisocoumarin binds to residues located in subdomain IIA of HSA.

  18. Photoaffinity labeling of high affinity nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-binding proteins in sea urchin egg.

    PubMed

    Walseth, Timothy F; Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Jain, Pooja; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony; Marchant, Jonathan S; Slama, James T

    2012-01-20

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a messenger that regulates calcium release from intracellular acidic stores. Recent studies have identified two-pore channels (TPCs) as endolysosomal channels that are regulated by NAADP; however, the nature of the NAADP receptor binding site is unknown. To further study NAADP binding sites, we have synthesized and characterized [(32)P-5-azido]nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate ([(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP) as a photoaffinity probe. Photolysis of sea urchin egg homogenates preincubated with [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP resulted in specific labeling of 45-, 40-, and 30-kDa proteins, which was prevented by inclusion of nanomolar concentrations of unlabeled NAADP or 5N(3)-NAADP, but not by micromolar concentrations of structurally related nucleotides such as NAD, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP binding was saturable and displayed high affinity (K(d) ∼10 nM) in both binding and photolabeling experiments. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP photolabeling was irreversible in a high K(+) buffer, a hallmark feature of NAADP binding in the egg system. The proteins photolabeled by [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP have molecular masses smaller than the sea urchin TPCs, and antibodies to TPCs do not detect any immunoreactivity that comigrates with either the 45-kDa or the 40-kDa photolabeled proteins. Interestingly, antibodies to TPC1 and TPC3 were able to immunoprecipitate a small fraction of the 45- and 40-kDa photolabeled proteins, suggesting that these proteins associate with TPCs. These data suggest that high affinity NAADP binding sites are distinct from TPCs.

  19. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  20. Binding affinity and capacities for ytterbium(3+) and hafinum(4+) by chemical entities of plant tissue fragments.

    PubMed

    Worley, R; Clearfield, A; Ellis, W C

    2002-12-01

    The binding affinity of ytterbium (Yb3+) and hafinum (Hf4+) to ligands of chemical entities of fragments of bermudagrass tissues and their resistance to exchanging Yb with other ligands and to displacement by protons were investigated. Chemical entities of acid resistant NDF (ARNDF), 0.1 N acid detergent fiber (0.1 N ADF), and permanganate cellulose (CELL) were prepared from fragments of bermudagrass hay (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.) obtained by grinding to pass a 2-mm sieve. 175Ytterbium and Yb, as YbCl3, were initially bound to each preparation by soaking for 12 h in pH 5.5 borate buffer to obtain Yb bound onto ligands having affinity constants for Yb equal to or greater than that for the weakly stable borate ligand, Yb > or = borate. The fraction of Yb > or = borate was measured and fragments then sequentially exposed to acetate, citrate, nitrotriacetate (NTA), and EDTA ions to allow exchange of Yb from Yb > or = borate with ligands having affinity constants for Yb equal to or greater than acetate (Yb > or = acetate), citrate (Yb > or = citrate), NTA (Yb > or = NTA), and EDTA (Yb > or = EDTA) ions. Binding of Yb > or = borate indicated the existence of two species of ligands: strong ligands binding essentially 100% of added Yb at levels of 1 to 1,300 ppm (0.1 N ADF) and at 1 to 7,000 ppm (ARNDF); and weaker ligands binding 4 and 8% of the Yb, respectively, at levels of added Yb greater than 1,300 ppm and 7,000 ppm. Ytterbium > or = acetate of ARNDF, but not 0.1 N ADF, was as resistant to exchange as Yb > or = citrate. Ytterbium > or = borate was exchanged extensively (85% or greater) with soluble ligands having affinity constants > or = NTA. Ytterbium resistance to proton displacement at pH of 1.5 increased with Yb > or = EDTA > Yb > or = NTA > Yb > or = citrate > Yb > or = acetate. Very efficient binding of Yb to CELL suggested that such chemical preparations are not representative of native cellulose. Hafnium (4+) was strongly bound to plant tissues rendering

  1. [Cell-ELA-based determination of binding affinity of DNA aptamer against U87-EGFRvIII cell].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Liang, Huiyu; Wu, Xidong; Gao, Yubo; Zhang, Xingmei

    2013-05-01

    A15, a DNA aptamer with binding specificity for U87 glioma cells stably overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (U87-EGFRvIII), was generated by cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) using a random nucleotide library. Subsequently, we established a cell enzyme-linked assay (cell-ELA) to detect the affinity of A15 compared to an EGFR antibody. We used A15 as a detection probe and cultured U87-EGFRvIII cells as targets. Our data indicate that the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) for A15 were below 100 nmol/L and had similar affinity compared to an EGFR antibody for U87-EGFRvIII. We demonstrated that the cell-ELA was a useful method to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) of aptamers generated by cell-SELEX.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and binding affinities of rhenium(I) thiosemicarbazone complexes for the estrogen receptor (α/β).

    PubMed

    Núñez-Montenegro, Ara; Carballo, Rosa; Vázquez-López, Ezequiel M

    2014-11-01

    The binding affinities towards estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β of a set of thiosemicarbazone ligands (HL(n)) and their rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes [ReX(HL(n))(CO)3] (X=Cl, Br) were determined by a competitive standard radiometric assay with [(3)H]-estradiol. The ability of the coordinated thiosemicarbazone ligands to undergo deprotonation and the lability of the ReX bond were used as a synthetic strategy to obtain [Re(hpy)(L(n))(CO)3] (hpy=3- or 4-hydroxypyridine). The inclusion of the additional hpy ligand endows the new thiosemicarbazonate complexes with an improved affinity towards the estrogen receptors and, consequently, the values of the inhibition constant (Ki) could be determined for some of them. In general, the values of Ki for both ER subtypes suggest an appreciable selectivity towards ERα.

  3. Opiorphin highly improves the specific binding and affinity of MERF and MEGY to rat brain opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Fanni; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sándor; Rougeot, Catherine; Wollemann, Mária

    2012-10-10

    Endogenously occurring opioid peptides are rapidly metabolized by different ectopeptidases. Human opiorphin is a recently discovered natural inhibitor of the enkephalin-inactivating neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase-N (AP-N) (Wisner et al., 2006). To date, in vitro receptor binding experiments must be performed either in the presence of a mixture of peptidase inhibitors and/or at low temperatures, to block peptidase activity. Here we demonstrate that, compared to classic inhibitor cocktails, opiorphin dramatically increases the binding of [(3)H]MERF and [(3)H]MEGY ligands to rat brain membrane preparations. We found that at 0 °C the increase in specific binding is as high as 40-60% and at 24 °C this rise was even higher. In contrast, the binding of the control [(3)H]endomorphin-1, which is relatively slowly degraded in rat brain membrane preparations, was not enhanced by opiorphin compared to other inhibitors. In addition, in homologous binding displacement experiments, the IC(50) affinity values measured at 24 °C were also significantly improved using opiorphin compared to the inhibitor cocktail. In heterologous binding experiments the differences were less obvious, but still pronounced using [(3)H]MERF and MEGY compared to dynorphin(1-11), or naloxone and DAGO competitor ligands.

  4. Relating structure to thermodynamics: the crystal structures and binding affinity of eight OppA-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Davies, T G; Hubbard, R E; Tame, J R

    1999-07-01

    The oligopeptide-binding protein OppA provides a useful model system for studying the physical chemistry underlying noncovalent interactions since it binds a variety of readily synthesized ligands. We have studied the binding of eight closely related tripeptides of the type Lysine-X-Lysine, where X is an abnormal amino acid, by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography. The tripeptides fall into three series of ligands, which have been designed to examine the effects of small changes to the central side chain. Three ligands have a primary amine as the second side chain, two have a straight alkane chain, and three have ring systems. The results have revealed a definite preference for the binding of hydrophobic residues over the positively charged side chains, the latter binding only weakly due to unfavorable enthalpic effects. Within the series of positively charged groups, a point of lowest affinity has been identified and this is proposed to arise from unfavorable electrostatic interactions in the pocket, including the disruption of a key salt bridge. Marked entropy-enthalpy compensation is found across the series, and some of the difficulties in designing tightly binding ligands have been highlighted.

  5. Computational Assay of H7N9 Influenza Neuraminidase Reveals R292K Mutation Reduces Drug Binding Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Christopher J.; Malaisree, Maturos; Long, Ben; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of a novel H7N9 avian influenza that infects humans is a serious cause for concern. Of the genome sequences of H7N9 neuraminidase available, one contains a substitution of arginine to lysine at position 292, suggesting a potential for reduced drug binding efficacy. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir bound to H7N9, H7N9-R292K, and a structurally related H11N9 neuraminidase. They show that H7N9 neuraminidase is structurally homologous to H11N9, binding the drugs in identical modes. The simulations reveal that the R292K mutation disrupts drug binding in H7N9 in a comparable manner to that observed experimentally for H11N9-R292K. Absolute binding free energy calculations with the WaterSwap method confirm a reduction in binding affinity. This indicates that the efficacy of antiviral drugs against H7N9-R292K will be reduced. Simulations can assist in predicting disruption of binding caused by mutations in neuraminidase, thereby providing a computational `assay.'

  6. Affinity-purified tetanus neurotoxin interaction with synaptic membranes: properties of a protease-sensitive receptor component

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarovici, P.; Yavin, E.

    1986-11-04

    The pharmacokinetic interaction of an affinity-purified /sup 125/I-labeled tetanotoxin fraction with guinea pig brain synaptosomal preparations was investigated. Binding of tetanotoxin was time- and temperature-dependent, was proportional to protein concentration, and was saturable at about 8 x 10/sup -9/ M as estimated by a solid-surface binding assay. Binding was optimal at pH 6.5 under low ionic strength buffer and was almost entirely blocked by gangliosides or antitoxin. In analogy to intact nerve cells, binding of toxin to membranes resulted in a tight association operationally defined as sequestration. Binding and sequestration were abolished after membrane pretreatment with sialidase. The enzyme could not dissociate the membrane-bound toxin formed at 4 or 37/sup 0/C under low ionic strength conditions, which is in part compatible with internalization as defined in nerve cell cultures. In the latter system the toxin could be removed at 4/sup 0/C but not at 37/sup 0/C. Binding was significantly reduced upon pretreatment of guinea pig brain membranes by a variety of hydrolytic enzymes. It is proposed that, in addition to a ganglioside, interaction of tetanotoxin with synaptic membranes is facilitated by a protein and may also require an appropriate lipid environment. These latter membrane constituents may play a pivotal role in the sequestration of the toxin.

  7. Enhanced Binding Affinity for an i-Motif DNA Substrate Exhibited by a Protein Containing Nucleobase Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoguang; Talukder, Poulami; Daskalova, Sasha M; Roy, Basab; Chen, Shengxi; Li, Zhongxian; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-03-17

    Several variants of a nucleic acid binding motif (RRM1) of putative transcription factor hnRNP LL containing nucleobase amino acids at specific positions have been prepared and used to study binding affinity for the BCL2 i-motif DNA. Molecular modeling suggested a number of amino acids in RRM1 likely to be involved in interaction with the i-motif DNA, and His24 and Arg26 were chosen for modification based on their potential ability to interact with G14 of the i-motif DNA. Four nucleobase amino acids were introduced into RRM1 at one or both of positions 24 and 26. The introduction of cytosine nucleobase 2 into position 24 of RRM1 increased the affinity of the modified protein for the i-motif DNA, consistent with the possible Watson-Crick interaction of 2 and G14. In comparison, the introduction of uracil nucleobase 3 had a minimal effect on DNA affinity. Two structurally simplified nucleobase analogues (1 and 4) lacking both the N-1 and the 2-oxo substituents were also introduced in lieu of His24. Again, the RRM1 analogue containing 1 exhibited enhanced affinity for the i-motif DNA, while the protein analogue containing 4 bound less tightly to the DNA substrate. Finally, the modified protein containing 1 in lieu of Arg26 also bound to the i-motif DNA more strongly than the wild-type protein, but a protein containing 1 both at positions 24 and 26 bound to the DNA less strongly than wild type. The results support the idea of using nucleobase amino acids as protein constituents for controlling and enhancing DNA-protein interaction. Finally, modification of the i-motif DNA at G14 diminished RRM1-DNA interaction, as well as the ability of nucleobase amino acid 1 to stabilize RRM1-DNA interaction.

  8. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS TO ESTROGEN RECEPTOR IN TWO SPECIES OF FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has been mandated to screen industrial chemicals and pesticides for potential endocrine activity. To evaluate the potential for chemicals to cause endocrine disruption in fish we have previously measured the affinity of a number of chemicals for the rainbow trout estr...

  9. CdTe/CdSe quantum dots improve the binding affinities between α-amylase and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaoling

    2012-03-01

    People exposed to engineered nanomaterials have potential health risks associated. Human α-amylase is one of the key enzymes in the digestive system. There are few reports about the influence of quantum dots (QDs) on the digestive enzymes and their inhibition system. This work focused on the toxic effect of CdTe/CdSe QDs on the interactions between α-amylase and its natural inhibitors. Thirty-six dietary polyphenols, natural α-amylase inhibitors from food, were studied for their affinities for α-amylase in the absence and presence of CdTe/CdSe QDs by a fluorescence quenching method. The magnitudes of apparent binding constants of polyphenols for α-amylase were almost in the range of 10(5)-10(7) L mol(-1) in the presence of CdTe/CdSe QDs, which were higher than the magnitudes of apparent binding constants in the absence of CdTe/CdSe QDs (10(4)-10(6) L mol(-1)). CdTe/CdSe QDs obviously improved the affinities of dietary polyphenols for α-amylase up to 389.04 times. It is possible that the binding interaction between polyphenols and α-amylase in the presence of CdTe/CdSe QDs was mainly caused by electrostatic interactions. QDs significantly influence the digestive enzymes and their inhibition system.

  10. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  11. The structure of the amyloid-beta peptide high-affinity copper II binding site in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor A; Titmuss, Stephen J; Epa, V Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J; Masters, Colin L; Varghese, Joseph N

    2008-10-01

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Abeta-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Abeta may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Abeta peptides complexed with Cu(2+) in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Abeta-Cu(2+) peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Abeta-Cu(2+) complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu(2+) binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Abeta can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  12. The Structure of the Amyloid-β Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Aβ-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Aβ may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Aβ peptides complexed with Cu2+ in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Aβ-Cu2+ peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Aβ-Cu2+ complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu2+ binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Aβ can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD. PMID:18599641

  13. A Novel Carbohydrate-binding Module from Sugar Cane Soil Metagenome Featuring Unique Structural and Carbohydrate Affinity Properties.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruna Medeia; Liberato, Marcelo Vizona; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Zanphorlin, Letícia Maria; Ematsu, Gabriela Cristina; Barud, Hernane; Polikarpov, Igor; Ruller, Roberto; Gilbert, Harry J; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Squina, Fabio Marcio

    2016-11-04

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are appended to glycoside hydrolases and can contribute to the degradation of complex recalcitrant substrates such as the plant cell wall. For application in bioethanol production, novel enzymes with high catalytic activity against recalcitrant lignocellulosic material are being explored and developed. In this work, we report the functional and structural study of CBM_E1, which was discovered through a metagenomics approach and is the founding member of a novel CBM family, CBM81. CBM_E1, which is linked to an endoglucanase, displayed affinity for mixed linked β1,3-β1,4-glucans, xyloglucan, Avicel, and cellooligosaccharides. The crystal structure of CBM_E1 in complex with cellopentaose displayed a canonical β-sandwich fold comprising two β-sheets. The planar ligand binding site, observed in a parallel orientation with the β-strands, is a typical feature of type A CBMs, although the expected affinity for bacterial crystalline cellulose was not detected. Conversely, the binding to soluble glucans was enthalpically driven, which is typical of type B modules. These unique properties of CBM_E1 are at the interface between type A and type B CBMs.

  14. Affinity chromatography on immobilized "biomimetic" ligands. Synthesis, immobilization and chromatographic assessment of an immunoglobulin G-binding ligand.

    PubMed

    Teng, S F; Sproule, K; Husain, A; Lowe, C R

    2000-03-31

    A synthetic bifunctional ligand (22/8) comprising a triazine scaffold substituted with 3-aminophenol (22) and 4-amino-1-naphthol (8) has been designed, synthesised, characterised and immobilized on agarose beads to create a robust, highly selective affinity adsorbent for human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Scatchard analysis of the binding isotherm for IgG on immobilized 22/8 (90 micromol 22/8/g moist weight gel) indicated an affinity constant (Ka) of 1.4 x 10(5) M(-1) and a theoretical maximum capacity of 151.9 mg IgG/g moist weight gel. The adsorbent shows similar selectivity to immobilized protein A and binds IgG from a number of species. An apparent capacity of 51.9 mg human IgG/g moist weight gel was observed under the experimental conditions selected for adsorption. Human IgG was eluted with glycine-HCl buffer with a recovery of 67-69% and a purity of 97.3-99.2%, depending on the pH value of the buffer used for elution. Preparative chromatography of IgG from human plasma showed that under the specified conditions, 94.4% of plasma IgG was adsorbed and 60% subsequently eluted with a purity of 92.5%. The immobilized ligand was able to withstand incubation in 1 M NaOH for 7 days without loss of binding capacity for IgG.

  15. Using three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships to examine estrogen receptor binding affinities of polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, C.L.; Minor, D.L.; McKinney, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    Certain phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system of animals, apparently in association with their estrogenic properties. Competition with natural estrogens for the estrogen receptor is a possible mechanism by which such effects could occur. We used comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) paradigm, to examine the underlying structural properties of ortho-chlorinated hydroxybiphenyl analogs known to bind to the estrogen receptor. The cross-validated and conventional statistical results indicate a high degree of internal predictability for the molecules included in the training data set. In addition to the phenolic (A) ring system, conformational restriction of the overall structure appears to play an important role in estrogen receptor binding affinity. Hydrophobic character as assessed using hydropathic interaction fields also contributes in a positive way to binding affinity. The CoMFA-derived QSARs may be useful in examining the estrogenic activity of a wider range of phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Background Antigen presenting cells (APCs) sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the method is validated on a large MHC class II benchmark data set covering 14 HLA-DR (human MHC) and three mouse H2-IA alleles. Results The predictive performance of the SMM-align method was demonstrated to be superior to that of the Gibbs sampler, TEPITOPE, SVRMHC, and MHCpred methods. Cross validation between peptide data set obtained from different sources demonstrated that direct incorporation of peptide length potentially results in over-fitting of the binding prediction method. Focusing on amino terminal peptide flanking residues (PFR), we demonstrate a consistent gain in predictive performance by favoring binding registers with a minimum PFR length of two amino acids. Visualizing the binding motif as obtained by the SMM-align and TEPITOPE methods highlights a series of fundamental discrepancies between the two predicted motifs. For the DRB1*1302 allele for instance, the TEPITOPE method favors basic amino acids at most anchor positions, whereas the SMM-align method identifies a preference for hydrophobic or neutral amino acids at the anchors. Conclusion The SMM-align method was

  17. The binding of pentapeptides to biological and synthetic high affinity heparin.

    PubMed

    Flengsrud, Ragnar; Antonsen, Simen Gjelseth

    2015-11-01

    Pentapeptides have been shown to bind the synthetic heparin fondaparinux (Arixtra) as well the biological heparins dalteparin (Fragmin) and salmon heparin. In contrast to heparin binding consensus sequences, the pentapeptides are acidic or neutral, with no arginine or histidine residue. The peptides showed an effect on in vitro heparin anti-factor X activity with a reduction of fondaparinux activity by 65-95%. Heparin binding was further studied by using peptide solid phase chromatography and NMR analysis.

  18. Binding of the Grb2 SH2 domain to phosphotyrosine motifs does not change the affinity of its SH3 domains for Sos proline-rich motifs.

    PubMed

    Cussac, D; Frech, M; Chardin, P

    1994-09-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptide binding to Grb2 induces tryptophan fluorescence changes in the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. Affinities are in the nanomolar range, the Shc peptide having the highest affinity, followed by peptides mimicking Grb2 binding sites on EGF and HGF receptors, the putative sites on insulin and IGF-1 receptors having much lower affinities. Proline-rich peptide binding to the SH3 domains induces fluorescence changes mainly in the C-terminal SH3. Affinities are in the micromolar range, the highest affinity peptides mimicking the first proline-rich motif of the Sos C-terminus. Additional residues before this PVPPPVPP motif provide a minor contribution to the binding, but the two residues after this motif are important and may contribute to specificity. The affinity of each SH3 for each proline-rich motif is too low to account for the high stability of the Grb2-Sos complex, suggesting that Grb2 recognizes other structural features in the Sos C-terminus. Binding of a phosphotyrosine peptide to the SH2 has no effect on the SH3s. Thus the binding of Grb2 to a receptor or to an associated protein phosphorylated on tyrosines is unlikely to activate the exchange factor activity of Sos through a conformational change transmitted from the SH2 to the SH3 domains.

  19. Switchable binding affinity of mannose tethered to collagen peptide by temperature-dependent triple-helix formation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomoko; Isobe, Chika; Wada, Takeaki; Ezaki, Sumiyo; Minoura, Norihiko

    2013-06-19

    Novel glycopeptides were created with a view to regulate the bindings of carbohydrates to lectins as a means of controlling biological function. We synthesized glycopeptides containing mannose (Man) tethered to a collagen peptide moiety (MPOG10: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10- or MGPP10: -(Gly-Pro-Pro)10-). Circular dichroism spectra showed formation of a triple helical structure for MPOG10, and the melting temperature indicates that MPOG10 forms a more stable triple helical structure than MGPP10 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). At 25 °C, fluorescence polarization (FP) values of MPOG10 and MGPP10 increased following the addition of concanavalin A (ConA), and the addition of α-methyl-mannose (MeMan) to a mixed solution of each glycopeptide with ConA resulted in a decrease in FP values. These results confirm that the previous increase in FP values observed was caused by ConA binding to Man on MPOG10 or MGPP10. The binding affinity of MPOG10 was higher than that of MGPP10, and the dissociation constant of MPOG10 to ConA was 1.9 × 10(-5) (mol/L). The observed binding of MPOG10 to ConA at 25 °C was reduced at higher temperature (50 °C). Therefore, the enhanced binding affinity of MPOG10 to ConA could be accounted for by formation of a clustered Man moiety triggered by the formation of a more stable triple helical structure of MPOG10 compared with MGPP10.

  20. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes.

  1. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides.

  2. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  3. Antibody to FcεRIα Suppresses Immunoglobulin E Binding to High-Affinity Receptor I in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung Yeon; Bae, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Mina; Kim, Min Hee; Kang, Hyun Jung; Park, Eun Hye; Yoo, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-affinity receptor I (FcεRI) on mast cells and basophils plays a key role in the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I hypersensitivity mediated by allergen cross-linking of the specific IgE-FcεRI complex. Thus, prevention of IgE binding to FcεRI on these cells is an effective therapy for allergic disease. We have developed a strategy to disrupt IgE binding to FcεRI using an antibody targeting FcεRIα. Materials and Methods Fab fragment antibodies, which lack the Fc domain, with high affinity and specificity for FcεRIα and effective inhibitory activity against IgE-FcεRI binding were screened. IgE-induced histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in basophils were determined by ELISA. A B6.Cg-Fcer1atm1Knt Tg(FCER1A)1Bhk/J mouse model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to examine the inhibitory effect of NPB311 on allergic skin inflammation. Results NPB311 exhibited high affinity to human FcεRIα (KD=4 nM) and inhibited histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in a concentration-dependent manner in hFcεRI-expressing cells. In hFcεRIα-expressing mice, dye leakage was higher in the PCA group than in controls, but decreased after NPB311 treatment. NPB311 could form a complex with FcεRIα and inhibit the release of inflammation mediators. Conclusion Our approach for producing anti-FcεRIα Fab fragment antibody NPB311 may enable clinical application to a therapeutic pathway in IgE/FcεRI-mediated diseases. PMID:27593869

  4. Affinity, stoichiometry and cooperativity of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) binding to nucleosomal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teif, Vladimir B.; Kepper, Nick; Yserentant, Klaus; Wedemann, Gero; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) participates in establishing and maintaining heterochromatin via its histone-modification-dependent chromatin interactions. In recent papers HP1 binding to nucleosomal arrays was measured in vitro and interpreted in terms of nearest-neighbour cooperative binding. This mode of chromatin interaction could lead to the spreading of HP1 along the nucleosome chain. Here, we reanalysed previous data by representing the nucleosome chain as a 1D binding lattice and showed how the experimental HP1 binding isotherms can be explained by a simpler model without cooperative interactions between neighboring HP1 dimers. Based on these calculations and spatial models of dinucleosomes and nucleosome chains, we propose that binding stoichiometry depends on the nucleosome repeat length (NRL) rather than protein interactions between HP1 dimers. According to our calculations, more open nucleosome arrays with long DNA linkers are characterized by a larger number of binding sites in comparison to chains with a short NRL. Furthermore, we demonstrate by Monte Carlo simulations that the NRL dependent folding of the nucleosome chain can induce allosteric changes of HP1 binding sites. Thus, HP1 chromatin interactions can be modulated by the change of binding stoichiometry and the type of binding to condensed (methylated) and non-condensed (unmethylated) nucleosome arrays in the absence of direct interactions between HP1 dimers.

  5. Photocontrol of Anion Binding Affinity to a Bis-urea Receptor Derived from Stiff-Stilbene

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Toward the development of photoresponsive anion receptors, a stiff-stilbene photoswitch has been equipped with two urea anion-binding motifs. Photoinduced E/Z isomerization has been studied in detail by UV–vis and NMR spectroscopy. Titration experiments (1H NMR) reveal strong binding of acetate and phosphate to the (Z)-isomer, in which the urea groups are closely together. Isomerization to the (E)-form separates the urea motifs, resulting in much weaker binding. Additionally, geometry optimizations by density functional theory (DFT) illustrate that oxo-anion binding to the (Z)-form involves four hydrogen bonds. PMID:28074657

  6. Inhibition of Enterococcus faecium adherence to collagen by antibodies against high-affinity binding subdomains of Acm.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K; Höök, Magnus; Murray, Barbara E

    2007-06-01

    Strains of Enterococcus faecium express a cell wall-anchored protein, Acm, which mediates adherence to collagen. Here, we (i) identify the minimal and high-affinity binding subsegments of Acm and (ii) show that anti-Acm immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) purified against these subsegments reduced E. faecium TX2535 strain collagen adherence up to 73 and 50%, respectively, significantly more than the total IgGs against the full-length Acm A domain (28%) (P < 0.0001). Blocking Acm adherence with functional subsegment-specific antibodies raises the possibility of their use as therapeutic or prophylactic agents.

  7. Evidence that the low-affinity folate-binding protein in erythrocyte hemolysate is identical to hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1981-07-01

    Gel filtration studies on erythrocyte hemolysate demonstrated the presence of a folate binding protein, apparently of the low-affinity type, that co-elutes with hemoglobin. Further, the folate binder eluted with a low salt concentration after DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte hemolysate at pH 6.3. The chromatographic behavior of hemoglobin labeled with (3H)folate was so similar to that of the present binder as to suggest that the folate binder in erythrocytes is in fact hemoglobin.

  8. Mapping of the high affinity Fc epsilon receptor binding site to the third constant region domain of IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, A; Jouvin, M H; Eshhar, Z

    1991-01-01

    Identification of the precise region(s) on the IgE molecule that take part in the binding of IgE to its high affinity receptor (Fc epsilon RI) may lead to the design of IgE analogues able to block the allergic response. To localize the Fc epsilon RI-binding domain of mouse IgE, we attempted to confer on human IgE, which normally does not bind to the rodent receptor, the ability to bind to the rat Fc epsilon RI. Employing exon shuffling, we have expressed chimeric epsilon-heavy chain genes composed of a mouse (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetic acid (NP)-binding VH domain, and human C epsilon in which various domains were replaced by their murine counterparts. This has enabled us to test the Fc epsilon RI-binding of each mouse IgE domain while maintaining the overall conformation of the molecule. All of the chimeric IgE molecules which contain the murine C epsilon 3, bound equally to both the rodent and human receptor, as well as to monoclonal antibodies recognizing a site on IgE which is identical or very close to the Fc epsilon RI binding site. Deletion of the second constant region domain did not impair either the binding capacity of the mutated IgE or its ability to mediate mast cell degradation. These results assign the third epsilon domain of IgE as the principal region involved in the interaction with the Fc epsilon RI. Images PMID:1824934

  9. Measurement of the relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol for uterine and oviduct estrogen receptors in swine, rats and chickens: an indicator of estrogenic potencies.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, D W; Picken, C A; Murphy, L C; Buhr, M M

    1989-01-01

    1. The relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol, and beta-zearalenol for estrogen receptors was determined in the pig, rat and chicken. 2. Similar relative binding patterns were observed, with alpha-zearalenol exhibiting greater affinity than zearalenone and beta-zearalenol the least binding affinity in all species. 3. The relative binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol was greater in pig, than in rat and significantly greater than in chicken. 4. Interspecies differences in zearalenone sensitivity may be due to the binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol for estrogen receptors and differences in zearalenone metabolites formed.

  10. Arg/Abl2 modulates the affinity and stoichiometry of binding of cortactin to F-actin.

    PubMed

    MacGrath, Stacey M; Koleske, Anthony J

    2012-08-21

    The Abl family nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Arg/Abl2 interacts with cortactin, an Arp2/3 complex activator, to promote actin-driven cell edge protrusion. Both Arg and cortactin bind directly to filamentous actin (F-actin). While protein-protein interactions between Arg and cortactin have well-characterized downstream effects on the actin cytoskeleton, it is unclear whether and how Arg and cortactin affect each other's actin binding properties. We employ actin cosedimentation assays to show that Arg increases the stoichiometry of binding of cortactin to F-actin at saturation. Using a series of Arg deletion mutants and fragments, we demonstrate that the Arg C-terminal calponin homology domain is necessary and sufficient to increase the stoichiometry of binding of cortactin to F-actin. We also show that interactions between Arg and cortactin are required for optimal affinity between cortactin and the actin filament. Our data suggest a mechanism for Arg-dependent stimulation of binding of cortactin to F-actin, which may facilitate the recruitment of cortactin to sites of local actin network assembly.

  11. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach.

    PubMed

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2011-04-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amount of HLA molecules, giving a selective force in the binding. The peptide libraries can be designed so that the sequence length, the alignment of binding registers, the numbers and composition of random positions are controlled, and also modified amino acids can be included. Selected library peptides bound to HLA are then isolated by size exclusion chromatography and sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry online coupled to liquid chromatography. The MS/MS data are subsequently searched against a library defined database using a search engine such as Mascot, followed by manual inspection of the results. We used two dodecamer and two decamer peptide libraries and HLA-DQ2.5 to test possibilities and limits of this method. The selected sequences which we identified in the fraction eluted from HLA-DQ2.5 showed a higher average of their predicted binding affinity values compared to the original peptide library. The eluted sequences fit very well with the previously described HLA-DQ2.5 peptide binding motif. This novel method, limited by library complexity and sensitivity of mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of several thousand synthetic sequences concomitantly in a simple water soluble format.

  12. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Sørensen, Lena; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Park, Minyoung; Huber, Thomas; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode photocrosslinking unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into 75 different positions in hSERT. UAAs are incorporated with high specificity, and functionally active transporters have similar transport properties and pharmacological profiles compared with wild-type transporters. We employ ultraviolet-induced crosslinking with p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) at selected positions in hSERT to map the binding site of imipramine, a prototypical tricyclic antidepressant, and vortioxetine, a novel multimodal antidepressant. We find that the two antidepressants crosslink with azF incorporated at different positions within the central substrate-binding site of hSERT, while no crosslinking is observed at the vestibular-binding site. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for defining the high-affinity antidepressant binding site in hSERT. PMID:27089947

  13. High and low affinity binding sites for endothelin on cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Badr, K F; Munger, K A; Sugiura, M; Snajdar, R M; Schwartzberg, M; Inagami, T

    1989-06-15

    Endothelin contracts glomerular mesangial cells, thereby influencing glomerular size and filtration rate. Here, we demonstrate the presence of two ET-specific binding sites on cultured rat mesangial cells with Kds of 0.76 and 44.70 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) values of 6.78 x 10(2) and 27.60 x 10(2) binding sites/cell, respectively. Binding of [125I]-ET was maximal at 120 min at 4 degrees C, stable for the subsequent 60 min, and selective. No competition for binding was observed with greater than 1000-fold concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide, angiotensin II, arginine vasopressin, nicardipine, or nifedipine. The presence of specific receptors for ET on glomerular mesangial cells suggests a major role for this peptide in the regulation of glomerular filtration rate.

  14. Decavanadate binding to a high affinity site near the myosin catalytic centre inhibits F-actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Tiago, Teresa; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2004-05-11

    Decameric vanadate (V(10)) inhibits the actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity, noncompetitively with actin or with ATP upon interaction with a high-affinity binding site (K(i) = 0.27 +/- 0.05 microM) in myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The binding of V(10) to S1 can be monitored from titration with V(10) of the fluorescence of S1 labeled at Cys-707 and Cys-697 with N-iodo-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) or 5-(iodoacetamido) fluorescein, which showed the presence of only one V(10) binding site per monomer with a dissociation constant of 0.16-0.7 microM, indicating that S1 labeling with these dyes produced only a small distortion of the V(10) binding site. The large quenching of AEDANS-labeled S1 fluorescence produced by V(10) indicated that the V(10) binding site is close to Cys-697 and 707. Fluorescence studies demonstrated the following: (i) the binding of V(10) to S1 is not competitive either with actin or with ADP.V(1) or ADP.AlF(4); (ii) the affinity of V(10) for the complex S1/ADP.V(1) and S1/ADP.AlF(4) is 2- and 3-fold lower than for S1; and (iii) it is competitive with the S1 "back door" ligand P(1)P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate. A local conformational change in S1 upon binding of V(10) is supported by (i) a decrease of the efficiency of fluorescence energy transfer between eosin-labeled F-actin and fluorescein-labeled S1, and (ii) slower reassociation between S1 and F-actin after ATP hydrolysis. The results are consistent with binding of V(10) to the Walker A motif of ABC ATPases, which in S1 corresponds to conserved regions of the P-loop which form part of the phosphate tube.

  15. Understanding Ion Binding Affinity and Selectivity in β-Parvalbumin Using Molecular Dynamics and Mean Spherical Approximation Theory.

    PubMed

    Kucharski, Amir N; Scott, Caitlin E; Davis, Jonathan P; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M

    2016-08-25

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a globular calcium (Ca(2+))-selective protein expressed in a variety of biological tissues. Our computational studies of the rat β-parvalbumin (β-PV) isoform seek to elucidate the molecular thermodynamics of Ca(2+) versus magnesium (Mg(2+)) binding at the protein's two EF-hand motifs. Specifically, we have utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a mean-field electrolyte model (mean spherical approximation (MSA) theory) to delineate how the EF-hand scaffold controls the "local" thermodynamics of Ca(2+) binding selectivity over Mg(2+). Our MD simulations provide the probability density of metal-chelating oxygens within the EF-hand scaffolds for both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), as well the conformational strain induced by Mg(2+) relative to Ca(2+) binding. MSA theory utilizes the binding domain oxygen and charge distributions to predict the chemical potential of ion binding, as well as their corresponding concentrations within the binding domain. We find that the electrostatic and steric contributions toward ion binding were similar for Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), yet the latter was 5.5 kcal/mol lower in enthalpy when internal strain within the EF hand was considered. We therefore speculate that beyond differences in dehydration energies for the Ca(2+) versus Mg(2+), strain induced in the β-PV EF hand by cation binding significantly contributes to the nearly 10,000-fold difference in binding affinity reported in the literature. We further complemented our analyses of local factors governing cation binding selectivity with whole-protein (global) contributions, such as interhelical residue-residue contacts and solvent exposure of hydrophobic surface. These contributions were found to be comparable for both Ca(2+)- and Mg(2+)-bound β-PV, which may implicate local factors, EF-hand strain, and dehydration, in providing the primary means of selectivity. We anticipate these methods could be used to estimate metal binding thermodynamics across a broad range of

  16. Decreased angiotensin II binding affinity and binding capacity in the anterior pituitary gland of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkind, J.S.; Castren, E.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG) binding sites were quantified in single pituitary glands from 4-week-old and 14-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched male normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats after incubation with /sup 125/I-(Sar/sup 1/)-ANG, autoradiography with computerized densitometry, and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. The maximum binding capacity (B/sub max/) decreased while the dissociation constant (K/sub d/) for ANG increased in 14-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched WKY control rats. Conversely, no difference between rat strains was found in 4-week-old animals. Our results suggest that pituitary ANG binding sites may play a role in the pathophysiology of established genetic hypertension.

  17. A bambusuril macrocycle that binds anions in water with high affinity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Yawer, Mirza Arfan; Havel, Vaclav; Sindelar, Vladimir

    2015-01-02

    Synthetic receptors that function in water are important for the qualitative and quantitative detection of anions, which may act as pollutants in the environment or play important roles in biological processes. Neutral receptors are particularly appealing because they are often more selective than positively charged receptors; however, their affinity towards anions in pure water is only in range of 1-10(3)  L mol(-1) . The anion-templated synthesis of a water-soluble bambusuril derivative is shown to be an outstanding receptor for various inorganic anions in pure water, with association constants of up to 10(7)  L mol(-1) . Furthermore, the macrocycle discriminates between anions with unprecedented selectivity (up to 500 000-fold). We anticipate that the combination of remarkable affinity and selectivity of this macrocycle will enable the efficient detection and isolation of diverse anions in aqueous solutions, which is not possible with current supramolecular systems.

  18. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. Catalase<-->Abeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro. PMID:10567208

  19. Enhanced tumor-targeting selectivity by modulating bispecific antibody binding affinity and format valence

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Yariv; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Yang, Chunning; Hansen, Anna; Filderman, Jessica; Mulgrew, Kathy; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies are considered attractive bio-therapeutic agents owing to their ability to target two distinct disease mediators. Cross-arm avidity targeting of antigen double-positive cancer cells over single-positive normal tissue is believed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, restrict major escape mechanisms and increase tumor-targeting selectivity, leading to reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. However, the interplay of factors regulating target selectivity is not well understood and often overlooked when developing clinically relevant bispecific therapeutics. We show in vivo that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to endow selective tumor-targeting, and report the pivotal roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and format valence. Specifically, a series of monovalent and bivalent bispecific IgGs composed of the anti-HER2 trastuzumab moiety paired with affinity-modulated VH and VL regions of the anti-EGFR GA201 mAb were tested for selective targeting and eradication of double-positive human NCI-H358 non-small cell lung cancer target tumors over single-positive, non-target NCI-H358-HER2 CRISPR knock out tumors in nude mice bearing dual-flank tumor xenografts. Affinity-reduced monovalent bispecific variants, but not their bivalent bispecific counterparts, mediated a greater degree of tumor targeting selectivity, while the overall efficacy against the targeted tumor was not substantially affected. PMID:28067257

  20. Bisphosphonate binding affinity as assessed by inhibition of carbonated apatite dissolution in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Zachary J.; Nancollas, George H.; Ebetino, F. Hal; Russell, R. Graham G.; Phipps, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs), which display a high affinity for calcium phosphate surfaces, are able to selectively target bone mineral, where they are potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. The dissolution of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) has been used previously as a model for BP effects on natural bone mineral. The present work examines the influence of BPs on carbonated apatite (CAP), which mimics natural bone more closely than does HAP. Constant composition dissolution experiments were performed at pH 5.50, physiological ionic strength (0.15M) and temperature (37°C). Selected BPs were added at (0.5 × 10−6) to (50.0 × 10−6)M, and adsorption affinity constants, KL, were calculated from the kinetics data. The BPs showed concentration-dependent inhibition of CAP dissolution, with significant differences in rank order zoledronate > alendronate > risedronate. In contrast, for HAP dissolution at pH 5.50, the differences between the individual BPs were considerably smaller. The extent of CAP dissolution was also dependent on the relative undersaturation, σ, and CAP dissolution rates increased with increasing carbonate content. These results demonstrate the importance of the presence of carbonate in mediating the dissolution of CAP, and the possible involvement of bone mineral carbonate in observed differences in bone affinities of BPs in clinical use. PMID:17907244

  1. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  2. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  3. Polymerization degrees, molecular weights and protein-binding affinities of condensed tannin fractions from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Mookiah; Tan, Hui Yin; Sieo, Chin Chin; Abdullah, Norhani; Wong, Clemente Michael Vui Ling; Abdulmalek, Emilia; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-06-12

    Condensed tannins (CTs) form insoluble complexes with proteins and are able to protect them from degradation, which could lead to rumen bypass proteins. Depending on their degrees of polymerization (DP) and molecular weights, CT fractions vary in their capability to bind proteins. In this study, purified condensed tannins (CTs) from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid were fractionated into five different molecular weight fractions. The structures of the CT fractions were investigated using 13C-NMR. The DP of the CT fractions were determined using a modified vanillin assay and their molecular weights were determined using Q-TOF LC-MS. The protein-binding affinities of the respective CT fractions were determined using a protein precipitation assay. The DP of the five CT fractions (fractions F1-F5) measured by the vanillin assay in acetic acid ranged from 4.86 to 1.56. The 13C-NMR results showed that the CT fractions possessed monomer unit structural heterogeneity. The number-average molecular weights (Mn) of the different fractions were 1265.8, 1028.6, 652.2, 562.2, and 469.6 for fractions F1, F2, F3, F4, and F5, respectively. The b values representing the CT quantities needed to bind half of the maximum precipitable bovine serum albumin increased with decreasing molecular weight--from fraction F1 to fraction F5 with values of 0.216, 0.295, 0.359, 0.425, and 0.460, respectively. This indicated that higher molecular weight fractions of CTs from L. leucocephala have higher protein-binding affinities than those with lower molecular weights.

  4. Mutational Analysis of the High-Affinity Zinc Binding Site Validates a Refined Human Dopamine Transporter Homology Model

    PubMed Central

    Stockner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R.; Kudlacek, Oliver; Weissensteiner, Rene; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT) is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i) when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii) LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22%) and (iii) the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter‚s movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle. PMID:23436987

  5. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    PubMed

    Stockner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R; Kudlacek, Oliver; Weissensteiner, Rene; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT) is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i) when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii) LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22%) and (iii) the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  6. Familial ligand-defective apolipoprotein B. Identification of a new mutation that decreases LDL receptor binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullinger, C R; Hennessy, L K; Chatterton, J E; Liu, W; Love, J A; Mendel, C M; Frost, P H; Malloy, M J; Schumaker, V N; Kane, J P

    1995-01-01

    Detection of new ligand-defective mutations of apolipoprotein B (apoB) will enable identification of sequences involved in binding to the LDL receptor. Genomic DNA from patients attending a lipid clinic was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for novel mutations in the putative LDL receptor-binding domain of apoB-100. A 46-yr-old woman of Celtic and Native American ancestry with primary hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol [TC] 343 mg/dl; LDL cholesterol [LDL-C] 241 mg/dl) and pronounced peripheral vascular disease was found to be heterozygous for a novel Arg3531-->Cys mutation, caused by a C-->T transition at nucleotide 10800. One unrelated 59-yr-old man of Italian ancestry was found with the same mutation after screening 1,560 individuals. He had coronary heart disease, a TC of 310 mg/dl, and an LDL-C of 212 mg/dl. A total of eight individuals were found with the defect in the families of the two patients. They had an age- and sex-adjusted TC of 240 +/- 14 mg/dl and LDL-C of 169 +/- 10 mg/dl. This compares with eight unaffected family members with age- and sex-adjusted TC of 185 +/- 12 mg/dl and LDL-C of 124 +/- 12 mg/dl. In a dual-label fibroblast binding assay, LDL from the eight subjects with the mutation had an affinity for the LDL receptor that was 63% that of control LDL. LDL from eight unaffected family members had an affinity of 91%. By way of comparison, LDL from six patients heterozygous for the Arg3500-->Gln mutation had an affinity of 36%. The percentage mass ratio of the defective Cys3531 LDL to normal LDL was 59:41, as determined using the mAb MB19 and dynamic laser light scattering. Thus, the defective LDL had accumulated in the plasma of these patients. Using this mass ratio, it was calculated that the defective Cys3531 LDL particles bound with 27% of normal affinity. Deduced haplotypes using 10 apoB gene markers showed the Arg3531-->Cys alleles to be different in the two kindreds and indicates that the mutations arose

  7. Bean peptides have higher in silico binding affinities than ezetimibe for the N-terminal domain of cholesterol receptor Niemann-Pick C1 Like-1.

    PubMed

    Real Hernandez, Luis M; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2017-04-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 like-1 (NPC1L1) mediates cholesterol absorption at the apical membrane of enterocytes through a yet unknown mechanism. Bean, pea, and lentil proteins are naturally hydrolyzed during digestion to produce peptides. The potential for pulse peptides to have high binding affinities for NPC1L1 has not been determined. In this study , in silico binding affinities and interactions were determined between the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1 and 14 pulse peptides (5≥ amino acids) derived through pepsin-pancreatin digestion. Peptides were docked in triplicate to the N-terminal domain using docking program AutoDock Vina, and results were compared to those of ezetimibe, a prescribed NPC1L1 inhibitor. Three black bean peptides (-7.2 to -7.0kcal/mol) and the cowpea bean dipeptide Lys-Asp (-7.0kcal/mol) had higher binding affinities than ezetimibe (-6.6kcal/mol) for the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1. Lentil and pea peptides studied did not have high binding affinities. The common bean peptide Tyr-Ala-Ala-Ala-Thr (-7.2kcal/mol), which can be produced from black or navy bean proteins, had the highest binding affinity. Ezetimibe and peptides with high binding affinities for the N-terminal domain are expected to interact at different locations of the N-terminal domain. All high affinity black bean peptides are expected to have van der Waals interactions with SER130, PHE136, and LEU236 and a conventional hydrogen bond with GLU238 of NPC1L1. Due to their high affinity for the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1, black and cowpea bean peptides produced in the digestive track have the potential to disrupt interactions between NPC1L1 and membrane proteins that lead to cholesterol absorption.

  8. In vitro toxicological evaluation of NCS-382, a high-affinity antagonist of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) binding.

    PubMed

    Vogel, K R; Ainslie, G R; Roullet, J-B; McConnell, A; Gibson, K M

    2017-01-22

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), a minor metabolite of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, can accumulate to significant concentrations in the heritable disorder of GABA degradation, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (SSADHD). Moreover, GHB may be employed in therapeutic settings (treatment of narcolepsy), as well as instances of illicit activity, including acquaintance sexual assault and the induction of euphoria. High-affinity binding sites for GHB in the brain have been identified, although the absolute identity of these receptors remains unclear. Pharmacological antagonism of GHB binding may have multiple instances of therapeutic relevance. The high affinity GHB receptor antagonist, NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzo-cyclohept-6-ylideneacetic acid) has not been piloted in humans. To address the potential clinical utility of NCS-382, we have piloted initial studies of its toxicology in HepG2 and primary hepatocyte cells. At high dose (0.5mM), NCS-382 showed no capacity for inhibition of microsomal CYPs (CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4) and minimal potential for activation of xenobiotic nuclear receptors. Additional cellular integrity and functional assays (viability, oxidative stress, apoptosis, ATP production) revealed little evidence for cytotoxicity, and a low degree of dysregulation of >370 genes actively engaged in the mediation of cellular toxicity. In vitro testing indicates a low probability of cellular toxicity associated with NCS-382.

  9. A bone substitute with high affinity for vitamin D-binding protein―relationship with niche of osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tohru; Kasai, Michiyuki; Tatsukawa, Eri; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Shibata, Yasuaki; Yokoi, Taishi; Nemoto, Takayuki K; Ioku, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts is regulated not only by hormones but also by local growth factors, which are expressed in neighbouring cells or included in bone matrix. Previously, we developed hydroxyapatite (HA) composed of rod-shaped particles using applied hydrothermal methods (HHA), and it revealed mild biodegradability and potent osteoclast homing activity. Here, we compared serum proteins adsorbed to HHA with those adsorbed to conventional HA composed of globular-shaped particles (CHA). The two ceramics adsorbed serum albumin and γ-globulin to similar extents, but affinity for γ-globulin was much greater than that to serum albumin. The chemotactic activity for macrophages of serum proteins adsorbed to HHA was significantly higher than that of serum proteins adsorbed to CHA. Quantitative proteomic analysis of adsorbed serum proteins revealed preferential binding of vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and complements C3 and C4B with HHA. When implanted with the femur of 8-week-old rats, HHA contained significantly larger amount of DBP than CHA. The biological activity of DBP was analysed and it was found that the chemotactic activity for macrophages was weak. However, DBP-macrophage activating factor, which is generated by the digestion of sugar chains of DBP, stimulated osteoclastogenesis. These results confirm that the microstructure of hydroxyapatite largely affects the affinity for serum proteins, and suggest that DBP preferentially adsorbed to HA composed of rod-shaped particles influences its potent osteoclast homing activity and local bone metabolism. PMID:24286277

  10. Mapping the affinity landscape of Thrombin-binding aptamers on 2'F-ANA/DNA chimeric G-Quadruplex microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lietard, Jory; Abou Assi, Hala; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; González, Carlos; Somoza, Mark M; Damha, Masad J

    2017-01-18

    In situ fabricated nucleic acids microarrays are versatile and very high-throughput platforms for aptamer optimization and discovery, but the chemical space that can be probed against a given target has largely been confined to DNA, while RNA and non-natural nucleic acid microarrays are still an essentially uncharted territory. 2'-Fluoroarabinonucleic acid (2'F-ANA) is a prime candidate for such use in microarrays. Indeed, 2'F-ANA chemistry is readily amenable to photolithographic microarray synthesis and its potential in high affinity aptamers has been recently discovered. We thus synthesized the first microarrays containing 2'F-ANA and 2'F-ANA/DNA chimeric sequences to fully map the binding affinity landscape of the TBA1 thrombin-binding G-quadruplex aptamer containing all 32 768 possible DNA-to-2'F-ANA mutations. The resulting microarray was screened against thrombin to identify a series of promising 2'F-ANA-modified aptamer candidates with Kds significantly lower than that of the unmodified control and which were found to adopt highly stable, antiparallel-folded G-quadruplex structures. The solution structure of the TBA1 aptamer modified with 2'F-ANA at position T3 shows that fluorine substitution preorganizes the dinucleotide loop into the proper conformation for interaction with thrombin. Overall, our work strengthens the potential of 2'F-ANA in aptamer research and further expands non-genomic applications of nucleic acids microarrays.

  11. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  12. Organogel-assisted topochemical synthesis of multivalent glyco-polymer for high-affinity lectin binding.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Baiju P; Raghu, Sreedevi; Mukherjee, Somnath; Sureshan, Kana M

    2016-12-01

    An organogelator, 2,4-undeca-diynyl-4',6'-O-benzylidene-β-d-galactopyranoside, which aligns its diacetylene upon gelation, has been synthesized. UV irradiation of its gel resulted in topochemical polymerization of the gelator forming polydiacetylene (PDA). We have used this gel-state reaction for the synthesis of surface-immobilized multi-valent glycoclusters, which showed 1000-fold enhanced binding, compared to monomers, with various galactose-binding lectins.

  13. A Novel Protein Domain Induces High Affinity Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence Binding and Elongation Factor Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Jesse; Caban, Kelvin; Ranaweera, Ruchira; Gonzalez-Flores, Jonathan N.; Copeland, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is incorporated at UGA codons in mRNAs possessing a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in their 3′-untranslated region. At least three additional factors are necessary for Sec incorporation: SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2), Sec-tRNASec, and a Sec-specific translation elongation factor (eEFSec). The C-terminal half of SBP2 is sufficient to promote Sec incorporation in vitro, which is carried out by the concerted action of a novel Sec incorporation domain and an L7Ae RNA-binding domain. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we show that two distinct regions of the Sec incorporation domain are required for Sec incorporation. Physical separation of the Sec incorporation and RNA-binding domains revealed that they are able to function in trans and established a novel role of the Sec incorporation domain in promoting SECIS and eEFSec binding to the SBP2 RNA-binding domain. We propose a model in which SECIS binding induces a conformational change in SBP2 that recruits eEFSec, which in concert with the Sec incorporation domain gains access to the ribosomal A site. PMID:18948268

  14. Prediction of SAMPL3 Host-Guest Binding Affinities: Evaluating the Accuracy of Generalized Force-Fields

    PubMed Central

    Muddana, Hari S.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    We used the second-generation mining minima method (M2) to compute the binding affinities of the novel host-guest complexes in the SAMPL3 blind prediction challenge. The predictions were in poor agreement with experiment, and we conjectured that much of the error might derive from the force field, CHARMm with Vcharge charges. Repeating the calculations with other generalized force-fields led to no significant improvement, and we observed that the predicted affinities were highly sensitive to the choice of force-field. We therefore embarked on a systematic evaluation of a set of generalized force fields, based upon comparisons with PM6-DH2, a fast yet accurate semi-empirical quantum mechanics method. In particular, we compared gas-phase interaction energies and entropies for the host-guest complexes themselves, as well as for smaller chemical fragments derived from the same molecules. The mean deviations of the force field interaction energies from the quantum results were greater than 3 kcal/mol and 9 kcal/mol, for the fragments and host-guest systems respectively. We further evaluated the accuracy of force-fields for computing the vibrational entropies and found the mean errors to be greater than 4 kcal/mol. Given these errors in energy and entropy, it is not surprising in retrospect that the predicted binding affinities deviated from the experiment by several kcal/mol. These results emphasize the need for improvements in generalized force-fields and also highlight the importance of systematic evaluation of force-field parameters prior to evaluating different free-energy methods. PMID:22274835

  15. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets.

  16. Replacement of the Bryostatin A- and B-Pyran Rings With Phenyl Rings Leads to Loss of High Affinity Binding With PKC.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Mark E; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M; Keck, Gary E

    2016-10-19

    We describe a convergent synthesis of a bryostatin analogue in which the natural A- and B-ring pyrans have been replaced by phenyl rings. The new analogue exhibited PMA like behavior in cell assays, but failed to maintain high affinity binding for PKC, despite retaining an unaltered C-ring 'binding domain'.

  17. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of plant adenylate isopentenyltransferase from Humulus lupulus: distinctive binding affinity for purine and pyrimidine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hsing-Mao; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2010-03-01

    Cytokinins are important plant hormones, and their biosynthesis most begins with the transfer of isopentenyl group from dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to the N6-amino group of adenine by either adenylate isopentenyltransferase (AIPT) or tRNA-IPT. Plant AIPTs use ATP/ADP as an isopentenyl acceptor and bacterial AIPTs prefer AMP, whereas tRNA-IPTs act on specific sites of tRNA. Here, we present the crystal structure of an AIPT-ATP complex from Humulus lupulus (HlAIPT), which is similar to the previous structures of Agrobacterium AIPT and yeast tRNA-IPT. The enzyme is structurally homologous to the NTP-binding kinase family of proteins but forms a solvent-accessible channel that binds to the donor substrate DMAPP, which is directed toward the acceptor substrate ATP/ADP. When measured with isothermal titration calorimetry, some nucleotides displayed different binding affinities to HlAIPT with an order of ATP > dATP approximately ADP > GTP > CTP > UTP. Two basic residues Lys275 and Lys220 in HlAIPT interact with the beta and gamma-phosphate of ATP. By contrast, the interactions are absent in Agrobacterium AIPT because they are replaced by the acidic residues Asp221 and Asp171. Despite its structural similarity to the yeast tRNA-IPT, HlAIPT has evolved with a different binding strategy for adenylate.

  18. Autoradiography: (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982 binds with picomolar affinity to D1 sites on striatonigral neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Marien, M.R.

    1986-03-01

    SCH 23390 is selective D1 antagonist. The authors show for the first time, with iodinated SCH 23390, (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982, D1 binding sites on striatonigral neurons. Rat brain sections were covered for 1 hr by a pH 7.6 TRIS buffer containing 2-770 pM (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982, rinsed 2 min at 4 /sup 0/C, dried, and exposed to film for 18 hr. (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982 was displaced by D1 (SCH 23390; IC50= 200 pM; cis-flupenthixol, 10 nM; SKF 38393, 90 nM) but not D2 (sulpiride, LY171555) ligands. Intermediate D1 binding was found in the internal capsule and entopeduncular nucleus. Striatal quinolinate (100 nmol) decreased nigral and striatal D1 binding. Intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6 ..mu..g) that destroyed > 90% of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons did not alter nigral or striatal D1 binding. Thus, (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982 labels with pM affinity D1 sites that reside on striatonigral neurons.

  19. Isopropylamino and isobutylamino groups as recognition sites for carbohydrates: acyclic receptors with enhanced binding affinity toward β-galactosides.

    PubMed

    Mazik, Monika; Sonnenberg, Claudia

    2010-10-01

    Binding motifs observed in the crystal structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes, in particular the participation of the isopropyl/isobutyl side chain of valine/leucine in the formation of van der Waals contacts, have inspired the design of new artificial carbohydrate receptors. The new compounds, containing a trisubstituted triethylbenzene core, were expected to recognize sugar molecules through a combination of NH···O and OH···N hydrogen bonds, CH···π interactions, and numerous van der Waals contacts. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations in competitive and noncompetitive media, as well as binding studies in two-phase systems, such as dissolution of solid carbohydrates in apolar media and phase transfer of sugars from aqueous into organic solvents, revealed effective recognition of neutral carbohydrates and β- vs α-anomer binding preferences in the recognition of glycosides as well as significantly increased binding affinity of the receptors toward β-galactoside in comparison with the previously described receptors.

  20. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered.

  1. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-05

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  2. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  3. Measured and predicted affinities of binding and relative potencies to activate the AhR of PAHs and their alkylated analogues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Shin, Woong-Hee; Hong, Seongjin; Kang, Habyeong; Jung, Dawoon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Khim, Jong Seong; Seok, Chaok; Giesy, John P; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their alkylated forms are important components of crude oil. Both groups of PAHs have been reported to cause dioxin-like responses, mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Thus, characterization of binding affinity to the AhR of unsubstituted or alkylated PAHs is important to understand the toxicological consequences of oil contamination on ecosystems. We investigated the potencies of major PAHs of crude oil, e.g., chrysene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene, and their alkylated forms (n=17) to upregulate expression of AhR-mediated processes by use of the H4IIE-luc transactivation bioassay. In addition, molecular descriptors of different AhR activation potencies among PAHs were investigated by use of computational molecular docking models. Based on responses of the H4IIE-luc in vitro assay, it was shown that potencies of PAHs were determined by alkylation in addition to the number and conformation of rings. Potencies of AhR-mediated processes were generally greater when a chrysene group was substituted, especially in 1-methyl-chrysene. Significant negative correlations were observed between the in vitro dioxin-like potency measured in H4IIE-luc cells and the binding distance estimated from the in silico modeling. The difference in relative potency for AhR activation observed among PAHs and their alkylated forms could be explained by differences among binding distances in the ligand binding domain of the AhR caused by alkylation. The docking model developed in the present study may have utility in predicting risks of environmental contaminants of which toxicities are mediated by AhR binding.

  4. SPOT-Seq-RNA: predicting protein-RNA complex structure and RNA-binding function by fold recognition and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhao, Huiying; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in RNA metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation. Computational methods have been developed separately for prediction of RBPs and RNA-binding residues by machine-learning techniques and prediction of protein-RNA complex structures by rigid or semiflexible structure-to-structure docking. Here, we describe a template-based technique called SPOT-Seq-RNA that integrates prediction of RBPs, RNA-binding residues, and protein-RNA complex structures into a single package. This integration is achieved by combining template-based structure-prediction software, SPARKS X, with binding affinity prediction software, DRNA. This tool yields reasonable sensitivity (46 %) and high precision (84 %) for an independent test set of 215 RBPs and 5,766 non-RBPs. SPOT-Seq-RNA is computationally efficient for genome-scale prediction of RBPs and protein-RNA complex structures. Its application to human genome study has revealed a similar sensitivity and ability to uncover hundreds of novel RBPs beyond simple homology. The online server and downloadable version of SPOT-Seq-RNA are available at http://sparks-lab.org/server/SPOT-Seq-RNA/.

  5. Identification of differential protein binding affinities in an atropisomeric pharmaceutical compound by noncovalent mass spectrometry, equilibrium dialysis, and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Maple, Hannah J; Garlish, Rachel A; Whitcombe, Ian; Hold, Adam; Prosser, Christine E; Ford, Daniel; Mackenzie, Harry; Crosby, John; Porter, John; Taylor, Richard J; Crump, Matthew P

    2013-06-18

    Atropisomerism of pharmaceutical compounds is a challenging area for drug discovery programs (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2009, 48, 6398-6401). Strategies for dealing with these compounds include raising the energy barrier to atropisomerization in order to develop the drug as a single isomer (Tetrahedron 2004, 60, 4337-4347) or reducing the barrier to rotation and developing a mixture of rapidly interconverting isomers (Chirality 1996, 8, 364-371). Commonly, however, the atropisomers will be differentiated in terms of their affinity for a given protein target, and it is therefore important to rapidly identify the most active component prior to further compound development. We present equilibrium dialysis and saturation transfer difference NMR (STD-NMR) as techniques for assessing relative affinities of an atropisomeric mixture against antiapoptotic protein targets Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. These techniques require no prior separation of the mixture of compounds and are therefore rapid and simple approaches. We also explore the use of noncovalent mass spectrometry for determining KD values of individual atropisomers separated from the equilibrium mixture and compare the results to solution-phase measurements. Results from equilibrium dialysis, STD-NMR, and noncovalent mass spectrometry are all in excellent agreement and provide complementary information on differential binding, amplification of the strongest binders, and KD values.

  6. Self-assembling choline mimicks with enhanced binding affinities to C-LytA protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Jingyu; Long, Jiafu; Yang, Zhimou; Ding, Dan

    2014-10-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) causes multiple illnesses in humans. Exploration of effective inhibitors with multivalent attachment sites for choline-binding modules is of great importance to reduce the pneumococcal virulence. In this work, we successfully developed two self-assembling choline mimicks, Ada-GFFYKKK' and Nap-GFFYKKK', which have the abilities to self-assemble into nanoparticles and nanofibers, respectively, yielding multivalent architectures. Additionally, the best characterized choline-binding module, C-terminal moiety of the pneumococcal cell-wall amidase LytA (C-LytA) was also produced with high purity. The self-assembling Ada-GFFYKKK' a