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Sample records for affinity choline uptake

  1. High affinity choline uptake: an early index of cholinergic innervation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, M; Kataoka, K

    1975-08-29

    The uptake of [3H]choline was investigated in nuclei-free homogenates or crude synaptosomal fractions (P2) from rat brain under various stages of development. A comparable sensitivity of uptake to treatment by hyposmotic shock suggested the involvement of synaptosomal populations in choline uptake in immature as well as in adult brains. However, significant changes in the "apparent" Km for the high affinity transport system and quantitative differences in the Na ion requirement for maximal uptake at 0.43 muM choline concentration were found during development; facts which suggested a greater contribution of the low affinity system in the more immature brains. Assuming that the uptake with high and low sensitivity to Na+ reduction reflected that via the high and low affinity system reslectively, we have attempted to obtain real Km values for the high affinity system. These Km values changed less than those measured directly, suggesting that the affinity constant for the high affinity system does not change during development. On these assumptions, the developmental changes of cholinergic synaptogenesis were examined in 5 distinct regions of the brain. It was found that the synaptogenesis begins several days earlier than the increase of choline acetyltransferase (ChAc) level in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus, the superior colliculus and the cerebellum. These regions may be included among the terminal-rich regions according to available evidence related to cholinergic systems. On the other hand, synaptogenesis accompanied the concomitant ChAc increase in the striatum, where the cholinergic interneurons are present. It is concluded that the increase of ChAc in the terminal-rich regions is delayed by the axoplasmic flow; therefore, the earlier index of cholinergic synaptogenesis in these regions is the high affinity uptake activity rather than the enzyme activity.

  2. MKC-231, a choline uptake enhancer: (3) Mode of action of MKC-231 in the enhancement of high-affinity choline uptake.

    PubMed

    Takashina, Ken; Bessho, Tomoko; Mori, Reiko; Kawai, Kunji; Eguchi, Junichi; Saito, Ken-Ichi

    2008-07-01

    MKC-231, a putative cholinergic activity, is reported to improve learning and memory impaired in AF64A-treated animals. MKC-231 enhances high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) known as the rate-limiting step of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis. We investigated the mode of action (MOA) of HACU enhancement by MKC-231. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of AF64A (3 nmol/brain) resulted in significant HACU reduction in hippocampal synaptosomes. Treatment with MKC-231 increased Vmax of HACU and Bmax of [3H]-HC-3 binding 1.6 and 1.7-fold, respectively. In studies of [3H]-MKC-231 binding and Biacore analysis, MKC-231 showed noticeable affinity for cloned high-affinity choline transporters (CHT1). The present study suggests that MKC-231 directly affects trafficking of CHT1 and increases the numbers of transporter, working for HACU, at the synaptic membrane.

  3. High-affinity choline uptake (HACU) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in neuronal cultures for mechanistic and drug discovery studies.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Simon, Jay R; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2012-07-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is the neurotransmitter used by cholinergic neurons at the neuromuscular junction, in parasympathetic peripheral nerve terminals, and in important memory-related circuits in the brain, and takes part in other critical functions. ACh is synthesized from choline and acetyl coenzyme A by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The formation of ACh in cholinergic nerve terminals requires the transport of choline into cells from the extracellular space and the activity of ChAT. High-affinity choline uptake (HACU) represents the majority of choline uptake into the nerve terminal and is the acutely regulated, rate-limiting step in ACh synthesis. HACU can be differentiated from nonspecific choline uptake by inhibition of the choline transporter with hemicholinium. Several methods have been described previously to measure HACU and ChAT activity simultaneously in synaptosomes, but a well-documented protocol for cultured cells is lacking. We describe a procedure for simultaneous measurement of HACU and ChAT in cultured cells by simple radionuclide-based techniques. Using this procedure, we have quantitatively determined HACU and ChAT activity in cholinergically differentiated human neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) cells. These simple methods can be used for neurochemical and drug discovery studies relevant to several disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, myasthenia gravis, and cardiovascular disease.

  4. Effects of anticonvulsants in vivo on high affinity choline uptake in vitro in mouse hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J. A.; Richter, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of several anticonvulsant drugs on sodium-dependent high affinity choline uptake (HACU) in mouse hippocampal synaptosomes was investigated. HACU was measured in vitro after in vivo administration of the drug to mice. HACU was inhibited by drugs which have in common the ability to facilitate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission, pentobarbitone, phenobarbitone, barbitone, diazepam, chloridiazepoxide, and valproic acid. Dose-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the drugs' potencies at inhibiting HACU correlated well with their anticonvulsant potencies. Clonazepam, ethosuximide, carbamazepine, and barbituric acid had no effect on HACU in the doses used while phenytoin and trimethadione stimulated HACU. These results suggest that certain anticonvulsants may elicit a part of their anticonvulsant activity by modulating cholinergic neurones. This effect may be mediated through a GABA mechanism. PMID:3978310

  5. Corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist blocks microwave-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Acute (45-min) irradiation with pulsed low-level microwaves (2450-MHz, 2 microseconds pulses at 500 pps, average power density of 1 mW/cm2, whole-body average specific absorption rate of 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. These effects were blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with intracerebroventricular injection of the specific corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist, alpha-helical-CRF9-41 (25 micrograms). Similar injection of the antagonist had no significant effect on HACU in the brain of the sham-exposed rats. These data suggest that low-level microwave irradiation activates CRF in the brain, which in turn causes the changes in central HACU.

  6. Uptake of (N-Me-3H)-choline by synaptosomes from the central nervous system of Locusta migratoria

    SciTech Connect

    Breer, H.

    1982-03-01

    The accumulation of 3H-choline by isolated synaptosomes from the central nervous system of locust was studied at concentrations varying from 0.05 to 40 microM. Kinetic analysis of the saturable process revealed a high-affinity and a low-affinity system. The high-affinity uptake was competitively inhibited by hemicholinium-3 and was absolutely dependent on external sodium. Elevated potassium concentrations inhibited choline uptake. The choline uptake by insect synaptosomes was found to be remarkably resistant to a variety of metabolic inhibitors. The reduced choline uptake under depolarizing conditions (high potassium concentration or veratridine) in the absence of calcium implies that electrochemical gradients are important for high-affinity choline uptake. Depolarization of preloaded synaptosomes under appropriate conditions resulted in a significant release of newly accumulated choline radioactivity.

  7. Uptake of free choline by isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, S H; Story, D L; Wurtman, R J; Brunengraber, H

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of free choline by isolated perfused rat liver was characterized. A saturable uptake mechanism [Ka = 0.17 +/- 0.07 mM (SD); Vmax = 0.84 +/- 0.16 mumol/min X g dry weight] and a nonsaturable mechanism (through which uptake is proportional to choline concentration in the perfusate) were identified. Most of the choline transported into hepatocytes was converted to betaine, phosphorylcholine, or lecithin. Free choline also accumulated within the intracellular space, suggesting that choline oxidase activity does not always limit choline's uptake by the liver. PMID:6933493

  8. Uptake of Free Choline by Isolated Perfused Rat Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeisel, Steven H.; Story, David L.; Wurtman, Richard J.; Brunengraber, Henri

    1980-08-01

    The uptake of free choline by isolated perfused rat liver was characterized. A saturable uptake mechanism [Ka=0.17± 0.07 mM (SD); Vmax=0.84± 0.16\\ μ mol/min × g dry weight] and a nonsaturable mechanism (through which uptake is proportional to choline concentration in the perfusate) were identified. Most of the choline transported into hepatocytes was converted to betaine, phosphorylcholine, or lecithin. Free choline also accumulated within the intracellular space, suggesting that choline oxidase activity does not always limit choline's uptake by the liver.

  9. Exposure of postnatal rats to a static magnetic field of 0.14 T influences functional laterality of the hippocampal high-affinity choline uptake system in adulthood; in vitro test with magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kristofiková, Z; Cermák, M; Benesová, O; Klaschka, J; Zach, P

    2005-02-01

    Our previous experiments indicated an age- and sex-dependent functional lateralization of a high-affinity choline uptake system in hippocampi of Wistar rats. The system is connected with acetylcholine synthesis and also plays a role in spatial navigation. The current study demonstrates that a single in vivo exposure of 7- or 14-day-old males to a static magnetic field of 0.14 T for 60-120 min evokes asymmetric alterations in the activity of carriers in adulthood. Namely, the negative field (antiparallel orientation with a vertical component of the geomagnetic field) mediated a more marked decrease in the right hippocampus. The positive field (parallel orientation) was ineffective. Moreover, differences between the carriers from the right and the left hippocampi were observed on synaptosomes pretreated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles and exposed for 30 min in vitro. The positive field enhanced more markedly the activity of carriers from the right hippocampus, the negative that from the left hippocampus, on the contrary. Our results demonstrate functionally teratogenic risks of the alterations in the orientation of the strong static magnetic field for postnatal brain development and suggest functional specialization of both hippocampi in rats. Choline carriers could be involved as secondary receptors in magnetoreception through direct effects of geomagnetic field on intracellular magnetite crystals and nanoparticles applied in vivo should be a useful tool to evaluate magnetoreception in future research.

  10. Substrate-induced internalization of the high-affinity choline transporter.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Takashi; Konishi, Asami; Misawa, Hidemi; Haga, Tatsuya

    2011-10-19

    Cholinergic neurons are endowed with a high-affinity choline uptake system for efficient synthesis of acetylcholine at the presynaptic terminals. The high-affinity choline transporter CHT1 is responsible for choline uptake, the rate-limiting step in acetylcholine synthesis. However, endogenous physiological factors that affect CHT1 expression or function and consequently regulate the acetylcholine synthesis rate are essentially unknown. Here we demonstrate that extracellular substrate decreases the cell-surface expression of CHT1 in rat brain synaptosomes, primary cultures from the basal forebrain, and mammalian cell lines transfected with CHT1. Extracellular choline rapidly decreases cell-surface CHT1 expression by accelerating its internalization, a process that is mediated by a dynamin-dependent endocytosis pathway in HEK293 cells. Specific inhibitor hemicholinium-3 decreases the constitutive internalization rate and thereby increases cell-surface CHT1 expression. We also demonstrate that the constitutive internalization of CHT1 depends on extracellular pH in cultured cells. Our results collectively suggest that the internalization of CHT1 is induced by extracellular substrate, providing a novel feedback mechanism for the regulation of acetylcholine synthesis at the cholinergic presynaptic terminals.

  11. High-Affinity Transport of Choline-O-Sulfate and Its Use as a Compatible Solute in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Nau-Wagner, Gabriele; Boch, Jens; Le Good, J. Ann; Bremer, Erhard

    1999-01-01

    We report here that the naturally occurring choline ester choline-O-sulfate serves as an effective compatible solute for Bacillus subtilis, and we have identified a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system responsible for its uptake. The osmoprotective effect of this trimethylammonium compound closely matches that of the potent and widely employed osmoprotectant glycine betaine. Growth experiments with a set of B. subtilis strains carrying defined mutations in the glycine betaine uptake systems OpuA, OpuC, and OpuD and in the high-affinity choline transporter OpuB revealed that choline-O-sulfate was specifically acquired from the environment via OpuC. Competition experiments demonstrated that choline-O-sulfate functioned as an effective competitive inhibitor for OpuC-mediated glycine betaine uptake, with a Ki of approximately 4 μM. Uptake studies with [1,2-dimethyl-14C]choline-O-sulfate showed that its transport was stimulated by high osmolality, and kinetic analysis revealed that OpuC has high affinity for choline-O-sulfate, with a Km value of 4 ± 1 μM and a maximum rate of transport (Vmax) of 54 ± 3 nmol/min · mg of protein in cells grown in minimal medium with 0.4 M NaCl. Growth studies utilizing a B. subtilis mutant defective in the choline to glycine betaine synthesis pathway and natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of whole-cell extracts from the wild-type strain demonstrated that choline-O-sulfate was accumulated in the cytoplasm and was not hydrolyzed to choline by B. subtilis. In contrast, the osmoprotective effect of acetylcholine for B. subtilis is dependent on its biotransformation into glycine betaine. Choline-O-sulfate was not used as the sole carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur source, and our findings thus characterize this choline ester as an effective compatible solute and metabolically inert stress compound for B. subtilis. OpuC mediates the efficient transport not only of glycine betaine and choline

  12. Evidence for the uptake of neuronally derived choline by glial cells in the leech central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, W A; Pentreath, V W

    1990-01-01

    1. With ion-sensitive microelectrodes based on the Corning exchanger 477317, the accumulation of an unidentified interfering substance was monitored in leech neuropile glial cells but not in neurons after a 10-fold increase in extracellular K+ concentration. Evidence is presented which shows that this substance may be choline. 2. The accumulation of interfering ions was not observed in Ca2(+)-free saline and was substantially reduced in the presence of eserine (a blocker of acetylcholinesterase). 3. In neuropile (and also packet) glial cells, extracellularly applied choline (10(-4) M) caused a steady increase in ion signal. This increase was not affected by removal of extracellular calcium, by hemicholinium-3 (a blocker of high-affinity choline uptake) or eserine. Shortly after the removal of choline from the saline the increase in ion signal stopped and the ion signal then decreased slowly to its original level. 4. Extracellular acetylcholine (10(-4) M) caused a similar increase in intracellular ion signal of neuropile glial cells to that caused by choline. This increase was blocked by eserine. 5. Extracellular choline caused a comparatively small increase in ion signal of Retzius neurones which was blocked by hemicholinium-3. In pressure neurones, choline or hemicholinium-3 had no effect on intracellular ion signal. 6. Autoradiographic analysis of [3H]choline uptake showed that most of the choline was taken up by glial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Small but significant amounts of choline were taken up by neurones and connective tissue. 7. It is concluded that the neuropile and packet glial cells possess an effective choline uptake system which is activated by exogenous choline but also by choline that stems from enzymatic inactivation of acetylcholine released by neurones. Images Fig. 11 PMID:2324991

  13. Functional analysis of [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake in glioblastoma cells: Influence of anti-cancer and central nervous system drugs.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Chiaki; Inazu, Masato; Saiki, Iwao; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (PET-CT) studies with (11)C- or (18)F-labeled choline derivatives are used for PET imaging in glioblastoma patients. However, the nature of the choline transport system in glioblastoma is poorly understood. In this study, we performed a functional characterization of [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake and sought to identify the transporters that mediate choline uptake in the human glioblastoma cell lines A-172 and U-251MG. In addition, we examined the influence of anti-cancer drugs and central nervous system drugs on the transport of [methyl-(3)H]choline. High- and low-affinity choline transport systems were present in A-172 cells, U-251MG cells and astrocytes, and these were Na(+)-independent and pH-dependent. Cell viability in A-172 cells was not affected by choline deficiency. However, cell viability in U-251MG cells was significantly inhibited by choline deficiency. Both A-172 and U-251MG cells have two different choline transporters, choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2. In A-172 cells, CTL1 is predominantly expressed, whereas in U-251MG cells, CTL2 is predominantly expressed. Treatment with anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide and vincristine influenced [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake in U-251MG cells, but not A-172 cells. Central nervous system drugs such as imipramine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, reboxetine, citalopram and donepezil did not affect cell viability or [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake. The data presented here suggest that CTL1 and CTL2 are functionally expressed in A-172 and U-251MG cells and are responsible for [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake that relies on a directed H(+) gradient as a driving force. Furthermore, while anti-cancer drugs altered [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake, central nervous system drugs did not affect [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake.

  14. Regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter activity and trafficking by its association with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Leah K; Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, Rebecca Jane

    2014-03-01

    The sodium-coupled, hemicholinium-3-sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is responsible for transport of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals from the synaptic cleft following acetylcholine release and hydrolysis. In this study, we address regulation of CHT function by plasma membrane cholesterol. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in both SH-SY5Y cells and nerve terminals from mouse forebrain. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells expressing rat CHT with filipin, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) or cholesterol oxidase significantly decreased choline uptake. In contrast, CHT activity was increased by addition of cholesterol to membranes using cholesterol-saturated MβC. Kinetic analysis of binding of [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 to CHT revealed that reducing membrane cholesterol with MβC decreased both the apparent binding affinity (KD) and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax ); this was confirmed by decreased plasma membrane CHT protein in lipid rafts in cell surface protein biotinylation assays. Finally, the loss of cell surface CHT associated with lipid raft disruption was not because of changes in CHT internalization. In summary, we provide evidence that CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for transporter function and localization. Alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol cholinergic nerve terminals could diminish cholinergic transmission by reducing choline availability for acetylcholine synthesis. The sodium-coupled choline transporter CHT moves choline into cholinergic nerve terminals to serve as substrate for acetylcholine synthesis. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts, and decreasing membrane cholesterol significantly reduces both choline uptake activity and cell surface CHT protein levels. CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for its function, and alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol could diminish cholinergic

  15. Effects of delta9-THC on the synaptosomal uptake of 3H-tryptophan and 3H-choline.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Dewey, W L

    1978-01-01

    The in vitro addition of (-)-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) resulted in a dose-responsive inhibition of the high-affinity specific synaptosomal uptake of both 3H-tryptophan and 3H-choline in mouse forebrain crude synaptosomal preparations. The approximate concentrations of delta9-THC required to cause a 50% inhibition of the uptake of 3H-tryptophan and 3H-choline were 33 and 16 muM, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that inhibition of both compounds were consistent with a noncompetitive mechanism. The pretreatment of mice with doses of 10, 30 or 100 mg/kg delta9-THC had no effect on the subsequent in vitro synaptosomal uptake of either 3H-tryptophan or 3H-choline into forebrain synaptosomes.

  16. Discovery of Compounds that Positively Modulate the High Affinity Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Parul; Armstrong, Emma J.; Jorgensen, Csilla C.; Piotrowski, Mary; Barthmes, Maria; Torella, Rubben; Johnston, Sarah E.; Maruyama, Yuya; Janiszewski, John S.; Storer, R. Ian; Skerratt, Sarah E.; Benn, Caroline L.

    2017-01-01

    Cholinergic hypofunction is associated with decreased attention and cognitive deficits in the central nervous system in addition to compromised motor function. Consequently, stimulation of cholinergic neurotransmission is a rational therapeutic approach for the potential treatment of a variety of neurological conditions. High affinity choline uptake (HACU) into acetylcholine (ACh)-synthesizing neurons is critically mediated by the sodium- and pH-dependent high-affinity choline transporter (CHT, encoded by the SLC5A7 gene). This transporter is comparatively well-characterized but otherwise unexplored as a potential drug target. We therefore sought to identify small molecules that would enable testing of the hypothesis that positive modulation of CHT mediated transport would enhance activity-dependent cholinergic signaling. We utilized existing and novel screening techniques for their ability to reveal both positive and negative modulation of CHT using literature tools. A screening campaign was initiated with a bespoke compound library comprising both the Pfizer Chemogenomic Library (CGL) of 2,753 molecules designed specifically to help enable the elucidation of new mechanisms in phenotypic screens and 887 compounds from a virtual screening campaign to select molecules with field-based similarities to reported negative and positive allosteric modulators. We identified a number of previously unknown active and structurally distinct molecules that could be used as tools to further explore CHT biology or as a starting point for further medicinal chemistry. PMID:28289374

  17. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT

    PubMed Central

    Fishwick, Katherine J.; Rylett, R. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  18. Expression Cloning of the High Affinity Choline Transporter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-05

    clones. It encodes a GABA transporter that we found to be localized to the glial cells of the purely cholinergic electromotor nucleus of Torpedo. In a...expression cloning approach employing frog oocytes and mRNA from Torpedo C.B. Gundersen electromotor nucleus to isolate a choline transporter cDNA...The rationale for this is that the electromotor neurons should harbor one of the highest abundances of choline transporter mRNA in the animal kingdom

  19. Crotoxin, the major toxin from the rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, inhibits 3H-choline uptake in guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Kattah, L S; Santoro, M M; Diniz, C R; De Lima, M E

    2000-09-01

    We examined the effect of crotoxin, the neurotoxic complex from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on the uptake of 3H-choline in minces of smooth muscle myenteric plexus from guinea pig ileum. In the concentration range used (0. 03-1 microM) and up to 10 min of treatment, crotoxin decreased 3H-choline uptake by 50-75% compared to control. This inhibition was time dependent and did not seem to be associated with the disruption of the neuronal membrane, because at least for the first 20 min of tissue exposure to the toxin (up to 1 microM) the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released into the supernatant were similar to those of controls. Higher concentrations of crotoxin or more extensive incubation times with this toxin resulted in elevation of LDH activity detected in the assay supernatant. The inhibitory effect of crotoxin on 3H-choline uptake seems to be associated with its phospholipase activity since the equimolar substitution of Sr2+ for Ca2+ in the incubation medium or the modification of the toxin with p-bromophenacyl bromide substantially decreased this effect. Our results show that crotoxin inhibits 3H-choline uptake with high affinity (EC25 = 10 +/- 5 nM). We suggest that this inhibition could explain, at least in part, the blocking effect of crotoxin on neurotransmission.

  20. Osmoprotectants in Halomonas elongata: high-affinity betaine transport system and choline-betaine pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Cánovas, D; Vargas, C; Csonka, L N; Ventosa, A; Nieto, J J

    1996-01-01

    The osmoregulatory pathways of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata DSM 3043 have been investigated. This strain grew optimally at 1.5 to 2 M NaCl in M63 glucose-defined medium. It required at least 0.5 M NaCl for growth, which is a higher concentration than that exhibited by the H. elongata type strain ATCC 33173. Externally provided betaine, choline, or choline-O-sulfate (but not proline, ectoine, or proline betaine) enhanced the growth of H. elongata on 3 M NaCl-glucose-M63 plates, demonstrating the utilization of these compounds as osmoprotectants. Moreover, betaine and choline stimulated the growth of H. elongata DSM 3043 over the entire range of salinity, although betaine was more effective than choline at salinities below and above the optimum. We found that H. elongata DSM 3043 has at least one high-affinity transport system for betaine (K(m) = 3.06 microM and Vmax = 9.96 nmol of betaine min(-1) mg of protein(-1)). Competition assays demonstrated that proline betaine and ectoine, but not proline, choline, or choline-O-sulfate, are also transported by the betaine permease. Finally, thin-layer chromatography and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that exogenous choline was taken up and transformed to betaine by H. elongata, demonstrating the existence of a choline-glycine betaine pathway in this moderately halophilic bacterium. PMID:8955405

  1. Affinity labelling and identification of the high-affinity choline carrier from synaptic membranes of Torpedo electromotor nerve terminals with [3H]choline mustard.

    PubMed

    Rylett, R J

    1988-12-01

    The physiological mechanisms regulating activity of the sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline transporter and the molecular events in the translocation process remain unclear; the protein has not been purified or characterized biochemically. In the present study, [3H]choline mustard aziridinium ion [( 3H]ChM Az), a nitrogen mustard analogue of choline, bound irreversibly to presynaptic plasma membranes from Torpedo electric organ in a hemicholinium-sensitive, and sodium-, time-, and temperature-dependent manner. Specific binding of this ligand was greatest when it was incubated with membranes in the presence of sodium at 30 degrees C. Separation of the 3H-labelled membrane proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that most of the radiolabel was associated with a polypeptide of apparent molecular mass of approximately 42,000 daltons; labelling of this species was abolished in membranes incubated with ligand in the presence of HC-3. Two other 3H-labelled polypeptides were detected, with apparent molecular masses of approximately 58,000 and 90,000 daltons; radiolabelling of the former was also HC-3 sensitive. [3H]ChM Az may be a useful affinity ligand in the purification of the choline carrier from cholinergic neurons.

  2. Apical uptake of choline and cationic drugs in epithelial cell lines derived from human placenta.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Born, I; Neubert, R H; Brandsch, M

    2005-01-01

    Many cationic drugs are administered during pregnancy and might enter the fetal circulation by transplacental passage. This study was performed to characterize the apical uptake of choline and several cationic drugs at cultured epithelial cells of the human placenta. Total uptake of [3H]choline in BeWo cells was H(+)-independent and to 65% Na(+)-independent. Uptake rates into both cell lines were saturable with Michaelis-Menten constants (Kt) of 108 microM (BeWo) and 206 microM (JEG-3), respectively. Cationic drugs such as etilefrine, clonidine, ranitidine, diphenhydramine, imipramine and butylscopolamine strongly inhibited the [3H]choline uptake in BeWo cells and in JEG-3 cells, with Ki values ranging from 0.18 to 3.3 mM. In contrast, tetraethylammonium had only little inhibitory effect on [3H]choline uptake. Using high-performance capillary electrophoresis for quantitative analyses, uptake of etilefrine and diphenhydramine into JEG-3 or BeWo cells was measured. Diphenhydramine was transported into JEG-3 cells in a saturable manner with a Kt value of 0.75 mM. In the presence of sodium, diphenhydramine uptake at BeWo cells was inhibited to 69% by the addition of 50 mM choline chloride. Like choline uptake, total diphenhydramine uptake was to 68% Na(+)-independent in BeWo cells. We conclude that in addition to choline, several cationic drugs, in particular diphenhydramine, are taken up by placental epithelial cells from the maternal blood by carrier-mediated processes. Etilefrine, clonidine, ranitidine, diphenhydramine and butylscopolamine interact with the Na(+)-independent placental choline transport system.

  3. Effect of the novel high affinity choline uptake enhancer 2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)-N-(2,3-dimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofuro[2,3-b] quinolin-4-yl)acetoamide on deficits of water maze learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Bessho, T; Takashina, K; Tabata, R; Ohshima, C; Chaki, H; Yamabe, H; Egawa, M; Tobe, A; Saito, K

    1996-04-01

    The pharmacological properties of MKC-231 (2-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)-N- (2,3-dimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofuro[2,3-b]quinolin-4-yl) acetoamide, CAS 135463-81-9) in comparison with an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, tacrine (CAS 1684-40-8) were studied. MKC-231(10(-10)-10(-6) moll) significantly increased high affinity choline uptake (HACU) when it was incubated with the hippocampal synaptosomes of ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF64A) treated rats, but not of normal rats. MKC-231 did not affect the AChE activity, [3H]- quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, and [3H]-pirenzepine binding. Oral administration of MKC-231 (1-10 mg/kg) significantly improved the learning deficits in the Morris' water maze of AF64A-treated rats, but it did not produce any significant side effects, like tremor, salivation or hypothermia, which were observed in rats treated with high doses of tacrine. Tacrine (0.1-3 mg/kg p.o.) failed to ameliorate the learning deficits in AF64A-treated rats. These results suggest that MKC-231 is a novel and quite unique compound, which improves the memory impairment induced by AF64A through the enhancement of HACU without any side effects at the effective doses.

  4. Choline Accumulation by Photoreceptor Cells of the Rabbit Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masland, Richard H.; Mills, John W.

    1980-03-01

    Photoreceptor cells of the rabbit retina accumulate choline from the extracellular environment by an overall process that has a high affinity for choline. These cells do not synthesize acetylcholine; instead, the choline taken up is incorporated into phosphorylcholine and eventually phospholipid. A mechanism for efficient choline accumulation is presumably concomitant to the photoreceptor cell's synthesis of large amounts of membrane for outer segment membrane renewal. Its existence in the photoreceptor cell supports previous evidence that high-affinity choline uptake is not confined to neurons that release acetylcholine, but may be present wherever large amounts of choline are required.

  5. Calcium-independent effects of TMB-8. Modification of phospholipid metabolism in neuroblastoma cells by inhibition of choline uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, F B; Byers, D M; Spence, M W; Cook, H W

    1992-01-01

    TMB-8 [8-(NN-diethylamino)-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate] blocks agonist-stimulated release of Ca2+ from intracellular sites in many cell lines and is often used to distinguish between dependence on extracellular and intracellular Ca2+. In N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells, TMB-8 did not alter the resting cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in unstimulated cells, yet phospholipid metabolism was greatly affected. At concentrations of TMB-8 (25-150 microM) that inhibit Ca2+ release, phosphatidylcholine formation was inhibited, whereas synthesis of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylserine was stimulated. Unlike other cationic amphipathic compounds, TMB-8 did not inhibit phosphatidate phosphatase or enzymes in the pathway from choline to phosphatidylcholine. Choline transport was the major site of action. TMB-8 was a competitive inhibitor (Ki = 10 microM) of low-affinity (Kt = 20 microM) choline transport. When added at the same time as labelled precursor, TMB-8 also decreased cellular uptake of phosphate and inositol, but not that of ethanolamine or serine. In prelabelled cells, continued uptake and incorporation of phosphate and inositol were not affected. Under these conditions phosphatidylinositol synthesis was increased 2-fold and, like the effect on phosphatidylcholine, reached a plateau at 100 microM-TMB-8. Phosphatidylglycerol synthesis increased linearly with TMB-8 concentration to 40-fold stimulation at 150 microM, suggesting a selective effect on synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol from CDP-diacylglycerol. Phosphatidylserine synthesis was also increased up to 3-fold. These Ca(2+)-independent effects limit the use of TMB-8 in studies of cell signalling that involve stimulated phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine metabolism. PMID:1530583

  6. Human TMEM30a promotes uptake of antitumor and bioactive choline phospholipids into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Brady, Erin; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2011-03-01

    Antitumor alkylphospholipids initiate apoptosis in transformed HL-60 and Jurkat cells while sparing their progenitors. 1-O-Alkyl-2-carboxymethyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (Edelfosine) like other short-chained phospholipids--inflammatory platelet-activating factor (PAF) and apoptotic oxidatively truncated phospholipids--are proposed to have intracellular sites of action, yet a conduit for these choline phospholipids into mammalian cells is undefined. Edelfosine is also accumulated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a process requiring the membrane protein Lem3p, and the human genome contains a Lem3p homolog TMEM30a. We show that import of choline phospholipids into S. cerevisiae ΔLem3 is partially reconstituted by human TMEM30a and by Lem3p-TMEM30a chimeras, showing the proteins are orthologous. TMEM30a-GFP chimeras expressed in mammalian cells localized in plasma membranes, as well as internal organelles, and ectopic TMEM30a expression promoted uptake of exogenous choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of TMEM30a reduced fluorescent choline phospholipid and [(3)H]PAF import. This knockdown also reduced mitochondrial depolarization from exogenous Edelfosine or the mitotoxic oxidatively truncated phospholipid azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine, and the knockdown reduced apoptosis in response to these two phospholipids. These results show that extracellular choline phospholipids with short sn-2 residues can have intracellular roles and sites of metabolism because they are transport substrates for a TMEM30a phospholipid import system. Variation in this mechanism could limit sensitivity to short chain choline phospholipids such as Edelfosine, PAF, and proapoptotic phospholipids.

  7. The human organic cation transporter OCT1 mediates high affinity uptake of the anticancer drug daunorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Emil; Brosseau, Nicolas; Carmona, Euridice; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines such as daunorubicin are anticancer agents that are transported into cells, and exert cytotoxicity by blocking DNA metabolism. Although there is evidence for active uptake of anthracyclines into cells, the specific transporter involved in this process has not been identified. Using the high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell line TOV2223G, we show that OCT1 mediated the high affinity (Km ~ 5 μM) uptake of daunorubicin into the cells, and that micromolar amounts of choline completely abolished the drug entry. OCT1 downregulation by shRNA impaired daunorubicin uptake into the TOV2223G cells, and these cells were significantly more resistant to the drug in comparison to the control shRNA. Transfection of HEK293T cells, which accommodated the ectopic expression of OCT1, with a plasmid expressing OCT1-EYFP showed that the transporter was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. These transfected cells exhibited an increase in the uptake of daunorubicin in comparison to control cells transfected with an empty EYFP vector. Furthermore, a variant of OCT1, OCT1-D474C-EYFP, failed to enhance daunorubicin uptake. This is the first report demonstrating that human OCT1 is involved in the high affinity transport of anthracyclines. We postulate that OCT1 defects may contribute to the resistance of cancer cells treated with anthracyclines. PMID:26861753

  8. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  9. Osmotic stress response in Acinetobacter baylyi: identification of a glycine-betaine biosynthesis pathway and regulation of osmoadaptive choline uptake and glycine-betaine synthesis through a choline-responsive BetI repressor.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Anica; Stahl, Julia; de Berardinis, Veronique; Müller, Volker; Averhoff, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi, a ubiquitous soil bacterium, can cope with high salinity by uptake of choline as precursor of the compatible solute glycine betaine. Here, we report on the identification of a choline dehydrogenase (BetA) and a glycine betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BetB) mediating the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine. The betAB genes were found to form an operon together with the potential transcriptional regulator betI. The transcription of the betIBA operon and the two recently identified choline transporters was upregulated in response to choline and choline plus salt. The finding that the osmo-independent transporter BetT1 undergoes a higher upregulation in response to choline alone than betT2 suggests that BetT1 does not primarily function in osmoadaptation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays led to the conclusion that BetI mediates transcriptional regulation of both, the betIBA gene operon and the choline transporters. BetI was released from the DNA in response to choline which together with the transcriptional upregulation of the bet genes in the presence of choline suggests that BetI is a choline sensing transcriptional repressor.

  10. Self-assembling choline mimicks with enhanced binding affinities to C-LytA protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Jingyu; Long, Jiafu; Yang, Zhimou; Ding, Dan

    2014-10-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) causes multiple illnesses in humans. Exploration of effective inhibitors with multivalent attachment sites for choline-binding modules is of great importance to reduce the pneumococcal virulence. In this work, we successfully developed two self-assembling choline mimicks, Ada-GFFYKKK' and Nap-GFFYKKK', which have the abilities to self-assemble into nanoparticles and nanofibers, respectively, yielding multivalent architectures. Additionally, the best characterized choline-binding module, C-terminal moiety of the pneumococcal cell-wall amidase LytA (C-LytA) was also produced with high purity. The self-assembling Ada-GFFYKKK' and Nap-GFFYKKK' show strong interactions with C-LytA, which possess much higher association constant values to the choline-binding modules as compared to the individual peptide Fmoc-K'. This study thus provides a self-assembly approach to yield inhibitors that are very promising for reducing the pneumococcal virulence.

  11. Uptake of /sup 3/H-choline and synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine by human penile corpus cavernosum

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Azadzoi, K.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The neuroeffectors which relax penile smooth muscle and lead to erection are unknown; physiological studies of human corpus cavernosum, in vitro, have suggested a significant role of cholinergic neurotransmission. To further characterize the importance of cholinergic nerves, biopsies of human corpus cavernosum were obtained at the time of penile prosthesis implantation. Tissues were incubated in /sup 3/H-choline (10/sup -5/M, 80 Ci/mmol) in oxygenated physiological salt solution at 37/sup 0/C, pH 7.4 for 1 hour. Radiolabelled compounds were extracted with perchloric acid (0.4 M) and acetylcholine and choline were separated by HPLC; /sup 14/C-acetylcholine was used as internal standard. /sup 3/H-choline was accumulated by the tissues (20 +/- 1.9 fmol/mg), and /sup 3/H-acetylcholine was synthesized (4.0 +/- 1.1 fmol/mg). In control experiments, heating of the tissue blocked synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine. Inhibition of high affinity choline transport by hemicholinium-3 (10/sup -5/M) diminished tissue accumulation of /sup 3/H-choline and significantly reduced the synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine (0.5 +/ 0.2 fmol/mg, p < 0.05). These results provide direct evidence of neuronal accumulation of choline and enzymatic conversion to acetylcholine in human corpus cavernosum. Taken together with the physiological studies, it can be concluded that cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum plays a role in penile erection.

  12. Inhibition of the high affinity choline transporter enhances hyperalgesia in a rat model of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Chen, Lei; Yu, Baoping

    2017-06-17

    The mechanisms underlying chronic and persistent pain associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) are not completely understood. The cholinergic system is one of the major neural pathways of the pancreas. Meanwhile, this system plays an important role in chronic pain. We hypothesized that the high affinity choline transporter CHT1, which is a main determinant of cholinergic signaling capacity, is involved in regulating pain associated with CP. CP was induced by intraductal injection of 2% trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Pathological examination was used to evaluate the inflammation of pancreas and hyperalgesia was assessed by measuring the number of withdrawal events evoked by application of the von Frey filaments. CHT1 expression in pancreas-specific dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) was assessed through immunohistochemistry and western blotting. We also intraperitoneally injected the rats with hemicholinium-3 (HC-3, a specific inhibitor of CHT1). Then we observed its effects on the visceral hyperalgesia induced by CP, and on the acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the DRGs through using an acetylcholine/acetylcholinesterase assay kit. Signs of CP were observed 21 days after TNBS injection. Rats subjected to TNBS infusions had increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the abdomen. CHT1-immunoreactive cells were increased in the DRGs from rats with CP compared to naive or sham rats. Western blots indicated that CHT1 expression was significantly up-regulated in TNBS-treated rats when compared to naive or sham-operated rats at all time points following surgery. In the TNBS group, CHT1 expression was higher on day 28 than on day 7 or day 14, but there was no statistical difference in CHT1 expression on day 28 vs. day 21. Treatment with HC-3 (60 μg/kg, 80 μg/kg, or 100 μg/kg) markedly enhanced the mechanical hyperalgesia and reduced ACh levels in a dose-dependent manner in rats with CP. We report for the first time that CHT1 may be involved

  13. Low-affinity Na+ uptake in the halophyte Suaeda maritima.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suo-Min; Zhang, Jin-Lin; Flowers, Timothy J

    2007-10-01

    Na(+) uptake by plant roots has largely been explored using species that accumulate little Na(+) into their shoots. By way of contrast, the halophyte Suaeda maritima accumulates, without injury, concentrations of the order of 400 mM NaCl in its leaves. Here we report that cAMP and Ca(2+) (blockers of nonselective cation channels) and Li(+) (a competitive inhibitor of Na(+) uptake) did not have any significant effect on the uptake of Na(+) by the halophyte S. maritima when plants were in 25 or 150 mM NaCl (150 mM NaCl is near optimal for growth). However, the inhibitors of K(+) channels, TEA(+) (10 mM), Cs(+) (3 mM), and Ba(2+) (5 mM), significantly reduced the net uptake of Na(+) from 150 mM NaCl over 48 h, by 54%, 24%, and 29%, respectively. TEA(+) (10 mM), Cs(+) (3 mM), and Ba(2+) (1 mm) also significantly reduced (22)Na(+) influx (measured over 2 min in 150 mM external NaCl) by 47%, 30%, and 31%, respectively. In contrast to the situation in 150 mm NaCl, neither TEA(+) (1-10 mM) nor Cs(+) (0.5-10 mM) significantly reduced net Na(+) uptake or (22)Na(+) influx in 25 mM NaCl. Ba(2+) (at 5 mm) did significantly decrease net Na(+) uptake (by 47%) and (22)Na(+) influx (by 36% with 1 mM Ba(2+)) in 25 mM NaCl. K(+) (10 or 50 mM) had no effect on (22)Na(+) influx at concentrations below 75 mM NaCl, but the influx of (22)Na(+) was inhibited by 50 mM K(+) when the external concentration of NaCl was above 75 mM. The data suggest that neither nonselective cation channels nor a low-affinity cation transporter are major pathways for Na(+) entry into root cells. We propose that two distinct low-affinity Na(+) uptake pathways exist in S. maritima: Pathway 1 is insensitive to TEA(+) or Cs(+), but sensitive to Ba(2+) and mediates Na(+) uptake under low salinities (25 mM NaCl); pathway 2 is sensitive to TEA(+), Cs(+), and Ba(2+) and mediates Na(+) uptake under higher external salt concentrations (150 mM NaCl). Pathway 1 might be mediated by a high-affinity K transporter

  14. Uptake and utilization of CDP-choline in primary brain cell cultures from fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Vecchini, A; Binaglia, L; Floridi, A; Palmerini, C A; Procellati, G

    1983-03-01

    The utilization of double-labeled CDP-choline by cultured brain cells has been studied. CDP-choline is demonstrated to be rapidly hydrolysed into CMP and choline phosphate. The fragments, or their hydrolysis products, penetrate into the cells and are utilized for lipid synthesis. At short times after the isotope administration a rapid labeling of phosphatidylcholine was detected, when cells were incubated with CDP-choline. The same was not seen when cells were incubated with labeled choline. From these observations it can be inferred that either CDP- choline can penetrate the cell membrane or that some mechanism involving CDP-choline and leading to phospholipid synthesis can work at the external surface of the plasma membranes.

  15. Effects of Flutamide on [Methyl-3H]-Choline Uptake in Human Prostate Cancer-3 Cells: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saeedi, Fatma

    2007-01-01

    Background: Positron emission tomography using [methyl-11C]-choline is effective in imaging many types of cancer, especially prostate cancer (PC). The antiandrogen flutamide is often used as part of the initial treatment of PC. Data on the effect of flutamide on and methylcholine incorporation into PC-3 cells are lacking in the experimental and literature work. Objectives: The aims of this study were to assess whether human PC-3 cells are susceptible to flutamide and whether the drug modulates the uptake of [methyl-3H]-choline into these cells. Methods: PC-3 cells were treated for 3 days with flutamide (≤100 nmol/L), inhibiting growth by 20% to 70% with control cells included. Two viability tests (cytotoxic analyses), the thiazole blue assay and the trypan blue exclusion method, were used to determine the median inhibitory concentration for flutamide (10 nmol/L). Control and flutamide-treated cells were incubated with [methyl-3H]-choline for 10 minutes and then in nonradioactive medium for 10 minutes to simulate the rapid blood clearance of [methyl-11C]-choline tracer that occurs within 5 to 20 minutes, and then extracted using organic and aqueous solvents to determine the intracellular distribution of the tracer. Protein assay and flow-cytometry analysis were used to determine protein content and DNA synthesis in both control and treated cells. The uptake of [methyl-3H]-choline was normalized to protein content and expressed as mean (SD) dpm/1Jg protein (n = 6). Results: PC-3 cell proliferation was inhibited with flutamide treatment. After treatment of PC-3 cells with flutamide 10 nmol/L for 3 days, cells accumulated DNA during the S phase. Mean (SD) [methyl-3H]-choline uptake was found to be significantly lower with flutamide 10-nmol/L-treated cells compared with control cells (65.95 [0.72] vs 114.21 [0.57] dpm/1Jg protein; P < 0.001); the difference between the 5-nmol/L-treated cells and controls was nonsignificant. Conclusions: In this pilot study, flutamide

  16. Low and high affinity receptors mediate cellular uptake of heparanase

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Zaken, Olga; Shafat, Itay; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Bangio, Haim; Kelson, Idil Kasuto; Alergand, Tal; Amor, Yehudit; Maya, Ruth Ben-Yakar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2008-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase which cleaves heparan sulfate and hence participates in degradation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Importantly, heparanase activity correlated with the metastatic potential of tumor-derived cells, attributed to enhanced cell dissemination as a consequence of heparan sulfate cleavage and remodeling of the extracellular matrix barrier. Heparanase has been characterized as a glycoprotein, yet glycan biochemical analysis was not performed to date. Here, we applied the Qproteome™ GlycoArray kit to perform glycan analysis of heparanase, and compared the kit results with the more commonly used biochemical analyses. We employed fibroblasts isolated from patients with I-cell disease (mucolipidosis II), fibroblasts deficient of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and fibroblasts lacking mannose 6-phosphate receptor, to explore the role of mannose 6-phosphate in heparanase uptake. Iodinated heparanase has been utilized to calculate binding affinity. We provide evidence for hierarchy of binding to cellular receptors as a function of heparanase concentration. We report the existence of a high affinity, low abundant (i.e., low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, mannose 6-phosphate receptor), as well as a low affinity, high abundant (i.e., heparan sulfate proteoglycan) receptors that mediate heparanase binding, and suggest that these receptors cooperate to establish high affinity binding sites for heparanase, thus maintaining extracellular retention of the enzyme tightly regulated. PMID:17981072

  17. Human TMEM30a Promotes Uptake of Anti-tumor and Bioactive Choline Phospholipids into Mammalian Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Brady, Erin; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumor alkylphospholipids initiate apoptosis in transformed HL-60 and Jurkat cells while sparing their progenitors. Edelfosine like other short-chained phospholipids—inflammatory Platelet-activating Factor (PAF) and apoptotic oxidatively-truncated phospholipids—are proposed to have intracellular sites of action, yet a conduit for these choline phospholipids into mammalian cells is undefined. Edelfosine is also accumulated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in process requiring the membrane protein Lem3p, and the human genome contains a Lem3p homolog TMEM30a. We show import of choline phospholipids into S. cerevisiae ⊗Lem3 is partially reconstituted by human TMEM30a and by Lem3p-TMEM30a chimeras, showing the proteins are orthologous. TMEM30a-GFP chimeras expressed in mammalian cells localized in plasma membranes, as well as internal organelles, and ectopic TMEM30a expression promoted uptake of exogenous choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. shRNA knockdown of TMEM30a reduced fluorescent choline phospholipid and [3H]PAF import. This knockdown also reduced mitochondrial depolarization from exogenous Edelfosine or the mitotoxic oxidatively truncated phospholipid azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine, and the knockdown reduced apoptosis in response to these two phospholipids. These results show extracellular choline phospholipids with short sn-2 residues can have intracellular roles and sites of metabolism because they are transport substrates for a TMEM30a phospholipid import system. Variation in this mechanism could limit sensitivity to short-chain choline phospholipids such as Edelfosine, PAF, and pro-apoptotic phospholipids. PMID:21289302

  18. MKC-231, a choline uptake enhancer, ameliorates working memory deficits and decreased hippocampal acetylcholine induced by ethylcholine aziridinium ion in mice.

    PubMed

    Murai, S; Saito, H; Abe, E; Masuda, Y; Odashima, J; Itoh, T

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acute and chronic administration of MKC-231, a new choline uptake enhancer, and two other nootropic agents, linopiridine (Dup 996) and tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) on working memory deficits and decreased hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) content were studied in a delayed non-matching to sample task, using a T-maze, in ethylcholine aziridinium ion (AF64A)-treated mice. Treatment with AF64A (3.5 nmol, i.c.v.) produced memory deficits and decreased hippocampal ACh content. In acute behavioral experiments, MKC-231 and THA had no significant effect on AF64A-induced memory deficits at any doses tested (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg), whereas Dup 996, at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg, significantly improved memory deficits. In chronic experiments, MKC-231 improved memory deficit at all doses tested (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg p.o., once daily for 11 days) and Dup 996 did so only at a dose of 3.0 mg/kg, whereas THA did not improve memory deficit at any doses tested. In acute neurochemical experiments, MKC-231 and THA did not reverse the AF64A-induced hippocampal ACh depletion. Dup 996, however, further decreased hippocampal ACh content compared to that in the AF64A-treated group. In chronic experiments, MKC-231 significantly reversed hippocampal ACh depletion at doses of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg, whereas neither Dup 996 nor THA reversed hippocampal ACh depletion at any doses tested. These results indicate that MKC-231 improved the AF64A-induced working memory deficit and hippocampal ACh depletion, probably by recovering reduced high-affinity choline uptake and ACh release.

  19. Choline transport via choline transporter-like protein 1 in conditionally immortalized rat syncytiotrophoblast cell lines TR-TBT.

    PubMed

    Lee, N-Y; Choi, H-M; Kang, Y-S

    2009-04-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for phospholipids and acetylcholine biosynthesis in normal development of fetus. In the present study, we investigated the functional characteristics of choline transport system and inhibitory effect of cationic drugs on choline transport in rat conditionally immortalized syncytiotrophoblast cell line (TR-TBT). Choline transport was weakly Na(+) dependent and significantly influenced by extracellular pH and by membrane depolarization. The transport process of choline is saturable with Michaelis-Menten constants (K(m)) of 68microM and 130microM in TR-TBT 18d-1 and TR-TBT 18d-2 respectively. Choline uptake in the cells was inhibited by unlabeled choline and hemicholinium-3 as well as various organic cations including guanidine, amiloride and acetylcholine. However, the prototypical organic cation tetraethylammonium and cimetidine showed very little inhibitory effect of choline uptake in TR-TBT cells. RT-PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) are expressed in TR-TBT cells. The transport properties of choline in TR-TBT cells were similar or identical to that of CTL1 but not OCT2. CTL1 was also detected in human placenta. In addition, several cationic drugs such as diphenhydramine and verapamil competitively inhibited choline uptake in TR-TBT 18d-1 with K(i) of 115microM and 55microM, respectively. Our results suggest that choline transport system, which has intermediate affinity and weakly Na(+) dependent, in TR-TBT seems to occur through a CTL1 and this system may have relevance with the uptake of pharmacologically important organic cation drugs.

  20. The sea urchin embryo as a model for mammalian developmental neurotoxicity: ontogenesis of the high-affinity choline transporter and its role in cholinergic trophic activity.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dan; Nikitina, Lyudmila A; Buznikov, Gennady A; Lauder, Jean M; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2003-11-01

    Embryonic development in the sea urchin requires trophic actions of the same neurotransmitters that participate in mammalian brain assembly. We evaluated the development of the high-affinity choline transporter, which controls acetylcholine synthesis. A variety of developmental neurotoxicants affect this transporter in mammalian brain. [3H]Hemicholinium-3 binding to the transporter was found in the cell membrane fraction at stages from the unfertilized egg to pluteus, with a binding affinity comparable with that seen in mammalian brain. Over the course of development, the concentration of transporter sites rose more than 3-fold, achieving concentrations comparable with those of cholinergically enriched mammalian brain regions. Dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), a competitive inhibitor of choline transport, elicited dysmorphology beginning at the mid-blastula stage, with anomalies beginning progressively later as the concentration of DMAE was lowered. Pretreatment, cotreatment, or delayed treatment with acetylcholine or choline prevented the adverse effects of DMAE. Because acetylcholine was protective at a lower threshold, the DMAE-induced defects were most likely mediated by its effects on acetylcholine synthesis. Transient removal of the hyaline layer enabled a charged transport inhibitor, hemicholinium-3, to penetrate sufficiently to elicit similar anomalies, which were again prevented by acetylcholine or choline. These results indicate that the developing sea urchin possesses a high-affinity choline transporter analogous to that found in the mammalian brain, and, as in mammals, the functioning of this transporter plays a key role in the developmental, trophic activity of acetylcholine. The sea urchin model may thus be useful in high-throughput screening of suspected developmental neurotoxicants.

  1. Evaluation of Thr(6)-bradykinin purified from Polybia occidentalis wasp venom in the choline uptake of mammal cortices.

    PubMed

    Mortari, Márcia Renata; Cunha, Alexandra Olimpio Siqueira; Carolino, Ruither Oliveira Gomes; Silva, Juliana de Castro E; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Santos, Wagner Ferreira Dos

    2016-12-01

    Thr(6)-bradykinin is a peptide found in the venom of social and solitary wasps. This kinin, along with other bradykinin-like peptides, is known to cause irreversible paralysis in insects by presynaptic blockade of cholinergic transmission. However, this activity has never been tested in mammals. As such, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Thr(6)-bradykinin on the cholinergic system of rats. The peptide was isolated from the venom of the Neotropical social wasp Polybia occidentalis Olivier (Vespidae). After correct identification and quantification by ESI-MS and MS/MS, the peptide was tested in [(14)C]-choline uptake using rat cortical synaptosomes. Each uptake assay was accompanied by lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) activity measurement to evaluate synaptosome integrity in the presence of six increasing concentrations of BK or Thr(6)-BK (0.039, 0.156, 0.625, 2.500, 10.000 and 40.000 μM). Data revealed that neither BK nor Thr(6)-BK at any of the six concentrations tested (from 0.039 to 40.000 μM) affected [(14)C]-choline uptake in synaptosomes. Moreover, there was no increase in LDH in the supernatants, indicating that BK and Thr(6)-BK did not disrupt the synaptosomes. In contrast to previous reports for the insect central nervous system (CNS), Thr(6)-BK had no effect on mammalian cholinergic transmission. Nevertheless, this selectivity for the insect CNS, combined with its irreversible mode of action may be relevant to the discovery of new sources of insecticides and could contribute to understanding the role of kinins in the mammalian CNS.

  2. AGE-RELATED EFFECTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS ON HIGH AFFINITY CHOLINE UPTAKE IN RAT BRAIN. (R825811)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Functional expression of choline transporter like-protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Iwao, Beniko; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Kawai, Yuiko; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Inazu, Masato

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs). Choline uptake into hBMECs was a saturable process that was mediated by a Na(+)-independent, membrane potential and pH-dependent transport system. The cells have two different [(3)H]choline transport systems with Km values of 35.0 ± 4.9 μM and 54.1 ± 8.1 μM, respectively. Choline uptake was inhibited by choline, acetylcholine (ACh) and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3). Various organic cations also interacted with the choline transport system. Choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 mRNA were highly expressed, while mRNA for high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) were not expressed in hBMECs. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were localized to brain microvascular endothelial cells in human brain cortical sections. Both CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were expressed on the plasma membrane and mitochondria. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins are mainly expressed in plasma membrane and mitochondria, respectively. We conclude that choline is mainly transported via an intermediate-affinity choline transport system, CTL1 and CTL2, in hBMECs. These transporters are responsible for the uptake of extracellular choline and organic cations. CTL2 participate in choline transport mainly in mitochondria, and may be the major site for the control of choline oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cadmium inhibits the induction of high-affinity nitrate uptake in maize (Zea mays L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Rizzardo, Cecilia; Tomasi, Nicola; Monte, Rossella; Varanini, Zeno; Nocito, Fabio F; Cesco, Stefano; Pinton, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) detoxification involves glutathione and phytochelatins biosynthesis: the higher need of nitrogen should require increased nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake and metabolism. We investigated inducible high-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake across the plasma membrane (PM) in maize seedlings roots upon short exposure (10 min to 24 h) to low Cd concentrations (0, 1 or 10 μM): the activity and gene transcript abundance of high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters, NO(3)(-) reductases and PM H(+)-ATPases were analyzed. Exposure to 1 mM NO(3)(-) led to a peak in high-affinity (0.2 mM) NO(3)(-) uptake rate (induction), which was markedly lowered in Cd-treated roots. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity was also strongly limited, while internal NO(3)(-) accumulation and NO(3)(-) reductase activity in extracts of Cd treated roots were only slightly lowered. Kinetics of high- and low-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake showed that Cd rapidly (10 min) blocked the inducible high-affinity transport system; the constitutive high-affinity transport system appeared not vulnerable to Cd and the low-affinity transport system appeared to be less affected and only after a prolonged exposure (12 h). Cd-treatment also modified transcript levels of genes encoding high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters (ZmNTR2.1, ZmNRT2.2), PM H(+)-ATPases (ZmMHA3, ZmMHA4) and NO(3)(-) reductases (ZmNR1, ZmNADH:NR). Despite an expectable increase in NO(3)(-) demand, a negative effect of Cd on NO(3)(-) nutrition is reported. Cd effect results in alterations at the physiological and transcriptional levels of NO(3)(-) uptake from the external solution and it is particularly severe on the inducible high-affinity anion transport system. Furthermore, Cd would limit the capacity of the plant to respond to changes in NO(3) (-) availability.

  5. Effect of spleen-cell-conditioned medium on [3H]-choline uptake by retinal cells in vitro is mediated by IL-2.

    PubMed

    Sholl-Franco, A; Marques, P M; Paes-De-Carvalho, R; de Araujo, E G

    2000-01-01

    Cytokines are essential molecules throughout the development of the nervous system and also play an important role during the adult life span. In the present work, we analyzed in vitro the effect of spleen-cell-conditioned medium (SCM) on the survival and [3H]-choline uptake of neonatal rat retinal cells. SCM induced an increase in neuronal survival, glial cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth, as evaluated by biochemical and morphological criteria. These effects were time dependent; after 120 h, SCM induced a 6-fold increase in the total protein level. The effect of SCM was blocked both by the inhibition of protein tyrosine kinase activity (10 microM genistein) and by the inhibition of cell division (20 microM fluorodeoxyuridine). SCM also increased the uptake of [3H]-choline by retinal cells. The effect was time dependent. The maximum effect was obtained after 48 h and was maintained at a high level until 120 h. Treatment by 10 microM genistein and 15 microM bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM) (an intracellular calcium chelator) completely blocked this effect. However, 20 microM fluorodeoxyuridine did not abolish it. Conditioned medium obtained from glial cells stimulated with SCM (S-GCM) induced an effect on [3H]-choline uptake earlier than that promoted by SCM. Anti-interleukin-2 (IL-2) antibodies blocked the effect of both SCM and S-GCM on [3H]-choline uptake after 48 and 72 h. IL-2 (50 U/ml) elicited the same effect as that observed when the cells were maintained in the presence of SCM. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-2 plays an important role in controlling the survival and differentiation of retinal cells in vitro.

  6. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis.

  7. Kinetics and autoradiography of high affinity uptake of serotonin by primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, D.M.; Kimelberg, H.K.

    1985-07-01

    Primary astrocyte cultures prepared from the cerebral cortices of neonatal rats showed significant accumulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; (/sup 3/H)-5-HT). At concentrations in the range of 0.01 to 0.7 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT, this uptake was 50 to 85% Na+ dependent and gave a Km of 0.40 +/- 0.11 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT and a Vmax of 6.42 +/- 0.85 (+/- SEM) pmol of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT/mg of protein/4 min for the Na+-dependent component. In the absence of Na+ the uptake was nonsaturable. Omission of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline markedly reduced the Na+-dependent component of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake but had a negligible effect on the Na+-independent component. This suggest significant oxidative deamination of serotonin after it has been taken up by the high affinity system, followed by release of its metabolite. The authors estimated that this system enabled the cells to concentrate (/sup 3/H)-5-HT up to 44-fold at an external (/sup 3/H)-5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake by a number of clinically effective antidepressants was also consistent with a specific high affinity uptake mechanism for 5-HT, the order of effectiveness of inhibition being chlorimipramine greater than fluoxetine greater than imipramine = amitriptyline greater than desmethylimipramine greater than iprindole greater than mianserin. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT was dependent on the presence of Cl- as well as Na+ in the medium, and the effect of omission of both ions was nonadditive. Varying the concentration of K+ in the media from 1 to 50 mM had a limited effect on (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake.

  8. Effect of hemoglobin on the uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and /sup 3/H-choline chloride into porcine cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Linnik, M.D.; Lee, T.J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries often follows subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). SAH exposes hemoglobin (Hb) to cerebral arteries and Hb has been demonstrated to induce vasoconstriction as well as alter cerebrovascular neurogenic response characteristics. The effect of Hb on uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (/sup 3/H-NE) and /sup 3/H-choline chloride (/sup 3/H-ChCl) into porcine cerebral arteries was therefore examined. 0.5 to 50 ..mu..M porcine Hb caused a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 3/H-NE uptake into the anterior (ANT), internal carotid (IC) and middle cerebral (MC) arteries of the pig. IC/sub 50/ values for uptake inhibition were: ANT, 31 ..mu..M; IC, 34 ..mu..M; MC, 37 ..mu..M. Porcine serum albumin (PSA) in the same concentration range also caused a decrease in /sup 3/H-NE uptake. An examination of protein-ligand interactions using column chromatography demonstrated binding of /sup 3/H-NE by both Hb and PSA. This protein binding may be responsible for part of the uptake inhibition. Hb and PSA had little effect on /sup 3/H-ChCl uptake into these arteries.

  9. Characterization of the low affinity transport system for NO(3)(-) uptake by Citrus roots.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, M; Flors, V; Legaz, F; García-Agustín, P

    2000-12-07

    Three-month old citrange Troyer (hybrid of Citrus sinensis x Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings were grown hydroponically and, after a period of NO(3)(-) starvation, plants were transferred to solutions enriched with K(15)NO(3) (96% atoms 15N excess) to measure 15NO(3)(-) uptake rates as a function of external 15NO(3)(-) concentrations. Two different NO(3)(-) uptake systems were found. Between 1 and 50 mM 15NO(3)(-) in the uptake solution medium, the uptake rate increased linearly due to the low affinity transport system (LATS). Nitrate reductase activity showed the same response to external [NO(3)(-)], and also appears to be regulated by the rate of nitrate uptake. Nitrate pre-treatments had a represive effect on NO(3)(-) uptake rate measured at 5 or 30 mM external [15NO(3)(-)]. The extent of the inhibition depended on the [NO(3)(-)] during the pre-treatment and in the uptake solution. These results suggest that the LATS of Citrus seedlings is under feedback control by the N status of the plant. Accordingly, addition of amino acids (Glu, Asp, Asn, Gln) to the uptake solution resulted in a decrease in 15NO(3)(-) uptake rate. However, the inactivation of nitrate reductase activity after treatment of the seedlings with either 100 or 500 µM WO(4)(2-) did not affect the activity of the LATS. Metabolic uncouplers, 2,4-DNP and KCN, reduced the uptake rate by 43.3% and 41.4% respectively at 5mM external [15NO(3)(-)]. However, these compounds had little effect when 15NO(3)(-) uptake was assayed at 30 mM external concentration. The ATPase inhibitors DCCD and DES reduced 15NO(3)(-) uptake by 68.8%-35.6%, at both external [15NO(3)(-)]. Nitrate uptake by the LATS declined with the increase of the solution pH beyond pH 4. The data presented are discussed in the context of the kinetics, energy dependence and regulation of NO(3)(-) uptake.

  10. Ectoine and hydroxyectoine as protectants against osmotic and cold stress: uptake through the SigB-controlled betaine-choline- carnitine transporter-type carrier EctT from Virgibacillus pantothenticus.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Anne U; Hoffmann, Tamara; Bursy, Jan; Jebbar, Mohamed; Bremer, Erhard

    2011-09-01

    Virgibacillus pantothenticus has been shown to synthesize the compatible solute ectoine in response to high salinity or low growth temperature. We found that exogenously provided ectoine and hydroxyectoine also serve as protectants against these challenges. Transport studies with [(14)C]ectoine revealed that both types of stress induced a high-affinity ectoine uptake activity in V. pantothenticus. By using an Escherichia coli mutant defective in osmoprotectant uptake systems, a functional complementation approach for osmostress resistance in the presence of ectoine was employed to retrieve a gene encoding an ectoine transporter from V. pantothenticus. The cloned gene (ectT) encodes a protein (EctT) that is a member of the BCCT (betaine-choline-carnitine-transporter) family of carriers. Osmoprotection assays demonstrated that the EctT carrier mediates the preferential import of ectoine and hydroxyectoine but also possesses minor uptake activities for the compatible solutes proline and glycine betaine. Northern blot analysis with RNA isolated from V. pantothenticus revealed that a rise in the external osmolality or a reduction in growth temperature strongly increased the transcription of the ectT gene. Primer extension analysis demonstrated that ectT was transcribed under these conditions from a SigB-type promoter. SigB is the master regulator of the general stress regulon of bacilli and provides protection to cells against various challenges, including high salinity and low temperature. Both the synthesis of ectoine and the EctT-mediated uptake of ectoine and hydroxyectoine are triggered by the same environmental cues, high salinity and cold stress, and thereby provide, in a concerted fashion, the protection of V. pantothenticus against these challenges.

  11. High and Low Affinity Urea Root Uptake: Involvement of NIP5;1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huayiu; Menz, Jochen; Häussermann, Iris; Benz, Martin; Fujiwara, Toru; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Urea is the most widespread nitrogen (N) fertilizer worldwide and is rapidly degraded in soil to ammonium by urease. Ammonium is either taken up by plant roots or is further processed to nitrate by soil microorganisms. However, urea can be taken up by roots and is further degraded to ammonium by plant urease for assimilation. When urea is supplied under sterile conditions, it acts as a poor N source for seedlings or adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Here, the gene expression of young seedlings exposed to urea and ammonium nitrate nutrition was compared. Several primary metabolism and transport genes, including those for nitrate and urea, were differentially expressed in seedlings. However, urease and most major intrinsic proteins were not differentially expressed, with the exception of NIP6;1, a urea-permeable channel, which was repressed. Furthermore, little overlap with the gene expression with ammonium as the sole N source was observed, confirming that pure urea nutrition is not associated with the ammonium toxicity syndrome in seedlings. The direct root uptake of urea was increased under boron deficiency, in both the high and low affinity range. This activity was entirely mediated by the NIP5;1 channel, which was confirmed to transport urea when expressed in oocytes. The uptake of urea in the high and low affinity range was also determined for maize and wheat roots. The urea uptake by maize roots was only about half that of wheat, but was not stimulated by boron deficiency or N deficiency in either species. This analysis identifies novel components of the urea uptake systems in plants, which may become agronomically relevant to urea uptake and utilization, as stabilized urea fertilizers become increasingly popular. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Regulation of high affinity iron uptake in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Role of dioxygen and Fe.

    PubMed

    Hassett, R F; Romeo, A M; Kosman, D J

    1998-03-27

    High affinity iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires a metal reductase, a multicopper ferroxidase, and an iron permease. Fet3, the apparent ferroxidase, is proposed to facilitate iron uptake by catalyzing the oxidation of reductase-generated Fe(II) to Fe(III) by O2; in this model, Fe(III) is the substrate for the iron permease, encoded by FTR1 (Kaplan, J., and O'Halloran, T. V. (1996) Science 271, 1510-1512). We show here that dioxygen also plays an essential role in the expression of these iron uptake activities. Cells grown anaerobically exhibited no Fe(III) reductase or high affinity iron uptake activity, even if assayed for these activities under air. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of those mRNAs encoding proteins associated with this uptake was repressed in anaerobic cultures but was rapidly induced by exposure of the culture to dioxygen. The anaerobic repression was reduced in cells expressing an iron-independent form of the trans-activator, Aft1, a protein that regulates the expression of these proteins. Thus, the effect of oxygenation on this expression appeared due at least in part to the state or distribution of iron in the cells. In support of this hypothesis, the membrane-permeant Fe(II) chelator, 2, 2'-bipyridyl, in contrast to the impermeant chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate, caused a strong and rapid induction of these transcripts under anaerobic conditions. An increase in the steady-state levels of iron-regulated transcripts upon oxygenation or 2,2'-bipyridyl addition occurred within 5 min, indicating that a relatively small, labile intracellular pool of Fe(II) regulates the expression of these activities. The strength of the anaerobic repression was dependent on the low affinity, Fe(II)-specific iron transporter, encoded by FET4, suggesting that this Fe(II) pool was linked in part to iron brought into the cell via Fet4 protein. The data suggest a model in which dioxygen directly or indirectly modulates the Fe

  13. High-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in cultured glial and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Balcar, V J; Mark, J; Borg, J; Mandel, P

    1979-06-01

    Both glial and neuronal cells maintained in primary culture were found to accumulate [3H]GABA by an efficient "high-affinity" uptake system (apparent Km = 9 muM, Vmax = 0.018 and 0.584 nmol/mg/min, respectively) which required sodium ions and was inhibited by 1 mM ouabain. Strychnine and parachloromercuriphenylsulfonate (pCS) (both at 1mM) also strongly inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, but metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol, potassium cyanide, and malonate) were without effect. Only three structural analogs of GABA (nipecotate, beta-alanine, and 2,4-diaminobutyrate) inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, while several other compounds with structural similarities to GABA (e.g. glycine, L-proline, and taurine) did not interact with the system. The kinetic studies indicated presence of a second uptake (Km = 92 muM, Vmax = 0.124 nmol/mg/min) in the primary cultures containing predominantly glioblasts. On the other hand, only one of the neuronal cell lines transformed by simian virus SV40 appeared to accumulate [3H]GABA against a concentration gradient. Apparent Km of this uptake was relatively high (819 muM), and it was only weakly inhibited by 1 mM ouabain and 1 mM pCS. The structural specificity also differed from that of the uptake observed in the primary cultures. Significantly, non of the nontransformed continuous cell lines of either tumoral (glioma, C6; neuroblastoma, M1; M1NN) or normal (NN;I6) origin actively accumulated [3H]GABA. It is suggested that for the neurochemical studies related to GABA and requiring homogeneous cell populations, the primary cultures offer a better experimental model than the continuous cell lines.

  14. Differential uptake of nanoparticles by endothelial cells through polyelectrolytes with affinity for caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Julia; Christensen, Jon; Shastri, V. Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) constitute an important medium for the targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics. Targeting of NPs to a specific cell type is traditionally achieved through the modification of the NP surface with peptides, aptamers, or other motifs that specifically recognize a cell-surface receptor, leading to internalization of NPs via clathrin and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. We have discovered that modifying the NP surface with anionic polyelectrolytes of varying lipophilicity can regulate the uptake of lipid NPs by endothelial and epithelial cells. Furthermore, we report the finding that synthetic polyelectrolytes composed of an aromatic sulfonic acid backbone exhibit specific affinity for caveolae of endothelial cells. By exploiting the higher expression of caveolae in endothelial cells in comparison with epithelial cells, a purely physiochemical approach to the targeted uptake of lipid NPs to endothelial cells is demonstrated. The ability to confer preferential affinity for NPs to cell surface domains by varying the charge and lipophilic characteristics of an NP surface offers a general means of achieving targeted delivery without the need for receptor–ligand-type targeting strategies. PMID:24516167

  15. Side-by-Side Comparison of Commonly Used Biomolecules That Differ in Size and Affinity on Tumor Uptake and Internalization.

    PubMed

    Leelawattanachai, Jeerapond; Kwon, Keon-Woo; Michael, Praveesuda; Ting, Richard; Kim, Ju-Young; Jin, Moonsoo M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to use a systemically injected agent to image tumor is influenced by tumor characteristics such as permeability and vascularity, and the size, shape, and affinity of the imaging agent. In this study, six different imaging biomolecules, with or without specificity to tumor, were examined for tumor uptake and internalization at the whole body, ex-vivo tissue, and cellular levels: antibodies, antibody fragments (Fab), serum albumin, and streptavidin. The time of peak tumor uptake was dependent solely on the size of molecules, suggesting that molecular size is the major factor that influences tumor uptake by its effect on systemic clearance and diffusion into tumor. Affinity to tumor antigen failed to augment tumor uptake of Fab above non-specific accumulation, which suggests that Fab fragments of typical monoclonal antibodies may fall below an affinity threshold for use as molecular imaging agents. Despite abundant localization into the tumor, albumin and streptavidin were not found on cell surface or inside cells. By comparing biomolecules differing in size and affinity, our study highlights that while pharmacokinetics are a dominant factor in tumor uptake for biomolecules, affinity to tumor antigen is required for tumor binding and internalization.

  16. Side-by-Side Comparison of Commonly Used Biomolecules That Differ in Size and Affinity on Tumor Uptake and Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Leelawattanachai, Jeerapond; Kwon, Keon-Woo; Michael, Praveesuda; Ting, Richard; Kim, Ju-Young; Jin, Moonsoo M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to use a systemically injected agent to image tumor is influenced by tumor characteristics such as permeability and vascularity, and the size, shape, and affinity of the imaging agent. In this study, six different imaging biomolecules, with or without specificity to tumor, were examined for tumor uptake and internalization at the whole body, ex-vivo tissue, and cellular levels: antibodies, antibody fragments (Fab), serum albumin, and streptavidin. The time of peak tumor uptake was dependent solely on the size of molecules, suggesting that molecular size is the major factor that influences tumor uptake by its effect on systemic clearance and diffusion into tumor. Affinity to tumor antigen failed to augment tumor uptake of Fab above non-specific accumulation, which suggests that Fab fragments of typical monoclonal antibodies may fall below an affinity threshold for use as molecular imaging agents. Despite abundant localization into the tumor, albumin and streptavidin were not found on cell surface or inside cells. By comparing biomolecules differing in size and affinity, our study highlights that while pharmacokinetics are a dominant factor in tumor uptake for biomolecules, affinity to tumor antigen is required for tumor binding and internalization. PMID:25901755

  17. The Long and Winding Road: from the high affinity choline uptake site to clinical trials for malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are one of the most lethal cancers. They originate from glial cells and invade throughout the brain. Current standard of care involves surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and median survival is currently ~14–20 months post-diagnosis. Glioma tumors are highly infiltrative. Given that the brain immune system is deficient in priming systemic immune responses to glioma antigens present within the brain, we proposed to reconstitute the brain immune system to achieve immunological priming from within the brain. Two adenoviral vectors are injected into the resection cavity or remaining tumor. One adenoviral vector expresses the HSV-1 derived thymidine kinase which converts ganciclovir into a compound only cytotoxic to dividing glioma cells. The second adenovirus expresses the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Flt3L differentiates precursors into dendritic cells and acts as a chemokine for dendritic cells. HSV-1/ganciclovir killing of tumor cells releases tumor antigens that are taken up by dendritic cells within the brain tumor microenvironment. Tumor killing also releases HMGB1, a TLR2 agonist that activates dendritic cells. HMGB1 activated dendritic cells, loaded with glioma antigens, migrate to cervical lymph nodes to stimulate a systemic CD8+ T cells cytotoxic immune response against glioma. This immune response is specific to glioma tumors, induces immunological memory, and does neither cause brain toxicity nor autoimmune responses. An IND was granted by the FDA on 4/7/2011. A Phase I, first in person, to test whether re-engineering the brain immune system is potentially therapeutic is ongoing. PMID:27288077

  18. The Long and Winding Road: From the High-Affinity Choline Uptake Site to Clinical Trials for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, P R; Castro, M G

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are one of the most lethal cancers. They originate from glial cells which infiltrate throughout the brain. Current standard of care involves surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy; median survival is currently ~14-20 months postdiagnosis. Given that the brain immune system is deficient in priming systemic immune responses to glioma antigens, we proposed to reconstitute the brain immune system to achieve immunological priming from within the brain. Two adenoviral vectors are injected into the resection cavity or remaining tumor. One adenoviral vector expresses the HSV-1-derived thymidine kinase which converts ganciclovir into a compound only cytotoxic to dividing glioma cells. The second adenovirus expresses the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Flt3L differentiates precursors into dendritic cells and acts as a chemokine that attracts dendritic cells to the brain. HSV-1/ganciclovir killing of tumor cells releases tumor antigens that are taken up by dendritic cells within the brain tumor microenvironment. Tumor killing also releases HMGB1, an endogenous TLR2 agonist that activates dendritic cells. HMGB1-activated dendritic cells, loaded with glioma antigens, migrate to cervical lymph nodes to stimulate a systemic CD8+ T cells cytotoxic immune response against glioma. This immune response is specific to glioma tumors, induces immunological memory, and does neither cause brain toxicity nor autoimmune responses. An IND was granted by the FDA on 4/7/2011. A Phase I, first in person trial, to test whether reengineering the brain immune system is potentially therapeutic is ongoing. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ANTICHOLINESTERASES AND MUSCARINIC AGONISTS ON RAT BRAIN SYNAPTOSOMAL HIGH AFFINITY CHOLINE UPTAKE. (R825811)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Receptor regulation of the glutamate, GABA and taurine high-affinity uptake into astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Hansson, E; Rönnbäck, L

    1991-05-10

    From experiments using dissociated primary astroglial cultures from newborn rat cerebral cortex, the stimulation of monoamine receptors (alpha, beta and 5HT) was shown to affect the high-affinity uptake kinetics of glutamate, GABA and taurine. In the presence of the alpha 1 agonist phenylephrine, there was an increased uptake (Vmax) of glutamate, while beta adrenoceptor activation slightly inhibited the glutamate uptake and stimulated the GABA and taurine uptakes. 5HT2 receptor stimulation caused a slight inhibition of the taurine uptake. The uptake rate of GABA was not affected by 5HT, alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists and the glutamate uptake was not affected by 5HT or alpha 2 receptor agonists. Nor was the taurine uptake affected by alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists. The active uptake of aspartate was unaffected by the presence of any of the monoamine receptor agonists used in this study. When the mechanisms behind these effects were studied, the GABA uptake seemed to be mediated via the G protein-adenylate cyclase complex in the receptor domain. Moreover, the K+ channels seemed to be involved. The taurine uptake, however, did not seem to be regulated by the same mechanism. It seems more probable that there is a direct interaction between the receptor and carrier of taurine at the membrane level. The mechanism underlying the receptor-regulated glutamate uptake is at present unclear, although it does not seem to involve protein kinase C.

  1. The antihyperalgesic effect of cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline in neuropathic and inflammatory pain models.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Sonat, Fusun Ak; Hamurtekin, Emre; Sonal, Songul; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to test the effects of intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered CDP-choline (cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline; citicoline) and its metabolites in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The i.c.v. administration of CDP-choline (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µmol) produced a dose and time-dependent reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia in both carrageenan-induced inflammatory and chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain models in rats. The antihyperalgesic effect of CDP-choline was similar to that observed with an equimolar dose of choline (1 µmol). The CDP-choline-induced antihyperalgesic effect was prevented by central administration of the neuronal high-affinity choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (1 µg), the nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (50 µg), the α7-selective nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, α-bungarotoxin (2 µg) and the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor antagonist CGP-35348 (20 µg). In contrast, i.c.v. pretreatment with the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (10 µg) only prevented the CDP-choline-induced antihyperalgesic effect in the neuropathic pain model while the nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (10 µg) did not alter the antihyperalgesic effect in the two models. These results indicate that CDP-choline-elicited antihyperalgesic effect in different models of pain occurs through mechanisms that seem to involve an interaction with supraspinal α7-selective nicotinic ACh receptors, and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptors, whereas central opioid receptors have a role only in the neuropathic pain model.

  2. Carbon Availability Modifies Temperature Responses of Heterotrophic Microbial Respiration, Carbon Uptake Affinity, and Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyungjin; Lehmeier, Christoph A; Iv, Ford Ballantyne; Billings, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformations of organic carbon (OC) generate a large flux of CO2 into the atmosphere and influence the C balance of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Yet, inherent heterogeneity in natural environments precludes direct quantification of multiple microbial C fluxes that underlie CO2 production. Here we used a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with a stable C isotope analyzer to determine the effects of temperature and C availability (cellobiose concentration) on C fluxes and (13)C discrimination of a microbial population growing at steady-state in a homogeneous, well-mixed environment. We estimated C uptake affinity and C use efficiency (CUE) to characterize the physiological responses of microbes to changing environmental conditions. Temperature increased biomass-C specific respiration rate and C uptake affinity at lower C availability, but did not influence those parameters at higher C availability. CUE decreased non-linearly with increasing temperature. The non-linear, negative relationship between CUE and temperature was more pronounced under lower C availability than under relatively high C availability. We observed stable isotope fractionation between C substrate and microbial biomass C (7~12‰ depletion), and between microbial biomass and respired CO2 (4~10‰ depletion). Microbial discrimination against (13)C-containing cellobiose during C uptake was influenced by temperature and C availability, while discrimination during respiration was only influenced by C availability. Shifts in C uptake affinity with temperature and C availability may have modified uptake-induced (13)C fractionation. By stressing the importance of C availability on temperature responses of microbial C fluxes, C uptake affinity, CUE, and isotopic fractionation, this study contributes to a fundamental understanding of C flow through microbes. This will help guide parameterization of microbial responses to varying temperature and C availability within Earth-system models.

  3. Carbon Availability Modifies Temperature Responses of Heterotrophic Microbial Respiration, Carbon Uptake Affinity, and Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyungjin; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformations of organic carbon (OC) generate a large flux of CO2 into the atmosphere and influence the C balance of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Yet, inherent heterogeneity in natural environments precludes direct quantification of multiple microbial C fluxes that underlie CO2 production. Here we used a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with a stable C isotope analyzer to determine the effects of temperature and C availability (cellobiose concentration) on C fluxes and 13C discrimination of a microbial population growing at steady-state in a homogeneous, well-mixed environment. We estimated C uptake affinity and C use efficiency (CUE) to characterize the physiological responses of microbes to changing environmental conditions. Temperature increased biomass-C specific respiration rate and C uptake affinity at lower C availability, but did not influence those parameters at higher C availability. CUE decreased non-linearly with increasing temperature. The non-linear, negative relationship between CUE and temperature was more pronounced under lower C availability than under relatively high C availability. We observed stable isotope fractionation between C substrate and microbial biomass C (7~12‰ depletion), and between microbial biomass and respired CO2 (4~10‰ depletion). Microbial discrimination against 13C-containing cellobiose during C uptake was influenced by temperature and C availability, while discrimination during respiration was only influenced by C availability. Shifts in C uptake affinity with temperature and C availability may have modified uptake-induced 13C fractionation. By stressing the importance of C availability on temperature responses of microbial C fluxes, C uptake affinity, CUE, and isotopic fractionation, this study contributes to a fundamental understanding of C flow through microbes. This will help guide parameterization of microbial responses to varying temperature and C availability within Earth-system models. PMID

  4. High-affinity uptake of sup 67 Cu into a veratridine-releasable pool in brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Barnea, A.; Hartter, D.E.; Cho, G. )

    1989-08-01

    We have previously characterized two saturable, ligand-dependent processes for 67Cu uptake by hypothalamic slices: a high- and low-affinity process. In this study, we wished to ascertain if veratridine, a secretagogue that mimics a physiological release process, stimulates the release of newly taken up 67Cu and whether uptake of 67Cu into the releasable pool of copper is dependent on the process of 67Cu uptake. Hypothalamic or caudate slices from male rats were loaded for 30 min with 67Cu complexed to histidine (His) under conditions favoring high- or low-affinity uptake. First, we assessed the stability of the newly taken up 67Cu and found that, regardless of the mode of 67Cu entry into the tissue, greater than or equal to 85% of the 67Cu is retained in tissues incubated for 3 h in 67Cu-free buffer. Moreover, the 67Cu taken up by the high-affinity process was not displaced by 15-fold molar excess of nonradiolabeled Cu2+, histidine, albumin, or Zn2+, and only 20-30% of the 67Cu taken up by the low-affinity process was displaced by 10-fold excess Cu2+ or albumin. Next, we assessed veratridine stimulation of 67Cu release and found that 67Cu release occurred only from tissues loaded with the high- but not with the low-affinity process. This effect of veratridine was calcium dependent and was blocked by Tetrodotoxin, a specific blocker of the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel. In addition, we confirmed our earlier observation that a depolarizing concentration of K+ stimulates 67Cu release.

  5. Characterization of AMT-mediated high-affinity ammonium uptake in roots of maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Gu, Riliang; Duan, Fengying; An, Xia; Zhang, Fusuo; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Yuan, Lixing

    2013-09-01

    High-affinity ammonium uptake in plant roots is mainly mediated by AMT1-type ammonium transporters, and their regulation varies depending on the plant species. In this study we aimed at characterizing AMT-mediated ammonium transport in maize, for which ammonium-based fertilizer is an important nitrogen (N) source. Two ammonium transporter genes, ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3, were isolated from a maize root-specific cDNA library by functional complementation of an ammonium uptake-defective yeast mutant. Ectopic expression of both genes in an ammonium uptake-defective Arabidopsis mutant conferred high-affinity ammonium uptake capacities in roots with substrate affinities of 48 and 33 μM for ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3, respectively. In situ hybridization revealed co-localization of both ZmAMT genes on the rhizodermis, suggesting an involvement in capturing ammonium from the rhizosphere. In N-deficient maize roots, influx increased significantly while ZmAMT expression did not. Ammonium resupply to N-deficient or nitrate-pre-cultured roots, however, rapidly enhanced both influx and ZmAMT transcript levels, revealing a substrate-inducible regulation of ammonium uptake. In conclusion, the two rhizodermis-localized transporters ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3 are most probably the major components in the high-affinity transport system in maize roots. A particular regulatory feature is their persistent induction by ammonium rather than an up-regulation under N deficiency.

  6. The shoot is important for high-affinity nitrate uptake in Egeria densa, a submerged vascular plant.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Shu; Takagi, Yuma; Shimizu, Akifumi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms of nitrate uptake by submerged vascular plants, a cDNA for a high-affinity nitrate transporter, NRT2, was isolated from Egeria densa, a submerged monocot. The deduced EdNRT2 protein was similar to the proteins of a conserved NRT2 group in higher plants. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that after feeding whole plants with 0.2 mM nitrate, the EdNRT2 transcripts were induced in both shoots and roots within 0.5 h, reached the maximum by 1-3 h and then decreased. The EdNRT2 transcript levels in shoots were comparable to those in roots. When nitrate was applied separately to shoots and roots, the EdNRT2 transcripts were induced only in nitrate-treated organs and reached the maximum levels comparable to those in organs when nitrate was applied to whole plants. (15)N-nitrate feeding experiments demonstrated that both shoots and roots are responsible for nitrate uptake and that biomass and (15)N content in shoots was even higher than that in roots. We concluded that EdNRT2 is involved in high-affinity nitrate uptake by shoots and roots of E. densa, that nitrate is taken up independently by shoots and roots and that shoots play an important role in nitrate uptake from aquatic ecosystem.

  7. The CBL-Interacting Protein Kinase CIPK23 Regulates HAK5-Mediated High-Affinity K+ Uptake in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Ragel, Paula; Ródenas, Reyes; García-Martín, Elena; Andrés, Zaida; Villalta, Irene; Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Rivero, Rosa M; Martínez, Vicente; Pardo, Jose M; Quintero, Francisco J; Rubio, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Plant growth and development requires efficient acquisition of essential elements. Potassium (K(+)) is an important macronutrient present in the soil solution at a wide range of concentrations. Regulation of the K(+) uptake systems in the roots is essential to secure K(+) supply. It has been shown in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that when the external K(+) concentration is very low (<10 µm), K(+) nutrition depends exclusively on the high-affinity K(+) transporter5 (HAK5). Low-K(+)-induced transcriptional activation of the gene encoding HAK5 has been previously reported. Here, we show the posttranscriptional regulation of HAK5 transport activity by phosphorylation. Expression in a heterologous system showed that the Ca(2+) sensors calcineurin B-like (CBL1), CBL8, CBL9, and CBL10, together with CBL-interacting protein kinase23 (CIPK23), activated HAK5 in vivo. This activation produced an increase in the affinity and the Vmax of K(+) transport. In vitro experiments show that the N terminus of HAK5 is phosphorylated by CIPK23. This supports the idea that phosphorylation of HAK5 induces a conformational change that increases its affinity for K(+). Experiments of K(+) (Rb(+)) uptake and growth measurements in low-K(+) medium with Arabidopsis single mutants hak5, akt1, and cipk23, double mutants hak5 akt1, hak5 cipk23, and akt1 cipk23, and the triple mutant hak5 akt1 cipk23 confirmed the regulatory role of CIPK23 in planta.

  8. A low K+ signal is required for functional high-affinity K+ uptake through HAK5 transporters.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Francisco; Fon, Mario; Ródenas, Reyes; Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Alemán, Fernando; Rivero, Rosa M; Martínez, Vicente

    2014-11-01

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter HAK5 is a key system for root K(+) uptake and, under very low external K(+), the only one capable of supplying K(+) to the plant. Functional HAK5-mediated K(+) uptake should be tightly regulated for plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Thus, it has been described that the gene encoding the transporter is transcriptionally regulated, being highly induced under K(+) limitation. Here we show that environmental conditions, such as the lack of K(+), NO(3)(-) or P, that induced a hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane of root cells, induce HAK5 transcription. However, only the deprivation of K(+) produces functional HAK5-mediated K(+) uptake in the root. These results suggest on the one hand the existence of a posttranscriptional regulation of HAK5 elicited by the low K(+) signal and on the other that HAK5 may be involved in yet-unknown functions related to NO(3)(-) and P deficiencies. These results have been obtained here with Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Micro-Tom) as well as Arabidopsis thaliana plants, suggesting that the posttranscriptional regulation of high-affinity HAK transporters take place in all plant species.

  9. Inhibition of high-affinity gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake in primary astrocyte cultures by phorbol esters and phospholipase C.

    PubMed Central

    Gomeza, J; Casado, M; Gimenez, C; Aragon, C

    1991-01-01

    The effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of protein kinase C (PKC), on high-affinity Na(+)-dependent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake were investigated in primary cultures of neurons and glial cells from rat brain cortex. Incubation of glial cells with PMA led to concentration- and time-dependent decreases in the GABA transport in glial cells. This effect could be completely suppressed by addition of the PKC inhibitor H7. The PMA effects could be mimicked by oleoylacetylglycerol, the diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 and exogenous phospholipase C. Treatment with PMA did not affect GABA transport in neuronal cells. PMID:1902665

  10. Dual regulation of the Arabidopsis high-affinity root iron uptake system by local and long-distance signals.

    PubMed

    Vert, Grégory A; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2003-06-01

    Regulation of the root high-affinity iron uptake system by whole-plant signals was investigated at the molecular level in Arabidopsis, through monitoring FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. These two genes encode the root ferric-chelate reductase and the high-affinity iron transporter, respectively, involved in the iron deficiency-induced uptake system. Recovery from iron-deficient conditions and modulation of apoplastic iron pools indicate that iron itself plays a major role in the regulation of root iron deficiency responses at the mRNA and protein levels. Split-root experiments show that the expression of IRT1 and FRO2 is controlled both by a local induction from the root iron pool and through a systemic pathway involving a shoot-borne signal, both signals being integrated to tightly control production of the root iron uptake proteins. We also show that IRT1 and FRO2 are expressed during the day and down-regulated at night and that this additional control is overruled by iron starvation, indicating that the nutritional status prevails on the diurnal regulation. Our work suggests, for the first time to our knowledge, that like in grasses, the root iron acquisition in strategy I plants may also be under diurnal regulation. On the basis of the new molecular insights provided in this study and given the strict coregulation of IRT1 and FRO2 observed, we present a model of local and long-distance regulation of the root iron uptake system in Arabidopsis.

  11. Valproate is neuroprotective against malonate toxicity in rat striatum: an association with augmentation of high-affinity glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Boldingh, Karen Astrid; Iversen, Evy Grini; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2004-11-01

    The antiepileptic drug valproate (VPA) may be neuroprotective. We treated rats with VPA for 14 days (300 mg/kg twice daily) before intrastriatal injection of 1.5 micromol (1 M) of the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate. VPA-treated animals developed smaller lesions than control animals: 10 +/- 2 mm(3) versus 26 +/- 8 mm(3) (means +/- SD; P = 10(-4). Injection of NaCl that was equiosmolar with 1 M malonate caused lesions of only 1.2 +/- 0.4 mm(3) in control animals, whereas physiologic saline produced no lesion. VPA pretreatment reduced the malonate-induced extracellular accumulation of glutamate. This effect paralleled an increase in the striatal level of the glutamate transporter GLT, which augmented high-affinity glutamate uptake by 25%, as determined from the uptake of [(3)H] glutamate into striatal proteoliposomes. Malonate caused a 76% reduction in striatal adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, but the glial, ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from radiolabeled glucose or glutamate was intact, indicating that glial ATP production supported uptake of glutamate. Striatal levels of HSP-70 and fos were reduced, and the levels of bcl-2 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase remained unaffected, but histone acetylation was increased by VPA treatment. The results suggest that augmentation of glutamate uptake may contribute importantly to VPA-mediated neuroprotection in striatum.

  12. Monitoring of the velocity of high-affinity glutamate uptake by isolated brain nerve terminals using amperometric glutamate biosensor.

    PubMed

    Soldatkin, O; Nazarova, A; Krisanova, N; Borуsov, A; Kucherenko, D; Kucherenko, I; Pozdnyakova, N; Soldatkin, A; Borisova, T

    2015-04-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, which is involved in the main aspects of normal brain functioning. High-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters is key proteins, which transport extracellular glutamate to the cytoplasm of nerve cells, thereby preventing continuous activation of glutamate receptors, and thus the development of neurotoxicity. Disturbance in glutamate uptake is involved in the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. Amperometric biosensors are the most promising and successful among electrochemical biosensors. In this study, we developed (1) amperometric glutamate biosensor, (2) methodological approach for the analysis of glutamate uptake in liquid samples of isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). The basal level of glutamate, the initial velocity of glutamate uptake and time-dependent accumulation of glutamate by synaptosomes were determined using developed glutamate biosensor. Comparative analysis of the data with those obtained by radioactive analysis, spectrofluorimetry and ion exchange chromatography was performed. Therefore, the methodological approach for monitoring of the velocity of glutamate uptake, which takes into consideration the definite level of endogenous glutamate in nerve terminals, was developed using glutamate biosensor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Choline, CDP-choline or phosphocholine increases plasma glucagon in rats: involvement of the peripheral autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cansev, Mehmet; Ilcol, Yesim Ozarda; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Hamurtekin, Emre; Ulus, Ismail H

    2008-07-28

    The present study was designed to test the effects of choline, cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) and phosphocholine on plasma glucagon concentrations in rats. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 200-600 micromol/kg of choline, CDP-choline or phosphocholine produced a dose-dependent increase in plasma glucagon and choline concentrations. Pretreatment with hexamethonium (15 mg/kg; i.p.), a peripherally-acting ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, entirely blocked the increases in plasma glucagon by 600 micromol/kg of choline, CDP-choline or phosphocholine. The increases in plasma glucagon by these choline compounds was reduced significantly (P<0.01) by about 25% by pretreatment with atropine methylnitrate (2 mg/kg), a peripherally-acting muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. Blockade of central acetylcholine receptors did not alter the increase in plasma glucagon induced by i.p. choline (600 micromol/kg). While alpha(2)-adrenoceptor blockade or bilateral adrenalectomy attenuated the increase in plasma glucagon evoked by choline compounds, blockade of alpha(1)- or beta-adrenoceptors or chemical sympathectomy failed to alter this increase. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) choline (1.5 micromol) administration also increased plasma glucagon; the effect was blocked by central pretreatment with a neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, mecamylamine (50 microg; i.c.v.) or the neuronal choline uptake inhibitor, hemicholinium-3 (20 microg; i.c.v.). These data show that choline, CDP-choline or phosphocholine increases plasma glucagon concentrations by increasing peripheral nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic neurotransmissions. Central choline also increases plasma glucagon by augmenting central nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission by acting presynaptically. Stimulation of adrenal medullary catecholamine release and subsequent activation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors are mainly involved in the increase in plasma glucagon

  14. Potentiation effect of choline esters on choline-catalysed decarbamoylation of dimethylcarbamoyl-acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y B; Jung, C H; Choi, S J; Seo, W J; Cha, S H; Sok, D E

    1992-01-01

    The choline esters potentiated the choline-catalysed decarbamoylation of dimethylcarbamoyl-acetylcholinesterase in proportion to the length of acyl group, although esters containing an acyl chain longer than the hexanoyl group exhibited a corresponding decrease in the potentiation. In structural requirement analysis it was found that both the quaternary ammonium moiety and the ester bond were important for the effective acceleration of choline-catalysed decarbamoylation. In general, the respective thiocholine ester was found to be more effective than the corresponding choline ester. Whereas the binding affinity (Ka) of choline in the decarbamoylation was not significantly altered, the maximum decarbamoylation rate (kr(max.)) of choline was greatly enhanced in the presence of choline esters or thiocholine esters. Along with the above observation, the isotope solvent effect, the effect of ionic strength and the antagonism studies demonstrate that the choline esters or thiocholine esters may interact with one of peripheral anionic sites, and thereby make the choline-catalysed decarbamoylation more favourable. PMID:1599395

  15. Constitutive expression of high-affinity sulfate transporter (HAST) gene in Indian mustard showed enhanced sulfur uptake and assimilation.

    PubMed

    Abdin, M Z; Akmal, M; Ram, M; Nafis, T; Alam, P; Nadeem, M; Khan, M A; Ahmad, A

    2011-07-01

    Lycopersicon esculantum sulfate transporter gene (LeST 1.1) encodes a high-affinity sulfate transporter (HAST) located in root epidermis. In this study, the LeST 1.1 gene was constitutively expressed in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea cv. Pusa Jai Kisan). Transgenic as well as untransformed plants were grown in sulfur-insufficient (25 and 50 μM) and sulfur-sufficient (1,000 μM) conditions for 30 days. Two-fold increase was noticed in the sulfate uptake rate of transgenic plants grown in both sulfur-insufficient and -sufficient conditions as compared to untransformed plants. The transgenic B. juncea plants were able to accumulate higher biomass and showed improved sulfur status even in sulfur-insufficient conditions when compared with untransformed plants. Chlorophyll content, ATP sulfurylase activity and protein content were also higher in transgenic plants than untranformed plants under sulfur-insufficient conditions. Our results, thus, clearly indicate that constitutive expression of LeST 1.1 gene in B. juncea had led to enhanced capacity of sulfur uptake and assimilation even in sulfur-insufficient conditions. This approach can also be used in other crops to enhance their sulfate uptake and assimilation potential under S-insufficient conditions.

  16. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-03-01

    It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular

  17. [Folate metabolism--epigenetic role of choline and vitamin B12 during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Drews, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Adequate choline intake during pregnancy is essential for proper fetal development. Nowadays studies suggest that even in high income countries regular pregnant women diet does not provide the satisfactory amount of choline. Choline demand during pregnancy is high and it seems to exceed present choline intake recommendations. Moreover lactation period also demands choline supplementation because of its high concentration in female milk. Numerous studies on animal model proved correlation between choline supplementation during pregnancy and proper fetal cognitive function development. Despite increased synthesis in maternal liver during pregnancy choline demand is much higher than common dietary uptake. Nowadays studies as to the nutritional recommendations during pregnancy concern also vitamin B12 supplementation. Vitamin B12 deficiency may be an important risk factor of neural tube defects development. Presented article contains a review of data on proper choline and vitamin B12 uptake during pregnancy and lactation and potential results of choline and vitamin B12 poor maternal status.

  18. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    MedlinePlus

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis ... painful shoulder. It is also used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in ...

  19. Chemical activation of a high-affinity glutamate transporter in human erythrocytes and its implications for malaria-parasite-induced glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Winterberg, Markus; Rajendran, Esther; Baumeister, Stefan; Bietz, Sven; Kirk, Kiaran; Lingelbach, Klaus

    2012-04-12

    Human erythrocytes have a low basal permeability to L-glutamate and are not known to have a functional glutamate transporter. Here, treatment of human erythrocytes with arsenite was shown to induce the uptake of L-glutamate and D-aspartate, but not that of D-glutamate or L-alanine. The majority of the arsenite-induced L-glutamate influx was via a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent system showing characteristics of members of the "excitatory amino acid transporter" (EAAT) family. Western blots and immunofluorescence assays revealed the presence of a member of this family, EAAT3, on the erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum take up glutamate from the extracellular environment. Although the majority of uptake is via a low-affinity Na(+)-independent pathway there is, in addition, a high-affinity uptake component, raising the possibility that the parasite activates the host cell glutamate transporter.

  20. Molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Kouji, Hironobu; Inazu, Masato; Yamada, Tomoko; Tajima, Hirohisa; Aoki, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Teruhiko

    2009-03-01

    We examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline uptake in human colon carcinomas using the cell line HT-29. Furthermore, we explored the possible correlation between choline uptake and cell proliferation. Choline uptake was saturable and mediated by a single transport system. Interestingly, removal of Na(+) from the uptake buffer strongly enhanced choline uptake. This increase in component of choline uptake under Na(+)-free conditions was inhibited by a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) inhibitor. Collapse of the plasma-membrane H(+) electrochemical gradient by a protonophore inhibited choline uptake. Choline uptake was inhibited by the choline analogue hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) and various organic cations, and was significantly decreased by acidification of the extracellular medium and by intracellular alkalinization. Real-time PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1), CTL2, CTL4 and NHE1 mRNA are mainly expressed in HT-29 cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis indicated that CTL1 protein was expressed in plasma membrane. The biochemical and pharmacological data indicated that CTL1 is functionally expressed in HT-29 cells and is responsible for choline uptake in these cells. We conclude that choline transporters, especially CTL1, use a directed H(+) gradient as a driving force, and its transport functions in co-operation with NHE1. Finally, cell proliferation was inhibited by HC-3 and tetrahexylammonium chloride (THA), which strongly inhibits choline uptake. Identification of this novel CTL1-mediated choline uptake system provides a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Fructose Uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti Is Mediated by a High-Affinity ATP-Binding Cassette Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Annie; Østerås, Magne; Mandon, Karine; Poggi, Marie-Christine; Le Rudulier, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter (FrcB, a periplasmic substrate binding protein, FrcC, an integral membrane permease, and FrcA, an ATP-binding cytoplasmic protein), which is the unique high-affinity (Km of 6 μM) fructose uptake system in S. meliloti. The FrcK protein shows homology with some kinases, while FrcR is probably a transcriptional regulator of the repressor-ORF-kinase family. The expression of S. meliloti frcBCAK in Escherichia coli, which transports fructose only via the phosphotransferase system, resulted in the detection of a periplasmic fructose binding activity, demonstrating that FrcB is the binding protein of the Frc transporter. The analysis of substrate specificities revealed that the Frc system is also a high-affinity transporter for ribose and mannose, which are both fructose competitors for the binding to the periplasmic FrcB protein. However, the Frc mutant was still able to grow on these sugars as sole carbon source, demonstrating the presence of at least one other uptake system for mannose and ribose in S. meliloti. The expression of the frcBC genes as determined by measurements of alkaline phosphatase activity was shown to be induced by mannitol and fructose, but not by mannose, ribose, glucose, or succinate, suggesting that the Frc system is primarily targeted towards fructose. Neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impared in the TnphoA mutant, demonstrating that fructose uptake is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, although FrcB protein is

  2. Fructose uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti is mediated by a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette transport system.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A; Østerås, M; Mandon, K; Poggi, M C; Le Rudulier, D

    2001-08-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter (FrcB, a periplasmic substrate binding protein, FrcC, an integral membrane permease, and FrcA, an ATP-binding cytoplasmic protein), which is the unique high-affinity (K(m) of 6 microM) fructose uptake system in S. meliloti. The FrcK protein shows homology with some kinases, while FrcR is probably a transcriptional regulator of the repressor-ORF-kinase family. The expression of S. meliloti frcBCAK in Escherichia coli, which transports fructose only via the phosphotransferase system, resulted in the detection of a periplasmic fructose binding activity, demonstrating that FrcB is the binding protein of the Frc transporter. The analysis of substrate specificities revealed that the Frc system is also a high-affinity transporter for ribose and mannose, which are both fructose competitors for the binding to the periplasmic FrcB protein. However, the Frc mutant was still able to grow on these sugars as sole carbon source, demonstrating the presence of at least one other uptake system for mannose and ribose in S. meliloti. The expression of the frcBC genes as determined by measurements of alkaline phosphatase activity was shown to be induced by mannitol and fructose, but not by mannose, ribose, glucose, or succinate, suggesting that the Frc system is primarily targeted towards fructose. Neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impared in the TnphoA mutant, demonstrating that fructose uptake is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, although FrcB protein is

  3. Two plant bacteria, S. meliloti and Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, share functional znuABC homologues that encode for a high affinity Zinc uptake system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Znu system, encoded for by znuABC, can be found in multiple genera of bacteria and has been shown to be responsible for the import of zinc under low zinc conditions. Although this high-affinity uptake system is known to be important for both growth and/or pathogenesis in bacteria, it has not bee...

  4. Identification and Characterization of ML352: A Novel, Noncompetitive Inhibitor of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is the rate-limiting determinant of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis, yet the transporter remains a largely undeveloped target for the detection and manipulation of synaptic cholinergic signaling. To expand CHT pharmacology, we pursued a high-throughput screen for novel CHT-targeted small molecules based on the electrogenic properties of transporter-mediated choline transport. In this effort, we identified five novel, structural classes of CHT-specific inhibitors. Chemical diversification and functional analysis of one of these classes identified ML352 as a high-affinity (Ki = 92 nM) and selective CHT inhibitor. At concentrations that fully antagonized CHT in transfected cells and nerve terminal preparations, ML352 exhibited no inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) and also lacked activity at dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporters, as well as many receptors and ion channels. ML352 exhibited noncompetitive choline uptake inhibition in intact cells and synaptosomes and reduced the apparent density of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding sites in membrane assays, suggesting allosteric transporter interactions. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed limited in vitro metabolism and significant CNS penetration, with features predicting rapid clearance. ML352 represents a novel, potent, and specific tool for the manipulation of CHT, providing a possible platform for the development of cholinergic imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:25560927

  5. The Organization of High-Affinity Ammonium Uptake in Arabidopsis Roots Depends on the Spatial Arrangement and Biochemical Properties of AMT1-Type Transporters[W

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lixing; Loqué, Dominique; Kojima, Soichi; Rauch, Sabine; Ishiyama, Keiki; Inoue, Eri; Takahashi, Hideki; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2007-01-01

    The AMMONIUM TRANSPORTER (AMT) family comprises six isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe the complete functional organization of root-expressed AMTs for high-affinity ammonium uptake. High-affinity influx of 15N-labeled ammonium in two transposon-tagged amt1;2 lines was reduced by 18 to 26% compared with wild-type plants. Enrichment of the AMT1;2 protein in the plasma membrane and localization of AMT1;2 promoter activity in the endodermis and root cortex indicated that AMT1;2 mediates the uptake of ammonium entering the root via the apoplasmic transport route. An amt1;1 amt1;2 amt1;3 amt2;1 quadruple mutant (qko) showed severe growth depression under ammonium supply and maintained only 5 to 10% of wild-type high-affinity ammonium uptake capacity. Transcriptional upregulation of AMT1;5 in nitrogen-deficient rhizodermal and root hair cells and the ability of AMT1;5 to transport ammonium in yeast suggested that AMT1;5 accounts for the remaining uptake capacity in qko. Triple and quadruple amt insertion lines revealed in vivo ammonium substrate affinities of 50, 234, 61, and 4.5 μM for AMT1;1, AMT1;2, AMT1;3, and AMT1;5, respectively, but no ammonium influx activity for AMT2;1. These data suggest that two principle means of achieving effective ammonium uptake in Arabidopsis roots are the spatial arrangement of AMT1-type ammonium transporters and the distribution of their transport capacities at different substrate affinities. PMID:17693533

  6. COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF PARAOXON, CHLORPYRIFOS OXON AND MUSCARINIC AGONISTS ON HIGH AFFINITY CHOLINE UPTAKE IN RAT CORTICAL OR STRIATAL SYNAPTOSOMES. (R825811)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Relative contribution of AtHAK5 and AtAKT1 to K+ uptake in the high-affinity range of concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Francisco; Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente

    2008-12-01

    The relative contribution of the high-affinity K(+) transporter AtHAK5 and the inward rectifier K(+) channel AtAKT1 to K(+) uptake in the high-affinity range of concentrations was studied in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia (Col-0). The results obtained with wild-type lines, with T-DNA insertion in both genes and specific uptake inhibitors, show that AtHAK5 and AtAKT1 mediate the NH4+-sensitive and the Ba(2+)-sensitive components of uptake, respectively, and that they are the two major contributors to uptake in the high-affinity range of Rb(+) concentrations. Using Rb(+) as a K(+) analogue, it was shown that AtHAK5 mediates absorption at lower Rb(+) concentrations than AtAKT1 and depletes external Rb(+) to values around 1 muM. Factors such as the presence of K(+) or NH4+ during plant growth determine the relative contribution of each system. The presence of NH4+ in the growth solution inhibits the induction of AtHAK5 by K(+) starvation. In K(+)-starved plants grown without NH4+, both systems are operative, but when NH4+ is present in the growth solution, AtAKT1 is probably the only system mediating Rb(+) absorption, and the capacity of the roots to deplete Rb(+) is reduced.

  8. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  9. A case of colon cancer incidentally detected by 18F-choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Crusco, Sonia; Cicciò, Carmelo; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-12-01

    A 65-year-old man had restaging of prostate cancer with an 18F-choline PET/CT, which revealed focal uptake in a thickened posterior wall of sigmoid colon. Biopsy demonstrated colon cancer. Incidental colorectal 18F-choline uptake should be further investigated with histological analysis.

  10. Choline PET for Monitoring Early Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Chiu, Song-mao

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new therapy that has shown promise for treating various cancers in both preclinical and clinical studies. The present study evaluated the potential use of PET with radiolabeled choline to monitor early tumor response to PDT in animal models. Methods Two human prostate cancer models (PC-3 and CWR22) were studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer, phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4), was delivered to each animal by a tail vein injection 48 h before laser illumination. Small-animal PET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and at 1, 24, and 48 h after PDT. Time–activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. The percentage of the injected dose per gram of tissue was quantified for both treated and control tumors at each time point. In addition, Pc 4-PDT was performed in cell cultures. Cell viability and 11C-choline uptake in PDT-treated and control cells were measured. Results For treated tumors, normalized 11C-choline uptake decreased significantly 24 and 48 h after PDT, compared with the same tumors before PDT (P < 0.001). For the control tumors, normalized 11C-choline uptake increased significantly. For mice with CWR22 tumors, the prostate-specific antigen level decreased 24 and 48 h after PDT. Pc 4-PDT in cell culture showed that the treated tumor cells, compared with the control cells, had less than 50% 11C-choline activity at 5, 30, and 45 min after PDT, whereas the cell viability test showed that the treated cells were viable longer than 7 h after PDT. Conclusion PET with 11C-choline is sensitive for detecting early changes associated with Pc 4-PDT in mouse models of human prostate cancer. Choline PET has the potential to determine whether a PDT-treated tumor responds to treatment within 48 h after therapy. PMID:20008981

  11. Mechanism of choline deficiency and membrane alteration in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome primary skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Laila C.; Singh, Ratnesh K.; Michel, Vera; Zeisel, Steven H.; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Johnson, Amy R.; Mudd, Harvey S.; Bakovic, Marica

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblasts from a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), who presented with low plasma choline and betaine, were studied to determine the metabolic characteristics of the choline deficiency. Choline is required for the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and for betaine, an important osmoregulator. Here, choline transport, lipid homeostasis, and mitochondria function were analyzed in skin fibroblasts from POTS and compared with control cells. The choline transporter-like protein 1/solute carrier 44A1 (CTL1/SLC44A1) and mRNA expression were 2–3 times lower in POTS fibroblasts, and choline uptake was reduced 60% (P < 0.05). Disturbances of membrane homeostasis were observed by reduced ratios between PC:phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin:cholesterol, as well as by modified phospholipid fatty acid composition. Choline deficiency also impaired mitochondria function, which was observed by a reduction in oxygen consumption, mitochondrial potential, and glycolytic activity. When POTS cells were treated with choline, transporter was up-regulated, and uptake of choline increased, offering an option for patient treatment. The characteristics of the POTS fibroblasts described here represent a first model of choline and CTL1/SLC44A1 deficiency, in which choline transport, membrane homeostasis, and mitochondrial function are impaired.—Schenkel, L. C., Singh, R. K., Michel, V., Zeisel, S. H., da Costa, K.-A., Johnson, A. R., Mudd, H. S., Bakovic, M. Mechanism of choline deficiency and membrane alteration in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome primary skin fibroblasts. PMID:25466896

  12. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6-12% going to kidney and 3-6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C)choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  13. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6 to 12% going to kidney and 3 to 6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C) choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  14. A novel choline cotransporter sequestration compartment in cholinergic neurons revealed by selective endosomal ablation.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Michael T; Newkirk, Robert F; Wang, Yilun; Townsel, James G

    2010-03-01

    The sodium-dependent, high affinity choline transporter - choline cotransporter - (ChCoT, aka: cho-1, CHT1, CHT) undergoes constitutive and regulated trafficking between the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic compartments. The pathways and regulatory mechanisms of this trafficking are not well understood. We report herein studies involving selective endosomal ablation to further our understanding of the trafficking of the ChCoT. Selective ablation of early sorting and recycling endosomes resulted in a decrease of approximately 75% of [3H]choline uptake and approximately 70% of [3H]hemicholinium-3 binding. Western blot analysis showed that ablation produced a similar decrease in ChCoTs in the plasma membrane subcellular fraction. The time frame for this loss was approximately 2 h which has been shown to be the constitutive cycling time for ChCoTs in this tissue. Ablation appears to be dependent on the intracellular cycling of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase and the selective deposition of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase in early endosomes, both sorting and recycling. Ablated brain slices retained their capacity to recruit via regulated trafficking ChCoTs to the plasma membrane. This recruitment of ChCoTs suggests that the recruitable compartment is distinct from the early endosomes. It will be necessary to do further studies to identify the novel sequestration compartment supportive of the ChCoT regulated trafficking.

  15. Autoradiography of phosphatidyl choline

    SciTech Connect

    Saffitz, J.E.; Gross, R.W.; Williamson, J.R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1981-03-01

    Saturated choline phosphatides are extracted during conventional tissue processing for electron microscopy. To facilitate autoradiographic subcellular localization of arrhythmogenic myocardial phospholipids, we evaluated tissue processing procedures for preservation of saturated phosphatidyl choline (PC). Suspensions, of a murine plasmacytoma were incubated with negative, unilamellar liposomes containing 14C-choline-labeled PC or 14C-1-palmitate dipalmitoyl PC. Extraction of radioactivity was monitored at each processing step by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Conventional fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide followed by acetone dehydration and Spurr's plastic embedding led to extraction of nearly all radioactivity. However, treatment of cells with 1.5% tannic acid after glutaraldehyde but before osmium tetroxide fixation preserved 93.1 +/- .6% of 14C-choline-labeled PC. Virtually identical results were obtained with dipalmitoyl PC. Autoradiography demonstrated no significant translocation of labeled PC from plasmacytoma cells to unlabeled avian erythrocytes, mixed in equal proportions after fixation but before dehydration and embedding.

  16. Low uptake affinity cultivars with biochar to tackle Cd-tainted rice--A field study over four rice seasons in Hunan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, De; Guo, Hu; Li, Ruiyue; Li, Lianqing; Pan, Genxing; Chang, Andrew; Joseph, Stephen

    2016-01-15

    Biochar is becoming an environmentally friendly material for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils and improving food safety. A field trial over four rice seasons was conducted to investigate the use of biochar and low Cd accumulating cultivars on Cd uptake in a heavy metal contaminated soil. Wheat straw derived biochar was applied at 0, 20 and 40 t ha(-1). Two rice cultivars with differing Cd accumulation abilities were selected in each season. The results showed that both biochar and low Cd affinity cultivars significantly reduced rice grain Cd accumulation. Biochar had no significant effect the first season but thereafter consistently reduced rice grain Cd by a maximum of 61, 86 and 57% over the next three seasons. Zn accumulation in the rice grains was not decreased by biochar application, although available soil Zn was sharply reduced (35-91%). Indica conventional rice cultivars had much lower Cd, but higher Zn and lower Cd/Zn ratios in the grain than indica hybrid cultivars. Biochar was more effective for mitigating grain Cd accumulation in low Cd affinity cultivars than in high affinity cultivars. Soil pH was sustainably increased (up to nearly 1 unit) while available Cd significantly decreased by a maximum of 85% after biochar addition. The translocation of Cd from rice roots to shoots was reduced from 20 to 80% by biochar. Low uptake affinity cultivars combined with biochar reduced late rice grain Cd concentration and Cd/Zn ratios by 69-80% and 72-80%, respectively. It indicated that the management of combining biochar and low Cd affinity cultivars should be an efficient way to remediate Cd contaminated rice paddies and reduce health risk associated with consuming rice from these soils.

  17. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk.

  18. The CBL-Interacting Protein Kinase CIPK23 Regulates HAK5-Mediated High-Affinity K+ Uptake in Arabidopsis Roots1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ragel, Paula; Ródenas, Reyes; García-Martín, Elena; Andrés, Zaida; Villalta, Irene; Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Martínez, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth and development requires efficient acquisition of essential elements. Potassium (K+) is an important macronutrient present in the soil solution at a wide range of concentrations. Regulation of the K+ uptake systems in the roots is essential to secure K+ supply. It has been shown in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that when the external K+ concentration is very low (<10 µm), K+ nutrition depends exclusively on the high-affinity K+ transporter5 (HAK5). Low-K+-induced transcriptional activation of the gene encoding HAK5 has been previously reported. Here, we show the posttranscriptional regulation of HAK5 transport activity by phosphorylation. Expression in a heterologous system showed that the Ca2+ sensors calcineurin B-like (CBL1), CBL8, CBL9, and CBL10, together with CBL-interacting protein kinase23 (CIPK23), activated HAK5 in vivo. This activation produced an increase in the affinity and the Vmax of K+ transport. In vitro experiments show that the N terminus of HAK5 is phosphorylated by CIPK23. This supports the idea that phosphorylation of HAK5 induces a conformational change that increases its affinity for K+. Experiments of K+ (Rb+) uptake and growth measurements in low-K+ medium with Arabidopsis single mutants hak5, akt1, and cipk23, double mutants hak5 akt1, hak5 cipk23, and akt1 cipk23, and the triple mutant hak5 akt1 cipk23 confirmed the regulatory role of CIPK23 in planta. PMID:26474642

  19. Mechanism of choline deficiency and membrane alteration in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome primary skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Laila C; Singh, Ratnesh K; Michel, Vera; Zeisel, Steven H; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Johnson, Amy R; Mudd, Harvey S; Bakovic, Marica

    2015-05-01

    Fibroblasts from a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), who presented with low plasma choline and betaine, were studied to determine the metabolic characteristics of the choline deficiency. Choline is required for the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and for betaine, an important osmoregulator. Here, choline transport, lipid homeostasis, and mitochondria function were analyzed in skin fibroblasts from POTS and compared with control cells. The choline transporter-like protein 1/solute carrier 44A1 (CTL1/SLC44A1) and mRNA expression were 2-3 times lower in POTS fibroblasts, and choline uptake was reduced 60% (P < 0.05). Disturbances of membrane homeostasis were observed by reduced ratios between PC:phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin:cholesterol, as well as by modified phospholipid fatty acid composition. Choline deficiency also impaired mitochondria function, which was observed by a reduction in oxygen consumption, mitochondrial potential, and glycolytic activity. When POTS cells were treated with choline, transporter was up-regulated, and uptake of choline increased, offering an option for patient treatment. The characteristics of the POTS fibroblasts described here represent a first model of choline and CTL1/SLC44A1 deficiency, in which choline transport, membrane homeostasis, and mitochondrial function are impaired.

  20. Transport and phosphorylation of choline in higher plant cells. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bligny, R.; Foray, M.F.; Roby, C.; Douce, R.

    1989-03-25

    When sycamore cells were suspended in basal medium containing choline, the latter was taken up by the cells very rapidly. A facilitated diffusion system appertained at low concentrations of choline and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. At higher choline concentrations simple diffusion appeared to be the principal mode of uptake. Addition of choline to the perfusate of compressed sycamore cells monitored by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy resulted in a dramatic accumulation of P-choline in the cytoplasmic compartment containing choline kinase and not in the vacuole. The total accumulation of P-choline over a 10-h period exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. During this period, in the absence of Pi in the perfusion medium there was a marked depletion of glucose-6-P, and the cytoplasmic Pi resonance disappeared almost completely. When a threshold of cytoplasmic Pi was attained, the phosphorylation of choline was sustained by the continuous release of Pi from the vacuole although at a much lower rate. However, when 100 microM inorganic phosphate was present in the perfusion medium, externally added Pi was preferentially used to sustain P-choline synthesis. It is clear, therefore, that cytosolic choline kinase associated with a carrier-mediated transport system for choline uptake appeared as effective systems for continuously trapping cytoplasmic Pi including vacuolar Pi entering the cytoplasm.

  1. Anacardium occidentale bark lectin: purification, immobilization as an affinity model and influence in the uptake of technetium-99M by rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Maria Inês Sucupira; de Mendonça Cavalcanti, Maria do Socorro; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; de Almeida Catanho, Maria Teresa Jansem; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso

    2012-10-01

    Lectins, proteins that recognize carbohydrates, have been immobilized on inert supports and used in the screening or purification of glycoproteins. Anacardium occidentale bark infusion has been used as a hypoglycemic agent in Brazil. The toxicity of natural products may be evaluated determining their capability to alter the biodistribution of technetium-99M ((99m)Tc). This work reports the isolation and characterization of a lectin from A. occidentale bark (AnocBL), its evaluation as an affinity support for glycoprotein isolation and lectin effect on the uptake of (99m)Tc by rat adipocytes. AnocBL was isolated from 80 % ammonium sulphate supernatant by affinity chromatography on fetuin-agarose. SDS-PAGE showed a single protein band of 47 kDa. The monossacharide L-arabinose and the glycoproteins fetuin, asialofetuin, ovomucoid, casein, thyroglobulin, peroxidase, fetal bovine serum and IgG inhibited the activity. The lectin activity was stable until 70 °C and at a pH range of 3.0-7.5. AnocBL-Sepharose column bound fetuin indicating that the lectin matrix may be used to obtain glycoconjugates of biotechnological interest. In vitro assay revealed that glucose and insulin increase (99m)Tc uptake by rat adipocytes. AnocBL decreases (99m)Tc uptake, and this effect was not detected in the presence of glucose. Fetuin inhibited AnocBL effect in all insulin concentrations.

  2. The ability of denbufylline to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and its affinity for adenosine receptors and the adenosine re-uptake site.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, C. D.; Jackman, S. A.; Wilke, R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Denbufylline has been examined for its ability to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes from rat cardiac ventricle and cerebrum, as well as for its affinity for adenosine A1 and A2 receptors and the re-uptake site. For comparison, SK&F 94120, theophylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) were examined as phosphodiesterase inhibitors whilst N6-cyclohexyladenosine, R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine, 2-nitrobenzylthioinosine, theophylline and IBMX were examined for their affinity for adenosine binding sites. 2. This investigation confirmed the presence of four phosphodiesterase activities in rat cardiac ventricle; in rat cerebrum only three were present. 3. Denbufylline selective inhibited one form of Ca2+-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. The form inhibited was one of two present in cardiac ventricle and the sole one in cerebrum. This form was not inhibited by cyclic GMP. The inotropic agent SK&F 94120 selectively inhibited the form of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase which was inhibited by cyclic GMP present in cardiac ventricle. Theophylline and IBMX were relatively non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors. 4. Denbufylline was a less potent inhibitor of ligand binding to adenosine receptors than of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This contrasted with theophylline, which had a higher affinity for adenosine receptors, and IBMX which showed no marked selectivity. Denbufylline, theophylline and IBMX all had a low affinity for the adenosine re-uptake site. 5. Denbufylline is being developed as an agent for the therapy of multi-infarct dementia. The selective inhibition of a particular low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase may account for the activity of this compound. PMID:2474352

  3. Transgenic overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter elevates acetylcholine levels and augments motor endurance

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrand, Ericka C.; Lund, David; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Wright, Jane; Martin, Rolicia F.; Ennis, Elizabeth A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Sarter, Martin; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    The hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) sustains cholinergic signaling via the presynaptic uptake of choline derived from dietary sources or from acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-mediated hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). Loss of cholinergic signaling capacity is associated with cognitive and motor deficits in humans and in animal models. Whereas genetic elimination of CHT has revealed the critical nature of CHT in maintaining ACh stores and sustaining cholinergic signaling, the consequences of elevating CHT expression have yet to be studied. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenic methods, we generated mice with integrated additional copies of the mouse Slc5a7 gene. BAC–CHT mice are viable, appear to develop normally, and breed at wild-type (WT) rates. Biochemical studies revealed a 2 to 3-fold elevation in CHT protein levels in the CNS and periphery, paralleled by significant increases in [3H]HC-3 binding and synaptosomal choline transport activity. Elevations of ACh in the BAC–CHT mice occurred without compensatory changes in the activity of either choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or AChE. Immunohistochemistry for CHT in BAC–CHT brain sections revealed markedly elevated CHT expression in the cell bodies of cholinergic neurons and in axons projecting to regions known to receive cholinergic innervation. Behaviorally, BAC–CHT mice exhibited diminished fatigue and increased speeds on the treadmill test without evidence of increased strength. Finally, BAC–CHT mice displayed elevated horizontal activity in the open field test, diminished spontaneous alteration in the Y-maze, and reduced time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies provide biochemical, pharmacological and behavioral evidence that CHT protein expression and activity can be elevated beyond that seen in wild-type animals. BAC–CHT mice thus represent a novel tool to examine both the positive and negative

  4. Transgenic overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter elevates acetylcholine levels and augments motor endurance.

    PubMed

    Holmstrand, Ericka C; Lund, David; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Wright, Jane; Martin, Rolicia F; Ennis, Elizabeth A; Stanwood, Gregg D; Sarter, Martin; Blakely, Randy D

    2014-07-01

    The hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) sustains cholinergic signaling via the presynaptic uptake of choline derived from dietary sources or from acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-mediated hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). Loss of cholinergic signaling capacity is associated with cognitive and motor deficits in humans and in animal models. Whereas genetic elimination of CHT has revealed the critical nature of CHT in maintaining ACh stores and sustaining cholinergic signaling, the consequences of elevating CHT expression have yet to be studied. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenic methods, we generated mice with integrated additional copies of the mouse Slc5a7 gene. BAC-CHT mice are viable, appear to develop normally, and breed at wild-type (WT) rates. Biochemical studies revealed a 2 to 3-fold elevation in CHT protein levels in the CNS and periphery, paralleled by significant increases in [(3)H]HC-3 binding and synaptosomal choline transport activity. Elevations of ACh in the BAC-CHT mice occurred without compensatory changes in the activity of either choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or AChE. Immunohistochemistry for CHT in BAC-CHT brain sections revealed markedly elevated CHT expression in the cell bodies of cholinergic neurons and in axons projecting to regions known to receive cholinergic innervation. Behaviorally, BAC-CHT mice exhibited diminished fatigue and increased speeds on the treadmill test without evidence of increased strength. Finally, BAC-CHT mice displayed elevated horizontal activity in the open field test, diminished spontaneous alteration in the Y-maze, and reduced time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies provide biochemical, pharmacological and behavioral evidence that CHT protein expression and activity can be elevated beyond that seen in wild-type animals. BAC-CHT mice thus represent a novel tool to examine both the positive and negative impact of

  5. Inhibition of Choline Transport by Redox-active Cholinomimetic Bis-catechol Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shuang; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Viranga Tillekeratne, L. M.; Hudson, Richard A.; Kirchhoff, Jon R.

    2007-01-01

    Both N,N′-(2,3-dihydroxybenzyl)-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-1,6-hexanediamine dibromide (DTH, 6) and N,N′-(2,3-dihydroxybenzyl)-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-1,10-decanediamine dibromide (DTD, 7), which are symmetrical bis-catechol substituted hexamethonium and decamethonium analogues, respectively, were found to inhibit high affinity choline transport in mouse brain synaptosomes. Inhibitory properties were evaluated using an extraordinarily sensitive capillary electrophoresis method employing electrochemical detection at an enzyme-modified microelectrode. Dose-response curves were generated for each inhibitor and IC50 values were determined to be 76 μM for 6 and 21 μM for 7. Lineweaver-Burk analysis revealed that both molecules inhibit high affinity choline uptake by a mixed inhibition mechanism. The KI values for 6 and 7 were determined to be 73 ± 1 and 31 ± 2 μM, respectively. The inhibition properties were further compared to a series of mono-catechol analogues, 3-[(trimethylammonio)methyl]catechol (1), N,N-dimethylepinephrine (4) and 6-hydroxy-N,N-dimethylepinephrine (5), as well as the well-characterized hemicholinium inhibitors, hemicholinium-15 (HC-15, 8) and hemicholinum-3 (HC-3, 9). PMID:17827016

  6. Functional expression of choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) in small cell lung carcinoma cells: a target molecule for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Inazu, Masato; Yamada, Tomoko; Kubota, Nobuo; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Choline is essential for the synthesis of the major membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). Elevated levels of choline and up-regulated choline kinase activity have been detected in cancer cells. Thus, the intracellular accumulation of choline through choline transporters is the rate-limiting step in phospholipid metabolism and a prerequisite for cancer cell proliferation. However, the uptake system for choline and the functional expression of choline transporters in lung cancer cells are poorly understood. We examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline uptake in the small cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H69. Choline uptake was saturable and mediated by a single transport system. Interestingly, removal of Na(+) from the uptake buffer strongly enhanced choline uptake. This increase in choline uptake under the Na(+)-free conditions was inhibited by dimethylamiloride (DMA), a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) inhibitor. Various organic cations and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibited the choline uptake and cell viability. A correlation analysis of the potencies of organic cations for the inhibition of choline uptake and cell viability showed a strong correlation (R=0.8077). RT-PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) mRNA and NHE1 are mainly expressed. HC-3 and CTL1 siRNA inhibited choline uptake and cell viability, and increased caspase-3/7 activity. The conversion of choline to ACh was confirmed, and this conversion was enhanced under Na(+)-free conditions, which in turn was sensitive to HC-3. These results indicate that choline uptake through CTL1 is used for ACh synthesis. Both an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (eserine) and a butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor (ethopropazine) increased cell proliferation, and these effects were inhibited by 4-DAMP, a mAChR3 antagonist. We conclude that NCI-H69 cells express the choline transporter CTL1 which uses a directed H

  7. Characterization of an AtCCX5 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that involves in high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Min; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} The AtCCX5 protein coding a putative cation calcium exchanger was characterized. {yields} AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. {yields} AtCCX5 protein did not show the same transport properties as the CAXs. {yields} AtCCX5 protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake in yeast. {yields} AtCCX5 protein also involves in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. -- Abstract: The gene for a putative cation calcium exchanger (CCX) from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCCX5, was cloned and its function was analyzed in yeast. Green fluorescent protein-tagged AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. The yeast transformants expressing AtCCX5 were created and their growth in the presence of various cations (K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Li{sup +}) were analyzed. AtCCX5 expression was found to affect the response to K{sup +} and Na{sup +} in yeast. The AtCCX5 transformant also showed a little better growth to Zn{sup 2+}. The yeast mutant 9.3 expressing AtCCX5 restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K{sup +} (0.5 mM), and also suppressed its Na{sup +} sensitivity. Ion uptake experiments showed that AtCCX5 mediated relatively high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and was also involved in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. Taken together, these findings suggest that the AtCCX5 is a novel transport protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast.

  8. Fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, potentiates morphine analgesia without altering its discriminative stimulus properties or affinity for opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.D.; Lochner, M.A.; Bemis, K.G.; Hymson, D.L.

    1985-06-17

    The analgesic effect of morphine in the rat tail jerk assay was enhanced by the serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Tail jerk latency was not affected by fluoxetine alone. Morphine's affinity for opioid receptors labeled in vitro with /sup 3/H-naloxone or /sup 3/H-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin was not altered by fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites at concentrations as high as 1000 nM. In rats trained to discriminate morphine from saline, fluoxetine at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg were recognized as saline. Increasing the fluoxetine dose to 20 mg/kg did not result in generalization to either saline or morphine. The dose response curve for morphine generalization was not significantly altered by fluoxetine doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg. Those rats treated with the combination of morphine and 20 mg/kg of fluoxetine did not exhibit saline or morphine appropriate responding. Fluoxetine potentiates the analgesic properties of morphine without enhancing its affinity for opioid receptors or its discriminative stimulus properties. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  10. Effects of ammonia on high affinity glutamate uptake and glutamate transporter EAAT3 expression in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Helen; Zwingmann, Claudia; Pannunzio, Marc; Butterworth, Roger F

    2003-07-01

    Increased levels of extracellular glutamate are a consistent feature of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with liver failure and other hyperammonemic pathologies. Reduction of glutamate uptake has been described in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes, synaptosomes, and in animal models of hyperammonemia. In the present study, we examine the effects of pathophysiological concentrations of ammonia on D-aspartate (a non-metabolizable analog of glutamate) uptake by cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Exposure of these cells to ammonia resulted in time-dependent (24% reduction at 24h and 60% reduction at 5 days, P<0.001) and dose-dependent (21, 37, and 57% reduction at 1, 2.5, and 5mM for 5 days, P<0.01) suppression of D-aspartate uptake. Kinetic analyses revealed significant decreases in the velocity of uptake (V(max)) (37% decrease at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 52% decrease at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001) as well as significant reductions in K(m) values (25% reduction at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 45% reduction at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001). Western blotting, on the other hand, showed no significant changes in the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/EAAT3 protein, the only glutamate transporter currently known to be expressed by these cells. In addition, 1H combined with 13C-NMR spectroscopy studies using the stable isotope [1-13C]-glucose demonstrated a significant increase in intracellular glutamate levels derived from the oxidative metabolism of glucose, rather than from the deamidation of exogenous glutamine in cultured granule neurons exposed to ammonia. The present study provides evidence that the effects of ammonia on glutamate uptake are not solely an astrocytic phenomenon and that unlike the astrocytic glutamate transporter counterpart, EAAT3 protein expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells is not down-regulated when exposed to ammonia. Decrease of glutamate uptake in these cellular preparations may afford an additional regulatory mechanism aimed at

  11. Choline molecular imaging with small-animal PET for monitoring tumor cellular response to photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Meyers, Joseph; Xue, Liang-Yan; MacLennan, Gregory; Schluchter, Mark

    2009-02-01

    We are developing and evaluating choline molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in animal models. Human prostate cancer (PC-3) was studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer Pc 4 was used for PDT in tumor-bearing mice. MicroPET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and 48 h after PDT. Time-activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. For treated tumors, normalized choline uptake decreased significantly 48 h after PDT, compared to the same tumors pre-PDT (p <~ 0.001). However, for the control tumors, normalized choline uptake increased significantly (p <~ 0.001). PET imaging with 11C-choline is sensitive to detect early tumor response to PDT in the animal model of human prostate cancer.

  12. Interaction between total body gamma-irradiation and choline deficiency triggers immediate modulation of choline and choline-containing moieties.

    PubMed

    Batra, Vipen; Kislay, Binita; Devasagayam, Thomas Paul Asir

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of 60Co-gamma (γ) radiation on acute phase modulation, if any, of choline and choline-containing moieties in choline-deficient subjects. Corresponding results could provide information that might be useful in the management of adverse effects of γ-radiation. Male Swiss mice maintained on a choline-sufficient diet (CSD) and choline-free diet (CFD) based on AIN-93M formula, were subjected to whole body γ-irradiation (2-6 Gy). Liver, serum and brain samples from each group were then tested for: (i) Alterations in choline and choline-containing moieties such as phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyeline (SM); and (ii) modulation of choline profile modulating enzymes such as phospholipase D (PLD) and total sphingomyelinase (t-SMase). Liver and brain samples were also subjected to histo-pathological examinations. No significant changes were observed in folate, choline, choline-containing moieties and choline-modulating enzymes in choline-sufficient mice. In contrast, interaction between cytotoxic effects of γ-radiation and choline deficiency modulated choline and choline-containing moieties. Feeding CFD reduced hepatic concentrations of choline, PC and SM whereas PLD and t-SMase activities were significantly raised. The decrease in liver choline and choline-containing moieties was accompanied by an increase in blood choline concentration. Despite choline deficiency, the level of choline and acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransfease (ChAT) significantly increased in the brain. We propose that choline deprivation and γ-radiation interact to modulate choline reserves of hepatic tissue, which might release choline to blood. Our studies also clearly showed that interaction between choline deficiency and γ-radiation might substantially enhance liver adipogenesis.

  13. A high-affinity and specific carrier-mediated mechanism for uptake of thiamine pyrophosphate by human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Said, Hamid M

    2012-08-01

    All mammals require exogenous sources of thiamine (vitamin B1), as they lack the ability to synthesize the vitamin. These sources are dietary and bacterial (the latter is in reference to the vitamin, which is synthesized by the normal microflora of the large intestine). Bacterially generated thiamine exists in the free, as well as the pyrophosphorylated [thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)], form. With no (or very little) phosphatase activity in the colon, we hypothesized that the bacterially generated TPP can also be taken up by colonocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined [(3)H]TPP uptake in the human-derived, nontransformed colonic epithelial NCM460 cells and purified apical membrane vesicles isolated from the colon of human organ donors. Uptake of TPP by NCM460 cells occurred without metabolic alterations in the transported substrate and 1) was pH- and Na(+)-independent, but energy-dependent, 2) was saturable as a function of concentration (apparent K(m) = 0.157 ± 0.028 μM), 3) was highly specific for TPP and not affected by free thiamine (or its analogs) or by thiamine monophosphate and unrelated folate derivatives, 4) was adaptively regulated by extracellular substrate (TPP) level via what appears to be a transcriptionally mediated mechanism(s), and 5) appeared to be influenced by an intracellular Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated regulatory pathway. These findings suggest the involvement of a carrier-mediated mechanism for TPP uptake by colonic NCM460 cells, which was further confirmed by results from studies of native human colonic apical membrane vesicles. The results also suggest that the bacterially synthesized TPP in the large intestine is bioavailable and may contribute to overall body homeostasis of vitamin B1 and, especially, to the cellular nutrition of the local colonocytes.

  14. Role of Fig1, a Component of the Low-Affinity Calcium Uptake System, in Growth and Sexual Development of Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cavinder, Brad

    2012-01-01

    The function of Fig1, a transmembrane protein of the low-affinity calcium uptake system (LACS) in fungi, was examined for its role in the growth and development of the plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum. The Δfig1 mutants failed to produce mature perithecia, and sexual development was halted prior to the formation of perithecium initials. The loss of Fig1 function also resulted in a reduced vegetative growth rate. Macroconidium production was reduced 70-fold in the Δfig1 mutants compared to the wild type. The function of the high-affinity calcium uptake system (HACS), comprised of the Ca2+ channels Mid1 and Cch1, was previously characterized for F. graminearum. To better understand the roles of the LACS and the HACS, Δfig1 Δmid1, Δfig1 Δcch1, and Δfig1 Δmid1 Δcch1 double and triple mutants were generated, and the phenotypes of these mutants were more severe than those of the Δfig1 mutants. Pathogenicity on wheat was unaffected for the Δfig1 mutants, but the Δfig1 Δmid1, Δfig1 Δcch1, and Δfig1 Δmid1 Δcch1 mutants, lacking both LACS and HACS functions, had reduced pathogenicity. Additionally, Δfig1 mutants of Neurospora crassa were examined and did not affect filamentous growth or female fertility in a Δfig1 mating type A strain, but the Δfig1 mating type a strain failed to produce fertile fruiting bodies. These results are the first report of Fig1 function in filamentous ascomycetes and expand its role to include complex fruiting body and ascus development. PMID:22635922

  15. Role of Fig1, a component of the low-affinity calcium uptake system, in growth and sexual development of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Cavinder, Brad; Trail, Frances

    2012-08-01

    The function of Fig1, a transmembrane protein of the low-affinity calcium uptake system (LACS) in fungi, was examined for its role in the growth and development of the plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum. The Δfig1 mutants failed to produce mature perithecia, and sexual development was halted prior to the formation of perithecium initials. The loss of Fig1 function also resulted in a reduced vegetative growth rate. Macroconidium production was reduced 70-fold in the Δfig1 mutants compared to the wild type. The function of the high-affinity calcium uptake system (HACS), comprised of the Ca(2+) channels Mid1 and Cch1, was previously characterized for F. graminearum. To better understand the roles of the LACS and the HACS, Δfig1 Δmid1, Δfig1 Δcch1, and Δfig1 Δmid1 Δcch1 double and triple mutants were generated, and the phenotypes of these mutants were more severe than those of the Δfig1 mutants. Pathogenicity on wheat was unaffected for the Δfig1 mutants, but the Δfig1 Δmid1, Δfig1 Δcch1, and Δfig1 Δmid1 Δcch1 mutants, lacking both LACS and HACS functions, had reduced pathogenicity. Additionally, Δfig1 mutants of Neurospora crassa were examined and did not affect filamentous growth or female fertility in a Δfig1 mating type A strain, but the Δfig1 mating type a strain failed to produce fertile fruiting bodies. These results are the first report of Fig1 function in filamentous ascomycetes and expand its role to include complex fruiting body and ascus development.

  16. Arabidopsis IRT2 cooperates with the high-affinity iron uptake system to maintain iron homeostasis in root epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Vert, Grégory; Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Séguéla, Mathilde; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all organisms but toxic when present in excess. Consequently, plants carefully regulate their iron uptake, dependent on the FRO2 ferric reductase and the IRT1 transporter, to control its homeostasis. Arabidopsis IRT2 gene, whose expression is induced in root epidermis upon iron deprivation, was shown to encode a functional iron/zinc transporter in yeast, and proposed to function in iron acquisition from the soil. In this study, we demonstrate that, unlike its close homolog IRT1, IRT2 is not involved in iron absorption from the soil since overexpression of IRT2 does not rescue the iron uptake defect of irt1-1 mutant and since a null irt2 mutant shows no chlorosis in low iron. Consistently, an IRT2-green fluorescent fusion protein, transiently expressed in culture cells, localizes to intracellular vesicles. However, IRT2 appears strictly co-regulated with FRO2 and IRT1, supporting the view that IRT2 is an integral component of the root response to iron deficiency in root epidermal cells. We propose a model where IRT2 likely prevents toxicity from IRT1-dependent iron fluxes in epidermal cells, through compartmentalization.

  17. Association with the cholinergic precursor choline alphoscerate and the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine: an approach for enhancing cholinergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Amenta, Francesco; Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Vitali, Daniela; Di Tullio, Maria Antonietta

    2006-02-01

    The effects of association of cholinergic precursors choline or choline alphoscerate with the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine on acetylcholine levels and [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 binding were assessed in rat frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Acetylcholine immunoreactivity was also evaluated in cerebrocortical cholinergic fibers by immunohistochemistry. Choline alphoscerate or rivastigmine, but not choline increased acetylcholine levels as well as [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 binding used as a marker of high affinity cholinergic transporter. The association of choline alphoscerate with rivastigmine dose-dependently increased both acetylcholine levels and [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 binding. Rivastigmine alone or in association with either choline or choline alphoscerate decreased acetylcholinesterase (AChE), whereas choline or choline alphoscerate alone did not affect AChE activity. Choline alphoscerate or rivastigmine alone or in association, but not choline increased acetylcholine immunoreactivity in nerve fibers supplying cerebral cortex. These data suggest that combination of a suitable precursor of brain acetylcholine such as choline alphoscerate and of a cholinesterase inhibitor may represent an association worthwhile of being further investigated as a cholinergic replacement therapy in pathologies characterized by altered cholinergic neurotransmission.

  18. Comparative genomics and mutagenesis analyses of choline metabolism in the marine R oseobacter clade

    PubMed Central

    Lidbury, Ian; Kimberley, George; Scanlan, David J.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Choline is ubiquitous in marine eukaryotes and appears to be widely distributed in surface marine waters; however, its metabolism by marine bacteria is poorly understood. Here, using comparative genomics and molecular genetic approaches, we reveal that the capacity for choline catabolism is widespread in marine heterotrophs of the marine Roseobacter clade (MRC). Using the model bacterium R uegeria pomeroyi, we confirm that the bet A, bet B and bet C genes, encoding choline dehydrogenase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase and choline sulfatase, respectively, are involved in choline metabolism. The bet T gene, encoding an organic solute transporter, was essential for the rapid uptake of choline but not glycine betaine (GBT). Growth of choline and GBT as a sole carbon source resulted in the re‐mineralization of these nitrogen‐rich compounds into ammonium. Oxidation of the methyl groups from choline requires formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase encoded by fhs in R . pomeroyi, deletion of which resulted in incomplete degradation of GBT. We demonstrate that this was due to an imbalance in the supply of reducing equivalents required for choline catabolism, which can be alleviated by the addition of formate. Together, our results demonstrate that choline metabolism is ubiquitous in the MRC and reveal the role of Fhs in methyl group oxidation in R . pomeroyi. PMID:26058574

  19. High-Affinity Manganese Uptake by the Metal Transporter NRAMP1 Is Essential for Arabidopsis Growth in Low Manganese Conditions[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Cailliatte, Rémy; Schikora, Adam; Briat, Jean-François; Mari, Stéphane; Curie, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    In contrast with many other essential metals, the mechanisms of Mn acquisition in higher eukaryotes are seldom studied and poorly understood. We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana relies on a high-affinity uptake system to acquire Mn from the soil in conditions of low Mn availability and that this activity is catalyzed by the divalent metal transporter NRAMP1 (for Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein 1). The nramp1-1 loss-of-function mutant grows poorly, contains less Mn than the wild type, and fails to take up Mn in conditions of Mn limitation, thus demonstrating that NRAMP1 is the major high-affinity Mn transporter in Arabidopsis. Based on confocal microscopy observation of an NRAMP1-green fluorescent protein fusion, we established that NRAMP1 is localized to the plasma membrane. Consistent with its function in Mn acquisition from the soil, NRAMP1 expression is restricted to the root and stimulated by Mn deficiency. Finally, we show that NRAMP1 restores the capacity of the iron-regulated transporter1 mutant to take up iron and cobalt, indicating that NRAMP1 has a broad selectivity in vivo. The role of transporters of the NRAMP family is well established in higher eukaryotes for iron but has been controversial for Mn. This study demonstrates that NRAMP1 is a physiological manganese transporter in Arabidopsis. PMID:20228245

  20. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a high-affinity betaine uptake system (BusA) in Lactococcus lactis reveals a new functional organization within bacterial ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Obis, D; Guillot, A; Gripon, J C; Renault, P; Bolotin, A; Mistou, M Y

    1999-10-01

    The cytoplasmic accumulation of exogenous betaine stimulates the growth of Lactococcus lactis cultivated under hyperosmotic conditions. We report that L. lactis possesses a single betaine transport system that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. Through transposon mutagenesis, a mutant deficient in betaine transport was isolated. We identified two genes, busAA and busAB, grouped in an operon, busA (betaine uptake system). The transcription of busA is strongly regulated by the external osmolality of the medium. The busAA gene codes for the ATP-binding protein. busAB encodes a 573-residue polypeptide which presents two striking features: (i) a fusion between the regions encoding the transmembrane domain (TMD) and the substrate-binding domain (SBD) and (ii) a swapping of the SBD subdomains when compared to the Bacillus subtilis betaine-binding protein, OpuAC. BusA of L. lactis displays a high affinity towards betaine (K(m) = 1.7 microM) and is an osmosensor whose activity is tightly regulated by external osmolality, leading the betaine uptake capacity of L. lactis to be under dual control at the biochemical and genetic levels. A protein presenting the characteristics predicted for BusAB was detected in the membrane fraction of L. lactis. The fusion between the TMD and the SBD is the first example of a new organization within prokaryotic ABC transporters.

  1. LjMOT1, a high-affinity molybdate transporter from Lotus japonicus, is essential for molybdate uptake, but not for the delivery to nodules.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guilan; Hakoyama, Tsuneo; Kamiya, Takehiro; Miwa, Hiroki; Lombardo, Fabien; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Chen, Zheng; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Shinano, Takuro; Fujiwara, Toru

    2017-03-09

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential nutrient for plants, and is required for nitrogenase activity of legumes. However, the pathways of Mo uptake from soils and then delivery to the nodules have not been characterized in legumes. In this study, we characterized a high-affinity Mo transporter (LjMOT1) from Lotus japonicus. Mo concentrations in an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized line (ljmot1) decreased by 70-95% compared with wild type (WT). By comparing the DNA sequences of four AtMOT1 homologs between mutant and WT lines, one point mutation was found in LjMOT1, which altered Trp(292) to a stop codon; no mutation was found in the other homologous genes. The phenotype of Mo concentrations in F2 progeny from ljmot1 and WT crosses were associated with genotypes of LjMOT1. Introduction of endogenous LjMOT1 to ljmot1 restored Mo accumulation to approximately 60-70% of the WT. Yeast expressing LjMOT1 exhibited high Mo uptake activity, and the Km was 182 nM. LjMOT1 was expressed mainly in roots, and its expression was not affected by Mo supply or rhizobium inoculation. Although Mo accumulation in the nodules of ljmot1 was significantly lower than that of WT, it was still high enough for normal nodulation and nitrogenase activity, even for cotyledons removed ljmot1 plants grown under low Mo conditions, in this case the plant growth was significantly inhibited by Mo deficiency. Our results suggest that LjMOT1 is an essential Mo transporter in L. japonicus for Mo uptake from the soil and growth, but is not Mo delivery to the nodules. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus is associated with learning strategy preference in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Wayne R; Witty, Christine F; Daniel, Jill M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2015-08-01

    One principle of the multiple memory systems hypothesis posits that the hippocampus-based and striatum-based memory systems compete for control over learning. Consistent with this notion, previous research indicates that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in modulating the preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy over a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Interestingly, in the hippocampus, greater activity and higher protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the enzyme that synthesizes acetylcholine, are associated with better performance on hippocampus-based learning and memory tasks. With this in mind, the primary aim of the current study was to determine if higher levels of ChAT and the high-affinity choline uptake transporter (CHT) in the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy on a task that also could be solved by relying on a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Results confirmed that levels of ChAT in the dorsal region of the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a place learning strategy on a water maze task that could also be solved by adopting a stimulus-response learning strategy. Consistent with previous studies, the current results support the hypothesis that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in balancing competition between memory systems that modulate learning strategy preference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction of nitrate uptake in maize roots: expression of a putative high-affinity nitrate transporter and plasma membrane H+-ATPase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Santi, Simonetta; Locci, Geraldine; Monte, Rossella; Pinton, Roberto; Varanini, Zeno

    2003-08-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the effect of nitrate supply on the root plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase of etiolated maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings grown in hydroponics. The treatment induced higher uptake rates of the anion and the expression of a putative high-affinity nitrate transporter gene (ZmNRT2.1), the first to be identified in maize. Root PM H+-ATPase activity displayed a similar time-course pattern as that of net nitrate uptake and investigations were carried out to determine which of the two isoforms reported to date in maize, MHA1 and 2, responded to the treatment. MHA1 was not expressed under the conditions analysed. Genome analysis revealed that MHA2, described as the most abundant form in all maize tissues, was not present in the maize hybrid investigated, but a similar form was found instead and named MHA3. A second gene (named MHA4) was also identified and partially sequenced. Both genes, classified as members of the PM H+-ATPase subfamily II, responded to nitrate supply, although to different degrees: MHA4, in particular, proved more sensitive than MHA3, with a greater up- and down-regulation in response to the treatment. Increased expression of subfamily II genes resulted in higher steady-state levels of the enzyme in the root tissues and enhanced ATP-hydrolysing activity. The results support the idea that greater proton-pumping activity is required when nitrate inflow increases and suggest that nitrate may be the signal triggering the expression of the two members of PM H+-ATPase subfamily II.

  4. In Vivo Analysis of HPr Reveals a Fructose-Specific Phosphotransferase System That Confers High-Affinity Uptake in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Nothaft, Harald; Parche, Stephan; Kamionka, Annette; Titgemeyer, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    HPr, the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS), serves multiple functions in carbohydrate uptake and carbon source regulation in low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria and in gram-negative bacteria. To assess the role of HPr in the high-G+C-content gram-positive organism Streptomyces coelicolor, the encoding gene, ptsH, was deleted. The ptsH mutant BAP1 was impaired in fructose utilization, while growth on other carbon sources was not affected. Uptake assays revealed that BAP1 could not transport appreciable amounts of fructose, while the wild type showed inducible high-affinity fructose transport with an apparent Km of 2 μM. Complementation and reconstitution experiments demonstrated that HPr is indispensable for a fructose-specific PTS activity. Investigation of the putative fruKA gene locus led to identification of the fructose-specific enzyme II permease encoded by the fruA gene. Synthesis of HPr was not specifically enhanced in fructose-grown cells and occurred also in the presence of non-PTS carbon sources. Transcriptional analysis of ptsH revealed two promoters that are carbon source regulated. In contrast to what happens in other bacteria, glucose repression of glycerol kinase was still operative in a ptsH background, which suggests that HPr is not involved in general carbon regulation. However, fructose repression of glycerol kinase was lost in BAP1, indicating that the fructose-PTS is required for transduction of the signal. This study provides the first molecular genetic evidence of a physiological role of the PTS in S. coelicolor. PMID:12533468

  5. Choline treatment affects the liver reticuloendothelial system and plasma fatty acid composition in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Saeedi, Fatma J; Cheng, Behling

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated effects of choline treatment on hepatic reticuloendothelial and biliary functions and plasma fatty acid composition in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Choline was administered to untreated rats and a portion of STZ-treated rats for two sequences of five consecutive days, separated by a 2-day interval. Hepatic functions were studied using (99m) Tc Tin (II) colloid (TIN) and 99 mTc mebrofenin [bromo-iminodiacetic acid (BrIDA)] imaging. The TIN-uptake ratios (organ/whole body) of heart, liver and spleen, and the BrIDA-uptake ratios (organ or tissue/whole body) of liver, biliary tree and abdomen were obtained following imaging studies. Fatty acids were analysed by GC/MS. Choline treatment did not attenuate hyperglycaemic development. Diabetic rats showed (i) a decreased TIN-uptake ratio in liver with co-increased ratios in heart and spleen; choline treatment diminished these changes, (ii) elevated BrIDA-uptake ratios in biliary tree and abdomen but not in liver; choline treatment did not attenuate the elevations and (iii) decreases in plasma palmitoleic acid and oleic acid, reflecting an impaired stearoyl-CoA desaturase function; choline treatment did not affect the diminutions, but caused a decrease in arachidonic acid with a co-increase in linoleic acid. Some rats developed hypoproteinemia (HPO). HPO rats also exhibited decreases in plasma palmitoleic acid and oleic acid. Diabetes caused almost absence of palmitoleic acid in HPO rats. Choline treatment exerted no effect on the plasma fatty acid composition of diabetic HPO rats. Choline treatment affected hepatic reticuloendothelial function and plasma fatty acid composition, but not hepatobiliary function, in diabetic rats. Whether choline treatment is beneficial requires further studies. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  6. Two Plant Bacteria, S. meliloti and Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, Share Functional znuABC Homologues That Encode for a High Affinity Zinc Uptake System

    PubMed Central

    Vahling-Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Zhou, Huasong; Benyon, Lesley; Morgan, J. Kent; Duan, Yongping

    2012-01-01

    The Znu system, encoded for by znuABC, can be found in multiple genera of bacteria and has been shown to be responsible for the import of zinc under low zinc conditions. Although this high-affinity uptake system is known to be important for both growth and/or pathogenesis in bacteria, it has not been functionally characterized in a plant-associated bacterium. A single homologue of this system has been identified in the plant endosymbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, while two homologous systems were found in the destructive citrus pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. To understand the role of these protein homologues, a complementation assay was devised allowing the individual genes that comprise the system to be assayed independently for their ability to reinstate a partially-inactivated Znu system. Results from the assays have demonstrated that although all of the genes from S. meliloti were able to restore activity, only one of the two Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus encoded gene clusters contained genes that were able to functionally complement the system. Additional analysis of the gene clusters reveals that distinct modes of regulation may also exist between the Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus and S. meliloti import systems despite the intracellular-plant niche common to both of these bacteria. PMID:22655039

  7. Genetic Variation in Choline-Metabolizing Enzymes Alters Choline Metabolism in Young Women Consuming Choline Intakes Meeting Current Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Ariel B.; Cohen, Vanessa V.; Swersky, Camille C.; Stover, Julie; Vitiello, Gerardo A.; Lovesky, Jessica; Chuang, Jasmine C.; Shields, Kelsey; Fomin, Vladislav G.; Lopez, Yusnier S.; Mohan, Sanjay; Ganti, Anita; Carrier, Bradley; Malysheva, Olga V.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in choline metabolizing genes are associated with disease risk and greater susceptibility to organ dysfunction under conditions of dietary choline restriction. However, the underlying metabolic signatures of these variants are not well characterized and it is unknown whether genotypic differences persist at recommended choline intakes. Thus, we sought to determine if common genetic risk factors alter choline dynamics in pregnant, lactating, and non-pregnant women consuming choline intakes meeting and exceeding current recommendations. Women (n = 75) consumed 480 or 930 mg choline/day (22% as a metabolic tracer, choline-d9) for 10–12 weeks in a controlled feeding study. Genotyping was performed for eight variant SNPs and genetic differences in metabolic flux and partitioning of plasma choline metabolites were evaluated using stable isotope methodology. CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs9001, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946, FMO3 rs2266782, SLC44A1 rs7873937, and SLC44A1 rs3199966 altered the use of choline as a methyl donor; CHDH rs9001 and BHMT rs3733890 altered the partitioning of dietary choline between betaine and phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the cytidine diphosphate (CDP)-choline pathway; and CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946 and SLC44A1 rs7873937 altered the distribution of dietary choline between the CDP-choline and phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) denovo pathway. Such metabolic differences may contribute to disease pathogenesis and prognosis over the long-term. PMID:28134761

  8. Usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base: comparison with FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shin; Yokoyama, Junkichi; Yoshimoto, Hitoshi; Yazawa, Masaki; Kazuo, Kubota; Hanaguri, Makoto; Ohba, Shinichi; Fujimaki, Mitsuhisa; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2012-02-07

    Choline is a new PET tracer that is useful for the detection of malignant tumor. Choline is a precursor of the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid in the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells. Malignant tumors have an elevated level of phosphatidylcholine in cell membrane. Thus, choline is a marker of tumor malignancy. The patient was a 51-year-old man with repeated recurrent hemangiopericytoma in the skull base. We performed Choline-PET in this patient after various treatments and compared findings with those of FDG-PET. Choline accumulated in this tumor, but FDG did not accumulate. We diagnosed this tumor as residual hemangiopericytoma and performed the resection of the residual tumor. FDG-PET is not appropriate for skull base tumor detection because uptake in the brain is very strong. We emphasize the usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base after various treatments, compared with FDG-PET.

  9. Diethanolamine Alters Proliferation and Choline Metabolism in Mouse Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Mihai D.; Wu, Renan; Guo, Zhong; da Costa, Kerry Ann; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) is a widely used ingredient in many consumer products and in a number of industrial applications. It has been previously reported that dermal administration of DEA to mice diminished hepatic stores of choline and altered brain development in the fetus. The aim of this study was to use mouse neural precursor cells in vitro to assess the mechanism underlying the effects of DEA. Cells exposed to DEA treatment (3mM) proliferated less (by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation) at 48 h (24% of control [CT]), and had increased apoptosis at 72 h (308% of CT). Uptake of choline into cells was reduced by DEA treatment (to 52% of CT), resulting in diminished intracellular concentrations of choline and phosphocholine (55 and 12% of CT, respectively). When choline concentration in the growth medium was increased threefold (to 210μM), the effects of DEA exposure on cell proliferation and apoptosis were prevented, however, intracellular phosphocholine concentrations remained low. In choline kinase assays, we observed that DEA can be phosphorylated to phospho-DEA at the expense of choline. Thus, the effects of DEA are likely mediated by inhibition of choline transport into neural precursor cells and by altered metabolism of choline. Our study suggests that prenatal exposure to DEA may have a detrimental effect on brain development. PMID:17204582

  10. The widespread plant-colonizing bacterial species Pseudomonas syringae detects and exploits an extracellular pool of choline in hosts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiliang; Li, Shanshan; McKeever, Dana R; Beattie, Gwyn A

    2013-09-01

    The quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) choline is a major component of membrane lipids in eukaryotes and, if available to microbial colonists of plants, could provide benefits for growth and protection from stress. Free choline is found in homogenized plant tissues, but its subcellular location and availability to plant microbes are not known. Whole-cell bacterial bioreporters of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae were constructed that couple a QAC-responsive transcriptional fusion with well-characterized bacterial QAC transporters. These bioreporters demonstrated the presence of abundant free choline compounds released from germinating seeds and seedlings of the bean Phaseolus vulgaris, and a smaller but consistently detectable amount of QACs, probably choline, from leaves. The localization of P. syringae bioreporter cells to the surface and intercellular sites of plant tissues demonstrated the extracellular location of these QAC pools. Moreover, P. syringae mutants that were deficient in the uptake of choline compounds exhibited reduced fitness on leaves, highlighting the importance of extracellular choline to P. syringae on leaves. Our data support a model in which this choline pool is derived from the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine through plant-encoded phospholipases that release choline into the intercellular spaces of plant tissues, such as for membrane lipid recycling. The consequent extracellular release of choline compounds enables their interception and exploitation by plant-associated microbes, and thus provides a selective advantage for microbes such as P. syringae that are adapted to maximally exploit choline.

  11. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  12. A systematic analysis reveals an essential role for high-affinity iron uptake system, haemolysin and CFEM domain-containing protein in iron homoeostasis and virulence in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Suneetha, Korivi Jyothiraj; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms and human pathogens employ a battery of factors to scavenge iron from the high-affinity iron-binding host proteins. In the present study, we have elucidated, via a candidate gene approach, major iron acquisition and homoeostatic mechanisms operational in an opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Phenotypic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a set of 13 C. glabrata strains, deleted for proteins potentially implicated in iron metabolism, revealed that the high-affinity reductive iron uptake system is required for utilization of alternate carbon sources and for growth under both in vitro iron-limiting and in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the cysteine-rich CFEM (common in fungal extracellular membranes) domain-containing cell wall structural protein, CgCcw14, and a putative haemolysin, CgMam3, are essential for maintenance of intracellular iron content, adherence to epithelial cells and virulence. Consistent with their roles in iron homoeostasis, mitochondrial aconitase activity was lower and higher in mutants disrupted for high-affinity iron transport, and haemolysin respectively. Additionally, we present evidence that the mitochondrial frataxin, CgYfh1, is pivotal to iron metabolism. Besides yielding insights into major in vitro and in vivo iron acquisition strategies, our findings establish high-affinity iron uptake mechanisms as critical virulence determinants in C. glabrata.

  13. Stress-induced stimulation of choline transport in cultured choroid plexus epithelium exposed to low concentrations of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Young, Robin K; Villalobos, Alice R A

    2014-03-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and accumulates essential minerals and heavy metals. Choroid plexus is cited as being a "sink" for heavy metals and excess minerals, serving to minimize accumulation of these potentially toxic agents in the brain. An understanding of how low doses of contaminant metals might alter transport of other solutes in the choroid plexus is limited. Using primary cultures of epithelial cells isolated from neonatal rat choroid plexus, our objective was to characterize modulation of apical uptake of the model organic cation choline elicited by low concentrations of the contaminant metal cadmium (CdCl₂). At 50-1,000 nM, cadmium did not directly decrease or increase 30-min apical uptake of 10 μM [(3)H]choline. However, extended exposure to 250-500 nM cadmium increased [(3)H]choline uptake by as much as 75% without marked cytotoxicity. In addition, cadmium induced heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression and markedly induced metallothionein gene expression. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine attenuated stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Conversely, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) enhanced stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Cadmium also activated ERK1/2 MAP kinase. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished ERK1/2 activation and attenuated stimulation of choline uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation abated stimulation of choline uptake in cells exposed to cadmium with BSO. These data indicate that in the choroid plexus, exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may induce oxidative stress and consequently stimulate apical choline transport through activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase.

  14. Stress-induced stimulation of choline transport in cultured choroid plexus epithelium exposed to low concentrations of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Young, Robin K.

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and accumulates essential minerals and heavy metals. Choroid plexus is cited as being a “sink” for heavy metals and excess minerals, serving to minimize accumulation of these potentially toxic agents in the brain. An understanding of how low doses of contaminant metals might alter transport of other solutes in the choroid plexus is limited. Using primary cultures of epithelial cells isolated from neonatal rat choroid plexus, our objective was to characterize modulation of apical uptake of the model organic cation choline elicited by low concentrations of the contaminant metal cadmium (CdCl2). At 50–1,000 nM, cadmium did not directly decrease or increase 30-min apical uptake of 10 μM [3H]choline. However, extended exposure to 250–500 nM cadmium increased [3H]choline uptake by as much as 75% without marked cytotoxicity. In addition, cadmium induced heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression and markedly induced metallothionein gene expression. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine attenuated stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Conversely, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) enhanced stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Cadmium also activated ERK1/2 MAP kinase. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished ERK1/2 activation and attenuated stimulation of choline uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation abated stimulation of choline uptake in cells exposed to cadmium with BSO. These data indicate that in the choroid plexus, exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may induce oxidative stress and consequently stimulate apical choline transport through activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase. PMID:24401988

  15. The effect of polychlorinated biphenyls on the high affinity uptake of the neurotransmitters, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate and GABA, into rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mariussen, E; Fonnum, F

    2001-02-21

    Studies have shown that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) may affect cognitive functions both in human and also in experimental animals. We have investigated whether this effect could be caused by an inhibition of the uptake of selected neurotransmitters into rat brain synaptosomes. Ortho-chlorinated biphenyls were found to inhibit transmitter transport into synaptosomes from rat brain. In contrast, several nonortho-chlorinated biphenyls did not inhibit uptake. The uptake of dopamine, glutamate, GABA and serotonin was inhibited by the PCB mixtures, Aroclor 1242 and 1254. Under identical condition, the uptake of dopamine was inhibited more efficient than that of glutamate. The inhibition of neurotransmitter uptake was found to be dependent on the chlorination patterns of the PCB congeners, (i) ortho-chlorinated PCBs with four to five chlorine substituents (with the exception of 2,2',6,6'-TeCB) were the most effective inhibitors; (ii) hexa- or heptachlorinated PCBs were poor inhibitors or partial inhibitors (e.g. 2,2',4,4',5,5'-HCB) of glutamate and GABA uptake. Kinetic studies indicated that Aroclor 1242 inhibited dopamine uptake mainly competitively. The uptake of glutamate and GABA was inhibited in either a mixed competitive or in a non-competitive way, respectively. The neurotoxic consequences of the effect of different PCBs on neurotransmitter uptake on the uptake into synaptosomes are discussed.

  16. Energy for wild-type acetylcholine receptor channel gating from different choline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bruhova, Iva; Gregg, Timothy; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-02-05

    Agonists, including the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), bind at two sites in the neuromuscular ACh receptor channel (AChR) to promote a reversible, global change in protein conformation that regulates the flow of ions across the muscle cell membrane. In the synaptic cleft, ACh is hydrolyzed to acetate and choline. Replacement of the transmitter's ester acetyl group with a hydroxyl (ACh→choline) results in a + 1.8 kcal/mol reduction in the energy for gating generated by each agonist molecule from a low- to high-affinity change of the transmitter binding site (ΔG(B)). To understand the distinct actions of structurally related agonist molecules, we measured ΔG(B) for 10 related choline derivatives. Replacing the hydroxyl group of choline with different substituents, such as hydrogen, chloride, methyl, or amine, increased the energy for gating (i.e., it made ΔG(B) more negative relative to choline). Extending the ethyl hydroxide tail of choline to propyl and butyl hydroxide also increased this energy. Our findings reveal the amount of energy that is available for the AChR conformational change provided by different, structurally related agonists. We speculate that a hydrogen bond between the choline hydroxyl and the backbone carbonyl of αW149 positions this agonist's quaternary ammonium group so as to reduce the cation-π interaction between this moiety and the aromatic groups at the binding site.

  17. Energy for Wild-Type Acetylcholine Receptor Channel Gating from Different Choline Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bruhova, Iva; Gregg, Timothy; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Agonists, including the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), bind at two sites in the neuromuscular ACh receptor channel (AChR) to promote a reversible, global change in protein conformation that regulates the flow of ions across the muscle cell membrane. In the synaptic cleft, ACh is hydrolyzed to acetate and choline. Replacement of the transmitter’s ester acetyl group with a hydroxyl (ACh→choline) results in a +1.8 kcal/mol reduction in the energy for gating generated by each agonist molecule from a low- to high-affinity change of the transmitter binding site (ΔGB). To understand the distinct actions of structurally related agonist molecules, we measured ΔGB for 10 related choline derivatives. Replacing the hydroxyl group of choline with different substituents, such as hydrogen, chloride, methyl, or amine, increased the energy for gating (i.e., it made ΔGB more negative relative to choline). Extending the ethyl hydroxide tail of choline to propyl and butyl hydroxide also increased this energy. Our findings reveal the amount of energy that is available for the AChR conformational change provided by different, structurally related agonists. We speculate that a hydrogen bond between the choline hydroxyl and the backbone carbonyl of αW149 positions this agonist’s quaternary ammonium group so as to reduce the cation-π interaction between this moiety and the aromatic groups at the binding site. PMID:23442907

  18. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  19. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. Improved human visuomotor performance and pupil constriction after choline supplementation in a placebo-controlled double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Marnix; Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    Only few nutrients are known to enhance cognition. Here we explore whether visuomotor performance can be improved through the intake of the nutrient choline, an essential chemical compound in a vertebrate’s diet. Choline is abundant in for example eggs and shrimps and many animal studies suggest that it serves as a cognitive enhancer. As choline is important for the communication between motor neurons and the control of skeletal muscles, we assumed that choline supplementation may have positive effects on action coordination in humans. A group of twenty-eight individuals ingested two grams of choline bitartrate or a placebo in two separate sessions. Seventy minutes post ingestion, participants performed a visuomotor aiming task in which they had to rapidly hit the centers of targets. Results showed that participants hit targets more centrally after choline supplementation. Pupil size (a cognition-sensitive biomarker) also significantly decreased after choline intake and correlated positively with the hit distance to the targets and the number of target misses, and negatively with reaction times. These findings point to a choline-induced bias towards action precision in the trade-off between speed and accuracy. The changes in pupil size suggest that choline uptake alters cholinergic functions in the nervous system. PMID:26271904

  9. Polyvalent choline phosphate as a universal biomembrane adhesive.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xifei; Liu, Zonghua; Janzen, Johan; Chafeeva, Irina; Horte, Sonja; Chen, Wei; Kainthan, Rajesh K; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Brooks, Donald E

    2012-03-18

    Phospholipids in the cell membranes of all eukaryotic cells contain phosphatidyl choline (PC) as the headgroup. Here we show that hyperbranched polyglycerols (HPGs) decorated with the 'PC-inverse' choline phosphate (CP) in a polyvalent fashion can electrostatically bind to a variety of cell membranes and to PC-containing liposomes, the binding strength depending on the number density of CP groups per macromolecule. We also show that HPG-CPs can cause cells to adhere with varying affinity to other cells, and that binding can be reversed by subsequent exposure to low molecular weight HPGs carrying small numbers of PCs. Moreover, PC-rich membranes adsorb and rapidly internalize fluorescent HPG-CP but not HPG-PC molecules, which suggests that HPG-CPs could be used as drug-delivery agents. CP-decorated polymers should find broad use, for instance as tissue sealants and in the self-assembly of lipid nanostructures.

  10. NO3(-) , PO4(3)(-) and SO4(2)(-) deprivation reduced LKT1-mediated low-affinity K(+) uptake and SKOR-mediated K(+) translocation in tomato and Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Reyes; García-Legaz, Manuel Francisco; López-Gómez, Elvira; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco; Ángeles Botella, M

    2017-08-01

    Regulation of essential macronutrients acquisition by plants in response to their availability is a key process for plant adaptation to changing environments. Here we show in tomato and Arabidopsis plants that when they are subjected to NO3(-) , PO4(3)(-) and SO4(2)(-) deprivation, low-affinity K(+) uptake and K(+) translocation to the shoot are reduced. In parallel, these nutritional deficiencies produce reductions in the messenger levels of the genes encoding the main systems for low-affinity K(+) uptake and K(+) translocation, i.e. AKT1 and SKOR in Arabidopsis and LKT1 and the tomato homolog of SKOR, SlSKOR in tomato, respectively. The results suggest that the shortage of one nutrient produces a general downregulation of the acquisition of other nutrients. In the case of K(+) nutrient, one of the mechanisms for such a response resides in the transcriptional repression of the genes encoding the systems for K(+) uptake and translocation. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  11. Phosphatidylcholine and the CDP-Choline Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fagone, Paolo; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The CDP-choline pathway of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis was first described more than 50 years ago. Investigation of the CDP-choline pathway in yeast provides a basis for understanding the CDP-choline pathway in mammals. PtdCho is considered as an intermediate in a cycle of synthesis and degradation, and the activity of a CDP-choline cycle is linked to subcellular membrane lipid movement. The components of the mammalian CDP-choline pathway include choline transport, choline kinase, phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, and choline phosphotransferase activities. The protein isoforms and biochemical mechanisms of regulation of the pathway enzymes are related to their cell and tissue-specific functions. Regulated PtdCho turnover mediated by phospholipases or neuropathy target esterase participates in the mammalian CDP-choline cycle. Knockout mouse models define the biological functions of the CDP-choline cycle in mammalian cells and tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23010477

  12. Choline Ions Stabilize A-T Base Pairs by Fitting into Minor Groove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Naoki

    In a Watson-Crick base paired DNA duplex, G-C base pairs are more stable than A-T base pairs. However, in solvent containing choline ions, the stabilities of these base pairs are reversed. To elucidate the mechanism through which choline ions exert this effect from a microscopic viewpoint, we performed molecular dynamics simulations. We found that choline ions interact with a DNA duplex through multiple hydrogen bonds. The affinity of choline ion for the minor groove of A-T base pairs was higher than that for the major groove. The binding of choline ions to the minor groove of A-T base pairs supports groove formation without disturbing the formation of hydrogen bonds between the base pairs. In contrast, choline ions inhibit the formation of hydrogen bonds between G-C base pairs by binding to atoms of these bases that are involved in Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding. These findings will help us understand the stabilities of canonical DNA structures under the crowded conditions inside cells.

  13. Choline Metabolites: Gene by Diet Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Tangi; Allayee, Hooman; Bennett, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between genetic polymorphisms in genes that metabolize choline and the dietary requirements of choline and how these interactions relate to human health and disease. Recent findings The importance of choline as an essential nutrient has been well established but our appreciation of the interaction between our underlying genetic architecture and dietary choline requirements is only beginning. It has been shown in both human and animal studies that choline deficiencies contribute to diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and various neurodegenerative diseases. An adequate supply of dietary choline is important for optimum development, highlighted by the increased maternal requirements during fetal development and in breast-fed infants. We discuss recent studies investigating variants in PEMT and MTHFR1 that are associated with a variety of birth defects. In addition to genetic interactions, we discuss several recent studies that uncover changes in fetal global methylation patterns in response to maternal dietary choline intake that result in changes in gene expression in the offspring. In contrast to the developmental role of adequate choline, there is now an appreciation of the role choline has in cardiovascular disease through the gut microbiota-mediated metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide. This pathway highlights some of our understanding of how the microbiome affects nutrient processing and bioavailability. Finally, in order to better characterize the genetic architecture regulating choline requirements, we discuss recent results focused on identifying polymorphisms that regulate choline and its derivative products. Summary Here we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of how specific alleles in key choline metabolism genes are related to dietary choline requirements and human disease. PMID:26655287

  14. Choline metabolites: gene by diet interactions.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Tangi; Allayee, Hooman; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-02-01

    The review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between genetic polymorphisms in genes that metabolize choline and the dietary requirements of choline and how these interactions relate to human health and disease. The importance of choline as an essential nutrient has been well established, but our appreciation of the interaction between our underlying genetic architecture and dietary choline requirements is only beginning. It has been shown in both human and animal studies that choline deficiencies contribute to diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and various neurodegenerative diseases. An adequate supply of dietary choline is important for optimum development, highlighted by the increased maternal requirements during fetal development and in breast-fed infants. We discuss recent studies investigating variants in PEMT and MTHFR1 that are associated with a variety of birth defects. In addition to genetic interactions, we discuss several recent studies that uncover changes in fetal global methylation patterns in response to maternal dietary choline intake that result in changes in gene expression in the offspring. In contrast to the developmental role of adequate choline, there is now an appreciation of the role choline has in cardiovascular disease through the gut microbiota-mediated metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide. This pathway highlights some of our understanding of how the microbiome affects nutrient processing and bioavailability. Finally, to better characterize the genetic architecture regulating choline requirements, we discuss recent results focused on identifying polymorphisms that regulate choline and its derivative products. Here we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of how specific alleles in key choline metabolism genes are related to dietary choline requirements and human disease.

  15. The choline transporter-like family SLC44: properties and roles in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Traiffort, Elisabeth; O'Regan, Seana; Ruat, Martial

    2013-01-01

    The Na(+)-independent, high affinity choline carrier system proposed to supply choline for the synthesis of cell membrane phospholipids was recently associated with SLC44 family members (SLC44A1-5) also called choline-like transporter family. SLC44A1 is widely expressed throughout the nervous system in both neurons and oligodendrocytes, while SLC44A2-4 are mainly detected in peripheral tissues. The subcellular localization of the proteins was mainly addressed for SLC44A1 through the development of specific antibodies. SLC44A1 is detected in both the plasma and mitochondrial membranes where the protein is able to transport choline at high affinity and in a Na(+)-independent manner. The physiological relevance of SLC44A1 as a choline carrier is indicated by its likely involvement in membrane synthesis for cell growth or repair, and also by its role in phospholipid production for the generation of lung surfactant. Moreover, an autoimmune disease has been related to the blockade of SLC44A2 function, which results in the alteration of hair cells in the inner ear and leads to autoimmune hearing loss. In the alloimmune syndrome called transfusion-related acute lung injury, antibodies to SLC44A2 cause a deleterious aggregation of granulocytes. Therefore transporters of the SLC44 family represent attractive and promising targets for therapeutic and diagnostic applications regarding both immune and degenerative diseases.

  16. Organic cation uptake in vitro by the rabbit iris-ciliary body, renal cortex, and choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Bárány, E H

    1976-05-01

    The uptake in vitro of radioactively labeled test substances was studied in tissues from albino rabbits. Choroid plexus, slices of outer renal cortex, and iris-ciliary body were incubated in a K-rich medium containing one of the cations 14C-Emepronium (Cetiprin), 14C-tetraethylammonium, 14C-choline, or 125I-o-iodobenzyltrimethylammonium and sometimes the anions 131I-o-iodohippurate and 125I-iodipamide. Choroid plexus and renal cortex accumulated all test substances, some to very high tissue-medium ratios. The iris-ciliary body preparation accumulated the anions well but the organic cations only weakly. The only convincing uptake was that of Emepronium. The affinity of this uptake system seemed to be similar to that in the kidney, half-saturating around 10(-4)M Emepronium.

  17. The high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcepsilonRI) regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake and a dihydropyridine receptor-mediated calcium influx in mast cells: Role of the FcepsilonRIbeta chain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Inoue, Toshio; Nunomura, Satoshi; Ra, Chisei

    2008-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondria take up calcium upon receptor (agonist) stimulation and that this contributes to the dynamics of spatiotemporal calcium signaling. We have previously shown that engagement of the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (FcepsilonRI) stimulates mitochondrial calcium ([Ca2+]m) uptake in mast cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms and biological significance of FcepsilonRI regulation of [Ca2+]m. Antigen stimulated [Ca2+]m uptake in a dose-dependent manner with a minimal effective dose of 0.03-3 ng/ml. This [Ca2+]m uptake took place immediately, reaching its peak within minutes and was inhibited by the src family kinase inhibitor PP1 and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Analyses using mast cells expressing the wild-type or the mutated type of the FcepsilonRIbeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in which all tyrosine residues were replaced by phenylalanine revealed that the FcepsilonRIbeta ITAM is essential for a sustained [Ca2+]m uptake. The FcepsilonRIbeta ITAM was essential for overall calcium response upon weak FcepsilonRI stimulation (at low antigen concentration), while upon strong stimulation (at high antigen concentration) it appeared necessary selectively to an immediate calcium response that was sensitive to the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) antagonist nifedipine and wortmannin but not to the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) antagonists such as 2-aminoethoxyphenyl borate and SK&F96365. These data demonstrate that the FcepsilonRIbeta regulates [Ca2+]m uptake in mast cells via the ITAM and suggest that this plays a key role in regulating calcium influx especially that induced via a DHPR-mediated calcium channel.

  18. Characterization of the high affinity Zn transporter from Noccaea caerulescens, NcZNT1, and dissection of its promoter for its role in Zn uptake and hyperaccumulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this paper, we conducted a detailed analysis of the ZIP family transporter, NcZNT1, in the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulating plant species, Noccaea caerulescens, formerly known as Thlaspi caerulescens. NcZNT1 was previously suggested to be the primary root Zn/Cd uptake transporter. Both a characterization ...

  19. Symmetrical choline-derived dications display strong anti-kinetoplastid activity

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Hasan M. S.; Al-Salabi, Mohammed I.; El Sabbagh, Nasser; Quashie, Neils B.; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A. M.; Escale, Roger; Smith, Terry K.; Vial, Henri J.; de Koning, Harry P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the anti-kinetoplastid activity of choline-derived analogues with previously reported antimalarial efficacy. Methods From an existing choline analogue library, seven antimalarial compounds, representative of the first-, second- and third-generation analogues previously developed, were assessed for activity against Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. Using a variety of techniques, the effects of choline analogue exposure on the parasites were documented and a preliminary investigation of their mode of action was performed. Results The activities of choline-derived compounds against Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana were determined. The compounds displayed promising anti-kinetoplastid activity, particularly against T. brucei, to which 4/7 displayed submicromolar EC50 values for the wild-type strain. Low micromolar concentrations of most compounds cleared trypanosome cultures within 24–48 h. The compounds inhibit a choline transporter in Leishmania, but their entry may not depend only on this carrier; T. b. brucei lacks a choline carrier and the mode of uptake remains unclear. The compounds had no effect on the overall lipid composition of the cells, cell cycle progression or cyclic adenosine monophosphate production or short-term effects on intracellular calcium levels. However, several of the compounds, displayed pronounced effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential; this action was not associated with production of reactive oxygen species but rather with a slow rise of intracellular calcium levels and DNA fragmentation. Conclusions The choline analogues displayed strong activity against kinetoplastid parasites, particularly against T. b. brucei. In contrast to their antimalarial activity, they did not act on trypanosomes by disrupting choline salvage or phospholipid metabolism, instead disrupting mitochondrial function, leading to chromosomal fragmentation. PMID:21078603

  20. Diethanolamine induces hepatic choline deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Gamsky, Elizabeth A; Hicks, Sarah M; Vassallo, Jeffrey D; Mar, Mei-Heng; Zeisel, Steven H

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of the present experiments was to test the hypothesis that diethanolamine (DEA), an alkanolamine shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in mice, induces hepatic choline deficiency and to determine whether altered choline homeostasis was causally related to the carcinogenic outcome. To examine this hypothesis, the biochemical and histopathological changes in male B6C3F1 mice made choline deficient by dietary deprivation were first determined. Phosphocholine (PCho), the intracellular storage form of choline was severely depleted, decreasing to about 20% of control values with 2 weeks of dietary choline deficiency. Other metabolites, including choline, glycerophosphocholine (GPC), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) also decreased. Hepatic concentrations of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) decreased, whereas levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) increased. Despite these biochemical changes, fatty liver, which is often associated with choline deficiency, was not observed in the mice. The dose response, reversibility, and strain-dependence of the effects of DEA on choline metabolites were studied. B6C3F1 mice were dosed dermally with DEA (0, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 160 mg/kg) for 4 weeks (5 days/week). Control animals received either no treatment or dermal application of 95% ethanol (1.8 ml/kg). PCho was most sensitive to DEA treatment, decreasing at dosages of 20 mg/kg and higher and reaching a maximum 50% depletion at 160 mg/kg/day. GPC, choline, and PC also decreased in a dose-dependent manner. At 80 and 160 mg/kg/day, SAM levels decreased while SAH levels increased in liver. A no-observed effect level (NOEL) for DEA-induced changes in choline homeostasis was 10 mg/kg/day. Choline metabolites, SAM and SAH returned to control levels in mice dosed at 160 mg/kg for 4 weeks and allowed a 2-week recovery period prior to necropsy. In a manner similar to dietary choline deficiency, no fatty change was observed in the liver of DEA-treated mice. In C57BL/6 mice, DEA treatment (160 mg

  1. Choline Analogues in Malaria Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peyrottes, Suzanne; Caldarelli, Sergio; Wein, Sharon; Périgaud, Christian; Pellet, Alain; Vial, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging resistance against well-established anti-malaria drugs warrants the introduction of new therapeutic agents with original mechanisms of action. Inhibition of membrane-based phospholipid biosynthesis, which is crucial for the parasite, has thus been proposed as a novel and promising therapeutic strategy. This review compiles literature concerning the design and study of choline analogues and related cation derivatives as potential anti-malarials. It covers advances achieved over the last two decades and describes: the concept validation, the design and selection of a clinical candidate (Albitiazolium), back-up derivatives while also providing insight into the development of prodrug approaches. PMID:22607139

  2. CDP-choline: acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Grau, T; Romero, A; Sacristán, A; Ortiz, J A

    1983-01-01

    The acute toxicity of a single dose of cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline, citicoline, Somazina) by different administration routes in mice and rats has been studied. LD50 values were determined according to the cumulative method by Reed-Muench for mortality rate, and Pizzi's method for calculation of standard error.

  3. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline...

  4. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250 Choline...

  5. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline...

  6. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250 Choline...

  7. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Zur Regulates the High-Affinity Zinc Uptake System TroCBA and the Putative Metal Chaperone YciC, along with ZinT and ZnuABC, for Survival under Zinc-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chaoprasid, Paweena; Dokpikul, Thanittra; Johnrod, Jaruwan; Sirirakphaisarn, Sirin; Nookabkaew, Sumontha; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a cluster of genes (Atu3178, Atu3179, and Atu3180) encoding an ABC-type transporter, here named troA, troB, and troC, respectively, which is shown here to be a zinc-specific uptake system. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis confirmed that troA, troB, and troC are cotranscribed, with troC as the first gene of the operon. The yciC (Atu3181) gene is transcribed in the opposite orientation to that of the troCBA operon and belongs to a metal-binding GTPase family. Expression of troCBA and yciC was inducible under zinc-limiting conditions and was controlled by the zinc uptake regulator, Zur. Compared to the wild type, the mutant strain lacking troC was hypersensitive to a metal chelator, EDTA, and the phenotype could be rescued by the addition of zinc, while the strain with a single yciC mutation showed no phenotype. However, yciC was important for survival under zinc limitation when either troC or zinT was inactivated. The periplasmic zinc-binding protein, ZinT, could not function when TroC was inactivated, suggesting that ZinT may interact with TroCBA in zinc uptake. Unlike many other bacteria, the ABC-type transporter ZnuABC was not the major zinc uptake system in A. tumefaciens. However, the important role of A. tumefaciens ZnuABC was revealed when TroCBA was impaired. The strain containing double mutations in the znuA and troC genes exhibited a growth defect in minimal medium. A. tumefaciens requires cooperation of zinc uptake systems and zinc chaperones, including TroCBA, ZnuABC, ZinT, and YciC, for survival under a wide range of zinc-limiting conditions. IMPORTANCE Both host and pathogen battle over access to essential metals, including zinc. In low-zinc environments, physiological responses that make it possible to acquire enough zinc are important for bacterial survival and could determine the outcome of host-pathogen interactions. A. tumefaciens was found to operate a novel pathway for zinc uptake in which Zin

  8. Characterization of the high affinity Zn transporter from Noccaea caerulescens, NcZNT1, and dissection of its promoter for its role in Zn uptake and hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Milner, Matthew J; Craft, Eric; Yamaji, Naoki; Koyama, Emi; Ma, Jian Feng; Kochian, Leon V

    2012-07-01

    • In this paper, we conducted a detailed analysis of the ZIP family transporter, NcZNT1, in the zinc (Zn)/cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulating plant species, Noccaea caerulescens, formerly known as Thlaspi caerulescens. NcZNT1 was previously suggested to be the primary root Zn/Cd uptake transporter. Both a characterization of NcZNT1 transport function in planta and in heterologous systems, and an analysis of NcZNT1 gene expression and NcZNT1 protein localization were carried out. • We show that NcZNT1 is not only expressed in the root epidermis, but also is highly expressed in the root and shoot vasculature, suggesting a role in long-distance metal transport. Also, NcZNT1 was found to be a plasma membrane transporter that mediates Zn but not Cd, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) or copper (Cu) uptake into plant cells. • Two novel regions of the NcZNT1 promoter were identified which may be involved in both the hyperexpression of NcZNT1 and its ability to be regulated by plant Zn status. • In conclusion, we demonstrate here that NcZNT1 plays a role in Zn and not Cd uptake from the soil, and based on its strong expression in the root and shoot vasculature, could be involved in long-distance transport of Zn from the root to the shoot via the xylem. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Sodium-dependent high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)hemicholinium-3 in the rat brain: a potentially selective marker for presynaptic cholinergic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Vickroy, T.W.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1984-12-03

    An attempt has been made to describes the membrane binding properties of (/sup 3/H)hemicholinium-3 ((/sup 3/H)HC-3), a selective inhibitor of sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (SDHACU) in cholinergic nerve terminals. Under the described assay conditions. (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binds with a saturable population of high-affinity (apparent K/sub d/ = 1.9 nM CNS membrane sites having the regional distribution: striatum >> hippocampus > cerebral cortex > cerebellum. High-affinity (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binding is entirely dependent upon the presence of sodium chloride (EC/sub 50/ = 35-50 mM) and is markedly reduced when other salts of sodium or monovalent ions are substituted. (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binding is inhibited by choline (K/sub i/ = 6..mu..M) and acetylcholine (K/sub i/ = 35..mu..M) but markedly less sensitive to other cholinergic agents and metabolic inhibitors. In light of the similar ionic dependencies, regional distributions and pharmacological specificities of (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binding and SDHACU, closely associated sites may be involved in both processes. 2 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Identification of an osmo-dependent and an osmo-independent choline transporter in Acinetobacter baylyi: implications in osmostress protection and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sand, Miriam; Stahl, Julia; Waclawska, Izabela; Ziegler, Christine; Averhoff, Beate

    2014-06-01

    Members of the genus Acinetobacter are well known for their metabolic versatility that allows them to adapt to different ecological niches. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 can cope with high salinities by uptake and accumulation of the well-known compatible solute glycine betaine. Here, we demonstrate that addition of choline restores growth at high salinities. We further show that choline was actively taken up by the cells and converted to glycine betaine. Uptake of choline was induced by high salinity and the presence of choline in the growth medium. At high salinities, glycine betaine was accumulated in the cells whereas in the absence of osmotic stress it was exported. Inspection of the genome sequence followed by mutant studies led to the identification of two genes encoding secondary transporters (BetT1 and BetT2) of the betaine-choline-carnitine transporter (BCCT) family. The BetT1 transporter lacks an extended C-terminal domain usually found in osmoregulated choline BCCTs. BetT1 was found to facilitate osmolarity-independent choline transport most likely by a uniport mechanism. We propose that BetT1 does not primarily function in osmoadaptation but might play a role in metabolic adaptation to choline-rich environments.

  11. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  12. Comparison of monoclonal antibodies 17-1A and 323/A3: the influence of the affinity on tumour uptake and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy in human ovarian cancer xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, E.; Pinedo, H. M.; Schlüper, H. M.; Haisma, H. J.; Boven, E.

    1996-01-01

    The low-affinity monoclonal antibody (MAb) chimeric 17-1A(c-17-1A) and the high-affinity MAb mouse 323/A3 (m-323/A3) were used to study the effect of the MAb affinity on the tumour uptake and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy in nude mice bearing subcutaneously the human ovarian cancer xenografts FMa, OVCAR-3 and Ov.Pe. Both MAbs are directed against the same pancarcinoma glycoprotein. In vitro, the number of binding sites on tumour cells at 4 degrees C was similar for both MAbs, but m-323/A3 had an approximately 5-fold higher affinity (1.3-3.0x10(9) M-1) than c-17-1A (3.0-5.4x10(8) M-1). This difference in affinity was more extreme at 37 degrees C, when no binding of c-17-1A could be observed. MAb m-323/A3 completely blocked binding of c-17-1A to tumour cells, whereas the reverse was not observed. Immunohistochemistry showed a similar but more intense staining pattern of m-323/A3 in human ovarian cancer xenografts than of c-17-1A. In vivo, the blood clearance in non-tumour-bearing nude mice was similar for both MAbs with terminal half-lives of 71.4 h for m-323/A3 and 62.7 h for c-17-1A. MAb m-323/A3 targeted better to tumour tissue, but was more heterogeneously distributed than c-17-1A. The cumulative absorbed radiation dose delivered by m-323/A3 to tumour tissue was 2.5- to 4.7-fold higher than that delivered by c-17-1A. When mice were treated with equivalent radiation doses of 131(I)m-323/A3 and 131(I)c-17-1A, based on a correction for the immunoreactivity of the radiolabelled MAbs, m-323/A3 induced a better growth inhibition in two of the three xenografts. When the radiation doses were adjusted to obtain a similar amount of radiation in the tumour c-17-1A was more effective in tumour growth inhibition in all three xenografts. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8595159

  13. Imaging features of Paget's disease on (11)C choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Cameron E; Goenka, Ajit H; Howe, Benjamin M; Broski, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the appearance of Paget's disease (PD) on (11)C choline PET/CT and correlate these findings to serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level and skeletal scintigraphy. With IRB approval, our institutional (11)C choline PET/CT database (9/2005-6/2015) was searched for patients with PD. Site of osseous involvement, CT appearance, and multiple semi-quantitative measures were measured and correlated with ALP and degree of uptake on bone scan. Our search identified 10 males (mean age 79.6 ± 7.8 years). Four had polyostotic disease and seven had more than one (11)C choline PET/CT. In total, 58 affected bones were evaluated on 25 PET/CTs. Mean lesion SUVmax was 2.6 ± 0.89 (range 1.0-4.4), SUVmax/Liver SUVmean 0.33 ± 0.13 (0.12-0.61), SUVmax/Liver SUVmax 0.29 ± 0.11 (0.10-0.52), SUVmax/BP SUVmean 2.47 ± 0.86 (0.91-4.22), and SUVmax/BP SUVmax 1.92 ± 0.71 (0.68-3.45). There was no correlation between ALP and any semiquantitative measure. Bone scan uptake was marked in 41 bones, moderate in nine, and mild in six. There was no correlation between lesion SUVmax and bone scan uptake (P = 0.26). Paget's disease on (11)C choline PET/CT demonstrates mild to moderate activity, which does not correlate with bone scan uptake or ALP level. It is important to recognize Paget's disease as a potential pitfall on (11)C choline PET/CT. However, the characteristic appearance on the CT portion of PET/CT examinations should allow confident diagnosis and differentiation from prostate cancer osseous metastases.

  14. Choline intakes exceeding recommendations during human lactation improve breast milk choline content by increasing PEMT pathway metabolites.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Crystal; Yan, Jian; Taesuwan, Siraphat; Shields, Kelsey; West, Allyson A; Jiang, Xinyin; Perry, Cydne A; Malysheva, Olga V; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2015-09-01

    Demand for the vital nutrient choline is high during lactation; however, few studies have examined choline metabolism and requirements in this reproductive state. The present study sought to discern the effects of lactation and varied choline intake on maternal biomarkers of choline metabolism and breast milk choline content. Lactating (n=28) and control (n=21) women were randomized to 480 or 930 mg choline/day for 10-12 weeks as part of a controlled feeding study. During the last 4-6 weeks, 20% of the total choline intake was provided as an isotopically labeled choline tracer (methyl-d9-choline). Blood, urine and breast milk samples were collected for choline metabolite quantification, enrichment measurements, and gene expression analysis of choline metabolic genes. Lactating (vs. control) women exhibited higher (P < .001) plasma choline concentrations but lower (P ≤ .002) urinary excretion of choline metabolites, decreased use of choline as a methyl donor (e.g., lower enrichment of d6-dimethylglycine, P ≤ .08) and lower (P ≤ .02) leukocyte expression of most choline-metabolizing genes. A higher choline intake during lactation differentially influenced breast milk d9- vs. d3-choline metabolite enrichment. Increases (P ≤ .03) were detected among the d3-metabolites, which are generated endogenously via the hepatic phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT), but not among the d9-metabolites generated from intact exogenous choline. These data suggest that lactation induces metabolic adaptations that increase the supply of intact choline to the mammary epithelium, and that extra maternal choline enhances breast milk choline content by increasing supply of PEMT-derived choline metabolites. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01127022.

  15. Pivotal role of choline metabolites in remyelination.

    PubMed

    Skripuletz, Thomas; Manzel, Arndt; Gropengießer, Karoline; Schäfer, Nora; Gudi, Viktoria; Singh, Vikramjeet; Salinas Tejedor, Laura; Jörg, Stefanie; Hammer, Anna; Voss, Elke; Vulinovic, Franca; Degen, Diane; Wolf, Rebecca; Lee, De-Hyung; Pul, Refik; Moharregh-Khiabani, Darius; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A; Stangel, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Neuroprotective approaches for central nervous system regeneration have not been successful in clinical practice so far and compounds that enhance remyelination are still not available for patients with multiple sclerosis. The objective of this study was to determine potential regenerative effects of the substance cytidine-5'-diphospho (CDP)-choline in two different murine animal models of multiple sclerosis. The effects of exogenously applied CDP-choline were tested in murine myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, the cuprizone-induced mouse model of de- and remyelination was used to specifically test the hypothesis that CDP-choline directly increases remyelination. We found that CDP-choline ameliorated the disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and exerted beneficial effects on myelin, oligodendrocytes and axons. After cuprizone-induced demyelination, CDP-choline effectively enhanced myelin regeneration and reversed motor coordination deficits. The increased remyelination arose from an increase in the numbers of proliferating oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocytes. Further in vitro studies suggest that this process is regulated by protein kinase C. We thus identified a new mechanism to enhance central nervous system remyelination via the choline pathway. Due to its regenerative action combined with an excellent safety profile, CDP-choline could become a promising substance for patients with multiple sclerosis as an add-on therapy.

  16. Peripheral administration of CDP-choline, phosphocholine or choline increases plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cansev, M; Ilcol, Y O; Yilmaz, M S; Hamurtekin, E; Ulus, I H

    2008-01-01

    1 Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 200-600 mumol/kg of cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) increased plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations dose- and time-dependently. 2 CDP-choline treatment caused several-fold increases in plasma concentrations of CDP-choline and its metabolites phosphocholine, choline, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) and cytidine. 3 Equivalent doses (200-600 mumol/kg; i.p.) of phosphocholine or choline, but not CMP or cytidine, increased plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline dose-dependently. 4 CDP-choline, phosphocholine and choline (600 mumol/kg; i.p.) augmented the increases in plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline in response to graded haemorrhage. 5 The increases in plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline induced by i.p. 600 mumol/kg of CDP-choline, phosphocholine or choline were abolished by pre-treatment with hexamethonium (15 mg/kg; i.p.), but not atropine (2 mg/kg; i.p.). 6 At 320-32 000 mum concentrations, choline, but not CDP-choline or phosphocholine, evoked catecholamine secretion from perfused adrenal gland. Choline (3200 mum)-induced catecholamine secretion was attenuated by the presence of 1 mum of hexamethonium or mecamylamine, but not atropine, in the perfusion medium. 7 Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of choline (0.5-1.5 mumol) also increased plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline dose- and time-dependently. Pre-treatment with mecamylamine (50 mug; i.c.v.) or hexamethonium (15 mg/kg; i.p.), but not atropine (10 mug; i.c.v.), prevented i.c.v. choline (1.5 mumol)-induced elevations in plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline. 8 It is concluded that i.p. administration of CDP-choline or its cholinergic metabolites phosphocholine and choline increases plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations by enhancing nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission in the sympatho-adrenal system. Central choline also activates the sympatho-adrenal system by increasing central nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission.

  17. Regulation of neuronal function by choline and 4OH-GTS-21 through alpha 7 nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Uteshev, Vladimir V; Meyer, Edwin M; Papke, Roger L

    2003-04-01

    A unique feature of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor physiology is that, under normal physiological conditions, alpha7 receptors are constantly perfused with their natural selective agonist, choline. Studying neurons of hypothalamic tuberomammillary (TM) nucleus, we show that choline and the selective alpha7 receptor agonist 4OH-GTS-21 can regulate neuronal functions directly, via activation of the native alpha7 receptors, and indirectly, via desensitizing those receptors or transferring them into a state "primed" for desensitization. The direct action produces depolarization and thereby increases the TM neuron spontaneous firing (SF) rate. The regulation of the spontaneous firing rate is robust in a nonphysiological range of choline concentrations >200 microM. However, modest effects persist at concentrations of choline that are likely to be attained perineuronally under some conditions (20-100 microM). At high physiological concentration levels, the indirect choline action reduces or even eliminates the responsiveness of alpha7 receptors and their availability to other strong cholinergic inputs. Similarly to choline, 4OH-GTS-21 increases the TM neuron spontaneous firing rate via activation of alpha7 receptors, and this regulation is robust in the range of clinically relevant concentrations of 4OH-GTS-21. We conclude that factors that regulate choline accumulation in the brain and in experimental slices such as choline uptake, hydrolysis of ACh, membrane phosphatidylcholine catabolism, and solution perfusion rate influence alpha7 nAChR neuronal and synaptic functions, especially under pathological conditions such as stroke, seizures, Alzheimer's disease, and head trauma, when the choline concentration in the CSF is expected to rise.

  18. Choline ion interactions with DNA atoms explain unique stabilization of A-T base pairs in DNA duplexes: a microscopic view.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-16

    Under physiological conditions, G-C base pairs are more stable than A-T base pairs. In a previous study, we showed that in the hydrated ionic liquid of choline dihydrogen phosphate, the stabilities of these base pairs are reversed. In the present study, we elucidated the unique binding interactions of choline ions with DNA atoms from a microscopic viewpoint using molecular dynamics simulations. Three times more choline ions bind to the DNA duplex than sodium ions. Sodium ions bind closely but not stably; in contrast, the choline ions bind through multiple hydrogen bonding networks with DNA atoms stably. The affinity of choline ion for the minor groove of A-T base pairs is more than 2 times that for other groove areas. In the narrow A-T minor groove, choline ion has high affinity for the ribose atoms of thymine. Choline ions also destabilize the formation of hydrogen bonds between G-C base pairs by binding to base atoms preferentially for both of duplex and single-strand DNA, which are associated with the bonds between G-C base pairs. Our new finding will not only lead to better control of DNA stability for use in DNA nanodevices, but also provide new insight into the stability of DNA duplexes under crowding conditions found in living cells.

  19. (18)F-choline PET/CT pitfalls in image interpretation: an update on 300 examined patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-02-01

    F-choline PET/CT is an important diagnostic tool in the management of patients with prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to describe and discuss some abnormal sites of uptake that we observed, not due to PC recurrence. Three hundred patients were submitted to F-choline PET/CT for staging or restaging of PC. Whole-body PET/CT was acquired 40 minutes after the F-choline administration. We found abnormal uptake of the tracer, not related to PC, in 48/300 patients (16%). Most of these findings were due to inflammatory processes. Furthermore, some malignant conditions, such as a case of colon cancer, a case of bladder carcinoma, and a multiple myeloma, were diagnosed. Mild uptake was also detected in some benign diseases, such as thymoma, adrenal adenoma, and sarcoidosis. Six patients showed focal brain uptake in correspondence to a meningioma. It is necessary for nuclear physicians, during clinical practice, to consider the possibility of F-choline uptake in some benign or malignant conditions for the intrinsic pharmacologic property of the tracer. An accurate medical investigation, correlative imaging with CT and/or MRI with contrast agents, laboratory data, and above all, histologic examination are often necessary for correct diagnosis.

  20. Hydrogen bonding. Part 21. Infrared spectral study of the high-temperature phases of choline bromide and choline iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Avci, Günself F.; Thiel, Anne C.

    1986-06-01

    Infrared spectra have been obtained for the high-temperature phase of choline bromide, and for the three high-temperature phases of choline iodide, and the results correlated with our previous studies on choline chloride. All eight known phases of the choline halides contain OH⋯X hydrogen bonds. β-Choline chloride, β-choline bromide, and δ- choline iodide appear to have identical environments; thus, when secondary interionic interactions are overcome by elevated temperatures, a face-centered cubic crystal habit is preferred for all three halides.

  1. Ocular lesions and experimental choline deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossani, Georgina P; Pelayes, David; Diaz, María L; Lago, Nestor R; Fariña, Silvia L; Monserrat, Alberto J; Zarate, Jorge O

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown ocular haemorrhages in choline-deficient rats. The aim of this paper is to study further the relationship between ocular and renal lesions and biochemical alterations in rats fed a choline-deficient diet. Fifty one weanling male Wistar rats, were divided into two groups. Thirty one of them were fed a choline-deficient diet and the rest was fed a choline-supplemented diet ad libitum. Animals from both groups were killed between the fifth and the eighth day. Urea, creatinine and homocysteine concentrations in blood were determined. Eyes were used for light microscopy study; high resolution light microscopy and the study of the retina as "rétine a plat". Kidneys were studied by light microscopy. Choline-supplemented rats did not show ocular or renal lesion. Choline-deficient rats that showed renal lesions, tubular or cortical necrosis, did not always have ocular changes. There were no ocular changes in the only choline-deficient rat without renal lesion. The ocular changes consisted mainly in haemorrhage in both cameras and ciliary and vitreous bodies. Correlations between ocular and renal lesion (r = 0.72, p < 0.0001, CI 95%: 0.48-0.86); ocular lesion and creatinine (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001, Cl 95%: 0.72-0.93) and ocular lesion and urea (r = 0.70, p < 0.0001, Cl 95%: 0.44-0.85) were positive. Choline-deficiency induces ocular haemorrhagic lesions after the development of renal necrosis. The ocular pathology could be due to the immaturity of the ocular vasculature at this age. The hyaloid, choroid and retinal system are involved.

  2. Choline induces opposite changes in pyramidal neuron excitability and synaptic transmission through a nicotinic receptor-independent process in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Albiñana, E; Luengo, J G; Baraibar, A M; Muñoz, M D; Gandía, L; Solís, J M; Hernández-Guijo, J M

    2017-06-01

    Choline is present at cholinergic synapses as a product of acetylcholine degradation. In addition, it is considered a selective agonist for α5 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In this study, we determined how choline affects action potentials and excitatory synaptic transmission using extracellular and intracellular recording techniques in CA1 area of hippocampal slices obtained from both mice and rats. Choline caused a reversible depression of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a concentration-dependent manner that was not affected by α7 nAChR antagonists. Moreover, this choline-induced effect was not mimicked by either selective agonists or allosteric modulators of α7 nAChRs. Additionally, this choline-mediated effect was not prevented by either selective antagonists of GABA receptors or hemicholinium, a choline uptake inhibitor. The paired pulse facilitation paradigm, which detects whether a substance affects presynaptic release of glutamate, was not modified by choline. On the other hand, choline induced a robust increase of population spike evoked by orthodromic stimulation but did not modify that evoked by antidromic stimulation. We also found that choline impaired recurrent inhibition recorded in the pyramidal cell layer through a mechanism independent of α7 nAChR activation. These choline-mediated effects on fEPSP and population spike observed in rat slices were completely reproduced in slices obtained from α7 nAChR knockout mice, which reinforces our conclusion that choline modulates synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability by a mechanism independent of nicotinic receptor activation.

  3. Usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base: comparison with FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Choline is a new PET tracer that is useful for the detection of malignant tumor. Choline is a precursor of the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid in the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells. Malignant tumors have an elevated level of phosphatidylcholine in cell membrane. Thus, choline is a marker of tumor malignancy. Method The patient was a 51-year-old man with repeated recurrent hemangiopericytoma in the skull base. We performed Choline-PET in this patient after various treatments and compared findings with those of FDG-PET. Results Choline accumulated in this tumor, but FDG did not accumulate. We diagnosed this tumor as residual hemangiopericytoma and performed the resection of the residual tumor. FDG-PET is not appropriate for skull base tumor detection because uptake in the brain is very strong. Conclusion We emphasize the usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base after various treatments, compared with FDG-PET. PMID:22314195

  4. Choline incorporation by Schistosoma mansoni: distribution of choline metabolites during development and after sexual differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ancelin, M.L.; Torpier, G.; Vial, H.J.; Capron, A.

    1987-06-01

    Choline metabolism was investigated in Schistosoma mansoni during the main phases of its development, namely, schistosomula, 11- and 15-day-old worms, and adults. At the physiological choline concentration used in the assay (20 microM), betaine was, along with phosphatidylcholine, one of the most abundant choline metabolites, revealing considerable choline oxidation activity. Very little radioactivity was associated with CDP-choline, whereas a sustained incorporation into phosphocholine occurred. These results provide good evidence that CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase plays a regulatory role in the de novo pathway of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. During development, the incorporation of choline into its various metabolites was maximal in 11-day-old worms. At this stage, the oxidative pathway predominated over the Kennedy pathway, whereas at all other stages the de novo phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis was predominant. Furthermore, choline incorporation into betaine was much more important in the adult female worm than in the male, indicating a major difference in choline incorporation and distribution between the 2 sexes of the adult worms.

  5. Dietary Intake of Choline and Plasma Choline Concentrations in Pregnant Women in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Gossell-Williams, M; Fletcher, H; McFarlane-Anderson, N; Jacob, A; Patel, J; Zeisel, S

    2008-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for humans and its availability during pregnancy is important for optimal fetal development. The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine in the United States of America has set the adequate choline intake during pregnancy at 450 mg/day. There is limited data available on normal plasma choline concentrations in pregnancy. Moreover, there are neither documented studies of choline intake among pregnant women in the Jamaican population nor of free plasma choline concentrations during pregnancy. Sixteen women presenting to the antenatal clinic of the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) at 10−15 weeks of gestation were selected for this pilot study. A food frequency questionnaire was administered to estimate frequency of consumption of foods rich in choline. Fasting blood samples were collected by venepuncture and plasma assayed for choline using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization isotopic dilution mass spectrometry. Most of the women reported consumption of diets that delivered less than the recommended choline intake (mean ± SEM, 278.5 ± 28.9 mg). Mean plasma choline concentration was 8.4 ± 0.4 μmol/L. This falls below the normal concentration (10 μmol/L) reported for individuals that are not pregnant and pregnant (14.5 μmol/L). The results of this study may be an indication that the choline included in the diet of pregnant women in Jamaica may not be adequate to meet both the needs of the mother and fetus and that further studies are warranted to determine clinical implications. PMID:16642650

  6. Erythrocyte choline concentrations and cluster headache.

    PubMed Central

    de Belleroche, J; Cook, G E; Das, I; Joseph, R; Tresidder, I; Rouse, S; Petty, R; Clifford Rose, F C

    1984-01-01

    Erythrocyte choline concentrations were measured in patients with cluster headache and age related control subjects. Concentrations were significantly reduced in the patients with headache both during a cluster period and between clusters, being 58% and 55% of the control value, respectively. After two weeks' treatment with lithium, choline concentrations in the patients with cluster headache increased to 78 times the control value (mean 369.2 mumol/l (3840 micrograms/100 ml) compared with 4.7 mumol/l (49 micrograms/100 ml]. The presence of depressed erythrocyte choline concentrations during and between cluster attacks indicates that this may be a predisposing condition which results in a cluster attack only when associated with a trigger factor. PMID:6419890

  7. Yeast mutants auxotrophic for choline or ethanolamine.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, K D; Jensen, B; Kolat, A I; Storm, E M; Henry, S A; Fogel, S

    1980-01-01

    Three mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which require exogenous ethanolamine or choline were isolated. The mutants map to a single locus (cho1) on chromosome V. The lipid composition suggests that cho1 mutants do not synthesize phosphatidylserine under any growth conditions. If phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine, which are usually derived from phosphatidylserine, were synthesized from exogenous ethanolamine or choline, the mutants grew and divided relatively normally. However, mitochondrial abnormalities were evident even when ethanolamine and choline were supplied. Diploids homozygous for the cho1 mutation were defective in sporulation. Growth on nonfermentable carbon sources was slow, and a high proportion of respiratory-deficient (petite) cells were generated in cho1 cultures. PMID:6988386

  8. Metabolism, mitochondrial uptake and toxicity of 2', 3'-dideoxycytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, L; Serafini, S; Schiavano, G F; Casabianca, A; Vallanti, G; Chiarantini, L; Magnani, M

    1999-01-01

    2',3'-Dideoxycytidine (ddCyd) is a prescription anti-retroviral drug that causes mitochondrial toxicity and peripheral neuropathy. ddCyd is actively phosphorylated by cytosolic deoxycytidine kinase and nucleoside (di)phosphate kinase to the 5'-triphosphate derivative. However, 2',3'-dideoxycytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (ddCDP-choline) was also found in human cells incubated with ddCyd. In this paper we show that ddCDP-choline is produced from dideoxyCTP (ddCTP) and phosphocholine by phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase. dCTP and CTP appear to activate this synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner. Although ddCTP and ddCDP-choline can both enter the mitochondria, ddCDP-choline uptake is more efficient than ddCTP uptake. These data suggest that ddCDP- choline is the ddCyd metabolite that is probably responsible for mitochondrial toxicity. The uptake of ddCTP and ddCDP-choline by mitochondria is inhibited by 3.0 mM l-carnitine in the cell-free system investigated; when added to U937 cells grown in the presence of 0.25 microM ddCyd, 3.0 mM l-carnitine partially abrogated the mitochondrial toxicity of ddCyd. PMID:10585881

  9. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573...

  10. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573...

  11. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573...

  12. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use. ...

  13. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use. ...

  14. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by reacting... source of iron in foods for special dietary use. ...

  15. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use. ...

  16. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use. ...

  17. Role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the kinetics of low-affinity high-capacity Na{sup +}-dependent alanine transport in SHR proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria Joao; Jose, Pedro A.; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. {yields} It is suggested that Na{sup +} binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells. -- Abstract: The presence of high and low sodium affinity states for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in immortalized renal proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells was previously reported (Am. J. Physiol. 293 (2007) R538-R547). This study evaluated the role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake of ASCT2 in immortalized renal PTE cells from Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Na{sup +} dependence of [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake was investigated replacing NaCl with an equimolar concentration of choline chloride in vehicle- and apocynin-treated cells. Na{sup +} removal from the uptake solution abolished transport activity in both WKY and SHR PTE cells. Decreases in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels in the extracellular medium significantly reduced Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of the low-affinity high-capacity component in SHR PTE cells, with no effect on the high-affinity low-capacity state of the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake. After removal of apocynin from the culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels returned to basal values within 1 to 3 h in both WKY and SHR PTE cells and these were found stable for the next 24 h. Under these experimental conditions, the Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} of the high-affinity low-capacity state were unaffected and the low-affinity high-capacity component remained significantly decreased 1 day but not 4 days after apocynin removal. In conclusion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only

  18. Choline and Choline Metabolite Patterns and Associations in Blood and Milk during Lactation in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Artegoitia, Virginia M.; Middleton, Jesse L.; Harte, Federico M.; Campagna, Shawn R.; de Veth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Milk and dairy products are an important source of choline, a nutrient essential for human health. Infant formula derived from bovine milk contains a number of metabolic forms of choline, all contribute to the growth and development of the newborn. At present, little is known about the factors that influence the concentrations of choline metabolites in milk. The objectives of this study were to characterize and then evaluate associations for choline and its metabolites in blood and milk through the first 37 weeks of lactation in the dairy cow. Milk and blood samples from twelve Holstein cows were collected in early, mid and late lactation and analyzed for acetylcholine, free choline, betaine, glycerophosphocholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphocholine and sphingomyelin using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified using stable isotope-labeled internal standards. Total choline concentration in plasma, which was almost entirely phosphatidylcholine, increased 10-times from early to late lactation (1305 to 13,535 µmol/L). In milk, phosphocholine was the main metabolite in early lactation (492 µmol/L), which is a similar concentration to that found in human milk, however, phosphocholine concentration decreased exponentially through lactation to 43 µmol/L in late lactation. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine was the main metabolite in mid and late lactation (188 µmol/L and 659 µmol/L, respectively), with the increase through lactation positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine in plasma (R2 = 0.78). Unlike previously reported with human milk we found no correlation between plasma free choline concentration and milk choline metabolites. The changes in pattern of phosphocholine and phosphatidylcholine in milk through lactation observed in the bovine suggests that it is possible to manufacture infant formula that more closely matches these metabolites profile in human milk. PMID:25157578

  19. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  20. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  1. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  2. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  3. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  4. USDA Choline Data for Baby Food

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Choline, a dietary component occurring naturally in high-protein and high-fat foods (e.g., eggs, meat, fish, nuts, legumes and human milk), plays a critical role in normal brain development (Zeisel et. al, 2004). It is essential to the development of cell membranes and therefore, inadequate intake b...

  5. Thermotropic phase behavior of choline soaps.

    PubMed

    Klein, Regina; Dutton, Helen; Diat, Olivier; Tiddy, Gordon J T; Kunz, Werner

    2011-04-14

    Choline carboxylates (ChCm with m = 12-18) are simple biocompatible anionic surfactants with very low Krafft temperatures, possessing a rich aqueous phase behavior. In the present work, we have investigated the thermotropic mesomorphism of anhydrous ChCm salts for m = 12-18. Transition temperatures and enthalpies determined by differential scanning calorimetry reveal that all investigated compounds exhibit three different phases between -20 and 95 °C. The phases were further characterized by optical polarizing microscopy, NMR spin-spin relaxation, and X-ray scattering measurements. The nature of the phases was identified with increasing temperature as crystalline, semicrystalline, and liquid-crystalline lamellar. Even long-chain choline carboxylates (m = 18) were found to melt into a lamellar liquid-crystalline phase below 100 °C. Accordingly, with choline as counterion in simple fatty acid soaps, not only the water solubility is considerably enhanced but also the melting points are substantially reduced, hence facilitating thermotropic mesomorphism at temperatures between 35 and 95 °C. Thus, simple choline soaps with m = 12-18 may be classified as ionic liquids.

  6. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  8. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  12. Dysfunction of choline transport system through blood-brain barrier in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y S; Terasaki, T; Tsuji, A

    1990-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport of choline was compared between stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and normotensive Wistar KY rats (WKY). The permeability surface area product (PS) of [3H]choline through the BBB in SHRSP (3.03 X 10(-3) +/- 1.09 X 10(-3) ml/min/g brain) was significantly lower than that in WKY (7.23 X 10(-3) +/- 0.97 X 10(-3) ml/min/g brain) in the presence of respective rat sera. No significant difference in the brain vascular space was indicated from the apparent uptake of [3H]sucrose between SHRSP and SKY. There was no significant difference for the Michaelis constant of choline transport between SHRSP (262 +/- 97 microM) and WKY (180 +/- 32 microM). However, the maximum velocity in SHRSP (3.41 +/- 1.19 nmol/min/g brain) was 37% lower than in WKY (5.40 +/- 0.38 nmol/min/g brain). Brain microdialysis technique was employed to collect the brain interstitial fluid in the rat hippocampus. The concentration of free choline in the brain dialysate in SHRSP was about half of that in WKY, while no significant difference was observed for the plasma concentration of free choline between SHRSP and WKY. In contrast, no significant difference was observed for the transport of D-[3H]glucose, 3-methyl-[3H]D-glucose and [3H]-phenylalanine through the BBB between SHRSP and WKY. Accordingly, the decreased choline concentration in the brain interstitial fluid ascribed to the specific dysfunction of the BBB choline transport has been demonstrated in SHRSP.

  13. Choline oxidation by intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Lerma, C.; Hanson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline ..-->.. betaine aldehyde ..-->.. betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness. We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers not the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO/sub 2/ fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed.

  14. The novel choline kinase inhibitor ICL-CCIC-0019 reprograms cellular metabolism and inhibits cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Trousil, Sebastian; Kaliszczak, Maciej; Schug, Zachary; Nguyen, Quang-De; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Favicchio, Rosy; Brickute, Diana; Fortt, Robin; Twyman, Frazer J.; Carroll, Laurence; Kalusa, Andrew; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Adejumo, Thomas; Carling, David; Gottlieb, Eyal; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    The glycerophospholipid phosphatidylcholine is the most abundant phospholipid species of eukaryotic membranes and essential for structural integrity and signaling function of cell membranes required for cancer cell growth. Inhibition of choline kinase alpha (CHKA), the first committed step to phosphatidylcholine synthesis, by the selective small-molecule ICL-CCIC-0019, potently suppressed growth of a panel of 60 cancer cell lines with median GI50 of 1.12 μM and inhibited tumor xenograft growth in mice. ICL-CCIC-0019 decreased phosphocholine levels and the fraction of labeled choline in lipids, and induced G1 arrest, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. Changes in phosphocholine cellular levels following treatment could be detected non-invasively in tumor xenografts by [18F]-fluoromethyl-[1,2–2H4]-choline positron emission tomography. Herein, we reveal a previously unappreciated effect of choline metabolism on mitochondria function. Comparative metabolomics demonstrated that phosphatidylcholine pathway inhibition leads to a metabolically stressed phenotype analogous to mitochondria toxin treatment but without reactive oxygen species activation. Drug treatment decreased mitochondria function with associated reduction of citrate synthase expression and AMPK activation. Glucose and acetate uptake were increased in an attempt to overcome the metabolic stress. This study indicates that choline pathway pharmacological inhibition critically affects the metabolic function of the cell beyond reduced synthesis of phospholipids. PMID:27206796

  15. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  16. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  17. PET/CT with (18)F-choline: Physiological whole bio-distribution in male and female subjects and diagnostic pitfalls on 1000 prostate cancer patients: (18)F-choline PET/CT bio-distribution and pitfalls. A southern Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Cicciò, Carmelo; Gangemi, Vincenzo; Gullà, Domenico; Rocca, Federico; Gallo, Gianpasquale; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio; Schillaci, Orazio

    2017-08-01

    The (11)C/(18)F-choline is a PET/CT radiopharmaceutical useful in detecting tumors with high lipogenesis. (11)C/(18)F-choline uptake can occur in physiological conditions or tumors. The knowledge of its bio-distribution is essential to recognize physiologic variants or diagnostic pitfalls. Moreover, few information are available on the bio-distribution of this tracer in female patients. Our aim was to discuss some documented (18)F-choline PET/CT pitfalls in prostate cancer patients. Our secondary aim was to describe the (18)F-choline bio-distribution in the female body. We collected diagnostic pitfalls in three PET centers examining 1000 prostate cancer by (18)F-choline PET/CT. All pitfalls were ensured by follow-up, imaging and/or histology. We also performed whole body (18)F-choline PET/CT in 5 female patients. 169/1000 (16.9%) patients showed pitfalls not owing to prostate cancer. These findings were due to inflammation, benign tumors while, in 1% of examined patients, a concomitant neoplasm was found. In the female body, the breast showed low physiological uptake. The accurate knowledge of (18)F-choline PET/CT bio-distribution and diagnostic pitfalls is essential. Correlative imaging and histological exam are often necessary to depict pitfalls. In women, the uptake in the breast is due to the physiological gradient of (18)F-choline uptake in the exocrine glands. Our results confirm the possibility of (18)F-choline uptake in several diseases other than prostate cancer. However, our experience was acquired on a large population and shows that a conspicuous amount of (18)F-choline diagnostic pitfalls are easily recognizable and attributable to inflammation. A new advance in knowledge is the minimal difference in terms of physiological tracer bio-distribution between male and female patients. The knowledge of the physiological bio-distribution and of the potential pitfalls linked of a tracer could help physicians to choose the best diagnostic and therapeutic

  18. The supply of choline is important for fetal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2011-08-01

    Fetal progenitor cells proliferate, migrate, differentiate and undergo apoptosis at specific times during fetal development. Choline is needed by these cells for membrane synthesis and for methylation. There is growing evidence that this nutrient also modulates epigenetic regulation of gene expression in both neuronal and endothelial progenitor cells, thereby modifying brain development. It is likely that these mechanisms explain why, in rodent models, maternal dietary intake of choline influences both angiogenesis and neurogenesis in fetal hippocampus, and results in life-long changes in memory function. This also may explain why women eating diets low in choline have a greater risk of having a baby with a birth defect. Choline is mainly found in foods that contain fat and cholesterol, and intake of such foods has diminished in response dietary advice from nutritionists and physicians. Forty years ago, diets commonly contained choline-rich foods but now women in the USA tend to eat diets low in choline content. Premenopausal women normally may require less choline in their diet than do men and postmenopausal women, because estrogen induces the gene for the enzyme catalyzing endogenous biosynthesis of the choline-containing phospholipid phosphatidylcholine. However, many women have a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that blocks the induction of endogenous biosynthesis, thereby making them require more dietary choline. When these women eat diets low in choline, the supply of this nutrient to the fetus is likely to be inadequate, and may perturb progenitor cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does Choline PET/CT Change the Management of Prostate Cancer Patients With Biochemical Failure?

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jeffrey; Even-Sapir, Einat; Ben-Haim, Simona; Saad, Akram; Spieler, Benjamin; Davidson, Tima; Berger, Raanan; Weiss, Ilana; Appel, Sarit; Lawrence, Yaacov R; Symon, Zvi

    2017-06-01

    The FDA approved C-11 choline PET/computed tomography (CT) for imaging patients with recurrent prostate cancer in 2012. Subsequently, the 2014 NCCN guidelines have introduced labeled choline PET/CT in the imaging algorithm of patients with suspected recurrent disease. However, there is only scarce data on the impact of labeled choline PET/CT findings on disease management. We hypothesized that labeled-choline PET/CT studies showing local or regional recurrence or distant metastases will have a direct role in selection of appropriate patient management and improve radiation planning in patients with disease that can be controlled using this mode of therapy. This retrospective study was approved by the Tel Aviv Sourasky and Sheba Medical Center's Helsinki ethical review committees. Patient characteristics including age, PSA, stage, prior treatments, and pre-PET choline treatment recommendations based on NCCN guidelines were recorded. Patients with biochemical failure and without evidence of recurrence on physical examination or standard imaging were offered the option of additional imaging with labeled choline PET/CT. Treatment recommendations post-PET/CT were compared with pre-PET/CT ones. Pathologic confirmation was obtained before prostate retreatment. A nonparametric χ test was used to compare the initial and final treatment recommendations following choline PET/CT. Between June 2010 and January 2014, 34 labeled-choline PET/CT studies were performed on 33 patients with biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy (RP) (n=6), radiation therapy (RT) (n=6), brachytherapy (n=2), RP+salvage prostate fossa RT (n=14), and RP+salvage prostate fossa/lymph node RT (n=6). Median PSA level before imaging was 2 ng/mL (range, 0.16 to 79). Labeled choline PET/CT showed prostate, prostate fossa, or pelvic lymph node increased uptake in 17 studies, remote metastatic disease in 9 studies, and failed to identify the cause for biochemical failure in 7 scans.PET/CT altered

  20. Relationship Between Organophosphate Toxicity and Choline Metabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-06

    Effects of the Organophosphates on the Activity of Phospholipase A2 in a Crude Mitochondrial Fraction from Striatumn 43 LIST OF FIGURES Figure I...Activity of Phospholipase A2 in a Crude Mitochondrial Fraction from Rat Striatum 41 8 1I Figure 7. Effects of DFP on the Postmortem Accumulation of...Accumulation of Choline in the Siaitu and Hippocampus 47 Figure 11. Effects of Chronic Paraoxon Adrninis,,ation on the Development of a Myopathy in Rat

  1. Pharmacokinetics of 14C CDP-choline.

    PubMed

    Dinsdale, J R; Griffiths, G K; Rowlands, C; Castelló, J; Ortiz, J A; Maddock, J; Aylward, M

    1983-01-01

    The absorption, metabolism and excretion of cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline, citicoline, Somazina) were investigated in six adult healthy subjects after a single oral dose of 300 mg of the 14C-labelled compound. The compound was well tolerated by the subjects. Absorption was virtually complete with less than 1% of the dose being found in the faeces during the 5-day collection period. Two peaks were found in the plasma radioactivity time profile: the first at 1 h, and a second larger peak at 24 h post-dose. Elimination of the ingested dose occurred via respiratory CO2 and through urinary excretion; the former predominating, and both routes exhibited biphasic patterns characterized by an early phase followed by slower decline. It is postulated that in the healthy human subject CDP-choline is metabolized in the gut wall and in the liver; the products arising from the compound's extensive hepatic metabolism being subsequently available for diverse biosynthetic pathways, tissue metabolism, and excretion.

  2. Expression of choline and acetylcholine transporters in synovial tissue and cartilage of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Janet; Schubert, Jan; Morhenn, Hans-Georg; Grau, Veronika; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence is showing that the non-neuronal cholinergic system plays an important role in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Choline transport into the cell is the rate-limiting step for the synthesis of acetylcholine (ACh), which can be released directly or in vesicles from the cell. However, in the human joint little is known about choline import or the release of ACh from the cell. Thus, we analyze the expression of members of the organic cation transporter (OCT), of the newly discovered choline transporter-like (CTL) family and of classical neuronal components such as the high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1) and the vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT) in the synovium and cartilage of the human hip joint from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and RA. OCT1, OCT3 and OCTN1 and all members of the CTL family were expressed in synovial and cartilage samples. The expression of CTL1 and CTL2 was localized in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts. CHT1 mRNA expression was detectable only in the synovium, whereas VAChT was completely absent in all samples. Therefore, in the human joint, choline transport into the cell and the release of ACh seems to be mediated mainly by members of the OCT and CTL family. Expression of transporters appears not to be influenced by the pathological state, as no differences have been detected between joints from OA or RA patients. Importantly, however, all necessary components for choline import and the release of non-neuronal ACh are present in the human joint.

  3. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Peculiar Choline-Binding β-Galactosidase from Streptococcus mitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana; Serra, Beatriz; Llull, Daniel; García, José L.; García, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    A Streptococcus mitis genomic DNA fragment carrying the SMT1224 gene encoding a putative β-galactosidase was identified, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. This gene encodes a protein 2,411 amino acids long with a predicted molecular mass of 268 kDa. The deduced protein contains an N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal choline-binding domain consisting of five consensus repeats, which facilitates the anchoring of the secreted enzyme to the cell wall. The choline-binding capacity of the protein facilitates its purification using DEAE-cellulose affinity chromatography, although its complete purification was achieved by constructing a His-tagged fusion protein. The recombinant protein was characterized as a monomeric β-galactosidase showing a specific activity of around 2,500 U/mg of protein, with optimum temperature and pH ranges of 30 to 40°C and 6.0 to 6.5, respectively. Enzyme activity is not inhibited by glucose, even at 200 mM, and remains highly stable in solution or immobilized at room temperature in the absence of protein stabilizers. In S. mitis, the enzyme was located attached to the cell surface, but a significant activity was also detected in the culture medium. This novel enzyme represents the first β-galactosidase having a modular structure with a choline-binding domain, a peculiar property that can also be useful for some biotechnological applications. PMID:19633119

  4. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m=2-10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=8, 10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m>8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes.

  5. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  6. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  7. Versatility of choline metabolism and choline-binding proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae and commensal streptococci.

    PubMed

    Hakenbeck, Regine; Madhour, Abderrahim; Denapaite, Dalia; Brückner, Reinhold

    2009-05-01

    The pneumococcal choline-containing teichoic acids are targeted by cholinebinding proteins (CBPs), major surface components implicated in the interaction with host cells and bacterial cell physiology. CBPs also occur in closely related commensal species, Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis, and many strains of these species contain choline in their cell wall. Physiologically relevant CBPs including cell wall lytic enzymes are highly conserved between Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. mitis. In contrast, the virulence-associated CBPs, CbpA, PspA and PcpA, are S. pneumoniae specific and are thus relevant for the characteristic properties of this species.

  8. Ferrous iron uptake in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, E S; Goodner, A P; Nyhus, K J

    1998-09-01

    Previous studies have implicated ferric reduction in the iron uptake pathway of the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Here we studied iron uptake directly, using 55Fe in the presence of reductants. Uptake was linear with respect to time and number of yeast cells. The plot of uptake versus concentration exhibited a steep rise up to about 1 microM, a plateau between 1 and 25 microM, and a second steep rise above 25 microM, consistent with high- and low-affinity uptake systems. A Km for high-affinity uptake was estimated to be 0.6 microM Fe(II); 1 microM was used for standardized uptake assays. At this concentration, the uptake rate was 110 +/- 3 pmol/10(6) cells/h. Iron repletion (15 microM) and copper starvation drastically decreased high-affinity iron uptake. Incubation at 0 degreesC or in the presence of 2 mM KCN abolished high-affinity iron uptake, suggesting that uptake requires metabolic energy. When exogenous reducing agents were not supplied and the culture was washed free of secreted reductants, uptake was reduced by 46%; the remaining uptake activity presumably was dependent upon the cell membrane ferric reductase. Further decreases in free Fe(II) levels achieved by trapping with bathophenanthroline disulfonate or reoxidizing with potassium nitrosodisulfonate reduced iron uptake very drastically, suggesting that it is the Fe(II) species which is transported by the high-affinity transporter. The uptake of Fe was stimulated two- to threefold by deferoxamine, but this increment could be abolished by copper starvation or inhibition of the ferric reductase by Pt, indicating that Fe solubilized by this molecule also entered the reductive iron uptake pathway.

  9. Choline alphoscerate (alpha-glyceryl-phosphoryl-choline) an old choline- containing phospholipid with a still interesting profile as cognition enhancing agent.

    PubMed

    Traini, Enea; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Cholinergic precursors have represented the first approach to counter cognitive impairment occurring in adultonset dementia disorders. These compounds were early leaved because their clinical efficacy was not clearly demonstrated. This is probably not true for some choline-containing phospholipids including choline alphoscerate. Choline alphoscerate increases the release of acetylcholine in rat hippocampus, facilitates learning and memory in experimental animals, improves brain transduction mechanisms and decreases age-dependent structural changes occurring in rat brain areas involved in learning and memory. The compound exerts neuroprotective effects in models of altered cholinergic neurotransmission and of brain vascular injury. In clinical studies choline alphoscerate improved memory and attention impairment, as well as affective and somatic symptoms in dementia disorders. An ongoing trial indicates that association between the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and choline alphoscerate is accompanied by an improvement in several cognitive tests superior to that induced by donepezil alone. It is suggested that this association may represent a therapeutic option to prolong beneficial effects of cholinergic therapies in Alzheimer's disease patients with concomitant ischemic cerebrovascular disorders. In summary, choline alphoscerate has significant effects on cognitive function with a good safety profile and tolerability. Although limited both in terms of size of the samples investigated and of the length of treatment, preclinical and clinical results presented suggest that cognitive enhancing capabilities of choline alphoscerate merit of being further investigated in appropriate trials.

  10. Transport and oxidation of choline by liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    1. Rapid choline oxidation and the onset of Pi-induced swelling by liver mitochondria, incubated in a sucrose medium at or above pH7.0, required the addition of both Pi and an uncoupling agent. Below pH7.0, Pi alone was required for rapid choline oxidation and swelling. 2. Choline oxidation was inhibited by each of several reagents that also inhibited Pi-induced swelling under similar conditions of incubation, including EGTA, mersalyl, Mg2+, the Ca2+-ionophore A23187, rotenone and nupercaine. None of these reagents had any significant effect on the rate of choline oxidation by sonicated mitochondria. There was therefore a close correlation between the conditions required for rapid choline oxidation and for Pi-induced swelling to occur, suggesting that in the absence of mitochondrial swelling the rate of choline oxidation is regulated by the rate of choline transport across the mitochondrial membrane. 3. Respiratory-chain inhibitors, uncoupling agents (at pH6.5) and ionophore A23187 caused a loss of endogenous Ca2+ from mitochondria, whereas nupercaine and Mg2+ had no significant effect on the Ca2+ content. Inhibition of choline oxidation and mitochondrial swelling by ionophore A23187 was reversed by adding Ca2+, but not by Mg2+. It is concluded that added Pi promotes the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial membrane phospholipase activity in respiring mitochondria, causing an increase in the permeability of the mitochondrial inner membrane to choline and therefore enabling rapid choline oxidation to occur. Nupercaine and Mg2+ appear to block choline oxidation and swelling by inhibiting phospholipase activity. 4. Choline was oxidized slowly by tightly coupled mitochondria largely depleted of their endogenous adenine nucleotides, suggesting that these compounds are not directly concerned in the regulation of choline oxidation. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the possible mechanism of choline transport across the mitochondrial membrane in vivo and

  11. Choline deprivation induces hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed low methionine diets.

    PubMed

    Setoue, Minoru; Ohuchi, Seiya; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2008-12-01

    To clarify the relationship between dietary choline level and plasma homocysteine concentration, the effects of choline deprivation on plasma homocysteine concentration and related variables were investigated in rats fed a standard (25%) casein (25C) diet or standard soybean protein (25S) diet. Using the 25S diet, the time-dependent effect of choline deprivation and the comparative effects of three kinds of lipotropes were also investigated. Feeding rats with the choline-deprived 25S diet for 10 d significantly increased plasma total homocysteine concentration to a level 2.68-times higher than that of the control group, whereas choline deprivation had no effect in rats fed the 25C diet. Increases in hepatic S-adenosylhomocysteine and homocysteine concentrations, decreases in hepatic betaine concentration and the activity of cystathionine beta-synthase, but not betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, and fatty liver also occurred in rats fed the choline-deprived 25S diet. Plasma homocysteine concentration increased when rats were fed the choline-deprived 25S diet for only 3 d, and the increase persisted up to 20 d. The hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deprivation was effectively suppressed by betaine or methionine supplementation. Choline deprivation caused hyperhomocysteinemia also in rats fed a choline-deprived low (10%) casein diet. The results indicate that choline deprivation can easily induce prominent hyperhomocysteinemia when rats are fed relatively low methionine diets such as a standard soybean protein diet and low casein diet, possibly through the suppression of homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. This hyperhomocysteinemia might be a useful model for investigating the role of betaine in the regulation of plasma homocysteine concentration.

  12. Choline kinase inhibition in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Guma, M; Sanchez-Lopez, E; Lodi, A; Garcia-Carbonell, R; Tiziani, S; Karin, M; Lacal, J C; Firestein, G S

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about targeting the metabolome in non-cancer conditions. Choline kinase (ChoKα), an essential enzyme for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, is required for cell proliferation and has been implicated in cancer invasiveness. Aggressive behaviour of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) led us to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway could play a role in RA FLS function and joint damage. Choline metabolic profile of FLS cells was determined by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) under conditions of ChoKα inhibition. FLS function was evaluated using the ChoKα inhibitor MN58b (IC₅₀=4.2 μM). For arthritis experiments, mice were injected with K/BxN sera. MN58b (3 mg/kg) was injected daily intraperitoneal beginning on day 0 or day 4 after serum administration. The enzyme is expressed in synovial tissue and in cultured RA FLS. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation increased ChoKα expression and levels of phosphocholine in FLS measured by Western Blot (WB) and metabolomic studies of choline-containing compounds in cultured RA FLS extracts respectively, suggesting activation of this pathway in RA synovial environment. A ChoKα inhibitor also suppressed the behaviour of cultured FLS, including cell migration and resistance to apoptosis, which might contribute to cartilage destruction in RA. In a passive K/BxN arthritis model, pharmacologic ChoKα inhibition significantly decreased arthritis in pretreatment protocols as well as in established disease. These data suggest that ChoKα inhibition could be an effective strategy in inflammatory arthritis. It also suggests that targeting the metabolome can be a new treatment strategy in non-cancer conditions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Choline kinase inhibition in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Guma, M; Sanchez-Lopez, E; Lodi, A; Garcia-Carbonell, R; Tiziani, S; Karin, M; Lacal, J C; Firestein, G S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about targeting the metabolome in non-cancer conditions. Choline kinase (ChoKα), an essential enzyme for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, is required for cell proliferation and has been implicated in cancer invasiveness. Aggressive behaviour of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) led us to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway could play a role in RA FLS function and joint damage. Methods Choline metabolic profile of FLS cells was determined by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) under conditions of ChoKα inhibition. FLS function was evaluated using the ChoKα inhibitor MN58b (IC50=4.2 μM). For arthritis experiments, mice were injected with K/BxN sera. MN58b (3 mg/kg) was injected daily intraperitoneal beginning on day 0 or day 4 after serum administration. Results The enzyme is expressed in synovial tissue and in cultured RA FLS. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation increased ChoKα expression and levels of phosphocholine in FLS measured by Western Blot (WB) and metabolomic studies of choline-containing compounds in cultured RA FLS extracts respectively, suggesting activation of this pathway in RA synovial environment. A ChoKα inhibitor also suppressed the behaviour of cultured FLS, including cell migration and resistance to apoptosis, which might contribute to cartilage destruction in RA. In a passive K/BxN arthritis model, pharmacologic ChoKα inhibition significantly decreased arthritis in pretreatment protocols as well as in established disease. Conclusions These data suggest that ChoKα inhibition could be an effective strategy in inflammatory arthritis. It also suggests that targeting the metabolome can be a new treatment strategy in non-cancer conditions. PMID:25274633

  14. Ascorbic Acid Efflux from Human Brain Microvascular Pericytes: Role of Re-uptake

    PubMed Central

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular pericytes take up ascorbic acid on the ascorbate transporter SVCT2. Intracellular ascorbate then protects the cells against apoptosis induced by culture at diabetic glucose concentrations. To investigate whether pericytes might also provide ascorbate to the underlying endothelial cells, we studied ascorbate efflux from human pericytes. When loaded with ascorbate to intracellular concentrations of 0.8–1.0 mM, almost two-thirds of intracellular ascorbate effluxed from the cells over 2 h. This efflux was opposed by ascorbate re-uptake from the medium, since preventing re-uptake by destroying extracellular ascorbate with ascorbate oxidase increased ascorbate loss even further. Ascorbate re-uptake occurred on the SVCT2, since its blockade by replacing medium sodium with choline, by the SVCT2 inhibitor sulfinpyrazone, or by extracellular ascorbate accelerated ascorbate loss from the cells. This was supported by finding that net efflux of radiolabeled ascorbate was increased by unlabeled extracellular ascorbate with a half-maximal effect in the range of the high affinity Km of the SVCT2. Intracellular ascorbate did not inhibit its efflux. To assess the mechanism of ascorbate efflux, known inhibitors of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) were tested. These potently inhibited ascorbate transport into cells on the SVCT2, but not its efflux. An exception was the anion transport inhibitor DIDS, which, despite inhibition of ascorbate uptake, also inhibited net efflux at 25–50 µM. These results suggest that ascorbate efflux from vascular pericytes occurs on a DIDS-inhibitable transporter or channel different from VRACs. Further, ascorbate efflux is opposed by re-uptake of ascorbate on the SVCT2, providing a potential regulatory mechanism. PMID:26340060

  15. Choline oxidation by intact chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Hanson, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    Illuminated chloroplasts derived from spinach leaf protoplasts synthesize betaine from choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde (BAL) (PNAS 82:3678). Photosynthetically active chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves oxidized (/sup 14/C)choline in the light at rates 10 times higher (25-80 nmol/mg chl b) than protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Up to 20% of the (/sup 14/C)choline supplied during a 30 min incubation was oxidized in the light; the main product was (/sup 14/C)BAL. Rates of (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness were only 5-30% of rates in light. Light-dependent (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation was abolished by DCMU and 5 mM DTT. Pre-illumination of the chloroplasts did not promote (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness. The uncouplers nigericin and CCCP at concentrations which eliminated CO/sub 2/-dependent O/sub 2/ evolution did not affect (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in the light. They hypothesize that (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation is not dependent upon light activation of an enzymatic system or upon the electrochemical proton gradient but requires an oxidant generated in the light.

  16. Benign fibrous dysplasia on [(11)C]choline PET: a potential mimicker of disease in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chris N; Hunt, Christopher H; Lehman, Vance T; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Diehn, Felix E; Schwartz, Kara M; Eckel, Laurence J

    2012-08-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old male with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer who underwent [(11)C]choline PET/CT. The PET/CT demonstrated an intense focus of uptake within the skull base that was initially felt to potentially represent metastatic disease. Subsequent evaluation with MRI and dedicated thin-section CT revealed this area to be benign fibrous dysplasia of the bone. The focal uptake on PET/CT with [(11)C]choline in benign fibrous dysplasia represents a potential mimicker of metastatic disease. Due to recognizing this benign process, our patient was able to avoid systemic treatment and/or focal radiation and was treated with cryotherapy for biopsy-proven local recurrence within the prostate bed. While benign fibrous dysplasia can demonstrate increased radiotracer uptake on other modalities (i.e., bone scintigraphy, FDG PET/CT), its appearance on [(11)C]choline PET/CT has been largely overlooked in the literature. With the increasing use of [(11)C]choline PET/CT for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer evaluation, it is important to understand this potential mimicker of disease.

  17. Choline associated hypersexuality in a 79-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Cordici, Francesco; Genovese, Carmelo; Bramanti, Placido

    2014-01-01

    Hypersexuality, also referred to as sexually inappropriate behavior and sexual disinhibition, involves persistent, uninhibited sexual behaviors directed at oneself or at others, sometimes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Choline is a water-soluble essential nutrient, used as a dietary supplement in different diseases. This report was aimed at considering choline intake as a possible cause of iatrogenic hypersexuality. After an evaluation, a 79-year-old man affected by memory loss was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and treated with oral choline. After 6 weeks of regular choline assumption, the patient showed a pathological increase in libido with sexual urges. As choline was withdrawn, the hypersexuality disappeared within 5 days. Since hypersexuality may be an underreported and overlooked adverse effect of drugs and dietary supplements acting on the cholinergic pathway, this should be considered when treating and counselling patients with inappropriate sexual behavior.

  18. Cloning and functional characterization of the high-affinity K+ transporter HAK1 of pepper.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2004-10-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake in plants plays a crucial role in K+ nutrition and different systems have been postulated to contribute to the high-affinity K+ uptake. The results presented here with pepper (Capsicum annum) demonstrate that a HAK1-type transporter greatly contributes to the high-affinity K+ uptake observed in roots. Pepper plants starved of K+ for 3 d showed high-affinity K+ uptake (Km of 6 microM K+) that was very sensitive to NH and their roots expressed a high-affinity K+ transporter, CaHAK1, which clusters in group I of the KT/HAK/KUP family of transporters. When expressed in yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ), CaHAK1 mediated high-affinity K+ and Rb+ uptake with Km values of 3.3 and 1.9 microM, respectively. Rb+ uptake was competitively inhibited by micromolar concentrations of NH and Cs+, and by millimolar concentrations of Na+.

  19. Deciphering the role of multiple betaine-carnitine-choline transporters in the Halophile Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Ongagna-Yhombi, Serge Y; McDonald, Nathan D; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophile that is the predominant cause of bacterial seafood-related gastroenteritis worldwide. To survive in the marine environment, V. parahaemolyticus must have adaptive strategies to cope with salinity changes. Six putative compatible solute (CS) transport systems were previously predicted from the genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633. In this study, we determined the role of the four putative betaine-carnitine-choline transporter (BCCT) homologues VP1456, VP1723, VP1905, and VPA0356 in the NaCl stress response. Expression analysis of the four BCCTs subjected to NaCl upshock showed that VP1456, VP1905, and VPA0356, but not VP1723, were induced. We constructed in-frame single-deletion mutant strains for all four BCCTs, all of which behaved similarly to the wild-type strain, demonstrating a redundancy of the systems. Growth analysis of a quadruple mutant and four BCCT triple mutants demonstrated the requirement for at least one BCCT for efficient CS uptake. We complemented Escherichia coli MHK13, a CS synthesis- and transporter-negative strain, with each BCCT and examined CS uptake by growth analysis and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses. These data demonstrated that VP1456 had the most diverse substrate transport ability, taking up glycine betaine (GB), proline, choline, and ectoine. VP1456 was the sole ectoine transporter. In addition, the data demonstrated that VP1723 can transport GB, proline, and choline, whereas VP1905 and VPA0356 transported only GB. Overall, the data showed that the BCCTs are functional and that there is redundancy among them.

  20. Bioavailability of iron from ferric choline citrate and a ferric copper cobalt choline citrate complex for young pigs.

    PubMed

    Miller, E R; Parsons, M J; Ullrey, D E; Ku, P K

    1981-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the bioavailability for young pigs of Fe from ferric choline citrate or from a commercial mixture of Fe, Cu and Co choline citrate salts. Relative biological value of Fe from either source with a standard of 100 for FeSO4 x 7H20 was about 140 by both hemoglobin regeneration and Fe retention methods.

  1. 11C-choline PET/CT predicts prostate cancer-specific survival in patients with biochemical failure during androgen-deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Picchio, Maria; Garcia-Parra, Rita; Briganti, Alberto; Abdollah, Firas; Gianolli, Luigi; Schindler, Christian; Montorsi, Francesco; Messa, Cristina; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown that (11)C-choline PET/CT may be useful for restaging prostate cancer (PCa) patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy. However, validation of (11)C-choline PET/CT findings scarcely relied on histologic findings, and prognostic implications of (11)C-choline PET/CT are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether (11)C-choline PET/CT predicts survival in PCa patients. This retrospective study included 195 PCa patients treated with radical prostatectomy who underwent (11)C-choline PET/CT from December 1, 2004, to July 31, 2007, due to biochemical failure (prostate-specific antigen > 0.2 mg/mL) during androgen-deprivation therapy. PCa-specific survival was computed as the interval from radical prostatectomy to PCa-specific death. The median interval after radical prostatectomy was 8.9 y (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-18.9 y). The median follow-up after (11)C-choline PET/CT was 4.5 y (95% CI, 0.4-8.5 y). (11)C-choline PET/CT results were positive in 57% of patients. The median PCa-specific survival was 16.4 y (95% CI, 14.0-18.8 y) in patients with negative (11)C-choline PET/CT results and 11.2 y (95% CI, 9.8-12.6 y) in patients with positive (11)C-choline PET/CT results (log-rank: χ(2) = 19.3, P < 0001). At multivariate analysis, statistical significance was obtained for (11)C-choline PET/CT (hazard ratio, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.41-4.53; P = 0.002), prostate-specific antigen (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00-1.05; P = 0.037), and Gleason score (>7: hazard ratio, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.25-4.95; P = 0.009). Patients with pathologic (11)C-choline uptake in the prostatic bed or in pelvic or retroperitoneal lymph nodes had longer PCa-specific survival (median, 12.1 y; 95% CI, 10.5-13.7 y) in comparison to patients with pathologic tracer uptake in the skeleton (median, 9.9 y; 95% CI, 6.8-13.1 y) (log-rank: χ(2) = 6.5, P = 0.010). Two internally validated nomograms predicted 10- and 15-y PCa-specific survival probability

  2. Choline or CDP-choline attenuates coagulation abnormalities and prevents the development of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in dogs during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zeki; Ozarda, Yesim; Cansev, Mehmet; Eralp, Oya; Kocaturk, Meric; Ulus, Ismail H

    2010-06-01

    Sepsis/endotoxemia causes platelet dysfunctions, abnormalities in coagulation and hemostatic mechanisms leading to organ dysfunctions and mortality. Choline prevents organ injury and improves survival during endotoxemia. The main objective of the present study was to determine the effects of choline or cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation and development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Dogs were treated intravenously (i.v.) with saline, choline (20 mg/kg), or CDP-choline (70 mg/kg) three times with 4-h intervals starting 5 min before i.v. injection of endotoxin (1 mg/kg). Platelet counts and functions, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, coagulation factors, D-dimer and antithrombin (AT) were measured before and at 0.5-96 h after endotoxin. Circulating platelet, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were decreased, whereas PT and aPTT were prolonged and serum D-dimer levels were elevated after endotoxin. Endotoxin-induced reductions in platelet counts and functions, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were attenuated or blocked by choline or CDP-choline. Choline or CDP-choline blocked endotoxin-induced prolongation in PT and aPTT and enhancement in D-dimer. Elevated DIC scores were attenuated by choline and blocked by CDP-choline. Choline administration increased serum choline concentrations and caused bradycardia. Choline also increased choline and acetylcholine contents of circulating mononuclear cells and inhibited radioligand binding to their cholinergic receptors. These data show that choline administration, as choline chloride or CDP-choline, restores the abnormalities in the primary, secondary, and tertiary hemostasis and prevents the development of DIC during experimental endotoxemia in dogs probably by increasing both neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic activity.

  3. [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of a neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M.; Knieling, Anna; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Kurth, Jens; Steiger, Katja; Eiber, Matthias; Esposito, Irene; Retz, Margitta; Kübler, Hubert; Gschwend, Jürgen E.; Schwaiger, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Thalgott, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have shown promising results of neoadjuvant therapy in prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response monitoring after combined neoadjuvant docetaxel chemotherapy and complete androgen blockade in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Results In [11C]Choline PET/CT there was a significant decrease of SUVmax and SUVmean (p = 0.004, each), prostate volume (p = 0.005) and PSA value (p = 0.003) after combined neoadjuvant therapy. MRI showed a significant prostate and tumor volume reduction (p = 0.003 and 0.005, respectively). Number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher in prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group compared to pretherapeutic biopsies and the control group (p = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively). Methods 11 patients received two [11C]Choline PET/CT and MRI scans before and after combined neoadjuvant therapy followed by radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. [11C]Choline uptake, prostate and tumor volume, PSA value (before/after neoadjuvant therapy) and apoptosis (of pretherapeutic biopsy/posttherapeutic prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group and prostatectomy specimens of a matched control group without neoadjuvant therapy) were assessed and tested for differences and correlation using SPSS. Conclusions The results showing a decrease in choline uptake after combined neoadjuvant therapy (paralleled by regressive and apoptotic changes in histopathology) confirm the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT to monitor effects of neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Further studies are recommended to evaluate its use during the course of neoadjuvant therapy for early response assessment. PMID:27572317

  4. Choline Synthesis in Spinach in Relation to Salt Stress.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, P. S.; Weretilnyk, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Choline metabolism was examined in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants growing under nonsaline and saline conditions. In spinach, choline is required for phosphatidylcholine synthesis and as a precursor for the compatible osmolyte glycine betaine (betaine). When control (nonsalinized) leaf discs were incubated for up to 2 h with [1,2-14C]ethanolamine, label appeared in the N-methylated derivatives of phosphoethanolamine including phosphomono-, phosphodi-, and phosphotri- (i.e. phosphocholine) methyl-ethanolamine, as well as in choline and betaine, whereas no radioactivity could be detected in the mono- and dimethylated derivatives of the free base ethanolamine. Leaf discs from salinized plants showed the same pattern of labeling, although the proportion of label that accumulated in betaine was almost 3-fold higher in the salinized leaf discs. Enzymes involved in choline metabolism were assayed in crude leaf extracts of plants. The activites of ethanolamine kinase and of the three S-adenosylmethionine:phospho-base N-methyltransferase enzymes responsible for N-methylating phosphoethanolamine to phosphocholine were all higher in extracts of plants salinized step-wise to 100, 200, or 300 mM NaCI compared with controls. In contrast, choline kinase, phosphocholine phosphatase, and cytidine 5[prime]-triphosphate: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase activities showed little variation with salt stress. Thus, the increased diversion of choline to betaine in salt-stressed spinach appears to be mediated by the increased activity of several key enzymes involved in choline biosynthesis. PMID:12232019

  5. Acetylcholine and choline levels in rabbit fetuses exposed to anticholinergics.

    PubMed

    McBride, W G; Hicks, L J

    1987-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that acetylcholine, choline acetylase and acetylcholinesterase may have an ontogenic and trophic influence in the embryo, and that therefore certain drugs may produce malformations via their effect on the acetylcholine and choline levels in the fetus. Thalidomide and the anticholinergics, scopolamine hydrobromide and orphenadrine hydrochloride, and doxylamine succinate, an antihistamine with secondary anticholinergic action, were administered to pregnant New Zealand White rabbit does from day 8 to day 15 of gestation. Cesarean sections were performed on gestational day 16, the fetuses removed and the acetylcholine and choline contents of the fetuses and placentas were estimated by organic extraction and derivation for injection into a GCMS. These acetylcholine and choline levels were compared with those of the fetuses and placentas of the control animals mated with the same buck on the same day as the treated animals. Thalidomide (50 mg/kg) did not affect acetylcholine or choline levels in the fetuses or the placentas obtained from the treated animal. Scopolamine (approximately 100 micrograms/kg) reduced the choline level in the placenta and fetus but not the acetylcholine levels. Orphenadrine (approximately 24 mg/kg) reduced acetylcholine and choline levels in the fetus and choline levels in the placenta. Doxylamine succinate (10 mg/kg) reduced the acetylcholine levels in the fetus and the choline levels in the placenta. The placenta is a fetal organ and the significance of acetylcholine production by the placenta is as yet unknown. The reduction in acetylcholine levels in the fetus exposed to drugs with an anticholinergic action may be of significance in the production of malformations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. A hyperpolarized choline molecular probe for monitoring acetylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Allouche-Arnon, Hyla; Gamliel, Ayelet; Barzilay, Claudia M; Nalbandian, Ruppen; Gomori, J Moshe; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Choline as a reporter molecule has been investigated by in vivo magnetic resonance for almost three decades. Accumulation of choline metabolites (mainly the phosphorylated forms) had been observed in malignancy in preclinical models, ex-vivo, in vivo and in patients. The combined choline metabolite signal appears in (1) H-MRS of the brain and its relative intensity had been used as a diagnostic factor in various conditions. The advent of spin hyperpolarization methods for in vivo use has raised interest in the ability to follow the physiological metabolism of choline into acetylcholine in the brain. Here we present a stable-isotope labeled choline analog, [1,1,2,2-D(4) ,2-(13) C]choline chloride, that is suitable for this purpose. In this analog, the (13) C position showed 24% polarization in the liquid state, following DNP hyperpolarization. This nucleus also showed a long T(1) (35 s) at 11.8 T and 25 °C, which is a prerequisite for hyperpolarized studies. The chemical shift of this (13) C position differentiates choline and acetylcholine from each other and from the other water-soluble choline metabolites, namely phosphocholine and betaine. Enzymatic studies using an acetyltransferase enzyme showed the synthesis of the deuterated-acetylcholine form at thermal equilibrium conditions and in a hyperpolarized state. Analysis using a comprehensive model showed that the T(1) of the formed hyperpolarized [1,1,2,2-D(4) ,2-(13) C]acetylcholine was 34 s at 14.1 T and 37 °C. We conclude that [1,1,2,2-D(4) ,2-(13) C]choline chloride is a promising new molecular probe for hyperpolarized metabolic studies and discuss the factors related to its possible use in vivo.

  7. Dietary intake and food sources of choline in European populations.

    PubMed

    Vennemann, Francy B C; Ioannidou, Sofia; Valsta, Liisa M; Dumas, Céline; Ocké, Marga C; Mensink, Gert B M; Lindtner, Oliver; Virtanen, Suvi M; Tlustos, Christina; D'Addezio, Laura; Mattison, Irene; Dubuisson, Carine; Siksna, Inese; Héraud, Fanny

    2015-12-28

    Choline is an important nutrient for humans. Choline intake of the European population was assessed considering the European Food Safety Authority European Comprehensive Food Consumption Database and the United States Department of Agriculture Nutrient Database. Average choline intake ranges were 151-210 mg/d among toddlers (1 to ≤3 years old), 177-304 mg/d among other children (3 to ≤10 years old), 244-373 mg/d among adolescents (10 to ≤18 years old), 291-468 mg/d among adults (18 to ≤65 years old), 284-450 mg/d among elderly people (65 to ≤75 years old) and 269-444 mg/d among very elderly people (≥75 years old). The intakes were higher among males compared with females, mainly due to larger quantities of food consumed per day. In most of the population groups considered, the average choline intake was below the adequate intake (AI) set by the Institute of Medicine in the USA. The main food groups contributing to choline intake were meat, milk, grain, egg and their derived products, composite dishes and fish. The main limitations of this study are related to the absence of choline composition data of foods consumed by the European population and the subsequent assumption made to assess their intake levels. Given the definition of AI, no conclusion on the adequacy of choline intake can be drawn for most European population groups. Such results improve the knowledge on choline intake in Europe that could be further refined by the collection of choline composition data for foods as consumed in Europe.

  8. YehZYXW of Escherichia coli Is a Low-Affinity, Non-Osmoregulatory Betaine-Specific ABC Transporter.

    PubMed

    Lang, Shenhui; Cressatti, Marisa; Mendoza, Kris E; Coumoundouros, Chelsea N; Plater, Samantha M; Culham, Doreen E; Kimber, Matthew S; Wood, Janet M

    2015-09-22

    Transporter-mediated osmolyte accumulation stimulates the growth of Escherichia coli in high-osmolality environments. YehZYXW was predicted to be an osmoregulatory transporter because (1) osmotic and stationary phase induction of yehZYXW is mediated by RpoS, (2) the Yeh proteins are homologous to the components of known osmoregulatory ABC transporters (e.g., ProU of E. coli), and (3) YehZ models based on the structures of periplasmic betaine-binding proteins suggested that YehZ retains key betaine-binding residues. The betaines choline-O-sulfate, glycine betaine, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate bound YehZ and ProX with millimolar and micromolar affinities, respectively, as determined by equilibrium dialysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The crystal structure of the YehZ apoprotein, determined at 1.5 Å resolution (PDB ID: 4WEP ), confirmed its similarity to other betaine-binding proteins. Small and nonpolar residues in the hinge region of YehZ (e.g., Gly223) pack more closely than the corresponding residues in ProX, stabilizing the apoprotein. Betaines bound YehZ-Gly223Ser an order of magnitude more tightly than YehZ, suggesting that weak substrate binding in YehZ is at least partially due to apo state stabilization. Neither ProX nor YehZ bound proline. Assays based on osmoprotection or proline auxotrophy failed to detect YehZYXW-mediated uptake of proline, betaines, or other osmolytes. However, transport assays revealed low-affinity glycine betaine uptake, mediated by YehZYXW, that was inhibited at high salinity. Thus, YehZYXW is a betaine transporter that shares substrate specificity, but not an osmoregulatory function, with homologues like E. coli ProU. Other work suggests that yehZYXW may be an antivirulence locus whose expression promotes persistent, asymptomatic bacterial infection.

  9. Bio-Distribution, Imaging Protocols and Diagnostic Accuracy of PET with Tracers of Lipogenesis in Imaging Prostate Cancer: a Comparison between 11C-Choline, 18FFluoroethylcholine and 18F-Methylcholine.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Gallo, Gianpasquale; Schillaci, Orazio; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio

    2015-01-01

    PET/CT with choline is a diagnostic tool useful for imaging prostate cancer patients. The overall published papers in this field are referred to three variants of the same radiopharmaceutical: 11C-Choline, 18FMethylcholine and 18F-Ethylcholine. As no data has been reported on the theoretical differences between these three variants of radiolabeled choline, this study aims to explore the knowledge on the physiological distribution of these three tracers, to compare data of imaging acquisition protocols and to verify the theoretical equivalence in terms of diagnostic accuracy and potential false positive cases that can occur in clinical practice. A literature research about published papers was conducted regarding the physiological distribution, imaging acquisition protocols and diagnostic performance of 11C-choline, 18F-methylcholine and 18F-ethylcholine PET/CT. Minimal differences of the "in vivo" bio-distribution of the variants of radiolabeled choline were registered. Several imaging acquisition protocols were utilized, considering the different half-decay of 11C and 18F and the early urinary excretion of 18F-FECH. The diagnostic accuracy resulted similar for all the tracers, despite an insignificant amount of data for 18F-FECH; however, some pitfalls were documented for all the variants, related to the intrinsic properties of choline as a non-tumour specific tracer. Finally, our clinical experience with the two fluorinated kinds of choline has also been reported describing the "in vivo" bio-distribution with semi-quantitative measurement of Standardised Uptake Value in target organs. The literature suggests these three variants of choline equally useful to be considered for prostate cancer imaging. A standardisation of acquisition protocols for fluorinated choline PET/CT has also been proposed.

  10. Effects of replacing medium sodium by choline, caesium, or rubidium, on water and ion contents of renal cortical slices

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Pauline M.; Macknight, Anthony D. C.

    1977-01-01

    1. Renal cortical slices from rat, rabbit, and guinea-pig were incubated in media in which choline, caesium or rubidium replaced sodium. 2. Slices of rabbit and guinea-pig renal cortex incubated in oxygenated choline Ringer decreased in volume initially and did not swell over 3 hr at 25° C. There was a steady loss of potassium. Inhibition of metabolism (N2 + 1 mM iodoacetamide) caused some swelling. Ouabain, 10 mM, in choline Ringer affected neither loss of potassium nor tissue water content. 3. Slices of rat renal cortex similarly incubated in choline Ringer swelled over 3 hr at 25° C whether or not metabolism was inhibited; ouabain (15 mM) affected neither tissue potassium loss nor tissue water content. 4. Incubation in choline Ringer containing either 0·2 mM p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, or 1 mM ethacrynic acid increased the tissue water content of guinea-pig renal cortical slices. 5. Depletion of cellular potassium (by preliminary incubation in oxygenated potassium-free sodium Ringer with 10 mM ouabain at 30° C) resulted in increased tissue water content when rabbit renal cortical slices were subsequently incubated in oxygenated choline Ringer at 25° C for 3 hr. 6. There was no evidence of energy-dependent extrusion of water or ions from either equilibrated rat or rabbit renal cortical slices leached at 0·5° C and then reincubated at 25° C in choline Ringer. 7. Rat and guinea-pig renal cortical slices leached at 0.5° C and reincubated at 25° C swelled in rubidium Ringer and in caesium Ringer. There was no evidence of energy-dependent water or ion extrusion when metabolism was restored after leaching in either of these media. Metabolizing rat slices but not guinea-pig slices swelled faster than slices whose metabolism was inhibited. 8. These results lend no support to the mechano-chemical hypothesis which ascribes cellular volume regulation to a contractile mechanism squeezing isotonic extracellular fluid from the cells. Instead it is suggested that

  11. Specific Stimulated Uptake of Acetylcholine by Torpedo Electric Organ Synaptic Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Stanley M.; Koenigsberger, Robert

    1980-10-01

    The specificity of acetylcholine uptake by synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica was studied. In the absence of cofactors, [3H]acetylcholine was taken up identically to [14C]choline in the same solution (passive uptake), and the equilibrium concentration achieved inside the vesicles was equal to the concentration outside. In the presence of MgATP, [3H]acetylcholine and [14C]choline in the same solution were taken up identically, except only about half as much of each was taken up (suppressed uptake). [3H]Acetylcholine uptake was stimulated by MgATP and HCO3 about 4-fold relative to suppressed uptake, for a net concentrative uptake of about 2:1 (stimulated uptake). Uptake of [14C]choline in the same solution remained at the suppressed level. [3H]Acetylcholine taken up under stimulated conditions migrated with vesicles containing [14C]mannitol on analytical glycerol density gradients during centrifugation. Vesicles were treated with nine protein modification reagents under mild conditions. Two reagents had no effect on, dithiothreitol potentiated, and six reagents strongly inhibited subsequent stimulated uptake of [3H]acetylcholine. The results indicate that uptake of acetylcholine is conditionally specific for the transported substrate, is carried out by the synaptic vesicles rather than a contaminant of the preparation, and requires a functional protein system containing a critical sulfhydryl group.

  12. Prospective evaluation of [(11)C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M; Eiber, Matthias; Kundt, Günther; Retz, Margitta; Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Rummeny, Ernst J; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Schwaiger, Markus; Thalgott, Mark; Krause, Bernd J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [(11)C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [(11)C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [(11)C] Choline uptake (SUVmax, SUVmean), CT derived Houndsfield units (HUmax, HUmean), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUVmax, SUVmean, HUmax, HUmean, and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUVmax and SUVmean (early and late) and changes of PSAearly and PSAlate were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUVmax and SUVmean was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUVmax and SUVmean were statistically significantly higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There is no

  13. Use of canonical variate analysis biplot in examination of choline content data of some foods.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Baris; Atakan, Cemal

    2011-03-01

    Adequate intake (AI) of choline as part of the daily diet can help prevent major diseases. Low choline intake is a major risk factor for liver and several neurological disorders. Extreme choline consumption may cause diseases such as hypotension, sweating, diarrhea, and fishy body odor. The AI of choline is 425 mg/day for adult women; higher for pregnant and lactating women. The AI for adult men is 550 mg/day. The total choline content of foods is calculated as the sum of free choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. These are called the choline variables. Observed values of choline variables may be different in amounts of nutrients. So different food groups in terms of choline variables are useful to compare. The present paper shows the advantages of using canonical variate analysis biplot to optimally separate groups and explore the differentiality of choline variables amounts in foods.

  14. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS... reacting approximately equimolecular quantities of ferric hydroxide, choline, and citric acid may be safely...

  15. Choline as a fuel sweetener and sulfur antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, G.L.; Porlier, B.W.; Cravey, W.E.

    1986-06-10

    A method is described of sweetening petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and, at the same time, reducing the sulfur content thereof which comprises treating such fuels with a sweetening and sulfur-removing amount of choline.

  16. Use of choline chloride for leukocyte cryopreservation (-40 degrees C).

    PubMed

    Svedentsov, E P; Zaitseva, O O; Tumanova, T V; Solomina, O N; Khudyakov, A N

    2009-09-01

    Choline chloride in complex with the main cryophylactic (1,2-propanediol) preserves morphological integrity and functional activity of blood nuclears after freezing to -40 degrees C by the exponential program.

  17. Determination of choline in infant formula by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laikhtman, M; Rohrer, J S

    1999-01-01

    Choline was determined in infant formula by ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection. Samples were digested with 1M hydrochloric acid, filtered, diluted, and injected into the chromatographic system. Choline and the alkali and alkaline earth metals were separated on a high-resolution cation-exchange column and detected by suppressed conductivity. The method was linear between 2 and 200 mg/L (r2 = 0.9999), the concentration range of the diluted samples. This method accurately determined choline in powdered, concentrated, and ready-to-feed infant formulas. Recoveries of choline spikes into powdered infant formula at approximately 1, 0.8, 0.5, and 0.2 times the labeled value ranged from 85 to 114%. This method had good agreement for 8 blind duplicates. The values determined for these samples, which were used in an AOAC collaborative study of an enzymatic method, were consistent with the values determined by the enzymatic method.

  18. The nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics of the dietary requirement for choline.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Karen D; Zeisel, Steven H

    2012-01-01

    Advances in nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics have been instrumental in demonstrating that nutrient requirements vary among individuals. This is exemplified by studies of the nutrient choline, in which gender, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, estrogen status, and gut microbiome composition have been shown to influence its optimal intake level. Choline is an essential nutrient with a wide range of biological functions, and current studies are aimed at refining our understanding of its requirements and, importantly, on defining the molecular mechanisms that mediate its effects in instances of suboptimal dietary intake. This chapter introduces the reader to challenges in developing individual nutrition recommendations, the biological function of choline, current and future research paradigms to fully understand the consequences of inadequate choline nutrition, and some forward thinking about the potential for individualized nutrition recommendations to become a tangible application for improved health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of Choline Transporters in the Human Placenta over Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Heidi K.; Trinder, Kinsey M.; Galimanis, Carly E.; Post, Annalisa; Phang, Tzu; Ross, Randal G.; Winn, Virginia D.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The developing fetus relies on the maternal blood supply to provide the choline it requires for making membrane lipids, synthesizing acetylcholine, and performing important methylation reactions. It is vital, therefore, that the placenta is efficient at transporting choline from maternal to fetal circulation. Although choline transporters have been found in term placenta samples, little is known about what cell types express specific choline transporters and how expression of the transporters may change over gestation. The objective of this study was to characterize choline transporter expression levels and localization in the human placenta throughout placental development. METHODS We analyzed CTL1 and −2 expression over gestation in human placental biopsies from 6 to 40 weeks gestation (n=6–10 per gestational window) by immunoblot analysis. To determine the cellular expression pattern of the choline transporters throughout gestation, immunofluorescence analysis was then performed. RESULTS Both CTL1 and CTL2 were expressed in the chorionic villi from 6 weeks gestation to term. Labor did not alter expression levels of either transporter. CTL1 localized to the syncytial trophoblasts and the endothelium of the fetal vasculature within the chorionic villous structure. CTL2 localized mainly to the stroma early in gestation and by the second trimester co-localized with CTL1 at the fetal vasculature. DISCUSSION The differential expression pattern of CTL1 and CTL2 suggests that CTL1 is the key transporter involved in choline transport from maternal circulation and both transporters are likely involved in stromal and endothelial cell choline transport. PMID:26601765

  20. Characterization of choline transporters in the human placenta over gestation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Heidi K; Trinder, Kinsey M; Galimanis, Carly E; Post, Annalisa; Phang, Tzu; Ross, Randal G; Winn, Virginia D

    2015-12-01

    The developing fetus relies on the maternal blood supply to provide the choline it requires for making membrane lipids, synthesizing acetylcholine, and performing important methylation reactions. It is vital, therefore, that the placenta is efficient at transporting choline from the maternal to the fetal circulation. Although choline transporters have been found in term placenta samples, little is known about what cell types express specific choline transporters and how expression of the transporters may change over gestation. The objective of this study was to characterize choline transporter expression levels and localization in the human placenta throughout placental development. We analyzed CTL1 and -2 expression over gestation in human placental biopsies from 6 to 40 weeks gestation (n = 6-10 per gestational window) by immunoblot analysis. To determine the cellular expression pattern of the choline transporters throughout gestation, immunofluorescence analysis was then performed. Both CTL1 and CTL2 were expressed in the chorionic villi from 6 weeks gestation to term. Labor did not alter expression levels of either transporter. CTL1 localized to the syncytial trophoblasts and the endothelium of the fetal vasculature within the chorionic villous structure. CTL2 localized mainly to the stroma early in gestation and by the second trimester co-localized with CTL1 at the fetal vasculature. The differential expression pattern of CTL1 and CTL2 suggests that CTL1 is the key transporter involved in choline transport from maternal circulation and both transporters are likely involved in stromal and endothelial cell choline transport. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-melting mixtures based on choline ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Fischer, Veronika; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-07

    In this article a strategy is proposed for the design of low toxic, room temperature liquid low-melting mixtures (LMMs) which are entirely composed of natural materials. From literature it is well known that, in general, deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride and dicarboxylic acids are LMMs, but not liquids at room temperature, with one exception: a 1 : 1 molar mixture of malonic acid and choline chloride. Therefore, the starting point of this study was the decrease of the melting point of one of the components, namely the dicarboxylic acid, which is succinic, glutaric or adipic acid. For this purpose, one of the two protons of the acidic group was exchanged by a bulky unsymmetrical choline cation. The resulting ionic liquids (ILs) were still solid at room temperature, but have a reduced melting temperature compared to the corresponding acids. In the second step, mixtures of these ILs with choline chloride were prepared. It turned out that choline glutarate-choline chloride mixtures are liquids at room temperature at compositions containing 95-98 wt% of choline glutarate. Finally, urea was added as another hydrogen bond donor. Density, conductivity and viscosity measurements were performed for all obtained mixtures. Moreover, a Walden plot was drawn which indicates that all mixtures are liquids with fully dissociated ions moving independently. Therefore, they are considered as "good" ionic liquids and, thus, for example they can be used to exchange more toxic or less biodegradable ILs in application processes. A brief outlook containing application possibilities is given. It is demonstrated that choline dodecylsulfate is readily soluble in these mixtures, forming aggregates in the LMM at temperatures exceeding 55 °C.

  2. Dietary choline requirement of juvenile red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Craig, S R; Gatlin, D M

    1996-06-01

    A 6-wk feeding experiment was conducted to determine the maximal dietary choline requirement of juvenile red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). Diets were formulated to provide 35 g crude protein/ 100 g dry weight from solvent-extracted lyophilized red drum muscle and an amino acid premix. This premix provided methionine precisely at the minimum requirement determined for red drum so that potential synthesis of choline from methionine would be limited. Menhaden oil and dextrin were added to all diets to provide 13.8 kJ metabolizable energy/g diet as estimated by physiological fuel values. The diets were supplemented with choline chloride to provide 0, 250, 500, 750, 1000 and 1500 mg choline/kg diet. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of red drum initially averaging 5.5 g/fish in a closed, recirculating system consisting of 110-L glass aquaria. Dietary choline concentration significantly (P < 0.05) affected weight gain, feed efficiency, total lipid in liver and plasma, as well as plasma cholesterol ester, triglyceride, cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine concentrations. Least-squares regression of these responses yielded requirements ranging from 330 to 676 mg choline/kg diet. Based on weight gain data, a maximal requirement estimate (+/- SEM) of 588 (+/- 35) mg choline/kg diet was established. Red drum appear to differ from other animals in regard to the response of total lipid in liver because fish fed choline-deficient diets had reduced liver lipid rather than lipid accumulation. Cultured red drum normally store high levels of lipid in the liver.

  3. Four Cation-Selective Transporters Contribute to Apical Uptake and Accumulation of Metformin in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tianxiang (Kevin); Proctor, William R.; Costales, Chester L.; Cai, Hao; Everett, Ruth S.

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is the frontline therapy for type II diabetes mellitus. The oral bioavailability of metformin is unexpectedly high, between 40 and 60%, given its hydrophilicity and positive charge at all physiologic pH values. Previous studies in Caco-2 cell monolayers, a cellular model of the human intestinal epithelium, showed that during absorptive transport metformin is taken up into the cells via transporters in the apical (AP) membrane; however, predominant transport to the basolateral (BL) side occurs via the paracellular route because intracellular metformin cannot egress across the BL membrane. Furthermore, these studies have suggested that the AP transporters can contribute to intestinal accumulation and absorption of metformin. Transporter-specific inhibitors as well as a novel approach involving a cocktail of transporter inhibitors with overlapping selectivity were used to identify the AP transporters that mediate metformin uptake in Caco-2 cell monolayers; furthermore, the relative contributions of these transporters in metformin AP uptake were also determined. The organic cation transporter 1, plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT), serotonin reuptake transporter, and choline high-affinity transporter contributed to approximately 25%, 20%, 20%, and 15%, respectively, of the AP uptake of metformin. PMAT-knockdown Caco-2 cells were constructed to confirm the contribution of PMAT in metformin AP uptake because a PMAT-selective inhibitor is not available. The identification of four intestinal transporters that contribute to AP uptake and potentially intestinal absorption of metformin is a significant novel finding that can influence our understanding of metformin pharmacology and intestinal drug-drug interactions involving this highly prescribed drug. PMID:25563903

  4. 18F-FET and 18F-FCH uptake in human glioblastoma T98G cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Persico, Marco Giovanni; Buroni, Federica Eleonora; Pasi, Francesca; Aprile, Carlo; Nano, Rosanna; Hodolic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite complex treatment of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, high grade gliomas often recur. Differentiation between post-treatment changes and recurrence is difficult. 18F-methyl-choline (18F-FCH) is frequently used in staging and detection of recurrent prostate cancer disease as well as some brain tumours; however accumulation in inflammatory tissue limits its specificity. The 18F-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET) shows a specific uptake in malignant cells, resulting from increased expression of amino acid transporters or diffusing through the disrupted blood-brain barrier. 18F-FET exhibits lower uptake in machrophages and other inflammatory cells. Aim of this study was to evaluate 18F-FCH and 18F-FET uptake by human glioblastoma T98G cells. Material and methods Human glioblastoma T98G or human dermal fibroblasts cells, seeded at a density to obtain 2 × 105 cells per flask when radioactive tracers were administered, grew adherent to the plastic surface at 37°C in 5% CO2 in complete medium. Equimolar amounts of radiopharmaceuticals were added to cells for different incubation times (20 to 120 minutes) for 18F-FCH and 18F-FET respectively. The cellular radiotracer uptake was determined with a gamma counter. All experiments were carried out in duplicate and repeated three times. The uptake measurements are expressed as the percentage of the administered dose of tracer per 2 × 105 cells. Data (expressed as mean values of % uptake of radiopharmaceuticals) were compared using parametric or non-parametric tests as appropriate. Differences were regarded as statistically significant when p<0.05. Results A significant uptake of 18F-FCH was seen in T98G cells at 60, 90 and 120 minutes. The percentage uptake of 18F-FET in comparison to 18F-FCH was lower by a factor of more than 3, with different kinetic curves.18F-FET showed a more rapid initial uptake up to 40 minutes and 18F-FCH showed a progressive rise reaching a maximum after 90 minutes

  5. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, Neil G. Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Isaacs, Neil W.

    2006-07-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V{sub M} = 2.77 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å.

  6. Renal inner medullary choline dehydrogenase activity: characterization and modulation.

    PubMed

    Grossman, E B; Hebert, S C

    1989-01-01

    Betaine belongs to the trimethylamine class of osmolytes (osmotically active substances believed to play an important role in cell volume homeostasis) and has recently been identified in the inner medulla of the mammalian kidney. Trimethylamines accumulate in the renal inner medulla during hypertonic stress, and betaine content in the inner medulla has been shown recently to increase during hypernatremia, yet the mechanisms governing the modulation of trimethylamine content and, in particular, of betaine content are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the renal inner medullas of three separate rat strains. Choline dehydrogenase is the enzyme that catalyzes the first of two successive oxidation steps in the biosynthetic conversion of choline to betaine. The presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the inner medulla suggests that betaine accumulation in the inner medulla may result, at least in part, through in situ synthesis. The Km and Vmax of the reaction in the inner medullas of Long-Evans rats are 4.7 +/- 0.5 mM and 36.9 +/- 5.0 nmol.mg protein-1.min-1, respectively. These values are similar to the characteristics of choline dehydrogenase in mammalian liver. During hypernatremia, when betaine content of the inner medulla has been shown to increase 1.5-fold, choline dehydrogenase activity remains unchanged (or slightly increased), whereas enzyme activity in the cortex increases approximately 50%. Possible mechanisms of inner medullary betaine accumulation are discussed.

  7. Metabolic crosstalk between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2013-03-01

    There are multiple identified mechanisms involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance and adiposity, but there are here-to-fore unsuspected metabolic factors that also influence these processes. Studies in animal models suggest important links between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. Rodents fed choline deficient diets become hypermetabolic. Mice with deletions in one of several different genes of choline metabolism have phenotypes that include increased metabolic rate, decreased body fat/lean mass ratio, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased ATP production by mitochondria, or decreased weight gain on a high fat diet. In addition, farmers have recognized that the addition of a metabolite of choline (betaine) to cattle and swine feed reduces body fat/lean mass ratio. Choline dietary intake in humans varies over a > three-fold range, and genetic variation exists that modifies individual requirements for this nutrient. Although there are some epidemiologic studies in humans suggesting a link between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy metabolism, there have been no controlled studies in humans that were specifically designed to examine this relationship.

  8. Choline pathways during normal and stimulated renal growth in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, G H; Lowenstein, L M

    1978-01-01

    Cellular membrane synthesis occurs during normal and stimulated renal growth. Choline in the kidney is utilized as a precursor for membrane synthesis via the choline kinase reaction. We investigated choline phosphorylation during normal and stimulated renal growth. Rapidly growing neonatal rat kidneys contained relatively high levels of choline kinase activity (61 pmol phosphorylcholine/min per mg protein). Choline kinase activity and phosphorylcholine production then fell gradually over the 1st mo of life; by 1 mo phosphorylcholine production was 34 pmol phosphorylcholine/min per mg protein. Choline kinase activity increased by 27% (P less than 0.001) in 28-day-old rats when renal growth was stimulated by contralateral nephrectomy; the increase occurred within 2 h after surgery. Thus, changes in the activity of this important enzyme in the initiation of membrane synthesis is associated both with normal renal development and with adaptation to nephron loss. The findings further suggest that the cell membrane may be involved in the initiation of compensatory renal growth. PMID:659614

  9. Choline Metabolism Alteration: A Focus on Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoli, Marina; Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca; Canevari, Silvana; Iorio, Egidio; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprograming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes such as choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a “cholinic phenotype” that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse, and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that “cholinic phenotype” is a peculiar feature of transformed cells and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27446799

  10. Lymph Node Metastasis from Tall-Cell Thyroid Cancer Negative on 18F-FDG PET/CT and Detected by 18F-Choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Arnoldo; Massollo, Michela; Bandelloni, Roberto; Arlandini, Anselmo; Foppiani, Luca

    2015-08-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent thyroidectomy and (131)I remnant ablation for tall-cell differentiated cancer (DTC) of the left lobe. Detectable Tg levels (4.1 μg/L) under TSH suppression, with undetectable serum Tg-antibody levels, prompted neck ultrasonography, which revealed a lymph node in the left laterocervical region and in the right retroclavicular region. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed uptake by the left lymph node. (18)F-choline PET/CT showed increased uptake by both lymph nodes. Histopathology revealed DTC solid metastasis in the left lymph node and solid and cystic metastasis in the right one. (18)F-choline PET/CT can locate virulent DTC recurrence, thereby increasing (18)F-FDG PET/CT information.

  11. Determination of total choline in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Lied, E; Braekkan, O R

    1975-01-01

    A microbiological eight-point parallel line assay for the determination of choline has been developed, using Neurospora crassa cholineless-1 as test organism. In the common procedure the mold is grown at 25 degrees C in 25 ml basal medium at pH 5.9-6.0. Growth studies showed, however, that a better log dose-response curve, with respect to the linear part of the curve, was obtained when the organism was grown at 30 degrees C, in 20 ml experimental volume and at pH 5.5. The proprosed eight-point assay was tested by comparison with the common procedure. Although repeated analyses of a test solution showed no significant difference in the mean values obtained, a greater scatter of the single values about the mean was observed when analyzing according to the common procedure. The developed procedure was also applied to different samples of biological material. The analysis of variance proved the parallelity and linearity of the dose-response curves. As a result of the variation between the replicates could be used as the experimental error of the assay when the confidence limits of the samples were computed.

  12. Choline or CDP-choline alters serum lipid responses to endotoxin in dogs and rats: involvement of the peripheral nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ilcol, Yesim Ozarda; Yilmaz, Zeki; Cansev, Mehmet; Ulus, Ismail H

    2009-09-01

    We showed previously that choline administration protects dogs from endotoxin-induced multiple organ injury and platelet dysfunctions. Because sepsis/endotoxemia is associated with alterations in lipid metabolism, we have investigated whether choline or cytidine-5'-diphosphate choline, a choline donor, alters serum lipid responses to endotoxin in dogs and rats. In response to endotoxin, serum concentrations of triglycerides, choline-containing phospholipids, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased in a dose- and time-related manner. Administration of choline (20 mg/kg i.v. in dogs or 90 mg/kg i.p. in rats) or cytidine-5'-diphosphate choline (70 mg/kg i.v. in dogs) 5 min before and 4 and 8 h after endotoxin blocked or attenuated the increases in serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and nonesterified fatty acids. Endotoxin-induced elevations in serum phospholipid levels did not change in rats and were enhanced in dogs by choline. In rats, serum lipid response to endotoxin was accompanied by severalfold elevations in serum levels of hepatorenal injury markers; their elevations were also blocked by choline. Pretreatment with hexamethonium blocked choline's effects on serum lipids and hepatorenal injury markers. Pretreatment with atropine blocked endotoxin-induced elevations in serum lipid and hepatorenal injury markers, but failed to alter choline's actions on these parameters. Choline treatment improved survival rate of rats in lethal endotoxin shock. In conclusion, these data show that choline treatment alters serum lipid responses to endotoxin and prevents hepatorenal injury during endotoxemia through a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated mechanism. Hence, choline and choline-containing compounds may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of endotoxemia/sepsis.

  13. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia.

  14. Influence of (11)C-choline PET/CT on the treatment planning for salvage radiation therapy in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Souvatzoglou, Michael; Krause, Bernd J; Pürschel, Anja; Thamm, Reinhard; Schuster, Tibor; Buck, Andreas K; Zimmermann, Frank; Molls, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus; Geinitz, Hans

    2011-05-01

    The present study evaluates the incidence of (11)C-choline PET/CT positive findings in patients with recurrent prostate cancer referred for salvage radiotherapy (SRT) and the influence on the definition of the planning target volume (PTV). Thirty-seven patients treated with radical prostatectomy and referred to SRT to the prostatic fossa because of biochemical relapse, were analysed retrospectively. All patients underwent (11)C-choline PET/CT before radiotherapy. The influence of PET/CT on the extent of the PTV was analysed. The median total follow up after SRT was 51.2 months. 11/37 (30%) patients had a positive finding in the (11)C-choline PET/CT, 5 (13%) outside of the prostatic fossa (iliac lymph nodes), implicating an extension of the PTV. Patients with positive (11)C-choline PET/CT had a significant higher PSA value than patients with no pathologic uptake (p=0.03). Overall, at the end of follow up 56% of the patients had a PSA ≤ 0.2ng/ml and 44% had a biochemical relapse of prostate cancer. (11)C-choline PET/CT detects abnormalities outside of the prostatic fossa in 13% of patients referred for SRT because of biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy, affecting the extent of the PTV. Prospective studies need to be implemented to evaluate the benefit of SRT with a PTV based on (11)C-choline PET/CT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Histopathological correlation of (11)C-choline PET scans for target volume definition in radical prostate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joe H; Joon, Daryl Lim; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J; Scott, Andrew M; Davis, Ian D; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of (11)C-choline PET scans in defining dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) for radiotherapy target volume definition. Eight men with prostate cancer who had (11)C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy were studied. Several methods were used to contour the DIL on the PET scans: visual, PET Edge, Region Grow, absolute standardised uptake value (SUV) thresholds and percentage of maximum SUV thresholds. Prostatectomy specimens were sliced in the transverse plane and DILs were delineated on these by a pathologist. These were then compared with the PET scans. The accuracy of correlation was assessed by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the Youden index. The contouring method resulting in both the highest DSC and the highest Youden index was 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV(60%)), with values of 0.64 and 0.51, respectively. However SUV(60%) was not statistically significantly better than all of the other methods by either measure. Although not statistically significant, SUV(60%) resulted in the best correlation between (11)C-choline PET and pathology amongst all the methods studied. The degree of correlation shown here is consistent with previous studies that have justified using imaging for DIL radiotherapy target volume definition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging primary prostate cancer with 11C-Choline PET/CT: relation to tumour stage, Gleason score and biomarkers of biologic aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yong; Li, Xin; Sun, Peng; Wang, Muwen; Wang, Ridong; Jin, Xunbo

    2012-01-01

    Background As a significant overlap of 11C-Choline standardized uptake value (SUV) between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, controversy exists regarding the clinical value of 11C-Choline PET/CT scan in primary prostate cancer. In this study, the SUVmax of the prostate lesions and the pelvic muscles were measured and their ratios (SUVmax-P/M ratio) were calculated. Then we evaluated whether the tracer 11C-Choline uptake, quantified as SUVmax-P/M ratio, correlated with tumour stage, Gleason score, and expression levels of several biomarkers of aggressiveness. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary prostate cancer underwent 11C-Choline PET/CT. Tumour specimens from these patients were graded histopathologically, and immunnohistochemistry for Ki-67, CD31, androgen receptor (AR), Her-2/neu, Bcl-2, and PTEN were performed. Results Both SUVmax and SUVmax-P/M ratio showed no significant difference between patients with tumour stage II and III, but significantly elevated in patients with tumour stage IV. SUVmax-P/M ratio was also significantly higher in lesions with Gleason score of 4+3 or higher versus less than or equal to 3+4. SUVmax-P/M ratio was found significantly correlated with expression levels of Ki-67 and CD31. In addition, a higher SUVmax-P/M ratio was demonstrated in Her-2/neu positive subgroup than negative subgroup. At the same time, Gleason score and expression levels of these biomarkers showed no significant association with SUVmax. Conclusions Using the parameter SUVmax-P/M ratio, 11C-Choline PET/CT may be a valuable non-invasive imaging technology in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer. PMID:23077456

  17. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  18. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [11C]-choline

    PubMed Central

    Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [11C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [11C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [11C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [11C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [11C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [11C]-target containing cyclotron. PMID:27660552

  19. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [(11)C]-choline.

    PubMed

    Szydło, Marcin; Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [(11)C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [(11)C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [(11)C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [(11)C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [(11)C]-target containing cyclotron.

  20. Ultraviolet radiation alters choline phospholipid metabolism in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeo, V.; Scheide, S.; Meshulam, J.; Hanson, D.; Cardullo, A.

    1988-10-01

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB-290-320 nm) induces inflammation and hyperproliferation in human epidermis. This response is associated with the recovery from irradiated skin of inflammatory mediators derived from membrane phospholipids. We have previously reported that UVB stimulates the production of such mediators by human keratinocytes (HK) in culture. In these studies we examined the effect of UVB on the metabolism of choline containing phospholipids in HK prelabeled with (/sup 3/H) choline. UVB (400-1600J/m2) stimulated a dose dependent release of (/sup 3/H) choline from HK within minutes of irradiation. Examination of media extracts by paper chromatography revealed that the released (/sup 3/H) choline was predominately in the form of glycerophosphorylcholine. Examination of label remaining in membranes of cells after irradiation by acid precipitation and HPLC revealed that the origin of the released (/sup 3/H) choline was the membrane phosphatidylcholine/lysophosphatidylcholine. These data support a concept of UVB stimulation of both a phospholipase A (1 or 2) and a lysophospholipase. These UVB induced alterations of HK membrane phospholipid metabolism likely have profound effects on UVB-induced inflammation and control of cell growth in human skin.

  1. Human choline dehydrogenase: medical promises and biochemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Francesca; Gadda, Giovanni

    2013-09-15

    Human choline dehydrogenase (CHD) is located in the inner membrane of mitochondria primarily in liver and kidney and catalyzes the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine. Its physiological role is to regulate the concentrations of choline and glycine betaine in the blood and cells. Choline is important for regulation of gene expression, the biosynthesis of lipoproteins and membrane phospholipids and for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine; glycine betaine plays important roles as a primary intracellular osmoprotectant and as methyl donor for the biosynthesis of methionine from homocysteine, a required step for the synthesis of the ubiquitous methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine. Recently, CHD has generated considerable medical attention due to its association with various human pathologies, including male infertility, homocysteinuria, breast cancer and metabolic syndrome. Despite the renewed interest, the biochemical characterization of the enzyme has lagged behind due to difficulties in the obtainment of purified, active and stable enzyme. This review article summarizes the medical relevance and the physiological roles of human CHD, highlights the biochemical knowledge on the enzyme, and provides an analysis based on the comparison of the protein sequence with that of bacterial choline oxidase, for which structural and biochemical information is available.

  2. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with radiolabeled choline PET.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando Franco; Barbarisi, Manlio; Gangemi, Vincenzo; Grillea, Giovanni; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio

    2016-05-26

    Several positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals have been emerged in the last decade as feasible in the management of brain lesions, due to the low performance in this field of the 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG), for its high physiological gradient of distribution in the brain. Beyond its usefulness in prostate cancer imaging, the radiolabeled choline is becoming a promising tool in diagnosing benign and malignant lesions of the brain, due to a very low rate of distribution in normal white and grey matters. The aim of our review was to assess the real impact of the radiolabeled choline PET/CT in the management of brain benign lesions, brain tumors, and metastases. Furthermore, emphasis was given to the comparison between the radiolabeled choline and the other radiopharmaceuticals in this field. A literature review was performed. The radiolabeled choline is useful in the management of patients with suspected brain tumor relapse, especially in association with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with caution regarding its intrinsic characteristic of non-tumor-specific tracer. For the same reason, it is not useful in the early evaluation of brain lesions. Similar results are reported for other radiopharmaceuticals. The inclusion of the head in the whole-body scans for somatic tumors is necessary to ensure metastases in the brain or choline-avid benign lesions.

  3. Cardiovascular effects of CDP-choline and its metabolites: involvement of peripheral autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cansev, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Ilcol, Yesim Ozarda; Hamurtekin, Emre; Ulus, Ismail Hakki

    2007-12-22

    Intraperitoneal administration of CDP-choline (200-900 micromol/kg) increased blood pressure and decreased heart rate of rats in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These responses were accompanied by elevated serum concentrations of CDP-choline and its metabolites phosphocholine, choline, cytidine monophosphate and cytidine. Blood pressure increased by intraperitoneal phosphocholine (200-900 micromol/kg), while it decreased by choline (200-600 micromol/kg) administration; phosphocholine or choline administration (up to 600 micromol/kg) decreased heart rate. Intraperitoneal cytidine monophosphate (200-600 micromol/kg) or cytidine (200-600 micromol/kg) increased blood pressure without affecting heart rate. Pressor responses to CDP-choline, phosphocholine, cytidine monophosphate or cytidine were not altered by pretreatment with atropine methyl nitrate or hexamethonium while hypotensive effect of choline was reversed to pressor effect by these pretreatments. Pretreatment with atropine plus hexamethonium attenuated or blocked pressor response to CDP-choline or phosphocholine, respectively. Heart rate responses to CDP-choline, phosphocholine and choline were blocked by atropine and reversed by hexamethonium. Cardiovascular responses to CDP-choline, phosphocholine and choline, but not cytidine monophosphate or cytidine, were associated with elevated plasma catecholamines concentrations. Blockade of alpha-adrenoceptors by prazosin or yohimbine attenuated pressor response to CDP-choline while these antagonists blocked pressor responses to phosphocholine or choline. Neither bilateral adrenalectomy nor chemical sympathectomy altered cardiovascular responses to CDP-choline, choline, cytidine monophosphate or cytidine. Sympathectomy attenuated pressor response to phosphocholine. Results show that intraperitoneal administration of CDP-choline and its metabolites alter cardiovascular parameters and suggest that peripheral cholinergic and adrenergic receptors are involved in these

  4. The Purification of Choline Acetyltransferase of Squid-Head Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, S. S.; Mautner, Henry G.

    1973-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.6) isolated from the head ganglia of squid could be purified by use of mercurial-Sepharose columns as well as Sepharose columns to which the enzyme inhibitor p-(m-bromophenyl)vinyl pyridinium had been attached. These columns, in conjunction with 30-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, 40-30% ammonium sulfate extraction, chromatography on sulfopropyl-Sephadex and on cellulose phosphate and hydroxylapatite columns, led to the isolation of three factions of choline acetyltransferase ranging in activity from 1000 to 4000 μmole/mg of protein/per hr. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggests that two of these fractions are homogeneous. The squid choline acetyltransferase is different from the mammalian-brain enzymes in having a larger molecular weight under the conditions used and in being relatively poorly inhibited by styryl pyridinium compounds. Images PMID:4521199

  5. Choline and polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm infants' maternal milk.

    PubMed

    Maas, Christoph; Franz, Axel R; Shunova, Anna; Mathes, Michaela; Bleeker, Christine; Poets, Christian F; Schleicher, Erwin; Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    Choline, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (ARA) are essential to fetal development, particularly of the brain. These components are actively enriched in the fetus. Deprivation from placental supply may therefore result in impaired accretion in preterm infants. To determine choline, choline metabolites, DHA, and ARA in human breast milk (BM) of preterm infants compared to BM of term born infants. We collected expressed BM samples from 34 mothers (N = 353; postnatal day 6-85), who had delivered 35 preterm infants undergoing neonatal intensive care (postmenstrual age 30 weeks, range 25.4-32.0), and from mothers after term delivery (N = 9; postnatal day 6-118). Target metabolites were analyzed using tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography and reported as medians and 25th/75th percentiles. In BM, choline was mainly present in the form of phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine, followed by free choline, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and lyso-phosphatidylcholine. In preterm infants' BM total choline ranged from 61 to 360 mg/L (median: 158 mg/L) and was decreased compared to term infants' BM (range 142-343 mg/L; median: 258 mg/L; p < 0.01). ARA and DHA comprised 0.81 (range: 0.46-1.60) and 0.43 (0.15-2.42) % of total preterm BM lipids, whereas term BM values were 0.68 (0.52-0.88) and 0.35 (0.18-0.75) %, respectively. Concentrations of all target parameters decreased after birth, and frequently 150 ml/kg/d BM did not meet the estimated fetal accretion rates. Following preterm delivery, BM choline concentrations are lower, whereas ARA and DHA levels are comparable versus term delivery. Based on these findings we suggest a combined supplementation of preterm infants' BM with choline, ARA and DHA combined to improve the nutritional status of preterm infants. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01773902.

  6. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  7. Effect of androgen deprivation therapy on intraprostatic tumour volume identified on (18)F choline PET/CT for prostate dose painting radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joachim; Carver, Antony; Brunt, John N H; Vinjamuri, Sobhan; Syndikus, Isabel

    2017-03-01

    Prostate dose painting radiotherapy requires the accurate identification of dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) to be used as boost volumes; these can be identified on multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) or choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Planning scans are usually performed after 2-3 months of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). We examine the effect of ADT on choline tracer uptake and boost volumes identified on choline PET/CT. Fluoroethylcholine ((18)F choline) PET/CT was performed for dose painting radiotherapy planning in patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Initially, they were performed at planning. Owing to low visual tracer uptake, PET/CT for subsequent patients was performed at staging. We compared these two approaches on intraprostatic lesions obtained on PET using both visual and automatic threshold methods [prostate maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) 60%] when compared with mpMRI. PET/CT was performed during ADT in 11 patients (median duration of 85 days) and before ADT in 29 patients. ADT significantly reduced overall prostate volume by 17%. During ADT, prostate SUVmax was lower although it did not reach statistical significance (4.2 vs 6.6, p = 0.06); three patients had no visually identifiable PET DIL; and visually defined PET DILs were significantly smaller than corresponding mpMRI DILs (p = 0.03). However, all patients scanned before ADT had at least one visually identifiable PET DIL, with no significant size difference between MRI and visually defined PET DILs. In both groups, threshold PET produced larger DILs than visual PET. Both PET methods have moderate sensitivity (0.50-0.68) and high specificity (0.85-0.98) for identifying MRI-defined disease. For visual contouring of boost volumes in prostate dose painting radiotherapy, (18)F choline PET/CT should be performed before ADT. For threshold contouring of boost volumes using our PET/CT scanning protocol, threshold levels of above 60% prostate

  8. Choline-sensing carbon paste electrode containing polyaniline (pani)-silicon dioxide composite-modified choline oxidase.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Merve; Arslan, Halit

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a novel carbon paste electrode (CPE) was prepared using the salt form of polyaniline (pani)-silicon dioxide composite that is sensitive to choline. Choline oxidase (ChO) enzyme was immobilized to modified carbon paste electrode (MCPE) by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. Determination of choline was carried out by the oxidation of enzymatically produced H2O2 at 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The effects of pH and temperature were investigated, and the optimum parameters were found to be 6.0 and 60°C, respectively. The linear working range of the electrode was 5.0 × 10(-7)-1.0 × 10(-5) M, R(2) = 0.922. The storage stability and operation stability of the enzyme electrode were also studied.

  9. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  10. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  11. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573.580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS...

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Phosphatidyl Choline from Spinach Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devor, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive but informative experiment for undergraduate biochemistry students involves isolating phosphatidyl choline from spinach leaves. Emphasis is on introducing students to techniques of lipid extraction, separation of lipids, identification using thin layer chromatography, and identification of fatty acids. Three periods of three hours…

  13. Purification and properties of choline kinase from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Yamashita, S

    1990-04-17

    A blue-dye column separated rat brain choline kinase (EC 2.7.1.32) into two peaks, very likely corresponding to distinct isozymes. The major-peak enzyme was purified 15,000-fold to homogeneity. The final specific activity was approx. 40 mumol.min-1.mg-1. This is 10-times higher than that reported for the enzymes from lung and kidney. The purified enzyme gave a single 44 kDa protein band on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Analytical gel-filtration showed that the native enzyme had a molecular weight of 90,000 and a Stokes radius of 4.2 nm. The sedimentation coefficient was deduced to be 4.8 S and the molecular weight 87,600 by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. Hence, the native enzyme appears to be a dimer. The apparent Km values for ATP and choline were 1.0 mM and 14 microM, respectively. At high choline concentrations, the enzyme showed deviation from Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The enzyme was active in a high pH range and utilized a variety of amino alcohols structurally related to choline, including ethanolamine, N-methylethanolamine and N,N-dimethylethanolamine as substrates. Spermine and spermidine stimulated the enzyme by decreasing the apparent Km for ATP and increasing Vmax. Although less efficiently, monovalent cations such as NH4+, K+, Li+ and Na+ and quaternary amines such as carpronium, chlorocholine and acetylcholine were also stimulatory.

  14. Choline Derivatives Involved in Osmotolerance of Penicillium fellutanum†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Il; Gander, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Penicillium fellutanum is osmotolerant and xerotolerant when cultured in a low-phosphate medium containing 3 M NaCl. Glycerol and erythritol accumulated in cultures with NaCl concentrations up to 2 M; glycerol was the only detectable polyol in cultures containing 3 M NaCl. In cultures with 3 M NaCl, the intracellular levels of glycine betaine and choline-O-sulfate were 22- and 2.6-fold greater (70 and 46 mM), respectively, than those of cultures without added NaCl. The levels of glycine betaine and glycerol decreased in mycelia transferred from a medium containing 3 M NaCl into a fresh medium without added NaCl. NaCl at 3 M inhibited mycelial mass accumulation; this inhibition was partially corrected by supplementation of cultures with glycine betaine (2 mM) or choline-O-sulfate (10 mM). The presence of exogenous choline chloride (2 mM) in plate cultures protected the cells from stress from 3 M NaCl. The data suggest that glycine betaine and choline-O-sulfate are secondary osmoprotectants which are effective at the point that the cell is incapable of synthesizing more glycerol. PMID:16349488

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Phosphatidyl Choline from Spinach Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devor, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive but informative experiment for undergraduate biochemistry students involves isolating phosphatidyl choline from spinach leaves. Emphasis is on introducing students to techniques of lipid extraction, separation of lipids, identification using thin layer chromatography, and identification of fatty acids. Three periods of three hours…

  16. New Acquisition Protocol of 18F-Choline PET/CT in Prostate Cancer Patients: Review of the Literature about Methodology and Proposal of Standardization

    PubMed Central

    Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Grassetto, Gaia; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rampin, Lucia; Veronese, Emma; Massaro, Arianna; Rubello, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. (1) To evaluate a new acquisition protocol of 18F-choline (FCH) PET/CT for prostate cancer patients (PC), (2) to review acquisition 18F-choline PET/CT methodology, and (3) to propose a standardized acquisition protocol on FCH PET/CT in PC patients. Materials. 100 consecutive PC patients (mean age 70.5 years, mean PSA 21.35 ng/mL) were prospectively evaluated. New protocol consisted of an early scan of the pelvis immediately after the injection of the tracer (1 bed position of 4 min) followed by a whole body scan at one 1 hour. Early and 1 hour images were compared for interfering activity and pathologic findings. Results. The overall detection rate of FCH PET/CT was 64%. The early static images of the pelvis showed absence of radioactive urine in ureters, bladder, or urethra which allowed a clean evaluation of the prostatic fossae. Uptake in the prostatic region was better visualized in the early phase in 26% (7/30) of cases. Other pelvic pathologic findings (bone and lymph nodes) were visualized in both early and late images. Conclusion. Early 18F-choline images improve visualization of abnormal uptake in prostate fossae. All pathologic pelvic deposits (prostate, lymph nodes, and bone) were visualized in both early and late images. PMID:25121090

  17. Spatial memory and hippocampal plasticity are differentially sensitive to the availability of choline in adulthood as a function of choline supply in utero.

    PubMed

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J E; Glenn, Melissa J; Mellott, Tiffany J; Blusztajn, Jan K; Meck, Warren H; Williams, Christina L

    2008-10-27

    Altered dietary choline availability early in life leads to persistent changes in spatial memory and hippocampal plasticity in adulthood. Developmental programming by early choline nutrition may determine the range of adult choline intake that is optimal for the types of neural plasticity involved in cognitive function. To test this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a choline chloride deficient (DEF), sufficient (CON), or supplemented (SUP) diet during embryonic days 12-17 and then returned to a control diet (1.1 g choline chloride/kg). At 70 days of age, we found that DEF and SUP rats required fewer choices to locate 8 baited arms of a 12-arm radial maze than CON rats. When switched to a choline-deficient diet (0 g/kg), SUP rats showed impaired performance while CON and DEF rats were unaffected. In contrast, when switched to a choline-supplemented diet (5.0 g/kg), DEF rats' performance was significantly impaired while CON and SUP rats were less affected. These changes in performance were reversible when the rats were switched back to a control diet. In a second experiment, DEF, CON, and SUP rats were either maintained on a control diet, or the choline-supplemented diet. After 12 weeks, DEF rats were significantly impaired by choline supplementation on a matching-to-place water-maze task, which was also accompanied by a decrease in dentate cell proliferation in DEF rats only. IGF-1 levels were elevated by both prenatal and adult choline supplementation. Taken together, these findings suggest that the in utero availability of an essential nutrient, choline, causes differential behavioral and neuroplastic sensitivity to the adult choline supply.

  18. Maternal dietary choline deficiency alters angiogenesis in fetal mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mehedint, Mihai G.; Craciunescu, Corneliu N.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether maternal dietary choline modulates angiogenesis in fetal brain. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were fed either a choline-deficient (CD), control (CT), or choline-supplemented diet (CS) from days 12 to 17 (E12-17) of pregnancy and then fetal brains were studied. In CD fetal hippocampus, proliferation of endothelial cells (EC) was decreased by 32% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS) while differentiated EC clusters (expressing factor VIII related antigen (RA)) increased by 25% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS). These changes were associated with > 25% decrease in the number of blood vessels in CD fetal hippocampus (p < 0.01 vs. CT and CS), with no change in total cross-sectional area of these blood vessels. Expression of genes for the angiogenic signals derived from both endothelial and neuronal progenitor cells (NPC) was increased in CD fetal hippocampus VEGF C (Vegfc), 2.0-fold, p < 0.01 vs. CT and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2), 2.1-fold, (p < 0.01 vs. CT)). Similar increased expression was observed in NPC isolated from E14 fetal mouse brains and exposed to low (5 μM), CT (70 μM), or high choline (280 μM) media for 72 h (low choline caused a 9.7-fold increase in relative gene expression of Vegfc (p < 0.001 vs. CT and high) and a 3.4-fold increase in expression of Angpt2, (p < 0.05 vs. CT and high). ANGPT2 protein was increased 42.2% (p < 0.01). Cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide islands in the proximity of the promoter areas of Vegfc and Angpt2 were hypomethylated in low choline NPC compared to CT NPC (p < 0.01). We conclude that maternal dietary choline intake alters angiogenesis in the developing fetal hippocampus. PMID:20624989

  19. The association of serum choline with linear growth failure in young children from rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Zhang, Pingbo; Gonzalez-Freire, Marta; Moaddel, Ruin; Trehan, Indi; Maleta, Kenneth M; Ordiz, M Isabel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for cell structure, cell signaling, neurotransmission, lipid transport, and bone formation. Choline can be irreversibly converted to betaine, a major source of methyl groups. Trimethylene N-oxide (TMAO), a proatherogenic molecule, is produced from the metabolism of dietary choline by the gut microbiome. The relation between serum choline and its closely related metabolites with linear growth in children is unknown. The aim was to characterize the relation between serum choline and its closely related metabolites, betaine and TMAO, with linear growth and stunting in young children. We measured serum choline, betaine, and TMAO concentrations by using liquid chromatography isotopic dilution tandem mass spectrometry in a cross-sectional study in 325 Malawian children, aged 12-59 mo, of whom 62% were stunted. Median (25th, 75th percentile) serum choline, betaine, and TMAO concentrations were 6.4 (4.8, 8.3), 12.4 (9.1, 16.3), and 1.2 (0.7, 1.8) μmol/L, respectively. Spearman correlation coefficients of age with serum choline, betaine, and TMAO were -0.57 (P < 0.0001), -0.26 (P < 0.0001), and -0.10 (P = 0.07), respectively. Correlation coefficients of height-for-age z score with serum choline, betaine-to-choline ratio, and TMAO-to-choline ratio were 0.31 (P < 0.0001), -0.24 (P < 0.0001), and -0.29 (P < 0.0001), respectively. Serum choline concentrations were strongly and significantly associated with stunting. Children with and without stunting had median (25th, 75th percentile) serum choline concentrations of 5.6 (4.4, 7.4) and 7.3 (5.9, 9.1) μmol/L (P < 0.0001). Linear growth failure in young children is associated with low serum choline and elevated betaine-to-choline and TMAO-to-choline ratios. Further work is needed to understand whether low dietary choline intake explains low circulating choline among stunted children living in low-income countries and whether increasing choline intake may correct choline deficiency and improve

  20. Generation of choline for acetylcholine synthesis by phospholipase D isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Frohman, Michael A; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2001-01-01

    Dedication This article is dedicated to the memory of Sue Kim Hanson, a graduate student in the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, who perished in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Abstract Background In cholinergic neurons, the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by a phospholipase D (PLD)-type enzyme generates some of the precursor choline used for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). We sought to determine the molecular identity of the relevant PLD using murine basal forebrain cholinergic SN56 cells in which the expression and activity of the two PLD isoforms, PLD1 and PLD2, were experimentally modified. ACh levels were examined in cells incubated in a choline-free medium, to ensure that their ACh was synthesized entirely from intracellular choline. Results PLD2, but not PLD1, mRNA and protein were detected in these cells and endogenous PLD activity and ACh synthesis were stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Introduction of a PLD2 antisense oligonucleotide into the cells reduced PLD2 mRNA and protein expression by approximately 30%. The PLD2 antisense oligomer similarly reduced basal- and PMA-stimulated PLD activity and ACh levels. Overexpression of mouse PLD2 by transient transfection increased basal- (by 74%) and PMA-stimulated (by 3.2-fold) PLD activity. Moreover, PLD2 transfection increased ACh levels by 26% in the absence of PMA and by 2.1-fold in the presence of PMA. Overexpression of human PLD1 by transient transfection increased PLD activity by 4.6-fold and ACh synthesis by 2.3-fold in the presence of PMA as compared to controls. Conclusions These data identify PLD2 as the endogenous enzyme that hydrolyzes PC to generate choline for ACh synthesis in cholinergic cells, and indicate that in a model system choline generated by PLD1 may also be used for this purpose. PMID:11734063

  1. Liver choline dehydrogenase and kidney betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase expression are not affected by methionine or choline intake in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Slow, Sandy; Garrow, Timothy A

    2006-09-01

    Choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) are 2 enzymes involved in choline oxidation. BHMT is expressed at high levels in rat liver and its expression is regulated by dietary Met and choline. BHMT is also found in rat kidney, albeit in substantially lower amounts, but it is not known whether kidney BHMT expression is regulated by dietary Met or choline. Similarly, CHDH activity is highest in the liver and kidney, but the regulation of its expression by diet has not been thoroughly investigated. Sprague Dawley rats ( approximately 50 g) were fed, for 9 d in 2 x 3 factorial design (n = 8), an l-amino acid-defined diet varying in l-Met (0.125, 0.3, or 0.8%) and choline (0 or 25 mmol/kg diet). Liver and kidney BHMT and CHDH were assessed using enzymatic, Western blot, and real-time PCR analyses. Liver samples were also fixed for histological analysis. Liver BHMT activity was 1.3-fold higher in rats fed the Met deficient diet containing choline, which was reflected in corresponding increases in mRNA content and immunodetectable protein. Independent of dietary choline, supplemental Met increased hepatic BHMT activity approximately 30%. Kidney BHMT and liver CHDH expression were refractory to these diets. Some degree of fatty liver developed in all rats fed a choline-devoid diet, indicating that supplemental Met cannot completely compensate for the lack of dietary choline in growing rats.

  2. Extension of AOAC official method 999.14 (choline in infant formula and milk) to the determination of choline in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Rader, Jeanne I; Weaver, Carol M; Trucksess, Mary W

    2004-01-01

    AOAC Official Method 999.14 is applicable for the determination of choline in milk and infant formulas. To date, its use has not been extended beyond these matrixes. We modified Official Method 999.14 and applied it to the determination of choline in a range of choline-containing dietary supplements. Dietary supplement tablets, capsules, wafers, softgels, liquid products, and drink powders were included. We found that the standard curve could be extended to cover a wider range of choline concentrations and defined a procedure for the use of Norit for samples in which the vitamin C content was high enough to interfere with the analysis. Recoveries of choline added to infant formula powders and to representative dietary supplement tablets, capsules, powdered drink mix, and wafer products were 85-114%. The use of Norit during the procedure did not affect the recovery of choline added to infant formula powders or to dietary supplements. An alkaline digestion was included for use with a product containing lecithin as the sole source of choline. Ten of 11 dietary supplement products analyzed by the modified method contained amounts of choline at or above declarations found on the product labels. The remaining product contained about 40% of the label-declared amount of choline.

  3. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  4. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  5. A sensitive choline biosensor using Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles as peroxidase mimics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanxia; Wang, Xiaolei; Yang, Xiurong

    2011-12-07

    A sensitive choline biosensor using Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles and a choline oxidase modified gold electrode was developed. Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles as peroxidase mimics used in the choline biosensor can not only improve the sensitivity of the response signal, but also possess the favorable properties of stability, magnetic separation and easy preparation, etc. When using the reduction currents of square wave voltammetry as the detection signals, the interferences of ascorbic acid and uric acid to the choline biosensor can be reduced effectively. The reduction currents of the square wave voltammetry were increased with the logarithm values of the choline chloride concentration (from 10(-9) to 10(-2) M), the detection limit was estimated to be 0.1 nM (S/N = 3). This choline biosensor also exhibited favorable selectivity and stability in the determination of choline chloride.

  6. Prostate cancer: sextant localization with MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, and 11C-choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Testa, Claudia; Schiavina, Riccardo; Lodi, Raffaele; Salizzoni, Eugenio; Corti, Barbara; Farsad, Mohsen; Kurhanewicz, John; Manferrari, Fabio; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Tonon, Caterina; Monetti, Nino; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano; Coe, Manuela; Grigioni, Walter F; Martorana, Giuseppe; Canini, Romeo; Barbiroli, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    To retrospectively compare sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, three-dimensional (3D) MR spectroscopy, combined MR imaging and 3D MR spectroscopy, and carbon 11 (11C)-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for intraprostatic tumor sextant localization, with histologic findings as reference standard. The local ethics committee on human research provided approval and a waiver of informed consent for the retrospective study. MR imaging, 3D MR spectroscopy, and 11C-choline PET/CT results were retrospectively reviewed in 26 men with biopsy-proved prostate cancer (mean age, 64 years; range, 51-75 years) who underwent radical prostatectomy. Cancer was identified as areas of nodular low signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images. At 3D MR spectroscopy, choline-plus-creatine-to-citrate and choline-to-creatine ratios were used to distinguish healthy from malignant voxels. At PET/CT, focal uptake was visually assessed, and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were recorded. Agreement between 3D MR spectroscopic and PET/CT results was calculated, and ability of maximum SUV to help localize cancer was assessed with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Significant differences between positive and negative sextants with respect to mean maximum SUV were calculated with a paired t test. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were, respectively, 55%, 86%, and 67% at PET/CT; 54%, 75%, and 61% at MR imaging; and 81%, 67%, and 76% at 3D MR spectroscopy. The highest sensitivity was obtained when either 3D MR spectroscopic or MR imaging results were positive (88%) at the expense of specificity (53%), while the highest specificity was obtained when results with both techniques were positive (90%) at the expense of sensitivity (48%). Concordance between 3D MR spectroscopic and PET/CT findings was slight (kappa=0.139). In localizing cancer within the prostate, comparable specificity was obtained with either 3D MR

  7. [Axolemmal transporters for neurotransmitter uptake].

    PubMed

    García-López, M

    Neurotransmission is a fundamental process in interneuronal communication. It starts with the release of the neurotransmitter following a nerve impulse and ends either by uptake by specific specific transporters or by metabolization to an inactive compound. In this review we will consider the molecular, ion dependence and electrogenic properties of the axolemal transporters for neurotransmitters and also the pathological consequences of their impairment as well as the drugs that can interact with them. Most axolemmal transporters have been cloned and grouped into two large families according to their molecular characteristics and electrogenic properties: 1. Those dependent on Na+/Cl- include transporters of GABA, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, choline, proline, betaine, glycine and taurine, and 2. Those dependent on Na+/K+, which include the transporters of glutamate, alanine, serine and cysteine. The clonation of transporters has permitted (and will continue to permit) the correlation of molecular alterations of transporters with different neuro-degenerative disorders (e.g. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease), with brain lesions (e.g. cerebral ischemia, status epilepticus) and with psychiatric alterations (e.g. schizophrenia, depression). In this respect, chemical synthesis of new selective drugs which interact with the different systems for uptake of neurotransmitters will offer new approaches to the treatment of many disorders of the central nervous system which still have no satisfactory drug treatment.

  8. Comparison of (68)Ga-labelled PSMA-11 and (11)C-choline in the detection of prostate cancer metastases by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Schwenck, Johannes; Rempp, Hansjoerg; Reischl, Gerald; Kruck, Stephan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina; la Fougère, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed ubiquitously on the membrane of most prostate tumors and its metastasis. While PET/CT using (11)C-choline was considered as the gold standard in the staging of prostate cancer, PET with radiolabelled PSMA ligands was introduced into the clinic in recent years. Our aim was to compare the PSMA ligand (68)Ga-PSMA-11 with (11)C-choline in patients with primary and recurrent prostate cancer. 123 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT examination using (68)Ga-PSMA-11 and (11)C-choline. Suspicious lesions were evaluated visually and semiquantitatively (SUVavg). Out of these, 103 suffered from a confirmed biochemical relapse after prostatectomy and/or radiotherapy (mean PSA level of 4.5 ng/ml), while 20 patients underwent primary staging. In 67 patients with biochemical relapse, we detected 458 lymph nodes suspicious for metastasis. PET using (68)Ga-PSMA-11 showed a significantly higher uptake and detection rate than (11)C-choline PET. Also (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET identified significantly more patients with suspicious lymph nodes as well as affected lymph nodes regions especially at low PSA levels. Bone lesions suspicious for prostate cancer metastasis were revealed in 36 patients' biochemical relapse. Significantly more bone lesions were detected by (68)Ga-PSMA-11, but only 3 patients had only PSMA-positive bone lesions. Nevertheless, we detected also 29 suspicious lymph nodes and 8 bone lesions, which were only positive as per (11)C-choline PET. These findings led to crucial differences in the TNM classification and the identification of oligometastatic patients. In the patients who underwent initial staging, all primary tumors showed uptake of both tracers. Although significantly more suspicious lymph nodes and bone lesions were identified, only 2 patients presented with bone lesions only detected by (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET. Thus, PET using (68)Ga-PSMA-11 showed a higher detection rate than (11)C-choline PET for lymph nodes

  9. Dioctanoylglycerol stimulates accumulation of [methyl-14C]choline and its incorporation into acetylcholine and phosphatidylcholine in a human cholinergic neuroblastoma cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, B. E.; Richardson, U. I.; Nitsch, R. M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Dioctanoylglycerol, a synthetic diacylglycerol, stimulated [14C]choline uptake in cultured human neuroblastoma (LA-N-2) cells. As this effect has not, to our knowledge, been reported before, it was of interest to characterize it in more detail. In the presence of 500 microM dioctanoylglycerol the levels of [14C]choline attained during a 2 hour labeling period were elevated by 78 +/- 12%, while [14C]acetylcholine and long fatty acyl chain [14C]phosphatidylcholine levels increased by 26 +/- 2% and 19 +/- 5%, respectively (mean +/- S.E.M.). Total (long chain plus dioctanoyl-) [14C]phosphatidylcholine was increased by 198 +/- 33%. Kinetic analysis showed that dioctanoylglycerol reduced the apparent Km for choline uptake to 56 +/- 9% of control (n = 4). The Vmax was not significantly altered. The stimulation of [14C]choline accumulation by dioctanoylglycerol was not dependent on protein kinase C activation; the effect was not mimicked by phorbol ester or by 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, and was not inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitors H-7 or staurosporine, or by prolonged pretreatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The effect of dioctanoylglycerol was slightly (but not significantly) reduced by EGTA and strongly inhibited by the cell-permeant calcium chelator bis(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)ester. Although these results implicate elevated intracellular calcium in the response, dioctanoylglycerol did not increase phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in LA-N-2 cells, and its effect was not inhibited by the diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R 59 022 (which blocks the conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid, a known stimulator of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Dioctanoylglycerol stimulates accumulation of [methyl-14C]choline and its incorporation into acetylcholine and phosphatidylcholine in a human cholinergic neuroblastoma cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, B. E.; Richardson, U. I.; Nitsch, R. M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Dioctanoylglycerol, a synthetic diacylglycerol, stimulated [14C]choline uptake in cultured human neuroblastoma (LA-N-2) cells. As this effect has not, to our knowledge, been reported before, it was of interest to characterize it in more detail. In the presence of 500 microM dioctanoylglycerol the levels of [14C]choline attained during a 2 hour labeling period were elevated by 78 +/- 12%, while [14C]acetylcholine and long fatty acyl chain [14C]phosphatidylcholine levels increased by 26 +/- 2% and 19 +/- 5%, respectively (mean +/- S.E.M.). Total (long chain plus dioctanoyl-) [14C]phosphatidylcholine was increased by 198 +/- 33%. Kinetic analysis showed that dioctanoylglycerol reduced the apparent Km for choline uptake to 56 +/- 9% of control (n = 4). The Vmax was not significantly altered. The stimulation of [14C]choline accumulation by dioctanoylglycerol was not dependent on protein kinase C activation; the effect was not mimicked by phorbol ester or by 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, and was not inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitors H-7 or staurosporine, or by prolonged pretreatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The effect of dioctanoylglycerol was slightly (but not significantly) reduced by EGTA and strongly inhibited by the cell-permeant calcium chelator bis(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)ester. Although these results implicate elevated intracellular calcium in the response, dioctanoylglycerol did not increase phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in LA-N-2 cells, and its effect was not inhibited by the diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R 59 022 (which blocks the conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid, a known stimulator of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Speciation of copper(II) complexes in an ionic liquid based on choline chloride and in choline chloride/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    De Vreese, Peter; Brooks, Neil R; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Matthijs, Edward; Binnemans, Koen; Van Deun, Rik

    2012-05-07

    A deep-eutectic solvent with the properties of an ionic liquid is formed when choline chloride is mixed with copper(II) chloride dihydrate in a 1:2 molar ratio. EXAFS and UV-vis-near-IR optical absorption spectroscopy have been used to compare the coordination sphere of the cupric ion in this ionic liquid with that of the cupric ion in solutions of 0.1 M of CuCl(2)·2H(2)O in solvents with varying molar ratios of choline chloride and water. The EXAFS data show that species with three chloride ions and one water molecule coordinated to the cupric ion as well as species with two chloride molecules and two water molecules coordinated to the cupric ion are present in the ionic liquid. On the other hand, a fully hydrated copper(II) ion is formed in an aqueous solution free of choline chloride, and the tetrachlorocuprate(II) complex forms in aqueous choline chloride solutions with more than 50 wt % of choline chloride. In solutions with between 0 and 50 wt % of choline chloride, mixed chloro-aquo complexes occur. Upon standing at room temperature, crystals of CuCl(2)·2H(2)O and of Cu(choline)Cl(3) formed in the ionic liquid. Cu(choline)Cl(3) is the first example of a choline cation coordinating to a transition-metal ion. Crystals of [choline](3)[CuCl(4)][Cl] and of [choline](4)[Cu(4)Cl(10)O] were also synthesized from molecular or ionic liquid solvents, and their crystal structures were determined.

  12. Conditional Mutagenesis of a Novel Choline Kinase Demonstrates Plasticity of Phosphatidylcholine Biogenesis and Gene Expression in Toxoplasma gondii*

    PubMed Central

    Sampels, Vera; Hartmann, Anne; Dietrich, Isabelle; Coppens, Isabelle; Sheiner, Lilach; Striepen, Boris; Herrmann, Andreas; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2012-01-01

    The obligate intracellular and promiscuous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii needs an extensive membrane biogenesis that must be satisfied irrespective of its host-cell milieu. We show that the synthesis of the major lipid in T. gondii, phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), is initiated by a novel choline kinase (TgCK). Full-length (∼70-kDa) TgCK displayed a low affinity for choline (Km ∼0.77 mm) and harbors a unique N-terminal hydrophobic peptide that is required for the formation of enzyme oligomers in the parasite cytosol but not for activity. Conditional mutagenesis of the TgCK gene in T. gondii attenuated the protein level by ∼60%, which was abolished in the off state of the mutant (Δtgcki). Unexpectedly, the mutant was not impaired in its growth and exhibited a normal PtdCho biogenesis. The parasite compensated for the loss of full-length TgCK by two potential 53- and 44-kDa isoforms expressed through a cryptic promoter identified within exon 1. TgCK-Exon1 alone was sufficient in driving the expression of GFP in E. coli. The presence of a cryptic promoter correlated with the persistent enzyme activity, PtdCho synthesis, and susceptibility of T. gondii to a choline analog, dimethylethanolamine. Quite notably, the mutant displayed a regular growth in the off state despite a 35% decline in PtdCho content and lipid synthesis, suggesting a compositional flexibility in the membranes of the parasite. The observed plasticity of gene expression and membrane biogenesis can ensure a faithful replication and adaptation of T. gondii in disparate host or nutrient environments. PMID:22451671

  13. Adjusting ammonium uptake via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lanquar, Viviane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-06-01

    In plants, AMT/MEP/Rh superfamily mediates high affinity ammonium uptake. AMT/MEP transporters form a trimeric complex, which requires a productive interaction between subunits in order to be functional. The AMT/MEP C-terminal domain is highly conserved in more than 700 AMT homologs from cyanobacteria to higher plants with no cases found to be lacking this domain. AMT1;1 exists in active and inactive states, probably controlled by the spatial positioning of the C-terminus. Ammonium triggers the phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue (T460) in the C-terminus of AMT1;1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The T460 phosphorylation level correlates with a decrease of root ammonium uptake. We propose that ammonium-induced phosphorylation modulates ammonium uptake as a general mechanism to protect against ammonium toxicity.

  14. Adjusting ammonium uptake via phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lanquar, Viviane

    2010-01-01

    In plants, AMT/MEP/Rh superfamily mediates high affinity ammonium uptake. AMT/MEP transporters form a trimeric complex, which requires a productive interaction between subunits in order to be functional. The AMT/MEP C-terminal domain is highly conserved in more than 700 AMT homologs from cyanobacteria to higher plants with no cases found to be lacking this domain. AMT1;1 exists in active and inactive states, probably controlled by the spatial positioning of the C-terminus. Ammonium triggers the phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue (T460) in the C-terminus of AMT1;1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The T460 phosphorylation level correlates with a decrease of root ammonium uptake. We propose that ammonium-induced phosphorylation modulates ammonium uptake as a general mechanism to protect against ammonium toxicity. PMID:20418663

  15. Copper uptake by Penicillium brevicompactum.

    PubMed

    Tsekova, K; Dentcheva, V; Ianis, M

    2001-01-01

    The copper binding properties of Penicillium brevicompactum biomass were influenced by growth phase of mycelium and concentration of copper in reaction mixtures. The efficiency of copper uptake increased with growth time and was largest at the mid-logarithmic growth phase. The time course of copper uptake was biphasic. Double reciprocal plots of absorption velocity of copper vs. copper concentration gave straight lines at concentration between 0.5 to 4 mM. The apparent affinity of copper to the biomass of the stationary growth phase was the same as that of logarithmic growth phase and Km values were about 1.4 mM. Pretreatment of the mycelium with glucose increased the amount of metal uptake about five times in comparison with the controls.

  16. Influence of dietary protein and excess methionine on choline needs for young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) to investigate the effect of differing dietary protein levels and nondetrimental amounts of excess methionine on choline needs. Growth and feed consumption of quail fed an adequate (27.3%) protein purified diet supplemented with 2000 mg/kg of choline were unaffected by increasing the level of excess methionine to 1.75%; however, greater amounts (2.0%, 2.25%) of excess methionine depressed growth (P less than .01), reduced feed consumption (P less than .01), and decreased feed utilization (P less than .05). Quail fed a purified diet containing 13.85% protein and 515 mg/kg of choline grew poorly. Growth was unaffected by additional choline in this diet. Growth was suboptimal among quail fed purified diets containing adequate or high (41.55%) levels of protein in which choline was limiting; however, a high level of protein did not in itself affect performance. Growth was improved by supplemental choline in these diets. Growth of quail fed purified diets with up to 1.35% excess methionine which were limiting (531 mg/kg) in choline was less than that of groups fed 2000 mg/kg of added dietary choline (P less than .01); however, excess methionine did not significantly influence growth of quail fed choline-deficient diets. These experiments indicate that neither high dietary protein nor excess methionine, fed at non-growth-depressing levels, increases dietary choline needs for young Bobwhite quail.

  17. Modulation of TNF Release by Choline Requires α7 Subunit Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, William R; Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Gallowitsch-Puerta, Margot; Ochani, Mahendar; Ochani, Kanta; Yang, Li-Hong; Hudson, LaQueta; Lin, Xinchun; Patel, Nirav; Johnson, Sarah M; Chavan, Sangeeta; Goldstein, Richard S; Czura, Christopher J; Miller, Edmund J; Al-Abed, Yousef; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2008-01-01

    The α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) is an essential component in the vagus nerve-based cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that regulates the levels of TNF, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), and other cytokines during inflammation. Choline is an essential nutrient, a cell membrane constituent, a precursor in the biosynthesis of acetylcholine, and a selective natural α7nAChR agonist. Here, we studied the anti-inflammatory potential of choline in murine endotoxemia and sepsis, and the role of the α7nAChR in mediating the suppressive effect of choline on TNF release. Choline (0.1–50 mM) dose-dependently suppressed TNF release from endotoxin-activated RAW macrophage-like cells, and this effect was associated with significant inhibition of NF-κB activation. Choline (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) treatment prior to endotoxin administration in mice significantly reduced systemic TNF levels. In contrast to its TNF suppressive effect in wild type mice, choline (50 mg/kg, i.p.) failed to inhibit systemic TNF levels in α7nAChR knockout mice during endotoxemia. Choline also failed to suppress TNF release from endotoxin-activated peritoneal macrophages isolated from α7nAChR knockout mice. Choline treatment prior to endotoxin resulted in a significantly improved survival rate as compared with saline-treated endotoxemic controls. Choline also suppressed HMGB1 release in vitro and in vivo, and choline treatment initiated 24 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced polymicrobial sepsis significantly improved survival in mice. In addition, choline suppressed TNF release from endotoxin-activated human whole blood and macrophages. Collectively, these data characterize the anti-inflammatory efficacy of choline and demonstrate that the modulation of TNF release by choline requires α7nAChR-mediated signaling. PMID:18584048

  18. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  19. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  20. Calixarene-Mediated Liquid-Membrane Transport of Choline Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Birendra Babu; Fujii, Ayu; Schramm, Michael P

    2014-05-01

    A series of supramolecular calixarenes efficiently transport distinct molecular species through a liquid membrane when attached to a receptor-complementary choline handle. Calix-[6]arene hexacarboxylic acid was highly effective at transporting different target molecules against a pH gradient. Both carboxylic- and phosphonic-acid-functionalized calix[4]arenes effect transport without requiring a pH or ion gradient. NMR binding studies, two-phase solvent extraction, and three-phase transport experiments reveal the necessary and subtle parameters to effect the transport of molecules attached to a choline "handle". On the other hand, rescorin[4]arene cavitands, which have similar guest recognition profiles, did not transport guest molecules. These developments reveal new approaches towards attempting synthetic-receptor-mediated selective small-molecule transport in vesicular and cellular systems.

  1. Legionella dumoffii Utilizes Exogenous Choline for Phosphatidylcholine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Kania, Magdalena; Janczarek, Monika; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidycholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes but it has been found in only a limited number of prokaryotes. Bacteria synthesize PC via the phospholipid N-methylation pathway (Pmt) or via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway (Pcs) or both. Here, we demonstrated that Legionella dumoffii has the ability to utilize exogenous choline for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis when bacteria grow in the presence of choline. The Pcs seems to be a primary pathway for synthesis of this phospholipid in L. dumoffii. Structurally different PC species were distributed in the outer and inner membranes. As shown by the LC/ESI-MS analyses, PC15:0/15:0, PC16:0/15:0, and PC17:0/17:1 were identified in the outer membrane and PC14:0/16:0, PC16:0/17:1, and PC20:0/15:0 in the inner membrane. L. dumoffii pcsA gene encoding phosphatidylcholine synthase revealed the highest sequence identity to pcsA of L. bozemanae (82%) and L. longbeachae (81%) and lower identity to pcsA of L. drancourtii (78%) and L. pneumophila (71%). The level of TNF-α in THP1-differentiated cells induced by live and temperature-killed L. dumoffii cultured on a medium supplemented with choline was assessed. Live L. dumoffii bacteria cultured on the choline-supplemented medium induced TNF-α three-fold less efficiently than cells grown on the non-supplemented medium. There is an evident effect of PC modification, which impairs the macrophage inflammatory response. PMID:24821544

  2. C Tracer Evidence for Synthesis of Choline and Betaine via Phosphoryl Base Intermediates in Salinized Sugarbeet Leaves.

    PubMed

    Hanson, A D; Rhodes, D

    1983-03-01

    Like other chenopods, sugarbeets (Beta vulgaris L. cv Great Western D-2) accumulate glycine betaine when salinized; this may be an adaptive response to stress. The pathway of betaine synthesis in leaves of salinized (150-200 millimolar NaCl) sugarbeet plants was investigated by supplying [(14)C]formate, phosphoryl[(14)C]monomethylethanolamine ([(14)C][unk] MME) or phosphoryl[(14)C]choline ([(14)C][unk] choline) to leaf discs and following (14)C incorporation into prospective intermediates. The (14)C kinetic data were used to develop a computer model of the betaine pathway.When [(14)C]formate was fed, [unk] MME, phosphoryldimethylethanolamine ([unk] DME) and [unk] choline were the most prominent methylated products at short labeling times, after which (14)C appeared in free choline and in betaine. Phosphatidylcholine labeled more slowly than [unk] choline, choline, and betaine, and behaved as a minor end product. Very little (14)C entered the free methylethanolamines. When [(14)C][unk] MME was supplied, a small amount was hydrolyzed to the free base but the major fate was conversion to [unk] DME, [unk] choline, free choline, and betaine; label also accumulated slowly in phosphatidylcholine. Label from supplied [(14)C][unk] choline entered choline and betaine rapidly, while phosphatidylcholine labeled only slowly and to a small extent.These results are consistent with the pathway [unk] MME -->[unk] DME --> [unk] choline --> choline --> --> betaine, with a minor side branch leading from [unk] choline into phosphatidylcholine. This contrasts markedly (a) with the pathway of stress-induced choline and betaine synthesis in barley, in which phosphatidylcholine apparently acts as an intermediate (Hitz, Rhodes, Hanson 1981, Plant Physiol 68: 814-822); (b) with choline biogenesis in mammalian liver and microorganisms. Computer modeling of the experimental data pointed strongly to regulation at the [unk] choline --> choline step, and also indicated that the rate of [unk

  3. Further studies on the formation of choline sulfate by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J W; Luschinski, P C

    1977-05-01

    Cell extracts of Pseudomonas C12B synthesized choline sulfate (COS) from SO42-, choline chloride, and ATP. However, most of the COS-forming activity was found in culture medium supernatants of this bacterium, and that which remained with the cells was cell wall-associated. Enzyme release was independent of the carbon and (or) sulfur source used for growth and was not suppressed by increasing the divalent cation concentration of the medium. The COS-synthesizing system was inhbited in vitro by L-cysteine (greater than or equal to 10(-3) mM), SO42- (greater than 0.1 mM), and choline chloride (greater than 0.1 M). L-Cysteine (0.1-5.0 mM) did not repress the synthesis of enzymes present in the system. COS formation from SO42- in vitro was increased 2.8-fold by 10 mM adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) and 5-fold by 1 mM 3'-phosphoadenosine,5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) during a 4-h incubation period. APS (10 mM) also inhibited the incorporation of 35SO42- into COS. Culture supernatants incubated with Na235SO4 produced two 35S-labelled metabolites having electrophoretic mobilities similar to those exhibited by authentic APS and PAPS. The synthesis of these metabolites was also inhibited in vitro by unlabelled APS and by L-cysteine.

  4. RADIOAUTOGRAPHIC STUDIES OF CHOLINE INCORPORATION INTO PERIPHERAL NERVE MYELIN

    PubMed Central

    Hendelman, Walter J.; Bunge, Richard P.

    1969-01-01

    This radioautographic study was designed to localize the cytological sites involved in the incorporation of a lipid precursor into the myelin and the myelin-related cell of the peripheral nervous system. Both myelinating and fully myelinated cultures of rat dorsal root ganglia were exposed to a 30-min pulse of tritiated choline and either fixed immediately or allowed 6 or 48 hr of chase incubation before fixation. After Epon embedding, light and electron microscopic radioautograms were prepared with Ilford L-4 emulsion. Analysis of the pattern of choline incorporation into myelinating cultures indicated that radioactivity appeared all along the length of the internode, without there being a preferential site of initial incorporation. Light microscopic radioautograms of cultures at varying states of maturity were compared in order to determine the relative degree of myelin labeling. This analysis indicated that the myelin-Schwann cell unit in the fully myelinated cultures incorporated choline as actively as did this unit in the myelinating cultures. Because of technical difficulties, it was not possible to determine the precise localization of the incorporated radioactivity within the compact myelin. These data are related to recent biochemical studies indicating that the mature myelin of the central nervous system does incorporate a significant amount of lipid precursor under the appropriate experimental conditions. These observations support the concept that a significant amount of myelin-related metabolic activity occurs in mature tissue; this activity is considered part of an essential and continuous process of myelin maintenance and repair. PMID:5782444

  5. Toxicity induced by Hg2+ on choline acetyltransferase activity from E. electricus (L.) electrocytes: the protective effect of 2,3 dimercapto-propanol (BAL).

    PubMed

    Nunes-Tavares, Nilson; Valverde, Rafael Hospodar Felippe; Araújo, Glauce Maria Nunes; Hassón-Voloch, Aida

    2005-04-01

    The effect of mercury (Hg(2+)) on the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) from electrocytes of Electrophorus electricus (L.) was studied due to the importance of this enzyme and acetylcholine in many neurochemical functions such as arousal, learning, and memory. Mercury, which has affinity to thiol groups, acted as a potent inhibitor of ChAT, which was obtained by differential centrifugation and ammonium sulfate precipitation, at 80%, from the main electric organ homogenate. Mercury inhibition presents different kinetic behaviors for both enzyme substrates: noncompetitive to choline and of mixed type to AcCoA, with inhibition constants on the order of 0.5 to 1.0 microM. The enzyme activity was recovered using 2,3 dimercapto-propanol (BAL), a well-known chelate for sulphydryl groups and metals, which acted as a protecting agent and was able to revert the Hg(2+) inhibition at a concentration of 10 (-6) M. After treatment with this metal and in the presence of 2,3 dimercapto-propanol, 70% of the enzyme activity was recovered for AcCoA and 80% for choline. The observed inhibition is likely due to direct protein interaction, because the addition of BAL reversed the effects of HgCl(2) on ChAT activity. The results cast new light on the mechanisms of mercurial neurotoxicity.

  6. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  7. Postnatal dietary choline supplementation alters behavior in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nag, Nupur; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E

    2007-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting females, is accompanied by behavioral and neuropathological abnormalities and decreases in brain cholinergic markers. Because the cholinergic system is associated with cognitive and motor functions, cholinergic deficits in RTT may underlie some of the behavioral abnormalities. In rodents, increased choline availability during development enhances transmission at cholinergic synapses and improves behavioral performance throughout life. We examined whether choline supplementation of nursing dams would attenuate deficits in Mecp2(1lox) offspring, a mouse model of RTT. Dams were given choline in drinking water, and pups nursed from birth to weaning. Offspring were assessed on development and behavior. In Mecp2(1lox) males, choline supplementation improved motor coordination and locomotor activity, whereas in females it enhanced grip strength. Choline supplementation did not improve response to fear conditioning. Postnatal choline supplementation attenuates some behavioral deficits in Mecp2(1lox) mice and should be explored further as a therapeutic agent in RTT.

  8. Effects of acute CDP-choline treatment on resting state brain oscillations in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; de la Salle, Sara; Smith, Dylan; Choueiry, Joelle; Impey, Danielle; Smith, Meaghan; Beaudry, Elise; Saghir, Salman; Ilivitsky, Vadim; Labelle, Alain

    2015-03-30

    CDP-choline (cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine) is a phospholipid used to treat cognitive disorders, presumably repairing and maintaining brain cell membranes. Additional mechanisms may include enhanced cholinergic neurotransmission as the α7 nicotinic receptor actions of choline and increased acetylcholine synthesis accompanying CDP-choline administration may modulate brain oscillations underlying cognitive processes. This study utilizes electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in healthy volunteers to evaluate CDP-choline induction of an oscillatory response profile associated with nicotinic stimulation. Resting state EEG was acquired in 24 male volunteers administered low (500mg) and moderate (1000mg) doses of CDP-choline in a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Consistent with nicotinic agonist treatment, spectral analysis showed dose-dependent reductions in delta and increases in alpha oscillations, which were also accompanied by decreases in beta and gamma oscillatory activity. These findings support the posit that CDP-choline cognitive enhancement involves multiple mechanisms including facilitated nicotinic cholinergic action.

  9. Choline: Critical Role During Fetal Development and Dietary Requirements in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient needed for the structural integrity and signaling functions of cell membranes; for normal cholinergic neurotransmission; for normal muscle function; for lipid transport from liver; and it is the major source of methyl groups in the diet. Choline is critical during fetal development, when it influences stem cell proliferation and apoptosis, thereby altering brain and spinal cord structure and function and influencing risk for neural tube defects and lifelong memory function. Choline is derived not only from the diet, but from de novo synthesis as well. Though many foods contain choline, there is at least a twofold variation in dietary intake in humans. When deprived of dietary choline, most men and postmenopausal women developed signs of organ dysfunction (fatty liver or muscle damage), while less than half of premenopausal women developed such signs. Aside from gender differences, there is significant variation in the dietary requirement for choline that can be explained by very common genetic polymorphisms. PMID:16848706

  10. A flower-like nickel oxide nanostructure: synthesis and application for choline sensing.

    PubMed

    Sattarahmady, N; Heli, H; Dehdari Vais, R

    2014-02-01

    Flower-like nickel oxide nanostructure was synthesized by a simple desolvation method. The nanostructure was then employed as the modifier of a carbon paste electrode to fabricate a choline sensor. The mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic oxidation of choline on the modified electrode surface were studied by cyclic voltammetry, steady-state polarization curve, and chronoamperometry. The catalytic rate constant and the charge transfer coefficient of the choline electrooxidation process by an active nickel species, and the diffusion coefficient of choline were reported. An amperometric method was developed for determination of choline with a sensitivity of 60.5 mA mol(-1)Lcm(-2) and a limit of detection of 25.4 μmol L(-1). The sensor had the advantages of high electrocatalytic activity and sensitivity, and long-term stability toward choline, with a simple fabrication method without complications of immobilization steps and using any enzyme or reagent.

  11. Changes in brain striatum dopamine and acetylcholine receptors induced by chronic CDP-choline treatment of aging mice.

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, R.; Raïch, J.; Aguilar, J.

    1991-01-01

    1. Spiroperidol binding (dopamine D2 receptors) and quinuclidinyl benzilate binding (muscarinic receptors) in striata of 19-month old mice was analyzed for animals that had received chronic administration of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) incorporated into the chow consumed (100 or 500 mg kg-1 added per day) for the 7 months before they were killed. 2. Treated animals displayed an increase in the dopamine receptor densities of 11% for those receiving 100 mg kg-1 and 18% for those receiving 500 mg kg-1 as compared to the control aged animals that had received no CDP-choline. Control animals showed, from 2 months to 19 months of life, a 28% decrease in the receptor density. No change in the affinity of the receptors for spiroperidol was found in the treated or untreated animals. 3. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor densities were also partially recovered by the same treatment in aged animals that showed a 14% decrease of these receptors in this case. The muscarinic receptor density increased 6% for the animals that received 100 mg kg-1 and 17% for the animals that received 500 mg kg-1 without any change in the affinity of the receptor for quinuclidinyl benzilate. 4. Aged animals displayed a slight increase in brain membrane fluidity as indicated by a decrease in the polarization value of the non-polar fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Interestingly, in the treated animals a greater increase in membrane fluidity was determined and found to be very similar for the two doses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1839138

  12. Influence of chain length and double bond on the aqueous behavior of choline carboxylate soaps.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Diat, Olivier; Klein, Regina; Kunz, Werner

    2013-02-26

    In preceding studies, we demonstrated that choline carboxylates ChC(m) with alkyl chain lengths of m = 12 - 18 are highly water-soluble (for m = 12, soluble up to 93 wt % soap and 0 °C). In addition, choline soaps are featured by an extraordinary lyotropic phase behavior. With decreasing water concentration, the following phases were found: micellar phase (L(1)), discontinuous cubic phase (I(1)' and I(1)"), hexagonal phase (H(1)), bicontinuous cubic phase (V(1)), and lamellar phase (L(α)). The present work is also focused on the lyotropic phase behavior of choline soaps but with shorter alkyl chains or different alkyl chain properties. We have investigated the aqueous phase behavior of choline soaps with C(8) and C(10) chain-lengths (choline octanoate and choline decanoate) and with a C(18) chain-length with a cis-double bond (choline oleate). We found that choline decanoate follows the lyotropic phase behavior of the longer-chain homologues mentioned above. Choline octanoate in water shows no discontinuous cubic phases, but an extended, isotropic micellar solution phase. In addition, choline octanoate is at the limit between a surfactant and a hydrotrope. The double bond in choline oleate leads also to a better solubility in water and a decrease of the solubilization temperature. It also influences the Gaussian curvature of the aggregates which results in a loss of discontinuous cubic phases in the binary phase diagram. The different lyotropic mesophases were identified by the penetration scan technique with polarizing light microscope and visual observations. To clarify the structural behavior small (SAXS) and wide (WAXS) angle X-ray scattering were performed. To further characterize the extended, isotropic micellar solution phase in the binary phase diagram of choline octanoate viscosity and conductivity measurements were also carried out.

  13. Choline is required in the diet of lactating dams to maintain maternal immune function.

    PubMed

    Dellschaft, Neele S; Ruth, Megan R; Goruk, Susan; Lewis, Erin D; Richard, Caroline; Jacobs, René L; Curtis, Jonathan M; Field, Catherine J

    2015-06-14

    Choline demands during lactation are high; however, detailed knowledge is lacking regarding the optimal dietary intake during this critical period. The present study was designed to determine the effects of varying intakes of choline on maternal immune function during lactation. Primiparous Sprague-Dawley rats (n 42) were randomised 24-48 h before birth and fed the following diets for 21 d: choline-devoid (0 g choline/kg diet; D, n 10); 1·0 g choline/kg diet (C1, n 11); 2·5 g choline/kg diet (C2·5, n 10); 6·2 g choline/kg diet (C6, n 11). Splenocytes were isolated and stimulated ex vivo with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CD3/CD28. D and C6 dams had lower final body weight, spleen weight and average pup weight than C1 dams (P< 0·05). There was a linear relationship between free choline concentration in pup stomach contents with maternal dietary choline content (P< 0·001, r² 0·415). Compared with C1 and C2·5, D spleens had a lower proportion of mature T cells and activated suppressor cells, and this resulted in reduced cytokine production after stimulation (P< 0·05). Feeding 6·2 g choline/kg diet resulted in a higher cytokine production after stimulation with CD3/CD28 (P< 0·05). Except for a higher IL-6 production after LPS stimulation with cells from the C2·5 dams (P< 0·05), there were no differences between the C1 and C2·5 dams. For the first time, we show that feeding lactating mothers a diet free of choline has substantial effects on their immune function and on offspring growth. Additionally, excess dietary choline had adverse effects on maternal and offspring body weight but only minimal effects on maternal immune function.

  14. Altered localization of choline transporter sites in the mouse hippocampus after prenatal heroin exposure.

    PubMed

    Vatury, Ori; Barg, Jacob; Slotkin, Theodore A; Yanai, Joseph

    2004-03-01

    Prenatal heroin exposure disrupts hippocampal cholinergic synaptic function and related behaviors. Biochemical studies indicate an increase in the number of presynaptic high-affinity choline transporter (HACT) sites, as assessed by [3H]hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding. The present study was designed to assess whether this effect involves global upregulation of the transporter, or whether disruption occurs with a specific tempero-spatial distribution. Pregnant mice were given 10mg/kg per day of heroin subcutaneously on gestational days (GD) 9-18. Autoradiographic distribution of HC-3 binding sites was evaluated in the hippocampus of the offspring at postnatal days 15, 25, and 53. These results, suggestive of hippocampal "miswiring," are likely to explain the net impairment of cholinergic synaptic function after prenatal heroin exposure, despite the simultaneous upregulation of both presynaptic cholinergic activity and postsynaptic receptors. Understanding the subregional selectivity of hippocampal defects can lead to the development of strategies that may potentially enable therapeutic interventions to offset or reverse the neurobehavioral defects.

  15. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    SciTech Connect

    Klig, L.S.; Friedli, L.; Schmid, E. )

    1990-08-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed.

  16. 75 FR 760 - Choline chloride; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... tolerance based on the low toxicity of the individual inert ingredients. IV. Toxicological Profile..., transmembrane signaling, methyl metabolism, and lipid and cholesterol transport and metabolism. Choline was...

  17. Structure of the choline-binding domain of Spr1274 in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyi; Li, Wenzhe; Frolet, Cecile; Bao, Rui; di Guilmi, Anne-Marie; Vernet, Thierry; Chen, Yuxing

    2009-01-01

    Spr1274 is a putative choline-binding protein that is bound to the cell wall of Streptococcus pneumoniae through noncovalent interactions with the choline moieties of teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. Its function is still unknown. The crystal structure of the choline-binding domain of Spr1274 (residues 44–129) was solved at 2.38 Å resolution with three molecules in the asymmetric unit. It may provide a structural basis for functional analysis of choline-binding proteins. PMID:19652332

  18. Combined Supplementation of Choline and Docosahexaenoic Acid during Pregnancy Enhances Neurodevelopment of Fetal Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Megur Ramakrishna Bhat, Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for humans which plays an important role in structural integrity and signaling functions. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid, highly enriched in cell membranes of the brain. Dietary intake of choline or DHA alone by pregnant mothers directly affects fetal brain development and function. But no studies show the efficacy of combined supplementation of choline and DHA on fetal neurodevelopment. The aim of the present study was to analyze fetal neurodevelopment on combined supplementation of pregnant dams with choline and DHA. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: normal control [NC], saline control [SC], choline [C], DHA, and C + DHA. Saline, choline, and DHA were given as supplements to appropriate groups of dams. NC dams were undisturbed during entire gestation. On postnatal day (PND) 40, brains were processed for Cresyl staining. Pups from choline or DHA supplemented group showed significant (p < 0.05) increase in number of neurons in hippocampus when compared to the same in NC and SC groups. Moreover, pups from C + DHA supplemented group showed significantly higher number of neurons (p < 0.001) in hippocampus when compared to the same in NC and SC groups. Thus combined supplementation of choline and DHA during normal pregnancy enhances fetal hippocampal neurodevelopment better than supplementation of choline or DHA alone. PMID:28210506

  19. Hydrogen bonding. Part 17. IR and NMR study of the lower hydrates of choline chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Avci, Günsel F.

    1984-09-01

    Choline chloride forms two lower hydrates — a dihydrate and a monohydrate — with quite unusual properties. The dihydrate is a highly structured liquid salt; the IR spectrum is similar to that of a crystalline framework clathrate hydrate, and there are separate 1H-NMR signals for the cation hydroxyl and water protons. The dihydrate is a crystalline solid at reduced pressure. The crystalline monohydrate only exists at reduced pressure; at atmospheric pressure it disproportionates to liquid dihydrate and anhydrous choline chloride. The anhydrous choline chloride thus formed is a previously unreported crystal modification of choline chloride.

  20. Anaerobic choline metabolism in microcompartments promotes growth and swarming of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Eleanor; Fu, Tiantian; Brown, Ian R; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Purdy, Kevin J; Frank, Stefanie; Chen, Yin

    2016-09-01

    Gammaproteobacteria are important gut microbes but only persist at low levels in the healthy gut. The ecology of Gammaproteobacteria in the gut environment is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that choline is an important growth substrate for representatives of Gammaproteobacteria. Using Proteus mirabilis as a model, we investigate the role of choline metabolism and demonstrate that the cutC gene, encoding a choline-trimethylamine lyase, is essential for choline degradation to trimethylamine by targeted mutagenesis of cutC and subsequent complementation experiments. Proteus mirabilis can rapidly utilize choline to enhance growth rate and cell yield in broth culture. Importantly, choline also enhances swarming-associated colony expansion of P. mirabilis under anaerobic conditions on a solid surface. Comparative transcriptomics demonstrated that choline not only induces choline-trimethylamine lyase but also genes encoding shell proteins for the formation of bacterial microcompartments. Subsequent analyses by transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of such novel microcompartments in cells cultivated in liquid broth and hyper-flagellated swarmer cells from solid medium. Together, our study reveals choline metabolism as an adaptation strategy for P. mirabilis and contributes to better understand the ecology of this bacterium in health and disease. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. An evaluation of an enzymatic choline determination for the identification of semen in casework samples.

    PubMed

    Noppinger, K; Morrison, R; Jones, N H; Hopkins, H

    1987-07-01

    This study compares the detection of choline in seminal stains by both an enzymatic method and by the standard Florence crystal test. The tests were conducted on 293 actual casework samples. In those samples identified as containing semen, choline was detected twice as often by the enzymatic method compared to the Florence method (84.6 versus 40.3%). The choline results were correlated with spermatozoa and acid phosphatase tests. The enzymatic detection of choline in seminal stains was found to be a fast, easy, sensitive, and reliable test.

  2. Is There an Additional Value of {sup 11}C-Choline PET-CT to T2-weighted MRI Images in the Localization of Intraprostatic Tumor Nodules?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Laura; Koole, Michel; Isebaert, Sofie; Joniau, Steven; Deroose, Christophe M.; Oyen, Raymond; Lerut, Evelyne; Budiharto, Tom; Mottaghy, Felix; Bormans, Guy; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Haustermans, Karin

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the additional value of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) to T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for localization of intraprostatic tumor nodules. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine prostate cancer patients underwent T2w MRI and {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT before radical prostatectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Tumor regions were outlined on the whole-mount histopathology sections and on the T2w MR images. Tumor localization was recorded in the basal, middle, and apical part of the prostate by means of an octant grid. To analyze {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT images, the same grid was used to calculate the standardized uptake values (SUV) per octant, after rigid registration with the T2w MR images for anatomic reference. Results: In total, 1,176 octants were analyzed. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of T2w MRI were 33.5%, 94.6%, and 70.2%, respectively. For {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT, the mean SUV{sub max} of malignant octants was significantly higher than the mean SUV{sub max} of benign octants (3.69 {+-} 1.29 vs. 3.06 {+-} 0.97, p < 0.0001) which was also true for mean SUV{sub mean} values (2.39 {+-} 0.77 vs. 1.94 {+-} 0.61, p < 0.0001). A positive correlation was observed between SUV{sub mean} and absolute tumor volume (Spearman r = 0.3003, p = 0.0362). No correlation was found between SUVs and prostate-specific antigen, T-stage or Gleason score. The highest accuracy (61.1%) was obtained with a SUV{sub max} cutoff of 2.70, resulting in a sensitivity of 77.4% and a specificity of 44.9%. When both modalities were combined (PET-CT or MRI positive), sensitivity levels increased as a function of SUV{sub max} but at the cost of specificity. When only considering suspect octants on {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT (SUV{sub max} {>=} 2.70) and T2w MRI, 84.7% of these segments were in agreement with the gold standard, compared with 80.5% for T2w MRI alone. Conclusions: The additional value of {sup

  3. Choline supplementation attenuates learning deficits associated with neonatal alcohol exposure in the rat: effects of varying the timing of choline administration.

    PubMed

    Ryan, S Hunter; Williams, Jennifer K; Thomas, Jennifer D

    2008-10-27

    Despite the harmful effects of fetal alcohol exposure, some pregnant women continue to drink alcohol. Thus, it is imperative to pursue safe, effective treatments for children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Using an animal model, our laboratory has demonstrated that choline, an essential nutrient, effectively reduces the severity of some fetal alcohol effects, even when administered after the ethanol insult is complete. The present study investigated whether there is a critical developmental period when choline is most effective in attenuating ethanol's teratogenic effects. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 5.25 g/kg/day ethanol during the third trimester equivalent brain growth spurt (postnatal days (PD) 4-9) via intubation. A non-intubation control group and a sham intubation control group were included. Following ethanol exposure, pups received subcutaneous injections of saline vehicle or choline chloride (100 mg/kg/day) from PD 11-20, PD 21-30, or PD 11-30. Beginning on PD 45, subjects were tested on a Morris water maze spatial learning task. Performance of both the ethanol-exposed group that did not receive choline and the ethanol-exposed group treated with choline from PD 21-30 was significantly impaired compared to controls during acquisition of the Morris water maze task. Performance of ethanol-exposed groups treated with choline from PD 11-20 or PD 11-30 was intermediate, not differing significantly from any other groups. However, during the probe trial, ethanol exposure produced significant deficits in spatial memory which were mitigated by all choline treatments, regardless of the timing of administration. These findings suggest that choline's therapeutic window may be very large, or spans across the two developmental periods examined in this study. Importantly, these findings indicate that choline supplementation may effectively reduce some alcohol-related learning impairments, even when administered in later childhood.

  4. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  5. Detection of Local, Regional, and Distant Recurrence in Patients With PSA Relapse After External-Beam Radiotherapy Using {sup 11}C-Choline Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Pruim, Jan; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Leliveld, Anna M.; Nijman, Rien J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Jong, Igle J. de

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and the presence of distant metastases after treatment with curative intent for prostate cancer. With the advent of salvage treatment such as cryotherapy, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence (local or distant). In this study, the potential of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) to identify site of recurrence was investigated in patients with rising PSA after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy patients with histologically proven prostate cancer treated with EBRT and showing biochemical recurrence as defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus statement and 10 patients without recurrence underwent a PET scan using 400 MBq {sup 11}C-choline intravenously. Biopsy-proven histology from the site of suspicion, findings with other imaging modalities, clinical follow-up and/or response to adjuvant therapy were used as comparative references. Results: None of the 10 patients without biochemical recurrence had a positive PET scan. Fifty-seven of 70 patients with biochemical recurrence (median PSA 9.1 ng/mL; mean PSA 12.3 ng/mL) showed an abnormal uptake pattern (sensitivity 81%). The site of recurrence was only local in 41 of 57 patients (mean PSA 11.1 ng/mL at scan), locoregionally and/or distant in 16 of 57 patients (mean PSA 17.7 ng/mL). Overall the positive predictive value and negative predictive value for {sup 11}C-choline PET scan were 1.0 and 0.44 respectively. Accuracy was 84%. Conclusions: {sup 11}C-choline PET scan is a sensitive technique to identify the site of recurrence in patients with PSA relapse after EBRT for prostate cancer.

  6. Dietary Choline Intake Is Directly Associated with Bone Mineral Density in the Hordaland Health Study.

    PubMed

    Øyen, Jannike; Gjesdal, Clara Gram; Karlsson, Therese; Svingen, Gard Ft; Tell, Grethe S; Strand, Elin; Drevon, Christian A; Vinknes, Kathrine J; Meyer, Klaus; Ueland, Per Magne; Nygård, Ottar

    2017-04-01

    Background: Choline is an important nutrient either obtained from a variety of foods or synthesized endogenously, and it is the precursor of betaine. We previously reported positive associations between plasma free choline and bone mineral density (BMD). Animal studies suggest an impact of dietary choline on bone metabolism, but the role of dietary intake of choline and betaine for human bone health is unknown.Objectives: The main aims were to examine the associations of dietary choline, choline species, and betaine with BMD and to study the relations between dietary and plasma free choline and betaine.Methods: Study subjects were participants in the Hordaland Health Study, including 2649 women and 1983 men (aged 46-49 or 71-74 y). BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and dietary intake was obtained by using a validated 169-item food-frequency questionnaire. Risk associations were assessed by logistic regression and correlations by ρ (Spearman's bivariate rank order correlation).Results: Subjects in the lowest compared with the highest tertile of dietary total choline, free choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin had a higher risk of low-femoral neck BMD, defined as the lowest BMD quintile. Particularly strong associations were found among middle-aged men for intake of free choline (OR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.69; P = 0.002) and glycerophosphocholine (OR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.43, 3.16; P < 0.001) and among elderly women for total choline (OR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.33, 2.88; P = 0.001) and phosphatidylcholine (OR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.33, 2.84: P = 0.001) intake. No significant associations were observed between dietary betaine and BMD. Dietary total choline, free choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin correlated weakly with plasma free choline (ρ: 0.07, 0.05, 0.07, 0.07, and 0.05, respectively; P < 0.01). Dietary betaine correlated with plasma betaine (ρ: 0.23; P < 0.001).Conclusion

  7. Citicoline (CDP-choline) increases Sirtuin1 expression concomitant to neuroprotection in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Olivia; Hernández-Jiménez, Macarena; Zarruk, Juan G; Cuartero, María I; Ballesteros, Iván; Camarero, Guadalupe; Moraga, Ana; Pradillo, Jesús M; Moro, María A; Lizasoain, Ignacio

    2013-09-01

    CDP-choline has shown neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischemia. In humans, although a recent trial International Citicoline Trial on Acute Stroke (ICTUS) has shown that global recovery is similar in CDP-choline and placebo groups, CDP-choline was shown to be more beneficial in some patients, such as those with moderate stroke severity and not treated with t-PA. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial actions of CDP-choline. We have now studied the participation of Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) in the neuroprotective actions of CDP-choline. Fischer rats and Sirt1⁻/⁻ mice were subjected to permanent focal ischemia. CDP-choline (0.2 or 2 g/kg), sirtinol (a SIRT1 inhibitor; 10 mg/kg), and resveratrol (a SIRT1 activator; 2.5 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally. Brains were removed 24 and 48 h after ischemia for western blot analysis and infarct volume determination. Treatment with CDP-choline increased SIRT1 protein levels in brain concomitantly to neuroprotection. Treatment with sirtinol blocked the reduction in infarct volume caused by CDP-choline, whereas resveratrol elicited a strong synergistic neuroprotective effect with CDP-choline. CDP-choline failed to reduce infarct volume in Sirt1⁻/⁻ mice. Our present results demonstrate a robust effect of CDP-choline like SIRT1 activator by up-regulating its expression. Our findings suggest that therapeutic strategies to activate SIRT1 may be useful in the treatment of stroke. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is implicated in a wide range of cellular functions. Regarding stroke, there is no direct evidence. We have demonstrated that citicoline increases SIRT1 protein levels in brain concomitantly to neuroprotection. Citicoline fails to reduce infarct volume in Sirt1⁻/⁻ mice. Our findings suggest that therapeutic strategies acting on SIRT1 may be useful in the treatment of stroke.

  8. Dietary choline and betaine intakes vary in an adult multiethnic population.

    PubMed

    Yonemori, Kim M; Lim, Unhee; Koga, Karin R; Wilkens, Lynne R; Au, Donna; Boushey, Carol J; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N; Murphy, Suzanne P

    2013-06-01

    Choline and betaine are important nutrients for human health, but reference food composition databases for these nutrients became available only recently. We tested the feasibility of using these databases to estimate dietary choline and betaine intakes among ethnically diverse adults who participated in the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) Study. Of the food items (n = 965) used to quantify intakes for the MEC FFQ, 189 items were exactly matched with items in the USDA Database for the Choline Content of Common Foods for total choline, choline-containing compounds, and betaine, and 547 items were matched to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference for total choline (n = 547) and 148 for betaine. When a match was not found, choline and betaine values were imputed based on the same food with a different form (124 food items for choline, 300 for choline compounds, 236 for betaine), a similar food (n = 98, 284, and 227, respectively) or the closest item in the same food category (n = 6, 191, and 157, respectively), or the values were assumed to be zero (n = 1, 1, and 8, respectively). The resulting mean intake estimates for choline and betaine among 188,147 MEC participants (aged 45-75) varied by sex (372 and 154 mg/d in men, 304 and 128 mg/d in women, respectively; P-heterogeneity < 0.0001) and by race/ethnicity among Caucasians, African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians (P-heterogeneity < 0.0001), largely due to the variation in energy intake. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of assessing choline and betaine intake and characterize the variation in intake that exists in a multiethnic population.

  9. Dietary Choline and Betaine Intakes Vary in an Adult Multiethnic Population123

    PubMed Central

    Yonemori, Kim M.; Lim, Unhee; Koga, Karin R.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Au, Donna; Boushey, Carol J.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Murphy, Suzanne P.

    2013-01-01

    Choline and betaine are important nutrients for human health, but reference food composition databases for these nutrients became available only recently. We tested the feasibility of using these databases to estimate dietary choline and betaine intakes among ethnically diverse adults who participated in the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) Study. Of the food items (n = 965) used to quantify intakes for the MEC FFQ, 189 items were exactly matched with items in the USDA Database for the Choline Content of Common Foods for total choline, choline-containing compounds, and betaine, and 547 items were matched to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference for total choline (n = 547) and 148 for betaine. When a match was not found, choline and betaine values were imputed based on the same food with a different form (124 food items for choline, 300 for choline compounds, 236 for betaine), a similar food (n = 98, 284, and 227, respectively) or the closest item in the same food category (n = 6, 191, and 157, respectively), or the values were assumed to be zero (n = 1, 1, and 8, respectively). The resulting mean intake estimates for choline and betaine among 188,147 MEC participants (aged 45–75) varied by sex (372 and 154 mg/d in men, 304 and 128 mg/d in women, respectively; P-heterogeneity < 0.0001) and by race/ethnicity among Caucasians, African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians (P-heterogeneity < 0.0001), largely due to the variation in energy intake. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of assessing choline and betaine intake and characterize the variation in intake that exists in a multiethnic population. PMID:23616508

  10. CHOLINE AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN BALANCE CAUSED BY ACUTE NEONATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, Cynthia F.; Wellmann, Kristen A.; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1% of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits, but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of 8 treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1-5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid® on P5, C or S post-treatment from P6-20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol. PMID:26085462

  11. Clinical applications of choline PET/CT in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Milano, Amalia; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas and metastatic tumors are the most common forms of brain tumors. From a clinical perspective, neuroimaging plays a significant role, in diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. To date MRI is considered the current clinical gold standard for imaging, however, despite providing superior structural detail it features poor specificity in identifying viable tumors in brain treated with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In the last years functional neuroimaging has become largely widespread thanks to the use of molecular tracers employed in cellular metabolism which has significantly improved the management of patients with brain tumors, especially in the post-treatment phase. Despite the considerable progress of molecular imaging in oncology its use in the diagnosis of brain tumors is still limited by a few wellknown technical problems. Because 18F-FDG, the most common radiotracer used in oncology, is avidly accumulated by normal cortex, the low tumor/background signal ratio makes it difficult to distinguish the tumor from normal surrounding tissues. By contrast, radiotracers with higher specificity for the tumor are labeled with a short half-life isotopes which restricts their use to those centers equipped with a cyclotron and radiopharmacy facility. 11C-choline has been reported as a suitable tracer for neuroimaging application. The recent availability of choline labeled with a long half-life radioisotope as 18F increases the possibility of studying this tracer's potential role in the staging of brain tumors. The present review focuses on the possible clinical applications of PET/CT with choline tracers in malignant brain tumors and brain metastases, with a special focus on malignant gliomas.

  12. Are dietary choline and betaine intakes determinants of total homocysteine concentration?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated homocysteine concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a decline in cognitive function. Intakes of choline and betaine, as methyl donors, may affect homocysteine concentrations. The objective was to examine whether choline and betaine intakes, assess...

  13. The association of serum choline with linear growth failure in young children from rural Malawi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Choline is an essential nutrient for cell structure, cell signaling, neurotransmission, lipid transport, and bone formation. Choline can be irreversibly converted to betaine, a major source of methyl groups. Trimethylene N-oxide (TMAO), a proatherogenic molecule, is produced from the metabolism of d...

  14. What Choline Metabolism Can Tell Us About the Underlying Mechanisms of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of fetal exposure to alcohol are very diverse and the likely molecular mechanisms involved must be able to explain how so many developmental processes could go awry. If pregnant rat dams are fed alcohol, their pups develop abnormalities characteristic of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), but if these rat dams were also treated with choline, the effects from ethanol were attenuated in their pups. Choline is an essential nutrient in humans, and is an important methyl group donor. Alcohol exposure disturbs the metabolism of choline and other methyl donors. Availability of choline during gestation directly influences epigenetic marks on DNA and histones, and alters gene expression needed for normal neural and endothelial progenitor cell proliferation. Maternal diets low in choline alter development of the mouse hippocampus, and decrement memory for life. Women eating low-choline diets have an increased risk of having an infant with a neural tube or or ofacial cleft birth defect. Thus, the varied effects of choline could affect the expression of FASD, and studies on choline might shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for FASD. PMID:21259123

  15. Prenatal Choline Availability Alters the Context Sensitivity of Pavlovian Conditioning in Adult Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3-4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline…

  16. USDA Database for the Choline Content of Common Foods, Release Two

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research has shown that choline is important for the synthesis of phospholipids in cell membranes, methyl metabolism, acetylcholine synthesis, and cholinergic neurotransmission in humans. Betaine, a choline derivative, is also important because of its role in the donation of methyl groups to homocy...

  17. Theoretical study on the structures and properties of mixtures of urea and choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yan; Wu, Xue; Li, Guohui

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we investigated in detail the structural characteristics of mixtures of choline chloride and urea with different urea contents by performing molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, and offer possible explanations for the low melting point of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea with a ratio of 1:2. The insertion of urea molecules was found to change the density distribution of cations and anions around the given cations significantly, disrupting the long-range ordered structure of choline chloride. Moreover, with increasing urea concentration, the hydrogen bond interactions between choline cations and Cl(-) anions decreased, while those among urea molecules obviously increased. From the hydrogen bond lifetimes, it was found that a ratio of 1:2 between choline chloride and urea is necessary for a reasonable strength of hydrogen bond interaction to maintain the low melting point of the mixture of choline chloride with urea. In addition, it was also deduced from the interaction energies that a urea content of 67.7 % may make the interactions of cation-anion, cation-urea and anion-urea modest, and thus results in the lower melting point of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea. The present results may offer assistance to some extent for understanding the physicochemical properties of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea, and give valuable information for the further development and application of deep eutectic solvents.

  18. Choline availability during embryonic development alters the localization of calretinin in developing and aging mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Albright, Craig D; Siwek, Donald F; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Mar, Mei-Heng; Kowall, Neil W; Williams, Christina L; Zeisel, Steven H

    2003-04-01

    Choline availability in the diet during pregnancy alters fetal brain biochemistry with resulting behavioral changes that persist throughout the lifetime of the offspring. In the present study, the effects of dietary choline on the onset of GABAergic neuronal differentiation in developing fetal brain, as demarcated by the expression of calcium binding protein calretinin, are described. In these studies, timed-pregnant mice were fed choline supplemented, control or choline deficient AIN-76 diet from day 12-17 of pregnancy and the brains of their fetuses were studied on day 17 of gestation. In the primordial dentate gyrus, we found that pups from choline deficient-dams had more calretinin protein (330% increase), and pups from choline supplemented-dams had less calretinin protein (70% decrease), than did pups from control-dams. Importantly, decreased calretinin protein was still detectable in hippocampus in aged, 24-month-old mice, born of choline supplemented-dams and maintained since birth on a control diet. Thus, alterations in the level of calretinin protein in fetal brain hippocampus could underlie the known, life long effects of maternal dietary choline availability on brain development and behavior.

  19. Choline Essentiality and Its Requirement in Diets for Juvenile Parrot Fish (Oplegnathus fasciatus)

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Sanaz; Jang, Ji-Woong; Rahimnejad, Samad; Song, Jin-Woo; Lee, Kyeong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 12-wk feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the essentiality of choline supplementation in diets for parrot fish. Five isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were supplemented with 0 (as control), 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg choline per kg diet, and a positive control diet without choline contained 0.3% of 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol as choline biosynthesis inhibitor (designated as Con, C500, C1000, C2000 and Con+, respectively). Triplicate groups of fish (body weight, 8.8±0.01 g) were fed one of the experimental diets at a rate of 4% body weight twice daily. The fish fed Con+ diet revealed significantly lower growth performance and feed utilization efficiency than other fish groups. Supplementation of choline to the basal diet did not significantly influence fish growth. The highest liver lipid content was observed in fish fed the Con+ diet and inversely correlated with liver choline concentration although the differences were not significant. Also, significantly higher liver linoleic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid contents were found in fish fed the Con+ diet. Innate immune parameters including respiratory burst and myeloperoxidase activities were not significantly affected by dietary choline levels. The findings in this study conclude that choline concentration of approximately 230 mg kg−1 diet meets the requirement of parrot fish. PMID:25924958

  20. Prenatal Choline Availability Alters the Context Sensitivity of Pavlovian Conditioning in Adult Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3-4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline…

  1. Choline acetyltransferase expression does not identify early pathogenic events in fetal SMA spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Soler-Botija, Carolina; Cuscó, Ivón; López, Eva; Clua, Agustín; Gich, Ignasi; Baiget, Montserrat; Ferrer, Isidre; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the expression of choline acetyltransferase, a specific marker for cholinergic neurons, in control and spinal muscular atrophy fetuses and newborns. By immunoblot we observed at 12 and 15 weeks a similar pattern of choline acetyltransferase expression in spinal muscular atrophy with respect to controls, although at 22 weeks this expression was reduced, probably due to a smaller number of motor neurons in the spinal muscular atrophy spinal cord. By immunohistochemistry, the counting of positive and negative motor neurons for choline acetyltransferase immunostaining in control and spinal muscular atrophy fetuses showed a similar proportion at all stages analyzed. The choline acetyltransferase-negative motor neurons were of similar appearance in both groups. After birth, chromatolytic motor neurons were detected in spinal muscular atrophy, all of which were choline acetyltransferase-negative. Our results in spinal muscular atrophy fetuses indicate that choline acetyltransferase immunostaining does not identify early events in neuronal pathogenesis and suggest that the spinal muscular atrophy surviving motor neurons may not be dysfunctional during this period. Furthermore, spinal muscular atrophy choline acetyltransferase-negative motor neurons showed detectable pathological changes only after birth, indicating that choline acetyltransferase is a late marker for motor neuron degeneration and not a primary contributing factor in this process.

  2. Fewer metabolites of dietary choline reach the blood of rats after treatment with lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Pomfret, E.A.; O'Connor, S.C.; Zola, T.H.; Zeisel, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studies the effect of lithium treatment upon the appearance in blood, liver and intestine of metabolites formed from dietary choline. Rats were treated for 9 days with 2 mEq/kg lithium carbonate or water. Animals were fasted overnight, and on the 10th day were fed with a solution containing radiolabeled choline chloride. The lithium treated groups also received 2.0 mEq/kg lithium as part of this solution. After an oral dose of 1 ml of a 1 mM choline solution, the lithium-treated animals had significantly lower levels of choline derived radiolabel in blood than did controls at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes (47%, 51%, 59% and 74%, respectively). They observed similar decreases of the accumulation in blood, at 180 minutes after the dose, of choline-derived radiolabel when choline was administered at lower or higher concentrations. After an oral treatment containing 0.1, 1 or 10 mM choline, lithium treated animals accumulated 69%, 66% and 72% as much radiolabel in serum as did controls. Most of the radiolabel found in blood at 180 minutes was in metabolites of choline which are formed within liver. The diminished accumulation of radiolabel in serum after lithium treatment was not due to increased accumulation of label by erythrocytes, liver or gut wall. They suggest that lithium influences the release by liver of betaine and phosphatidylcholine. 36 references, 5 figures.

  3. Crocodile choline from Crocodylus siamensis induces apoptosis of human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-Mei; Fu, Qi-Rui; Li, Hua-Liang; Zheng, Ya-Hui; Chen, Shu-Ming; Hu, Xin-Yi; Chen, Qing-Xi; Chen, Qiong-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Crocodile choline, an active compound isolated from Crocodylus siamensis, was found to exert potent anti-cancer activities against human gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Our study revealed that crocodile choline led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase through attenuating the expressions of cyclins, Cyclin B1, and CDK-1. Furthermore, crocodile choline accelerated apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway with the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, the increase in reactive oxygen species production and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and the activation of caspase-3 along with the release of cytochrome c. In addition, this study, for the first time, shows that Notch pathway is remarkably deregulated by crocodile choline. The combination of crocodile choline and Notch1 short interfering RNA led to dramatically increased cytotoxicity than observed with either agent alone. Notch1 short interfering RNA sensitized and potentiated the capability of crocodile choline to suppress the cell progression and invasion of gastric cancer. Taken together, these data suggested that crocodile choline was a potent progression inhibitor of gastric cancer cells, which was correlated with mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and Notch pathway. Combining Notch1 inhibitors with crocodile choline might represent a novel approach for gastric cancer.

  4. Enzymatic methods for choline-containing water soluble phospholipids based on fluorescence of choline oxidase: Application to lyso-PAF.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Vicente, Isabel; Domínguez, Andrés; Ferrández, Carlos; Galbán, Javier

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we present methods to determine water soluble phospholipids containing choline (wCh-PL). The analytes were hydrolyzed by the enzyme phospholipase D and the choline formed was oxidized by the enzyme Choline Oxidase (ChOx); the fluorescence changes of the ChOx are followed during the enzymatic reaction, avoiding the necessity of an indicating step. Both reactions (hydrolysis and oxidation) can be combined in two different ways: 1) a two-step process (TSP) in which the hydrolysis reaction takes place during an incubation time and then the oxidation reaction is carried out, the analytical signal being provided by the intrinsic fluorescence of ChOx due to tryptophan; 2) a one-step process (OSP) in which both enzymatic reactions are carried out simultaneously in the same test; in this case the analytical signal is provided by the ChOx extrinsic fluorescence due to a fluorescent probe (Ru (II) chelate) linked to the enzyme (ChOx-RuC). The analytical capabilities of these methods were studied using 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C8PC), a water soluble short alkyl chain Ch-PL as a substrate, and 1-O-hexadecyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine (lyso-PAF). The analytical features of merit for both analytes using both methods were obtained. The TSP gave a 10-fold sensitivity and lower quantification limit (1.0*10(-5) M for lyso-PAF), but OSP reduced the determination time and permitted to use the same enzyme aliquot for several measurements. Both methods gave similar precision (RSD 7%, n = 5). The TSP was applied to the determination of C8PC and lyso-PAF in spiked synthetic serum matrix using the standard addition method. The application of this methodology to PLD activity determination is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet

    PubMed Central

    Getty, Caitlyn M.; Dilger, Ryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  6. Structure and Function of CutC Choline Lyase from Human Microbiota Bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kalnins, Gints; Kuka, Janis; Grinberga, Solveiga; Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Liepinsh, Edgars; Dambrova, Maija; Tars, Kaspars

    2015-08-28

    CutC choline trimethylamine-lyase is an anaerobic bacterial glycyl radical enzyme (GRE) that cleaves choline to produce trimethylamine (TMA) and acetaldehyde. In humans, TMA is produced exclusively by the intestinal microbiota, and its metabolite, trimethylamine oxide, has been associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, information about the three-dimensional structures of TMA-producing enzymes is important for microbiota-targeted drug discovery. We have cloned, expressed, and purified the CutC GRE and the activating enzyme CutD from Klebsiella pneumoniae, a representative of the human microbiota. We have determined the first crystal structures of both the choline-bound and choline-free forms of CutC and have discovered that binding of choline at the ligand-binding site triggers conformational changes in the enzyme structure, a feature that has not been observed for any other characterized GRE.

  7. Optimization of choline administration regimen for correction of cognitive functions in rats after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Guseva, M V; Kamenskii, A A; Gusev, V B

    2013-06-01

    Choline diet promotes improvement of the brain cognitive functions in rats with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. In previous studies, the rats received choline being standard (0.2%) or choline-supplemented (2%) diet for 2 weeks prior to and 2 weeks after experimental brain injury. To the end of the experiments (in 4 weeks), the post-traumatic disturbances in the cognitive functions were observed in both groups, although they were less pronounced than in the rats kept on the choline-supplemented diet. Based on original mathematical model, this paper proposes a method to calculate the most efficient use of choline to correct the brain cognitive functions. In addition to evaluating the cognitive functions, the study assessed expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, the amount of consumed food and water, and the dynamics of body weight.

  8. Intrastriatal injection of choline accelerates the acquisition of positively rewarded behaviors.

    PubMed

    Diaz del Guante, M A; Carbonell-Hernandez, C; Quirarte, G; Cruz-Morales, S E; Rivas-Arancibia, S; Prado-Alcalá, R A

    1993-01-01

    The prediction was made that by increasing the synthesis of striatal acetylcholine, through local injection of its precursor choline, the acquisition of a lever-pressing response in two different autoshaping situations would be accelerated. In the first experiment, choline was injected into the striatum or parietal cortex of rats immediately after dipper training; 24 h later and during 5 consecutive days the animals were submitted to an autoshaping procedure of the operant kind. In the second experiment, choline was administered to the same regions shortly after each of three classical-operant autoshaping sessions; during the next two sessions, autoshaping contingencies of the operant kind were in effect. In both experiments choline injection into the striatum induced a marked facilitation of acquisition of the conditioned responses, although cortical injection of choline produced a milder improvement only in the first experiment. These results indicate that striatal cholinergic activity is, indeed, involved in the early phases of positively reinforced learning.

  9. Brucella abortus Synthesizes Phosphatidylcholine from Choline Provided by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2006-01-01

    The Brucella cell envelope is characterized by the presence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid in eukaryotes that is rare in prokaryotes. Studies on the composition of Brucella abortus 2308 phospholipids revealed that the synthesis of PC depends on the presence of choline in the culture medium, suggesting that the methylation biosynthetic pathway is not functional. Phospholipid composition of pmtA and pcs mutants indicated that in Brucella, PC synthesis occurs exclusively via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway. Transformation of Escherichia coli with an expression vector containing the B. abortus pcs homologue was sufficient for PC synthesis upon induction with IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside), while no PC formation was detected when bacteria were transformed with a vector containing pmtA. These findings imply that Brucella depends on choline provided by the host cell to form PC. We could not detect any obvious associated phenotype in the PC-deficient strain under vegetative or intracellular growth conditions in macrophages. However, the pcs mutant strain displays a reproducible virulence defect in mice, which suggests that PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process. PMID:16484204

  10. The Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Choline and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Noriko; Wildes, Flonné; Takagi, Tomoyo; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    An increase of cellular phosphocholine (PC) and total choline (tCho)-containing compounds as well as alterations in lipids have been consistently observed in cancer cells and tissue. These metabolic changes are closely related to malignant transformation, invasion, and metastasis. The study of cancer cells in culture plays an important role in understanding mechanisms leading to altered choline (Cho) and lipid metabolism in cancer, as it provides a carefully controlled environment. However, a solid tumor is a complex system with a unique tumor microenvironment frequently containing hypoxic and acidic regions and areas of nutrient deprivation and necrosis. Cancer cell–stromal cell interactions and the extracellular matrix may also alter Cho and lipid metabolism. Human tumor xenograft models in mice are useful to mimic the growth of human cancers and provide insights into the influence of in vivo conditions on metabolism. Here, we have compared metabolites, obtained with high resolution 1H MRS of extracts from human breast and prostate cancer cells in a 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture and from solid tumor xenografts derived from these cells, as well as the protein expression of enzymes that regulate Cho and lipid metabolism. Our data demonstrate significant differences in Cho and lipid metabolism and protein expression patterns between human breast and prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumors derived from these cells. These data highlight the influence of the tumor microenvironment on Cho and lipid metabolism. PMID:28066718

  11. Purification of biodiesel by choline chloride based deep eutectic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niawanti, Helda; Zullaikah, Siti; Rachimoellah, M.

    2017-05-01

    Purification is a crucial step in biodiesel production to meet the biodiesel standard. This study purified biodiesel using choline chloride based deep eutectic solvent (DES). DES was used to reduce unreacted oil and unsaponifiable matter in rice bran oil based biodiesel. The objective of this work was to study the effect of extraction time using DES on the content and yield of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Rice bran used in this work contains 16.49 % of oil with initial free fatty acids (FFA) of 44.75 %. Acid catalyzed methanolysis was employed to convert rice bran oil (RBO) into biodiesel under following operation conditions: T = 60 °C, t = 8 h, molar ratio of oil to methanol = 1/10, H2SO4 = 1% w/w of oil. Rice bran oil based biodiesel obtained contain 89.05 % of FAME with very low FFA content (0.05 %). DES was made from a mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol with molar ratio of 1/2. Molar ratio of crude biodiesel to DES were 1/2 and 1/4. Extraction time was varied from 15 minutes to 240 minutes at 30 °C. The highest FAME content was obtained after purification for 240 min. at molar ratio crude biodiesel to DES 1/4 was 96.60 %. This work shows that DES has potential to purify biodiesel from non-edible raw material, such as RBO.

  12. Perinatal Choline Supplementation Reduces Amyloidosis and Increases Choline Acetyltransferase Expression in the Hippocampus of the APPswePS1dE9 Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mellott, Tiffany J.; Huleatt, Olivia M.; Shade, Bethany N.; Pender, Sarah M.; Liu, Yi B.; Slack, Barbara E.; Blusztajn, Jan K.

    2017-01-01

    Prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major goal of biomedical sciences. In previous studies we showed that high intake of the essential nutrient, choline, during gestation prevented age-related memory decline in a rat model. In this study we investigated the effects of a similar treatment on AD-related phenotypes in a mouse model of AD. We crossed wild type (WT) female mice with hemizygous APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP.PS1) AD model male mice and maintained the pregnant and lactating dams on a control AIN76A diet containing 1.1 g/kg of choline or a choline-supplemented (5 g/kg) diet. After weaning all offspring consumed the control diet. As compared to APP.PS1 mice reared on the control diet, the hippocampus of the perinatally choline-supplemented APP.PS1 mice exhibited: 1) altered levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolites–specifically elevated amounts of β-C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) and reduced levels of solubilized amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides; 2) reduced number and total area of amyloid plaques; 3) preserved levels of choline acetyltransferase protein (CHAT) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) and 4) absence of astrogliosis. The data suggest that dietary supplementation of choline during fetal development and early postnatal life may constitute a preventive strategy for AD. PMID:28103298

  13. Modulation of monoaminergic transporters by choline-containing phospholipids in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Tomassoni, Daniele; Nwankwo, Innocent Ejike; Di Stefano, Antonio; Sozio, Piera; Cerasa, Laura Serafina; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Choline-containing phospholipids were proposed as cognition enhancing agents, but evidence on their activity is controversial. CDP-choline (cytidine-5´-diphosphocholine, CDP) and choline alphoscerate (L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine, GPC) represent the choline-containing phospholipids with larger clinical evidence in the treatment of sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents and of cognitive disorders. These compounds which display mainly a cholinergic profile interfere with phospholipids biosynthesis, brain metabolism and neurotransmitter systems. Dated preclinical studies and clinical evidence suggested that CDP-choline may have also a monoaminergic profile. The present study was designed to assess the influence of treatment for 7 days with choline-equivalent doses (CDP-choline: 325 mg/Kg/day; GPC: 150 mg/Kg/day) of these compounds on brain dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) levels and on DA plasma membrane transporter (DAT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1 and VMAT2), serotonin transporter (SERT), and norepinephrine transporter (NET) in the rat. Frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum were investigated by HPLC with electrochemical detection, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis and ELISA techniques. CDP-choline did not affect DA levels, which increased after GPC administration in frontal cortex and cerebellum. GPC increased also 5-HT levels in frontal cortex and striatum. DAT was stimulated in frontal cortex and cerebellum by both CDP and GPC, whereas VMAT2, SERT, NET were unaffected. VMAT1 was not detectable. The above data indicate that CDP-choline and GPC possess a monoaminergic profile and interfere to some extent with brain monoamine transporters. This activity on a relevant drug target, good tolerability and safety of CDP-choline and GPC suggests that these compounds may merit further investigations in appropriate clinical settings.

  14. Efficient multi-enzyme-catalyzed CDP-choline production driven by an ATP donor module.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingmiao; Wang, Junzhi; Xu, Chongmao; Chen, Yong; Yang, Junjie; Liu, Dong; Niu, Huanqing; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng; Ying, Hanjie

    2017-02-01

    Cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) has been applied for treating acute craniocerebral injury and allowing recovery of consciousness after brain surgery. In this study, an acetate kinase (ACK)/acetyl phosphate system was used to supply ATP and combined with Escherichia coli-overexpressed CMP kinase (CMK), NDP kinase (NDK), choline phosphate cytidylyltransferase (CCT), and choline kinase (CKI) to produce CDP-choline from CMP and choline chloride. Within 1 h, 49 mM CDP-choline was produced, for a molar yield of 89.9 and 68.4 % based on CMP and choline chloride, respectively; the utilization efficiency of energy (UEE) was 79.5 %. Acetyl phosphate, sodium acetate, and CTP inhibited the reaction when the concentration exceeded 18.5, 600, and 30 mM, respectively. This inhibition could be overcome by controlling the rate of acetyl phosphate, CMP addition or using KOH instead of NaOH to regulate the pH in fed-batch transformation. After 24 h, the maximum titer was 124.1 ± 2.7 mM, the productivity was 5.1 ± 0.1 mM l(-1) h(-1), the molar yield to CMP and choline chloride were 83.8 and 63.7 %, respectively, and the UEE was 58.2 %. This high yield and productivity of CDP-choline through biocatalysis suggest future application at the industrial scale.

  15. UPTAKE OF RADIONUCLIDE METALS BY SPME FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M; S Crump, S; Robert02 Ray, R; Keisha Martin, K; Donna Beals, D

    2006-08-28

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating high explosive (HE) and fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of HE and FD residue involves using solid phase microextraction or SPME fibers to remove residue of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most metals. However, no studies have measured the affinity of radionuclides for SPME fibers. The focus of this research was to examine the affinity of dissolved radionuclide ({sup 239/240}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 226}Ra) and stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Sr, Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr, Ru, and Nd) for SPME fibers at the exposure conditions that favor the uptake of HE and FD residues. Our results from radiochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate these metals have little measurable affinity for these SPME fibers during conditions that are conducive to HE and FD residue uptake with subsequent analysis by liquid or gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

  16. Fluorescence of the Flavin group in choline oxidase. Insights and analytical applications for the determination of choline and betaine aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ortega, E; de Marcos, S; Sanz-Vicente, I; Ubide, C; Ostra, M; Vidal, M; Galbán, J

    2016-01-15

    Choline oxidase (ChOx) is a flavoenzyme catalysing the oxidation of choline (Ch) to betaine aldehyde (BA) and glycine betaine (GB). In this paper a fundamental study of the intrinsic fluorescence properties of ChOx due to Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD) is presented and some analytical applications are studied in detail. Firstly, an unusual alteration in the excitation spectra, in comparison with the absorption spectra, has been observed as a function of the pH. This is ascribed to a change of polarity in the excited state. Secondly, the evolution of the fluorescence spectra during the reaction seems to indicate that the reaction takes place in two consecutive, but partially overlapped, steps and each of them follows a different mechanism. Thirdly, the chemical system can be used to determine the Ch concentration in the range from 5×10(-6)M to 5×10(-5)M (univariate and multivariate calibration) in the presence of BA as interference, and the joint Ch+BA concentration in the range 5×10(-6)-5×10(-4)M (multivariate calibration) with mean errors under 10%; a semiquantitative determination of the BA concentration can be deduced by difference. Finally, Ch has been successfully determined in an infant milk sample.

  17. AtKUP1: an Arabidopsis gene encoding high-affinity potassium transport activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E J; Kwak, J M; Uozumi, N; Schroeder, J I

    1998-01-01

    Because plants grow under many different types of soil and environmental conditions, we investigated the hypothesis that multiple pathways for K+ uptake exist in plants. We have identified a new family of potassium transporters from Arabidopsis by searching for homologous sequences among the expressed sequence tags of the GenBank database. The deduced amino acid sequences of AtKUP (for Arabidopsis thaliana K+ uptake transporter) cDNAs are highly homologous to the non-plant Kup and HAK1 potassium transporters from Escherichia coli and Schwanniomyces occidentalis, respectively. Interestingly, AtKUP1 and AtKUP2 are able to complement the potassium transport deficiency of an E. coli triple mutant. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis suspension cells overexpressing AtKUP1 showed increased Rb+ uptake at micromolar concentrations with an apparent K(m) of approximately 22 microM, indicating that AtKUP1 encodes a high-affinity potassium uptake activity in vivo. A small, low-affinity Rb+ uptake component was also detected in AtKUP1-expressing cells. RNA gel blot analysis showed that the various members of the AtKUP family have distinct patterns of expression, with AtKUP3 transcript levels being strongly induced by K+ starvation. It is proposed that plants contain multiple potassium transporters for high-affinity uptake and that the AtKUP family may provide important components of high- and low-affinity K+ nutrition and uptake into various plant cell types. PMID:9477571

  18. High oxygen affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Mangin, O

    2017-02-01

    High oxygen affinity hemoglobins are responsible for rare and heterogeneous autosomic dominant genetic diseases. They cause pure erythrocytosis, sometimes accountable for hyperviscosity and thrombosis, or hemolysis. Differential diagnoses must be first ruled out. The diagnosis is based on the identification of a decreased P50, and their possible characterization by cation exchange-high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Finally, genetic studies of the responsible globin chain gene will confirm the mutation. The prognosis mainly relies on the P50 decrease rate and on the hemoglobin cooperativity impairment. Disease management should be personalized, and it should primarily depend on smoking cessation and physical activity. Phlebotomy and platelet aggregation inhibitors' prescriptions can be discussed. There is no contraindication to flights, high-altitude conditions, or pregnancy. Nevertheless, blood donation must be prohibited. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  20. Choline acetyltransferase and organic cation transporters are responsible for synthesis and propionate-induced release of acetylcholine in colon epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bader, Sandra; Klein, Jochen; Diener, Martin

    2014-06-15

    Acetylcholine is not only a neurotransmitter, but is found in a variety of non-neuronal cells. For example, the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), catalyzing acetylcholine synthesis, is expressed by the colonic epithelium of different species. These cells release acetylcholine across the basolateral membrane after luminal exposure to propionate, a short-chain fatty acid. The functional consequence is the induction of chloride secretion, measurable as increase in short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chamber experiments. It is unclear how acetylcholine is produced and released by colonic epithelium. Therefore, the aim of the present study was the identification (on mRNA and protein level) and functional characterization (in Ussing chamber experiments combined with HPLC detection of acetylcholine) of transporters/enzymes in the cholinergic system of rat colonic epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining as well as RT-PCR revealed the expression of high-affinity choline transporter, ChAT, carnitine acetyltransferase (CarAT), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and organic cation transporters (OCT 1, 2, 3) in colonic epithelium. In contrast to blockade of ChAT with bromoacetylcholine, inhibition of CarAT with mildronate did not inhibit the propionate-induced increase in Isc, suggesting a predominant synthesis of epithelial acetylcholine by ChAT. Although being expressed, blockade of VAChT with vesamicol was ineffective, whereas inhibition of OCTs with omeprazole and corticosterone inhibited propionate-induced Isc and the release of acetylcholine into the basolateral compartment. In summary, OCTs seem to be involved in regulated acetylcholine release by colonic epithelium, which is assumed to be involved in chemosensing of luminal short-chain fatty acids by the intestinal epithelium.

  1. Motor Neuron-Specific Overexpression of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter: Impact on Motor Endurance and Evoked Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lund, David; Ruggiero, Alicia M.; Ferguson, Shawn M.; Wright, Jane; English, Brett A.; Reisz, Peter A.; Whitaker, Sarah M.; Peltier, Amanda C.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2010-01-01

    The presynaptic, hemicholinium-3 sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) supplies choline for acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis. In mice, a homozygous deletion of CHT (CHT−/−) leads to premature cessation of spontaneous or evoked neuromuscular signaling and is associated with perinatal cyanosis and lethality within 1 hr. Heterozygous (CHT+/−) mice exhibit diminished brain ACh levels and demonstrate an inability to sustain vigorous motor activity. We sought to explore the contribution of CHT gene dosage to motor function in greater detail using transgenic mice where CHT is expressed under control of the motor neuron promoter Hb9 (Hb9:CHT). On a CHT−/− background, the Hb9:CHT transgene conferred mice with the ability to move and breath for a postnatal period of ~24 hrs, thus increasing survival. Conversely, Hb9:CHT expression on a wild-type background (CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT) leads to an increased capacity for treadmill running compared to wild-type littermates. Analysis of the stimulated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in these animals under basal conditions established that CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT mice display an unexpected, bidirectional change, producing either elevated or reduced CMAP amplitude, relative to CHT+/+ animals. To examine whether these two groups arise from underlying changes in synaptic properties, we used high-frequency stimulation of motor axons to assess CMAP recovery kinetics. Although CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT mice in the two groups display an equivalent, time-dependent reduction in CMAP amplitude, animals with a higher basal CMAP amplitude demonstrate a significantly enhanced rate of recovery. To explain our findings, we propose a model whereby CHT support for neuromuscular signaling involves contributions to ACh synthesis as well as cholinergic synaptic vesicle availability. PMID:20888396

  2. Motor neuron-specific overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter: impact on motor endurance and evoked muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Lund, D; Ruggiero, A M; Ferguson, S M; Wright, J; English, B A; Reisz, P A; Whitaker, S M; Peltier, A C; Blakely, R D

    2010-12-29

    The presynaptic, hemicholinium-3 sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) supplies choline for acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis. In mice, a homozygous deletion of CHT (CHT-/-) leads to premature cessation of spontaneous or evoked neuromuscular signaling and is associated with perinatal cyanosis and lethality within 1 h. Heterozygous (CHT+/-) mice exhibit diminished brain ACh levels and demonstrate an inability to sustain vigorous motor activity. We sought to explore the contribution of CHT gene dosage to motor function in greater detail using transgenic mice where CHT is expressed under control of the motor neuron promoter Hb9 (Hb9:CHT). On a CHT-/- background, the Hb9:CHT transgene conferred mice with the ability to move and breath for a postnatal period of ∼24 h, thus increasing survival. Conversely, Hb9:CHT expression on a wild-type background (CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT) leads to an increased capacity for treadmill running compared to wild-type littermates. Analysis of the stimulated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in these animals under basal conditions established that CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT mice display an unexpected, bidirectional change, producing either elevated or reduced CMAP amplitude, relative to CHT+/+ animals. To examine whether these two groups arise from underlying changes in synaptic properties, we used high-frequency stimulation of motor axons to assess CMAP recovery kinetics. Although CHT+/+; Hb9:CHT mice in the two groups display an equivalent, time-dependent reduction in CMAP amplitude, animals with a higher basal CMAP amplitude demonstrate a significantly enhanced rate of recovery. To explain our findings, we propose a model whereby CHT support for neuromuscular signaling involves contributions to ACh synthesis as well as cholinergic synaptic vesicle availability.

  3. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    SciTech Connect

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-15

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  4. Differential Role of Human Choline Kinase α and β Enzymes in Lipid Metabolism: Implications in Cancer Onset and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Ortega, David; Ramirez de Molina, Ana; Ramos, Maria Angeles; Valdes-Mora, Fatima; Barderas, Maria Gonzalez; Sarmentero-Estrada, Jacinto; Lacal, Juan Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Background The Kennedy pathway generates phosphocoline and phosphoethanolamine through its two branches. Choline Kinase (ChoK) is the first enzyme of the Kennedy branch of synthesis of phosphocholine, the major component of the plasma membrane. ChoK family of proteins is composed by ChoKα and ChoKβ isoforms, the first one with two different variants of splicing. Recently ChoKα has been implicated in the carcinogenic process, since it is over-expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, no evidence for a role of ChoKβ in carcinogenesis has been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we compare the in vitro and in vivo properties of ChoKα1 and ChoKβ in lipid metabolism, and their potential role in carcinogenesis. Both ChoKα1 and ChoKβ showed choline and ethanolamine kinase activities when assayed in cell extracts, though with different affinity for their substrates. However, they behave differentially when overexpressed in whole cells. Whereas ChoKβ display an ethanolamine kinase role, ChoKα1 present a dual choline/ethanolamine kinase role, suggesting the involvement of each ChoK isoform in distinct biochemical pathways under in vivo conditions. In addition, while overexpression of ChoKα1 is oncogenic when overexpressed in HEK293T or MDCK cells, ChoKβ overexpression is not sufficient to induce in vitro cell transformation nor in vivo tumor growth. Furthermore, a significant upregulation of ChoKα1 mRNA levels in a panel of breast and lung cancer cell lines was found, but no changes in ChoKβ mRNA levels were observed. Finally, MN58b, a previously described potent inhibitor of ChoK with in vivo antitumoral activity, shows more than 20-fold higher efficiency towards ChoKα1 than ChoKβ. Conclusion/Significance This study represents the first evidence of the distinct metabolic role of ChoKα and ChoKβ isoforms, suggesting different physiological roles and implications in human carcinogenesis. These findings constitute a step forward in the

  5. Choline acetate enhanced the catalytic performance of Candida rogusa lipase in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Luyan; Zhao, Yin; Yu, Lijie; Sun, Yanwen; Yan, Keqian; Li, Ying; Huang, Xirong; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-05-01

    Choline acetate is an ionic liquid composed of a kosmotropic anion and a chaotropic cation. According to Hofmeister series, a kosmotropic anion and/or a chaotropic cation could stabilize an enzyme, thereby facilitating the retention of the catalytic activity of the enzyme. In this work, we first report the influence of choline acetate on the activity and stability of lipase in AOT/water/isooctane reverse micelles. The indicator reaction is the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl butyrate. The results show that a low level of choline acetate does not affect the microstructure of the AOT reverse micelles, but the ionic liquid can improve the catalytic efficiency of lipase. Fluorescence spectra show that a high level of choline acetate has an impact on the conformation of lipase, so the activation is mainly due to the influence of choline acetate on the nucleophilicity of water. Infrared spectra demonstrate that choline acetate can form stronger hydrogen bonds with water surrounding lipase, and therefore enhance the nucleophilicity of the water, which makes it easier to attack the acyl enzyme intermediate, thereby increasing the activity of the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of the ester. A study on the stability of lipase in AOT reverse micelles indicates that the ionic liquid is able to maintain the activity of lipase to a certain extent. The effect of choline acetate is consistent with that predicted based on Hofmeister series.

  6. No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults.

    PubMed

    Lippelt, D P; van der Kint, S; van Herk, K; Naber, M

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0-2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The null hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants.

  7. No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lippelt, D. P.; van der Kint, S.; van Herk, K.; Naber, M.

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0–2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The null hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants. PMID:27341028

  8. ELUCIDATION OF HUMAN CHOLINE KINASE CRYSTAL STRUCTURES IN COMPLEX WITH THE PRODUCTS ADP OR PHOSPHOCHOLINE

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Sekulic, Nikolina; Too, Wei Cun See; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2006-01-01

    Summary Choline kinase, responsible for the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine as the first step of the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, has been recognized as a new target for anticancer therapy. Crystal structures of human choline kinase in its apo, ADP- and phosphocholine-bound complexes, respectively, reveal the molecular details of the substrate binding sites. ATP binds in a cavity where residues from both the N- and C-terminal lobes contribute to form a cleft, while the choline-binding site constitutes a deep hydrophobic groove in the C-terminal domain with a rim composed of negatively charged residues. Upon binding of choline, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes independently affecting the N-terminal domain and the ATP-binding loop. From this structural analysis and comparison with other kinases, and from mutagenesis data on the homologous C. elegans choline kinase, a model of the ternary ADP·Phosphocholine complex was built that reveals the molecular basis for the phosphoryl transfer activity of this enzyme. PMID:17007874

  9. Dietary CDP-choline supplementation prevents memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Teather, Lisa A; Wurtman, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    We previously showed that dietary cytidine (5')-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) supplementation could protect against the development of memory deficits in aging rats. In the present study, younger rats exposed to impoverished environmental conditions and manifesting hippocampal-dependent memory impairments similar to those observed in the aging rodents were given CDP-choline, and its effects on this cognitive deficit were assessed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats reared for 3 mo in impoverished (IC) or enriched environmental (EC) conditions concurrently received either a control diet or a diet supplemented with CDP-choline (approximately 500 mg/kg/d). After 3 mo, rats were trained to perform spatial and cued versions of the Morris water maze, and their rates of acquisition and retention were compared. Impoverished rats exhibited a selective deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory which could be ameliorated by feeding them CDP-choline. The CDP-choline had no memory-enhancing effect in enriched rats, nor did it prevent the memory impairment of impoverished rats if the animals consumed it for the initial or final months instead of for the entire 3-mo period. These findings indicate that long-term dietary CDP-choline supplementation can ameliorate the hippocampal-dependent memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats, and suggest that its actions result, in part, from a long-term effect such as enhanced membrane phosphatide synthesis, an effect shown to require long-term dietary supplementation with CDP-choline.

  10. Dietary CDP-choline supplementation prevents memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Teather, Lisa A.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    We previously showed that dietary cytidine (5′)-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) supplementation could protect against the development of memory deficits in aging rats. In the present study, younger rats exposed to impoverished environmental conditions and manifesting hippocampal-dependent memory impairments similar to those observed in the aging rodents were given CDP-choline, and its effects on this cognitive deficit were assessed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats reared for 3 mo in impoverished (IC) or enriched environmental (EC) conditions concurrently received either a control diet or a diet supplemented with CDP-choline (∼500 mg/kg/d). After 3 mo, rats were trained to perform spatial and cued versions of the Morris water maze, and their rates of acquisition and retention were compared. Impoverished rats exhibited a selective deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory which could be ameliorated by feeding them CDP-choline. The CDP-choline had no memory-enhancing effect in enriched rats, nor did it prevent the memory impairment of impoverished rats if the animals consumed it for the initial or final months instead of for the entire 3-mo period. These findings indicate that long-term dietary CDP-choline supplementation can ameliorate the hippocampal-dependent memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats, and suggest that its actions result, in part, from a long-term effect such as enhanced membrane phosphatide synthesis, an effect shown to require long-term dietary supplementation with CDP-choline. PMID:15647594

  11. Anaerobic choline metabolism in microcompartments promotes growth and swarming of P roteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Eleanor; Fu, Tiantian; Brown, Ian R.; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Purdy, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gammaproteobacteria are important gut microbes but only persist at low levels in the healthy gut. The ecology of G ammaproteobacteria in the gut environment is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that choline is an important growth substrate for representatives of G ammaproteobacteria. Using P roteus mirabilis as a model, we investigate the role of choline metabolism and demonstrate that the cut C gene, encoding a choline‐trimethylamine lyase, is essential for choline degradation to trimethylamine by targeted mutagenesis of cut C and subsequent complementation experiments. P roteus mirabilis can rapidly utilize choline to enhance growth rate and cell yield in broth culture. Importantly, choline also enhances swarming‐associated colony expansion of P . mirabilis under anaerobic conditions on a solid surface. Comparative transcriptomics demonstrated that choline not only induces choline‐trimethylamine lyase but also genes encoding shell proteins for the formation of bacterial microcompartments. Subsequent analyses by transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of such novel microcompartments in cells cultivated in liquid broth and hyper‐flagellated swarmer cells from solid medium. Together, our study reveals choline metabolism as an adaptation strategy for P . mirabilis and contributes to better understand the ecology of this bacterium in health and disease. PMID:26404097

  12. Dietary Intake and Plasma Levels of Choline and Betaine in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Joanna C.; Melnyk, Stepan; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Starrett, William; Crook, Tina A.; James, S. Jill

    2013-01-01

    Abnormalities in folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism have been reported in many children with autism. Because inadequate choline and betaine can negatively affect folate metabolism and in turn downstream methylation and antioxidant capacity, we sought to determine whether dietary intake of choline and betaine in children with autism was adequate to meet nutritional needs based on national recommendations. Three-day food records were analyzed for 288 children with autism (ASDs) who participated in the national Autism Intervention Research Network for Physical Health (AIR-P) Study on Diet and Nutrition in children with autism. Plasma concentrations of choline and betaine were measured in a subgroup of 35 children with ASDs and 32 age-matched control children. The results indicated that 60–93% of children with ASDs were consuming less than the recommended Adequate Intake (AI) for choline. Strong positive correlations were found between dietary intake and plasma concentrations of choline and betaine in autistic children as well as lower plasma concentrations compared to the control group. We conclude that choline and betaine intake is inadequate in a significant subgroup of children with ASDs and is reflected in lower plasma levels. Inadequate intake of choline and betaine may contribute to the metabolic abnormalities observed in many children with autism and warrants attention in nutritional counseling. PMID:24396597

  13. 1H- 14N HSQC detection of choline-containing compounds in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiezhen; Jiang, Ling; Jiang, Bin; Liu, Maili; Mao, Xi-an

    2010-09-01

    Choline nitrogen ( 14N) has a long relaxation time (seconds) which is due to the highly symmetric chemical environments. 14N in choline also has coupling constants with protons (0.6 Hz to methyl protons, 2.7 Hz to CH 2O protons and 0.2 Hz to NCH 2 protons). Based on these properties, we introduce a two-dimensional NMR method to detect choline and its derivatives in solutions. This method is the 1H- 14N hetero-nuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) experiment which has been developed in solid-state NMR in recent years. Experiments have demonstrated that the 1H- 14N HSQC technique is a sensitive method for detection of choline-containing compounds in solutions. From 1 mM choline solution in 16 min on a 500 MHz NMR spectrometer, a 1H- 14N HSQC spectrum has been recorded with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1700. Free choline, phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine in milk can be well separated in 1H- 14N HSQC spectra. This technique would become a promising analytical approach to mixture analyses where choline-containing compounds are of interest, such as tissue extracts, body fluids and food solutions.

  14. Acute toxicity assessment of choline by inhalation, intraperitoneal and oral routes in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit Kumar; Arora, Naveen; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Singh, Bhanu Pratap

    2009-08-01

    Studies suggest that choline has potential to be used as a dietary supplement and a drug for immune inflammatory diseases like asthma and rhinitis. But there are apprehensions regarding adverse effects of choline when given orally in high doses. To address this knowledge gap, toxicity assessment of choline chloride was carried out by intranasal (i.n.), oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes in Balb/c mice for 28days. Body weight, food and water consumption of mice were recorded daily. Hematology and clinical chemistry were assessed to check hepatocellular functions and morphological alterations of the cells. Splenocyte counts were analysed for evaluating cellular immunity. Liver function test was performed by assaying different enzyme systems in serum such as, urea, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Body weight, food and water consumption did not differ between mice treated with choline and the saline control group. Hematologic and biochemical variables were not affected with any increase in serum toxicity marker enzymes indicating normal liver functioning. Choline administration did not affect total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein levels as compared to their respective controls. Urea and blood urea nitrogen levels in choline treated mice were not different than controls. Creatinine level was, however, higher than control in i.p. treatment group, but other parameters were normal. In conclusion, the repeated consumption of choline chloride via i.n. and oral or i.p. routes did not cause toxicity in mice in the toxicological endpoints examined.

  15. Choline and betaine consumption lowers cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shanwen; Li, Xiao; Ren, Anjing; Du, Mulong; Du, Haina; Shu, Yongqian; Zhu, Lingjun; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A number of human and animal in vitro or in vivo studies have investigated the relationship between dietary choline and betaine and cancer risk, suggesting that choline and betaine consumption may be protective for cancer. There are also a few epidemiologic studies exploring this relationship, however, with inconsistent conclusions. The PubMed and Embase were searched, from their inception to March 2016, to identify relevant studies and we brought 11 articles into this meta-analysis eventually. The pooled relative risks (RRs) of cancer for the highest versus the lowest range were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97) for choline consumption only, 0.86 (95%CI, 0.76 to 0.97) for betaine consumption only and 0.60 (95%CI, 0.40 to 0.90) for choline plus betaine consumption, respectively. Significant protective effect of dietary choline and betaine for cancer was observed when stratified by study design, location, cancer type, publication year, sex and quality score of study. An increment of 100 mg/day of choline plus betaine intake helped reduce cancer incidence by 11% (0.89, 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.92) through a dose-response analysis. To conclude, choline and betaine consumption lowers cancer incidence in this meta-analysis, but further studies are warranted to verify the results. PMID:27759060

  16. Synthesis of acetylcholine from choline derived from phosphatidylcholine in a human neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Blusztajn, J.K.; Liscovitch, M.; Richardson, U.I.

    1987-08-01

    Cholinergic neurons are unique among cells since they alone utilize choline not only as a component of major membrane phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine (Ptd-Cho), but also as a precursor of their neurotransmitter acetylcholine (AcCho). It has been hypothesized that choline-phospholipids might serve as a storage pool of choline for AcCho synthesis. The selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons in certain neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer disease, motor neuron disorders) might result from the abnormally accelerated liberation of choline (to be used a precursor of AcCho) from membrane phospholipids, resulting in altered membrane composition and function and compromised neuronal viability. However, the proposed metabolic link between membrane turnover and AcCho synthesis has been difficult to demonstrate because of the heterogeneity of the preparations used. Here the authors used a population of purely cholinergic cells (human neuroblastomas, LA-N-2), incubated in the presence of (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine to selectively label PtdCho synthesized by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine, the only pathway of de novo choline synthesis. Three peaks of radioactive material that cochromatographed with authentic AcCho, choline, and phosphocholine were observed when the water-soluble metabolites of the (/sup 3/H)PtdCho were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results demonstrate that AcCho can be synthesized from choline derived from the degradation of endogenous PtdCho formed de novo by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine.

  17. Choline supplementation in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders has high feasibility and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Jeffrey R; Fuglestad, Anita J; Eckerle, Judith K; Kroupina, Maria G; Miller, Neely C; Boys, Christopher J; Brearley, Ann M; Fink, Birgit A; Hoecker, Heather L; Zeisel, Steven H; Georgieff, Michael K

    2013-11-01

    There are no biological treatments for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), lifelong conditions associated with physical anomalies, brain damage, and neurocognitive abnormalities. In preclinical studies, choline partially ameliorates memory and learning deficits from prenatal alcohol exposure. This phase I pilot study evaluated the feasibility, tolerability, and potential adverse effects of choline supplementation in children with FASD. We hypothesized that choline would be well tolerated with minimal adverse events. The study design was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants included 20 children aged 2.5 to 4.9 years with prenatal alcohol exposure and FASD diagnoses. Participants were randomly assigned to 500 mg choline or placebo daily for 9 months (10 active, 10 placebo). Primary outcome measures included feasibility, tolerability, adverse effects, and serum choline levels. Seventeen participants completed the study. Compliance was 82% to 87%, as evidenced by parent-completed log sheets and dose counts. Periodic 24-hour dietary recalls showed no evidence of dietary confounding. Adverse events were minimal and were equivalent in the active and placebo arms with the exception of fishy body odor, which occurred only in the active group. There were no serious adverse events to research participants. This phase I pilot study demonstrates that choline supplementation at 500 mg/d for 9 months in children aged 2 to 5 years is feasible and has high tolerability. Further examination of the efficacy of choline supplementation in FASD is currently underway. © 2013.

  18. Behavioural effects of chronic manipulations of dietary choline in senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Fundaro, A; Paschero, A

    1990-01-01

    1. Senescent rats were maintained on choline-deficient and choline-enriched diets. The modifications in rat behaviour caused by the chronic manipulations of dietary choline were studied in two schedules of operant conditioning. 2. In the "periodic conditioning" test, the schedule of reinforcement, in a 100 min trial, was changed from a fixed ratio to a fixed interval schedule. In the "reversal" test the contingency for food delivery was switched four times from one lever to the other in a two lever Skinner box. 3. In the "periodic conditioning" test, the choline enriched group (430 mg/Kg/day) showed the same reduction of responses/reinforcement as controls, from the beginning to the end of trial; in the same group the time course reduction of responses/reinforcement became significant earlier than in the control group. The deficient-choline group in the last 40 min of "periodic conditioning" trial gave a reduction of responses/reinforcement greater than controls and one rat in the group did not learn the change of experimental schedule and extinguished its operant behaviour. 4. In the "reversal" test, the choline-enriched diet (320 mg/Kg/day) improved the reinforced responses in the IV reversal; one rat of the deficient-choline group could not learn the new operant schedule since the first reversal and continued to respond on the same lever during the whole of the test.

  19. Interaction between cytotoxic effects of gamma-radiation and folate deficiency in relation to choline reserves.

    PubMed

    Batra, Vipen; Devasagayam, Thomas Paul Asir

    2009-01-08

    The search for non-toxic radio-protective drugs has yielded many potential agents but most of these compounds have certain amount of toxicity. Recent studies have indicated that bio-molecules such as folate and choline might be of radio-protective value as they are, within broad dose ranges, non-toxic to humans and experimental animals. The objective of the present study was to investigate choline dependent adaptive response to potential synergistic cytotoxic effect of folate deficiency and gamma-radiation. Male Swiss mice maintained on folate sufficient diet (FSD) and folate free diet (FFD) based on AIN-93M formula, were subjected to 1-4Gy total body gamma-irradiation. To investigate liver DNA damage, apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) were quantified. A significant increase in liver DNA AP sites with concomitant depletion of liver choline reserves was observed when gamma-radiation was combined with folate deficiency. Further work in this direction suggested that cytotoxic interaction between folate deficiency and gamma radiation might induce utilization of choline and choline containing moieties by modifying levels of key regulatory enzymes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and choline oxidase (ChoOx). Another major finding of these studies is that significant liver damage at higher doses of radiation (3-4Gy), might release considerable amounts of choline reserves to serum. In conclusion, a plausible interpretation of the present studies is that folate deprivation and gamma-radiation interact to mobilize additional choline reserves of hepatic tissue, for redistribution to other organs, which could not be utilized by folate deficiency alone. Present results clearly indicated a distinct choline pool in liver and kidney tissues that could be utilized by folate deficient animals only under radiation stress conditions.

  20. Supplemental dietary choline during development exerts antidepressant-like effects in adult female rats

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Melissa J.; Adams, Raven S.; McClurg, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal choline supplementation in rats is neuroprotective against insults such as fetal alcohol exposure, seizures, and advanced age. In the present study we explored whether dietary choline supplementation may also confer protection from psychological challenges, like stress, and act as a natural buffer against stress-linked psychological disorders, like depression. We previously found that choline supplementation increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a function compromised by stress, lowered in depression, and boosted by antidepressants; and increased levels of growth factors linked to depression, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Together, these were compelling reasons to study the role of choline in depressed mood. To do this, we treated rats with a choline supplemented diet (5 mg/kg choline chloride in AIN76A) prenatally on embryonic days 10–22, on postnatal days (PD) 25–50, or as adults from PD75 onward. Outside of these treatment periods rats were fed a standard diet (1.1 mg/kg choline chloride in AIN76A); control rats consumed only this diet throughout the study. Starting on PD100 rats’ anxiety-like responses to an open field, learning in a water maze, and reactivity to forced swimming were assessed. Rats given choline supplementation during pre- or post-natal development, but not adult-treated rats, were less anxious in the open field and less immobile in the forced swim test than control rats. These effects were not mediated by a learning deficit as all groups performed comparably and well in the water maze. Thus, we offer compelling support for the hypothesis that supplemental dietary choline, at least when given during development, may inoculate an individual against stress and major psychological disorders, like depression. PMID:22305146

  1. Supplemental dietary choline during development exerts antidepressant-like effects in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Melissa J; Adams, Raven S; McClurg, Lauren

    2012-03-14

    Perinatal choline supplementation in rats is neuroprotective against insults such as fetal alcohol exposure, seizures, and advanced age. In the present study we explored whether dietary choline supplementation may also confer protection from psychological challenges, like stress, and act as a natural buffer against stress-linked psychological disorders, like depression. We previously found that choline supplementation increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a function compromised by stress, lowered in depression, and boosted by antidepressants; and increased levels of growth factors linked to depression, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Together, these were compelling reasons to study the role of choline in depressed mood. To do this, we treated rats with a choline supplemented diet (5 mg/kg choline chloride in AIN76A) prenatally on embryonic days 10-22, on postnatal days (PD) 25-50, or as adults from PD75 onward. Outside of these treatment periods rats were fed a standard diet (1.1 mg/kg choline chloride in AIN76A); control rats consumed only this diet throughout the study. Starting on PD100 rats' anxiety-like responses to an open field, learning in a water maze, and reactivity to forced swimming were assessed. Rats given choline supplementation during pre- or post-natal development, but not adult-treated rats, were less anxious in the open field and less immobile in the forced swim test than control rats. These effects were not mediated by a learning deficit as all groups performed comparably and well in the water maze. Thus, we offer compelling support for the hypothesis that supplemental dietary choline, at least when given during development, may inoculate an individual against stress and major psychological disorders, like depression.

  2. Association between composition of the human gastrointestinal microbiome and development of fatty liver with choline deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Melanie D.; Hamp, Timothy J.; Reid, Robert W.; Fischer, Leslie M.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Fodor, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease affects up to 30% of the U.S. population, but the mechanisms underlying this condition are incompletely understood. We investigated how diet standardization and choline deficiency influence the composition of the microbial community in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the development of fatty liver under conditions of choline deficiency. METHODS We performed a 2-month in-patient study of 15 female subjects who were placed on well-controlled diets in which choline levels were manipulated. We used 454-FLX pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA bacterial genes to characterize microbiota in stool samples collected over the course of the study. RESULTS The compositions of the GI microbial communities changed with choline levels of diets; each individual’s microbiome remained distinct for the duration of the experiment, even though all subjects were fed identical diets. Variations between subjects in levels of Gammaproteobacteria and Erysipelotrichi were directly associated with changes in liver fat in each subject during choline depletion. Levels of these bacteria, change in amount of liver fat, and a single nucleotide polymorphism that affects choline were combined into a model that accurately predicted the degree to which subjects developed fatty liver on a choline-deficient diet. CONCLUSIONS Host factors and GI bacteria each respond to dietary choline deficiency, although the gut microbiota remains distinct in each individual. We identified bacterial biomarkers of fatty liver that results from choline deficiency, adding to the accumulating evidence that GI microbes have a role in metabolic disorders. PMID:21129376

  3. Choline requirements of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 days of age.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z G; Tang, J; Hou, S S; Guo, Y M; Huang, W; Xie, M

    2014-12-01

    A dose-response experiment with 8 dietary choline levels (302, 496, 778, 990, 1,182, 1,414, 1,625, and 1,832 mg/kg) was conducted with male White Pekin ducks to estimate the choline requirement from hatch to 21 d of age. Three hundred eighty-four 1-d-old male White Pekin ducks were randomly assigned to 8 dietary treatments, each containing 6 replicate pens with 8 birds per pen. At 21 d of age, weight gain, feed intake, and feed/gain from each pen were calculated for feeding period, and 2 ducks selected randomly from each pen were euthanized and the liver was collected to determine total lipids, triglycerides, and phospholipids. In our study, perosis, poor growth, and high liver fat were all observed in choline-deficient ducks and incidence of perosis was zero when dietary choline was 1,182 mg/kg. As dietary choline increased, the weight gain and feed intake increased linearly or quadratically (P < 0.05). On the other hand, as dietary choline increased, the total lipid and triglyceride in liver decreased linearly and liver phospholipid increased linearly (P < 0.05), and the lipotropic activity of choline may be associated with increasing phospholipid at a high dietary choline level. According to broken-line regression, the choline requirements for weight gain and feed intake were 810 and 823 mg/kg, respectively, but higher requirement should be considered to prevent perosis and excess liver lipid deposition completely. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Choline and Betaine Intake and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Chinese Population: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhong, Xiao; Zheng, Mei-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the association of choline and betaine intake with colorectal cancer risk, although they might play an important role in colorectal cancer development because of their role as methyl donors. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between consumption of choline and betaine and colorectal cancer risk in a Chinese population. Methodology/Principal Findings A case-control study was conducted between July 2010 and December 2013 in Guangzhou, China. Eight hundred and ninety consecutively recruited colorectal cancer cases were frequency matched to 890 controls by age (5-year interval) and sex. Dietary information was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire by face-to-face interviews. The logistic regression model was used to estimate multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Total choline intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk after adjustment for various lifestyle and dietary factors. The multivariate-adjusted OR was 0.54 (95%CI = 0.37-0.80, Ptrend <0.01) comparing the highest with the lowest quartile. No significant associations were observed for betaine or total choline+betaine intakes. For choline-containing compounds, lower colorectal cancer risk was associated with higher intakes of choline from phosphatidylcholine, glycerophosphocholine and sphingomyelin but not for free choline and phosphocholine. The inverse association of total choline intake with colorectal cancer risk was observed in both men and women, colon and rectal cancer. These inverse associations were not modified by folate intake. Conclusions These results indicate that high intake of total choline is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:25785727

  5. Metabolic imprinting of choline by its availability during gestation: implications for memory and attentional processing across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Meck, Warren H; Williams, Christina L

    2003-09-01

    A growing body of research supports the view that choline is an essential nutrient during early development that has long-lasting effects on memory and attentional processes throughout the lifespan. This review describes the known effects of alterations in dietary choline availability both in adulthood and during early development. Although modest effects of choline on cognitive processes have been reported when choline is administered to adult animals, we have found that the perinatal period is a critical time for cholinergic organization of brain function. Choline supplementation during this period increases memory capacity and precision of the young adult and appears to prevent age-related memory and attentional decline. Deprivation of choline during early development leads to compromised cognitive function and increased decline with age. We propose that this organizational effect of choline availability may be due to relatively permanent alterations in the functioning of the cholinergic synapse, which we have called 'metabolic imprinting'.

  6. Dynamic model of flexible phytoplankton nutrient uptake

    PubMed Central

    Bonachela, Juan A.; Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic machinery of marine microbes can be remarkably plastic, allowing organisms to persist under extreme nutrient limitation. With some exceptions, most theoretical approaches to nutrient uptake in phytoplankton are largely dominated by the classic Michaelis–Menten (MM) uptake functional form, whose constant parameters cannot account for the observed plasticity in the uptake apparatus. Following seminal ideas by earlier researchers, we propose a simple cell-level model based on a dynamic view of the uptake process whereby the cell can regulate the synthesis of uptake proteins in response to changes in both internal and external nutrient concentrations. In our flexible approach, the maximum uptake rate and nutrient affinity increase monotonically as the external nutrient concentration decreases. For low to medium nutrient availability, our model predicts uptake and growth rates larger than the classic MM counterparts, while matching the classic MM results for large nutrient concentrations. These results have important consequences for global coupled models of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry, which lack this regulatory mechanism and are thus likely to underestimate phytoplankton abundances and growth rates in oligotrophic regions of the ocean. PMID:22143781

  7. Effects of Dietary Methionine Levels on Choline Requirements of Starter White Pekin Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Z. G.; Tang, J.; Xie, M.; Yang, P. L.; Hou, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    A 2×5 factorial experiment, using 2 dietary methionine levels (0.28% and 0.48%) and 5 dietary choline levels (0, 394, 823, 1,239, and 1,743 mg/kg), was conducted to study the effects of dietary methionine status on choline requirements of starter white Pekin ducks from 7 to 28 days of age. Four hundred eighty 7-d-old male White Pekin ducks were randomly allotted to ten dietary treatments, each containing 6 replicate pens with 8 birds per pen. At 28 d of age, weight gain, feed intake, and feed/gain were measured and the legs of all ducks from each pen were examined for incidence of perosis. Perosis and growth depression were observed in choline-deficient ducks and supplementation of choline reduced perosis and significantly increased weight gain and feed intake regardless of dietary methionine levels (p<0.05). In addition, significant positive effects of dietary methionine supplementation on weight gain, feed intake, and feed/gain were observed at any choline level (p<0.05). Supplementation of 1,743 mg/kg choline in diets alleviated the depression of weight gain and feed intake caused by methionine deficiency at 0.28% methionine level. The interaction between choline and methionine influenced weight gain and feed intake of ducks (p<0.05). At 0.28% methionine level, 1,743 mg/kg choline group caused 4.92% and 3.23% amount of improvement in weight gain and feed intake compared with 1,239 mg/kg choline group, respectively. According to the broken-line regression, the choline requirements of starter Pekin ducks for weight gain and feed intake were 1,472 and 1,424 mg/kg at 0.28% methionine level and 946 and 907 mg/kg at 0.48% methionine level, respectively. It suggested the choline recommendations of starter Pekin ducks on a semi-purified diet were 1448 mg/kg at 0.28% methionine level and 927 mg/kg at 0.48% methionine level, respectively. Compared with the adequate methionine level, menthionine deficiency markedly increased the choline requirements of ducks. PMID

  8. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using {sup 11}C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J.; Anderson, Nigel J.; Scott, Andrew M.; Davis, Ian D.; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Khoo, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had {sup 11}C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub 60%} and SUV{sub 70%}). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN{sub 78}, which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN{sub 78-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy; and PLAN{sub 72-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP{sub PET}) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP{sub path}), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP{sub PET} values for PLAN{sub 78}, PLAN{sub 78-90}, and PLAN{sub 72-90} were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP{sub path} values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} had significantly higher TCP{sub PET} (P=.002 and .001) and TCP{sub path} (P<.001 and .014) values than PLAN{sub 78}. PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} were not significantly different in terms of TCP{sub PET} or TCP{sub path}. There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for

  9. A pH and thermosensitive choline phosphate-based delivery platform targeted to the acidic tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xifei; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Horte, Sonja; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Brooks, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors generally exhibit an acidic microenvironment which has been recognized as a potential route to distinguishing tumor from normal tissue for purposes of drug delivery or imaging. To this end we describe a pH and temperature sensitive polymeric adhesive that can be derivatized to carry drugs or other agents and can be tuned synthetically to bind to tumor cells at pH 6.8 but not at pH 7.4 at 37 °C. The adhesive is based on the universal reaction between membrane phosphatidyl choline (PC) molecules and polymers derivatized with multiple copies of the inverse motif, choline phosphate (CP). The polymer family we use is a linear copolymer of a CP terminated tetraethoxymethacrylate and dimethylaminoethyl (DMAE) methacrylate, the latter providing pH sensitivity. The copolymer exhibits a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) just below 37 °C when the DMAE is uncharged at pH 7.4 but the LCST does not occur when the group is charged at pH 6.8 due to the ionization hydrophilicity. At 37 °C the polymer binds strongly to mammalian cells at pH 6.8 but does not bind at pH 7.4, potentially targeting tumor cells existing in an acidic microenvironment. We show the binding is strong, reversible if the pH is raised and is followed rapidly by cellular uptake of the fluorescently labeled material. Drug delivery utilizing this dually responsive family of polymers should provide a basis for targeting tumor cells with minimal side reactions against untransformed counterparts.

  10. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammelgaard, Bente; Furger, Evelyne; Alberto, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-) and H2O, respectively), were included as control samples. The results indicated that B12 derivatives delivered cisplatin to both cellular cytosol and nuclei with an efficiency of one third compared to the uptake of free cisplatin cis-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)2]. In addition, uptake of charged B12 derivatives including [Cbl-OH2](+), [{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), [{Re}-{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), and [{Co}-CN-{trans-Pt(Cyt)(NH3)2}](2+) (Cyt = cytarabin) was high compared to neutral B12, which implied the existence of an additional internalization pathway for charged B12 vitamin analogs. The affinities of the charged B12 derivatives to the B12 transporters HC, IF and TC were similar to that of native vitamin B12.

  11. Hepatic effects of a methionine-choline-deficient diet in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Y.-J.Y.

    2009-01-15

    Retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXR{alpha} deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null (H-RXR{alpha}-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid {beta}-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXR{alpha}-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXR{alpha} in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury.

  12. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  13. MTHFR C677T genotype influences the isotopic enrichment of one-carbon metabolites in folate-compromised men consuming d9-choline123

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Gregory, Jesse F; Malysheva, Olga; Brenna, J Thomas; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Homozygosity for the variant 677T allele in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene increases the requirement for folate and may alter the metabolic use of choline. The choline adequate intake is 550 mg/d for men, although the metabolic consequences of consuming extra choline are unclear. Objective: Deuterium-labeled choline (d9-choline) as tracer was used to determine the differential effects of the MTHFR C677T genotype and the effect of various choline intakes on the isotopic enrichment of choline derivatives in folate-compromised men. Design: Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or 677TT genotype consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline chloride for total choline intakes of 550 (n = 11; 4 with 677CC and 7 with 677TT) or 1100 (n = 12; 4 with 677CC and 8 with 677TT) mg/d for 12 wk. During the last 3 wk, 15% of the total choline intake was provided as d9-choline. Results: Low but measurable enrichments of the choline metabolites were achieved, including that of d3-phosphatidylcholine (d3-PtdCho)—a metabolite produced in the de novo pathway via choline-derived methyl groups. Men with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had a higher urinary enrichment ratio of betaine to choline (P = 0.041), a higher urinary enrichment of sarcosine (P = 0.041), and a greater plasma enrichment ratio of d9-betaine to d9-PtdCho with the 1100 mg choline/d intake (P = 0.033). Conclusion: These data show for the first time in humans that choline itself is a source of methyl groups for de novo PtdCho biosynthesis and indicate that the MTHFR 677TT genotype favors the use of choline as a methyl donor. PMID:21123458

  14. MTHFR C677T genotype influences the isotopic enrichment of one-carbon metabolites in folate-compromised men consuming d9-choline.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Gregory, Jesse F; Malysheva, Olga; Brenna, J Thomas; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2011-02-01

    Homozygosity for the variant 677T allele in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene increases the requirement for folate and may alter the metabolic use of choline. The choline adequate intake is 550 mg/d for men, although the metabolic consequences of consuming extra choline are unclear. Deuterium-labeled choline (d9-choline) as tracer was used to determine the differential effects of the MTHFR C677T genotype and the effect of various choline intakes on the isotopic enrichment of choline derivatives in folate-compromised men. Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or 677TT genotype consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline chloride for total choline intakes of 550 (n = 11; 4 with 677CC and 7 with 677TT) or 1100 (n = 12; 4 with 677CC and 8 with 677TT) mg/d for 12 wk. During the last 3 wk, 15% of the total choline intake was provided as d9-choline. Low but measurable enrichments of the choline metabolites were achieved, including that of d3-phosphatidylcholine (d3-PtdCho)--a metabolite produced in the de novo pathway via choline-derived methyl groups. Men with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had a higher urinary enrichment ratio of betaine to choline (P = 0.041), a higher urinary enrichment of sarcosine (P = 0.041), and a greater plasma enrichment ratio of d9-betaine to d9-PtdCho with the 1100 mg choline/d intake (P = 0.033). These data show for the first time in humans that choline itself is a source of methyl groups for de novo PtdCho biosynthesis and indicate that the MTHFR 677TT genotype favors the use of choline as a methyl donor.

  15. Methionine and choline regulate the metabolic phenotype of a ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Pissios, Pavlos; Hong, Shangyu; Kennedy, Adam Richard; Prasad, Deepthi; Liu, Fen-Fen; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets are commonly used as weight loss alternatives to low-fat diets, however the physiological and molecular adaptations to these diets are not completely understood. It is assumed that the metabolic phenotype of the ketogenic diet (KD) is caused by the absence of carbohydrate and high fat content, however in rodents the protein content of KD affects weight gain and ketosis. In this study we examined the role of methionine and choline in mediating the metabolic effects of KD. We have found that choline was more effective than methionine in decreasing the liver steatosis of KD-fed mice. On the other hand, methionine supplementation was more effective than choline in restoring weight gain and normalizing the expression of several fatty acid and inflammatory genes in the liver of KD-fed mice. Our results indicate that choline and methionine restriction rather than carbohydrate restriction underlies many of the metabolic effects of KD.

  16. Hydrogen bonding. Part 20. Infrared study of the high temperature β-form of choline chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Avci, Günsel F.

    1986-02-01

    Infrared spectral studies of β-choline chloride at 95°C clearly demonstrate the presence of OH … Cl hydrogen bonding. This observation contradicts an earlier conclusion, based on X-ray structural studies, that such hydrogen bonding could not occur in this high-temperature form of choline chloride. A moderate reinterpretation of the X-ray data may reconcile these contradictory conclusions. Unlike α-choline chloride, β-choline chloride does not show CH … Cl hydrogen bonding. It is possible that loss of CH … Cl hydrogen bonding is a factor in the marked difference in radiation sensitivity of the α- and β-forms.

  17. Choline metabolism as a basis for the selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The unique propensity of cholinergic neurons to use choline for two purposes--ACh and membrane phosphatidylcholine synthesis--may contribute to their selective vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease and other cholinergic neurodegenerative disorders. When physiologically active, the neurons use free choline taken from the 'reservoir' in membrane phosphatidylcholine to synthesize ACh; this can lead to an actual decrease in the quantity of membrane per cell. Alzheimer's disease (but not Down's syndrome, or other neurodegenerative disorders) is associated with characteristic neurochemical lesions involving choline and ethanolamine: brain levels of these compounds are diminished, while those of glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine (breakdown products of their respective membrane phosphatides) are increased, both in cholinergic and noncholinergic brain regions. Perhaps this metabolic disturbance and the tendency of cholinergic neurons to 'export' choline--in the form of ACh--underlie the selective vulnerability of the neurons. Resulting changes in membrane composition could abnormally expose intramembraneous proteins such as amyloid precursor protein to proteases.

  18. Choline metabolism as a basis for the selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The unique propensity of cholinergic neurons to use choline for two purposes--ACh and membrane phosphatidylcholine synthesis--may contribute to their selective vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease and other cholinergic neurodegenerative disorders. When physiologically active, the neurons use free choline taken from the 'reservoir' in membrane phosphatidylcholine to synthesize ACh; this can lead to an actual decrease in the quantity of membrane per cell. Alzheimer's disease (but not Down's syndrome, or other neurodegenerative disorders) is associated with characteristic neurochemical lesions involving choline and ethanolamine: brain levels of these compounds are diminished, while those of glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine (breakdown products of their respective membrane phosphatides) are increased, both in cholinergic and noncholinergic brain regions. Perhaps this metabolic disturbance and the tendency of cholinergic neurons to 'export' choline--in the form of ACh--underlie the selective vulnerability of the neurons. Resulting changes in membrane composition could abnormally expose intramembraneous proteins such as amyloid precursor protein to proteases.

  19. 75 FR 53577 - Choline hydroxide; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...-operation and Development (OECD) due to its caustic nature (pH 14), acute toxicity testing of choline hydroxide would not be appropriate (OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals, Procedure 404 (2002); OECD...

  20. Prenatal choline supplementation mitigates the adverse effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on development in rats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer D; Abou, Elizabeth J; Dominguez, Hector D

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to a range of physical, neurological, and behavioral alterations referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Variability in outcome observed among children with FASD is likely related to various pre- and postnatal factors, including nutritional variables. Choline is an essential nutrient that influences brain and behavioral development. Recent animal research indicates that prenatal choline supplementation leads to long-lasting cognitive enhancement, as well as changes in brain morphology, electrophysiology and neurochemistry. The present study examined whether choline supplementation during ethanol exposure effectively reduces fetal alcohol effects. Pregnant dams were exposed to 6.0g/kg/day ethanol via intubation from gestational days (GD) 5-20; pair-fed and lab chow controls were included. During treatment, subjects from each group received choline chloride (250mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Physical development and behavioral development (righting reflex, geotactic reflex, cliff avoidance, reflex suspension and hindlimb coordination) were examined. Subjects prenatally exposed to alcohol exhibited reduced birth weight and brain weight, delays in eye opening and incisor emergence, and alterations in the development of all behaviors. Choline supplementation significantly attenuated ethanol's effects on birth and brain weight, incisor emergence, and most behavioral measures. In fact, behavioral performance of ethanol-exposed subjects treated with choline did not differ from that of controls. Importantly, choline supplementation did not influence peak blood alcohol level or metabolism, indicating that choline's effects were not due to differential alcohol exposure. These data indicate early dietary supplements may reduce the severity of some fetal alcohol effects, findings with important implications for children of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy.

  1. Choline ameliorates cardiovascular damage by improving vagal activity and inhibiting the inflammatory response in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Longzhu; Lu, Yi; Bi, Xueyuan; Xu, Man; Yu, Xiaojiang; Xue, Runqing; He, Xi; Zang, Weijin

    2017-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction and abnormal immunity lead to systemic inflammatory responses, which result in cardiovascular damage in hypertension. The aim of this report was to investigate the effects of choline on cardiovascular damage in hypertension. Eight-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and Wistar-Kyoto rats were intraperitoneally injected with choline or vehicle (8 mg/kg/day). After 8 weeks, choline restored the cardiac function of the SHRs, as evidenced by decreased heart rate, systolic blood pressure, left ventricle systolic pressure, and ±dp/dtmax and increased ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Choline also ameliorated the cardiac hypertrophy of the SHRs, as indicated by reduced left ventricle internal dimensions and decreased cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area. Moreover, choline improved mesenteric arterial function and preserved endothelial ultrastructure in the SHRs. Notably, the protective effect of choline may be due to its anti-inflammatory effect. Choline downregulated expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α and upregulated IL-10 in the mesenteric arteries of SHRs, possibly because of the inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4. Furthermore, choline restored baroreflex sensitivity and serum acetylcholine level in SHRs, thus indicating that choline improved vagal activity. This study suggests that choline elicits cardiovascular protective effects and may be useful as a potential adjunct therapeutic approach for hypertension. PMID:28225018

  2. Evidence for negative selection of gene variants that increase dependence on dietary choline in a Gambian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Matt J.; Corbin, Karen D.; Hellenthal, Garrett; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Moore, Sophie E.; Owen, Jennifer; Prentice, Andrew M.; Hennig, Branwen J.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient, and the amount needed in the diet is modulated by several factors. Given geographical differences in dietary choline intake and disparate frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in choline metabolism genes between ethnic groups, we tested the hypothesis that 3 SNPs that increase dependence on dietary choline would be under negative selection pressure in settings where choline intake is low: choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) rs12676, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 1 (MTHFD1) rs2236225, and phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) rs12325817. Evidence of negative selection was assessed in 2 populations: one in The Gambia, West Africa, where there is historic evidence of a choline-poor diet, and the other in the United States, with a comparatively choline-rich diet. We used 2 independent methods, and confirmation of our hypothesis was sought via a comparison with SNP data from the Maasai, an East African population with a genetic background similar to that of Gambians but with a traditional diet that is higher in choline. Our results show that frequencies of SNPs known to increase dependence on dietary choline are significantly reduced in the low-choline setting of The Gambia. Our findings suggest that adequate intake levels of choline may have to be reevaluated in different ethnic groups and highlight a possible approach for identifying novel functional SNPs under the influence of dietary selective pressure.—Silver, M. J., Corbin, K. D., Hellenthal, G., da Costa, K.-A., Dominguez-Salas, P., Moore, S. E., Owen, J., Prentice, A. M., Hennig, B. J., Zeisel, S. H. Evidence for negative selection of gene variants that increase dependence on dietary choline in a Gambian cohort. PMID:25921832

  3. Prenatal choline supplementation attenuates spatial learning deficits of offspring rats exposed to low-protein diet during fetal period.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui-Hong; Wu, Ting; Jin, Yu; Huang, Bi-Xia; Zhou, Rui-Fen; Wang, Yi-Qin; Luo, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Hui-Lian

    2016-06-01

    Prenatal intake of choline has been reported to lead to enhanced cognitive function in offspring, but little is known about the effects on spatial learning deficits. The present study examined the effects of prenatal choline supplementation on developmental low-protein exposure and its potential mechanisms. Pregnant female rats were fed either a normal or low-protein diet containing sufficient choline (1.1g/kg choline chloride) or supplemented choline (5.0g/kg choline chloride) until delivery. The Barnes maze test was performed at postnatal days 31-37. Choline and its metabolites, the synaptic structural parameters of the CA1 region in the brain of the newborn rat, were measured. The Barnes maze test demonstrated that prenatal low-protein pups had significantly greater error scale values, hole deviation scores, strategy scores and spatial search strategy and had lesser random search strategy values than normal protein pups (all P<.05). These alterations were significantly reversed by choline supplementation. Choline supplementation increased the brain levels of choline, betaine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine of newborns by 51.35% (P<.05), 33.33% (P<.001), 28.68% (P<.01) and 23.58% (P<.05), respectively, compared with the LPD group. Prenatal choline supplementation reversed the increased width of the synaptic cleft (P<.05) and decreased the curvature of the synaptic interface (P<.05) induced by a low-protein diet. Prenatal choline supplementation could attenuate the spatial learning deficits caused by prenatal protein malnutrition by increasing brain choline, betaine and phospholipids and by influencing the hippocampus structure.

  4. Serial Plasma Choline Measurements after Cardiac Arrest in Patients Undergoing Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia: A Prospective Observational Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Christian; Danne, Oliver; Ueland, Per Magne; Leithner, Christoph; Hasper, Dietrich; Schroeder, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Objective Choline is related to phospholipid metabolism and is a marker for global ischaemia with a small reference range in healthy volunteers. The aim of our study was to characterize the early kinetics of plasma free choline in patients after cardiac arrest. Additionally, we investigated the potential of plasma free choline to predict neurological outcome. Methods Twenty patients admitted to our medical intensive care unit were included in this prospective, observational trial. All patients were enrolled between May 2010 and May 2011. They received post cardiac arrest treatment including mild therapeutic hypothermia which was initiated with a combination of cold fluid and a feedback surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Sixteen blood samples per patient were analysed for plasma free choline levels within the first week after resuscitation. Choline was detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results Most patients showed elevated choline levels on admission (median 14.8 µmol/L; interquartile range; IQR 9.9-20.1) which subsequently decreased. 48 hours after cardiac arrest choline levels in all patients reached subnormal levels at a median of 4.0 µmol/L (IQR 3-4.9; p = 0.001). Subsequently, choline levels normalized within seven days. There was no significant difference in choline levels when groups were analyzed in relation to neurological outcome. Conclusions Our data indicate a choline deficiency in the early postresucitation phase. This could potentially result in impaired cell membrane recovery. The detailed characterization of the early choline time course may aid in planning of choline supplementation trials. In a limited number of patients, choline was not promising as a biomarker for outcome prediction. PMID:24098804

  5. Choline transporter hemizygosity results in diminished basal extracellular dopamine levels in nucleus accumbens and blunts dopamine elevations following cocaine or nicotine.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Dani, John A; Blakely, Randy D

    2013-10-15

    Dopamine (DA) signaling in the central nervous system mediates the addictive capacities of multiple commonly abused substances, including cocaine, amphetamine, heroin and nicotine. The firing of DA neurons residing in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the release of DA by the projections of these neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), is under tight control by cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs). The capacity for cholinergic signaling is dictated by the availability and activity of the presynaptic, high-affinity, choline transporter (CHT, SLC5A7) that acquires choline in an activity-dependent matter to sustain ACh synthesis. Here, we present evidence that a constitutive loss of CHT expression, mediated by genetic elimination of one copy of the Slc5a7 gene in mice (CHT+/-), leads to a significant reduction in basal extracellular DA levels in the NAc, as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Moreover, CHT heterozygosity results in blunted DA elevations following systemic nicotine or cocaine administration. These findings reinforce a critical role of ACh signaling capacity in both tonic and drug-modulated DA signaling and argue that genetically imposed reductions in CHT that lead to diminished DA signaling may lead to poor responses to reinforcing stimuli, possibly contributing to disorders linked to perturbed cholinergic signaling including depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  6. Quantum Chemical Insight into the Interactions and Thermodynamics Present in Choline Chloride Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Deakyne, Carol A; Baker, Gary A

    2016-07-14

    We report quantum chemical calculations performed on three popular deep eutectic solvents (DESs) in order to elucidate the molecular interactions, charge transfer interactions, and thermodynamics associated with these systems. The DESs studied comprise 1:2 choline chloride/urea (reline), 1:2 choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ethaline), and 1:1 choline chloride/malonic acid (maloline). The excellent correlation between calculated and experimental vibrational spectra allowed for identification of dominant interactions in the DES systems. The DESs were found to be stabilized by both conventional hydrogen bonds and C-H···O/C-H···π interactions between the components. The hydrogen-bonding network established in the DES is clearly distinct from that which exists within the neat hydrogen-bond donor dimer. Charge decomposition analysis indicates significant charge transfer from choline and chloride to the hydrogen-bond donor with a higher contribution from the cation, and a density of states analysis confirms the direction of the charge transfer. Consequently, the sum of the bond orders of the choline-Cl(-) interactions in the DESs correlates directly with the melting temperatures of the DESs, a correlation that offers insight into the effect of the tuning of the choline-Cl(-) interactions by the hydrogen-bond donors on the physical properties of the DESs. Finally, the differences in the vibrational entropy changes upon DES formation are consistent with the trend in the overall entropy changes upon DES formation.

  7. Effect of treatment with choline alphoscerate on hippocampus microanatomy and glial reaction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Amenta, Francesco

    2006-11-20

    The influence of long term treatment with choline alphoscerate on microanatomy of hippocampus and glial reaction was assessed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) used as an animal model of cerebrovascular disease. Choline alphoscerate is a cholinergic precursor, which has shown to be effective in countering cognitive symptoms in forms of dementia disorders of degenerative, vascular or combined origin. Male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) aged 6 months and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated for 8 weeks with an oral daily dose of 100 mg/kg of choline alphoscerate, 285 mg/kg of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) or vehicle. On the hippocampus of different animal groups, nerve cell number and GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes were assessed by neuroanatomical, immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques associated with quantitative analysis. Treatment with choline alphoscerate countered nerve cell loss and glial reaction primarily in the CA1 subfields and in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of SHR. Phosphatidylcholine did not affect hypertension-dependent changes in hippocampal microanatomy. Both compounds did not affect blood pressure values in SHR. These data suggest that choline alphoscerate may play a role in the countering hippocampal changes induced by cerebrovascular involvement. The observation that treatment with choline alphoscerate attenuates the extent of glial reaction in the hippocampus of SHR suggests also that the compound may afford neuroprotection in this animal model of vascular brain damage.

  8. Choline chloride-thiourea, a deep eutectic solvent for the production of chitin nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, Chandrakant; Mondal, Dibyendu; Sharma, Mukesh; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2014-03-15

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of the mixtures of choline halide (chloride/bromide)-urea and choline chloride-thiourea were used as solvents to prepare α-chitin nanofibers (CNFs). CNFs of diameter 20-30 nm could be obtained using the DESs comprising of the mixture of choline chloride and thiourea (CCT 1:2); however, NFs could not be obtained using the DESs having urea (CCU 1:2) as hydrogen bond donor. The physicochemical properties of thus obtained NFs were compared with those obtained using a couple of imidazolium based ionic liquids namely, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulphate [(Bmim)HSO4] and 1-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulphate [(Hmim)HSO4] as well as choline based bio-ILs namely, choline hydrogen sulphate [(Chol)HSO4] and choline acrylate. The CNFs obtained using the DES as a solvent were used to prepare calcium alginate bio-nanocomposite gel beads having enhanced elasticity in comparison to Ca-alginate beads. The bio-nanocomposite gel beads thus obtained were used to study slow release of 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer drug.

  9. Choline requirements of male White Pekin ducks from 21 to 42 d of age.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z G; Hou, S S; Tang, J; Feng, Y L; Huang, W; Guo, Y M; Xie, M

    2014-01-01

    1. A dose-response experiment with 6 dietary choline concentrations (0, 342, 779, 1285, 1662 and 1962 mg/kg) was conducted with male White Pekin ducks to estimate the choline requirement from 21 to 42 d of age. 2. Ninety 21-d-old male White Pekin ducks were allotted to 6 dietary treatments, each containing 5 replicate pens with three birds per pen. At 42 d of age, final weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed/gain were measured. Liver was collected to determine total liver lipid, triglyceride and phospholipids. 3. Significant positive effects of dietary choline on final weight, weight gain and feed intake were observed. In addition, dietary choline supplementation significantly decreased liver lipid and triglyceride content and increased liver phospholipids of Pekin ducks. 4. According to broken-line regression analysis, the choline requirements of male White Pekin ducks from 21 to 42 d of age for weight gain, feed intake and total liver lipid were 980, 950 and 1130 mg/kg. Pekin ducks needed more choline to prevent excess liver lipid deposition than to maintain growth.

  10. Choline inadequacy impairs trophoblast function and vascularization in cultured human placental trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyin; Jones, Sara; Andrew, Benjamin Y; Ganti, Anita; Malysheva, Olga V; Giallourou, Natasa; Brannon, Patsy M; Roberson, Mark S; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-08-01

    Maternal choline intake during gestation may influence placental function and fetal health outcomes. Specifically, we previously showed that supplemental choline reduced placental and maternal circulating concentrations of the anti-angiogenic factor, fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT1), in pregnant women as well as sFLT1 production in cultured human trophoblasts. The current study aimed to quantify the effect of choline on a wider array of biomarkers related to trophoblast function and to elucidate possible mechanisms. Immortalized HTR-8/SVneo trophoblasts were cultured in different choline concentrations (8, 13, and 28 µM [control]) for 96-h and markers of angiogenesis, inflammation, apoptosis, and blood vessel formation were examined. Choline insufficiency altered the angiogenic profile, impaired in vitro angiogenesis, increased inflammation, induced apoptosis, increased oxidative stress, and yielded greater levels of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms δ and ϵ possibly through increases in the PKC activators 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol and 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycerol. Notably, the addition of a PKC inhibitor normalized angiogenesis and apoptosis, and partially rescued the aberrant gene expression profile. Together these results suggest that choline inadequacy may contribute to placental dysfunction and the development of disorders related to placental insufficiency by activating PKC.

  11. Effect of CDP-choline on learning and memory processes in rodents.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Mosharrof, A H; Kehayov, R; Petkov, V V; Konstantinova, E; Getova, D

    1992-10-01

    The effects of cytidine (5') diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on learning and memory were studied using conditioned reflex methods for passive avoidance and active avoidance with punishment reinforcement (step-through, step-down, shuttle box and maze), for active avoidance with alimentary reinforcement (staircase maze), and the Morris water maze. The majority of experiments involved comparative studies of the nootropic drugs meclofenoxate and/or piracetam. CDP-choline was administered orally, in some of the experiments also intraperitoneally, at doses of 10-500 mg/kg body weight once or twice daily for 5 or 7 days. In separate cases only single doses were administered. Trainings started one hour after the last dose of the drugs. Retention tests were given 3 h, 24 h, 7 days or 10 days after training. The results obtained with the different methods document CDP-choline's ability to improve learning and memory in rats and mice. No essential differences in the effects of CDP-choline were established upon oral and intraperitoneal administration of the drug. The learning- and memory-facilitating effects of CDP-choline were similar to those of meclofenoxate and piracetam. The results of the present study permit us to define CDP-choline as a substance capable of improving cognitive levels.

  12. Role of Choline in the Modulation of Degenerative Processes: In Vivo and In Vitro Studies.

    PubMed

    Merinas-Amo, Tania; Tasset-Cuevas, Inmaculada; Díaz-Carretero, Antonio M; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Calahorro, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the nutraceutical potential of choline as an added value to its well-known brain nutrient role. Several toxicity, antitoxicity, genotoxicity, antigenotoxicity, and longevity endpoints were checked in the somatic mutation and recombination test in in vivo Drosophila animal model. Cytotoxicity in human leukemia-60 cell line (HL-60) promyelocytic and NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells, proapoptotic DNA fragmentation, comet assay, methylation status, and macroautophagy (MA) activity were tested in in vitro assays. Choline is not only safe but it is also able to protect against the DNA damage caused by an oxidative genotoxin. Moreover, it improves the life extension in the animal model. The in vitro results show that it is able to exhibit genetic damage against leukemia HL-60 cells. Single-strand breaks in DNA are observed at the molecular level in treatments with choline, although only a significant hypermethylation on the long interspersed elements-1 and a hypomethylation on the satellite-alpha DNA repetitive DNA sequences of HL-60 cells at the lowest concentration (0.447 mM) were observed. Besides, choline decreased MA at the lower assayed concentration and the MA response to topoisomerase inhibitor (etoposide) is maintained in the presence of treatment with 0.22 mM choline. Taking into account the hopeful results obtained in the in vivo and in vitro assays, choline could be proposed as a substance with an important nutraceutical value for different purposes.

  13. Facile pulping of lignocellulosic biomass using choline acetate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangchao; Wang, Hui; Chatel, Gregory; Gurau, Gabriela; Rogers, Robin D

    2014-07-01

    Treating ground bagasse or Southern yellow pine in the biodegradable ionic liquid (IL), choline acetate ([Cho][OAc]), at 100°C for 24h led to dissolution of hemicellulose and lignin, while leaving the cellulose pulp undissolved, with a 54.3% (bagasse) or 34.3% (pine) reduction in lignin content. The IL solution of the dissolved biopolymers can be separated from the undissolved particles either by addition of water (20 wt% of IL) followed by filtration or by centrifugation. Hemicellulose (19.0 wt% of original bagasse, 10.2 wt% of original pine, containing 14-18 wt% lignin) and lignin (5.0 wt% of original bagasse, 6.0 wt% of original pine) could be subsequently precipitated. The pulp obtained from [Cho][OAc] treatment can be rapidly dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (e.g., 17 h for raw bagasse vs. 7h for pulp), and precipitated as cellulose-rich material (CRM) with a lower lignin content (e.g., 23.6% for raw bagasse vs. 10.6% for CRM).

  14. Evolutionary Ancestry of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases and Choline Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shenshen; Safaei, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by protein kinases in eukaryotes supports an important role for eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) in the emergence of nucleated cells in the third superkingdom of life. Choline kinases (ChKs) could also be critical in the early evolution of eukaryotes, because of their function in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is unique to eukaryotic membranes. However, the genomic origins of ePKs and ChKs are unclear. The high degeneracy of protein sequences and broad expansion of ePK families have made this fundamental question difficult to answer. In this study, we identified two class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with high similarities to consensus amino acid sequences of human protein-serine/threonine kinases. Comparisons of primary and tertiary structures supported that ePKs and ChKs evolved from a common ancestor related to glutaminyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which may have been one of the key factors in the successful of emergence of ancient eukaryotic cells from bacterial colonies. PMID:26742849

  15. Blood pressure regulation by CD4+ lymphocytes expressing choline acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Peder S.; Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Sobbi, Roozbeh; Cox, Maureen A.; Ahmed, Mohamed N.; Oswald, Michaela; Szekeres, Ferenc; Hanes, William M.; Introini, Andrea; Liu, Shu Fang; Holodick, Nichol E.; Rothstein, Thomas L.; Lövdahl, Cecilia; Chavan, Sangeeta S.; Yang, Huan; Pavlov, Valentin A.; Broliden, Kristina; Andersson, Ulf; Diamond, Betty; Miller, Edmund J.; Arner, Anders; Gregersen, Peter K.; Backx, Peter H.; Mak, Tak W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2017-01-01

    Blood pressure regulation is known to be maintained by a neuro-endocrine circuit, but whether immune cells contribute to blood pressure homeostasis has not been defined. We previously described that CD4+ T lymphocytes that express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the synthesis of the vasorelaxant acetylcholine, relay neural signals1. Here we show that these CD4+ CD44high CD62Llow T helper cells by gene expression are a distinct T cell population defined by ChAT (CD4 TChAT). Mice lacking ChAT expression in CD4+ cells have elevated arterial blood pressure and echocardiographic assessment consistent with increased vascular resistance as compared to littermate controls. Jurkat T cells overexpressing ChAT (JTChAT) decreased blood pressure when infused into mice. Co-incubation of JTChAT increased endothelial cell levels of phosphorylated eNOS, and of nitrates and nitrites in conditioned media, indicating increased release of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide. The isolation and characterization of CD4 TChAT cells will enable analysis of the role of these cells in hypotension and hypertension, and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies by targeting cell-mediated vasorelaxation. PMID:27617738

  16. PET/CT in prostate cancer: non-choline radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    CASTELLUCCI, P.; JADVAR, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this brief review, the major potential clinical applications of 18F-FDG, 11C-acetate, 18F-FDHT, 18F-FLT, 18F-FMAU, and anti-18F-FACBC in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer are discussed. 18F-FDG has a limited role in primary diagnosis and staging but it may be able to reflect tumour aggressiveness, detect sites of recurrence in some men with high serum PSA after biochemical failure and assess response to chemo- and hormonal treatment in metastatic disease. 11C-acetate has been investigated for intra-prostatic primary tumour detection and staging as well as for re-staging in case of biochemical relapse with results that are overall similar to those with 18F- and 11C-labeled choline. 18F-FDHT targets the androgen receptor and may be particularly useful in the assessment of the pharmacodynamics of the androgen signalling pathway. PET in conjunction with 18F-FLT or 18F-FMAU that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis has also been investigated for imaging cellular proliferation in prostate cancer. Initial exprience with the radiolabeked synthetic amino acid, anti-18F-FACBC, which displays slow urinary excretion has been encouraging but further studies will be needed to decipher its exact role in the imaging management of men with prostate cancer. PMID:23013666

  17. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  18. Glucocorticoids: binding affinity and lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Ponec, M; Kempenaar, J; Shroot, B; Caron, J C

    1986-10-01

    The relative binding affinity of 35 steroids for the glucocorticoid receptor was determined in experiments in which the competition of various unlabeled steroids with either [6,7-3H]dexamethasone or [1,2-3H]hydrocortisone for the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor of cultured human keratinocytes was measured. The data obtained were correlated with steroid lipophilicity, measured as the partition coefficient of the steroid between 1-octanol and pH 7.4 aqueous buffer. The introduction of various substituents on the steroid molecule induced changes in the binding affinity and was associated in some cases with concomitant changes in steroid lipophilicity. The substitution by a 17 alpha-OH or 21-OH group leads in all cases to a decrease in steroid lipophilicity and to an increase in affinity. In contrast, 17 alpha-OAc and especially 21-OAc substitution on hydrocortisone and betamethasone causes a decrease in the steroid affinity for the receptor and an increase in steroid lipophilicity. The elongation of the ester chain from acetate to valerate in both position C-17 and C-21 leads to the increase in both the binding affinity for the receptor and the lipophilicity of steroids. However, all 21-esters showed lower binding affinity than the parent alcohol. The binding affinity of the highly lipophilic 17 alpha, 21-diester was found to be lower than that of the 17 alpha-ester but higher than that of the 21-ester or of the parent alcohol. Only in the series of 17 alpha- and 21-esters is there a correlation between the binding affinity of steroids for the glucocorticoid receptor and their lipophilicity.

  19. Hydrogen bonding. Part 19. IR and NMR study of the lower hydrates of choline fluoride and acetylcholine chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Avci, Günsel F.; Desantis, Nancy J.; Thiel, Anne C.

    1985-05-01

    Acetylcholine chloride, like choline chloride, forms a liquid salt dihydrate, and a crystalline monohydrate that only exists at reduced pressure; at atmospheric pressure the monohydrate disproportionates into liquid dihydrate and anhydrous acetylcholine chloride. Both choline and acetylcholine chlorides give endothermic dissolution in water. In contrast, choline fluoride gives exothermic dissclution in water, and forms an extra-ordinarily stable monohydrate in which choline cation hydroxyls form strong hydrogen bonds to an H 4O 2F 2-2 cluster anion. Since the hydration behavior of choline fluoride is like that of unsubstituted tetraalkylammonium fluorides, the unusual hydration behavior of choline and acetyline chlorides results from the presence of chloride ion, and is not an intrinsic property of cholinergic cations.

  20. Quantification of choline concentration following liver cell apoptosis using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhi-Wei; Cao, Zhen; You, Ke-Zeng; Yang, Zhong-Xian; Xiao, Ye-Yu; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Chen, Yao-Wen; Wu, Ren-Hua

    2012-03-14

    To evaluate the feasibility of quantifying liver choline concentrations in both normal and apoptotic rabbit livers in vivo, using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). 1H-MRS was performed in 18 rabbits using a 1.5T GE MR system with an eight-channel head/neck receiving coil. Fifteen rabbits were injected with sodium selenite at a dose of 10 μmol/kg to induce the liver cell apoptosis. Point-resolved spectroscopy sequence-localized spectra were obtained from 10 livers once before and once 24 h after sodium selenite injection in vivo. T1 and T2 relaxation time of water and choline was measured separately in the livers of three healthy rabbits and three selenite-treated rabbits. Hematoxylin and eosin and dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining was used to detect and confirm apoptosis. Choline peak areas were measured relative to unsuppressed water using LCModel. Relaxation attenuation was corrected using the average of T1 and T2 relaxation time. The choline concentration was quantified using a formula, which was tested by a phantom with a known concentration. Apoptosis of hepatic cells was confirmed by TUNEL assay. In phantom experiment, the choline concentration (3.01 mmol/L), measured by 1H-MRS, was in good agreement with the actual concentration (3 mmol/L). The average T1 and T2 relaxation time of choline was 612 ± 15 ms and 74 ± 4 ms in the control group and 670 ± 27 ms and 78 ± 5 ms in apoptotic livers in vivo, respectively. Choline was quantified in 10 rabbits, once before and once after the injection with sodium selenite. The choline concentration decreased from 14.5 ± 7.57 mmol/L before sodium selenite injection to 10.8 ± 6.58 mmol/L (mean ± SD, n = 10) after treatment (Z = -2.395, P < 0.05, two-sample paired Wilcoxon test). 1H-MRS can be used to quantify liver choline in vivo using unsuppressed water as an internal reference. Decreased liver choline concentrations are found in sodium selenite-treated rabbits undergoing liver cell

  1. Xylose uptake by the ruminal bacterium Selenomonas ruminantium.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D K; Martin, S A

    1990-01-01

    Selenomonas ruminantium HD4 does not use the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system to transport xylose (S. A. Martin and J. B. Russell, J. Gen. Microbiol. 134:819-827, 1988). Xylose uptake by whole cells of S. ruminantium HD4 was inducible. Uptake was unaffected by monensin or lasalocid, while oxygen, o-phenanthroline, and HgCl2 were potent inhibitors. Menadione, antimycin A, and KCN had little effect on uptake, and acriflavine inhibited uptake by 23%. Sodium fluoride decreased xylose uptake by 10%, while N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide decreased uptake by 31%. Sodium arsenate was a strong inhibitor (83%), and these results suggest the involvement of a high-energy phosphate compound and possibly a binding protein in xylose uptake. The protonophores carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and SF6847 inhibited xylose uptake by 88, 82, and 43%, respectively. The cations Na+ and K+ did not stimulate xylose uptake. The kinetics of xylose uptake were nonlinear, and it appeared that more than one uptake mechanism may be involved or that two proteins (i.e., a binding protein and permease protein) with different affinities for xylose were present. Excess (10 mM) glucose, sucrose, or maltose decreased xylose uptake less than 40%. Uptake was unaffected at extracellular pH values between 6.0 and 8.0, while pH values of 5.0 and 4.0 decreased uptake 28 and 24%, respectively. The phenolic monomers p-coumaric acid and vanillin inhibited growth on xylose and xylose uptake more than ferulic acid did. The predominant end products resulting from the fermentation of xylose were lactate (7.5 mM), acetate (4.4 mM), and propionate (5.1 nM), and the Yxylose was 24.1 g/mol. PMID:2383009

  2. Xylose uptake by the ruminal bacterium Selenomonas ruminantium.

    PubMed

    Williams, D K; Martin, S A

    1990-06-01

    Selenomonas ruminantium HD4 does not use the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system to transport xylose (S. A. Martin and J. B. Russell, J. Gen. Microbiol. 134:819-827, 1988). Xylose uptake by whole cells of S. ruminantium HD4 was inducible. Uptake was unaffected by monensin or lasalocid, while oxygen, o-phenanthroline, and HgCl2 were potent inhibitors. Menadione, antimycin A, and KCN had little effect on uptake, and acriflavine inhibited uptake by 23%. Sodium fluoride decreased xylose uptake by 10%, while N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide decreased uptake by 31%. Sodium arsenate was a strong inhibitor (83%), and these results suggest the involvement of a high-energy phosphate compound and possibly a binding protein in xylose uptake. The protonophores carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and SF6847 inhibited xylose uptake by 88, 82, and 43%, respectively. The cations Na+ and K+ did not stimulate xylose uptake. The kinetics of xylose uptake were nonlinear, and it appeared that more than one uptake mechanism may be involved or that two proteins (i.e., a binding protein and permease protein) with different affinities for xylose were present. Excess (10 mM) glucose, sucrose, or maltose decreased xylose uptake less than 40%. Uptake was unaffected at extracellular pH values between 6.0 and 8.0, while pH values of 5.0 and 4.0 decreased uptake 28 and 24%, respectively. The phenolic monomers p-coumaric acid and vanillin inhibited growth on xylose and xylose uptake more than ferulic acid did. The predominant end products resulting from the fermentation of xylose were lactate (7.5 mM), acetate (4.4 mM), and propionate (5.1 nM), and the Yxylose was 24.1 g/mol.

  3. Higher Dietary Choline and Betaine Intakes Are Associated with Better Body Composition in the Adult Population of Newfoundland, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Yongbo; Randell, Edward; Pedram, Pardis; Yi, Yanqing; Gulliver, Wayne; Sun, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Choline is an essential nutrient and betaine is an osmolyte and methyl donor. Both are important to maintain health including adequate lipid metabolism. Supplementation of dietary choline and betaine increase muscle mass and reduce body fat in animals. However, little data is available regarding the role of dietary choline and betaine on body composition in humans. Objective To investigate the association between dietary choline and betaine intakes with body composition in a large population based cross-sectional study. Design A total of 3214 subjects from the CODING (Complex Disease in Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics) study were assessed. Dietary choline and betaine intakes were computed from the Willett Food Frequency questionnaire. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry following a 12-hour fast. Major confounding factors including age, sex, total calorie intake and physical activity level were controlled in all analyses. Result Significantly inverse correlations were found between dietary choline and betaine intakes, with all obesity measurements: total percent body fat (%BF), percent trunk fat (%TF), percent android fat (%AF), percent gynoid fat (%GF) and anthropometrics: weight, body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio in both women and men (r range from -0.13 to -0.47 for choline and -0.09 to -0.26 for betaine, p<0.001 for all). Dietary choline intake had stronger association than betaine. Moreover, obese subjects had the lowest dietary choline and betaine intakes, with overweight subjects in the middle, and normal weight subjects consumed the highest dietary choline and betaine (p<0.001). Vice versa, when subjects were ranked according to dietary choline and betaine intakes, subjects with the highest intake of both had the lowest %TF, %AF, %GF, %BF and highest %LM among the groups in both sexes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that high dietary choline and betaine intakes are

  4. Intensity-modulated salvage radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for local recurrence of prostate carcinoma: a pilot study on the place of PET-choline for guiding target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Wahart, Aurélien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Vallard, Alexis; Geissler, Benjamin; Ben Mrad, Majed; Falk, Alexander T; Prevot, Nathalie; de Laroche, Guy; Rancoule, Chloé; Chargari, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to report the first cases of salvage radiotherapy (RT) using the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) targeted on choline positron emission tomography (PET) uptake in a local recurrent prostate cancer, after a radical prostatectomy. Methods: Four patients received salvage irradiation for biochemical relapse that occurred after the initial radical prostatectomy. The relapse occurred from 10 months to 6 years with PSA levels ranging from 2.35 to 4.86 ng ml−1. For each patient, an 18F-choline PET-CT showed a focal choline uptake in prostatic fossa, with standardized uptake value calculated on the basis of predicted lean body mass (SUL) max of 3.3–6.8. No involved lymph node or distant metastases were diagnosed. IMRT doses were of 62.7 Gy (1.9 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions), with a SIB of 69.3 Gy (2.1 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions) to a PET-guided target volume. Results: Acute toxicities were limited. We observed no gastrointestinal toxicity ≥grade 2 and only one grade 2 genitourinary toxicity. At 1-month follow-up evaluation, no complication and a decrease in PSA level (6.8–43.8% of the pre-therapeutic level) were reported. After 4 months, a decrease in PSA level was obtained for all the patients, ranging from 30% to 70%. At a median follow-up of 15 months, PSA level was controlled for all the patients, but one of them experienced a distant lymph node recurrence. Conclusion: Salvage irradiation to the prostate bed with SIB guided by PET-CT is feasible, with biological efficacy and no major acute toxicity. Advances in knowledge: IMRT with PET-oriented SIB for salvage treatment of prostate cancer is possible, without major acute toxicity. PMID:26648528

  5. Homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction of neodymium(III) by choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate in the ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide.

    PubMed

    Onghena, Bieke; Jacobs, Jeroen; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-08-14

    The ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [Chol][Tf2N], was used for the extraction of neodymium(III), in combination with choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate, [Chol][hfac], as the extractant. The binary mixture of [Chol][Tf2N] and water shows temperature-dependent phase behavior, with an upper critical solution temperature of 72 °C. A novel extraction technique, homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction (HLLE), was applied to this solvent system. HLLE is based on the use of thermomorphic solvent mixtures and has the advantage of forming a homogeneous phase during mixing. Extraction is not kinetically hindered by an interface and the extraction equilibrium is reached faster than in the case of heterogeneous mixing in conventional solvent extraction. Several extraction parameters were studied for the extraction of neodymium(III) with [Chol][hfac]: temperature, pH, extractant concentration and loading of the ionic liquid phase. A speciation study was performed to determine the stoichiometry of the extracted neodymium(III) complex and a plausible extraction mechanism is proposed. Neodymium is extracted as a tetrakis hexafluoroacetylacetonate complex with one choline cation as counter ion. The crystal structure of the extracted complex showed the presence of a coordination bond between the choline counter ion and the neodymium(III) center, resulting in a coordination number of nine. The stripping of the loaded neodymium and the influence of acid and extractant concentrations on the phase behavior of the [Chol][Tf2N]-H2O system were investigated.

  6. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  7. Body composition in patients with classical homocystinuria: body mass relates to homocysteine and choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Soraia; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Bandeira, Isabel Cristina; D'Almeida, Vânia; de Souza, Carolina Fischinger Moura; Spritzer, Poli Mara; Castro, Kamila; Tonon, Tássia; Nalin, Tatiéle; Imbard, Apolline; Blom, Henk J; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2014-08-10

    Classical homocystinuria is a rare genetic disease caused by cystathionine β-synthase deficiency, resulting in homocysteine accumulation. Growing evidence suggests that reduced fat mass in patients with classical homocystinuria may be associated with alterations in choline and homocysteine pathways. This study aimed to evaluate the body composition of patients with classical homocystinuria, identifying changes in body fat percentage and correlating findings with biochemical markers of homocysteine and choline pathways, lipoprotein levels and bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores. Nine patients with classical homocystinuria were included in the study. Levels of homocysteine, methionine, cysteine, choline, betaine, dimethylglycine and ethanolamine were determined. Body composition was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in patients and in 18 controls. Data on the last BMD measurement and lipoprotein profile were obtained from medical records. Of 9 patients, 4 (44%) had a low body fat percentage, but no statistically significant differences were found between patients and controls. Homocysteine and methionine levels were negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI), while cysteine showed a positive correlation with BMI (p<0.05). There was a trend between total choline levels and body fat percentage (r=0.439, p=0.07). HDL cholesterol correlated with choline and ethanolamine levels (r=0.757, p=0.049; r=0.847, p=0.016, respectively), and total cholesterol also correlated with choline levels (r=0.775, p=0.041). There was no association between BMD T-scores and body composition. These results suggest that reduced fat mass is common in patients with classical homocystinuria, and that alterations in homocysteine and choline pathways affect body mass and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Insights into molecular plasticity of choline binding proteins (pneumococcal surface proteins) by SAXS.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Monterroso, Begoña; Menéndez, Margarita; Diakun, Greg; Chacón, Pablo; Hermoso, Juan Antonio; Díaz, J Fernando

    2007-01-12

    Phosphocholine moieties decorating the pneumococcal surface are used as a docking station for a family of modular proteins, the so-called choline binding proteins or CBPs. Choline recognition is essential for CBPs function and may also be a determinant for their quaternary structure. There is little knowledge about modular arrangement or oligomeric structures in this family. Therefore, we have used the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique combined with analytical ultracentrifugation in order to model the three-dimensional envelope of two highly different CBPs: the phage encoded Cpl-1 lysozyme and the pneumococcal phosphorylcholine esterase Pce. Both enzymes have an N-terminal catalytic module and a C-terminal choline-binding module (CBM) that attaches them to the bacterial surface and comprises six and ten sequence repeats in Cpl-1 and Pce, respectively. SAXS experiments have shown an inherent conformational plasticity in Cpl-1 that accounts for the different relative position of these regions in the solution and crystal structures. Dimerization of Cpl-1 upon choline binding has been also visualised for the first time, and monomer-monomer interactions take place through the first CBR where a non-canonical choline binding site has now been identified. This mode of association seems to be independent of the absence or presence of the Cpl-1 catalytic module and reveals that the arrangement of the monomers differs from that previously found in the isolated CBM dimer of pneumococcal LytA amidase. In contrast, Pce displays the same modular disposition in the solution and crystal structures, and remains almost invariant upon choline binding. The present results suggest that protein dimerization and duplication of CBRs may be alternative but not equivalent ways of improving cell wall recognition by CBPs, since they provide different interaction geometries for choline residues present in (lipo)teichoic acids.

  9. Long-lasting effects of prenatal dietary choline availability on object recognition memory ability in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Hayarelis C; de Brugada, Isabel; Carias, Diamela; Gallo, Milagros

    2013-11-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient required for early development. Previous studies have shown that prenatal choline availability influences adult memory abilities depending on the medial temporal lobe integrity. The relevance of prenatal choline availability on object recognition memory was assessed in adult Wistar rats. Three groups of pregnant Wistar rats were fed from E12 to E18 with choline-deficient (0 g/kg choline chloride), standard (1.1 g/kg choline chloride), or choline-supplemented (5 g/kg choline chloride) diets. The offspring was cross-fostered to rat dams fed a standard diet during pregnancy and tested at the age of 3 months in an object recognition memory task applying retention tests 24 and 48 hours after acquisition. Although no significant differences have been found in the performance of the three groups during the first retention test, the supplemented group exhibited improved memory compared with both the standard and the deficient group in the second retention test, 48 hours after acquisition. In addition, at the second retention test the deficient group did not differ from chance. Taken together, the results support the notion of a long-lasting beneficial effect of prenatal choline supplementation on object recognition memory which is evident when the rats reach adulthood. The results are discussed in terms of their relevance for improving the understanding of the cholinergic involvement in object recognition memory and the implications of the importance of maternal diet for lifelong cognitive abilities.

  10. The effect of centrally injected CDP-choline on respiratory system; involvement of phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Bora B; Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Saha, Sikha; Batten, Trevor F; Savci, Vahide; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-05-01

    CDP-choline is an endogenous metabolite in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Exogenous administration of CDP-choline has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular, neuroendocrine neuroprotective actions. On the other hand, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effect. Therefore the current study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected CDP-choline on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cholinergic receptors and phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway on CDP-choline-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administration of CDP-choline induced dose- and time-dependent increased respiratory rates, tidal volume and minute ventilation of male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. İ.c.v. pretreatment with atropine failed to alter the hyperventilation responses to CDP-choline whereas mecamylamine, cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist, mepacrine, phospholipase A2 inhibitor, and neomycin phospholipase C inhibitor, blocked completely the hyperventilation induced by CDP-choline. In addition, central pretreatment with furegrelate, thromboxane A2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially blocked CDP-choline-evoked hyperventilation effects. These data show that centrally administered CDP-choline induces hyperventilation which is mediated by activation of central nicotinic receptors and phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

  11. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Planning for Primary Prostate Cancer With Selective Intraprostatic Boost Determined by {sup 18}F-Choline PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Yu; Wu, Lili; Hirata, Emily; Miyazaki, Kyle; Sato, Miles

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated expected tumor control and normal tissue toxicity for prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with and without radiation boosts to an intraprostatically dominant lesion (IDL), defined by {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with localized prostate cancer underwent {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT before treatment. Two VMAT plans, plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} and plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}, were compared for each patient. The whole-prostate planning target volume (PTV{sub prostate}) prescription was 79 Gy in both plans, but plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} added simultaneous boost doses of 100 Gy and 105 Gy to the IDL, defined by 60% and 70% of maximum prostatic uptake on {sup 18}F-choline PET (IDL{sub suv60%} and IDL{sub suv70%}, respectively, with IDL{sub suv70%} nested inside IDL{sub suv60%} to potentially enhance tumor specificity of the maximum point dose). Plan evaluations included histopathological correspondence, isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: Planning objectives and dose constraints proved feasible in 30 of 30 cases. Prostate sextant histopathology was available for 28 cases, confirming that IDL{sub suv60%} adequately covered all tumor-bearing prostate sextants in 27 cases and provided partial coverage in 1 case. Plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} had significantly higher TCP than plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} across all prostate regions for α/β ratios ranging from 1.5 Gy to 10 Gy (P<.001 for each case). There were no significant differences in bladder and femoral head NTCP between plans and slightly lower rectal NTCP (endpoint: grade ≥ 2 late toxicity or rectal bleeding) was found for plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}. Conclusions: VMAT can potentially increase the likelihood of tumor control in primary prostate cancer while observing normal tissue tolerances through

  12. Volumetric modulated arc therapy planning for primary prostate cancer with selective intraprostatic boost determined by 18F-choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yu; Wu, Lili; Hirata, Emily; Miyazaki, Kyle; Sato, Miles; Kwee, Sandi A

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated expected tumor control and normal tissue toxicity for prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with and without radiation boosts to an intraprostatically dominant lesion (IDL), defined by (18)F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Thirty patients with localized prostate cancer underwent (18)F-choline PET/CT before treatment. Two VMAT plans, plan79 Gy and plan100-105 Gy, were compared for each patient. The whole-prostate planning target volume (PTVprostate) prescription was 79 Gy in both plans, but plan100-105 Gy added simultaneous boost doses of 100 Gy and 105 Gy to the IDL, defined by 60% and 70% of maximum prostatic uptake on (18)F-choline PET (IDLsuv60% and IDLsuv70%, respectively, with IDLsuv70% nested inside IDLsuv60% to potentially enhance tumor specificity of the maximum point dose). Plan evaluations included histopathological correspondence, isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Planning objectives and dose constraints proved feasible in 30 of 30 cases. Prostate sextant histopathology was available for 28 cases, confirming that IDLsuv60% adequately covered all tumor-bearing prostate sextants in 27 cases and provided partial coverage in 1 case. Plan100-105 Gy had significantly higher TCP than plan79 Gy across all prostate regions for α/β ratios ranging from 1.5 Gy to 10 Gy (P<.001 for each case). There were no significant differences in bladder and femoral head NTCP between plans and slightly lower rectal NTCP (endpoint: grade ≥ 2 late toxicity or rectal bleeding) was found for plan100-105 Gy. VMAT can potentially increase the likelihood of tumor control in primary prostate cancer while observing normal tissue tolerances through simultaneous delivery of a steep radiation boost to a (18)F-choline PET-defined IDL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of (18)F-Choline PET/CT in guiding biopsy in patients with risen PSA levels and previous negative biopsy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Londoño, G A; García Vicente, A M; Amo-Salas, M; Fúnez Mayorga, F; López Guerrero, M A; Talavera Rubio, M P; Gutierrez Martin, P; González García, B; de la Torre Pérez, J A; Soriano Castrejón, Á M

    To study (18)F-Choline PET/CT in the diagnosis and biopsy guide of prostate cancer (pCa) in patients with persistently high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and previous negative prostate biopsy. To compare the clinical risk factors and metabolic variables as predictors of malignancy. Patients with persistently elevated PSA in serum (total PSA >4ng/mL) and at least a previous negative or inconclusive biopsy were consecutively referred for a whole body (18)F-Choline PET/CT. Patient age, PSA level, PSA doubling time (PSAdt) and PSA velocity (PSAvel) were obtained. PET images were visually (positive or negative) and semiquantitatively (SUVmax) reviewed. (18)F-Choline uptake prostate patterns were defined as focal, multifocal, homogeneous or heterogeneous. Histology on biopsy using transrectal ultrasound-guided approach was the gold standard. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and accuracy (Ac) of PET/CT for diagnosis of pCa were evaluated using per-patient and per-prostate lobe analysis. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the value of SUVmax to diagnose pCa. Correlation between PET/CT and biopsy results per-prostate lobe was assessed using the Chi-square test. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied to compare clinical risk factors and metabolic variables as predictors of malignancy. Thirty-six out of 43 patients with histologic confirmation were included. In 11 (30.5%) patients, pCa was diagnosed (Gleason score from 4 to 9). The mean values of patient age, PSA level, PSAdt and PSAvel were: 65.5 years, 15.6ng/ml, 28.1 months and 8.5ng/mL per year, respectively. Thirty-three patients had a positive PET/CT; 18 had a focal pattern, 7 multifocal, 4 homogeneous and 4 heterogeneous. Se, Sp and Ac of PET/CT were of 100%, 12% and 38% in the patient based analysis, and 87%, 29% and 14% in the prostate lobe based analysis, respectively. The ROC curve analysis of SUVmax showed an AUC of 0.568 (p=0.52). On a lobe

  14. Effect of choline chloride supplementation on milk production and milk composition of Etawah grade goats.

    PubMed

    Supriyati; Budiarsana, I Gusti Made; Praharani, Lisa; Krisnan, Rantan; Sutama, I Ktut

    2016-01-01

    The effect of choline chloride supplementation through forced drinking combined with concentrate diets containing Ca-fish oil on milk production and milk composition of Etawah Grade goats was evaluated. Choline chloride is an essential component in ruminant diets as it is required for fat metabolism. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized block design with three types of treatments and eight replications. The trial had two successive experimental periods; the first, during the eight weeks of late pregnancy, and the second, during the first 12 weeks of lactation. Twenty-four Etawah Grade does in the second gestation period were divided into three treatment groups. Commercial choline chloride 60 % in corncobs-based powder was used as a source of choline chloride. The treatments were no supplementation (control) and supplemented with either 4 g or 8 g/2days of choline chloride. Choline chloride was given to the animals through a forced drinking technique, after dissolving it in 60 ml drinking water. The initial body weight of does was 38.81 ± 3.66 kg. The does were penned individually, and were given fresh chopped King Grass ad libitum and 700 g/day of concentrate diets containing Ca-fish oil, starting eight weeks prior to expecting kidding and continuing for 12 weeks of parturition. All nutrient intakes were not significantly different (p > 0.05) among the treatments during the late pregnancy and the lactation periods. Supplementation did not affect (p > 0.05) the average daily gains and feed conversion ratio during pregnancy but gave effects (p < 0.05) on the average daily gains, feed conversion ratio and income over feed cost during lactation. The highest average daily milk yields and 4 % fat corrected milk yields were found in goats supplemented with 4 g/2days of choline chloride and increased by 17.00 % and 24.67 %, respectively, compared to the control. Moreover, milk composition percentage and milk constituent yields

  15. Several transport systems contribute to the intestinal uptake of Paraquat, modulating its cytotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata; Carmo, Helena; Vilas-Boas, Vânia; Barbosa, Daniel José; Monteiro, Márcia; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Remião, Fernando

    2015-01-05

    Paraquat (PQ) is an extremely toxic herbicide upon oral ingestion that lacks a specific antidote. In case of intoxication, treatment primarily relies on limiting its intestinal absorption. In this study, we elucidate the intestinal transport mechanisms of PQ uptake using Caco-2 cells as a model of the human intestinal epithelium. The cells were incubated with a wide range of PQ concentrations (0-5000μM) for 24h with or without simultaneous exposure to different transporters substrates/inhibitors including, choline or hemicolinium-3 (for choline carrier-mediated transport system inhibition) and putrescine, trifluoperazine, valine, lysine, arginine or N-ethylmaleimide (for basic amino acid transport systems inhibition). PQ cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT reduction assay and correlated with PQ intracellular levels quantified by gas chromatography-ion trap-mass spectrometry (GC-IT/MS). Potential interactions of PQ with the substrates/inhibitors of the transport systems were investigated and discarded by infrared spectroscopy. Our results showed a significant reduction in PQ intracellular accumulation and, consequently, in PQ cytotoxicity, in the presence of both choline and hemicolinium-3, demonstrating that the choline carrier-mediated transport system is partially involved in PQ intestinal uptake. Likewise, PQ cytotoxicity and intracellular accumulation were significantly attenuated by simultaneous exposure to putrescine, trifluoperazine, valine, lysine, arginine and N-ethylmaleimide. These data suggested the involvement of more than one of the basic amino acids transport systems, including the y(+), b(0,+) or y(+)L systems. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that several transport systems mediate PQ intestinal absorption and, therefore, their modulation may provide alternative efficient pathways for limiting PQ toxicity in intoxication scenarios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical and chemical immobilization of choline oxidase onto different porous solid supports: Adsorption st